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Sample records for adhesion synthesis surface

  1. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of composites as adherends was studied. Several other variables were studied by fractography: aluminum powder adhesive filler, fiber glass cloth scrim or adhesive carrier, new adhesives PPQ-413 and LARC-13, and strength-test temperature. When the new results were juxtaposed with previous work, it appeared that complex interactions between adhesive, adherend, bonding, and testing conditions govern the observed strength and fracture-surface features. The design parameters likely to have a significant effect upon strength-test results are listed.

  2. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Adherend surfaces and fractography were studied using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. In addition, Auger Electron Spectroscopy with depth profiling capability was used. It is shown that contamination of adhesion systems plays an important role not only in determining initial bond strengths but also in the durability of adhesive bonds. It is concluded that the analytical techniques used to characterize and monitor such contamination.

  3. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics. [titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Various surface preparations for titanium 6-4 alloy were studied. An anodizing method was investigated, and compared with the results of other chemical treatments, namely, phosphate/fluoride, Pasa-Jell and Turco. The relative durability of the different surface treatments was assessed by monitoring changes in surface chemistry and morphology occasioned by aging at 505 K (450 F). Basic electron spectroscopic data were collected for polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline adhesives and synthetic precursors. Fractographic studies were completed for several combinations of adherend, adhesive, and testing conditions.

  4. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of SEM/EDAX to determine the physical and chemical composition of very small areas was used to study several diverse types of samples representative of NASA-LaRC technology. More systematic investigation was carried out on differences in the results of grit-blasting Ti 6-4 adherends and the presence of extraneous elements, primarily silicon, in some polymer/HT-S fiber composites. Initial results were obtained from a fractured (ILS) short-beam shear specimen, and from Ti 6-4 alloy, before and after a proprietary Boeing anodizing surface preparation for adhesive bonding. Photomicrographs and EDAX spectra were also obtained from new, fractured lap shear strength specimens that employed PPQ and LARC-13 adhesives.

  5. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polystyrene. This technique together with various oxidation techniques that render surfaces suitable for cell culture generated high surface densities of hydroxyl groups. The importance of surface hydroxyl groups for the adhesion of baby hamster kidney cells or leukocytes was demonstrated by the inhibition of adhesion when these groups were blocked: blocking of carboxyl groups did not inhibit adhesion and may raise the adhesion of a surface. These results applied to cell adhesion in the presence and absence of serum. The relative unimportance of fibronectin for the adhesion and spreading of baby hamster kidney cells to hydroxyl-rich surfaces was concluded when cells spread on such surfaces after protein synthesis was inhibited with cycloheximide, fibronectin was removed by trypsinization, and trypsin activity was stopped with leupeptin. PMID:6355120

  7. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Several techniques were used to study pretreated Ti 6-4 surfaces including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA), and, reflectance visible spectroscopy. Each pretreatment type gave a characteristic surface morphology as seen by SEM. Elemental analysis of the Ti 6-4 surfaces was done using ESCA. Trace residual contaminants from particular chemical pretreatments were identified readily. Results indicate that reflectance visible spectroscopy using indicator dyes placed on Ti 6-4 surfaces appears to be a feasible approach to establish surface acidity. Differences in surface acidity were observed using bromthymol blue on Ti 6-4 surfaces pretreated by two different methods.

  8. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Pretreated and primed Ti 6-4 surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDAX) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). Fractured lap shear bonded Ti 6-4 specimens were also characterized by SEM/EDAX and ESCA. A number of surface techniques were used to characterize Ti02 powders.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury. PMID:26398308

  11. Bacterial Adhesion at Synthetic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, D.; Smart, C. A.; Alexander, C.; Vulfson, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    A systematic investigation into the effect of surface chemistry on bacterial adhesion was carried out. In particular, a number of physicochemical factors important in defining the surface at the molecular level were assessed for their effect on the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The primary experiments involved the grafting of groups varying in hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, chain length, and chemical functionality onto glass substrates such that the surfaces were homogeneous and densely packed with functional groups. All of the surfaces were found to be chemically well defined, and their measured surface energies varied from 15 to 41 mJ · m−2. Protein adsorption experiments were performed with 3H-labelled bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c prior to bacterial attachment studies. Hydrophilic uncharged surfaces showed the greatest resistance to protein adsorption; however, our studies also showed that the effectiveness of poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO) polymers was not simply a result of its hydrophilicity and molecular weight alone. The adsorption of the two proteins approximately correlated with short-term cell adhesion, and bacterial attachment for L. monocytogenes and E. coli also correlated with the chemistry of the underlying substrate. However, for S. aureus and S. typhimurium a different pattern of attachment occurred, suggesting a dissimilar mechanism of cell attachment, although high-molecular-weight PEO was still the least-cell-adsorbing surface. The implications of this for in vivo attachment of cells suggest that hydrophilic passivating groups may be the best method for preventing cell adsorption to synthetic substrates provided they can be grafted uniformly and in sufficient density at the surface. PMID:10543814

  12. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  13. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    PubMed

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  14. Stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (approximately 10.8 N/cm(2)) and shear adhesion (approximately 14.7 N/cm(2)) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of approximately 3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of approximately 0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  15. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  16. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  17. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jessica S; Kamperman, Marleen; de Souza, Emerson J; Schick, Bernhard; Arzt, Eduard

    2011-02-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) polymer systems. Micropatterned and non-patterned compliant PDMS did not show significant differences in adhesion on compliant mice ear skin or on gelatin-glycerin model substrates. However, adhesion measurements for micropatterned stiff PLGA on compliant gelatin-glycerin model substrates showed significant enhancement in pull-off strengths compared to non-patterned controls.

  18. Hierarchical bioinspired adhesive surfaces-a review.

    PubMed

    Brodoceanu, D; Bauer, C T; Kroner, E; Arzt, E; Kraus, T

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary adherence and climbing agility of geckos on rough surfaces has been attributed to the multiscale hierarchical structures on their feet. Hundreds of thousands of elastic hairs called setae, each of which split into several spatulae, create a large number of contact points that generate substantial adhesion through van der Waals interactions. The hierarchical architecture provides increased structural compliance on surfaces with roughness features ranging from micrometers to millimeters. We review synthetic adhesion surfaces that mimic the naturally occurring hierarchy with an emphasis on microfabrication strategies, material choice and the adhesive performance achieved. PMID:27529743

  19. Influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerrit; Gorb, Stanislav N; Hosoda, Naoe; Spolenak, Ralph; Arzt, Eduard

    2007-07-01

    In this study we show the influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion on both the nano- and macroscales. We present experimental data for the force necessary to pull off single spatulae from hard rough substrates and also detail observations on living geckos clinging to various surfaces. Both experiments consistently show that the effective adhesion shows a minimum for a root mean square roughness ranging from 100 to 300nm.

  20. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  1. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  2. Superhydrophobic nanocomposite surface topography and ice adhesion.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander; Yeong, Yong Han; Steele, Adam; Bayer, Ilker S; Loth, Eric

    2014-06-25

    A method to reduce the surface roughness of a spray-casted polyurethane/silica/fluoroacrylic superhydrophobic nanocomposite coating was demonstrated. By changing the main slurry carrier fluid, fluoropolymer medium, surface pretreatment, and spray parameters, we achieved arithmetic surface roughness values of 8.7, 2.7, and 1.6 μm on three test surfaces. The three surfaces displayed superhydrophobic performance with modest variations in skewness and kurtosis. The arithmetic roughness level of 1.6 μm is the smoothest superhydrophobic surface yet produced with these spray-based techniques. These three nanocomposite surfaces, along with a polished aluminum surface, were impacted with a supercooled water spray in icing conditions, and after ice accretion occurred, each was subjected to a pressurized tensile test to measure ice-adhesion. All three superhydrophobic surfaces showed lower ice adhesion than that of the polished aluminum surface. Interestingly, the intermediate roughness surface yielded the best performance, which suggests that high kurtosis and shorter autocorrelation lengths improve performance. The most ice-phobic nanocomposite showed a 60% reduction in ice-adhesion strength when compared to polished aluminum.

  3. Adhesive contact of randomly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2012-02-01

    The contact area, stiffness and adhesion between rigid, randomly rough surfaces and elastic substrates is studied using molecular statics and continuum simulations. The surfaces are self-affine with Hurst exponent 0.3 to 0.8 and different short λs and long λL wavelength cutoffs. The rms surface slope and the range and strength of the adhesive potential are also varied. For parameters typical of most solids, the effect of adhesion decreases as the ratio λL/λs increases. In particular, the pull-off force decreases to zero and the area of contact Ac becomes linear in the applied load L. A simple scaling argument is developed that describes the increase in the ratio Ac/L with increasing adhesion and a corresponding increase in the contact stiffness [1]. The argument also predicts a crossover to finite contact area at zero load when surfaces are exceptionally smooth or the ratio of surface tension to bulk modulus is unusually large, as for elastomers. Results that test this prediction will be presented and related to the Maugis-Dugdale [2] theories for individual asperities and the more recent scaling theory of Persson [3]. [1] Akarapu, Sharp, Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 204301 (2011) [2] Maugis, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 150, 243 (1992) [3] Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 75420 (2006)

  4. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (<50 nm), it is challenging to characterize their material properties for correlation to adhesive performance. We circumvent this problem by estimating the elastic modulus of the silane-based coatings using the buckling instability formed between two materials of a large elastic mismatch. The elastic modulus is found to effectively predict the joint strength of an epoxy/aluminum joint that has been reinforced with silane coupling agents. This buckling

  5. Immobilization of poly(acrylamide) brushes onto poly(caprolactone) surface by combining ATRP and "click" chemistry: Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of protein adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuhao; Bian, Xinxiu; He, Liu; Cai, Mengtan; Xie, Xiaoxiong; Luo, Xianglin

    2015-02-01

    Developments of poly(caprolactone) in blood-contacting applications are often restricted due to its intrinsic hydrophobicity. One common way to improve its hemocompatibility is to attach hydrophilic polymers. Here we developed a non-destructive method to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) onto poly(caprolactone) (PCL) surface. In this strategy, azido-ended PCL with low molecular weights was synthesized and blended with PCL to create a surface with "clickable" property. Alkyne-ended poly(acrylamide)s with controlled chain lengths were then synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and finally were immobilized onto PCL surface by "click" reaction. The occurrence of immobilization was verified qualitatively by water contact angle measurement and quantitatively by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The PAAm grafted surface exhibited fouling resistant properties, as demonstrated by reduced bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) adhesion.

  6. Copolyimide Surface Modifying Agents for Particle Adhesion Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Marine biofouling, insect adhesion on aircraft surfaces, microbial contamination of sterile environments, and particle contamination all present unique challenges for which researchers have adopted an array of mitigation strategies. Particulate contamination is of interest to NASA regarding exploration of the Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.1 Lunar dust compromised seals, clogged filters, abraded visors and space suit surfaces, and was a significant health concern during the Apollo missions.2 Consequently, NASA has instituted a multi-faceted approach to address dust including use of sacrificial surfaces, active mitigation requiring the use of an external energy source, and passive mitigation utilizing materials with an intrinsic resistance to surface contamination. One passive mitigation strategy is modification of a material s surface energy either chemically or topographically. The focus of this paper is the synthesis and evaluation of novel copolyimide materials with surface modifying agents (SMA, oxetanes) enabling controlled variation of surface chemical composition.

  7. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics. [acid-base properties of titanium 6-4 surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium 6-4 plates (low surface area) were investigated after three different pretreatments, namely Turco, phosphate-fluoride and Pasa-Jell. A series of indicators was used and color changes were detected using diffuse reflectance visible spectroscopy. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to examine the indicator on the Ti 6-4 surface. Specular reflectance infra-red spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of stearic acid from cyclohexane solutions on the Ti 6-4 surface.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of soluble conducting polymers and conducting adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztemiz, Serhan

    With the demanding nature of the technology today, scientists are looking for new materials in order to decrease the cost, increase the efficiency of the use of the materials, and decrease time-consuming steps in order to increase the speed of production. New materials are being studied to decrease the weight of cars, planes and space vehicles; surface properties are being modified to decrease the drag coefficient; new technologies are being introduced for speeding up applications in production and assembly lines. In this research we address the needs of different technological applications from a conductivity perspective. In the first part of the thesis, the synthesis of soluble conducting polymers in order to make them more processable for potential electronic and photovoltaic applications is presented. Soluble conducting polymers of 3-hexylthiophene, 3-octylthiophene, 3-decylthiophene and 3-dodecylthiophene were synthesized electrochemically and thus, doped during synthesis. It was found that the conductivities; molecular weights and degrees of polymerization of the polymers strongly depend on the side chain's length. The substitution of alkyl side chains decreases the reactivity of the growing chain, and with an increasing side-chain length, all of these properties show a decrease. The hexyl substituent, being the shortest of the four side chains, causes the least distortion in the background, has the highest conjugation, and has the highest shift in the UV spectrum when it polymerizes. As the length of the side chain increases, the shift in the UV spectrum decreases, too. Decrease in the pi-stacking, conjugation and delocalization decreases the conductivity. This gives the material an opportunity to be used in photovoltaic applications. In the second part of the thesis, a conducting adhesive formulation that eliminates the need for heat or other expensive and rather bothersome application methods to activate the adhesive is investigated. Using the quick

  9. Effect of polymer properties and adherend surfaces on adhesion. [titanium, aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Counts, M. E.; Wightman, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The surface properties associated with good adhesive joints were evaluated in terms of application of adhesive bonding in aerospace technology. The physical and chemical nature was determined of Ti and Al adherend surfaces after various surface treatments, and the effects on fracture surfaces of high temperature aging, and variations in amide, anhydride, and solvent during polymer synthesis. The effects were characterized of (1) high temperature during shear strength testing, (2) fiber-reinforced composites as adherends, (3) acid/base nature of adherends, (4) aluminum powder adhesive filler, and (5) bonding pressure.

  10. Synthesis and curing of hyperbranched poly(triazole)s with click polymerization for improved adhesion strength.

    PubMed

    Tang, Youhong; Jim, Cathy K W; Liu, Yang; Ye, Lin; Qin, Anjun; Lam, Jacky W Y; Zhao, Chengbi; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2010-02-01

    We successfully synthesized hyperbranched poly(triazole)s by in situ click polymerization of diazides 1 and triyne 2 monomers on different metal surfaces (copper, iron, and aluminum) and characterized their adhesive properties. Optimizations were performed to obtain high adhesive strength at different temperatures by analyzing the effects of curing kinetics, annealing temperature and time, catalyst, monomer ratio, surface conditions, alkyl chain length of diazides 1, etc. The adhesive bonding strength with metal substrate is 2 orders of magnitude higher than similar hyperbranched poly(triazole)s made by click polymerization and clearly higher than some commercial adhesives at elevated temperatures. With the same conditions, adhesives prepared on aluminum and iron substrates have higher adhesive strength than those prepared on copper substrate, and an excess of triyne 2 monomer in synthesis has greater adhesive strength than an excess of diazide 1 monomer. Tof-SIMS experiment was employed to understand these phenomena, and the existence of an interphase between the polymer and metal surface was found to be critical for adhesive bonding with thicker interphase (excess of triyne 2 monomer) and the higher binding energy between polymer atoms and substrate atoms (e.g., aluminum substrate) generating the higher bonding strength. In addition, the light-emitting property of synthesized polymers under UV irradiation can be used to check the failure mode of adhesive bonding. PMID:20356206

  11. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erli, Hans J; Marx, Rudolf; Paar, Othmar; Niethard, Fritz U; Weber, Michael; Wirtz, Dieter C

    2003-01-01

    Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties) usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m). This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body. PMID:14561228

  12. Understanding Surface Adhesion in Nature: A Peeling Model

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Siheng; Zhang, Feilong

    2016-01-01

    Nature often exhibits various interesting and unique adhesive surfaces. The attempt to understand the natural adhesion phenomena can continuously guide the design of artificial adhesive surfaces by proposing simplified models of surface adhesion. Among those models, a peeling model can often effectively reflect the adhesive property between two surfaces during their attachment and detachment processes. In the context, this review summarizes the recent advances about the peeling model in understanding unique adhesive properties on natural and artificial surfaces. It mainly includes four parts: a brief introduction to natural surface adhesion, the theoretical basis and progress of the peeling model, application of the peeling model, and finally, conclusions. It is believed that this review is helpful to various fields, such as surface engineering, biomedicine, microelectronics, and so on. PMID:27812476

  13. Fabrication and characterization of hierarchical nanostructured smart adhesion surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungoo; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-04-15

    The mechanics of fibrillar adhesive surfaces of biological systems such as a Lotus leaf and a gecko are widely studied due to their unique surface properties. The Lotus leaf is a model for superhydrophobic surfaces, self-cleaning properties, and low adhesion. Gecko feet have high adhesion due to the high micro/nanofibrillar hierarchical structures. A nanostructured surface may exhibit low adhesion or high adhesion depending upon fibrillar density, and it presents the possibility of realizing eco-friendly surface structures with desirable adhesion. The current research, for the first time uses a patterning technique to fabricate smart adhesion surfaces: single- and two-level hierarchical synthetic adhesive structure surfaces with various fibrillar densities and diameters that allows the observation of either the Lotus or gecko adhesion effects. Contact angles of the fabricated structured samples were measured to characterize their wettability, and contamination experiments were performed to study for self-cleaning ability. A conventional and a glass ball attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip were used to obtain the adhesive forces via force-distance curves to study scale effect. A further increase of the adhesive forces on the samples was achieved by applying an adhesive to the surfaces.

  14. Sticky surface: sphere-sphere adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Younger, John G.; Bortz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-scale model to study the attachment of spherical particles with a rigid core, coated with binding ligands and suspended in the surrounding, quiescent fluid medium. This class of fluid-immersed adhesion is widespread in many natural and engineering settings, particularly in microbial surface adhesion. Our theory highlights how the micro-scale binding kinetics of these ligands, as well as the attractive / repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium affects the eventual macro-scale size distribution of the particle aggregates (flocs). The bridge between the micro-macro model is made via an aggregation kernel. Results suggest that the presence of elastic ligands on the particle surface lead to the formation of larger floc aggregates via efficient inter-floc collisions (i.e., non-zero sticking probability, g). Strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favors large floc formation as well. The kernel for the Brownian diffusion for hard spheres is recovered in the limit of perfect binding effectiveness (g → 1) and in a neutral solution with no dissolved salts. PMID:25159830

  15. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  16. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  17. Ice adhesion on lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Srinivas Bengaluru; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-11-01

    Ice accretion is an important problem and passive approaches for reducing ice-adhesion are of great interest in various systems such as aircrafts, power lines, wind turbines, and oil platforms. Here, we study the ice-adhesion properties of lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces. Force measurements show ice adhesion strength on textured surfaces impregnated with thermodynamically stable lubricant films to be higher than that on surfaces with excess lubricant. Systematic ice-adhesion measurements indicate that the ice-adhesion strength is dependent on texture and decreases with increasing texture density. Direct cryogenic SEM imaging of the fractured ice surface and the interface between ice and lubricant-impregnated textured surface reveal stress concentrators and crack initiation sites that can increase with texture density and result in lowering adhesion strength. Thus, lubricant-impregnated surfaces have to be optimized to outperform state-of-the-art icephobic treatments.

  18. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-06-01

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  19. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Allred, R.E.; Wilson, K.V. Jr.

    1992-02-18

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  20. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Allred, Ronald E.; Wilson, Jr., Kennard V.

    1992-01-01

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  1. Adhesion of elastomeric surfaces structured with micro-dimples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Gabriele; Fragouli, Despina; Ceseracciu, Luca; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2015-01-01

    Topography has a dominant role in determining the adhesion properties of a surface. In this work we explore how arrays of micron-sized dimples can alter the adhesion performance of elastomeric surfaces. We study the effect of the dimple surface coverage, showing that the dimples act both as passive suction devices, allowing to exceed the adhesion performance of untextured surfaces, and crack-like defects, generating stress concentration at the edge of the contact area between the surface of the sample and a flat surface. Interestingly, our results reveal that the suction effect generated by the negative pressure produced by the dimples can be effectively tuned by adjusting their depth. These findings have significant relevance for the fabrication of adhesive systems in which selective adhesion to objects with small difference in weight is required.

  2. Controlled droplet transport on a gradient adhesion surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Liu, Chengcheng; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-04-01

    A surface with continuously changed adhesion from ultrahigh to ultralow is fabricated by an integrated method of anodic oxidation combined with octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma. The control of droplet transport along the direction of the adhesion gradient in length is achieved, as the surface is submitted to either tilted angle or vibration frequency. PMID:25740352

  3. Controlled droplet transport on a gradient adhesion surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Liu, Chengcheng; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-04-01

    A surface with continuously changed adhesion from ultrahigh to ultralow is fabricated by an integrated method of anodic oxidation combined with octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma. The control of droplet transport along the direction of the adhesion gradient in length is achieved, as the surface is submitted to either tilted angle or vibration frequency.

  4. Intrinsic Surface-Drying Properties of Bio-adhesive Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W.; Miller, Dusty R.; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Herbert Waite, J.

    2014-01-01

    Sessile marine mussels must “dry” underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bio-inspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces but these are poor predictors of an adhesive’s ability to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction via the surface water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were found to have differential abilities to evict hydration layers from the surfaces—a necessary step for adsorption and adhesion. It was anticipated that Dopa would mediate dehydration given its efficacy forbio-inspired wet adhesion. Instead, hydrophobic side-chains are found to be a critical component in bringing about protein-surface intimacy. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial water dynamics during force-free adsorptive interactions at solid surfaces, and offers guidance for engineering wet adhesives and coatings. PMID:25168789

  5. Surface wettability plays a significant role in gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Badge, Ila; Wucinich, Nicholas A; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-04-16

    Although we now have thousands of studies focused on the nano-, micro-, and whole-animal mechanics of gecko adhesion on clean, dry substrates, we know relatively little about the effects of water on gecko adhesion. For many gecko species, however, rainfall frequently wets the natural surfaces they navigate. In an effort to begin closing this gap, we tested the adhesion of geckos on submerged substrates that vary in their wettability. When tested on a wet hydrophilic surface, geckos produced a significantly lower shear adhesive force (5.4 ± 1.33 N) compared with a dry hydrophilic surface (17.1 ± 3.93 N). In tests on an intermediate wetting surface and a hydrophobic surface, we found no difference in shear adhesion between dry and wet contact. Finally, in tests on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), we found that geckos clung significantly better to wet PTFE (8.0 ± 1.09 N) than dry PTFE (1.6 ± 0.66 N). To help explain our results, we developed models based on thermodynamic theory of adhesion for contacting surfaces in different media and found that we can predict the ratio of shear adhesion in water to that in air. Our findings provide insight into how geckos may function in wet environments and also have significant implications for the development of a synthetic gecko mimic that retains adhesion in water. PMID:23576727

  6. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  7. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone.

  8. Modeling and simulation of adhesion between carbon nanotubes and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldum, Alper; Paudel, Naba Raj; Ohashi, Toshiyuki; Dai, Liming

    2008-03-01

    There have been also many experimental studies which were performed to compare the adhesion properties of carbon nanotubes with that of a gecko's foot on smooth surfaces. Yurdumakan et al. measured the adhesive force of multiwalled carbon nanotube hairs and found it to be 200 times higher than that observed for gecko foot-hairs.Here, we present theoretical investigations of CNTs interacting with surfaces. We study the deformation of CNTs and evaluate their adhesion similar to the experimental investigation of a gecko's foot. To study the deformation behavior and adhesion of CNTs, atomistic simulations of capped armchair (10, 10) nanotubes with two different lengths are performed on rigid and relaxed graphite surfaces.Simulations were also performed for different orientations of the nanotube with respect to the graphite surface to study the angular dependence of adhesion and deformation.

  9. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    PubMed

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides. PMID:26250681

  10. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    PubMed

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  11. Modified Surface Having Low Adhesion Properties to Mitigate Insect Residue Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J., Jr. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Penner, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A process to modify a surface to provide reduced adhesion surface properties to mitigate insect residue adhesion. The surface may include the surface of an article including an aircraft, an automobile, a marine vessel, all-terrain vehicle, wind turbine, helmet, etc. The process includes topographically and chemically modifying the surface by applying a coating comprising a particulate matter, or by applying a coating and also topographically modifying the surface by various methods, including but not limited to, lithographic patterning, laser ablation and chemical etching, physical vapor phase deposition, chemical vapor phase deposition, crystal growth, electrochemical deposition, spin casting, and film casting.

  12. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ida; Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

  13. Microstructured shape memory polymer surfaces with reversible dry adhesion.

    PubMed

    Eisenhaure, Jeffrey D; Xie, Tao; Varghese, Stephen; Kim, Seok

    2013-08-28

    We present a shape memory polymer (SMP) surface with repeatable, very strong (>18 atm), and extremely reversible (strong to weak adhesion ratio of >1 × 10(4)) dry adhesion to a glass substrate. This was achieved by exploiting bulk material properties of SMP and surface microstructuring. Its exceptional dry adhesive performance is attributed to the SMP's rigidity change in response to temperature and its capabilities of temporary shape locking and permanent shape recovery, which when combined with a microtip surface design enables time-independent control of contact area.

  14. Measurement of surface adhesion force of adhesion promoter and release layer for UV-nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae-Geun; Lee, Dong-Il; Kim, Ki-Don; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2009-02-01

    In this work, we investigated the effect of surface treatment as release layer and adhesion promoter for UV-Nanoimprint lithography and measured the surface adhesion force by using tensile separation force of Instron equipment. Several Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of 3-Acryloxypropyl methyl dichlorosilane (APMDS) 3-Aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTS), and 3-Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTS) as adhesion promoters and (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)trichlorosilane (FOTS) as release layer were fabricated by vapor deposition method and were compared with oxygen plasma treatment. APMDS could strongly improve the adhesion force between UV-curable acrylate resin and silicon substrate because of strong covalent bonding. Finally, we could successfully fabricate various imprint patterns by using proper surface treatment of SAMs.

  15. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  16. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  17. Laser processing of metal surfaces for increasing paint adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Tomiyasu; Ichihara, Hideki; Sugimoto, Kenji; Sasazawa, Kazuo; Shibasaki, Shouji

    2000-01-01

    Painted metal exteriors of buildings begin to degrade in about 10 years due to solar heat, UV rays, the sea salt adhesion, the acid rain etc. When degradation and exfoliation of the paint film occurs, rust appears in the metal and replacement or repainting becomes necessary. The adhesion of paints on metal is usually achieved by chemical adhesion or by increasing the surface area by blast processing. In this study, the possibility of improving paint adhesion by forming minute holes on the metal surface by laser irradiation was studied through modeling of the adhesion of the paint film and adaptability to deformation. The viscosity and painting method depend on the size and location of the oles. The presence of the holes makes it possible to form complicated shapes by pressing because the holes absorb some of the strain caused by pressing.

  18. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  19. Surface tension regularizes the crack singularity of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; van Wijngaarden, Leen; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-05-11

    The elastic and adhesive properties of a solid surface can be quantified by indenting it with a rigid sphere. Indentation tests are classically described by the JKR-law when the solid is very stiff, while recent work highlights the importance of surface tension for exceedingly soft materials. Here we show that surface tension plays a crucial role even in stiff solids: Young's wetting angle emerges as a boundary condition and this regularizes the crack-like singularity at the edge of adhesive contacts. We find that the edge region exhibits a universal, self-similar structure that emerges from the balance of surface tension and elasticity. The similarity theory is solved analytically and provides a complete description of adhesive contacts, by which we reconcile global adhesion laws and local contact mechanics. PMID:27087459

  20. Adhesion of perfume-filled microcapsules to model fabric surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Yanping; Bowen, James; Andrews, James W; Liu, Min; Smets, Johan; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    The retention and adhesion of melamine formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules on a model fabric surface in aqueous solution were investigated using a customised flow chamber technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A cellulose film was employed as a model fabric surface. Modification of the cellulose with chitosan was found to increase the retention and adhesion of microcapsules on the model fabric surface. The AFM force-displacement data reveal that bridging forces resulting from the extension of cellulose chains dominate the adhesion between the microcapsule and the unmodified cellulose film, whereas electrostatic attraction helps the microcapsules adhere to the chitosan-modified cellulose film. The correlation between results obtained using these two complementary techniques suggests that the flow chamber device can be potentially used for rapid screening of the effect of chemical modification on the adhesion of microparticles to surfaces, reducing the time required to achieve an optimal formulation.

  1. Controllable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces based on PDMS microwell arrays.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Dongshi; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Si, Jinhai; Meng, Xiangwei; Hou, Xun

    2013-03-12

    This paper presents a one-step method to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with extremely controllable adhesion based on PDMS microwell arrays. The microwell array structures are rapidly produced on PDMS films by a point-by-point femtosecond laser scanning process. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces show water controllable adhesion that ranges from ultrahigh to ultralow by adjusting the extent of overlap of the adjacent microwells, on which the sliding angle can be controlled from 180° (a water droplet can not slide down even when the as-prepared surface is turned upside down) to 3°. A "micro-airbag effect" is introduced to explain the adhesion transition phenomenon of the microwell array structures. This work provides a facile and promising strategy to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable adhesion.

  2. Covalent surface modification of titanium oxide with different adhesive peptides: surface characterization and osteoblast-like cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dettin, Monica; Bagno, Andrea; Gambaretto, Roberta; Iucci, Giovanna; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Tuccitto, Nunzio; Menti, Anna Michela; Grandi, Claudio; Di Bello, Carlo; Licciardello, Antonino; Polzonetti, Giovanni

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental goal in the field of implantology is the design of innovative devices suitable for promoting implant-to-tissue integration. This result can be achieved by means of surface modifications aimed at optimizing tissue regeneration. In the framework of oral and orthopedic implantology, surface modifications concern both the optimization of titanium/titanium alloy surface roughness and the attachment of biochemical factors able to guide cellular adhesion and/or growth. This article focuses on the covalent attachment of two different adhesive peptides to rough titanium disks. The capability of biomimetic surfaces to increase osteoblast adhesion and the specificity of their biological activity due to the presence of cell adhesion signal-motif have also been investigated. In addition, surface analyses by profilometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry have been carried out to investigate the effects and modifications induced by grafting procedures.

  3. Analysis of the surface effects on adhesion in MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, F.; Pustan, M.; Bîrleanu, C.; Müller, R.; Voicu, R.; Baracu, A.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main failure causes in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is stiction. Stiction is the adhesion of contacting surfaces due to surface forces. Adhesion force depends on the operating conditions and is influenced by the contact area. In this study, the adhesion force between MEMS materials and the AFM tips is analyzed using the spectroscopy in point mode of the AFM. The aim is to predict the stiction failure mode in MEMS. The investigated MEMS materials are silicon, polysilicon, platinum, aluminum, and gold. Three types of investigations were conducted. The first one aimed to determine the variation of the adhesion force with respect to the variation of the roughness. The roughness has a strong influence on the adhesion because the contact area between components increases if the roughness decreases. The second type of investigation aimed to determine the adhesion force in multiple points of each considered sample. The values obtained experimentally for the adhesion force were also validated using the JKR and DMT models. The third type of investigation was conducted with the purpose of determining the influence of the temperature on the adhesion force.

  4. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0–100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  5. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0-100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  6. Polymer adhesion at surfaces: biological adhesive proteins and their synthetic mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messersmith, Phillip

    2008-03-01

    Mussels are famous for their ability to permanently adhere to a wide variety of wet surfaces, such as rocks, metal and polymer ship hulls, and wood structures. They accomplish this through specialized proteins collectively referred to as mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). The biophysical aspects of MAP adhesion is being revealed through the use of single molecule force measurements. The results provide insight into the adhesive roles of key amino acids found in these proteins, including the magnitude of adhesive forces, cooperative effects, and their self-healing properties. This molecular-level information is being incorporated into designs of biomimetic polymer coatings for a variety of applications. Our biomimetic approach to polymer design will be illustrated by a few examples where adhesive constituents found in MAPs are exploited to make wet-adhesive polymer coatings. In addition, small molecule analogs of MAPs can be used to apply thin functional films onto virtually any material surface using a facile approach. These coatings have a variety of potential uses in microelectronics, water treatment, prevention of environmental biofouling, and for control of biointerfacial phenomena at the surfaces of medical/diagnostic devices.

  7. The Role of Glottal Surface Adhesion on Vocal Folds Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a very thin mucus layer and covers the vocal fold (VF) surface. Adhesion mediated by the ASL occurs during phonation as the VFs separate after collision. Such adhesion is hypothesized to determine voice quality and health. However, biomechanical insights into the adhesive processes during VF oscillation are lacking. Here, a computational study is reported on self-sustained VF vibration involving contact and adhesion. The VF structural model and the glottal airflow are considered fully three-dimensional. The mechanical behavior of the ASL is described through a constitutive traction–separation law where mucosal cohesive strength, cohesive energy and rupture length enter. Cohesive energy values considered are bound below by the cohesive energy of water at standard temperature and pressure. Cohesive strength values considered are bound above by prior reported data on the adhesive strength of mucosal surface of rat small intestine. This model introduces a mechanical length scale into the analysis. The sensitivity of various aspects of VF dynamics such as flow-declination rate, VF separation under adhesive condition and formation of multiple local fluid bridges is determined in relation to specific ASL adhesive properties. It is found that for the ASL considered here, the characteristics of the VF separation process are of debond type. Instabilities lead to the breakup of the bond area into several smaller bond patches. Such finding is consistent with in-vivo observations. PMID:25034504

  8. Enhanced adhesion of bioinspired nanopatterned elastomers via colloidal surface assembly

    PubMed Central

    Akerboom, Sabine; Appel, Jeroen; Labonte, David; Federle, Walter; Sprakel, Joris; Kamperman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    We describe a scalable method to fabricate nanopatterned bioinspired dry adhesives using colloidal lithography. Close-packed monolayers of polystyrene particles were formed at the air/water interface, on which polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was applied. The order of the colloidal monolayer and the immersion depth of the particles were tuned by altering the pH and ionic strength of the water. Initially, PDMS completely wetted the air/water interface outside the monolayer, thereby compressing the monolayer as in a Langmuir trough; further application of PDMS subsequently covered the colloidal monolayers. PDMS curing and particle extraction resulted in elastomers patterned with nanodimples. Adhesion and friction of these nanopatterned surfaces with varying dimple depth were studied using a spherical probe as a counter-surface. Compared with smooth surfaces, adhesion of nanopatterned surfaces was enhanced, which is attributed to an energy-dissipating mechanism during pull-off. All nanopatterned surfaces showed a significant decrease in friction compared with smooth surfaces. PMID:25392404

  9. The effect of surface water and wetting on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H

    2012-09-01

    Despite profound interest in the mechanics and performance of the gecko adhesive system, relatively few studies have focused on performance under conditions that are ecologically relevant to the natural habitats of geckos. Because geckos are likely to encounter surfaces that are wet, we used shear force adhesion measurements to examine the effect of surface water and toe pad wetting on the whole-animal performance of a tropical-dwelling gecko (Gekko gecko). To test the effect of surface wetting, we measured the shear adhesive force of geckos on three substrate conditions: dry glass, glass misted with water droplets and glass fully submerged in water. We also investigated the effect of wetting on the adhesive toe pad by soaking the toe pads prior to testing. Finally, we tested for repeatability of the adhesive system in each wetting condition by measuring shear adhesion after each step a gecko made under treatment conditions. Wetted toe pads had significantly lower shear adhesive force in all treatments (0.86 ± 0.09 N) than the control (17.96 ± 3.42 N), as did full immersion in water (0.44 ± 0.03 N). Treatments with droplets of water distributed across the surface were more variable and did not differ from treatments where the surface was dry (4.72 ± 1.59 N misted glass; 9.76 ± 2.81 N dry glass), except after the gecko took multiple steps. These findings suggest that surface water and the wetting of a gecko's adhesive toe pads may have significant consequences for the ecology and behavior of geckos living in tropical environments.

  10. Verification of surface preparation for adhesive bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Rodney S.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of solid rocket booster (SRB) production operations identified potential contaminants which might adversely affect bonding operations. Lap shear tests quantified these contaminants' effects on adhesive strength. The most potent contaminants were selected for additional studies on SRB thermal protection system (TPS) bonding processes. Test panels were prepared with predetermined levels of contamination, visually inspected using white and black light, then bonded with three different TPS materials over the unremoved contamination. Bond test data showed that white and black light inspections are adequate inspection methods for TPS bonding operations. Extreme levels of contamination (higher than expected on flight hardware) had an insignificant effect on TPS bond strengths because of the apparent insensitivity of the adhesive system to contamination effects, and the comparatively weak cohesive strength of the TPS materials.

  11. Rapid Development of Wet Adhesion between Carboxymethylcellulose Modified Cellulose Surfaces Laminated with Polyvinylamine Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Pelton, Robert; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-09-14

    The surface of regenerated cellulose membranes was modified by irreversible adsorption of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Pairs of wet CMC-modified membranes were laminated with polyvinylamine (PVAm) at room temperature, and the delamination force for wet membranes was measured for both dried and never-dried laminates. The wet adhesion was studied as a function of PVAm molecular weight, amine content, and deposition pH of the polyelectrolyte. Surprisingly the PVAm-CMC system gave substantial wet adhesion that exceeded that of TEMPO-oxidized membranes with PVAm for both dried and never-dried laminates. The greatest wet adhesion was achieved for fully hydrolyzed high molecular weight PVAm. Bulk carboxymethylation of cellulose membranes gave inferior wet adhesion combined with PVAm as compared to CMC adsorption which indicates that a CMC layer of the order of 10 nm was necessary. There are no obvious covalent cross-linking reactions between CMC and PVAm at room temperature, and on the basis of our results, we are instead attributing the wet adhesion to complex formation between the PVAm and the irreversibly adsorbed CMC at the cellulose surface. We propose that interdigitation of PVAm chains into the CMC layer is responsible for the high wet adhesion values. PMID:27552256

  12. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  13. Surface treatment of polymer microfibrillar structures for improved surface wettability and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyvandi, Amirpasha; Abideen, Saqib Ul; Huang, Yue; Lee, Ilsoon; Soroushian, Parviz; Lu, Jue

    2014-01-01

    The effects of altering the polymer surface characteristics on adhesion qualities of bio-inspired fibrillar adhesives were found to be significant. Treatment of fibril tip surfaces in polymer fibrillar adhesives improved their wettability and adhesion capacity. Surface modifications of fibril tips involved UV/Ozone and oxygen plasma treatments for making the fibril tips more hydrophilic. These surface treatment effects, however, tend to degrade over time (rendering hydrophobic recovery). The stability of treated (hydrophilic) surfaces was improved, while retaining their wettability, through coating with a polyelectrolyte such as polyethyleneimine (PEI) via self-assembly.

  14. Plasma-driven tunable liquid adhesion of superoleophobic aluminum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Song, Haojie; Tang, Hua; Ji, Haiyan; Li, Changsheng

    2013-09-01

    With the aim of tuning adhesion with various liquids, we develop a convenient route to achieve sliding superoleophobicity and sticky superoleophobicity on the aluminum surfaces by surface fluorination and masked plasma treatment. Droplets of various liquids, such as oils, organic liquids, and water, can be tuned between rolling state and pinned state on the superoleophobic surfaces. The tunable adhesion of the superoleophobic surface is demonstrated by visible experimental results and measurements. The key to this effect is the combination of the oleophobic domains produced by masked plasma treatment as well as a permanently superoleophobic substrate and the hierarchical texture. Our results gave a useful attempt in understanding the fabrication principle of preparing superoleophobic surfaces with tunable liquid adhesion.

  15. Motion of Elastic Microcapsules on Compliant Surfaces with Adhesive Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresov, Egor; Kolmakov, German; Balazs, Anna

    2011-03-01

    By integrating mesoscale models for hydrodynamics, micromechanics and adhesion, we examine the fluid driven motion of elastic microcapsules on compliant surfaces. The capsules, modeled as three-dimensional fluid-filled elastic shells, represent polymeric microcapsules or biological cells. Our combined integrated Lattice Boltzmann model/Lattice spring model (LBM/LSM) approach allows for a dynamic interaction between the elastic capsule's wall and surrounding fluid. To capture the interaction between the shell and the surface, we adopt the Bell model, used previously to describe the interaction of biological cell like leukocytes rolling on surfaces under the influence of an imposed shear. The surface of the microcapsule contains receptors with an affinity to adhesive ligands of the substrate. We examine how the parameters of adhesion and rigidity of the capsules and the substrate affect movement of the capsules. The findings provide guidelines for creating smart surfaces that could regulate the microcapsules' motion.

  16. Nanostructures increase water droplet adhesion on hierarchically rough superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Teisala, Hannu; Tuominen, Mikko; Aromaa, Mikko; Stepien, Milena; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Saarinen, Jarkko J; Toivakka, Martti; Kuusipalo, Jurkka

    2012-02-14

    Hierarchical roughness is known to effectively reduce the liquid-solid contact area and water droplet adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces, which can be seen for example in the combination of submicrometer and micrometer scale structures on the lotus leaf. The submicrometer scale fine structures, which are often referred to as nanostructures in the literature, have an important role in the phenomenon of superhydrophobicity and low water droplet adhesion. Although the fine structures are generally termed as nanostructures, their actual dimensions are often at the submicrometer scale of hundreds of nanometers. Here we demonstrate that small nanometric structures can have very different effect on surface wetting compared to the large submicrometer scale structures. Hierarchically rough superhydrophobic TiO(2) nanoparticle surfaces generated by the liquid flame spray (LFS) on board and paper substrates revealed that the nanoscale surface structures have the opposite effect on the droplet adhesion compared to the larger submicrometer and micrometer scale structures. Variation in the hierarchical structure of the nanoparticle surfaces contributed to varying droplet adhesion between the high- and low-adhesive superhydrophobic states. Nanoscale structures did not contribute to superhydrophobicity, and there was no evidence of the formation of the liquid-solid-air composite interface around the nanostructures. Therefore, larger submicrometer and micrometer scale structures were needed to decrease the liquid-solid contact area and to cause the superhydrophobicity. Our study suggests that a drastic wetting transition occurs on superhydrophobic surfaces at the nanometre scale; i.e., the transition between the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel wetting states will occur as the liquid-solid-air composite interface collapses around nanoscale structures. Consequently, water adheres tightly to the surface by penetrating into the nanostructure. The droplet adhesion mechanism presented in

  17. Controlling adhesion force by means of nanoscale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Rao, Akshata; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2011-08-16

    Control of adhesion is a crucial aspect in the design of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices. To understand the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness, a roughness gradient has been employed. Monomodal roughness gradients were fabricated by means of silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼12 nm) to produce substrates with varying nanoparticle density. Pull-off force measurements on the gradients were performed using (polyethylene) colloidal-probe microscopy under perfluorodecalin, in order to restrict interactions to van der Waals forces. The influence of normal load on pull-off forces was studied and the measured forces compared with existing Hamaker-approximation-based models. We observe that adhesion force reaches a minimum value at an optimum particle density on the gradient sample, where the mean particle spacing becomes comparable with the diameter of the contact area with the polyethylene sphere. We also observe that the effect on adhesion of increasing the normal load depends on the roughness of the surface.

  18. The effects of leaf roughness, surface free energy and work of adhesion on leaf water drop adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huixia; Shi, Hui; Li, Yangyang; Wang, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    The adhesion of water droplets to leaves is important in controlling rainfall interception, and affects a variety of hydrological processes. Leaf water drop adhesion (hereinafter, adhesion) depends not only on droplet formulation and parameters but also on the physical (leaf roughness) and physico-chemical (surface free energy, its components, and work-of-adhesion) properties of the leaf surface. We selected 60 plant species from Shaanxi Province, NW China, as experimental materials with the goal of gaining insight into leaf physical and physico-chemical properties in relation to the adhesion of water droplets on leaves. Adhesion covered a wide range of area, from 4.09 to 88.87 g/m(2) on adaxial surfaces and 0.72 to 93.35 g/m(2) on abaxial surfaces. Distinct patterns of adhesion were observed among species, between adaxial and abaxial surfaces, and between leaves with wax films and wax crystals. Adhesion decreased as leaf roughness increased (r =  -0.615, p = 0.000), but there were some outliers, such as Salix psammophila and Populus simonii with low roughness and low adhesion, and the abaxial surface of Hyoscyamus pusillus and the adaxial surface of Vitex negundo with high roughness and high adhesion. Meanwhile, adhesion was positively correlated with surface free energy (r = 0.535, p = 0.000), its dispersive component (r = 0.526, p = 0.000), and work of adhesion for water (r = 0.698, p = 0.000). However, a significant power correlation was observed between adhesion and the polar component of surface free energy (p = 0.000). These results indicated that leaf roughness, surface free energy, its components, and work-of-adhesion for water played important roles in hydrological characteristics, especially work-of-adhesion for water.

  19. The Effects of Leaf Roughness, Surface Free Energy and Work of Adhesion on Leaf Water Drop Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huixia; Shi, Hui; Li, Yangyang; Wang, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    The adhesion of water droplets to leaves is important in controlling rainfall interception, and affects a variety of hydrological processes. Leaf water drop adhesion (hereinafter, adhesion) depends not only on droplet formulation and parameters but also on the physical (leaf roughness) and physico-chemical (surface free energy, its components, and work-of-adhesion) properties of the leaf surface. We selected 60 plant species from Shaanxi Province, NW China, as experimental materials with the goal of gaining insight into leaf physical and physico-chemical properties in relation to the adhesion of water droplets on leaves. Adhesion covered a wide range of area, from 4.09 to 88.87 g/m2 on adaxial surfaces and 0.72 to 93.35 g/m2 on abaxial surfaces. Distinct patterns of adhesion were observed among species, between adaxial and abaxial surfaces, and between leaves with wax films and wax crystals. Adhesion decreased as leaf roughness increased (r =  −0.615, p = 0.000), but there were some outliers, such as Salix psammophila and Populus simonii with low roughness and low adhesion, and the abaxial surface of Hyoscyamus pusillus and the adaxial surface of Vitex negundo with high roughness and high adhesion. Meanwhile, adhesion was positively correlated with surface free energy (r = 0.535, p = 0.000), its dispersive component (r = 0.526, p = 0.000), and work of adhesion for water (r = 0.698, p = 0.000). However, a significant power correlation was observed between adhesion and the polar component of surface free energy (p = 0.000). These results indicated that leaf roughness, surface free energy, its components, and work-of-adhesion for water played important roles in hydrological characteristics, especially work-of-adhesion for water. PMID:25198355

  20. Renewable Interfaces: Surface Topography Actuation for Complex Biological Adhesion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Ye, Sangho; Cao, Kathleen; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Velankar, Sachin; Wagner, William

    2015-03-01

    Controlling adhesion at biological interfaces is a complex problem with great biomedical importance. We use dynamic wrinkling, generated with PDMS/UVO chemistry under different macroscopic strains (ɛij ~ 0 . 3), to create a mechanical interfacial term that frustrates particle adhesion. This device actuates surface topography between flat (zero surface confinement χij) and wrinkled surfaces (χij ~(A / λ) 2 , where A and λ are wrinkle amplitude and wavelength, respectively), with a maximum rate of 0.6 Hz. Un-actuated PDMS placed in contact with whole sheep blood shows near total surface coverage with adhered platelets over 90 min. Actuation showed a nearly 100-fold decrease in platelet adhesion. Interestingly, topographic actuation is four times as effective compared to flat surface actuation in controlling platelet adhesion. Our model explores the competition between surface tension terms (Uγ = γɛij) and interfacial elastic terms (Uχ =Eij (t .ɛij2 +t3 . (χij /λ2)) generated because of actuation and wrinkling, where Eij is platelet modulus and t is characteristic platelet length scale. The condition for de-adhesion is Uχ >Uγ .

  1. Adhesion of Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis on a Planar Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; Joy, David Charles; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion of spores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and spherical silica particles on surfaces was experimentally and theoretically investigated in this study. Topography analysis via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy indicates that Bt spores are rod shaped, {approx}1.3 {mu}m in length and {approx}0.8 {mu}m in diameter. The adhesion force of Bt spores and silica particles on gold-coated glass was measured at various relative humidity (RH) levels by AFM. It was expected that the adhesion force would vary with RH because the individual force components contributing to the adhesion force depend on RH. The adhesion force between a particle and a planar surface in atmospheric environments was modeled as the contribution of three major force components: capillary, van der Waals, and electrostatic interaction forces. Adhesion force measurements for Bt spore (silica particle) and the gold surface system were comparable with calculations. Modeling results show that there is a critical RH value, which depends on the hydrophobicity of the materials involved, below which the water meniscus does not form and the contribution of the capillary force is zero. As RH increases, the van der Waals force decreases while the capillary force increases to a maximum value.

  2. Micropatterned surfaces for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under flow.

    PubMed

    Nalayanda, Divya D; Kalukanimuttam, Mahendran; Schmidtke, David W

    2007-04-01

    Cell adhesion and rolling on the vascular wall is critical to both inflammation and thrombosis. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of using microfluidic patterning for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under physiological flow conditions. By controlling the width of the lines (50-1000 microm) and the spacing between them (50-100 microm) we were able to fabricate surfaces with well-defined patterns of adhesion molecules. We demonstrate the versatility of this technique by patterning surfaces with 3 different adhesion molecules (P-selectin, E-selectin, and von Willebrand Factor) and controlling the adhesion and rolling of three different cell types (neutrophils, Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and platelets). By varying the concentration of the incubating solution we could control the surface ligand density and hence the cell rolling velocity. Finally by patterning surfaces with both P-selectin and von Willebrand Factor we could control the rolling of both leukocytes and platelets simultaneously. The technique described in this paper provides and effective and inexpensive way to fabricate patterned surfaces for use in cell rolling assays under physiologic flow conditions. PMID:17160704

  3. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  4. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  5. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  6. Integrin receptors and platelet adhesion to synthetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S L; Cooper, S L; Albrecht, R M

    1993-05-01

    The activation-independent and -dependent integrin receptors--glycoproteins GPIc-IIa (alpha 5-beta 1) and GPIIb-IIIa (alpha IIb-beta 3)--are involved in platelet adhesion and thrombus growth on damaged subendothelium through interactions with fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. Because these receptors are used in normal in vivo hemostatic adhesion, they may also have a role for adhesion onto synthetic surfaces in the vasculature. Platelet adhesion in vitro was examined onto Formvar, glass, and four polyurethaneureas with various soft segment chemistries and surface properties. Platelets were pretreated with RGD peptides before and after adhesion. RGD peptide pretreatment inhibited spreading and close contact formation compared to treatment with saline or control RGE peptides, with no observable effect on the number of adherent platelets per area. High-voltage electron microscopy showed abnormally sparse and short microfilament structures with RGD peptide treatment, suggesting an indirect inhibition of actin filament formation. Video-enhanced light microscopy showed a cessation of spreading and a partial reversal of close contacts following RGD peptide application to adherent platelets. Because minimal amounts of plasma proteins are present in column-washed platelet suspensions, and as platelet secretion appeared to be minimal in these experiments, these observations suggest that RGD binding integrin receptors may function in platelet spreading even in the absence of exogenous ligand. As RGD peptides did not affect the numbers of adherent platelets, while producing substantial decreases in the extent of spreading, we suggest that platelet integrins, possibly GPIIb-IIIa, are involved in spreading on synthetic surfaces but not for initial adhesion.

  7. Reduction of water surface tension significantly impacts gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; McClung, Brandon; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The gecko adhesive system is dependent on weak van der Waals interactions that are multiplied across thousands of fine hair-like structures (setae) on geckos' toe pads. Due to the requirements of van der Waals forces, we expect that any interruption between the setae and substrate, such as a water layer, will compromise adhesion. Our recent results suggest, however, that the air layer (plastron) surrounding the superhydrophobic toe pads aid in expelling water at the contact interface and create strong shear adhesion in water when in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. To test the function of the air plastron, we reduced the surface tension of water using two surfactants, a charged anionic surfactant and a neutral nonionic surfactant. We tested geckos on three substrates: hydrophilic glass and two hydrophobic surfaces, glass with a octadecyl trichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer (OTS-SAM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). We found that the anionic surfactant inhibited the formation of the air plastron layer and significantly reduced shear adhesion to all three substrates. Interestingly, the air plastron was more stable in the nonionic surfactant treatments than the anionic surfactant treatments and we found that geckos adhered better in the nonionic surfactant than in the anionic surfactant on OTS-SAM and PTFE but not on glass. Our results have implications for the evolution of a superhydrophobic toe pad and highlight some of the challenges faced in designing synthetic adhesives that mimic geckos' toes.

  8. Adhesion and friction force coupling of gecko setal arrays: implications for structured adhesive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boxin; Pesika, Noshir; Rosenberg, Kenny; Tian, Yu; Zeng, Hongbo; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2008-02-19

    The extraordinary climbing ability of geckos is partially attributed to the fine structure of their toe pads, which contain arrays consisting of thousands of micrometer-sized stalks (setae) that are in turn terminated by millions of fingerlike pads (spatulae) having nanoscale dimensions. Using a surface forces apparatus (SFA), we have investigated the dynamic sliding characteristics of setal arrays subjected to various loading, unloading, and shearing conditions at different angles. Setal arrays were glued onto silica substrates and, once installed into the SFA, brought toward a polymeric substrate surface and then sheared. Lateral shearing of the arrays was initiated along both the "gripping" and "releasing" directions of the setae on the foot pads. We find that the anisotropic microstructure of the setal arrays gives rise to quite different adhesive and tribological properties when sliding along these two directions, depending also on the angle that the setae subtend with respect to the surface. Thus, dragging the setal arrays along the gripping direction leads to strong adhesion and friction forces (as required during contact and attachment), whereas when shearing along the releasing direction, both forces fall to almost zero (as desired during rapid detachment). The results and analysis provide new insights into the biomechanics of adhesion and friction forces in animals, the coupling between these two forces, and the specialized structures that allow them to optimize these forces along different directions during movement. Our results also have practical implications and criteria for designing reversible and responsive adhesives and articulated robotic mechanisms.

  9. Adhesion performance of UHMWPE after different surface modification techniques.

    PubMed

    Oosterom, R; Ahmed, T J; Poulis, J A; Bersee, H E N

    2006-05-01

    A novel design of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) glenoid component has been proposed, based on adhesion to PMMA bone cement. However, due to the non-polar nature of UHMWPE, surface modification techniques are needed to obtain good adhesion and thus for the design to be viable. The aim of the study is to investigate adhesion of UHMWPE after different surface treatments. Three gas-phase surface modification techniques were investigated, namely UV/Ozone, corona discharge and radio frequency glow discharge plasma, as well as abrasion. The surface treated samples were examined using water contact angle, surface energy and roughness measurements, as well as single lap-joint shear testing using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and methylmethacrylate (MMA) adhesive. The effect of aging on bonded samples has also been investigated. Corona and glow discharge treatments were found to activate the surface as shown by an increase in surface energy of over 100% in an order of less than a minute, corresponding to an increase in ultimate shear stress from 0.12 to 0.40 MPa. In contrast, UV/Ozone required exposure times in the order of minutes to have an effect that was still incomparable to the other gas-phase treatments examined. Abrasion produced slightly better adhesion properties for single lap-joints bonded with PMMA compared to the corona treatment. The best treatment was found to be a combined treatment of surface roughening for 10 s, and subsequently a 90 s glow discharge treatment, resulting in failure of the UHMWPE sheet material.

  10. Adhesion performance of UHMWPE after different surface modification techniques.

    PubMed

    Oosterom, R; Ahmed, T J; Poulis, J A; Bersee, H E N

    2006-05-01

    A novel design of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) glenoid component has been proposed, based on adhesion to PMMA bone cement. However, due to the non-polar nature of UHMWPE, surface modification techniques are needed to obtain good adhesion and thus for the design to be viable. The aim of the study is to investigate adhesion of UHMWPE after different surface treatments. Three gas-phase surface modification techniques were investigated, namely UV/Ozone, corona discharge and radio frequency glow discharge plasma, as well as abrasion. The surface treated samples were examined using water contact angle, surface energy and roughness measurements, as well as single lap-joint shear testing using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and methylmethacrylate (MMA) adhesive. The effect of aging on bonded samples has also been investigated. Corona and glow discharge treatments were found to activate the surface as shown by an increase in surface energy of over 100% in an order of less than a minute, corresponding to an increase in ultimate shear stress from 0.12 to 0.40 MPa. In contrast, UV/Ozone required exposure times in the order of minutes to have an effect that was still incomparable to the other gas-phase treatments examined. Abrasion produced slightly better adhesion properties for single lap-joints bonded with PMMA compared to the corona treatment. The best treatment was found to be a combined treatment of surface roughening for 10 s, and subsequently a 90 s glow discharge treatment, resulting in failure of the UHMWPE sheet material. PMID:16118059

  11. Effect of polymer properties and adherend surfaces on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    High temperature polymer surface characteristics associated with joint strength were evaluated. Selected samples represented composite adherends, aluminum filler and fiber glass carrier cloth. Detailed analysis of fractured joint surfaces revealed unique characteristics typical of the specific adhesive formulations and test conditions. A fracture mechanism model was developed for correlating macroscopic shear strength and microstructure of fracture surfaces. Applications were made to unpublished data on polyimides and fluoropolymers.

  12. Adhesion of echinoderm tube feet to rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Santos, Romana; Gorb, Stanislav; Jamar, Valérie; Flammang, Patrick

    2005-07-01

    Echinoderms attach strongly and temporarily to the substratum by means of specialized organs, the podia or tube feet. The latter consist of a basal extensible cylinder, the stem, which bears an apical flattened disc. The disc repeatedly attaches to and detaches from the substratum through adhesive and de-adhesive secretions. In their activities, echinoderms have to cope with substrata of varying degrees of roughness as well as with changing hydrodynamic conditions, and therefore their tube feet must adapt their attachment strength to these environmental constraints. This study is the first attempt to evaluate the influence of substratum roughness on the temporary adhesion of echinoderm tube feet and to investigate the material properties of their contact surface. It was demonstrated that tube foot discs are very soft (E-modulus of 6.0 and 8.1 kPa for sea stars and sea urchins, respectively), have viscoelastic properties and adapt their surface to the substratum profile. They also show increased adhesion on a rough substratum in comparison to its smooth counterpart, which is due mostly to an increase in the geometrical area of contact between the disc and the surface. Tenacity (force per unit area) increases with roughness [e.g. 0.18 and 0.34 MPa on smooth polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), 0.21 and 0.47 MPa on rough PMMA for sea stars and sea urchins, respectively] if only the projected surface area of the adhesive footprint is considered. However, if this tenacity is corrected to take into account the actual substratum 3-D profile, surface roughness no longer influences significantly the corrected adhesion strength (e.g. 0.18 and 0.34 MPa on smooth PMMA, 0.19 and 0.42 MPa on rough PMMA for sea stars and sea urchins, respectively). It can be hypothesized that, under slow self-imposed forces, disc material behaves viscously to adapt to substratum roughness while the adhesive fills out only very small surface irregularities (in the nanometer range). It is deposited as a

  13. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  14. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  15. Gun facilitates adhesive bonding of studs to surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. K.; Simpson, W. G.

    1969-01-01

    Gun facilitates adhesive bonding of thermoplastic-backed studs to smooth, hard surfaces. Such studs can be used for mounting loads where defacement with drilled holes cannot be tolerated. These studs can be easily removed by softening the plastic bonding with heat from the gun.

  16. Bioinspired Directional Surfaces for Adhesion, Wetting and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Sekeroglu, Koray

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, directional surfaces on insect cuticle, animal fur, bird feathers, and plant leaves are comprised of dual micro-nanoscale features that tune roughness and surface energy. This feature article summarizes experimental and theoretical approaches for the design, synthesis and characterization of new bioinspired surfaces demonstrating unidirectional surface properties. The experimental approaches focus on bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods of unidirectional micro- and nanoscale films to explore and characterize their anomalous features. The theoretical component of the review focuses on computational tools to predict the physicochemical properties of unidirectional surfaces. PMID:23526120

  17. Surface preparation of polyolefins prior to adhesive bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Rosty, R.; Martinelli, D.; Devine, A.; Bodnar, M.J.; Beetle, J.

    1987-08-01

    The standard polyolefin surface treatment for adhesive bonding specifies using a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid/water solution. This solution is both carcinogenic and polluting due to chromate inclusion. A study was made of the treated surface of polyolefin versus a control (untreated) surface in an attempt to find an alternate chemical polyolefin pretreatment for adhesive bonding. The new pretreatment solution would have to be noncarcinogenic and nonpolluting. Scanning electron microscope photos of a polyethylene surface treated in the standard solution show pitting not seen in the controls, similar to the P2 etch effect on aluminum surfaces. This pitting roughens the surface and leaves a larger surface area for adhesive bonding, suggesting one of the reasons this pretreatment yielded such good bond strengths. Another reason may be because it is an oxidant. Many nonchromate-bearing alternative solutions were tested. A good number of these were oxidizing agents, patterning the standard solution. Several test solutions resulted in bond strengths close in magnitude to those resulting from standard solution usage. 7 references.

  18. Minimal adhesion surface area in tangentially loaded digital contacts.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Hayward, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The stick-to-slip transition of a fingertip in contact with a planar surface does not occur instantaneously. As the tangential load increases, portions of the skin adhere while others slip, giving rise to an evolution of the contact state, termed partial slip. We develop a quasi-static model that predicts that if the coefficient of kinetic friction is larger than the coefficient of static friction, then the stuck surface area diminishes as the tangential load increases until reaching a 'minimal adhesion surface area' where it vanishes abruptly. This phenomenon was observed in recently measured finger-slip image data (André et al., 2011) that were processed by an optic flow detection algorithm. We examined the results of 10 trials. Four of them exhibited the minimal adhesion surface area phenomenon, four of them did not, and two were inconclusive.

  19. Minimal adhesion surface area in tangentially loaded digital contacts.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Hayward, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The stick-to-slip transition of a fingertip in contact with a planar surface does not occur instantaneously. As the tangential load increases, portions of the skin adhere while others slip, giving rise to an evolution of the contact state, termed partial slip. We develop a quasi-static model that predicts that if the coefficient of kinetic friction is larger than the coefficient of static friction, then the stuck surface area diminishes as the tangential load increases until reaching a 'minimal adhesion surface area' where it vanishes abruptly. This phenomenon was observed in recently measured finger-slip image data (André et al., 2011) that were processed by an optic flow detection algorithm. We examined the results of 10 trials. Four of them exhibited the minimal adhesion surface area phenomenon, four of them did not, and two were inconclusive. PMID:21774936

  20. Measurements of growth cone adhesion to culture surfaces by micromanipulation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Neurons were grown on plastic surfaces that were untreated, or treated with polylysine, laminin, or L1 and their growth cones were detached from their culture surface by applying known forces with calibrated glass needles. This detachment force was taken as a measure of the force of adhesion of the growth cone. We find that on all surfaces, lamellipodial growth cones require significantly greater detachment force than filopodial growth cones, but this differences is, in general, due to the greater area of lamellipodial growth cones compared to filopodial growth cones. That is, the stress (force/unit area) required for detachment was similar for growth cones of lamellipodial and filopodial morphology on all surfaces, with the exception of lamellipodial growth cones on L1-treated surfaces, which had a significantly lower stress of detachment than on other surfaces. Surprisingly, the forces required for detachment (760-3,340 mudynes) were three to 15 times greater than the typical resting axonal tension, the force exerted by advancing growth cones, or the forces of retraction previously measured by essentially the same method. Nor did we observe significant differences in detachment force among growth cones of similar morphology on different culture surfaces, with the exception of lamellipodial growth cones on L1-treated surfaces. These data argue against the differential adhesion mechanism for growth cone guidance preferences in culture. Our micromanipulations revealed that the most mechanically resistant regions of growth cone attachment were confined to quite small regions typically located at the ends of filopodia and lamellipodia. Detached growth cones remained connected to the substratum at these regions by highly elastic retraction fibers. The closeness of contact of growth cones to the substratum as revealed by interference reflection microscopy (IRM) did not correlate with our mechanical measurements of adhesion, suggesting that IRM cannot be used as a

  1. Thermomechanical Mechanisms of Reducing Ice Adhesion on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cohen, N; Dotan, A; Dodiuk, H; Kenig, S

    2016-09-20

    Superhydrophobic (SH) coatings have been shown to reduce freezing and ice nucleation rates, by means of low surface energy chemistry tailored with nano/micro roughness. Durability enhancement of SH surfaces is a crucial issue. Consequently, the present research on reducing ice adhesion is based on radiation-induced radical reaction for covalently bonding SiO2 nanoparticles to polymer coatings to obtain durable roughness. Results indicated that the proposed approach resulted in SH surfaces having high contact angles (>155°) and low sliding angles (<5°) with improved durability and transparency. In a subsequent stage, the synthesized SH coating was investigated for its icephobic characteristics using a variety of substrates. Results indicated that supercooled water drops bounced back when impinging on SH polycarbonate substrate and froze on SH copper substrate held at -10 to -30 °C and were easily peeled off when coated by ice formed during exposure to air/supercooled water drops at -20 °C. The ice shear adhesion investigation (at -20 °C) demonstrated reduction of shear adhesion to a variety of SH treated substrates having low thermal expansion coefficient (copper and aluminum) and high thermal expansion coefficient (polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate)). It was concluded that the thermal mismatch between the adhering ice and the various substrates and its resultant interfacial thermal stresses affect the adhesion strength of the ice to the respective substrate. PMID:27578298

  2. Bacterial adhesion on biomedical surfaces covered by yttria stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Tanoira, Ramón; Horwat, David; Kinnari, Teemu J; Pérez-Jorge, Concepción; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Migot, Sylvie; Esteban, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus spp. on Ti-6Al-4V with respect to Ti-6Al-V modified alloys with a set of Cubic yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Ag-YSZ nanocomposite films. Silver is well known to have a natural biocidal character and its presence in the surface predicted to enhance the antimicrobial properties of biomedical surfaces. Microbial adhesion tests were performed using collection strains and twelve clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The adherence study was performed using a previously published protocol by Kinnari et al. Both collection strains and clinical isolates have shown lower bacterial adhesion to materials modified with respect to the alloy Ti-6Al-4V and the modification with silver reduced the bacterial adhesion for most of all the strains studied. Moreover the percentage of dead bacteria have been evaluated, demonstrating increased proportion of dead bacteria for the modified surfaces. Nanocrystalline silver dissolves releasing both Ag(+) and Ag(0) whereas other silver sources release only Ag(+). We can conclude that YSZ with nanocrystalline silver coating may lead to diminished postoperative infections and to increased corrosion and scratch resistance of YSZ incorporating alloys Ti-6Al-4V. PMID:26610929

  3. Stick-Slip Friction of PDMS Surfaces for Bioinspired Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xue, Longjian; Pham, Jonathan T; Iturri, Jagoba; Del Campo, Aránzazu

    2016-03-15

    Friction plays an important role in the adhesion of many climbing organisms, such as the gecko. During the shearing between two surfaces, periodic stick-slip behavior is often observed and may be critical to the adhesion of gecko setae and gecko-inspired adhesives. Here, we investigate the influence of short oligomers and pendent chains on the stick-slip friction of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a commonly used material for bioinspired adhesives. Three different stick-slip patterns were observed on these surfaces (flat or microstructured) depending on the presence or absence of oligomers and their ability to diffuse out of the material. After washing samples to remove any untethered oligomeric chains, or after oxygen plasma treatment to convert the surface to a thin layer of silica, we decouple the contributions of stiffness, oligomers, and pendant chains to the stick-slip behavior. The stick phase is mainly controlled by the stiffness while the amount of untethered oligomers and pendant chains available at the contact interface defines the slip phase. A large amount of oligomers and pendant chains resulted in a large slip time, dominating the period of stick-slip motion. PMID:26903477

  4. Thermomechanical Mechanisms of Reducing Ice Adhesion on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cohen, N; Dotan, A; Dodiuk, H; Kenig, S

    2016-09-20

    Superhydrophobic (SH) coatings have been shown to reduce freezing and ice nucleation rates, by means of low surface energy chemistry tailored with nano/micro roughness. Durability enhancement of SH surfaces is a crucial issue. Consequently, the present research on reducing ice adhesion is based on radiation-induced radical reaction for covalently bonding SiO2 nanoparticles to polymer coatings to obtain durable roughness. Results indicated that the proposed approach resulted in SH surfaces having high contact angles (>155°) and low sliding angles (<5°) with improved durability and transparency. In a subsequent stage, the synthesized SH coating was investigated for its icephobic characteristics using a variety of substrates. Results indicated that supercooled water drops bounced back when impinging on SH polycarbonate substrate and froze on SH copper substrate held at -10 to -30 °C and were easily peeled off when coated by ice formed during exposure to air/supercooled water drops at -20 °C. The ice shear adhesion investigation (at -20 °C) demonstrated reduction of shear adhesion to a variety of SH treated substrates having low thermal expansion coefficient (copper and aluminum) and high thermal expansion coefficient (polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate)). It was concluded that the thermal mismatch between the adhering ice and the various substrates and its resultant interfacial thermal stresses affect the adhesion strength of the ice to the respective substrate.

  5. Enhanced bacterial adhesion on surfaces pretreated with fibrinogen and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, S.F.; Topham, N.S.; Burns, G.L.; Olsen, D.B.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of certain plasma proteins on the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis on polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, or glass was investigated. Test surfaces were treated with serum, plasma, albumin, immunoglobulin G, fibrinogen, or fibronectin. Using a specially designed test chamber, surfaces previously treated with test proteins were incubated with bacterial suspension. During the experiment, the test chamber was placed on a rotator to prevent settling of bacteria. At the end of the experiment, each test well was rinsed repeatedly to remove non-adherent bacteria. The number of bacteria adherent to the test surfaces was quantitated by a combination of methods including microscopic counting of cells, scintillation counting and autoradiography. It was noted that a greater number of bacteria adhered to surfaces coated with fibrinogen or fibronectin whereas surfaces treated with serum showed reduced bacterial adhesion. The inhibitory effect of serum appeared more pronounced with S. epidermidis when compared with P. aeruginosa under identical experimental conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that adherent bacteria were randomly distributed on the test surfaces and appeared to replicate while still adherent. These observations suggested that bacterial adhesion to biomaterials can be significantly influenced by the composition of the adsorbed proteins at the interface.

  6. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  7. The variation of ice adhesion strength with substrate surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. F.; Lee, H. P.; Lim, S. P.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a relationship exists between the mean surface roughness Ra of an aluminium sample and the interfacial bonding strength σ between it and ice that has been frozen onto its surface. A method of forced vibration of a cantilevered composite beam at 10.0 Hz was used to study the interfacial fracture of the metal-ice interface. Low-cost strain gauges instead of piezoelectric PVDF sensors used in other reported studies were used for the adhesion strength measurements. It was found that increasing surface roughness would lead to a higher interfacial bonding strength, although there was no clearly defined mathematical relationship between Ra and σ. For smooth beams, the adhesion strength was found to be between 0.142 and 0.267 MPa, which was in good agreement with the range of values reported in other studies.

  8. Theory and Simulations of Adhesion Receptor Dimerization on Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yinghao; Honig, Barry; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium constants of trans and cis dimerization of membrane bound (2D) and freely moving (3D) adhesion receptors are expressed and compared using elementary statistical-thermodynamics. Both processes are mediated by the binding of extracellular subdomains whose range of motion in the 2D environment is reduced upon dimerization, defining a thin reaction shell where dimer formation and dissociation take place. We show that the ratio between the 2D and 3D equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of individual factors describing, respectively, the spatial ranges of motions of the adhesive domains, and their rotational freedom within the reaction shell. The results predicted by the theory are compared to those obtained from a novel, to our knowledge, dynamical simulations methodology, whereby pairs of receptors perform realistic translational, internal, and rotational motions in 2D and 3D. We use cadherins as our model system. The theory and simulations explain how the strength of cis and trans interactions of adhesive receptors are affected both by their presence in the constrained intermembrane space and by the 2D environment of membrane surfaces. Our work provides fundamental insights as to the mechanism of lateral clustering of adhesion receptors after cell-cell contact and, more generally, to the formation of lateral microclusters of proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:23528081

  9. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  10. Three-Dimensional Adhesion Map Based on Surface and Interfacial Cutting Analysis System for Predicting Adhesion Properties of Composite Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyuman; Byun, Seoungwoo; Cho, Inseong; Ryou, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Yong Min

    2016-09-14

    Using a surface and interfacial cutting analysis system (SAICAS) that can measure the adhesion strength of a composite electrode at a specific depth from the surface, we can subdivide the adhesion strength of a composite electrode into two classes: (1) the adhesion strength between the Al current collector and the cathode composite electrode (FAl-Ca) and (2) the adhesion strength measured at the mid-depth of the cathode composite electrode (Fmid). Both adhesion strengths, FAl-Ca and Fmid, increase with increasing electrode density and loading level. From the SAICAS measurement, we obtain a mathematical equation that governs the adhesion strength of the composite electrodes. This equation revealed a maximum accuracy of 97.2% and 96.1% for FAl-Ca and Fmid, respectively, for four randomly chosen composite electrodes varying in electrode density and loading level. PMID:27398829

  11. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties. PMID:27612825

  12. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties.

  13. Graphene thickness dependent adhesion force and its correlation to surface roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Pourzand, Hoorad; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, adhesion force of graphene layers on 300 nm silicon oxide is studied. A simple model for measuring adhesion force for a flat surface with sub-nanometer roughness was developed and is shown that small surface roughness decreases adhesion force while large roughness results in an effectively larger adhesion forces. We also show that surface roughness over scales comparable to the tip radius increase by nearly a factor of two, the effective adhesion force measured by the atomic force microscopy. Thus, we demonstrate that surface roughness is an important parameter that should be taken into account in analyzing the adhesion force measurement results.

  14. Fabrication of Adhesive Lenses Using Free Surface Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoheisel, D.; Kelb, C.; Wall, M.; Roth, B.; Rissing, L.

    2013-09-01

    Two approaches for fabricating polymer lenses are presented in this paper. Both are based on filling circular holes with UV curing adhesives. Initially, the viscous adhesive material creates a liquid and spherical free surface due to its own surface tension. This shape is then preserved by curing with UV-hardening light. For the first approach, the holes are generated in a 4 inch Si-wafer by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and for the second, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mould is manufactured. Three types of UV-curing adhesives are investigated (NOA 61, NOA 88 and NEA 121 by Norland Products). Preliminary to the determination of the lens curvature, a contact angle goniometer is used for taking side view images of the lenses. The radius of curvature is then extracted via image processing with the software MATLAB®. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the PDMS mould and the generated lenses is measured with a white light interferometer to characterize the casting process. The resolution power of the generated lenses is evaluated by measurement of their point spread functions (psf) and modulation transfer functions (mtf), respectively.

  15. Effects of surface wettability on gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Z L; Wang, C; Chen, S H

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiments have shown that gecko adhesion underwater depends significantly on surface wettability. Theoretical models of a gecko seta adhering on different substrates are firstly established in order to disclose such an adhesion mechanism. The results show that the capillary force induced by nano-bubbles between gecko seta and the substrate is the mainly influencing factor. The capillary force exhibits an attractive feature between gecko setae and hydrophobic surfaces underwater. However, it is extremely weak or even repulsive on hydrophilic surfaces underwater. A self-similarly splitting model is further considered to simulate multiple gecko setae on substrates underwater. It is interesting to find that the total capillary force depends significantly on the number of nano-bubble bridges and wettability of substrates. The total force is attractive and increases monotonically with the increase of the splitting number on hydrophobic substrates underwater. However, it decreases drastically or even becomes repulsive on hydrophilic substrates underwater. The present result can not only give a reasonable explanation on the existing experimental observations but also be helpful for the design of novel biomimetic adhesives.

  16. On the relation between surface roughness of metallic substrates and adhesion of human primary bone cells.

    PubMed

    Anselme, K; Bigerelle, M

    2014-01-01

    Surface characteristics of materials, whether their topography, chemistry, or surface energy, play an essential part in osteoblast adhesion on biomaterials. Thus, the quality of cell adhesion will influence the cell's capacity to proliferate and differentiate in contact with a biomaterial. We have developed for more than ten years numerous studies on the influence of topography and chemistry of metallic substrates on the response of primary human bone cells. The originality of our approach is that contrary to most of other authors, we quantified the adhesion of primary human bone cells on metallic substrates with perfectly characterized surface topography after some hours but also over 21 days. Moreover, we have developed original statistical approaches for characterizing the relation between surface roughness and cell-adhesion parameters. In this article, we will illustrate different studies we did these last ten years concerning the development of a new adhesion parameter, the adhesion power; the correlation between short-term adhesion, long-term adhesion, and proliferation; the influence of roughness organization on cell adhesion and the development of the order parameter; our modeling approach of cell adhesion on surface topography; the relative influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell adhesion and contact angle; the relation between surface features dimensions and cell adhesion. Further, some considerations will be given on the methods for scanning surface topography for cell-adhesion studies. Finally, perspectives will be given to elucidate these intracellular mechanotransduction mechanisms induced by the deformation of cells on model sinusoidal peaks-or-valleys surfaces.

  17. Effects of surface wettability and contact time on protein adhesion to biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2007-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to directly measure the adhesion forces between three test proteins and low density polyethylene (LDPE) surfaces treated by glow discharge plasma to yield various levels of water wettability. The adhesion of proteins to the LDPE substrates showed a step dependence on the wettability of surfaces as measured by the water contact angle (theta). For LDPE surfaces with theta> approximately 60-65 degrees , stronger adhesion forces were observed for bovine serum albumin, fibrinogen and human FXII than for the surfaces with theta<60 degrees . Smaller adhesion forces were observed for FXII than for the other two proteins on all surfaces although trends were identical. Increasing the contact time from 0 to 50s for each protein-surface combination increased the adhesion force regardless of surface wettability. Time varying adhesion data was fit to an exponential model and free energies of protein unfolding were calculated. This data, viewed in light of previously published studies, suggests a 2-step model of protein denaturation, an early stage on the order of seconds to minutes where the outer surface of the protein interacts with the substrate and a second stage involving movement of hydrophobic amino acids from the protein core to the protein/surface interface. Impact statement: The work described in this manuscript shows a stark transition between protein adherent and protein non-adherent materials in the range of water contact angles 60-65 degrees , consistent with known changes in protein adsorption and activity. Time-dependent changes in adhesion force were used to calculate unfolding energies relating to protein-surface interactions. This analysis provides justification for a 2-step model of protein denaturation on surfaces. PMID:17466368

  18. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Staphylococcus aurius on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amroski, Alicia; Olsen, Morgan; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Reshani; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Staphylococcus aureus is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic strain methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and further as a study for bio-machine interfacing. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured S. aureus were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 4 Log/ml S. aureus solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  19. Platelet adhesion onto segmented polyurethane surfaces modified by carboxybetaine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J; Zhang, J; Zhou, J; Yuan, Y L; Shen, J; Lin, S C

    2003-01-01

    Polyurethanes are widely used as blood-contacting biomaterials due to their good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. Nevertheless, their blood compatibility is still not adequate for more demanding applications. Surface modification is an effective way to improve the hemocompatibility for biomaterials. The purpose of present study was to synthesize a novel nonthrombogenic biomaterial by modifying the surface of polyurethane with Zwitterions of carboxybetaine monomer. The films of polyurethane were grafted with two kinds of carboxybetaine by a three-step procedure. In the first step, the film surfaces were treated with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) in toluene at 50 degrees C in the presence of di-n-butyl tin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst. The extent of the reaction was measured by ATR-FT-IR spectra: a maximum number of free NCO group was obtained after a reaction time of 90 min. In the second step, the hydroxyl group of N,N-dimethylethylethanolamine (DMEA) or 4-dimethylamino-1-butanol (DMBA) was allowed to react in toluene with isocyanate groups bound on surface. In the third step, carboxybetaines were formed in the surface through the ring-opening reaction between tertiary amine of DMEA or DMBA and beta-propiolactone (PL). It was characterized by ATR-FT-IR and XPS that the grafted surfaces were composed of carboxybetaine. The results of the contact angle measurements showed that they were strongly hydrophilic. Platelet adhesion tests showed that films grafted carboxybetaine have good blood compatibility, as featured by the low platelet adhesion. PMID:14870938

  20. Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion to Geochemical Surfaces: Computer Simulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adhesion to Goethite

    PubMed Central

    Shroll, Robert M.; Straatsma, T. P.

    2003-01-01

    The adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the goethite mineral is investigated using classical molecular simulation. A fragment model for goethite has been integrated into a fully atomistic membrane model. Properties for the resulting system are evaluated for a 1.5-ns simulation in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. The response of the membrane to the presence of the mineral is investigated. Radial distribution functions are used to present an average picture of the hydrogen bonding. Orientational vectors, assigned to the saccharide groups, reveal the extent of the mineral's perturbations on the membrane. Significant structural changes were observed for the outermost saccharide groups, several of which rotate to form hydrogen bonds with the mineral surface. The structure of the inner core, and the corresponding integrity of the membrane, is maintained. The mineral surface dehydrates slightly in the presence of the membrane as saccharide hydroxyl groups compete with water molecules for hydrogen-bonding sites on its surface. PMID:12609878

  1. Cell surface hydrophobicity of Bacillus spp. as a function of nutrient supply and lipopeptides biosynthesis and its role in adhesion.

    PubMed

    Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Białas, Wojciech; Myszka, Kamila

    2008-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) is recognised as a important factor in microbial adhesion to solid surfaces. Growth conditions have been found to determine the synthesis of extracellular molecules by microorganisms. It has major consequences in modification of bacterial surface properties and consequently, in bacterial adhesion to solid surfaces. In this paper, CSH properties of Bacillus spp. depending on the nutrient supply and lipopeptide biosynthesis and its role in bacterial adhesion to solid surfaces were investigated. The obtained results indicate that the examined factors (nitrogen and carbon availability) influence the CSH of Bacillus spp. cells. In most variants of the experiments the role of nutrient supply in adhesion process was characteristic for species. The strongest effect was observed for peptone concentration (P < 0.001). A decrease of CSH was noticed in optimal nitrogen availability (10 g/l) and it was connected with maximum yield of surfactin biosynthesis. The highest values of CSH of examined Bacillus spp. strains were observed under nitrogen starvation and in excess of carbon source. In these conditions the adhesion to stainless steel surface was more extensive.

  2. Adhesion enhancement of Al coatings on carbon/epoxy composite surfaces by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulon, J. F.; Tournerie, N.; Maillard, H.

    2013-10-01

    Adhesion strengths between aluminium thin film coatings and manufactured carbon/epoxy composite surfaces were measured by assessing fracture tensile strengths using pull-off tests. The effect of the substrate roughness (nm to μm) of these composite surfaces on adhesion was studied by examining the surface free energies and adhesion strengths. The adhesion strengths of the coatings varied significantly. To improve the coating adhesion, each composite surface was treated with atmospheric plasma prior to deposition, which resulted in an increase in the surface free energy from approximately 40 mJ/m2 to 70 mJ/m2 because the plasma pretreatment led to the formation of hydrophilic Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bonds on the composite surfaces, as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The adhesion strengths of the coatings were enhanced for all surface roughnesses studied. In our study, the effect of mechanical adhesion due to roughness was separated from the effect of modifying the chemical bonds with plasma activation. The adhesion ability of the pure resin was relatively weak. Increasing the surface roughness largely improved the adhesion of the resin surface. Plasma treatment of the pure resin also increased the surface adhesion. Our study shows that plasma activation effectively enhances the adhesion of manufactured composites, even when the surface roughness is on the order of microns. The ageing of the surface activation was also investigated, and the results demonstrate that atmospheric plasma has potential for use in the pretreatment of composite materials.

  3. Improved performance of protected catecholic polysiloxanes for bio-inspired wet adhesion to surface oxides

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinhwa; Kang, Taegon; Jang, Se Gyu; Hwang, Dong Soo; Spruell, Jason M.; Killops, Kato L.; Waite, J. Herbert; Hawker, Craig J.

    2012-01-01

    A facile synthetic strategy for introducing catecholic moieties into polymeric materials based on a readily available precursor – eugenol – and efficient chemistries – tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane catalyzed silation and thiol-ene coupling is reported. Silyl-protection is shown to be critical for the oxidative stability of catecholic moieties during synthesis and processing which allows functionalized polysiloxane derivatives to be fabricated into 3-D microstructures as well as 2-D patterned surfaces. Deprotection gives stable catechol surfaces with adhesion to a variety of oxide surfaces being precisely tuned by the level of catechol incorporation. The advantage of silyl-protection for catechol functionalized polysiloxanes is demonstrated and represents a promising and versatile new platform for underwater surface treatments. PMID:23181614

  4. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  5. 3D surface topology guides stem cell adhesion and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Engler, Adam J; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilizers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors.

  6. 3D Surface Topology Guides Stem Cell Adhesion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G.; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Nghamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Engler, Adam J.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilisers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors. PMID:25818420

  7. Engineered Surfaces for Mitigation of Insect Residue Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Smith, Joseph G.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Gardner, J. M.; Penner, Ronald K.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of laminar flow under operational flight conditions is being investigated under NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. Among the challenges with natural laminar flow is the accretion of residues from insect impacts incurred during takeoff or landing. Depending on air speed, temperature, and wing structure, the critical residue height for laminar flow disruption can be as low as 4 microns near the leading edge. In this study, engineered surfaces designed to minimize insect residue adhesion were examined. The coatings studied included chemical compositions containing functional groups typically associated with abhesive (non-stick) surfaces. To reduce surface contact by liquids and enhance abhesion, the engineered surfaces consisted of these coatings doped with particulate additives to generate random surface topography, as well as coatings applied to laser ablated surfaces having precision patterned topographies. Performance evaluation of these surfaces included contact angle goniometry of pristine coatings and profilometry of surfaces after insect impacts were incurred in laboratory scale tests, wind tunnel tests and flight tests. The results illustrate the complexity of designing antifouling surfaces for effective insect contamination mitigation under dynamic conditions and suggest that superhydrophobic surfaces may not be the most effective solution for preventing insect contamination on aircraft wing leading edges.

  8. Mercapto-based coupling agent for improved thermophotovoltaic device back surface reflector adhesion and reflectance

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard; Fiedor, Joseph N.; Irr, Lawrence G.; Palmisiano, Marc N.

    2016-10-04

    A back surface reflector (BSR) is described. The BSR includes a reflecting layer, a substrate and an adhesion layer between the reflecting layer and the substrate. The adhesion layer includes 3-mercaptopropyl (trimethoxy) silane (a.k.a. Merc).

  9. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, charged, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous, ionic fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience both attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a selected range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function [Formula: see text]) between the adhesion phase (when [Formula: see text]) and the fragmentation phase (when [Formula: see text]) is attributed to a nonlinear relation between the total nanoscale binding forces and the separation gap between the cells. We show that adhesion is favoured in highly ionic fluids, increased deformability of the cells, elastic binders and a higher fluid shear rate (until a critical threshold value of shear rate is reached). Within a selected range of critical shear rates, the continuation of the limit points (i.e., the turning points where the slope of [Formula: see text] changes sign) predict a bistable region, indicating an abrupt switching between the adhesion and the fragmentation regimes. Although, bistability in the adhesion-fragmentation phase diagram of two deformable, charged cells immersed in an ionic aqueous environment has been identified by some in vitro experiments, but until now, has not been quantified theoretically.

  10. Influence of surface potential on the adhesive force of radioactive gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2013-09-24

    Radioactive particles may acquire surface potential through self-charging, and thus can behave differently from natural aerosols in atmospheric systems with respect to aggregation, deposition, resuspension, and transport to areas surrounding a radioactive source. This work focuses on the adhesive force between radioactive particles and metallic surfaces, which relates to the deposition and resuspension of particles on surrounding surfaces. Scanning surface potential microscopy was employed to measure the surface potential of radioactive gold foil. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the adhesive force for gold that acquired surface charge either by irradiation or by application of an equivalent electrical bias. Overall, the adhesive force increases with increasing surface potential or relative humidity. However, a behavior that does not follow the general trend was observed for the irradiated gold at a high decay rate. A comparison between experimental measurements and calculated values revealed that the surface potential promotes adhesion. The contribution of the electrostatic force at high levels of relative humidity was lower than the one found using theoretical calculations due to the effects caused by enhanced adsorption rate of water molecules under a high surface charge density. The results of this study can be used to provide a better understanding of the behavior of radioactive particles in atmospheric systems.

  11. Nanoscale adhesive forces between silica surfaces in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Paula; Saavedra, Jorge H; Acuña, Sergio M; Jeldres, Ricardo; Concha, Fernando; Toledo, Pedro G

    2014-06-15

    Nanoscale adhesive forces between a colloidal silica probe and a flat silica substrate were measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) in a range of aqueous NaCl, CaCl2, and AlCl3 solutions, with concentrations ranging from 10(-)(6) to 10(-)(2) M at pH ∼5.1. Notably, the measured force curves reveal large pull-off forces in water which increase in electrolyte solutions, with jump-off-contact occurring as a gradual detachment of the probe from the flat substrate rather than as a sharp discontinuous jump. The measured force curves also show that the number and size of the steps increase with concentration and notably with electrolyte valence. For the higher concentration and valence the steps become jumps. We propose that these nanoscale adhesive forces between mineral surfaces in aqueous solutions may arise from newly born cavities or persistent subnanometer bubbles. Formation of cavities or nanobubbles cannot be observed directly in our experiments; however, we cannot disregard them as responsible for the discontinuities in the measured force data. A simple model based on several cavities bridging the two surfaces we show that is able to capture all the features in the measured force curves. The silica surfaces used are clean but not intentionally hydroxylated, as contact angle measurements show, and as such may be responsible for the cavities.

  12. Inhibition of bacterial and leukocyte adhesion under shear stress conditions by material surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jasmine D; Ebert, Michael; Stokes, Ken; Ward, Robert; Anderson, James M

    2003-01-01

    Biomaterial-centered infections, initiated by bacterial adhesion, persist due to a compromised host immune response. Altering implant materials with surface modifying endgroups (SMEs) may enhance their biocompatibility by reducing bacterial and inflammatory cell adhesion. A rotating disc model, which generates shear stress within physiological ranges, was used to characterize adhesion of leukocytes and Staphylococcus epidermidis on polycarbonate-urethanes and polyetherurethanes modified with SMEs (polyethylene oxide, fluorocarbon and dimethylsiloxane) under dynamic flow conditions. Bacterial adhesion in the absence of serum was found to be mediated by shear stress and surface chemistry, with reduced adhesion exhibited on materials modified with polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs. In contrast, bacterial adhesion was enhanced on materials modified with fluorocarbon SMEs. In the presence of serum, bacterial adhesion was primarily neither material nor shear dependent. However, bacterial adhesion in serum was significantly reduced to < or = 10% compared to adhesion in serum-free media. Leukocyte adhesion in serum exhibited a shear dependency with increased adhesion occurring in regions exposed to lower shear-stress levels of < or = 7 dyne/cm2. Additionally, polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs reduced leukocyte adhesion on polyether-urethanes. In conclusion, these results suggest that surface chemistry and shear stress can mediate bacterial and cellular adhesion. Furthermore, materials modified with polyethylene oxide SMEs are capable of inhibiting bacterial adhesion, consequently minimizing the probability of biomaterial-centered infections.

  13. Role of Surface Roughness in Hysteresis during Adhesive Elastic Contact

    PubMed Central

    Kesari, Haneesh; Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Cai, Wei; Lew, Adrian J.

    2010-01-01

    In experiments that involve contact with adhesion between two surfaces, as found in atomic force microscopy or nanoindentation, two distinct contact force (P) vs. indentation-depth (h) curves are often measured depending on whether the indenter moves towards or away from the sample. The origin of this hysteresis is not well understood and is often attributed to moisture, plasticity or viscoelasticity. Here we report experiments that show that hysteresis can exist in the absence of these effects, and that its magnitude depends on surface roughness. We develop a theoretical model in which the hysteresis appears as the result of a series of surface instabilities, in which the contact area grows or recedes by a finite amount. The model can be used to estimate material properties from contact experiments even when the measured P-h curves are not unique. PMID:21152108

  14. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bagge, D; Hjelm, M; Johansen, C; Huber, I; Gram, L

    2001-05-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25 degrees C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 10(8) CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  15. Low Ice Adhesion on Nano-Textured Superhydrophobic Surfaces under Supersaturated Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bengaluru Subramanyam, Srinivas; Kondrashov, Vitaliy; Rühe, Jürgen; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2016-05-25

    Ice adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces can significantly increase in humid environments because of frost nucleation within the textures. Here, we studied frost formation and ice adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces with various surface morphologies using direct microscale imaging combined with macroscale adhesion tests. Whereas ice adhesion increases on microtextured surfaces, a 15-fold decrease is observed on nanotextured surfaces. This reduction is because of the inhibition of frost formation within the nanofeatures and the stabilization of vapor pockets. Such "Cassie ice"-promoting textures can be used in the design of anti-icing surfaces. PMID:27150450

  16. Decreased bacterial adhesion to surface-treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Del Curto, B; Brunella, M F; Giordano, C; Pedeferri, M P; Valtulina, V; Visai, L; Cigada, A

    2005-07-01

    Osteointegrative dental implants are widely used in implantology for their well-known excellent performance once implanted in the host. Remarkable bacterial colonization along the transgingival region may result in a progressive loss of adhesion at gum-implant interface and an increase of the bone area exposed to pathogens. This phenomenon may negatively effect the osteointegration process and cause, in the most severe cases, implant failure. The presence of bacteria at implant site affect the growth of new bone tissue and consequently, the achievement of a mechanically stable bone-implant interface, key parameters for a suitable implant osteointegration. In the present work, a novel surface treatment has been developed and optimized in order to convert the amorphous titanium oxide in a crystalline layer enriched in anatase capable of providing not only antibacterial properties but also of stimulating the precipitation of apatite when placed in simulated body fluid. The collected data have shown that the tested treatment results in a crystalline anatase-type titanium oxide layer able to provide a remarkable decrease in bacterial attachment without negatively effecting cell metabolic activity. In conclusion, the surface modification treatment analyzed in the present study might be an elegant way to reduce the risk of bacterial adhesion and increase the lifetime of the transgingival component in the osteointegrated dental implant.

  17. The Effect of Surface Chemical Functionality Upon Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Doss, Jereme; Spence, Destiny; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Knuth, Taylor; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougal, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, anti-freeze proteins present in fish utilize specific organic functionalities to disrupt ice crystal formation and propagation. Based on these structures, surfaces with controlled chemical functionality and chain length were evaluated both experimentally and computationally to assess the effect of both parameters in mitigating ice formation. Linear aliphatic dimethylethoxysilanes terminated with methyl or hydroxyl groups were prepared, characterized, and used to coat aluminum. The effect upon icing using a microdroplet freezing apparatus and the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand found hydroxyl-terminated materials exhibited a greater propensity for ice formation and adhesion. Molecular dynamics simulations of a silica substrate bearing functionalized species of similar composition were brought into contact with a pre-equilibrated ice crystal. Several parameters including chain mobility were monitored to ascertain the size of a quasi-liquid layer. The studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition.

  18. Temperature-Induced Switchable Adhesion using Nickel–Titanium–Polydimethylsiloxane Hybrid Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Frensemeier, Mareike; Kaiser, Jessica S; Frick, Carl P; Schneider, Andreas S; Arzt, Eduard; Fertig, Ray S; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    A switchable dry adhesive based on a nickel–titanium (NiTi) shape-memory alloy with an adhesive silicone rubber surface has been developed. Although several studies investigate micropatterned, bioinspired adhesive surfaces, very few focus on reversible adhesion. The system here is based on the indentation-induced two-way shape-memory effect in NiTi alloys. NiTi is trained by mechanical deformation through indentation and grinding to elicit a temperature-induced switchable topography with protrusions at high temperature and a flat surface at low temperature. The trained surfaces are coated with either a smooth or a patterned adhesive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, resulting in a temperature-induced switchable surface, used for dry adhesion. Adhesion tests show that the temperature-induced topographical change of the NiTi influences the adhesive performance of the hybrid system. For samples with a smooth PDMS layer the transition from flat to structured state reduces adhesion by 56%, and for samples with a micropatterned PDMS layer adhesion is switchable by nearly 100%. Both hybrid systems reveal strong reversibility related to the NiTi martensitic phase transformation, allowing repeated switching between an adhesive and a nonadhesive state. These effects have been discussed in terms of reversible changes in contact area and varying tilt angles of the pillars with respect to the substrate surface. PMID:26120295

  19. Sessile droplet freezing and ice adhesion on aluminum with different surface wettability and surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, JunFei; Shi, QingWen; Wang, ZhiLe; Wang, FaJun; Xue, MingShan; Li, Wen; Yan, GuiLong

    2015-07-01

    This paper focused on the sessile droplet freezing and ice adhesion on aluminum with different wettability (hydrophilic, common hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces, coded as HIS, CHS, SHS, respectively) over a surface temperature range of -9°C to -19°C. It was found that SHS could retard the sessile droplet freezing and lower the ice adhesion probably due to the interfacial air pockets (IAPs) on water/SHS interface. However, as surface temperature decreasing, some IAPs were squeezed out and such freezing retarding and adhesion lowering effect for SHS was reduced greatly. For a surface temperature of -19°C, ice adhesion on SHS was even greater than that on CHS. To discover the reason for the squeezing out of IAPs, forces applied to the suspended water on IAPs were analyzed and it was found that the stability of IAPs was associated with surface micro-structures and surface temperature. These findings might be helpful to designing of SHS with good anti-icing properties.

  20. Self-Cleaning Synthetic Adhesive Surfaces Mimicking Tokay Geckos.

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, Eric D.; Singh, Seema; Burckel, David Bruce; Fan, Hongyou; Houston, Jack E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Johnson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    A gecko's extraordinary ability to suspend itself from walls and ceilings of varied surface roughness has interested humans for hundreds of years. Many theories and possible explanations describing this phenomenon have been proposed including sticky secretions, microsuckers, and electrostatic forces; however, today it is widely accepted that van der Waals forces play the most important role in this type of dry adhesion. Inarguably, the vital feature that allows a gecko's suspension is the presence of billions 3 of tiny hairs on the pad of its foot called spatula. These features are small enough to reach within van der Waals distances of any surface (spatula radius %7E100 nm); thus, the combined effect of billions of van der Waals interactions is more than sufficient to hold a gecko's weight to surfaces such as smooth ceilings or wet glass. Two lithographic approaches were used to make hierarchal structures with dimensions similar to the gecko foot dimensions noted above. One approach combined photo-lithography with soft lithography (micro-molding). In this fabrication scheme the fiber feature size, defined by the alumina micromold was 0.2 um in diameter and 60 um in height. The second approach followed more conventional photolithography-based patterning. Patterned features with dimensions %7E0.3 mm in diameter by 0.5 mm tall were produced. We used interfacial force microscopy employing a parabolic diamond tip with a diameter of 200 nm to measure the surface adhesion of these structures. The measured adhesive forces ranged from 0.3 uN - 0.6 uN, yielding an average bonding stress between 50 N/cm2 to 100 N/cm2. By comparison the reported literature value for the average stress of a Tokay gecko foot is 10 N/cm2. Acknowledgements This work was funded by Sandia National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research & Development program (LDRD). All coating processes were conducted in the cleanroom facility located at the University of New Mexico's Center for High Technology

  1. Bonding Analysis of Amino Resin Wood Adhesive with Pesticide Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Rajin, Mariani; Siambun, Nancy Julius

    Wood base industries are among the dominant players in Malaysia economic activities. In this research, by using Response Surface Method (RSM), studies of bonding between Disodium Tetraborate Decahydrate (DTD) pesticide and various formulation of wood adhesive i.e., Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF) resin is carried out. The RSM formulated twenty-five MUF formulations, consisting combination of different amount of formaldehyde, melamine, urea added in stage-1 and stage-2 of resin synthesis and DTD pesticide. The liquid products of resin are then hardened and tested using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red (FTIR) and visible spectrophotometer (VIS), to analyse the bonding of the resin and pesticide. The data from the FTIR and VIS analysis were then compiled and analysed using Response Surface Method. The results show that, different amount of the formaldehyde, melamine, urea and DTD pesticide, gives specific impact to the strength of MUF resin-pesticide bonding.

  2. Segmental dynamics simulation of the deformation for polymer adhesive between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Adams, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    The deformation of polymer adhesives between surfaces is investigated using the authors Segmental Dynamics Model. A simple tensile test is simulated by placing an equilibrated polymer adhesive film between two surfaces. The equilibrium structure and dynamics of the adhesive deformation are investigated. The density of anchor segments ({rho}) and the bond strength of the anchor segment to the surface ({phi}) were varied to determine the effects on deformation.

  3. The Measurement of Surface Rheological and Surface Adhesive Properties using Nanosphere Embedment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Stephen; McKenna, Gregory

    2008-03-01

    In previous work, we determined the actual rheological behavior at the surface of a polystyrene film with nanometer scale resolution by applying a viscoelastic contact mechanics model to experimental data in the literature. The goal of our current research is to build upon this analysis and use nanosphere embedment experiments to probe the nanorheological behavior of polymer surfaces near the glass transition, in the melt state and in the solid rubbery state. An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to measure the embedment depth as nanoparticles are pulled into the surface by the thermodynamic work of adhesion. The results show that, with properly designed experiments, both the surface adhesion properties and the surface rheological properties can be extracted from nanosphere embedment rates. We include work on a phase separated copolymer and a commercially available polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber.

  4. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking.

    PubMed

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-05-15

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 s lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sensitivity to substrate topography, outcome of interaction, and initial kinetics of contact extension. PMID:18234815

  5. Dynamics of spider glue adhesion: effect of surface energy and contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chen, Yizhou; Blackledge, Todd; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Spider glue is a unique biological adhesive which is humidity responsive such that the adhesion continues to increase upto 100% relative humidity (RH) for some species. This is unlike synthetic adhesives that significantly drop in adhesion with an increase in humidity. However, most of adhesion data reported in literature have used clean hydrophilic glass substrate, unlike the hydrophobic, and charged insect cuticle surface that adheres to spider glue in nature. Previously, we have reported that the spider glue viscosity changes over five orders of magnitude with humidity. Here, we vary the surface energy and surface charge of the substrate to test the change in Larnioides cornutus spider glue adhesion with humidity. We find that an increase in both surface energy and surface charge density increases the droplet spreading and there exists an optimum droplet contact area where adhesion is maximized. Moreover, spider glue droplets act as reusable adhesive for low energy hydrophobic surface at the optimum humidity. These results explain why certain prey are caught more efficiently by spiders in their habitat. The mechanism by which spider species tune its glue adhesion for local prey capture can inspire new generation smart adhesives.

  6. Controlling solid lipid nanoparticle adhesion by polyelectrolyte multilayer surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Finke, Jan Henrik; Schmolke, Hannah; Klages, C-P; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the tunability of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) toward adsorption of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In SLN production for pharmaceutical applications, repellence from production equipment is desired while targeted adsorption is necessary for the functionalization of surfaces. SLN containing triglyceride/phospholipid or wax matrices were exposed to different PEM (consisting of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly(acrylic acid)). PEM varied regarding layer architecture and surface properties by means of deposition pH, top layer variation, PEGylation with poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer, and thermal crosslinking. FTIR-ATR and SEM revealed SLN adhesion depending on PEM composition. Particle adsorption was tunable toward attraction as well as repellence: PEGylated PEM displayed lowest adsorption while PEM capped with PAH provided the strongest attraction of particles. Examinations at elevated temperatures resembled production conditions of SLN where these are processed as emulsions. Crystalline triglyceride SLN displayed high anisometry and, consequently, a large specific surface area. These platelets were more adherend than spherical droplets from the same formulation as an emulsion. Wax-based nanoparticles showed spherical shape, both in crystalline and molten state. However, adsorption was fostered as the fluidity of the disperse phase increased upon melting. Additionally, coalescence of adsorbed droplets took place, further increasing adsorption. PMID:23591009

  7. Controlling solid lipid nanoparticle adhesion by polyelectrolyte multilayer surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Finke, Jan Henrik; Schmolke, Hannah; Klages, C-P; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the tunability of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) toward adsorption of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In SLN production for pharmaceutical applications, repellence from production equipment is desired while targeted adsorption is necessary for the functionalization of surfaces. SLN containing triglyceride/phospholipid or wax matrices were exposed to different PEM (consisting of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly(acrylic acid)). PEM varied regarding layer architecture and surface properties by means of deposition pH, top layer variation, PEGylation with poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer, and thermal crosslinking. FTIR-ATR and SEM revealed SLN adhesion depending on PEM composition. Particle adsorption was tunable toward attraction as well as repellence: PEGylated PEM displayed lowest adsorption while PEM capped with PAH provided the strongest attraction of particles. Examinations at elevated temperatures resembled production conditions of SLN where these are processed as emulsions. Crystalline triglyceride SLN displayed high anisometry and, consequently, a large specific surface area. These platelets were more adherend than spherical droplets from the same formulation as an emulsion. Wax-based nanoparticles showed spherical shape, both in crystalline and molten state. However, adsorption was fostered as the fluidity of the disperse phase increased upon melting. Additionally, coalescence of adsorbed droplets took place, further increasing adsorption.

  8. Imaging Active Surface Processes in Barnacle Adhesive Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Burden, Daniel K; Fears, Kenan P; Barlow, Daniel E; So, Christopher R; Burns, Justin; Miltenberg, Benjamin; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittshof, Daniel; Spillmann, Christopher M; Wahl, Kathryn J; Tender, Leonard M

    2016-01-19

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) and voltammetry were used simultaneously to monitor Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite barnacles reattached and grown on gold-coated glass slides in artificial seawater. Upon reattachment, SPRI revealed rapid surface adsorption of material with a higher refractive index than seawater at the barnacle/gold interface. Over longer time periods, SPRI also revealed secretory activity around the perimeter of the barnacle along the seawater/gold interface extending many millimeters beyond the barnacle and varying in shape and region with time. Ex situ experiments using attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed that reattachment of barnacles was accompanied by adsorption of protein to surfaces on similar time scales as those in the SPRI experiments. Barnacles were grown through multiple molting cycles. While the initial reattachment region remained largely unchanged, SPRI revealed the formation of sets of paired concentric rings having alternately darker/lighter appearance (corresponding to lower and higher refractive indices, respectively) at the barnacle/gold interface beneath the region of new growth. Ex situ experiments coupling the SPRI imaging with optical and FTIR microscopy revealed that the paired rings coincide with molt cycles, with the brighter rings associated with regions enriched in amide moieties. The brighter rings were located just beyond orifices of cement ducts, consistent with delivery of amide-rich chemistry from the ducts. The darker rings were associated with newly expanded cuticle. In situ voltammetry using the SPRI gold substrate as the working electrode revealed presence of redox active compounds (oxidation potential approx 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl) after barnacles were reattached on surfaces. Redox activity persisted during the reattachment period. The results reveal surface adsorption processes coupled to the complex secretory and chemical activity under barnacles as they construct

  9. Imaging Active Surface Processes in Barnacle Adhesive Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Burden, Daniel K; Fears, Kenan P; Barlow, Daniel E; So, Christopher R; Burns, Justin; Miltenberg, Benjamin; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittshof, Daniel; Spillmann, Christopher M; Wahl, Kathryn J; Tender, Leonard M

    2016-01-19

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) and voltammetry were used simultaneously to monitor Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite barnacles reattached and grown on gold-coated glass slides in artificial seawater. Upon reattachment, SPRI revealed rapid surface adsorption of material with a higher refractive index than seawater at the barnacle/gold interface. Over longer time periods, SPRI also revealed secretory activity around the perimeter of the barnacle along the seawater/gold interface extending many millimeters beyond the barnacle and varying in shape and region with time. Ex situ experiments using attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed that reattachment of barnacles was accompanied by adsorption of protein to surfaces on similar time scales as those in the SPRI experiments. Barnacles were grown through multiple molting cycles. While the initial reattachment region remained largely unchanged, SPRI revealed the formation of sets of paired concentric rings having alternately darker/lighter appearance (corresponding to lower and higher refractive indices, respectively) at the barnacle/gold interface beneath the region of new growth. Ex situ experiments coupling the SPRI imaging with optical and FTIR microscopy revealed that the paired rings coincide with molt cycles, with the brighter rings associated with regions enriched in amide moieties. The brighter rings were located just beyond orifices of cement ducts, consistent with delivery of amide-rich chemistry from the ducts. The darker rings were associated with newly expanded cuticle. In situ voltammetry using the SPRI gold substrate as the working electrode revealed presence of redox active compounds (oxidation potential approx 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl) after barnacles were reattached on surfaces. Redox activity persisted during the reattachment period. The results reveal surface adsorption processes coupled to the complex secretory and chemical activity under barnacles as they construct

  10. Reducing Ice Adhesion on Nonsmooth Metallic Surfaces: Wettability and Topography Effects.

    PubMed

    Ling, Edwin Jee Yang; Uong, Victor; Renault-Crispo, Jean-Sébastien; Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Servio, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    The effects of ice formation and accretion on external surfaces range from being mildly annoying to potentially life-threatening. Ice-shedding materials, which lower the adhesion strength of ice to its surface, have recently received renewed research attention as a means to circumvent the problem of icing. In this work, we investigate how surface wettability and surface topography influence the ice adhesion strength on three different surfaces: (i) superhydrophobic laser-inscribed square pillars on copper, (ii) stainless steel 316 Dutch-weave meshes, and (iii) multiwalled carbon nanotube-covered steel meshes. The finest stainless steel mesh displayed the best performance with a 93% decrease in ice adhesion relative to polished stainless steel, while the superhydrophobic square pillars exhibited an increase in ice adhesion by up to 67% relative to polished copper. Comparisons of dynamic contact angles revealed little correlation between surface wettability and ice adhesion. On the other hand, by considering the ice formation process and the fracture mechanics at the ice-substrate interface, we found that two competing mechanisms governing ice adhesion strength arise on nonplanar surfaces: (i) mechanical interlocking of the ice within the surface features that enhances adhesion, and (ii) formation of microcracks that act as interfacial stress concentrators, which reduce adhesion. Our analysis provides insight toward new approaches for the design of ice-releasing materials through the use of surface topographies that promote interfacial crack propagation. PMID:26953827

  11. Adhesion of smooth and rough phenotypes of Flavobacterium psychrophilum to polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Högfors-Rönnholm, E; Norrgård, J; Wiklund, T

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic smooth cells of the fish pathogenic bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum have previously been reported to be more adhesive to polystyrene surfaces than corresponding rough cells. In this study, the adhesion ability of smooth and rough cells of F. psychrophilum to polystyrene surfaces was investigated in detail with a crystal violet staining method. By treating both polystyrene surfaces with fish mucus and carbohydrates and the bacterial cells with carbohydrates, the involvement of lectins in the adhesion process was investigated. Smooth cells showed significantly higher adhesion ability to untreated polystyrene surfaces compared with corresponding rough cells and increasing water hardness had an inhibitory effect on the adhesion. Treatment of polystyrene surfaces with D-glucose, D-galactose and fish mucus increased the adhesion ability of smooth cells to polystyrene. Furthermore, treatment of the smooth cells with D-glucose, D-galactose and sialic acid decreased the adhesion ability of the cells, indicating that the adhesion is likely mediated by complementary lectins on the surface of the cells. Sodium (meta)periodate treatment of smooth cells also decreased the adhesion ability to polystyrene, suggesting that the lectins, such as the dominating sialic acid-binding lectin, are probably localized in the extracellular polysaccharides surrounding the cells. PMID:24716830

  12. Friction and adhesion of gecko-inspired PDMS flaps on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Chary, Sathya; Das, Saurabh; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-08-01

    Geckos have developed a unique hierarchical structure to maintain climbing ability on surfaces with different roughness, one of the extremely important parameters that affect the friction and adhesion forces between two surfaces. Although much attention has been paid on fabricating various structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of a gecko foot, yet no systematic effort, in experiment or theory, has been made to quantify the effect of surface roughness on the performance of the fabricated structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of geckos. Using a modified surface forces apparatus (SFA), we measured the adhesion and friction forces between microfabricated tilted PDMS flaps and optically smooth SiO(2) and rough SiO(2) surfaces created by plasma etching. Anisotropic adhesion and friction forces were measured when sliding the top glass surface along (+y) and against (-y) the tilted direction of the flaps. Increasing the surface roughness first increased the adhesion and friction forces measured between the flaps and the rough surface due to topological matching of the two surfaces but then led to a rapid decrease in both of these forces. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness significantly affects the performance of gecko mimetic adhesives and that different surface textures can either increase or decrease the adhesion and friction forces of the fabricated adhesives.

  13. Synthesis of Mesoporous Supraparticles on Superamphiphobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wooh, Sanghyuk; Huesmann, Hannah; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Paven, Maxime; Wichmann, Kristina; Vollmer, Doris; Tremel, Wolfgang; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    A method for mesoporous supraparticle synthesis on superamphiphobic surfaces is designed. Therefore, supraparticles assembled with nanoparticles are synthesized by the evaporation of nanoparticle dispersion drops on the superamphiphobic surface. For synthesis, no further purification is required and no organic solvents are wasted. Moreover, by changing the conditions such as drop size and concentration, supraparticles of different sizes, compositions, and architectures are fabricated.

  14. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H.; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-01-01

    Translating sticky biological molecules—such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)—into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue’s molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces. PMID:27036002

  15. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces.

  16. Frictional adhesion of patterned surfaces and implications for gecko and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Pesika, Noshir; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Boxin; Chen, Yunfei; Tirrell, Matthew; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2009-07-01

    Geckos and smaller animals such as flies, beetles, and spiders have extraordinary climbing abilities: They can firmly attach and rapidly detach from almost any kind of surface. In the case of geckos, this ability is attributed to the surface topography of their attachment pads, which are covered with fine columnar structures (setae). Inspired by this biological system, various kinds of regularly structured or "patterned" surfaces are being fabricated for use as responsive adhesives or in robotic systems. In this study, we theoretically analyze the correlated adhesion and friction (frictional adhesion) of patterned surfaces against smooth (unstructured) surfaces by applying well-established theories of van der Waals forces, together with the classic Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory of contact (or adhesion) mechanics, to recent theories of adhesion-controlled friction. Our results, when considered with recent experiments, suggest criteria for simultaneously optimizing the adhesion and friction of patterned surfaces. We show that both the van der Waals adhesion and the friction forces of flexible, tilted, and optimally spaced setal stalks or (synthetic) pillars are high enough to support not only a large gecko on rough surfaces of ceilings (adhesion) and walls (friction) but also a human being if the foot or toe pads-effectively the area of the hands-have a total area estimated at approximately 230 cm2.

  17. The role of surface chemistry in adhesion and wetting of gecko toe pads.

    PubMed

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y; Paoloni, Eva L; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-17

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  18. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    PubMed Central

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70–90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties. PMID:25323067

  19. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  20. Bridging Adhesion of Mussel-Inspired Peptides: Role of Charge, Chain Length, and Surface Type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of marine mussels provide attractive design paradigms for engineering synthetic polymers that can serve as high performance wet adhesives and coatings. Although the role of Dopa in promoting adhesion between mussels and various substrates has been carefully studied, the context by which Dopa mediates a bridging or nonbridging macromolecular adhesion to surfaces is not understood. The distinction is an important one both for a mechanistic appreciation of bioadhesion and for an intelligent translation of bioadhesive concepts to engineered systems. On the basis of mussel foot protein-5 (Mfp-5; length 75 res), we designed three short, simplified peptides (15–17 res) and one relatively long peptide (30 res) into which Dopa was enzymatically incorporated. Peptide adhesion was tested using a surface forces apparatus. Our results show that the short peptides are capable of weak bridging adhesion between two mica surfaces, but this adhesion contrasts with that of full length Mfp-5, in that (1) while still dependent on Dopa, electrostatic contributions are much more prominent, and (2) whereas Dopa surface density remains similar in both, peptide adhesion is an order of magnitude weaker (adhesion energy Ead ∼ −0.5 mJ/m2) than full length Mfp-5 adhesion. Between two mica surfaces, the magnitude of bridging adhesion was approximately doubled (Ead ∼ −1 mJ/m2) upon doubling the peptide length. Notably, the short peptides mediate much stronger adhesion (Ead ∼ −3.0 mJ/m2) between mica and gold surfaces, indicating that a long chain length is less important when different interactions are involved on each of the two surfaces. PMID:25540823

  1. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Properties of Clean Surfaces: Adhesion, Friction, and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of smooth, atomically clean surfaces of solid-solid couples, such as metal-ceramic couples, in a clean environment. Surface and bulk properties, which determine the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of solid-solid couples, are described. The primary emphasis is on the nature and character of the metal, especially its surface energy and ductility. Also, the mechanisms of friction and wear for clean, smooth surfaces are stated.

  2. Quorum-Sensing Regulation of Adhesion in Serratia marcescens MG1 Is Surface Dependent▿

    PubMed Central

    Labbate, Maurizio; Zhu, Hua; Thung, Leena; Bandara, Rani; Larsen, Martin R.; Willcox, Mark D. P.; Givskov, Michael; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen and a major cause of ocular infections. In previous studies of S. marcescens MG1, we showed that biofilm maturation and sloughing were regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). Because of the importance of adhesion in initiating biofilm formation and infection, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether QS is important in adhesion to both abiotic and biotic surfaces, as assessed by determining the degree of attachment to hydrophilic tissue culture plates and human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Our results demonstrate that while adhesion to the abiotic surface was AHL regulated, adhesion to the HCE cell biotic surface was not. Type I fimbriae were identified as the critical adhesin for non-QS-mediated attachment to the biotic HCE cell surface but played no role in adhesion to the abiotic surface. While we were not able to identify a single QS-regulated adhesin essential for attachment to the abiotic surface, four AHL-regulated genes involved in adhesion to the abiotic surface were identified. Interestingly, two of these genes, bsmA and bsmB, were also shown to be involved in adhesion to the biotic surface in a non-QS-controlled fashion. Therefore, the expression of these two genes appears to be cocontrolled by regulators other than the QS system for mediation of attachment to HCE cells. We also found that QS in S. marcescens regulates other potential cell surface adhesins, including exopolysaccharide and the outer membrane protein OmpX. We concluded that S. marcescens MG1 utilizes different regulatory systems and adhesins in attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces and that QS is a main regulatory pathway in adhesion to an abiotic surface but not in adhesion to a biotic surface. PMID:17237163

  3. Quorum-sensing regulation of adhesion in Serratia marcescens MG1 is surface dependent.

    PubMed

    Labbate, Maurizio; Zhu, Hua; Thung, Leena; Bandara, Rani; Larsen, Martin R; Willcox, Mark D P; Givskov, Michael; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2007-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen and a major cause of ocular infections. In previous studies of S. marcescens MG1, we showed that biofilm maturation and sloughing were regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). Because of the importance of adhesion in initiating biofilm formation and infection, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether QS is important in adhesion to both abiotic and biotic surfaces, as assessed by determining the degree of attachment to hydrophilic tissue culture plates and human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Our results demonstrate that while adhesion to the abiotic surface was AHL regulated, adhesion to the HCE cell biotic surface was not. Type I fimbriae were identified as the critical adhesin for non-QS-mediated attachment to the biotic HCE cell surface but played no role in adhesion to the abiotic surface. While we were not able to identify a single QS-regulated adhesin essential for attachment to the abiotic surface, four AHL-regulated genes involved in adhesion to the abiotic surface were identified. Interestingly, two of these genes, bsmA and bsmB, were also shown to be involved in adhesion to the biotic surface in a non-QS-controlled fashion. Therefore, the expression of these two genes appears to be cocontrolled by regulators other than the QS system for mediation of attachment to HCE cells. We also found that QS in S. marcescens regulates other potential cell surface adhesins, including exopolysaccharide and the outer membrane protein OmpX. We concluded that S. marcescens MG1 utilizes different regulatory systems and adhesins in attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces and that QS is a main regulatory pathway in adhesion to an abiotic surface but not in adhesion to a biotic surface.

  4. Adhesive Force of a Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae, to a Flat Smooth Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Katsumi; Egashira, Kai; Toukai, Tadashi; Ogushi, Jun

    The adhesion of a spider mite to a surface of a flat smooth plate is investigated as a model for micromachine parts to adhere to and move on such surfaces. The measurement of adhesive force is carried out under various conditions in which plate material, surface roughness of a plate and environmental humidity are differed. The adhesion mechanism is also discussed. Of the forces acting between a spider mite and a surface, one from dispersion interaction is the most dominant because (1) there is a high correlation between the adhesive force and the dispersion force component of surface energy with adhesive forces of 8.2µN for glass, 9.7µN for mica, 9.9µN for silicon and 12.1µN for gold, and because (2) high humidity and high surface roughness reduce the adhesive force. For strong adhesion based on work of adhesion, spider mites have tenent hairs with a bell-shaped end.

  5. Effects of contact cap dimension on dry adhesion of bioinspired mushroom-shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Dry adhesion observed in small creatures, such as spiders, insects, and geckos, has many great advantages such as repeatability and strong adhesiveness. In order to mimic these unique performances, fibrillar surface with a mushroom shaped end has drawn lots of attentions because of its advantage in efficiently enhancing adhesion compared with other sphere or simple flat ends. Here, in order to study the effects of contact cap dimension on adhesion strength, patterned surfaces of mushroom-shaped micropillars with differing cap diameters are fabricated based on the conventional photolithography and molding. The normal adhesion strength of these dry adhesives with varying cap diameters is measured with home-built equipment. The strength increases with the rise of cap diameter, and interestingly it becomes strongest when the mushroom caps join together.

  6. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  7. Adhesion of DOPA-Functionalized Model Membranes to Hard and Soft Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guvendiren, Murat; Brass, David A; Messersmith, Phillip B; Shull, Kenneth R

    2009-01-01

    The adhesive proteins secreted by marine mussels form a natural glue that cures rapidly to form strong and durable bonds in aqueous environments. These mussel adhesive proteins contain an unusual amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA), which is largely responsible for their cohesive and adhesive strengths. In this study, we incorporated DOPA into diblock and triblock polymers and developed a membrane contact experiment to assess the adhesive interactions of these materials with TiO(2) and tissue surfaces. In a typical experiment a micrometer-thick DOPA-functionalized elastomeric membrane is attached to the end of a cylindrical glass tube. Application of a positive pressure to the tube brings the membrane into contact with the surface of interest. The negative pressure needed to separate the membrane from the substrate is a measure of the strength of the adhesive interaction. The test confirms previous results obtained with TiO(2) substrates. Because the membrane geometry is well suited for rough or chemically heterogeneous surfaces, it is ideal for studies of tissue adhesion. DOPA was found to give strong adhesion to tissue surfaces, with the strongest adhesion obtained when the DOPA groups were oxidized while in contact with the tissue surface. PMID:21461121

  8. Surface wettability and platelet adhesion studies on Langmuir Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuh-Lang; Chen, Chi-Yun

    2003-02-01

    Because Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) deposition technique is known to be capable of preparing highly ordered monomolecular films with densely packed structure, LB technique is used to prepare films of DPPC, DMPC, cholesterol, octadecylamine (ODA), and stearic acid, with thickness of one molecular layer. The film surfaces were characterized by dynamic contact angle measurement and the interaction between blood and these materials were investigated. The properties of LB films were also compared with the results obtained on continuous films prepared by solution dipping. The results show that the contact angles of water on LB films of the five compounds decreases as the following order: ODA> DMPC≈ DPPC> stearic acid > cholesterol. The hydrophobic property reflects the highest organization of ODA molecules on the substrate, which is related to its interaction between the molecule and substrate. The advancing contact angle of ODA is equivalent to that of a methyl-terminated SAM, but its receding contact angle is smaller which implies the exposing of hydrophilic pole or glass substrate on LB film. The irregular orientation of molecules on LB film increases with decreasing of contact angle and is especially significant on LB film of cholesterol which has highest hydrophilic property. The plate adhesion experiments on the continuous films show that the hemocompatibility of the five materials decreases as the order: DPPC≈ DMPC> ODA> cholesterol> stearic acid ≈ glass. This result implies that the lipid has highest blood compatibility, and then -NH 2, and then -OH functionality. On the contrary, the glass surface, -COOH and -CH 3 functionalities have high reactivity to platelet. Due to the possibility of glass exposure on LB films, as estimated from the surface wettability, the LB films have higher platelet reactivity, especially for the cholesterol, compared with the continuous films. Because the interaction of the LB film to the substrate is physical force, the deposited

  9. Surface free energy predominates in cell adhesion to hydroxyapatite through wettability.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Miho; Hori, Naoko; Ando, Hiroshi; Namba, Saki; Toyama, Takeshi; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2016-05-01

    The initial adhesion of cells to biomaterials is critical in the regulation of subsequent cell behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate a mechanism through which the surface wettability of biomaterials can be improved and determine the effects of biomaterial surface characteristics on cellular behaviors. We investigated the surface characteristics of various types of hydroxyapatite after sintering in different atmospheres and examined the effects of various surface characteristics on cell adhesion to study cell-biomaterial interactions. Sintering atmosphere affects the polarization capacity of hydroxyapatite by changing hydroxide ion content and grain size. Compared with hydroxyapatite sintered in air, hydroxyapatite sintered in saturated water vapor had a higher polarization capacity that increased surface free energy and improved wettability, which in turn accelerated cell adhesion. We determined the optimal conditions of hydroxyapatite polarization for the improvement of surface wettability and acceleration of cell adhesion.

  10. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  11. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  12. Surface roughness mediated adhesion forces between borosilicate glass and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Emily; Perni, Stefano; Nipiĉ, Damijan; Bohinc, Klemen; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-08-12

    It is well-known that a number of surface characteristics affect the extent of adhesion between two adjacent materials. One of such parameters is the surface roughness as surface asperities at the nanoscale level govern the overall adhesive forces. For example, the extent of bacterial adhesion is determined by the surface topography; also, once a bacteria colonizes a surface, proliferation of that species will take place and a biofilm may form, increasing the resistance of bacterial cells to removal. In this study, borosilicate glass was employed with varying surface roughness and coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to replicate the protein layer that covers orthopedic devices on implantation. As roughness is a scale-dependent process, relevant scan areas were analyzed using atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine Ra; furthermore, appropriate bacterial species were attached to the tip to measure the adhesion forces between cells and substrates. The bacterial species chosen (Staphylococci and Streptococci) are common pathogens associated with a number of implant related infections that are detrimental to the biomedical devices and patients. Correlation between adhesion forces and surface roughness (Ra) was generally better when the surface roughness was measured through scanned areas with size (2 × 2 μm) comparable to bacteria cells. Furthermore, the BSA coating altered the surface roughness without correlation with the initial values of such parameter; therefore, better correlations were found between adhesion forces and BSA-coated surfaces when actual surface roughness was used instead of the initial (nominal) values. It was also found that BSA induced a more hydrophilic and electron donor characteristic to the surfaces; in agreement with increasing adhesion forces of hydrophilic bacteria (as determined through microbial adhesion to solvents test) on BSA-coated substrates.

  13. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to establish design allowables data for the following room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber based adhesives: (1) General Electric's RTV-560; (2) Dow Corning's 93-046; and (3) Martin Marietta's SLA-561. These adhesives are being evaluated for attaching reusable surface insulation to space shuttle structure.

  14. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; List, Martina S.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesively bonded structures are potentially lighter in weight than mechanically fastened ones, but existing surface treatments are often considered unreliable. Two main problems in achieving reproducible and durable adhesive bonds are surface contamination and variability in standard surface preparation techniques. In this work three surface pretreatments were compared: laser etching with and without grit blasting and conventional Pasa-Jell treatment. Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry, optical microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Laser -etching was found to produce clean surfaces with precisely controlled surface topographies and PETI-5 lap shear strengths and durabilities were equivalent to those produced with Pasa-Jell.

  15. Adhesion of metals to a clean iron surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of adhesion experiments conducted with various metals contacting a clean iron surface. The metals included gold, silver, nickel, platinum, lead, tantalum, aluminum, and cobalt. Some of the metals were examined with oxygen present on their surface as well as in the clean state. The results indicate that, with the various metals contacting iron, the cohesively weaker will adhere and transfer to the cohesively stronger. The chemical activity of the metal also influenced the adhesive forces measured. With oxygen present on the metal surface, the adhesive forces measured could be correlated with the binding energy of the metal to oxygen.

  16. The Effect of Fluid Shear Stress on Endothelial Cell Adhesiveness to Polymer Surfaces with Wettability Gradient.

    PubMed

    Lee; Lee; Khang; Lee

    2000-10-01

    In this study, the adhesive strength of endothelial cells (ECs) attached on polymer surfaces with different hydrophilicity was investigated using wettability gradient polyethylene (PE) surfaces prepared by corona discharge treatment from a knife-type electrode whose power increases gradually along the sample length. The EC-attached wettability gradient surfaces were mounted on parallel-plate flow chambers in a flow system prepared for cell adhesiveness test. Three different shear stresses (150, 200, and 250 dyne/cm(2)) were applied to the flow chambers and each shear stress was maintained for 120 min to investigate the effect of shear stress and surface hydrophilicity on the EC adhesion strength. It was observed that the ECs were adhered more onto the positions with moderate hydrophilicity of the wettability gradient surface than onto the more hydrophobic or hydrophilic positions. The maximum adhesion of the cells appeared at around water contact angles of 55 degrees. The EC adhesion strength was higher on the hydrophilic positions than on the hydrophobic ones. However, the maximum adhesion strength of the cells also appeared at around water contact angles of 55 degrees. More than 90% of the adhered cells remained on that position after applying the shear stress, 250 dyne/cm(2) for 2 h, whereas the cells were completely detached on the hydrophobic position (water contact angle, about 86 degrees ) within 10 min after applying the same shear stress. It seems that surface hydrophilicity plays a very important role for cell adhesion strength. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells: dependence on adhesion surface--cell surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth of C 1300 neuroblastoma cells, which were dispersed from adherent cultures or grown in suspension, was studied on different protein-coated surfaces. Of 29 different surface structures studied, including surfaces treated with various fibronectins, lectins, glycosidases, or glycosyltransferases capable of stimulating fibroblast spreading, only the surfaces coated with plasma fibronectin or with a protein mixture secreted by C6 glioma cells displayed an extensive activity in the sprouting assay. Neurite outgrowth was inhibited by brain gangliosides and by colominic acid (a sialic acid polymer). A 50% inhibition of neurite outgrowth of N18 neuroblasts induced by the glioma cell proteins was observed at the following approximate concentration: 100 microM (0.2 mg/ml) GD1A ganglioside, 20 microM (0.04 mg/ml) GT1B ganglioside, and 5 mg/ml colominic acid. Specificity of inhibition was suggested by the finding that a few polyanionic substances tested were not inhibitory in the sprouting assay, and that the type of gangliosides inhibiting sprouting were found to be major sialoglycolipids of the neuroblasts. A hypothesis is discussed, according to which neurite outgrowth of neuroblasts is stimulated by adhesion involving interactions of the adhesion-mediating protein with cell surface carbohydrates characteristic of brain gangliosides. PMID:6699078

  18. Chemical force microscopy study of adhesive properties of polypropylene films: influence of surface polarity and medium.

    PubMed

    Gourianova, Svetlana; Willenbacher, Norbert; Kutschera, Michael

    2005-06-01

    The adhesive properties of untreated and corona treated polypropylene (PP) films were studied in polar (water) and nonpolar (hexadecane) liquid medium by using chemical force microscopy. A gold-coated colloidal probe was sequentially modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of omega-functionalized alkanethiols. The same colloidal probe was used for the force measurements, to avoid influence of determination accuracy of the spring constant and sphere radius on the obtained results. The thermodynamic work of adhesion was determined from the measured pull-off force using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) adhesion theory. Rabinovich's model was applied for the consideration of an effect of roughness when calculating the work of adhesion. It was found that the work of adhesion correlates with the hydrophilic properties of the PP surface and SAMs as well as with the polarity of the liquid medium. The observed correlations agree well with those found for the work of adhesion calculated from contact angle measurement.

  19. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  20. Surface characterization and adhesion of oxygen plasma-modified LARC-TPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    LARC-TPI, an aromatic thermoplastic polyimide, was exposed to an oxygen plasma as a surface pretreatment for adhesive bonding. Chemical and physical changes which occurred in the polyimide surface as a result of the plasma treatment were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS), contact-angle analysis, ellipsometry, and high resolution SEM. A 180-deg peel test with an acrylate-based pressure sensitive adhesive as a flexible adherent was utilized to study the interactions of the plasma-treated polyimide surface with other polymeric materials. The surface characterization and adhesion testing results showed that the oxygen plasma treatment, while creating a more hydrophilic, polar surface, also caused chain scission, resulting in the formation of a weak boundary layer which inhibited adhesion.

  1. Enhancement and suppression effects of a nanopatterned surface on bacterial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantitative thermodynamic model to elucidate the effects of a nanopatterned surface on bacterial adhesion. Based on the established model, we studied the equilibrium state of rodlike bacterial cells adhered to a nanopillar-patterned surface. Theoretical analyses showed the physical origin of bacterial adhesion on a nanopatterned surface is actually determined by the balance between adhesion energy and deformation energy of the cell membrane. We found that there are enhancement effects on bacterial adhesion to the patterned surface with large radius and small spacing of nanopillars, but suppression effects for nanopillars with a radius smaller than a critical value. In addition, according to our model, a phase diagram has been constructed which can clarify the interrelated effects of the radius and the spacing of nanopillars. The broad agreement with experimental observations implies that these studies would provide useful guidance to the design of nanopatterned surfaces for biomedical applications.

  2. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns.

  3. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. PMID:26302067

  4. Atmospheric Ice Adhesion on Water-Repellent Coatings: Wetting and Surface Topology Effects.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Yong Han; Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Sokhey, Jack; Lambourne, Alexis

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the potential of water-repellent surfaces such as superhydrophobic surfaces in delaying ice accretion and reducing ice adhesion. However, conflicting trends in superhydrophobic ice adhesion strength were reported by previous studies. Hence, this investigation was performed to study the ice adhesion strength of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic coatings under realistic atmospheric icing conditions, i.e., supercooled spray of 20 μm mean volume diameter (MVD) droplets in a freezing (-20 °C), thermally homogeneous environment. The ice was released in a tensile direction by underside air pressure in a Mode-1 ice fracture condition. Results showed a strong effect of water repellency (increased contact and receding angles) on ice adhesion strength for hydrophobic surfaces. However, the extreme water repellency of nanocomposite superhydrophobic surfaces did not provide further adhesion strength reductions. Rather, ice adhesion strength for superhydrophobic surfaces depended primarily on the surface topology spatial parameter of autocorrelation length (Sal), whereby surface features in close proximities associated with a higher capillary pressure were better able to resist droplet penetration. Effects from other surface height parameters (e.g., arithmetic mean roughness, kurtosis, and skewness) were secondary. PMID:26566168

  5. Properties Data for Adhesion and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum: Sapphire-Aluminum, Single-Crystal Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pohlchuck, Bobby; Whitle, Neville C.; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Adams, Jim

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and surface chemistry of single-crystal aluminum in contact with single-crystal sapphire (alumina). Pull-off force (adhesion) measurements were conducted under loads of 0. I to I mN in a vacuum of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) at room temperature. An Auger electron spectroscopy analyzer incorporated directly into an adhesion-measuring vacuum system was primarily used to define the chemical nature of the surfaces before and after adhesion measurements. The surfaces were cleaned by argon ion sputtering. With a clean aluminum-clean -sapphire couple the mean value and standard deviation of pull-off forces required to separate the surfaces were 3015 and 298 micro-N, respectively. With a contaminated aluminum-clean sapphire couple these values were 231 and 241 micro-N. The presence of a contaminant film on the aluminum surface reduced adhesion by a factor of 13. Therefore, surfaces cleanliness, particularly aluminum cleanliness, played an important role in the adhesion of the aluminum-sapphire couples. Pressures on the order of 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) maintained a clean aluminum surface for only a short time (less then 1 hr) but maintained a clean sapphire surface, once it was achieved, for a much longer time.

  6. Oleophobicity of Biomimetic Micropatterned Surface and Its Effect on the Adhesion of Frozen Oil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zihe; Zhang, Wei; Kowalski, Andrew; Zhao, Boxin

    2015-09-15

    The relationship between the oleophobicity of micropatterned surfaces and the reduction of oil adhesion at low temperatures was explored by using siloxane elastomer surfaces as a model system. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces were fabricated with varying oleophobicity from oleophilic to superoleophobic by combing the blending of trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane (FDTS) into PDMS with the construction of bioinspired micropillars. The oil contact angles of micropillars were >130°, with the largest contact angle measured to be 146°. The micropillared surface showed remarkable self-cleaning properties; the contact angle hysteresis was <15°. The transparent oil droplets on PDMS surfaces of varied oleophobicity were frozen into a white-colored solid at -25 °C with the aid of a cooling system. Adhesion forces of the frozen oil droplets were obtained from the knock-off tests, showing that the adhesion forces dropped with the increased oleophobicity. The largest adhesion force was observed on the oleophilic flat surface, while the lowest adhesion force was on the highest oleophobic micropillared surface. The relative effectiveness of chemical and physical modifications on adhesion strength reduction was studied in terms of FDTS and micropillars, respectively. The results showed that a reduction of adhesion strength by 4% was reached by blending FDTS into flat PDMS, while a much more pronounced reduction of frozen oil adhesion strength by 60% was achieved by blending FDTS into PDMS micropillars; these results suggested a possible synergic effect of the FDTS chemistry and micropillar on the reduction of adhesion strength of frozen oil droplets. PMID:26300446

  7. Oleophobicity of Biomimetic Micropatterned Surface and Its Effect on the Adhesion of Frozen Oil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zihe; Zhang, Wei; Kowalski, Andrew; Zhao, Boxin

    2015-09-15

    The relationship between the oleophobicity of micropatterned surfaces and the reduction of oil adhesion at low temperatures was explored by using siloxane elastomer surfaces as a model system. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces were fabricated with varying oleophobicity from oleophilic to superoleophobic by combing the blending of trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane (FDTS) into PDMS with the construction of bioinspired micropillars. The oil contact angles of micropillars were >130°, with the largest contact angle measured to be 146°. The micropillared surface showed remarkable self-cleaning properties; the contact angle hysteresis was <15°. The transparent oil droplets on PDMS surfaces of varied oleophobicity were frozen into a white-colored solid at -25 °C with the aid of a cooling system. Adhesion forces of the frozen oil droplets were obtained from the knock-off tests, showing that the adhesion forces dropped with the increased oleophobicity. The largest adhesion force was observed on the oleophilic flat surface, while the lowest adhesion force was on the highest oleophobic micropillared surface. The relative effectiveness of chemical and physical modifications on adhesion strength reduction was studied in terms of FDTS and micropillars, respectively. The results showed that a reduction of adhesion strength by 4% was reached by blending FDTS into flat PDMS, while a much more pronounced reduction of frozen oil adhesion strength by 60% was achieved by blending FDTS into PDMS micropillars; these results suggested a possible synergic effect of the FDTS chemistry and micropillar on the reduction of adhesion strength of frozen oil droplets.

  8. Synthesis of Cell-Adhesive Anisotropic Multifunctional Particles by Stop Flow Lithography and Streptavidin-Biotin Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bong, Ki Wan; Kim, Jae Jung; Cho, Hansang; Lim, Eugene; Doyle, Patrick S; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Cell-adhesive particles are of significant interest in biotechnology, the bioengineering of complex tissues, and biomedical research. Their applications range from platforms to increase the efficiency of anchorage-dependent cell culture to building blocks to loading cells in heterogeneous structures to clonal-population growth monitoring to cell sorting. Although useful, currently available cell-adhesive particles can accommodate only homogeneous cell culture. Here, we report the design of anisotropic hydrogel microparticles with tunable cell-adhesive regions as first step toward micropatterned cell cultures on particles. We employed stop flow lithography (SFL), the coupling reaction between amine and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and streptavidin-biotin chemistry to adjust the localization of conjugated collagen and poly-L-lysine on the surface of microscale particles. Using the new particles, we demonstrate the attachment and formation of tight junctions between brain endothelial cells. We also demonstrate the geometric patterning of breast cancer cells on particles with heterogeneous collagen coatings. This new approach avoids the exposure of cells to potentially toxic photoinitiators and ultraviolet light and decouples in time the microparticle synthesis and the cell culture steps to take advantage of the most recent advances in cell patterning available for traditional culture substrates. PMID:26545155

  9. Influence of cell surface characteristics on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite.

    PubMed

    White, Jane S; Walker, Graeme M

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the physicochemical properties of biomaterials on microbial cell adhesion is well known, with the extent of adhesion depending on hydrophobicity, surface charge, specific functional groups and acid-base properties. Regarding yeasts, the effect of cell surfaces is often overlooked, despite the fact that generalisations may not be made between closely related strains. The current investigation compared adhesion of three industrially relevant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M-type, NCYC 1681 and ALY, strains used in production of Scotch whisky, ale and lager, respectively) to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite (HAP). Adhesion of the whisky yeast was greatest, followed by the ale strain, while adhesion of the lager strain was approximately 10-times less. According to microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) analysis, the ale strain was hydrophobic while the whisky and lager strains were moderately hydrophilic. This contrasted with analyses of water contact angles where all strains were characterised as hydrophilic. All yeast strains were electron donating, with low electron accepting potential, as indicated by both surface energy and MATS analysis. Overall, there was a linear correlation between adhesion to HAP and the overall surface free energy of the yeasts. This is the first time that the relationship between yeast cell surface energy and adherence to a biomaterial has been described.

  10. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. PMID:23893032

  11. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  12. Application of nanotechnology to control bacterial adhesion and patterning on material surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Yeung, Chun L.; Rawson, Frankie J.; Mendes, Paula M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces raises health hazard issues in the medical environment. Previous studies of bacteria adhesion have focused on observations in their natural/native environments. Recently, surface science has contributed in advancing the understanding of bacterial adhesion by providing ideal platforms that attempt to mimic the bacteria's natural environments, whilst also enabling concurrent control, selectivity and spatial control of bacterial adhesion. In this review, we will look at techniques of how nanotechnology is used to control cell adhesion on a planar scale, in addition to describing the use of nanotools for cell micropatterning. Additionally, it will provide a general background of common methods for nanoscale modification enabling biologist unfamiliar with nanotechnology to enter the field. PMID:24273593

  13. Tuning cell adhesion on polymeric and nanocomposite surfaces: Role of topography versus superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Zangi, Sepideh; Hejazi, Iman; Seyfi, Javad; Hejazi, Ehsan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Davachi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Development of surface modification procedures which allow tuning the cell adhesion on the surface of biomaterials and devices is of great importance. In this study, the effects of different topographies and wettabilities on cell adhesion behavior of polymeric surfaces are investigated. To this end, an improved phase separation method was proposed to impart various wettabilities (hydrophobic and superhydrophobic) on polypropylene surfaces. Surface morphologies and compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Cell culture was conducted to evaluate the adhesion of 4T1 mouse mammary tumor cells. It was found that processing conditions such as drying temperature is highly influential in cell adhesion behavior due to the formation of an utterly different surface topography. It was concluded that surface topography plays a more significant role in cell adhesion behavior rather than superhydrophobicity since the nano-scale topography highly inhibited the cell adhesion as compared to the micro-scale topography. Such cell repellent behavior could be very useful in many biomedical devices such as those in drug delivery and blood contacting applications as well as biosensors.

  14. Gecko toe and lamellar shear adhesion on macroscopic, engineered rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Henry, Amy; Lin, Hauwen; Ren, Angela; Shiuan, Kevin; Fearing, Ronald S; Full, Robert J

    2014-01-15

    The role in adhesion of the toes and lamellae - intermediate-sized structures - found on the gecko foot remains unclear. Insight into the function of these structures can lead to a more general understanding of the hierarchical nature of the gecko adhesive system, but in particular how environmental topology may relate to gecko foot morphology. We sought to discern the mechanics of the toes and lamellae by examining gecko adhesion on controlled, macroscopically rough surfaces. We used live Tokay geckos, Gekko gecko, to observe the maximum shear force a gecko foot can attain on an engineered substrate constructed with sinusoidal patterns of varying amplitudes and wavelengths in sizes similar to the dimensions of the toes and lamellae structures (0.5 to 6 mm). We found shear adhesion was significantly decreased on surfaces that had amplitudes and wavelengths approaching the lamella length and inter-lamella spacing, losing 95% of shear adhesion over the range tested. We discovered that the toes are capable of adhering to surfaces with amplitudes much larger than their dimensions even without engaging claws, maintaining 60% of shear adhesion on surfaces with amplitudes of 3 mm. Gecko adhesion can be predicted by the ratio of the lamella dimensions to surface feature dimensions. In addition to setae, remarkable macroscopic-scale features of gecko toes and lamellae that include compliance and passive conformation are necessary to maintain contact, and consequently, generate shear adhesion on macroscopically rough surfaces. Findings on the larger scale structures in the hierarchy of gecko foot function could provide the biological inspiration to drive the design of more effective and versatile synthetic fibrillar adhesives.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the adhesion time of Penicillium spores to cedar wood surface.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Elabed; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Abdellah, Houari; Hassan, Latrache

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the adhesion of 4 Penicillium strains (Penicillium granulatum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium commune and Penicillium chrysogenum) on cedar wood was examined qualitatively and quantitatively by using the extended DLVO (XDLVO) approach and the environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM) technique. A comparison between the XDLVO theories and the ESEM technique was also investigated. The adhesion tests revealed that P. chrysogenum was not able to adhere on the cedar wood substrata, as predicted by the XDLVO approach. We have also found by ESEM that the three Penicillium strains (P. granulatum, P. crustosum, P. commune) adhered on wood, as not predicted theoretically. Moreover, the time of adhesion (3 h and 24 h) was used not only to compare the capacity of adhesion according to contact time but also to explain the discrepancies between the XDLVO approach prediction and the adhesion experiments. A positive relationship between the XDLVO approach and adhesion experiments has been observed after 3h of adhesion. In contrast, a contradiction between the XDLVO predictions and the adhesion test results has been noted after 24h of adhesion of Penicillium strains to the wood surface.

  16. Under-water adhesion of rigid spheres on soft, charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion in a liquid medium is fundamentally important for understanding a myriad of physiological and technological issues such as nanoparticle or bacteria uptake by cells, attachment of viruses on bacterial surfaces, adhesion of a bacteria on a preformed biofilm, biofouling of ships and marine vehicles, and many more. In this paper, we provide a theory to analyze the under-water adhesion of a rigid spherical particle on a soft, charged surface, which is represented as a layer of grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). Our model is based on calculating and minimizing the free energy, appropriately modified to account for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. The central result of our paper is that the presence of surface charge typically enhances the adhesion, indicated by a larger negative value of the equilibrium free energy and larger value of the equilibrium depth of indentation. Such a behavior can be explained by noting that the lowering of EDL electrostatic energy due to adhesion better balances the increase in elastic energy caused by the adhesion-induced deformation. We anticipate that our theory will provide the hitherto unknown basis of quantifying the effect of surface charge in under-liquid adhesion, which is central to the vast number of phenomena involving charged bio-systems, like cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  17. Controlling cell adhesion via replication of laser micro/nano-textured surfaces on polymers.

    PubMed

    Koufaki, Niki; Ranella, Anthi; Aifantis, Katerina E; Barberoglou, Marios; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate cell adhesion and viability on highly rough polymeric surfaces with gradient roughness ratios and wettabilities prepared by microreplication of laser micro/nano-textured Si surfaces. Negative replicas on polydimethylsiloxane as well as positive ones on a photocurable (organically modified ceramic) and a biodegradable (poly(lactide-co-glycolide)) polymer have been successfully reproduced. The final culture substrates comprised from forests of micron-sized conical spikes exhibiting a range of roughness ratios and wettabilities, was achieved by changing the laser fluence used to fabricate the original template surfaces. Cell culture experiments were performed with the fibroblast NIH/3T3 and PC12 neuronal cell lines in order to investigate how these surfaces are capable of modulating different types of cellular responses including, viability, adhesion and morphology. The results showed a preferential adhesion of both cell types on the microstructured surfaces compared to the unstructured ones. In particular, the fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells show optimal adhesion for small roughness ratios, independent of the surface wettability and polymer type, indicating a non-monotonic dependence of cell adhesion on surface energy. In contrast, the PC12 cells were observed to adhere well to the patterned surfaces independent of the roughness ratio and wettability. These experimental findings are correlated with micromechanical measurements performed on the unstructured and replicated surfaces and discussed on the basis of previous observations describing the relation of cell response to surface energy and rigidity.

  18. The surface properties of carbon fibers and their adhesion to organic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Drzal, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the surface properties of carbon fibers is reviewed, with emphasis on fiber/matrix adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Subjects treated include carbon fiber structure and chemistry, techniques for the study of the fiber surface, polymer/fiber bond strength and its measurement, variations in polymer properties in the interphase, and the influence of fiber matrix adhesion on composite mechanical properties. Critical issues are summarized and search recommendations are made.

  19. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusables surface insulation, addendum 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1973-01-01

    The task consisted of conducting mechanical and thermal tests to establish design allowables data on a new room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone adhesive, X3-6004. Low modulus, coupled with relatively low density and good low-temperature properties of this adhesive, places it in contention as a candidate for attaching reusable surface insulation on the space shuttle. Data obtained show that the modulus values of X3-6004 are significantly lower than those of RTV-560 and the other three adhesives characterized at test temperatures from 550 to -175 F. At -175, -200 and -270 F, the modulus of X3-6004 is approximately the same as GE RTV-560 and the other three silicone adhesives. The X3-6004 adhesive exhibits good processing properties. It has a 12 percent lower density than RTV-560. Although lower in overall strength properties as compared to the other adhesives in the program, X3-6004 has adequate adhesion to 2024T81 aluminum to compete as an adhesive for attaching reusable surface insulation. It does exhibit some tendency to revert and soften at temperatures above 350 F when in a confined area.

  20. Nanometer surface roughness increases select osteoblast adhesion on carbon nanofiber compacts.

    PubMed

    Price, Rachel L; Ellison, Karen; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2004-07-01

    Carbon nanofibers have exceptional theoretical mechanical properties (such as low weight-to-strength ratios) that, along with possessing nanoscale fiber dimensions similar to crystalline hydroxyapatite found in bone, suggest strong possibilities for use as an orthopedic/dental implant material. To determine, for the first time, cytocompatibility properties pertinent for bone prosthetic applications, osteoblast (bone-forming cells), fibroblast (cells contributing to callus formation and fibrous encapsulation events that result in implant loosening), chondrocyte (cartilage-forming cells), and smooth muscle cell (for comparison purposes) adhesion were determined on carbon nanofibers in the present in vitro study. Results provided evidence that, compared to conventional carbon fibers, nanometer dimension carbon fibers promoted select osteoblast adhesion. Moreover, adhesion of other cells was not influenced by carbon fiber dimensions. In fact, smooth muscle cell, fibroblast, and chondrocyte adhesion decreased with an increase in either carbon nanofiber surface energy or simultaneous change in carbon nanofiber chemistry. To determine properties that selectively enhanced osteoblast adhesion, similar cell adhesion assays were performed on polymer (specifically, poly-lactic-co-glycolic; PLGA) casts of carbon fiber compacts previously tested. Compared to PLGA casts of conventional carbon fibers, results provided the first evidence of enhanced select osteoblast adhesion on PLGA casts of nanophase carbon fibers. The summation of these results demonstrate that due to a high degree of nanometer surface roughness, carbon fibers with nanometer dimensions may be optimal materials to selectively increase osteoblast adhesion necessary for successful orthopedic/dental implant applications.

  1. Fibrinogen surface distribution correlates to platelet adhesion pattern on fluorinated surface-modified polyetherurethane.

    PubMed

    Massa, T M; Yang, M L; Ho, J Y C; Brash, J L; Santerre, J P

    2005-12-01

    In previous work, it had been shown that platelet adhesion could be reduced by fluorinating surfaces with oligomeric fluoropolymers, referred to as surface-modifying macromolecules (SMMs). In the current study, two in vitro blood-contacting experiments were carried out on a polyetherurethane modified with three different SMMs in order to determine if altered platelet adhesion levels could be related to the pattern of adsorbed protein and more specifically to the manner in which fibrinogen (Fg) distribution occurs at the surface. In the first experiment, the materials were placed in whole human blood and the adherent platelets were viewed with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In a second experiment, the materials were incubated with human plasma with the absence of platelets. The plasma contained 5% fluorescent-Fg. The materials were then viewed with a fluorescence microscope and images were collected to define the distribution of high-density fluorescent-Fg areas. The SEM and fluorescent-Fg images were imported to Image Pro Plus imaging software to measure the area, length and circularity and a bivariate correlation test was conducted between the two sets of data. For area and length morphology parameters, there were high and significant correlations (r > 0.9, p < 0.05) between the platelets and Fg aggregates. The data suggest that the Fg distribution may serve as a predictor of platelet morphology/activation and provides insight into the non-thrombogenic character of biomaterials containing the fluorinated SMMs. PMID:16026826

  2. Candida albicans Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Formation is Closely Related to Surface Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Zhigang; Chu, Haoyue; Guo, Jing; Jiang, Guangshui; Qi, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans persisters have so far been observed only in biofilm environment; the biofilm element(s) that trigger(s) persister formation are still unknown. In this study, we tried to further elucidate the possible relationship between C. albicans persisters and the early phases of biofilm formation, especially the surface adhesion phase. Three C. albicans strains were surveyed for the formation of persisters. We tested C. albicans persister formation dynamically at different time points during the process of adhesion and biofilm formation. The number of persister cells was determined based on an assessment of cell viability after amphotericin B treatment and colony-forming unit assay. None of the planktonic cultures contained persisters. Immediately following adhesion of C. albicans cells to the surface, persister cells emerged and the proportion of persisters reached a peak of 0.2-0.69 % in approximately 2-h biofilm. As the biofilm matured, the proportion of persisters decreased and was only 0.01-0.02 % by 24 h, while the number of persisters remained stable with no significant change. Persisters were not detected in the absence of an attachment surface which was pre-coated. Persisters were also absent in biofilms that were scraped to disrupt surface adhesion prior to amphotericin B treatment. These results indicate that C. albicans antifungal-tolerant persisters are produced mainly in surface adhesion phase and surface adhesion is required for the emergence and maintenance of C. albicans persisters.

  3. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-01

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations.

  4. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  5. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  6. Platelet adhesive resistance of polyurethane surface grafted with zwitterions of sulfobetaine.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Qingfeng, Hou; Baolei, Liu; Jian, Shen; Sicong, Lin

    2004-07-01

    A possible approach to improve the blood compatibility of poly(etherurethane)s (PU) involves the covalent attachment of key molecular on its surface. Recently, polymer tailed with zwitterions was found having good blood compatibility. The purpose of present study was to design and synthesis a novel nonthrombogenic biomaterial by modifying the surface of poly(etherurethane) with zwitterions of sulfobetaine via HDI spacer. The films of polyurethane were grafted with sulfobetaine by a three-step procedure. In the first step, the film surfaces were treated with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) in toluene at 50 degrees C in the presence of di-n-butyl tin dilaurate(DBTDL) as a catalyst. The extent of the reaction was measured by ATR-IR spectra; a maximum number of free NCO group was obtained after a reaction time of 2.5 h. In the second step, the primary amine group of N,N-diethylethylenediamine (DEA) or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (DMA) was allowed to react in toluene with isocyanate groups bound on surface. In the third step, two kinds of sulfobetaines were formed in the surface through the ring-opening reaction between tertiary amine of DMA or DEA and 1,3- propanesultone (PS). The reaction process was monitored with ATR-IR spectra and XPS spectra. The wettability of films was investigated by water contact angle measurement. A platelet adhesion experiment was conducted as a preliminary test to confirm the improved blood compatibility of PU. The number of platelets adhering to PU decreased greatly compared to original after 1 h and 3 h of contact with human plate-rich plasma. PMID:15261019

  7. Studies on polyurethane adhesives and surface modification of hydrophobic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Jayaraman

    This thesis work deals with (a) Curing of reactive, hot-melt polyurethane adhesives and (b) Adsorption studies using different interactions. Research on polyurethanes involves characterization of polyurethane prepolymers and a novel mechanism to cure isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymer by a "trigger" mechanism. Curing of isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymers has been shown to be influenced by morphology and environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity. Although the initial composition, final morphology and curing kinetics are known, information regarding the intermediate prepolymer mixture is yet to be established. Polyurethane prepolymers prepared by the reaction of diisocyanates with the primary hydroxyls of polyester diol (PHMA) and secondary hydroxyls of polyether diol (PPG) were characterized. The morphology and crystallization kinetics of a polyurethane prepolymer was compared with a blend of PPG prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PPG with diisocyanate) and a PHMA prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PHMA with diisocyanate) to study the effect of copolymer formed in the polyurethane prepolymer on the above-mentioned properties. Although the morphology of the polyurethane prepolymer is determined in the first few minutes of application, the chemical curing of isocyanate-terminated prepolymer occurs over hours to days. In the literature, different techniques are described to follow the curing kinetics. But there is no established technique to control the curing of polyurethane prepolymer. To make the curing process independent of environmental factors, a novel approach using a trigger mechanism was designed and implemented by using ammonium salts as curing agents. Ammonium salts that are stable at room temperature but decompose on heating to yield active hydrogen-containing compounds, NH3 and H2O, were used as 'Trojan horses' to cure the prepolymer chemically. Research on adsorption

  8. Investigation into the mechanism of bacterial adhesion to hydrogel-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R; Anders, C; Heinrich, L; Gersonde, K

    1999-01-01

    As a model for hydrogel-coated biomaterials, self-assembled monolayers of polyoxyethylene (POE) derivatives on sheets of polymeric biomaterials were prepared. The POE derivatives consisted of hydrophilic chains with different lengths and a long-chain alkyl group that served as an anchor function. The coatings obtained were analyzed with XPS and contact angle measurements showing hydrophilic chains of different lengths extending away from the surface. Bacterial adhesion was measured with a clinically relevant Klebsiella pneumoniae type strain and measurements reproduced 12 times. Bacterial adhesion decreased markedly with increasing hydrophilic chain length. Based upon these findings a new model for bacterial adhesion to hydrogel-coated surfaces is suggested: steric repulsion effects that increase with increasing chain length of grafted hydrophilic chains play an important role in bacterial adhesion to hydrogel-coated surfaces. PMID:15347980

  9. Interspecific variation in patterns of adhesion of marine fouling to silicone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Holm, Eric R; Kavanagh, Christopher J; Meyer, Anne E; Wiebe, Deborah; Nedved, Brian T; Wendt, Dean; Smith, Celia M; Hadfield, Michael G; Swain, Geoff; Wood, Christina Darkangelo; Truby, Kathryn; Stein, Judith; Montemarano, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The adhesion of six fouling organisms: the barnacle Balanus eburneus, the gastropod mollusc Crepidulafornicata, the bivalve molluscs Crassostrea virginica and Ostrea/Dendrostrea spp., and the serpulid tubeworms Hydroides dianthus and H. elegans, to 12 silicone fouling-release surfaces was examined. Removal stress (adhesion strength) varied among the fouling species and among the surfaces. Principal component analysis of the removal stress data revealed that the fouling species fell into two distinct groups, one comprising the bivalve molluscs and tubeworms, and the other the barnacle and the gastropod mollusc. None of the silicone materials generated a minimum in removal stress for all the organisms tested, although several surfaces produced low adhesion strengths for both groups of species. These results suggest that fouling-release materials do not rank (in terms of adhesion strength) identically for all fouling organisms, and thus development of a globally-effective hull coating will continue to require testing against a diversity of encrusting species. PMID:17290867

  10. An in vitro bacterial adhesion assessment of surface-modified medical-grade PVC.

    PubMed

    Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Novák, Igor; Lehocký, Marián; Sedlarík, Vladimir; Vesel, Alenka; Junkar, Ita; Sáha, Petr; Chodák, Ivan

    2010-06-01

    Medical-grade polyvinyl chloride was surface modified by a multistep physicochemical approach to improve bacterial adhesion prevention properties. This was fulfilled via surface activation by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge plasma followed by radical graft copolymerization of acrylic acid through surface-initiated pathway to render a structured high density brush. Three known antibacterial agents, bronopol, benzalkonium chloride, and chlorhexidine, were then individually coated onto functionalized surface to induce biological properties. Various modern surface probe techniques were employed to explore the effects of the modification steps. In vitro bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation assay was performed. Escherichia coli strain was found to be more susceptible to modifications rather than Staphylococcus aureus as up to 85% reduction in adherence degree of the former was observed upon treating with above antibacterial agents, while only chlorhexidine could retard the adhesion of the latter by 50%. Also, plasma treated and graft copolymerized samples were remarkably effective to diminish the adherence of E. coli. PMID:20189783

  11. Fluid-shear method to evaluate bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Torres, Ashley; Chen, Liangxian; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Liang, H.

    2012-07-01

    Adhered bacteria onto different surfaces cause infection that affects our health and environments. The understanding of the bacterial adhesive strength is crucial for better control and safe manufacturing in order to design adhesion resistant materials. The current evaluation methods lack precision and are often time consuming. In the present research, we developed a fluid-shear method to quantitatively evaluate bacterial adhesive strength on glass substrates. The glass was chosen based on its abundance in household, industrial, and medical environments. The fluid shear stress applied by a rheometer ranged from 0 to 3 Pa and the average surface roughness (Ra) of glass ranged from 1 to 23 nm. Bacterial adhesive stress was calculated based on the measurement of the critical radius. It was also found that the adhesive strength decreased with the increase of surface roughness, while the number of adhered bacteria increased when the surface become rougher. The fluid-shear method was proven to be effective in measure bacterial adhesion on a surface.

  12. Subnanometric Roughness Affects the Deposition and Mobile Adhesion of Escherichia coli on Silanized Glass Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumedha; Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly Andrea; McLay, Ryan B; Cirino, Patrick C; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-05-31

    We investigate the deposition and transient adhesion of Escherichia coli on alkyl and fluoroalkyl silanized glass surfaces of different carbon chain lengths. The rate at which bacteria deposit onto these surfaces decreases as the shear stress is increased from 3 to 67 mPa, but trends in the deposition rate across all surfaces cannot be predicted from extended DLVO calculations of the interaction potential. As the surface root-mean-square (rms) roughness increases, the deposition rate increases and the percentage of motile tethered cells decreases. Furthermore, on surfaces of root-mean-square roughness of less than 0.2 nm, bacteria exhibit mobile adhesion, for which surface-associated cells linearly translate distances greater than approximately 1.5 times their average body length along the flow direction. E. coli bacteria with and without flagella exhibit mobile adhesion, indicating that this behavior is not driven by these appendages. Cells that express fimbriae do not exhibit mobile adhesion. These results suggest that even subnanoscale roughness can influence the deposition and transient adhesion of bacteria and imply that strategies to reduce frictional interactions by making cells or surfaces smoother may help to control the initial fouling of surfaces by E. coli bacteria. PMID:27158837

  13. Influence of Reaction with XeF2 on Surface Adhesion of Al and Al2O3 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tianfu; Park, Jeong Y.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-28

    The change of surface adhesion after fluorination of Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces using XeF{sub 2} was investigated with atomic force microscopy. The chemical interaction between XeF{sub 2} and Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Fresh Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces were obtained by etching top silicon layers of Si/Al and Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with XeF{sub 2}. The surface adhesion and chemical composition were measured as a function of time after the exposure to air or annealing (at 200 C under vauum). The correlation between the adhesion force increase and presence of AlF{sub 3} on the surface was revealed.

  14. Influence of reaction with XeF2 on surface adhesion of Al and Al2O3 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Park, Jeong Y.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-10-01

    The change in surface adhesion after fluorination of Al and Al2O3 surfaces using XeF2 was investigated with atomic force microscopy. The chemical interaction between XeF2 and Al and Al2O3 surfaces was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Fresh Al and Al2O3 surfaces were obtained by etching top silicon layers of Si /Al and Si /Al2O3 with XeF2. The surface adhesion and chemical composition were measured after the exposure to air or annealing (at 200°C under vacuum). The correlation between the adhesion force increase and presence of AlF3 on the surface was revealed.

  15. Corneal epithelial adhesion strength to tethered-protein/peptide modified hydrogel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Christopher; Jacob, Jean T; Stoltz, Albert; Bi, Jingjing; Bundy, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the suitability of microjet impingement for use on hydrogel materials to determine the cellular adhesion strength of corneal epithelial cells grown on novel hydrogels with extracellular matrix proteins (laminin and/or fibronectin) or a peptide sequence (fibronectin adhesion promoting peptide, FAP) tethered to their surface with poly(ethylene glycol) chains. The deformation of the hydrogel surface in response to the force of the microjet was analyzed both visually and mathematically. After the results of these experiments and calculations determined that no deformation occurred and that the pressure required for indentation (1.25 x 10(6) Pa) was three factors of 10 greater than the maximum pressure of the microjet, the relative mean adhesion strength of primary rabbit corneal epithelial cells grown on the novel poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) hydrogels was determined and compared with that of the same type of cells grown on control glass surfaces. Only confluent cell layers were tested. Cells grown on control glass surfaces adhered with a mean relative adhesion strength of 488 +/- 28 dynes/cm2. Under identical conditions, cells grown on laminin- and FAP-tethered hydrogel surfaces were unable to be removed, indicating an adhesion strength greater than 516 dynes/cm2. Cells grown on fibronectin- and fibronectin/laminin (1:1)-tethered surfaces showed significantly lower relative adhesion strengths (201 +/- 50 and 189 +/- 11 dynes/cm2, respectively), compared with laminin- and FAP-tethered surfaces (p = 0.001). Our results demonstrate that the microjet impingement method of cell adhesion analysis is applicable to hydrogel substrates. Additionally, analysis of our test surfaces indicates that fibronectin tethered to this hydrogel in the quantity and by the method used here does not induce stable ligand/receptor bonding to the epithelial cell membrane to the same degree as does laminin or FAP. PMID:15534866

  16. Influence of fermentation conditions on the surface properties and adhesion of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The surface properties of probiotic bacteria influence to a large extent their interactions within the gut ecosystem. There is limited amount of information on the effect of the production process on the surface properties of probiotic lactobacilli in relation to the mechanisms of their adhesion to the gastrointestinal mucosa. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the fermentation pH and temperature on the surface properties and adhesion ability to Caco-2 cells of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Results The cells were grown at pH 5, 5.5, 6 (temperature 37°C) and at pH 6.5 (temperature 25°C, 30°C and 37°C), and their surfaces analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gel-based proteomics. The results indicated that for all the fermentation conditions, with the exception of pH 5, a higher nitrogen to carbon ratio and a lower phosphate content was observed at the surface of the bacteria, which resulted in a lower surface hydrophobicity and reduced adhesion levels to Caco-2 cells as compared to the control fermentation (pH 6.5, 37°C). A number of adhesive proteins, which have been suggested in previous published works to take part in the adhesion of bacteria to the human gastrointestinal tract, were identified by proteomic analysis, with no significant differences between samples however. Conclusions The temperature and the pH of the fermentation influenced the surface composition, hydrophobicity and the levels of adhesion of L. rhamnosus GG to Caco-2 cells. It was deduced from the data that a protein rich surface reduced the adhesion ability of the cells. PMID:22931558

  17. Effect of Fluoride-Modified Titanium Surface on Early Adhesion of Irradiated Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun Yuan; Zheng, Li Wu; Ma, Li; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Cheung, Lim Kwong; Pow, Edmond Ho Nang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of fluoride-modified titanium surface on adhesion of irradiated osteoblasts. Materials and Methods. Fluoride-modified surface was obtained and the morphology, roughness, and chemical composition of the surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The adhesion of irradiated osteoblast-like cells, in terms of number, area, and fluorescence intensity on the titanium surface, was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining. Results. Numerous nanosize pits were seen only in the F-TiO surface. The pits were more remarkable and uniform on F-TiO surface than on TiO surface; however, the amplitude of peaks and bottoms on F-TiO surface appeared to be smaller than on TiO surface. The Sa value and Sdr percentage of TiO surfaces were significantly higher than those of F-TiO surface. The concentrations of main elements such as titanium, oxygen, and carbon were similar on both surfaces. The number of irradiated osteoblasts adhered on the control surface was larger than on fluoride-modified surface. Meanwhile, the cells on the fluoride-modified surface formed more actin filaments. Conclusions. The fluoride-modified titanium surface alters the adhesion of irradiated osteoblasts. Further studies are needed to investigate the proliferation, differentiation, maturation, gene expression, and cytokine production of irradiated osteoblasts on fluoride-modified titanium surface. PMID:26266253

  18. Effect of atmospheric plasma versus conventional surface treatments on the adhesion capability between self-adhesive resin cement and titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Kilicarslan, Mehmet Ali; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Mumcu, Emre; Ozkan, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of atmospheric plasma (APL) versus conventional surface treatments on the adhesion of self-adhesive resin cement to Ti-6Al-4V alloy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty plates of machined titanium (Ti) discs were divided into five groups (n=12): 1) Untreated (CNT); 2) Sandblasted (SAB); 3) Tribochemically treated (ROC); 4) Tungsten CarbideBur (TCB); 5) APL treated (APL). SEM analysis and surface roughness (Ra) measurements were performed. Self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the Ti surfaces and shear bond strength (SBS) tests, Ra and failure mode examinations were carried out. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and chi-squared test. RESULTS The lowest SBS value was obtained with CNT and was significantly different from all other groups except for APL. The ROC showed the highest SBS and Ra values of all the groups. CONCLUSION It was concluded that the effect of APL on SBS and Ra was not sufficient and it may not be a potential for promoting adhesion to titanium. PMID:26140177

  19. The Effect of Surface Contamination on Adhesive Forces as Measured by Contact Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    EMERSON,JOHN A.; GIUNTA,RACHEL K.; MILLER,GREGORY V.; SORENSEN,CHRISTOPHER R.; PEARSON,RAYMOND A.

    2000-12-18

    The contact adhesive forces between two surfaces, one being a soft hemisphere and the other being a hard plate, can readily be determined by applying an external compressive load to mate the two surfaces and subsequently applying a tensile load to peel the surfaces apart. The contact region is assumed the superposition of elastic Hertzian pressure and of the attractive surface forces that act only over the contact area. What are the effects of the degree of surface contamination on adhesive forces? Clean aluminum surfaces were coated with hexadecane as a controlled contaminant. The force required to pull an elastomeric hemisphere from a surface was determined by contact mechanics, via the JKR model, using a model siloxane network for the elastomeric contact sphere. Due to the dispersive nature of the elastomer surface, larger forces were required to pull the sphere from a contaminated surface than a clean aluminum oxide surface.

  20. Adhesion of E. coli to silver- or copper-coated porous clay ceramic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, I.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2012-06-01

    Porous ceramic water filters (CWFs), produced by sintering a mixture of clay and a combustible material (such as woodchips), are often used in point-of-use water filtration systems that occlude microbes by size exclusion. They are also coated with colloidal silver, which serves as a microbial disinfectant. However, the adhesion of microbes to porous clay surfaces and colloidal silver coated clay surfaces has not been studied. This paper presents the results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the adhesion force between Escherichia coli bacteria, colloidal silver, and porous clay-based ceramic surfaces. The adhesion of silver and copper nanoparticles is also studied in control experiments on these alternative disinfectant materials. The adhesive force between the wide range of possible bi-materials was measured using pull-off measurements during force microscopy. These were combined with measurements of AFM tip radii/substrate roughness that were incorporated into adhesion models to obtain the adhesion energies for the pair wise interaction. Of the three antimicrobial metals studied, the colloidal silver had the highest affinity for porous ceramic surface (125 ± 32 nN and ˜0.29 J/m2) while the silver nanoparticles had the highest affinity for E. coli bacteria (133 ± 21 nN and ˜0.39 J/m2). The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of ceramic water filter that can purify water by adsorption and size exclusion.

  1. Controlling adhesion between multi-asperity contacting surfaces in MEMS devices by local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkouzou, A.; Kokorian, J.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; van Spengen, W. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we have incorporated heaters in a MEMS device, which allow the in situ local heating of its contacting surfaces. This design offers a promising solution for MEMS devices with contacting components by preventing capillary-induced adhesion. The force of adhesion was assessed by optically measuring in-plane snap-off displacements. We were able to decrease adhesion from 500 nN to 200 nN with just one heated surface of which the temperature was set above 300 °C. The temperature should not be set too high: we observed increased adhesion due to a direct bonding process once the temperature was increased above 750 °C. Remarkably, adhesion increased by heating from room temperature to 75 °C, which is attributed to more water being transferred to the contact area due to faster kinetics. We observed the same effect in the cases where both surfaces were heated, although at slightly different temperatures. We demonstrated that heating only one surface to between 300 °C and 750 °C is sufficient to significantly lower adhesion, due to the removal of capillary menisci. The required heater is typically most easily implemented in a stationary part of the device.

  2. Functionalization of UV-curing adhesives for surface-integrated micro-polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachicha, B.; Overmeyer, L.

    2016-02-01

    Polymer optical waveguides, especially single-mode waveguides are increasingly used for short distance communication, as well as for sensing applications. The realization of a working communication route requires different and sequentially realized steps. Generally, these steps are the packaging of semiconductor beam senders and receivers, the fabrication of an optical waveguide, the preparation of its end-facets, the alignment of different elements along their optical axis and the integration into a desired communication route. The development of a process, which integrates all these steps for planar surfaces, offers a reduction in time and an increase in flexibility. A sub-step toward such a highly automated system is the integration of optical waveguides into the planar surface. In this context, we are investigating the use of the micro-dispensing process to realize this integration step. We functionalize UV-curing adhesives as cladding for micro-optical cores as well as for inherent bonding to the substrate surface. For this purpose an optical characterization of the adhesives is necessary for an adequate core and cladding material combination. A ow behavior characterization is also relevant in order to analyze the used dispensing process with the selected adhesive. Finally, a mechanical characterization is done to test the adhesion of the core to the adhesive, as well as the adhesive to the substrate surface. In this paper we present a summary of the realized characterization of the selected polymer. Based on experiment results we infer limits and opportunities of this method.

  3. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  4. Chlorine-induced damage to surface adhesions during sublethal injury of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, S M; Bissonnette, G K

    1983-01-01

    A comparison of the adhesive ability of noninjured and chlorine-injured enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was made by in vitro attachment to human peripheral leukocytes. Chlorination selected for noninjured cells with greater capabilities for colonizing the small intestine. Injured populations exhibited reduced association with leukocytes. Maximum reduction was seen in populations with greater than 80% injury. These cells demonstrated less adhesive ability than nonpiliated populations. Electron micrographs suggested that reduced adhesive ability was due to the loss of surface structures as a consequence of sublethal chlorination. The data imply a reduced ability among chlorine-injured pathogens to colonize the small intestine and initiate disease. Images PMID:6133503

  5. Prediction of the adhesive behavior of bio-inspired functionally graded materials against rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peijian, Chen; Juan, Peng; Yucheng, Zhao; Feng, Gao

    2014-06-01

    Roughness effect and adhesion properties are important characteristics to be accessed in the development of functionally graded materials for biological and biomimetic applications, particularly for the hierarchical composition in biomimetic gecko robot. A multi-asperities adhesion model to predict the adhesive forces is presented in this work. The effect of surface roughness and graded material properties, which significantly alter the adhesive strength between contact bodies, can be simultaneously considered in the generalized model. It is found that proper interfacial strength can be controlled by adjusting surface roughness σ / R, graded exponent k and material parameter E*R / Δγ. The results should be helpful in the design of new biomimetic materials and useful in application of micro functional instruments.

  6. Bottom-up engineering of the surface roughness of nanostructured cubic zirconia to control cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Ferri, M; Tamplenizza, M; Borghi, F; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Lenardi, C; Piazzoni, C; Merlini, M; Podestà, A; Milani, P

    2012-11-30

    Nanostructured cubic zirconia is a strategic material for biomedical applications since it combines superior structural and optical properties with a nanoscale morphology able to control cell adhesion and proliferation. We produced nanostructured cubic zirconia thin films at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition of nanoparticles produced in the gas phase. Precise control of film roughness at the nanoscale is obtained by operating in a ballistic deposition regime. This allows one to study the influence of nanoroughness on cell adhesion, while keeping the surface chemistry constant. We evaluated cell adhesion on nanostructured zirconia with an osteoblast-like cell line using confocal laser scanning microscopy for detailed morphological and cytoskeleton studies. We demonstrated that the organization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesion formation can be controlled by varying the evolution of surface nanoroughness.

  7. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R

    2015-10-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at constant water chemical potential in combination with basic theoretical arguments, we study hydration-induced interactions between two overall charge-neutral yet polar planar surfaces with different wetting properties. Whether the water film between the two surfaces becomes unstable below a threshold separation and cavitation gives rise to long-range attraction, depends on the sum of the two individual surface contact angles. Consequently, cavitation-induced attraction also occurs for a mildly hydrophilic surface interacting with a very hydrophobic surface. If both surfaces are very hydrophilic, hydration repulsion dominates at small separations and direct attractive force contribution can-if strong enough-give rise to wet adhesion in this case. In between the regimes of cavitation-induced attraction and hydration repulsion we find a narrow range of contact angle combinations where the surfaces adhere at contact in the absence of cavitation. This dry adhesion regime is driven by direct surface-surface interactions. We derive simple laws for the cavitation transition as well as for the transition between hydration repulsion and dry adhesion, which favorably compare with simulation results in a generic adhesion state diagram as a function of the two surface contact angles.

  8. Adhesion assays of endothelial cells on nanopatterned surfaces within a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se Yon; Kwon, Keon Woo; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Park, Min Cheol; Lee, Jeong Sang; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-04-01

    We present a simple analytical method to measure adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs) using nanopatterned, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces for potential applications to artificial tissue-engineered blood vessel. Various nanostructured PLGA surfaces (350 nm wide ridges/350 nm grooves, 350 nm ridges/700 nm grooves, 350 nm ridges/1750 nm grooves, 700 nm ridges/350 nm grooves, 1050 nm ridges/350 nm grooves, 1750 nm ridges/350 nm grooves) and flat (unpatterned) surfaces were fabricated on the bottom of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel of 2 mm width and 60 microm height by using thermal imprinting and irreversible channel bonding. To measure adhesion strength of HUVECs and CPAEs, the cells were exposed to a range of shear stress (12, 40, and 80 dyn/cm(2)) within the channels for 20 min after a preculture for 3 days and the remaining cells were counted under each condition. The highest adhesion strength was found on the surface of 700 nm wide ridges, 350 nm wide grooves for both cell types. The enhanced adhesion on nanopatterned surfaces can be attributed to two aspects: (i) contact guidance along the line direction and (ii) clustered focal adhesions. In particular, the contact guidance induced cell alignment along the line directions, which in turn lowers wall shear stress applied to the cell surface, as supported by a simple hydrodynamic model based on cell morphology. PMID:20218573

  9. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  10. Effects of aging on surface properties and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans on various fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Cariaga, Tashiana; Müller, Rainer; Rosentritt, Martin; Reischl, Udo; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was the quantification of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on ten widely used pit and fissure sealant materials and the correlation of these findings to surface roughness (R(a)) and surface free energy (SFE). Additionally, changes in streptococcal adhesion and surface parameters after water immersion and artificial aging have been investigated. Circular specimens of ten fissure sealants (seven resin-based composites, two glass ionomers, and one compomer) were made and polished. Surface roughness was determined by perthometer and SFE by goniometer measurements. Sealant materials were incubated with S. mutans suspension (2.5 h, 37 degrees C), and adhering bacteria were quantified by using a biofluorescence assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Surface properties and S. mutans adhesion were measured prior to and after water immersion after 1 and 6 months and after additional thermocycling (5,000 cycles; 5 degrees C/55 degrees C). The tested sealants showed significant differences in S. mutans adhesion prior to and after the applied aging procedures. Aging resulted in slight increases (mostly <0.2 microm) in surface roughness, as well as in significant decreases in SFE and in significantly lower quantities of adhering bacteria. Ketac Bond and UltraSeal XT plus revealed the lowest adhesion potential after artificial aging. In general, the amount of adhering S. mutans was reduced after aging, which may be related to the decline in SFEs.

  11. Reflections on a sticky situation: how surface contact pulls the trigger for bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Viollier, Patrick H

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of bacterial cells to surfaces can be mediated by a wide variety of extracellular structures, which can either recognize specific molecular motifs or adhere in non-specific ways to multiple types of surfaces. The attachment is thought to be highly regulated, but the underlying sensory mechanism(s) are poorly understood. In the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the formation of adhesive organelles is 'hardwired' into the cell cycle regulatory circuitry. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Li et al. (2011) employed this model organism to examine the adhesion process and the transition from temporary to permanent attachment using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Surprisingly, they observed that adhesin production was not only under developmental control, but was also stimulated by surface contact. Initial reversible contact of the pili with the surface was followed by flagellum rotation arrest and subsequent induction of the holdfast to allow irreversible surface adhesion. These findings demonstrate that Caulobacter produces its holdfast only at the appropriate time for surface attachment, preventing premature export of the adhesin, which could then be inactivated by 'curing' or be masked by occluding particles. Importantly, their results support the notion that the flagellum serves as a mechanosensor for adhesion.

  12. Clustering of adhesion receptors following exposure of insect blood cells to foreign surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Zhuang, Shufei; Pilas, Barbara; Bee, Charles Mark; Kanost, Michael R

    2005-05-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses of insects involve interactions of two main classes of blood cells (hemocytes) known as granular cells and plasmatocytes. In response to a foreign surface, these hemocytes suddenly transform from circulating, non-adherent cells to cells that interact and adhere to each other and the foreign surface. This report presents evidence that during this adhesive transformation the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins lacunin and a ligand for peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin are released by granular cells and bind to surfaces of both granular cells and plasmatocytes. ECM protein co-localizes on cell surfaces with the adhesive receptors integrin and neuroglian, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The ECM protein(s) secreted by granular cells are hypothesized to interact with adhesion receptors such as neuroglian and integrin by cross linking and clustering them on hemocyte surfaces. This clustering of receptors is known to enhance the adhesiveness (avidity) of interacting mammalian immune cells. The formation of ring-shaped clusters of these adhesion receptors on surfaces of insect immune cells represents an evolutionary antecedent of the mammalian immunological synapse. PMID:15894002

  13. Enhanced cell adhesion on silk fibroin via lectin surface modification.

    PubMed

    Teuschl, Andreas H; Neutsch, Lukas; Monforte, Xavier; Rünzler, Dominik; van Griensven, Martijn; Gabor, Franz; Redl, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Various tissue engineering (TE) approaches are based on silk fibroin (SF) as scaffold material because of its superior mechanical and biological properties compared to other materials. The translation of one-step TE approaches to clinical application has generally failed so far due to the requirement of a prolonged cell seeding step before implantation. Here, we propose that the plant lectin WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), covalently bound to SF, will mediate cell adhesion in a time frame acceptable to be part of a one-step surgical intervention. After the establishment of a modification protocol utilizing carbodiimide chemistry, we examined the attachment of cells, with a special focus on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), on WGA-SF compared to pure native SF. After a limited time frame of 20min the attachment of ASCs to WGA-SF showed an increase of about 17-fold, as compared to pure native SF. The lectin-mediated cell adhesion further showed an enhanced resistance to trypsin (as a protease model) and to applied fluid shear stress (mechanical stability). Moreover, we could demonstrate that the adhesion of ASCs on the WGA-SF does not negatively influence proliferation or differentiation potential into the osteogenic lineage. To test for in vitro immune response, the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in contact with the WGA-SF was determined, showing no alterations compared to plain SF. All these findings suggest that the WGA modification of SF offers important benefits for translation of SF scaffolds into clinical applications. PMID:24530561

  14. Effect of wettability and surface roughness on ice-adhesion strength of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathidasan, T.; Kumar, S. Vijay; Bobji, M. S.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Basu, Bharathibai J.

    2014-09-01

    The anti-icing properties of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings were evaluated using a custom-built apparatus based on zero-degree cone test method. The ice-adhesion reduction factor (ARF) of these coatings has been evaluated using bare aluminium alloy as a reference. The wettability of the surfaces was evaluated by measuring water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle. It was found that the ice-adhesion strength (τ) on silicone based hydrophobic surfaces was ∼ 43 times lower than compared to bare polished aluminium alloy indicating excellent anti-icing property of these coatings. Superhydrophobic coatings displayed poor anti-icing property in spite of their high water repellence. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope reveal that Silicone based hydrophobic coatings exhibited smooth surface whereas the superhydrophobic coatings had a rough surface consisting of microscale bumps and protrusions superimposed with nanospheres. Both surface roughness and surface energy play a major role on the ice-adhesion strength of the coatings. The 3D surface roughness profiles of the coatings also indicated the same trend of roughness. An attempt is made to correlate the observed ice-adhesion strength of different surfaces with their wettability and surface roughness.

  15. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-01

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  16. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-01

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall. PMID:25332072

  17. Effect of surface potential on epithelial cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Yun; Kao, Wei-Lun; You, Yun-Wen; Chu, Yi-Hsuan; Chu, Kuo-Jui; Chen, Peng-Jen; Wu, Chen-Yi; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2016-05-01

    Cell adhesion is the basis of individual cell survival, division and motility. Hence, understanding the effects that the surface properties have on cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology are crucial. In particular, surface charge/potential has been identified as an important factor that affects cell behavior. However, how cells respond to incremental changes in surface potential remains unclear. By using binary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified Au surfaces that are similar in mechanical/chemical properties and provide a series of surface potentials, the effect of surface potential on the behavior of cells can be studied. In this work, the effect of surface potential on epithelial cells, including human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), were examined. The results showed that the adhesion density of epithelial cells increased with increasing surface potential, which is similar to but varied more significantly compared with fibroblasts. The proliferation rate is found to be independent of surface potential in both cell types. Furthermore, epithelial cells show no morphological change with respect to surface potential, whereas the morphology of the fibroblasts clearly changed with the surface potential. These differences between the cell types were rationalized by considering the difference in extracellular matrix composition. Laminin-dominant epithelial cells showed higher adhesion density and less morphological change than did fibronectin-dominant fibroblasts because the more significant adsorption of positively charged laminin on the surface enhanced the adhesion of epithelial cells. In contrast, due to the dominance of negatively charged fibronectin that adsorbed weakly on the surface, fibroblasts had to change their morphology to fit the inhomogeneous fibronectin-adsorbed area.

  18. Design of an anti-adhesive surface by a pilicide strategy.

    PubMed

    Reffuveille, Fany; Nicol, Marion; Dé, Emmanuelle; Thébault, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Biofilm formation on surfaces is one of major problems in medical, cosmetic and food industries. Nowadays any efficient treatment is known, as consequence, research of new strategies to inhibit biofilm formation is urgent. Recently, virstatin, which interferes with bacterial type IV pili formation, has demonstrated a capacity to inhibit biofilm formation developed by Acinetobacter baumannii after 24h. In this study, we aim to elaborate anti-adhesive surfaces preventing biofilm development by the covalent immobilization of virstatin on silicon surface. Surfaces were functionalized by self-assembled monolayers of two aminosilanes (11-aminoundecyltrimethoxysilane (AUTMS) and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)). Then, virstatin (2mM) was immobilized on those modified surfaces. We observed an increase in surface hydrophobicity of AUTMS modified substratum leading to an increase of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 adhesion (after 4h). Immobilization of virstatin molecule on APTMS modified surface was efficient to decrease cell attachment by 32.1±5.7% compared to unmodified surface. As virstatin is known to inhibit type IV pili formation in solution, the observed decrease of bacterial adhesion might be due to this pilicide action. We also demonstrated that hydrophobicity of strains plays a role in adhesion according to surface properties. In conclusion, immobilized virstatin succeeded to inhibit bacterial attachment of various Acinetobacter baumannii strains comparing to APTMS modified support. PMID:27469573

  19. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at constant water chemical potential in combination with basic theoretical arguments, we study hydration-induced interactions between two overall charge-neutral yet polar planar surfaces with different wetting properties. Whether the water film between the two surfaces becomes unstable below a threshold separation and cavitation gives rise to long-range attraction, depends on the sum of the two individual surface contact angles. Consequently, cavitation-induced attraction also occurs for a mildly hydrophilic surface interacting with a very hydrophobic surface. If both surfaces are very hydrophilic, hydration repulsion dominates at small separations and direct attractive force contribution can—if strong enough—give rise to wet adhesion in this case. In between the regimes of cavitation-induced attraction and hydration repulsion we find a narrow range of contact angle combinations where the surfaces adhere at contact in the absence of cavitation. This dry adhesion regime is driven by direct surface–surface interactions. We derive simple laws for the cavitation transition as well as for the transition between hydration repulsion and dry adhesion, which favorably compare with simulation results in a generic adhesion state diagram as a function of the two surface contact angles. PMID:26392526

  20. Adhesion of finely dispersed particles to the surface of coating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petryanov, I.V.; Lyashkevich, I.M.; Sadovskii, B.F.; Chernaya, L.G.; Chernyaeva, G.A.

    1986-12-01

    It was established experimentally that compressed gypsums with added organosilicon liquids GKZh-10 and GKZh-94 have the lowest values of the molecular and capillary components of adhesive strength of particles to surface. The specific bulk and surface electrical conductivities of natural marble are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than those of the gypsums. Thus the high-strength gypsums with the special additives have significantly lower adhesive strength toward dust particles than does natural marble. The dependence of the adhesive properties of materials on surface structure was estimated by scanning electron microscopy. The dust-retentive capability of the sample surfaces was determined by blow-off of precipitated particles by a current of filtered air.

  1. Chromia scale adhesion on 430 stainless steel: Effect of different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovsky, I.; Hou, P. Y.; Jacobson, C. P.; Visco, S. J.

    In the context of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications, the adhesion strength and failure location of chromia scale that developed on 430 stainless steel after various surface modifications prior to oxidations between 600 and 800 °C were evaluated. Results demonstrated that the tensile strength and nature of adhesion of the oxide/alloy interface on 430 stainless steel can be compromised by polishing, but can be improved by reducing surface impurities, increasing surface roughness and applying a coating that contains a reactive element, such as Y-nitrate. Optimally, a combination of firing in a reducing atmosphere and applying a thin yttrium nitrate coating was found to be especially effective. These findings identify surface modification techniques that improve scale adhesion for Cr 2O 3-forming metallic interconnects whether independently or beneath a protective coating.

  2. Failure Surface Analysis of Polyimide/Titanium Notched Coating Adhesion Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    GIUNTA,RACHEL K.; KANDER,RONALD G.

    2000-12-18

    Adhesively bonded joints of LaRC{trademark} PETI-5, a phenylethynyl-terminated polyimide, with chromic acid anodized titanium were fabricated and debonded interfacially. The adhesive-substrate failure surfaces were investigated using several surface analysis techniques. From Auger spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies, polymer appears to be penetrating the pores of the anodized substrate to a depth of approximately 100 nm. From x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data, the polymer penetrating the pores appears to be in electrical contact with the titanium substrate, leading to differential charging. These analyses confirm that the polymer is becoming mechanically interlocked within the substrate surface.

  3. Adhesion of sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant monolayers with TiO2 (rutile and anatase) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Darkins, Robert; Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2013-09-17

    Surfactants are widely used as templates to control the nucleation and growth of nanostructured metal oxides such as titania. To gain insight into the origin of surfactant-titania interactions responsible for polymorph and orientation selection, we simulate the self-assembly of an anionic surfactant monolayer on various low-index titania surfaces and for a range of densities. We characterize the binding in each case and compute the adhesion energies, finding anatase (100) and rutile (110) to be the strongest-binding surfaces. The sodium counterions in the monolayer are found to dominate the adhesion. It is also observed that the assembly is directed predominantly by surface-monolayer electrostatic complementarity.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of high temperature curable poly(arylene ether) structural adhesive and composite matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Mecham, S.J.; Jayaraman, S.; Bobbitt, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    Crosslinked poly(arylene ether) systems are projected to display many desirable properties suitable for aerospace structural adhesive and composite matrix applications. The synthesis and characterization of a series of processable high temperature curing poly(arylene ether) oligomers incorporating terminally reactive phenylethynyl endgroups will be discussed. Characterization of the oligomers includes NMR, intrinsic viscosity, parallel plate rheological behavior, TGA, and DSC. Curing of these oligomers was conducted at or above 380{degrees}C, providing a large processing window. Thermal stability is very good and the melt viscosity of the oligomers in the processing temperature range is exceptionally low.

  5. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery.

  6. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27046771

  7. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-05

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  8. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  9. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27046771

  10. Receding dynamics of contact lines and size-dependent adhesion on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Xue, Yahui; Lv, Pengyu; Huang, Shenglin; Lin, Hao; Duan, Huiling

    2016-05-14

    The microstructure size on textured surfaces of a given solid fraction exhibits an important effect on their properties. To understand the size effect on surface adhesion, we study the receding dynamics of the microscopic three-phase contact lines, the adhesive properties, and the relation between them on microstructured surfaces. Two types of surfaces are used, which are micropillar and micropore, respectively. First, the receding process of the contact line is directly observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which shows distinct characteristics on the two types of surfaces. The micro contact line experiences pinnning, sliding, and rupture on micropillar-patterned surfaces while no rupture occurs on micropore-patterned surfaces. The three-dimensional morphology of the micromeniscus on the micropillared surfaces and the two-dimensional scanning of the cross-sections of the micromeniscus along the diagonal direction are imaged. Based on the images, the local contact angles around the micropillar at the receding front, and the curvatures of the micro-meniscus are obtained. Then, the adhesive force on these surfaces is measured, which surprisingly shows an increasing trend with the size of the microstructure for micropillared surfaces but no obvious size dependence for micropored surfaces. Wetting hysteresis is also measured to testify the similar trend with the size for the two types of surfaces. Further investigation shows that the monotonic increase of the adhesive force with the increasing size of micropillars is due to the growing difficulty of the detachment of the contact lines. The underlying mechanism responsible for the size dependence of the adhesive force is the enhancement of the local reduced pressure exerted on the top of the micropillar with increasing size, resulting from the concave profile of the outer micromeniscus. PMID:27072295

  11. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  12. PolyNaSS grafting on titanium surfaces enhances osteoblast differentiation and inhibits Staphylococcus aureus adhesion.

    PubMed

    Alcheikh, A; Pavon-Djavid, G; Helary, G; Petite, H; Migonney, V; Anagnostou, F

    2013-07-01

    Titanium surface modifications to simultaneously prevent bacterial adhesion but promote bone-cell functions could be highly beneficial for improving implant osseointegration. In the present in vitro study, the effect of sulfonate groups on titanium surfaces was investigated with respect to both S. aureus adhesion and osteoblast functions pertinent to new bone formation. Commercial pure titanium (cpTi) squares were oxydized (Tiox), grafted with poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) groups (Tigraft) by covalent bonding using radical polymerization, and were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (HATR-FTIR) and colorimetry. Bacterial adhesion study showed that Tigraft exhibited high inhibition of S. aureus adhesion S at levels >90 %, when compared to cpTi (P < 0.05). In contrast osteoblasts adhesion was similar on all three titanium surfaces. While the kinetics of cell proliferation were similar on the three titanium surfaces, Alkaline phosphatase-specific activity of osteoblasts cultured on Tigraft surfaces was twofold higher than that observed on either on Tiox or cpTi surfaces (P < 0.01). More importantly, the amount and the distribution of calcium-containing nodules was different. The total area covered by calcium-containing nodules was 2.2-fold higher on the Tigraft as compared to either Tiox or cpTi surfaces (P < 0.01). These results provide evidence that poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) groups grafting on cpTi simultaneously inhibits bacteria adhesion but promote osteoblast function pertinent to new bone formation. Such modified titanium surfaces offer a promising strategy for preventing biofilm-related infections and enhancing osteointegration of implants in orthopaedic and dental applications. PMID:23625318

  13. HOS cell adhesion on Ti6Al4V surfaces texturized by laser engraving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Amador, A.; Carreño Garcia, H.; Escobar Rivero, P.; Peña Ballesteros, D. Y.; Estupiñán Duran, H. A.

    2016-02-01

    The cell adhesion of the implant is determinate by the chemical composition, topography, wettability, surface energy and biocompatibility of the biomaterial. In this work the interaction between human osteosarcoma HOS cells and textured Ti6Al4V surfaces were evaluated. Ti6Al4V surfaces were textured using a CO2 laser in order to obtain circular spots on the surfaces. Test surfaces were uncoated (C1) used as a control surface, and surfaces with points obtained by laser engraving, with 1mm spacing (C2) and 0.5mm (C3). The HOS cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotics. No cells toxicity after one month incubation time occurred. The increased cell adhesion and cell spreading was observed after 1, 3 and 5 days without significant differences between the sample surfaces (C2 and C3) and control (uncoated) at the end of the experiment.

  14. Nanoscale Cell Wall Deformation Impacts Long-Range Bacterial Adhesion Forces on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; Norde, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria occurs on virtually all natural and synthetic surfaces and is crucial for their survival. Once they are adhering, bacteria start growing and form a biofilm, in which they are protected against environmental attacks. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is mediated by a combination of different short- and long-range forces. Here we present a new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method to derive long-range bacterial adhesion forces from the dependence of bacterial adhesion forces on the loading force, as applied during the use of AFM. The long-range adhesion forces of wild-type Staphylococcus aureus parent strains (0.5 and 0.8 nN) amounted to only one-third of these forces measured for their more deformable isogenic Δpbp4 mutants that were deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking. The measured long-range Lifshitz-Van der Waals adhesion forces matched those calculated from published Hamaker constants, provided that a 40% ellipsoidal deformation of the bacterial cell wall was assumed for the Δpbp4 mutants. Direct imaging of adhering staphylococci using the AFM peak force-quantitative nanomechanical property mapping imaging mode confirmed a height reduction due to deformation in the Δpbp4 mutants of 100 to 200 nm. Across naturally occurring bacterial strains, long-range forces do not vary to the extent observed here for the Δpbp4 mutants. Importantly, however, extrapolating from the results of this study, it can be concluded that long-range bacterial adhesion forces are determined not only by the composition and structure of the bacterial cell surface but also by a hitherto neglected, small deformation of the bacterial cell wall, facilitating an increase in contact area and, therewith, in adhesion force. PMID:24212582

  15. How solid-liquid adhesive property regulates liquid slippage on solid surfaces?

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Wu, Yang; Pei, Xiaowei; Duan, Huiling; Xue, Qunji; Zhou, Feng

    2015-01-13

    The influence of solid-liquid adhesive property on liquid slippage at solid surfaces has been investigated using experiment approach on well-defined model surfaces as well as theoretical analysis. Based on a classical molecular-kinetic description for molecular and hydrodynamic slip, we propose a simple theoretical model that directly relates the liquid slip length to the liquid adhesive force on solid surfaces, which yields an exponential decay function. Well-defined smooth surfaces with varied surface wettability/adhesion are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers on gold with different mole ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic thiols. The adhesive force of a water droplet and the molecular slippage on these surfaces are probed by surface force apparatus and quartz crystal microbalance measurements, respectively. The experiment results are well consistent with our theoretical prediction. Our finding benefits the understanding of the underlying mechanism of liquid slippage on solid surfaces at molecular level and the rational design of microfluidics with an aim to be frictionless or highly controllable. PMID:25511171

  16. Bacteria and osteoblast adhesion to chitosan immobilized titanium surface: A race for the surface.

    PubMed

    Foss, Berit L; Ghimire, Niranjan; Tang, Ruogu; Sun, Yuyu; Deng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    In order to evaluate the anti-infective efficacy of the titanium implant materials, two co-culture systems, a low-bacteria/osteoblast (L-B) and a high-bacteria/osteoblast system (H-B), were established. Untreated (UN-Ti), sulfuric acid-treated (SA-Ti), and chitosan immobilized titanium (SA-CS-Ti) materials were developed and evaluated. Bacteria and osteoblast behaviors, including initial attachment (evaluated at 30 mins), adhesion (evaluated at 4 h), and osteoblast spreading on each material surface were evaluated using quantification assays, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal microscopy. Quantification analysis at 30 mins showed significantly higher number of osteoblast present on SA-CS-Ti in both L-B (10,083 ± 2626) and H-B (23,592 ± 2233) than those on the UN-Ti (p<0.05). SEM observation and confocal microscopy results showed more surface area was occupied by adhered osteoblasts on SA-CS-Ti than UN-Ti and SA-Ti in both co-culture systems at 30 mins. At all time points, SA-CS-Ti had the lowest level of bacterial adhesion compared to UN-Ti and SA-Ti in both co-culture systems. A significantly (p<0.05) lower number of bacteria were recovered from SA-CS-Ti (2233 ± 681) in the H-B system compared to UN-Ti (5367 ± 1662) and SA-Ti (4533 ± 680) at 4h. Quantitative and qualitative co-culture results show the great potential of chitosan immobilization onto implant materials to prevent implant-associated infections. PMID:26222405

  17. Adhesion-creepage characteristics of wheel/rail system under dry and contaminated rail surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzoubi, Mohammed F.

    1998-11-01

    This thesis presents an experimental and theoretical study of adhesion and creepage characteristics of wheel and rail under both dry and contaminated rail surfaces. The experimental work was conducted largely on the IIT 1/4.5 Scale Wheel/Rail Simulation Facility. Based on the experimental data in the laboratory, a theoretical model of adhesion and creepage relationship with different degrees of contamination was developed. Non-dimensional analysis of parameters yielded four important non-dimensional groups, which include the adhesion, creepage coefficients, the elastic properties of the materials, the load on the wheel surface roughness of wheel and rail, train speed and the contaminant density, viscosity and minimum film thickness. Rail contaminants were gathered from several U.S. passenger rail systems and tested on the laboratory facility. It was found that presence of moisture reduce the adhesion levels with these contaminants. Under hot air jet applications, normal adhesion could be achieved. A series of tests were conducted with water contamination on clean rail. Maximum adhesion for different tests was nearly constant and approximately 0.2. Maximum adhesion produced under water contamination is significantly affected by the average roughness of the wheel and the rail. As the roughness decreases, maximum adhesion drops sharply. Maximum adhesion also decreases with speed in the presence of moisture even at relatively low speeds (4--8 mph). An empirical relation of maximum adhesion with axle load, speed and roughness has been derived. An analytical expression for the adhesion-creepage curves under (TOR) lubrication has been derived. The maximum adhesion coefficient achieved for different (TOR) lubricant formulations was found to be approximately proportional to kinematic viscosity. A theoretical approach for estimating potential energy savings with the (TOR) lubricant was developed using the laboratory data of the 1/12.5 scale simulator and 1/4.5 scale test

  18. The effect of solvent polarity on the molecular surface properties and adhesion of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abu-Lail, Nehal I; Camesano, Terri A

    2006-08-01

    The elasticity and molecular surface characteristics of Escherichia coli JM109 were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solvents expressing different polarities. The nature of bacterial adhesion and surface characteristics was probed in formamide, water, and methanol, with dielectric constants of 111, 80, and 33, respectively. Solvent polarity affected the elasticity of the bacterium, the conformation of the cell surface biopolymers, the height of the surface biopolymers, and measured adhesion forces between the bacterium and silicon nitride. By applying the Hertz model to force-indentation data, we determined that the Young's modulus was greatest in the least polar solvent, with values of 182 +/- 34.6, 12.8 +/- 0.1, and 0.8 +/- 0.3 MPa in methanol, water, and formamide, respectively. The thickness of the biopolymer brush layer on the bacterial surface was quantified using a steric model, and these values increased as polarity increased, with values of 27, 93, and 257 nm in methanol, water, and formamide, respectively. The latter results suggest that highly polar conditions favor extension of the biopolymer brush layer. Cross-sectional analysis performed on tapping mode images of the bacterial cells in methanol, water, and formamide further supported this hypothesis. The image height values are larger, since the image analysis measures the height of the bacterium and the polymer layer, but the trend with respect to solvent polarity was the same as was obtained from the steric model of the brush length. Measured adhesion forces scaled inversely with solvent polarity, with greatest adhesion observed in the least polar solvent, methanol. The combined conformational changes to the bacterial surface and biopolymer layer result in different presentations of macromolecules to a substrate surface, and therefore affect the adhesion forces between the bacterial molecules and the substrate. These results suggest that polarity of the solvent environment can be

  19. Nano-materials for adhesive-free adsorbers for bakable extreme high vacuum cryopump surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stutzman, Marcy; Jordan, Kevin; Whitney, Roy R.

    2016-10-11

    A cryosorber panel having nanomaterials used for the cryosorption material, with nanomaterial either grown directly on the cryopanel or freestanding nanomaterials attached to the cryopanel mechanically without the use of adhesives. Such nanomaterial cryosorber materials can be used in place of conventional charcoals that are attached to cryosorber panels with special low outgassing, low temperature capable adhesives. Carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials could serve the same purpose as conventional charcoal cryosorbers, providing a large surface area for cryosorption without the need for adhesive since the nanomaterials can be grown directly on a metallic substrate or mechanically attached. The nanomaterials would be capable of being fully baked by heating above 100.degree. C., thereby eliminating water vapor from the system, eliminating adhesives from the system, and allowing a full bake of the system to reduce hydrogen outgassing, with the goal of obtaining extreme high vacuum where the pump can produce pressures below 1.times.10.sup.-12 Torr.

  20. Influence of artificial ageing on surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of artificial ageing on the surface properties and early Streptococcus mutans adhesion to current dental composites for the direct restoration of class II defects. Three hundred and thirty specimens each were prepared from five dental composites, and were randomly allotted to various artificial ageing protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7/90/365 days; thermal cycling, 6,000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). Prior and after each treatment, surface roughness (R(a)) and hydrophobicity were determined, and S. mutans adhesion (ATCC 25175; 2.5 h, 37 degrees C) was simulated with and without prior exposition to human whole saliva (2 h, 37 degrees C). Adherence of S. mutans was determined fluorometrically. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). For both R(a) and S. mutans adherence to uncoated and saliva-coated specimens, significant influences of the composite material, the ageing medium and the ageing duration have been observed; for surface hydrophobicity, significant influences of the composite material and the ageing duration were found. For uncoated specimens, significant increases in S. mutans adhesion were observed with prolonged artificial ageing, whereas significant decreases in S. mutans adhesion were found for the saliva-coated specimens. The data indicate influences of the artificial ageing method on surface parameters such as R(a) and hydrophobicity as well as microbial adhesion. The results underline the relevance of saliva coating on the outcome of studies simulating microbial adhesion, and highlight differences in the susceptibility of dental composites for the adhesion of oral bacteria.

  1. Programming Controlled Adhesion of E. coli to Target Surfaces, Cells, and Tumors with Synthetic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report synthetic adhesins (SAs) enabling the rational design of the adhesion properties of E. coli. SAs have a modular structure comprising a stable β-domain for outer membrane anchoring and surface-exposed immunoglobulin domains with high affinity and specificity that can be selected from large repertoires. SAs are constitutively and stably expressed in an E. coli strain lacking a conserved set of natural adhesins, directing a robust, fast, and specific adhesion of bacteria to target antigenic surfaces and cells. We demonstrate the functionality of SAs in vivo, showing that, compared to wild type E. coli, lower doses of engineered E. coli are sufficient to colonize solid tumors expressing an antigen recognized by the SA. In addition, lower levels of engineered bacteria were found in non-target tissues. Therefore, SAs provide stable and specific adhesion capabilities to E. coli against target surfaces of interest for diverse applications using live bacteria. PMID:25045780

  2. Immobilized liquid layers: A new approach to anti-adhesion surfaces for medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sotiri, Irini; Overton, Jonathan C; Waterhouse, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Surface fouling and undesired adhesion are nearly ubiquitous problems in the medical field, complicating everything from surgeries to routine daily care of patients. Recently, the concept of immobilized liquid (IL) interfaces has been gaining attention as a highly versatile new approach to antifouling, with a wide variety of promising applications in medicine. Here, we review the general concepts behind IL layers and discuss the fabrication strategies on medically relevant materials developed so far. We also summarize the most important findings to date on applications of potential interest to the medical community, including the use of these surfaces as anti-thrombogenic and anti-bacterial materials, anti-adhesive textiles, high-performance coatings for optics, and as unique platforms for diagnostics. Although the full potential and pitfalls of IL layers in medicine are just beginning to be explored, we believe that this approach to anti-adhesive surfaces will prove broadly useful for medical applications in the future. PMID:27022136

  3. Inductively Coupling Plasma (ICP) Treatment of Propylene (PP) Surface and Adhesion Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yenchun; Fu, Yenpei

    2009-12-01

    Study on increasing the roughness of the polymer substrate surface to enhance the adhesion with the copper layer in an inductively coupling plasma (ICP) process was carried out. The microstructure of the polymer substrate surfaces, which were exposed to different kinds of plasma treatment, was identified by scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis, peel strength of the copper coating and water surface contact angle. The adhesion of the substrate was largely enhanced by plasma treatment and the copper deposited coating reached a value of 7.68 kgf/m in verifying the adhesion of the copper coating with polymer material. The quality of the line/space 50/50 μm produced in the laboratory was examined by the pressure cooker test and proved to meet the requirement.

  4. Biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces by combining mussel-inspired adhesion with lotus-inspired coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Ji, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Jia, Shun-Tian

    2015-08-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces on PET textiles were fabricated by combined bioinspiration from the strong adhesion of marine mussels and the two-scale structure of lotus leaves under mild conditions. Dopamine can spontaneously polymerize in alkaline aqueous solution to form a thin adhesive layer of polydopamine (PDA) wrapping on the micro-scale fibers. The as-formed thin PDA layer worked as a reactive template to generate PDA nanoparticles decorated on the fiber surfaces, imparting the textiles with excellent UV-shielding properties as well as a hierarchical structure similar to the morphology of the lotus leaf. After further modification with perfluorodecyl trichlorosilane, the textiles turned superhydrophobic with a water contact angle higher than 150°. Due to the strong adhesion of PDA to a wide range of materials, the present strategy may be extendable to fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces on a variety of other substrates.

  5. Nanocrystalline diamond surfaces for adhesion and growth of primary neurons, conflicting results and rational explanation

    PubMed Central

    Ojovan, Silviya M.; McDonald, Mathew; Rabieh, Noha; Shmuel, Nava; Erez, Hadas; Nesladek, Milos; Spira, Micha E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a variety of proliferating cell types, it was shown that the surface of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) provides a permissive substrate for cell adhesion and development without the need of complex chemical functionalization prior to cell seeding. In an extensive series of experiments we found that, unlike proliferating cells, post-mitotic primary neurons do not adhere to bare NCD surfaces when cultured in defined medium. These observations raise questions on the potential use of bare NCD as an interfacing layer for neuronal devices. Nevertheless, we also found that classical chemical functionalization methods render the “hostile” bare NCD surfaces with adhesive properties that match those of classically functionalized substrates used extensively in biomedical research and applications. Based on the results, we propose a mechanism that accounts for the conflicting results; which on one hand claim that un-functionalized NCD provides a permissive substrate for cell adhesion and growth, while other reports demonstrate the opposite. PMID:24966832

  6. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  7. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties. PMID:26909529

  8. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  9. Contact studies of weak adhesive interactions in water with membrane enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, David Alan

    The measurement of weak adhesive energies has previously been difficult to obtain. To measure these energies, I designed a technique that uses the combined sensitivities of both a quartz crystal resonator and the inflation of an elastomeric polymer membrane. The surfaces of the quartz crystal and/or the membrane are modified with water swollen polymer brushes, which are used to eliminate nonspecific adhesion. These brushes are then end-modified with adhesive functional groups. An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator as the membrane layer is placed in contact with the surface of these swollen brushes. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. The calculated shift decreases substantially for increases in the brush thickness of ten to twenty nanometers, giving a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the resonant frequency shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. Detailed calculations are presented for the specific case of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes swollen by water and capped by a poly(styrene-ethylene/butene-styrene) (SEBS) elastomeric, water-permeable membrane. These calculations show that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer. This surface acoustic wave technique was coupled with an inflation method that enabled quantification of the adhesion between the membrane and the brush coated surface. This adhesive interaction is obtained from the contact angle made between the quartz and membrane surfaces and the tension on the membrane. An analysis of the membrane profile based on the numerical solution of the axisymmetric Laplace equation is developed and used to investigate both adhesive and non-adhesive situations with both an

  10. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne; Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Mozetic, Miran; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy

    2012-01-01

    This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions. PMID:24955631

  11. Elastic-plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; De Angeli, M.; Bykov, I.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Brochard, F.; Ripamonti, D.; den Harder, N.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-08-01

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust.

  12. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  13. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  14. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to glass surfaces measured by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC).

    PubMed

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; de Freitas, Patricia Scandiucci; Dan Daniels, A U; Meyer, Jürg

    2008-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of the oral biofilm, called dental plaque. Plaque is the cause of caries, periodontal diseases, and periimplantitis. Investigations of dental plaque, including bacterial adhesion, employ various in vivo and in vitro models using microscopic methods. Microcalorimetry offers another direct approach. The model organism Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the first colonizers adhering to the saliva-coated human tooth surfaces or dental materials within minutes after tooth cleaning. TAM III thermostats, equipped with microcalorimeters, were used for isothermal microcalorimetric (IMC) measurements of heat production as a function of time, expressed by power-time (p-t) curves. Continuous measurements of heat production of growing S. sanguinis cells showed their overall metabolic activity and were highly reproducible. For the adhesion experiments the bacteria were allowed to adhere to different amounts of glass beads. Growing S. sanguinis cells produced a characteristic p-t curve with a maximum of 500 microW at 4.5 h when reaching 10(9) cells ml(-1). The same number of stationary S. sanguinis cells, suspended in PBS produced only approximately 30 microW at 0.5 h due to adhesion. But the amount of heat increased with available glass surface area, indicating that a portion of the heat of adhesion was measured. Similar results were obtained with stationary S. sanguinis cells suspended in human saliva. This study shows that microcalorimetric evaluation of initial bacterial adhesion is indeed possible and may become a rapid, reproducible screening method to study adhesion of different bacteria to different dental materials or to modified surfaces.

  15. Influence of Surface Properties and Impact Conditions on Adhesion of Insect Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residues can cause premature transition to turbulent flow on laminar flow airfoils. Engineered surfaces that mitigate the adhesion of insect residues provide, therefore, a route to more efficient aerodynamics and reduced fuel burn rates. Areal coverage and heights of residues depend not only on surface properties, but also on impact conditions. We report high speed photography of fruit fly impacts at different angles of inclination on a rigid aluminum surface, optical microscopy and profilometry, and contact angle goniometry to support the design of engineered surfaces. For the polyurethane and epoxy coatings studied, some of which exhibited superhydrophobicity, it was determined that impact angle and surface compositions play critical roles in the efficacy of these surfaces to reduce insect residue adhesion.

  16. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  17. Estimation of the adhesive force distribution for the flagellar adhesion of Escherichia coli on a glass surface.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Akinori; Nobuhira, Noritaka; Narahara, Hisaya; Toyoda, Syunsuke; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Toshiyuki

    2015-07-01

    The effects of the presence or absence of microbial flagella and the microbial motility on the colloidal behaviors of microbial cells were quantitatively evaluated. The microbial cell attachment and detachment processes on a glass surface were observed directly using a parallel-plate flow chamber. Wild-type, flagellar paralyzed, and nonflagellated Escherichia coli strains were used as model microbial cells. In the cell attachment tests, the microbial adhesion rate in a 160mM NaCl solution was approximately 10 times higher than that in a 10mM solution, for all E. coli strains. The colloidal behavior of the microbial cells agreed well with the predictions of the DLVO theory. In addition, the microbial flagella and motility did not significantly affect the cell attachment, regardless of the existence of a potential barrier between the cell and the glass substratum. In the cell detachment tests, the cumulative number of microbial cells detached from the glass substratum with increasing flow rate was fit well with the Weibull distribution function. The list of strains arranged in order of increasing median drag force required to remove them was nonflagellated strain, flagellar paralyzed strain, and wild-type strain. These results indicated that the flagella and the flagellar motility inhibited the cell detachment from the glass substratum. Furthermore, a large external force would likely be required to inhibit the microbial adhesion in the early stage of the biofilm formation.

  18. General methodology for evaluating the adhesion force of drops and bubbles on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Antonini, C; Carmona, F J; Pierce, E; Marengo, M; Amirfazli, A

    2009-06-01

    The shortcomings of the current formulation for calculating the adhesion force for drops and bubbles with noncircular contact lines are discussed. A general formulation to evaluate the adhesion force due to surface forces is presented. Also, a novel methodology, that is, IBAFA, image based adhesion force analysis, was developed to allow implementation of the general formulation. IBAFA is based on the use of multiple profile images of a drop. The images are analyzed (1) to accurately reconstruct the contact line shape, which is analytically represented by a Fourier cosine series, and (2) to measure contact angles at multiple locations along the contact line and determine the contact angle distribution based on a linear piecewise interpolation routine. The contact line shape reconstruction procedure was validated with both actual experiments and simulated experiments. The procedure for the evaluation of the adhesion force was tested using simulated experiments with synthetic drops of known shapes. A comparison with current methods showed that simplifying assumptions (e.g., elliptical contact line or linear contact angle distribution) used in these methods result in errors up to 76% in the estimated adhesion force. However, the drop adhesion force evaluated using IBAFA results in small errors on the order of 1%.

  19. Surface Chemistry of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Relevant to Adhesion on Mineral Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Devasia, Preston; Natarajan, K. A.; Sathyanarayana, D. N.; Rao, G. Ramananda

    1993-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans cells grown on sulfur, pyrite, and chalcopyrite exhibit greater hydrophobicity than ferrous ion-grown cells. The isoelectric points of sulfur-, pyrite-, and chalcopyrite-grown cells were observed to be at a pH higher than that for ferrous ion-grown cells. Microbe-mineral interactions result in change in the surface chemistry of the organism as well as that of the minerals with which it has interacted. Sulfur, pyrite, and chalcopyrite after interaction with T. ferrooxidans exhibited a significant shift in their isoelectric points from the initial values exhibited by uninteracted minerals. With antibodies raised against sulfur-grown T. ferrooxidans, pyrite- and chalcopyrite-grown cells showed immunoreactivity, whereas ferrous ion-grown cells failed to do so. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of sulfur-grown cells suggested that a proteinaceous new cell surface appendage synthesized in mineral-grown cells brings about adhesion to the solid mineral substrates. Such an appendage was found to be absent in ferrous ion-grown cells as it is not required during growth in liquid substrates. PMID:16349107

  20. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models.

  1. Covalent and stable CuAAC modification of silicon surfaces for control of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Vutti, Surendra; Buch-Månson, Nina; Schoffelen, Sanne; Bovet, Nicolas; Martinez, Karen L; Meldal, Morten

    2015-03-23

    Stable primary functionalization of metal surfaces plays a significant role in reliable secondary attachment of complex functional molecules used for the interfacing of metal objects and nanomaterials with biological systems. In principle, this can be achieved through chemical reactions either in the vapor or liquid phase. In this work, we compared these two methods for oxidized silicon surfaces and thoroughly characterized the functionalization steps by tagging and fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that the vapor-phase functionalization only provided transient surface modification that was lost on extensive washing. For stable surface modification, a liquid-phase method was developed. In this method, silicon wafers were decorated with azides, either by silanization with (3-azidopropyl)triethoxysilane or by conversion of the amine groups of an aminopropylated surface by means of the azido-transfer reaction. Subsequently, D-amino acid adhesion peptides could be immobilized on the surface by use of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. This enabled the study of cell adhesion to the metal surface. In contrast to unmodified surfaces, the peptide-modified surfaces were able to maintain cell adhesion during significant flow velocities in a microflow reactor.

  2. Durability of the tunable adhesive superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces for harsh environment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yao; Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng; Huo, Jinglan; Yang, Qing; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    Tunable adhesive superhydrophobic materials have attracted increasing research interest due to their applications in microdroplet manipulation, biological detection and microfluidic system. However, most of the artificial materials easily lose superhydrophobicity in harsh environments. The durability of superhydrophobic materials is very important to extend their lifetime in practical applications. In this paper, bioinspired durable superhydrophobicity with tunable adhesion on polytetrafluoroethylene surfaces is realized via a one-step femtosecond laser irradiation. On the laser-induced superhydrophobic surfaces, the sliding angle can be tuned from 1° to 90° (water droplet is pinned on the surface at any titled angles). The tunable water adhesion results from different contact states which change from the lotus state to the transition state and then to the composite state with increasing average distance of irradiation points. Water droplet quick localization and no-loss droplet transportation were achieved through designing surface adhesion. In addition, the resultant surfaces are so stable that they can maintain superhydrophobicity even after storing in harsh environments, without dramatical superhydrophobicity decay for a long time.

  3. Handling sticky resin by Stingless Bees: adhesive properties of surface structures.

    PubMed

    Gastauer, Markus; Campos, Lucio A O; Wittmann, Dieter

    2013-09-01

    Many Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Meliponini) like Tetragonisca angustula collect resin to defend their nests against intruders like ants or Robber Bees. Small portions of resin are attached to intruders bodies and extremities causing their immobilization. It has been observed that resin is removed easily from the bee's mandible but adheres strongly to the intruder's cuticle. We tested the hypothesis that resin sticks lesser to the mandibles of Stingless Bees than to the surface of intruders due to special surface structures or adhesive properties of these structures. The surface structures of the mandible of T. angustula and the trochanter of Camponotus sericeiventris were studied by scanning electron microscopy. To measure adhesion properties, selected surfaces were fixed on a fine glass pin and withdrawn from a glass tip covered with resin. The deformation of the glass pin indicates adhesion forces operating between the resin and the selective surface. The absolute value of the forces is computed from the glass pin's stiffness. It has been shown that resin sticks more to the smooth mandible of the bee than to the structured trochanter of the ant. A new hypothesis to be tested says that the bees might lubricate their mandibles with nectar or honey to reduce the resin's adhesion temporarily. PMID:24068098

  4. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Jens; Emge, Philippe; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Vogel, Viola

    2013-12-01

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length.

  5. Adhesion strength measurements of excimer-laser-treated PTFE surfaces using liquid photoreagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Bela; Smausz, Tomi; Kresz, Norbert; Ignacz, Ferenc

    2003-04-01

    The most known feature of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is its adhesion behavior: it is hydrophobic and oleophobic at the same time. This can cause serious problems and obstacles during the surface treatment and fixing of PTFE objects. During our experiments Teflon films were irradiated by an ArF excimer laser beam in presence of liquid photoreagents containing amine groups (aminoethanol, 1,2-diaminoethane, triethylene-tetramine). In consequence of the treatment the adhesion of the modified surfaces significantly increased, the samples could be glued and moistened. The adhesion strength of the glued surfaces was measured in the function of the applied laser fluence. The adhesion strength increased drastically between 0 - 1 mJ/cm2 and showed saturation above 1 mJ/cm2 at approximately 5 - 9 MPa values depending on the applied photoreagents. On the basis of our experiments it was found that the treatment with triethylene-tetramine was the most effective. The surface chemical modifications of the treated Teflon samples can be due to the incorporation of amine groups into the surface layer.

  6. Gradient immobilization of a cell adhesion RGD peptide on thermal responsive surface for regulating cell adhesion and detachment.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhui; Wu, Jindan; Gao, Changyou

    2011-06-15

    Using surface initiated atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and an injection method, a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly(acrylic acid)-g-RGD (PNIPAAm-b-PAA-g-RGD) gradient surface was prepared. First, a thermoresponsive surface with a constant thickness of PNIPAAm was fabricated, onto which the AA monomers were block copolymerized using the PNIPAAm macromolecules as initiators. During this process, a continuous injection method was employed to yield a molecular weight gradient of PAA on the underlying uniform PNIPAAm layer. RGD peptide was finally covalently immobilized onto the PAA gradient by carbodiimide chemistry. In vitro culture of HepG2 cells showed that immobilization of the RGD peptide could accelerate cell attachment, while the thermoresponsive layer beneath could effectively release the cells by simply lowering temperature. Thus, the PNIPAAm-b-PAA-g-RGD gradient surface, combining the thermal response with cell affinity properties, can well regulate the cell adhesion and detachment, which may thus be useful for investigation of cell-substrate interactions with a smaller number of samples.

  7. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P < 0.05). In general, improvements in bond strength (MPa) were found in the following order: M10 > C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. PMID:25424595

  8. The influence of surface modification on bacterial adhesion to titanium-based substrates.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Martina; Dogša, Iztok; Stošicki, Tjaša; Stopar, David; Kalin, Mitjan; Kobe, Spomenka; Novak, Saša

    2015-01-28

    This study examines bacterial adhesion on titanium-substrates used for bone implants. Adhesion is the most critical phase of bacterial colonization on medical devices. The surface of titanium was modified by hydrothermal treatment (HT) to synthesize nanostructured TiO2-anatase coatings, which were previously proven to improve corrosion resistance, affect the plasma protein adsorption, and enhance osteogenesis. The affinity of the anatase coatings toward bacterial attachment was studied by using a green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli (gfp-E. coli) strain in connection with surface photoactivation by UV irradiation. We also analyzed the effects of surface topography, roughness, charge, and wettability. The results suggested the dominant effects of the macroscopic surface topography, as well as microasperity at the surface roughness scale, which were produced during titanium machining, HT treatment, or both. Macroscopic grooves provided a preferential site for bacteria deposit within the valleys, while the microscopic roughness of the valleys determined the actual interaction surface between bacterium and substrate, resulting in an "interlocking" effect and undesired high bacterial adhesion on nontreated titanium. In the case of TiO2-coated samples, the nanocrystals reduced the width between the microasperities and thus added nanoroughness features. These factors decreased the contact area between the bacterium and the coating, with consequent lower bacterial adhesion (up to 50% less) in comparison to the nontreated titanium. On the other hand, the pronounced hydrophilicity of one of the HT-coated discs after pre-irradiation seemed to enhance the attachment of bacteria, although the increase was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). This observation may be explained by the acquired similar degree of wetting between gfp-E. coli and the coating. No correlation was found between the bacterial adhesion and the ζ-values of the samples in PBS, so the

  9. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  10. Stick tight: suction adhesion on irregular surfaces in the northern clingfish

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Dylan K.; Kleinteich, Thomas; Kleinteich, Anja; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Summers, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    The northern clingfish, Gobiesox maeandricus, is able to adhere to slippery, fouled and irregular surfaces in the marine intertidal environment. We have found that the fish can adhere equally well to surfaces with a broad range of surface roughness, from the finest sandpaper (Ra = 15 µm) to textures suitable for removing finish from flooring (Ra = 269 µm). The fishes outperform man-made suction cups, which only adhere to the smoothest surfaces. The adhesive forces of clingfish correspond to pressures 0.2–0.5 atm below ambient and are 80–230 times the body weight of the fish. The tenacity appears related to hierarchically structured microvilli around the edges of the adhesive disc that are similar in size and aspect ratio to the setae found on the feet of geckoes, spiders and insects. This points to a possible biomimetic solution to the problem of reversibly adhering to irregular, submerged surfaces. PMID:23637393

  11. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expressing vancomycin resistance early after adhesion to a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Sakimura, Toshiyuki; Kajiyama, Shiro; Adachi, Shinji; Chiba, Ko; Yonekura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masato; Koseki, Hironobu; Miyamoto, Takashi; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Osaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We investigated biofilm formation and time of vancomycin (VCM) resistance expression after adhesion to a metal surface in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis with a VCM MIC of 1 μg/mL was used. The bacteria were made to adhere to a stainless steel washer and treated with VCM at different times and concentrations. VCM was administered 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after adhesion. The amount of biofilm formed was evaluated based on the biofilm coverage rates (BCRs) before and after VCM administration, bacterial viability in biofilm was visually observed using the fluorescence staining method, and the viable bacterial count in biofilm was measured. The VCM concentration required to decrease BCR significantly compared with that of VCM-untreated bacteria was 4 μg/mL, even in the 0 hr group. In the 4 and 8 hr groups, VCM could not inhibit biofilm growth even at 1,024 μg/mL. In the 8 hr group, viable bacteria remained in biofilm at a count of 10(4) CFU even at a high VCM concentration (1,024 μg/mL). It was suggested that biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expresses resistance to VCM early after adhesion to a metal surface. Resistance increased over time after adhesion as the biofilm formed, and strong resistance was expressed 4-8 hours after adhesion.

  12. Adhesion of melanoma cells to the surfaces of microspheres studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hiroyuki; Aso, Yuki; Fukasawa, Tomonori; Higashitani, Ko

    2012-03-01

    It is of fundamental importance to understand the mechanism of adhesion between a mammalian cell and a material surface. In the present study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the interaction forces between the murine melanoma cells and the single polystyrene microspheres of different surface chemistries in serum-free culture media: the unmodified hydrophobic polystyrene (bare/PS) and the carboxyl-modified polystyrene (COOH/PS). The cell-microsphere interaction forces have been also measured in the culture media containing the free Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides as an integrin inhibitor. In the absence of free RGD peptides, the adhesion force for COOH/PS was larger than that for bare/PS. The adhesion force for COOH/PS decreased with increasing the concentration of free RGD peptides added in the culture media and then became almost constant at the RGD concentrations larger than 0.5 mg/mL, whereas that for bare/PS remained very small regardless of the RGD concentration. In addition, the effects of the microsphere diameter and the contact time on the adhesion forces were investigated. On the basis of the AFM results, possible mechanism of cell-microsphere adhesion will be discussed.

  13. Monitoring the Contact Stress Distribution of Gecko-Inspired Adhesives Using Mechano-Sensitive Surface Coatings.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jens W; Xue, Longjian; Erath, Johann; Drotlef, Dirk-M; Campo, Aránzazu Del; Fery, Andreas

    2016-07-20

    The contact geometry of microstructured adhesive surfaces is of high relevance for adhesion enhancement. Theoretical considerations indicate that the stress distribution in the contact zone is crucial for the detachment mechanism, but direct experimental evidence is missing so far. In this work, we propose a method that allows, for the first time, the detection of local stresses at the contact area of biomimetic adhesive microstructures during contact formation, compression and detachment. We use a mechano-sensitive polymeric layer, which turns mechanical stresses into changes of fluorescence intensity. The biomimetic surface is brought into contact with this layer in a well-defined fashion using a microcontact printer, while the contact area is monitored with fluorescence microscopy in situ. Thus, changes in stress distribution across the contact area during compression and pull-off can be visualized with a lateral resolution of 1 μm. We apply this method to study the enhanced adhesive performance of T-shaped micropillars, compared to flat punch microstructures. We find significant differences in the stress distribution of the both differing contact geometries during pull-off. In particular, we find direct evidence for the suppression of crack nucleation at the edge of T-shaped pillars, which confirms theoretical models for the superior adhesive properties of these structures. PMID:27327111

  14. Monitoring the Contact Stress Distribution of Gecko-Inspired Adhesives Using Mechano-Sensitive Surface Coatings.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jens W; Xue, Longjian; Erath, Johann; Drotlef, Dirk-M; Campo, Aránzazu Del; Fery, Andreas

    2016-07-20

    The contact geometry of microstructured adhesive surfaces is of high relevance for adhesion enhancement. Theoretical considerations indicate that the stress distribution in the contact zone is crucial for the detachment mechanism, but direct experimental evidence is missing so far. In this work, we propose a method that allows, for the first time, the detection of local stresses at the contact area of biomimetic adhesive microstructures during contact formation, compression and detachment. We use a mechano-sensitive polymeric layer, which turns mechanical stresses into changes of fluorescence intensity. The biomimetic surface is brought into contact with this layer in a well-defined fashion using a microcontact printer, while the contact area is monitored with fluorescence microscopy in situ. Thus, changes in stress distribution across the contact area during compression and pull-off can be visualized with a lateral resolution of 1 μm. We apply this method to study the enhanced adhesive performance of T-shaped micropillars, compared to flat punch microstructures. We find significant differences in the stress distribution of the both differing contact geometries during pull-off. In particular, we find direct evidence for the suppression of crack nucleation at the edge of T-shaped pillars, which confirms theoretical models for the superior adhesive properties of these structures.

  15. Nanoscale topographic changes on sterilized glass surfaces affect cell adhesion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Lauer, Günter; Oswald, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk; Franz, Clemens M

    2014-08-01

    Producing sterile glass surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of laboratory and medical applications, including in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering. However, sterilization may change the surface properties of glass and thereby affect its use for medical applications, for instance as a substrate for culturing cells. To investigate potential effects of sterilization on glass surface topography, borosilicate glass coverslips were left untreated or subjected to several common sterilization procedures, including low-temperature plasma gas, gamma irradiation and steam. Imaging by atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the surface of untreated borosilicate coverslips features a complex landscape of microislands ranging from 1000 to 3000 nm in diameter and 1 to 3 nm in height. Steam treatment completely removes these microislands, producing a nanosmooth glass surface. In contrast, plasma treatment partially degrades the microisland structure, while gamma irradiation has no effect on microisland topography. To test for possible effects of the nanotopographic structures on cell adhesion, human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on untreated or sterilized glass surfaces. Analyzing fibroblast adhesion 3, 6, and 24 h after cell seeding revealed significant differences in cell attachment and spreading depending on the sterilization method applied. Furthermore, single-cell force spectroscopy revealed a connection between the nanotopographic landscape of glass and the formation of cellular adhesion forces, indicating that fibroblasts generally adhere weakly to nanosmooth but strongly to nanorough glass surfaces. Nanotopographic changes induced by different sterilization methods may therefore need to be considered when preparing sterile glass surfaces for cell culture or biomedical applications.

  16. Fine tuning of graphene-metal adhesion by surface alloying.

    PubMed

    Alfè, D; Pozzo, M; Miniussi, E; Günther, S; Lacovig, P; Lizzit, S; Larciprete, R; Santos Burgos, B; Menteş, T O; Locatelli, A; Baraldi, A

    2013-01-01

    We show that bimetallic surface alloying provides a viable route for governing the interaction between graphene and metal through the selective choice of the elemental composition of the surface alloy. This concept is illustrated by an experimental and theoretical characterization of the properties of graphene on a model PtRu surface alloy on Ru(0001), with a concentration of Pt atoms in the first layer between 0 and 50%. The progressive increase of the Pt content determines the gradual detachment of graphene from the substrate, which results from the modification of the carbon orbital hybridization promoted by Pt. Alloying is also found to affect the morphology of graphene, which is strongly corrugated on bare Ru, but becomes flat at a Pt coverage of 50%. The method here proposed can be readily extended to several supports, thus opening the way to the conformal growth of graphene on metals and to a full tunability of the graphene-substrate interaction. PMID:23938361

  17. Surface adhesive forces: a metric describing the drag-reducing effects of superhydrophobic coatings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Song, Mengmeng; Dong, Hongyu; Shi, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Nanomaterials with superhydrophobic properties are promising as drag-reducing coatings. However, debates regarding whether superhydrophobic surfaces are favorable for drag reduction require further clarification. A quantified water adhesive force measurement is proposed as a metric and its effectiveness demonstrated using three typical superhydrophobic coatings on model ships with in situ sailing tests. PMID:25418808

  18. Surface adhesive forces: a metric describing the drag-reducing effects of superhydrophobic coatings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Song, Mengmeng; Dong, Hongyu; Shi, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Nanomaterials with superhydrophobic properties are promising as drag-reducing coatings. However, debates regarding whether superhydrophobic surfaces are favorable for drag reduction require further clarification. A quantified water adhesive force measurement is proposed as a metric and its effectiveness demonstrated using three typical superhydrophobic coatings on model ships with in situ sailing tests.

  19. Effect of sterilization and water rinsing on cell adhesion to titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Mitsuhiro; Kozuka, Taro; Asano, Yuta; Kakuchi, Yuko; Arai, Hirofumi; Ohtsu, Naofumi

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the effects of sterilization and water rinsing on cell adhesion to titanium (Ti) surfaces were investigated. Ti substrates were treated using autoclave, dry-heating, and 70% ethanol. Thereafter, some of the substrates were rinsed with sterilized ultrapure water. Osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the Ti surfaces and the numbers of adhered cells were counted after cultivation for 24 h. The number of cells adhered to ethanol-treated plates was lower than that on autoclave- and dry-heat-sterilized Ti substrates. However, interestingly, the cell adhesion performance on the ethanol-treated substrates was superior compared to that of the other substrates, after rinsing with ultrapure water. To investigate the origin of these differences, the chemical state of the treated surfaces was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We found a clear correlation between the number of adhered cells and the concentration of hydroxide groups (OH-) on the surface, thus indicating that a change in OH- concentration affects the cell adhesion performance on Ti substrates. Since the sterilization and subsequent water rinsing affect the cell adhesion on Ti substrates, we suggest that the sterilization methods should be unified to correctly evaluate the cytocompatibility of metallic materials.

  20. Aircraft surface coatings study: Energy efficient transport program. [sprayed and adhesive bonded coatings for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Surface coating materials for application on transport type aircraft to reduce drag, were investigated. The investigation included two basic types of materials: spray on coatings and adhesively bonded films. A cost/benefits analysis was performed, and recommendations were made for future work toward the application of this technology.

  1. Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces – A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phat L.; Gamboa, Jessica R.; McCracken, Katherine E.; Riley, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring cell adhesion to an underlying biomaterial surface is vital in implant device design and tissue engineering, particularly under circumstances where cells are subjected to potential detachment from overriding fluid flow. Cell-substrate adhesion is a highly regulated process involving the interplay of mechanical properties, surface topographic features, electrostatic charge, and biochemical mechanisms. At the nanoscale level the physical properties of the underlying substrate are of particular importance in cell adhesion. Conventionally, natural, pro-adhesive, and often thrombogenic, protein biomaterials are frequently utilized to facilitate adhesion. In the present study nanofabrication techniques are utilized to enhance the biological functionality of a synthetic polymer surface, polymethymethacrylate, with respect to cell adhesion. Specifically we examine the effect on cell adhesion of combining: 1. optimized surface texturing, 2. electrostatic charge and 3. cell adhesive ligands, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, as an ensemble of nanoparticles trapped in nanowells. Our results reveal that the ensemble strategy leads to enhanced, more than simply additive, endothelial cell adhesion under both static and flow conditions. This strategy may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of blood-contacting surfaces of cardiovascular devices subjected to flow-mediated shear. PMID:23225491

  2. Synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtovyy, Oleksandr

    The composition and behavior of surfaces and interfaces play a pivotal role in dictating the overall efficiency of the majority of polymeric materials and devices. Surface properties of the materials can be altered using surface modification techniques. It is necessary to highlight that successful methods of surface modification should affect only the upper layer of the polymer material without changing bulk properties. The processes must introduce new functionalities to the surface, optimize surface roughness, lubrication, hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, adhesion, conductivity, and/or biocompatibility. Research presented in this dissertation is dedicated to the synthesis, characterization, and application of thin macromolecular layers anchored to polymer substrates. Specifically, attachment of functional polymers via a "grafting to" approach has been extensively studied using PET and nylon model substrates. First, poly(glycidyl methacrylate) was used to introduce permanent functionalities to the model substrates by anchoring it to model films. Then, three different functional polymers were grafted on top of the previous layer. As one part of this study, the temperature and time dependence of grafting functional layers were studied. The surface coverage by hydrophobic polymer was determined from experimental data and predicted by a model. In general, the model has a high degree of predictive capability. Next, surface modification of polymeric fibers and membranes is presented as an important application of the polymer thin layers targeted in the study. Specifically, the procedures developed for surface modification of model substrates was employed for modification of PET, nylon, and cotton fabrics as well as PET track-etched membranes. Since epoxy groups are highly reactive in various chemical reactions, the approach becomes virtually universal, allowing both various surfaces and end-functionalized macromolecules to be used in the grafted layer synthesis. PET

  3. Grafting of phosphorylcholine functional groups on polycarbonate urethane surface for resisting platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Feng, Yakai; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Miao; Shi, Changcan; Khan, Musammir; Guo, Jintang

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the resistance of platelet adhesion on material surface, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) was grafted onto polycarbonate urethane (PCU) surface via Michael reaction to create biomimetic structure. After introducing primary amine groups via coupling tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TAEA) onto the polymer surface, the double bond of MPC reacted with the amino group to obtain MPC modified PCU. The modified surface was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results verified that MPC was grafted onto PCU surface by Michael reaction method. The MPC grafted PCU surface had a low water contact angle and a high water uptake. This means that the hydrophilic PC functional groups improved the surface hydrophilicity significantly. In addition, surface morphology of MPC grafted PCU film was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the grafted surface was rougher than the blank PCU surface. In addition, platelet adhesion study was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The PCU films after treated with platelet-rich plasma demonstrated that much fewer platelets adhered to the MPC-grafted PCU surface than to the blank PCU surface. The antithrombogenicity of the MPC-grafted PCU surface was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The result suggested that the MPC modified PCU may have potential application as biomaterials in blood-contacting and some subcutaneously implanted devices.

  4. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  5. Engineered nanoparticle adhesion and removal from tomato surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Sablani, Shyam S; Rasco, Barbara

    2013-10-23

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are being used in different industries due to their unique physicochemical properties. NPs may be toxic and could pose both public health and environmental contamination risks. In this study, two concentrations (50 and 500 μg mL(-1)) of titania (TiO2), silica (SiO2), and alumina (Al2O3) were applied to contaminate the surface of cherry tomato as a food model, followed by washing with deionized water (DI) to remove the NPs from the tomato surfaces. The NP surface charge and hydrodynamic diameter results showed that the isoelectric point (IEP) for alumina was at pH 9-9.6, for silica at pH <3, and for titania was at pH 6.5-6.8; in addition, the highest hydrodynamic size for all NPs was observed at the IEP. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) indicated that the highest NP concentration was observed on tomato surfaces contaminated at the higher concentration (500 μg mL(-1)) (P < 0.05). After the tomatoes had been washed with DI, alumina levels decreased significantly, whereas for titania and silica, no significant difference in NP concentration on tomato surface was observed following the washing treatment. This study shows that removal of NPs may be possible with a simple washing treatment but that removal of NPs is likely to be more effective when the moment ratio is >1, which can occur if the pH of the washing solution is significantly different from the IEP of NPs. PMID:24079610

  6. Novel Epoxy Particulate Composites for Mitigation of Insect Residue Adhesion on Future Aircraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Gardner, John M.; Penner, Ronald K.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2014-01-01

    Drag is reduced significantly for airflow over surfaces when laminar flow can be maintained over greater chord lengths, the distance from the leading edge of an airfoil.1 However, surface imperfections, such as chipped paint, scratches, and events that change topography on a microscopic scale can introduce airflow instabilities resulting in premature transition to turbulent flow.1 Although many of these surface imperfections can be avoided with proper maintenance, advanced materials, and advanced manufacturing practices, topographical surface anomalies arising during flight from insect impacts cannot be controlled and can influence laminar flow stability. Practical solutions to this operational challenge need to be developed for future aircraft to have full advantage of laminar flow designs that improve fuel efficiency.2 Researchers have investigated various methods to mitigate insect residue adhesion for decades.3 Although several techniques have demonstrated efficacy including mechanical scrapers, active liquid discharge systems, and sacrificial paper coatings, they have not been commercially implemented due to increased manufacturing and operational complexity, environmental impact, and weight penalties. Coatings offer a simple route for passive insect residue adhesion prevention without many of the challenges associated with maintenance of laminar flow.4 In our previous work, we determined that most commercially available materials were not effective at insect residue adhesion.5 We also identified improvements when both surface energy could be controlled by surface modifying agents and the topography could be altered through the use of micron-sized and nanometer-sized filler materials.6 In this work, these general principles were applied to an epoxy system to evaluate the behavior of the surface modifying agent, a fluorinated alkyl ether oligomer, on surface energy and insect residue adhesion properties.

  7. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; Dantas, Talita Souza; Naves, Lucas Zago; das Neves, Flávio Domingues; da Mota, Adérito Soares

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing). For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6 ± 3.05; MP, 5.36 ± 2.08; NP, 4.96 ± 1.93; MF, 7.36 ± 2.45; and LP, 1.56 ± 0.62 (CFU). The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23 ± 0.15; MP, 0.52 ± 0.05; NP, 0.60 ± 0.08; MF, 2.69 ± 0.12; and LP, 0.07 ± 0.02 (μm). A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material. PMID:27516775

  8. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; da Mota, Adérito Soares

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing). For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6 ± 3.05; MP, 5.36 ± 2.08; NP, 4.96 ± 1.93; MF, 7.36 ± 2.45; and LP, 1.56 ± 0.62 (CFU). The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23 ± 0.15; MP, 0.52 ± 0.05; NP, 0.60 ± 0.08; MF, 2.69 ± 0.12; and LP, 0.07 ± 0.02 (μm). A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material. PMID:27516775

  9. Elastomeric angled microflaps with reversible adhesion for transfer-printing semiconductor membranes onto dry surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byungsuk; Cho, Sungbum; Seo, Seungwan; Lee, Jongho

    2014-11-12

    Recent research for unconventional types of electronics has revealed that it is necessary to transfer-print high-performance microelectronic devices onto diverse surfaces, including flexible or stretchable surfaces, to relieve mechanical constraints associated with conventional rigid electronics. Picking up and placing ultrathin microdevices without damage are critical procedures for the successful manufacture of various types of unconventional electronics. This paper introduces elastomeric angled microflaps that have reversible adhesion; i.e., they generate higher adhesion for picking up and low adhesion for printing because of their structural shapes and viscoelastic material properties. The microstructured stamp, fabricated in relatively simple ways, enables simultaneous transfer-printing of multiple silicon membranes that have irregular shapes in sizes ranging from micrometer to millimeter scales. Mechanical characterizations by experiment reveal optimal parameters for picking up and placing ultrathin membranes on a programmable custom-built microstage. Further refinement of the structures and materials should be useful for many applications requiring the microassembly of multiple semiconductor membranes in diverse shapes and sizes on dry surfaces without the aid of liquid adhesives.

  10. Adhesion switch on a gecko-foot inspired smart nanocupule surface.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlong

    2014-11-21

    A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 ± 5.5° and 150.6 ± 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation.

  11. A simplified model for dynamics of cell rolling and cell-surface adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Cimrák, Ivan

    2015-03-10

    We propose a three dimensional model for the adhesion and rolling of biological cells on surfaces. We study cells moving in shear flow above a wall to which they can adhere via specific receptor-ligand bonds based on receptors from selectin as well as integrin family. The computational fluid dynamics are governed by the lattice-Boltzmann method. The movement and the deformation of the cells is described by the immersed boundary method. Both methods are fully coupled by implementing a two-way fluid-structure interaction. The adhesion mechanism is modelled by adhesive bonds including stochastic rules for their creation and rupture. We explore a simplified model with dissociation rate independent of the length of the bonds. We demonstrate that this model is able to resemble the mesoscopic properties, such as velocity of rolling cells.

  12. UV-assisted surface modification of PET fiber for adhesion improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-Dong; Sheng, De-Kun; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Li, Tong-Bing; Yang, Yu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A facile and highly efficient method for adhesion improvement of PET/TPU laminates was introduced. A considerable improvement in adhesion was achieved by treating PET fabric with isocyanate (MDI) in toluene solution. Compared with unmodified ones, the maximal peel strength reaches to 2.27 kN/m (up to three times). The fabrics were also treated with NaOH and CDT (corona discharge treatment) and the results were compared respectively. It is considered that the improvement mainly depends on the strengthening of chemical bonding and mechanical interlocking between the fiber and the adhesive matrix. As the difference directly affects the effective transference of the stress (tension force) from matrix to fiber. The failure surface of PET fiber was severely destroyed which could be examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  13. Effect of Ti adhesive layer on individual gold nanodisk surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Ghosh, Pijush; French, David; Bauman, Stephen; Herzog, Joseph B.

    We investigate localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold nanodisks of various diameter and height fabricated on extremely thin Ti adhesive layers. Dark field scattering measurements reveal significant dependence of SPR in the size nano structures and polarization of the light. Comparisons of peak resonance extracted from spectra using Gaussian fitting of different Ti adhesive layer thickness indicates significant red shifting and damping of the plasmon mode. Experimental results are supported by numerical simulation based on three dimensional finite element time domain analysis. From the simulation and experimental results we quantitatively developed optimized model equation of resonance mode of the nanodisks with respect to adhesive layer thickness and broadening effect of the line shape. Such optimized model is very helpful in guiding targeted nanofabrication such as gold nanodisk antennas or biosensors.

  14. Hydrothermal degradation of lignin: products analysis for phenol formaldehyde adhesive synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Li, Ming-Fei; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-01-01

    Corncob lignin was treated with pressurized hot water in a cylindrical autoclave in current investigation. With the aim of investigating the effect of reaction temperature and retention time on the distribution of degradation products, the products were divided into five fractions including gas, volatile organic compounds, water-soluble oil, heavy oil, and solid residue. It was found that hydrothermal degradation of corncob lignin in pressurized hot water produced a large amount of phenolic compounds with lower molecular weight than the raw lignin. Some phenolic and benzene derivatives monomers such as vanillin, 2-methoxy-phenol, 2-ethyl-phenol, p-xylene, and 1, 3-dimethyl-benzene were also identified in the degradation products. The products were further analyzed by GC-MS, GPC, 2D-HSQC, and (31)P-NMR to investigate their suitability for partial incorporation into phenol formaldehyde adhesive as a substitution of phenol. The results indicated that the reaction temperature had more effect on the products distribution than the retention time. The optimal condition for heavy oil production appeared at 290 °C with retention time 0 min. The compounds of heavy oil had more active sites than the raw lignin, suggesting that the heavy oil obtained from hydrothermal degradation of lignin is a promising material for phenol formaldehyde adhesive synthesis.

  15. Adhesion of single polyelectrolyte molecules on silica, mica, and bitumen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Long, Jun; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2006-02-14

    In a recent study (Energy Fuels 2005, 19, 936), a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) was used as a process aid to recover bitumen from oil sand ores. It was found that HPAM addition at the bitumen extraction step not only improved bitumen recovery but also enhanced fine solids settling in the tailings stream. To understand the role of HPAM, single-molecule force spectroscopy was employed for the first time to measure the desorption/adhesion forces of single HPAM molecules on silica, mica, and bitumen surfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Silicon wafers with an oxidized surface layer and newly cleaved mica were used, respectively, to represent sand grains and clays in oil sands. The force measurements were carried out in deionized water and in commercial plant process water under equilibrium conditions. The desorption/adhesion forces of HPAM obtained on mica, silica, and bitumen surfaces were approximately 200, 40, and 80 pN in deionized water and approximately 100, 50, and 40 pN in the plant process water, respectively. The measured adhesion forces together with the zeta potential values of these surfaces indicate that the polymer would preferentially adsorb onto clay surfaces rather than onto bitumen surfaces. It is the selective adsorption of HPAM that benefits both bitumen recovery and tailings settling when the polymer was added directly to the bitumen extraction process at an appropriate dosage.

  16. Adhesion and sliding response of a biologically inspired fibrillar surface: experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Rocca, G Della; Guduru, P R; Gao, H

    2008-07-01

    Inspired by the adhesion mechanisms of several animal species such as geckos, beetles and flies, several efforts in designing and fabricating surface engineering strategies have been made recently to mimic the adhesive and frictional behaviour of biological foot pads. An important feature of such biological adhesion systems is the ability to switch between strong attachment and easy detachment, which is crucial for animal locomotion. Recent investigations have suggested that such a 'switching' mechanism can be achieved by the elastic anisotropy of the attachment pad, which renders the magnitude of the detachment force to be direction dependent. This suggestion is supported by the observations that the fibres of the foot pads in geckos and insects are oriented at an angle to the base and that geckos curl their toes backwards (digital hyperextension) while detaching from a surface. One of the promising bio-inspired architectures developed recently is a film-terminated fibrillar PDMS surface; this structure was demonstrated to result in superior detachment force and energy dissipation compared with a bulk PDMS surface. In this investigation, the film-terminated fibrillar architecture is modified by tilting the fibres to make the surface vertically more compliant and elastically anisotropic. The directional detachment and the sliding resistance between the tilted fibrillar surfaces and a spherical glass lens are measured: both show significant directional anisotropy. It is argued that the anisotropy introduced by the tilted fibres and the deformation-induced change in the compliance of the fibre layer are responsible for the observed anisotropy in the detachment force.

  17. Effect of surface treatments of porcelain on adhesion of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash; Farzad, Azin; Adimi, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    Surface treatment of porcelain is required to minimize the adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces of the restoration. This study sought to assess the effects of 3 different porcelain surface treatments on adhesion of Candida albicans. This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 60 porcelain disks (10 × 3 mm) randomly divided into 4 groups of 15. The nonglazed group received no surface treatment; specimens in the other 3 groups were glazed in the furnace, overglazed with liquid glaze, or polished using a polishing kit. The specimens were washed, sterilized, and separately incubated with 350 µL of Candida albicans suspension for 24 hours. Specimens were then rinsed for 20 seconds and shaken in 1 mL of saline solution for 1 minute, and 20 µL of this suspension was cultured in a plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. Candida albicans colonies were counted to assess the number of microorganisms adhering to each disk. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistically significant differences were found among the 4 groups in terms of C albicans adherence (P = 0.001). The nonglazed porcelain had the highest and the overglazed porcelain had the lowest mean adherence value. No statistically significant difference was noted between glazed and polished specimens. Based on the obtained results, overglazing resulted in the least adhesion of C albicans, and polishing provided a surface as smooth as a glazed surface. PMID:27367639

  18. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  19. Construction of a tethered poly(ethylene glycol) surface gradient for studies of cell adhesion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mougin, K; Ham, A S; Lawrence, M B; Fernandez, E J; Hillier, A C

    2005-05-24

    Surface gradients can be used to perform a wide range of functions and represent a novel experimental platform for combinatorial discovery and analysis. In this work, a gradient in the coverage of a surface-immobilized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) layer is constructed to interrogate cell adhesion on a solid surface. Variation of surface coverage is achieved by controlled transport of a reactive PEG precursor from a point source through a hydrated gel. Immobilization of PEG is achieved by covalent attachment of the PEG molecule via direct coupling chemistry to a cystamine self-assembled monolayer on gold. This represents a simple method for creating spatial gradients in surface chemistry that does not require special instrumentation or microfabrication procedures. The structure and spatial distribution of the PEG gradient are evaluated via ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. A cell adhesion assay using bovine arteriole endothelium cells is used to study the influence of PEG thickness and chain density on biocompatibility. The kinetics of cell adhesion are quantified as a function of the thickness of the PEG layer. Results depict a surface in which the variation in layer thickness along the PEG gradient strongly modifies the biological response.

  20. Adhesion switch on a gecko-foot inspired smart nanocupule surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenlong

    2014-10-01

    A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 +/- 5.5° and 150.6 +/- 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation.A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 +/- 5.5° and 150.6 +/- 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04090b

  1. Quantitative Characterization of the Influence of the Nanoscale Morphology of Nanostructured Surfaces on Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Vyas, Varun; Patil, Rajendra; Sharma, Vimal; Scopelliti, Pasquale Emanuele; Bongiorno, Gero; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Gade, Wasudev Namdev; Milani, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological features. The

  2. Surface characterization in composite and titanium bonding: Carbon fiber surface treatments for improved adhesion to thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of anodization in NaOH, H2SO4, and amine salts on the surface chemistry of carbon fibers was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surfaces of carbon fibers after anodization in NaOH and H2SO4 were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), angular dependent XPS, UV absorption spectroscopy of the anodization bath, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and polar/dispersive surface energy analysis. Hercules AS-4, Dexter Hysol XAS, and Union Carbide T-300 fibers were examined by STEM, angular dependent XPS, and breaking strength measurement before and after commercial surface treatment. Oxygen and nitrogen were added to the fiber surfaces by anodization in amine salts. Analysis of the plasmon peak in the carbon 1s signal indicated that H2SO4 anodization affected the morphological structure of the carbon fiber surface. The work of adhesion of carbon fibers to thermoplastic resins was calculated using the geometric mean relationship. A correlation was observed between the dispersive component of the work of adhesion and the interfacial adhesion.

  3. Amino Acid-Based Zwitterionic Polymer Surfaces Highly Resist Long-Term Bacterial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingsheng; Li, Wenchen; Wang, Hua; Newby, Bi-Min Zhang; Cheng, Fang; Liu, Lingyun

    2016-08-01

    The surfaces or coatings that can effectively suppress bacterial adhesion in the long term are of critical importance for biomedical applications. Herein, a group of amino acid-based zwitterionic polymers (pAAZ) were investigated for their long-term resistance to bacterial adhesion. The polymers were derived from natural amino acids including serine, ornithine, lysine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The pAAZ brushes were grafted on gold via the surface-initiated photoiniferter-mediated polymerization (SI-PIMP). Results show that the pAAZ coatings highly suppressed adsorption from the undiluted human serum and plasma. Long-term bacterial adhesion on these surfaces was investigated, using two kinds of representative bacteria [Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa] as the model species. Results demonstrate that the pAAZ surfaces were highly resistant to bacterial adhesion after culturing for 1, 5, 9, or even 14 days, representing at least 95% reduction at all time points compared to the control unmodified surfaces. The bacterial accumulation on the pAAZ surfaces after 9 or 14 days was even lower than on the surfaces grafted with poly[poly(ethyl glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (pPEGMA), one of the most common antifouling materials known to date. The pAAZ brushes also exhibited excellent structural stability in phosphate-buffered saline after incubation for 4 weeks. The bacterial resistance and stability of pAAZ polymers suggest they have good potential to be used for those applications where long-term suppression to bacterial attachment is desired. PMID:27397718

  4. Adhesive performance of the stick-capture apparatus of rove beetles of the genus Stenus (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) toward various surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N; Betz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Rove beetles of the genus Stenus possess a unique adhesive prey-capture apparatus that enables them to catch elusive prey such as springtails over a distance of several millimeters. The prey-capture device combines the hierarchically organized morphology of dry adhesive systems with the properties of wet ones, since an adhesive secretion is released into the contact zone. We hypothesize that this combination enables Stenus species successfully to capture prey possessing a wide range of surface structures and chemistries. We have investigated the influence of both surface energy and roughness of the substrate on the adhesive performance of the prey-capture apparatus in two Stenus species. Force transducers have been used to measure both the compressive and adhesive forces generated during the predatory strike of the beetles on (1) epoxy resin surfaces with defined roughness values (smooth versus rough with asperity diameters ranging from 0.3 to 12 μm) and (2) hydrophobic versus hydrophilic glass surfaces. Our experiments show that neither the surface roughness nor the surface energy significantly influences the attachment ability of the prey-capture apparatus. Thus, in contrast to the performance of locomotory adhesive systems in geckos, beetles, and flies, no critical surface roughness exists that might impede adhesion of the prey-capture apparatus of Stenus beetles. The prey-capture apparatus of Stenus beetles is therefore well adapted to adhere to the various unpredictable surfaces with diverse roughness and surface energy occurring in a wide range of potential prey.

  5. Adhesive performance of the stick-capture apparatus of rove beetles of the genus Stenus (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) toward various surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N; Betz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Rove beetles of the genus Stenus possess a unique adhesive prey-capture apparatus that enables them to catch elusive prey such as springtails over a distance of several millimeters. The prey-capture device combines the hierarchically organized morphology of dry adhesive systems with the properties of wet ones, since an adhesive secretion is released into the contact zone. We hypothesize that this combination enables Stenus species successfully to capture prey possessing a wide range of surface structures and chemistries. We have investigated the influence of both surface energy and roughness of the substrate on the adhesive performance of the prey-capture apparatus in two Stenus species. Force transducers have been used to measure both the compressive and adhesive forces generated during the predatory strike of the beetles on (1) epoxy resin surfaces with defined roughness values (smooth versus rough with asperity diameters ranging from 0.3 to 12 μm) and (2) hydrophobic versus hydrophilic glass surfaces. Our experiments show that neither the surface roughness nor the surface energy significantly influences the attachment ability of the prey-capture apparatus. Thus, in contrast to the performance of locomotory adhesive systems in geckos, beetles, and flies, no critical surface roughness exists that might impede adhesion of the prey-capture apparatus of Stenus beetles. The prey-capture apparatus of Stenus beetles is therefore well adapted to adhere to the various unpredictable surfaces with diverse roughness and surface energy occurring in a wide range of potential prey. PMID:22119444

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) for the Evaluation of Shear-Force-Dependent Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zagorodko, Oleksandr; Bouckaert, Julie; Dumych, Tetiana; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Larroulet, Iban; Yanguas Serrano, Aritz; Alvarez Dorta, Dimitri; Gouin, Sebastien G.; Dima, Stefan-Ovidiu; Oancea, Florin; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The colonization of Escherichia coli (E. coli) to host cell surfaces is known to be a glycan-specific process that can be modulated by shear stress. In this work we investigate whether flow rate changes in microchannels integrated on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) surfaces would allow for investigating such processes in an easy and high-throughput manner. We demonstrate that adhesion of uropathogenic E. coli UTI89 on heptyl α-d-mannopyranoside-modified gold SPR substrates is minimal under almost static conditions (flow rates of 10 µL·min−1), and reaches a maximum at flow rates of 30 µL·min−1 (≈30 mPa). This concept is applicable to the investigation of any ligand-pathogen interactions, offering a robust, easy, and fast method for screening adhesion characteristics of pathogens to ligand-modified interfaces. PMID:26018780

  7. Coordinate role for cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and alpha 4 beta 1 integrin in mediating melanoma cell adhesion to fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Cellular recognition and adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) has a complex molecular basis, involving both integrins and cell surface proteoglycans (PG). The current studies have used specific inhibitors of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) synthesis along with anti- alpha 4 integrin subunit monoclonal antibodies to demonstrate that human melanoma cell adhesion to an A-chain derived, 33-kD carboxyl- terminal heparin binding fragment of human plasma fibronectin (FN) involves both cell surface CSPG and alpha 4 beta 1 integrin. A direct role for cell surface CSPG in mediating melanoma cell adhesion to this FN fragment was demonstrated by the identification of a cationic synthetic peptide, termed FN-C/H-III, within the fragment. FN-C/H-III is located close to the amino terminal end of the fragment, representing residues #1721-1736 of intact FN. FN-C/H-III binds CSPG directly, can inhibit CSPG binding to the fragment, and promotes melanoma cell adhesion by a CSPG-dependent, alpha 4 beta 1 integrin- independent mechanism. A scrambled version of FN-C/H-III does not inhibit CSPG binding or cell adhesion to the fragment or to FN-C/H-III, indicating that the primary sequence of FN-C/H-III is important for its biological properties. Previous studies have identified three other synthetic peptides from within this 33-kD FN fragment that promote cell adhesion by an arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) independent mechanism. Two of these synthetic peptides (FN-C/H-I and FN-C/H-II) bind heparin and promote cell adhesion, implicating cell surface PG in mediating cellular recognition of these two peptides. Additionally, a third synthetic peptide, CS1, is located in close proximity to FN-C/H-I and FN-C/H-II and it promotes cell adhesion by an alpha 4 beta 1 integrin-dependent mechanism. In contrast to FN-C/H-III, cellular recognition of these three peptides involved contributions from both CSPG and alpha 4 integrin subunits. Of particular importance are observations

  8. Cell adhesive and antifouling polyvinyl chloride surfaces via wet chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Matthias; Strand, Dennis; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is one of the most frequently used polymers for the manufacturing of medical devices. Limitations for its usage are based upon unfavorable surface properties of the polymer including its hydrophobicity and lack of functionalities in order to increase its versatility. To address this issue, wet chemical modification of PVC was performed through surface amination using the bifunctional compound ethylene diamine. The reaction was conducted in order to achieve maximum surface amination while leaving the bulk material unaffected. The initial activation step was characterized by means of various methods including contact angle measurements, colorimetric amine quantification, infrared spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Depth profiles were obtained by a confocal microscopic method using fluorescence labeling. Exclusive surface modification was thus confirmed. To demonstrate biological applications of the presented technique, two examples were chosen: The covalent immobilization of the cell adhesive Asp-Gly-Asp-Ser-peptide (RGD) onto PVC samples yielded a surface that strongly supported cellular adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts. In contrast, the decoration of PVC with the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol prevented cellular adhesion to a large extent. The impact of these modifications was demonstrated by cell culture experiments.

  9. Multiscale treatment of theoretical mechanisms for the protection of hydrogel surfaces from adhesive forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    One role of a lubricant is to prevent wear of two surfaces in contact, which is likely to be the result of adhesive forces that cause a pair of asperities belonging to two surfaces in contact to stick together. Such adhesive sticking of asperities can occur both for sliding surfaces and for surfaces which are pressed together and then pulled apart. The latter situation, for example, is important for contact lenses, as prevention of sticking reduces possible damage to the cornea as the lenses are inserted and removed from the eye. Contact lenses are made from both neutral and polyelectrolyte hydrogels. It is demonstrated here that sticking of neutral hydrogels can be prevented by repulsive forces between asperities in contact, resulting from polymers attached to the gel surface but not linked with each other. For polyelectrolyte hydrogels, it is shown that osmotic pressure due to counterions, held at the interface between asperities in contact by the electrostatic attraction between the ions and the fixed charges in the gel, can provide a sufficiently strong repulsive force to prevent adhesive sticking of small-length-scale asperities.

  10. Cell adhesive and antifouling polyvinyl chloride surfaces via wet chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Matthias; Strand, Dennis; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is one of the most frequently used polymers for the manufacturing of medical devices. Limitations for its usage are based upon unfavorable surface properties of the polymer including its hydrophobicity and lack of functionalities in order to increase its versatility. To address this issue, wet chemical modification of PVC was performed through surface amination using the bifunctional compound ethylene diamine. The reaction was conducted in order to achieve maximum surface amination while leaving the bulk material unaffected. The initial activation step was characterized by means of various methods including contact angle measurements, colorimetric amine quantification, infrared spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Depth profiles were obtained by a confocal microscopic method using fluorescence labeling. Exclusive surface modification was thus confirmed. To demonstrate biological applications of the presented technique, two examples were chosen: The covalent immobilization of the cell adhesive Asp-Gly-Asp-Ser-peptide (RGD) onto PVC samples yielded a surface that strongly supported cellular adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts. In contrast, the decoration of PVC with the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol prevented cellular adhesion to a large extent. The impact of these modifications was demonstrated by cell culture experiments. PMID:22747750

  11. Effect of surface cleanliness of aluminium substrates on silicone rubber adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, L.; Meier, P.; Kornmann, X.; Hillborg, H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the minimum surface cleanliness of aluminium substrates required for good and reproducible silicone rubber adhesion. Aluminium substrates were prepared, ranging from 'contaminated' to different degrees of 'cleaned'. The surface energy of the substrates was determined by contact angle measurements. The surfaces were also compared using simplified methods, such as a wettability test or by the use of inks with known surface tension. Silicone rubber was then compression moulded onto the cleaned and primed substrates. The silicone rubber adhesion was then evaluated by lap-shear testing, before and after ageing. The ageing step consisted of immersion of samples in boiling water for 100 h to evaluate the hydrolytic stability of the interfaces. The failure modes after lap-shear testing were determined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and were divided into three different categories: cohesive failure, adhesive failure or a mixture thereof. Energy dispersive x-ray mapping was useful in clarifying the failure modes by determining the position of the primer, which contained Ti. It was concluded that in order to obtain a strong and stable interface, exhibiting mainly cohesive failure between the aluminium substrate and silicone rubber, the surface energy of the substrate before priming should be >45 mJ m-2, including a polar component of >10 mJ m-2. This corresponded to a hydrophobicity class of the substrate of >=6, according to IEC 62073.

  12. Characterization of adhesion associated surface properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bartková, G; Ciznár, I; Lehotská, V; Kernová, T

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli was isolated from the urine of patients with pyelonephritis, with urinary tract infections other than pyelonephritis and with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Surface properties of the strains were analyzed by the salting-out aggregation test (SAT), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), Congo red binding (Crb), agglutination of erythrocytes (MRHA) and latex particles covered by digalactoside (PF) and by adherence to tissue culture cells. In addition, a DNA probe for the pap gene was used. The DNA probe detected the highest proportion of strains with pap gene in the group of patients with pyelonephritis, lower in the urinary tract infections other than pyelonephritis and the lowest in the group with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Tests for P-fimbriae (PF, MRHA) showed a similar distribution. Hydrophobicity measured by SAT and by HIC did not show differences among the tested groups of strains. The results suggest that factors other than the P-fimbriae and hydrophobicity may contribute to the persistence of E. coli in the urinary tract.

  13. EFFECT OF SURFACE TREATMENTS ON THE SPREADING VELOCITY OF SIMPLIFIED ADHESIVE SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Pazinatto, Flávia B.; Lopes, Fernanda A.; Marquezini, Luiz; de Castro, Fabrício L. A.; Atta, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the roughness of glass surfaces submitted to different treatments and to correlate it with the spreading velocity of two adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Glass slides were used as substrates to evaluate the spreading velocity of Single Bond and Prime & Bond NT adhesive systems. Six different surface treatments were compared: 1) no treatment; 2) silanization (SL); 3) sandblasting (SB); 4) SB + SL; 5) 10% hydrofluoric acid treatment (HF); 6) HF + SL. Before and after treatments, surface roughness was measured by a profilometer (Ra, μm). Drop volumes (10 μl) of the adhesive systems were deposited onto substrates with a micropipette to observe materials spreading during 30s. Data were expressed in mm/s as spreading velocity. Statistical significances among groups were analyzed using one-way and two-way-ANOVA designs and the SNK test. Results: Significant differences in spreading velocity were found between materials (p < 0.001) and among treatments (p < 0.001). Silanization decreased the spreading velocity for both adhesives in comparison to groups where it was not performed (p < 0.05). Differences in roughness were found only for SB surfaces that were rougher than the others (p < 0.05). Silanization decreased the roughness of SB surfaces (p < 0.05). Linear regression did not indicate any correlation between spreading velocity and roughness (R = 0.173). Conclusions: Although surface treatments yielded different roughness, they did not provide differences in the spreading velocity of the simplified bonding systems studied. Silanization decreased bonding systems' spreading velocities. PMID:19089237

  14. Solvent-free synthesis of microparticles on superamphiphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu; Paven, Maxime; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Ye, Ming; Wu, Si; Schuster, Thomas; Klapper, Markus; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-10-18

    Polymeric and composite microspheres can be synthesized without solvents or process liquids by using superamphiphobic surfaces. In this method, the repellency of superamphiphobic layers to monomers and polymer melts and the extremely low adhesion to particles are taken advantage of.

  15. Adhesive forces and surface properties of cold gas plasma treated UHMWPE

    PubMed Central

    Preedy, Emily Callard; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Evans, Sam L.; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment was used on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), a common articulating counter material employed in hip and knee replacements. UHMWPE is a biocompatible polymer with low friction coefficient, yet does not have robust wear characteristics. CAP effectively cross-links the polymer chains of the UHMWPE improving wear performance (Perni et al., Acta Biomater. 8(3) (2012) 1357). In this work, interactions between CAP treated UHMWPE and spherical borosilicate sphere (representing model material for bone) were considered employing AFM technique. Adhesive forces increased, in the presence of PBS, after treatment with helium and helium/oxygen cold gas plasmas. Furthermore, a more hydrophilic surface of UHMWPE was observed after both treatments, determined through a reduction of up to a third in the contact angles of water. On the other hand, the asperity density also decreased by half, yet the asperity height had a three-fold decrease. This work shows that CAP treatment can be a very effective technique at enhancing the adhesion between bone and UHMWPE implant material as aided by the increased adhesion forces. Moreover, the hydrophilicity of the CAP treated UHMWPE can lead to proteins and cells adhesion to the surface of the implant stimulating osseointegration process. PMID:25431523

  16. Adhesive forces and surface properties of cold gas plasma treated UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Emily Callard; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Evans, Sam L; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-10-20

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment was used on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), a common articulating counter material employed in hip and knee replacements. UHMWPE is a biocompatible polymer with low friction coefficient, yet does not have robust wear characteristics. CAP effectively cross-links the polymer chains of the UHMWPE improving wear performance (Perni et al., Acta Biomater. 8(3) (2012) 1357). In this work, interactions between CAP treated UHMWPE and spherical borosilicate sphere (representing model material for bone) were considered employing AFM technique. Adhesive forces increased, in the presence of PBS, after treatment with helium and helium/oxygen cold gas plasmas. Furthermore, a more hydrophilic surface of UHMWPE was observed after both treatments, determined through a reduction of up to a third in the contact angles of water. On the other hand, the asperity density also decreased by half, yet the asperity height had a three-fold decrease. This work shows that CAP treatment can be a very effective technique at enhancing the adhesion between bone and UHMWPE implant material as aided by the increased adhesion forces. Moreover, the hydrophilicity of the CAP treated UHMWPE can lead to proteins and cells adhesion to the surface of the implant stimulating osseointegration process.

  17. Surface Polarity Of Beta-hmx Crystal And The Related Adhesive Forces With Estane Binder

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lu; Hanson, David E

    2008-01-01

    Here we present the results on the study of surface properties of {beta}-HMX crystal utilizing molecular simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces are investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles agree excellently with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain with and without nitroplasticizer from the three principal crystal surfaces were calculated using umbrella sampling technique. We find that the detaching free energy/force increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, our results also show that nitroplasticizer plays an important role in the adhesion forces between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  18. Effects of nano-surface properties on initial osteoblast adhesion and Ca/P adsorption ability for titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Hsu, Y C; Hsieh, M C; Yang, S P; Su, F C; Lee, T M

    2008-08-20

    Titanium alloys (Ti6Al4V), while subjected to high temperature surface treatment, experience altered nano-surface characteristics. The effects of such surface treatments are examined, including the initial adhesion force experienced by osteoblasts, the Ca/P adsorption capability, and the nano-surface properties, including the amounts of amphoteric Ti-OH groups, surface topography, and surface roughness. The initial adhesion force is considered a quantitative indicator of cyto-compatibility in vitro. Previously, a cyto-detacher was applied in a pioneer attempt measuring the initial adhesion force of fibroblasts on a metal surface. Presently, the cyto-detacher is further applied to evaluate the initial adhesion force of osteoblasts. Results reveal that (1) titanium alloys subjected to heat treatment could promote the adsorption capability of Ca and P; (2) titanium alloys subjected to heat treatment could have higher initial osteoblast adhesion forces; (3) the adhesion strength of osteoblasts, ranging from 38.5 to 58.9 nN (nanonewtons), appears stronger for rougher surfaces. It is concluded that the heat treatment could have impacted the biocompatibility in terms of the initial osteoblast adhesion force and Ca/P adsorption capability.

  19. Effects of nano-surface properties on initial osteoblast adhesion and Ca/P adsorption ability for titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. C.; Hsu, Y. C.; Hsieh, M. C.; Yang, S. P.; Su, F. C.; Lee, T. M.

    2008-08-01

    Titanium alloys (Ti6Al4V), while subjected to high temperature surface treatment, experience altered nano-surface characteristics. The effects of such surface treatments are examined, including the initial adhesion force experienced by osteoblasts, the Ca/P adsorption capability, and the nano-surface properties, including the amounts of amphoteric Ti-OH groups, surface topography, and surface roughness. The initial adhesion force is considered a quantitative indicator of cyto-compatibility in vitro. Previously, a cyto-detacher was applied in a pioneer attempt measuring the initial adhesion force of fibroblasts on a metal surface. Presently, the cyto-detacher is further applied to evaluate the initial adhesion force of osteoblasts. Results reveal that (1) titanium alloys subjected to heat treatment could promote the adsorption capability of Ca and P; (2) titanium alloys subjected to heat treatment could have higher initial osteoblast adhesion forces; (3) the adhesion strength of osteoblasts, ranging from 38.5 to 58.9 nN (nanonewtons), appears stronger for rougher surfaces. It is concluded that the heat treatment could have impacted the biocompatibility in terms of the initial osteoblast adhesion force and Ca/P adsorption capability.

  20. Washing-resistant surfactant coated surface is able to inhibit pathogenic bacteria adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treter, Janine; Bonatto, Fernando; Krug, Cristiano; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Macedo, Alexandre José

    2014-06-01

    Surface-active substances, which are able to organize themselves spontaneously on surfaces, triggering changes in the nature of the solid-liquid interface, are likely to influence microorganism adhesion and biofilm formation. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate chemical non-ionic surfactants activity against pathogenic microbial biofilms and to cover biomaterial surfaces in order to obtain an anti-infective surface. After testing 11 different surfactants, Pluronic F127 was selected for further studies due to its non-biocidal properties and capability to inhibit up to 90% of biofilm formation of Gram-positive pathogen and its clinical isolates. The coating technique using direct impregnation on the surface showed important antibiofilm formation characteristics, even after extensive washes. Surface roughness and bacterial surface polarity does not influence the adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis, however, the material coated surface became extremely hydrophilic. The phenotype of S. epidermidis does not seem to have been affected by the contact with surfactant, reinforcing the evidence that a physical phenomenon is responsible for the activity. This paper presents a simple method of surface coating employing a synthetic surfactant to prevent S. epidermidis biofilm formation.

  1. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion on polyurethane/Pluronic surface with lotus leaf-like topography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Song, Wei; Huang, He; Chen, Hong

    2010-06-01

    Lotus leaf-like polyurethane/Pluronic F-127 surface was fabricated via replica molding using a natural lotus leaf as the template. Water contact angle measurements showed that both the hydrophobicity of the unmodified polyurethane (PU) surface and the hydrophilicity of the PU/Pluronic surface were enhanced by the construction of lotus leaf-like topography. Protein adsorption on the PU/Pluronic surface without topographic modification was significantly lower than on the PU surface. Adsorption was further reduced when lotus leaf-like topography was constructed on the PU/Pluronic surface. Cell culture experiments with L929 cells showed that adhesion on the PU/Pluronic surface with lotus leaf-like topography was low and adherent cells were spherical and of low viability. The PU/Pluronic surface with lotus leaf-like topography thus appears to be resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption and to cell adhesion, and these effects derive from the both chemical composition and topography. The results suggest a new strategy based on surface topography for the design of antifouling materials.

  2. Adhesion of phospholipid vesicles to Chinese hamster fibroblasts: Role of cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, RE; Takeichi, M

    1977-01-01

    The adhesion of artificially generated lipid membrane vesicles to Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts in suspension was used as a model system for studying membrane interactions. Below their gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, vesicles comprised of dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL) or dimyristoyl lecithin (DML) absorbed to the surfaces of EDTA- dissociated cells. These adherent vesicles could not be removed by repeated washings of the treated cells but could be released into the medium by treatment with trypsin. EM autoradiographic studies of cells treated with[(3)H]DML or [(3)H]DPL vesicles showed that most of the radioactive lipids were confined to the cell periphery. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy further confirmed the presence of adherent vesicles at the cell surface. Adhesion of DML or DPL vesicles to EDTA-dissociated cells modified the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination pattern of the cell surface proteins; the inhibition of labeling of two proteins with an approximately 60,000- dalton mol wt was particularly evident. Incubation of cells wit h (3)H-lipid vesicles followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that some of the (3)H-lipid migrated preferentially with these approximately 60,000-mol wt proteins. Studies of the temperature dependence of vesicle uptake and subsequent release by trypsin showed that DML or DPL vesicle adhesion to EDTA- dissociated cells increased with decreasing temperatures. In contrast, cells trypsinized before incubation with vesicles showed practically no temperature dependence of vesicle uptake. These results suggest two pathways for adhesion of lipid vesicles to the cell surface-a temperature-sensitive one involving cell surface proteins, and a temperature-independent one. These findings are discussed in terms of current models for cell-cell interactions. PMID:407233

  3. Inhibition of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis adhesion and biofilm formation on medical grade silicone surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Shi, Zhilong; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    Silicone has been utilized extensively for biomedical devices due to its excellent biocompatibility and biodurability properties. However, its surface is easily colonized by bacteria which will increase the probability of nosocomial infection. In the present work, a hydrophilic antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) layer has been grafted on medical grade silicone surface pre-treated with polydopamine (PDA). The increase in hydrophilicity was confirmed from contact angle measurement. Bacterial adhesion tests showed that the PDA-CMCS coating reduced the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis by ≥ 90%. The anti-adhesion property was preserved even after the aging of the functionalized surfaces for 21 days in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and also after autoclaving at 121°C for 20 min. Both E. coli and P. mirabilis readily form biofilms on the pristine surface under static and flow conditions but with the PDA-CMCS layer, biofilm formation is inhibited. The flow experiments indicated that it is more difficult to inhibit biofilm formation by the highly motile P. mirabilis as compared to E. coli. No significant cytotoxicity of the modified substrates was observed with 3T3 fibroblasts. PMID:21956834

  4. Inhibition of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis adhesion and biofilm formation on medical grade silicone surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Shi, Zhilong; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    Silicone has been utilized extensively for biomedical devices due to its excellent biocompatibility and biodurability properties. However, its surface is easily colonized by bacteria which will increase the probability of nosocomial infection. In the present work, a hydrophilic antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) layer has been grafted on medical grade silicone surface pre-treated with polydopamine (PDA). The increase in hydrophilicity was confirmed from contact angle measurement. Bacterial adhesion tests showed that the PDA-CMCS coating reduced the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis by ≥ 90%. The anti-adhesion property was preserved even after the aging of the functionalized surfaces for 21 days in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and also after autoclaving at 121°C for 20 min. Both E. coli and P. mirabilis readily form biofilms on the pristine surface under static and flow conditions but with the PDA-CMCS layer, biofilm formation is inhibited. The flow experiments indicated that it is more difficult to inhibit biofilm formation by the highly motile P. mirabilis as compared to E. coli. No significant cytotoxicity of the modified substrates was observed with 3T3 fibroblasts.

  5. Designing robust alumina nanowires-on-nanopores structures: superhydrophobic surfaces with slippery or sticky water adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shan; Tian, Dong; Miao, Xinrui; Yang, Xiaojun; Deng, Wenli

    2013-11-01

    Hierarchical alumina surfaces with different morphologies were fabricated by a simple one-step anodization method. These alumina films were fabricated by a new raw material: silica gel plate (aluminum foil with a low purity of 97.17%). The modulation of anodizing time enabled the formation of nanowires-on-nanopores hybrid nanostructures having controllable nanowires topographies through a self-assembly process. The resultant structures were demonstrated to be able to achieve superhydrophobicity without any hydrophobic coating layer. More interestingly, it is found that the as-prepared superhydrophobic alumina surfaces exhibited high contrast water adhesion. Hierarchical alumina film with nanowire bunches-on-nanopores (WBOP) morphology presents extremely slippery property which can obtain a sliding angle (SA) as low as 1°, nanowire pyramids-on-nanopores (WPOP) structure shows strongly sticky water adhesion with the adhesive ability to support 15 μL inverted water droplet at most. The obtained superhydrophobic alumina surfaces show remarkable mechanical durability even treated by crimping or pressing without impact on the water-repellent performance. Moreover, the created surfaces also show excellent resistivity to ice water, boiling water, high temperature, organic solvent and oil contamination, which could expand their usefulness and efficacy in harsh conditions.

  6. Spatially controlled bacterial adhesion using surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Krsko, Peter; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Libera, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    We constructed surface-patterned hydrogels using low-energy focused electron beams to locally crosslink poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) thin films on silanized glass substrates. Derived from electron-beam lithography, this technique was used to create patterned hydrogels with well-defined spatial positions and degrees of swelling. We found that cells of the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis adhered to and grew on the silanized glass substrates. These cells did not, however, adhere to surfaces covered by high-swelling lightly crosslinked PEG hydrogels. This finding is consistent with the cell-repulsiveness generally attributed to PEGylated surfaces. In contrast, S. epidermidis cells did adhere to surfaces covered by low-swelling highly crosslinked hydrogels. By creating precise patterns of repulsive hydrogels combined with adhesive hydrogels or with exposed glass substrate, we were able to spatially control the adhesion of S. epidermidis. Significantly, adhesive areas small enough to trap single bacterial cells could be fabricated. The results suggest that the lateral confinement imposed by cell-repulsive hydrogels hindered the cell proliferation and development into larger bacterial colonies.

  7. Micro-plasticity of surface steps under adhesive contact: Part I—Surface yielding controlled by single-dislocation nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. H.; Shrotriya, P.; Gao, Y. F.; Kim, K.-S.

    2007-03-01

    Mechanics of nano- and meso-scale contacts of rough surfaces is of fundamental importance in understanding deformation and failure mechanisms of a solid surface, and in engineering fabrication and reliability of small surface structures. We present a micro-mechanical dislocation model of contact-induced deformation of a surface step or ledge, as a unit process model to construct a meso-scale model of plastic deformations near and at a rough surface. This paper (Part I) considers onset of contact-induced surface yielding controlled by single-dislocation nucleation from a surface step. The Stroh formalism of anisotropic elasticity and conservation integrals are used to evaluate the driving force on the dislocation. The driving force together with a dislocation nucleation criterion is used to construct a contact-strength map of a surface step in terms of contact pressure, step height, surface adhesion and lattice resistance. Atomistic simulations of atomic surface-step indentation on a gold (1 0 0) surface have been also carried out with the embedded atom method. As predicted by the continuum dislocation model, the atomistic simulations also indicate that surface adhesion plays a significant role in dislocation nucleation processes. Instabilities due to adhesion and dislocation nucleation are evident. The atomistic simulation is used to calibrate the continuum dislocation nucleation criterion, while the continuum dislocation modeling captures the dislocation energetics in the inhomogeneous stress field of the surface-step under contact loading. Results show that dislocations in certain slip planes can be easily nucleated but will stay in equilibrium positions very close to the surface step, while dislocations in some other slip planes easily move away from the surface into the bulk. This phenomenon is called contact-induced near-surface dislocation segregation. As a consequence, we predict the existence of a thin tensile-stress sub-layer adjacent to the surface within

  8. Adhesion of a fluorinated poly(amic acid) with stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngsuk; Song, Sunjin; Kim, Sangmo; Yang, Yooseong; Chae, Jungha; Park, Tai-Gyoo; Dong Cho, Myung

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate an origin and probable mechanism of adhesion strength change at an interface of fluorinated poly(amic acid) and stainless steel. Fluorination provides favorable delamination with release strength weaker than 0.08 N/mm from a metal surface, once the amount of residual solvent becomes less than 35 wt. %. However, the release strength critically depends on film drying temperature. Characterization on stainless steel surfaces and thermodynamic analyses on wet films reveal a drying temperature of 80 °C fosters interaction between the metal oxides at stainless steel surface and the free electron donating groups in poly(amic acid).

  9. Intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) regulates differentiation and functioning of neurons by accumulating at the cell surface where it mediates the interactions of neurons with the extracellular environment. NCAM also induces a number of intracellular signaling cascades, which coordinate interactions at the cell surface with intracellular processes including changes in gene expression, transport and cytoskeleton remodeling. Since NCAM functions at the cell surface, its transport and delivery to the cell surface play a critical role. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM. We also discuss the data suggesting a possibility of cross talk between activation of NCAM at the cell surface and the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM.

  10. Macrophage Serum-Based Adhesion to Plasma-Processed Surface Chemistry is Distinct from That Exhibited by Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Malkov, Galiya Sh; Fisher, Ellen R; Grainger, David W

    2006-08-15

    Plasma-polymerized films deposited from AlAm, HxAm, NVP, NVFA, AA and FC were compared to TCPS and PS surfaces in supporting cellular attachment, viability, and proliferation in serum-based culture in vitro for extended periods of time (>7 d). Surface patterns were created using multi-step depositions with physical masks. Cell adhesion in the presence of serum was compared for (monocyte-) macrophage and fibroblast cell lines. Cellular response was tracked over time, reporting adhesive behavior, proliferative rates, and morphological changes as a function of surface chemistry. Micropatterned surfaces containing different surface chemistries and functional groups (e.g. -NH(2), -COOH, -CF(3)) produced differential cell adhesive patterns for NIH 3T3 fibroblasts compared to J774A.1, RAW 264.7 or IC-21 (monocyte-) macrophage cell types. Significantly, macrophage adhesion is substantial on surfaces where fibroblasts do not adhere under identical culture conditions. PMID:17417668

  11. Macrophage Serum-Based Adhesion to Plasma-Processed Surface Chemistry is Distinct from That Exhibited by Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Godek, Marisha L.; Malkov, Galiya Sh.; Fisher, Ellen R.; Grainger, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Plasma-polymerized films deposited from AlAm, HxAm, NVP, NVFA, AA and FC were compared to TCPS and PS surfaces in supporting cellular attachment, viability, and proliferation in serum-based culture in vitro for extended periods of time (>7 d). Surface patterns were created using multi-step depositions with physical masks. Cell adhesion in the presence of serum was compared for (monocyte-) macrophage and fibroblast cell lines. Cellular response was tracked over time, reporting adhesive behavior, proliferative rates, and morphological changes as a function of surface chemistry. Micropatterned surfaces containing different surface chemistries and functional groups (e.g. –NH2, –COOH, –CF3) produced differential cell adhesive patterns for NIH 3T3 fibroblasts compared to J774A.1, RAW 264.7 or IC-21 (monocyte-) macrophage cell types. Significantly, macrophage adhesion is substantial on surfaces where fibroblasts do not adhere under identical culture conditions. PMID:17417668

  12. Redox cycling for passive modification of polypyrrole surface properties: effects on cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Kartik M; Ozkale, Berna; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Lühmann, Tessa; Fortunato, Giuseppino; Zeeshan, Muhammad Arif; Nelson, Bradley J; Pané, Salvador

    2013-04-01

    The surface properties of electrodeposited poly(pyrrole) (Ppy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate (NaDBS) are modified by two methods: addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) during the electrodeposition and through redox cycling post electrodeposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to ascertain PEG incorporation and to analyze the change in the oxidation state of the polymer. Anodic cycling resulted in the formation of micrometer-sized surface cracks which increased the amount of Rhodamine-B dye adsorbed onto the surface, and played a role in decreasing the wettability of the surface. The change in surface wettability caused by these cracks was mitigated by the presence of PEG in the Ppy matrix. Compared to the incorporation of PEG, redox cycling was more effective in passively modulating the adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells on the Ppy surface. Based on the attenuation of surface polarity of the Ppy surfaces by the incorporated PEG, a mechanism is proposed to explain the observed cell adhesion behavior.

  13. The Effect of Novel Fluorapatite Surfaces on Osteoblast-Like Cell Adhesion, Growth, and Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Jin, Taocong; Chang, Syweren; Czajka-Jakubowska, Agata; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Nör, Jacques E.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing demand for biomedical implants to correct skeletal defects caused by trauma, disease, or genetic disorder. In this study, the MG-63 cells were grown on metals coated with ordered and disordered fluorapatite (FA) crystal surfaces to study the biocompatibility, initial cellular response, and the underlying mechanisms during this process. The long-term growth and mineralization of the cells were also investigated. After 3 days, the cell numbers on etched metal surface are significantly higher than those on the ordered and disordered FA surfaces, but the initial adherence of a greater number of cells did not lead to earlier mineral formation at the cell–implant interface. Of the 84 cell adhesion and matrix-focused pathway genes, an up- or down-regulation of a total of 15 genes such as integrin molecules, integrin alpha M and integrin alpha 7 and 8 was noted, suggesting a modulating effect on these adhesion molecules by the ordered FA surface compared with the disordered. Osteocalcin expression and the mineral nodule formation are most evident on the FA surfaces after osteogenic induction (OI) for 7 weeks. The binding of the ordered FA surfaces to the metal, with and without OI, was significantly higher than that of the disordered FA surfaces with OI. Most significantly, even without the OI supplement, the MG-63 cells grown on FA crystal surfaces start to differentiate and mineralize, suggesting that the FA crystal could be a simple and bioactive implant coating material. PMID:20412028

  14. Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface of high adhesion fabricated with micronano binary structure on aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Jindan; Li, Shuyi; Liu, Jiaan; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2013-09-25

    Triggered by the microstructure characteristics of the surfaces of typical plant leaves such as the petals of red roses, a biomimetic superhydrophobic surface with high adhesion is successfully fabricated on aluminum alloy. The essential procedure is that samples were processed by a laser, then immersed and etched in nitric acid and copper nitrate, and finally modified by DTS (CH3(CH2)11Si(OCH3)3). The obtained surfaces exhibit a binary structure consisting of microscale crater-like pits and nanoscale reticula. The superhydrophobicity can be simultaneously affected by the micronano binary structure and chemical composition of the surface. The contact angle of the superhydrophobic surface reaches up to 158.8 ± 2°. Especially, the surface with micronano binary structure is revealed to be an excellent adhesive property with petal-effect. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surfaces show excellent stability in aqueous solution with a large pH range and after being exposed long-term in air. In this way, the multifunctional biomimetic structural surface of the aluminum alloy is fabricated. Furthermore, the preparation technology in this article provides a new route for other metal materials. PMID:24016423

  15. Rapid transfer of hierarchical microstructures onto biomimetic polymer surfaces with gradually tunable water adhesion from slippery to sticky superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, An-Fu; Huang, Han-Xiong

    2016-02-01

    Biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces are generally limited to extremely high or quite low water droplet adhesion. The present work proposes flexible template replication methods for bio-inspired polypropylene (PP) surfaces with microtopographies and gradually tunable water droplet adhesion in one step using microinjection compression molding (μ-ICM). A dual-level microstructure appears on PP surfaces prepared using a flexible template. The microstructures obtained under low and high mold temperatures exhibit low-aspect-ratio (AR) micropillars with semi-spherical top and high-AR ones with conical top, resulting in the surfaces with high-adhesive hydrophobicity and low-adhesive superhydrophobicity, respectively. Further, silica nanoparticles (SNPs) coated on templates are transferred to viscous state-dominated melt during its filling in μ-ICM, and firmly adhered to the skin of the replicas, forming hierarchical microstructures on PP surfaces. The hydrophilic and hydrophobic SNPs on high-AR micropillared surfaces help achieve extremely high (petal effect) and extremely low (lotus effect) adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces, respectively. The hybrid SNPs on low-AR micropillars change the Wenzel state-dominated surface to Cassie-Baxter state-dominated surface and preserves medium adhesion with superhydrophobicity. The proposed methods for fast and mass replication of superhydrophobic surfaces with the dual-level or hierarchical microtopography can be excellent candidates for the development of microfluidics, sensors, and labs on chip.

  16. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  17. Evaluation of Ti-6Al-4V surface treatments for use with a polyphenylquinoxaline adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Three surface treatments for Ti-6Al-4V adherends were evaluated using a thermoplastic polymer monoether polyphenylquinoxaline, MEPPQ, which had been shown in previous studies to have good potential as a high temperature adhesive for aerospace applications. Initial results based on long term thermal exposure at 232 C (450 F) using the phosphate-fluoride (PF) and chromic acid anodized (CAA) treatments with MEPPQ adhesive were not encouraging. A significant improvement in strength retention and a change in failure mode (cohesive) at 232 C (450F) was found for the SHA treated specimens compared to the PF and CAA treatments. Although an improvement in long term thermal durability was obtained with the SHA treatment of Ti-6Al-4V, an improved surface treatment with better long term durability is still required for aerospace applications.

  18. Evaluation of Ti-6Al-4V surface treatments for use with a polyphenylquinoxaline adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    Three surface treatments for Ti-6Al-4V adherends were evaluated using a thermoplastic polymer monoether polyphenylquinoxaline, MEPPQ, which had been shown in previous studies to have good potential as a high temperature adhesive for aerospace applications. Initial results based on long term thermal exposure at 232 C (450 F) using the phosphate-fluoride (PF) and chromic acid anodized (CAA) treatments with MEPPQ adhesive were not encouraging. A significant improvement in strength retention and a change in failure mode (cohesive) at 232 C (450 F) was found for the SHA treated specimens compared to the PF and CAA treatments. Although an improvement in long term thermal durability was obtained with the SHA treatment of Ti-6Al-4V, an improved surface treatment with better long term durability is still required for aerospace applications.

  19. Dust Particle Release from the Lunar Surface: Influence of Adhesion and Meteoroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Sergey; Golub', Anatoliy; Izvekova, Yulia; Lisin, Evgeniy; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Dolnikov, Gennadiy; Zakharov, Aleksandr; Zelenyi, Lev

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that for consideration of dust particle release from the lunar surface one has to take into account (among other effects) both adhesion and meteoroid impacts. The effect of surface roughness on the adhesion intensity on the Moon is discussed. The rate of meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface per unit area is determined. The strength of the regolith due to the adhesion effect is estimated. The processes occurring when a high-speed meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface are described. In particular, the characteristic parameters of zones of evaporation of the substance, its melting, destruction of particles constituting lunar regolith, their irreversible deformations, and elastic deformation of the regolith substance are found. A possibility of the rise of micrometer-sized dust particles above the lunar surface is shown. It is demonstrated that most of the particles rising over lunar surface due to the meteoroid impact originates from the elastic deformation zone. The number of dust particles raised over the lunar surface as result of a meteoroid impact is estimated. The size-distribution function of particles released from the lunar surface due to meteoroid impacts is determined. It is noted that micrometeoroid impacts can result in rise of dust particles of the size of a few μm up to an altitude of about 30 cm that explains the effect of "horizon glow" observed by Surveyor lunar lander. This work was carried out as part of the Russian Academy of Sciences Presidium program no. 7 and was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects nos. 15-02-05627, 15-32-21159) and the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2), as well as NCN grant Rezonans 2012/07/B/ST9/04414.

  20. Simple surface engineering of polydimethylsiloxane with polydopamine for stabilized mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and multipotency

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Koh, Yi Ting; Lim, Kaiyang; Menon, Nishanth V.; Wu, Yingnan; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been extensively exploited to study stem cell physiology in the field of mechanobiology and microfluidic chips due to their transparency, low cost and ease of fabrication. However, its intrinsic high hydrophobicity renders a surface incompatible for prolonged cell adhesion and proliferation. Plasma-treated or protein-coated PDMS shows some improvement but these strategies are often short-lived with either cell aggregates formation or cell sheet dissociation. Recently, chemical functionalization of PDMS surfaces has proved to be able to stabilize long-term culture but the chemicals and procedures involved are not user- and eco-friendly. Herein, we aim to tailor greener and biocompatible PDMS surfaces by developing a one-step bio-inspired polydopamine coating strategy to stabilize long-term bone marrow stromal cell culture on PDMS substrates. Characterization of the polydopamine-coated PDMS surfaces has revealed changes in surface wettability and presence of hydroxyl and secondary amines as compared to uncoated surfaces. These changes in PDMS surface profile contribute to the stability in BMSCs adhesion, proliferation and multipotency. This simple methodology can significantly enhance the biocompatibility of PDMS-based microfluidic devices for long-term cell analysis or mechanobiological studies. PMID:26647719

  1. The influence of surface properties on carbon fiber/epoxy matrix interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Wightman, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, as composites become increasingly sophisticated to meet ever-increasing performance requirements, it has become more important to control the interaction between the reinforcing fibers and matrix materials. The major challenge here is the lack of fundamental understanding and knowledge about the reinforcement/matrix system which contribute to the establishment of the interphase. It has been recognized that the state of the fiber surface substantially effects the quality of interfacial adhesion. However, basic and specific correlation is still incomplete. The possible mechanisms by which the fiber surface parameters contribute to the constitution of the fiber/matrix interface include the interfacial chemical and physical interactions caused by fiber surface functionality and surface energy, the mechanical interlocking due to fiber surface irregularity, and, the interfacial wetting based on fiber surface energy. It was the objective of this work to explore the effects of physical and chemical aspects of fiber surfaces on the durability of interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  2. The Promotion of Au Adhesion on Polymer Surfaces Using Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsequioxane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Chris; Augustine, Brian; Mo, Alan; Wyrick, Jonathan; Caputo, Bruno; Rosenthal, Ethan

    2009-03-01

    The adhesion of Au on polymer surfaces is weak because of the inert nature of Au and the non-polarity of the hydrocarbon surface of the polymer. We seek to fabricate microfluidic devices in which vacuum deposited gold thin films will be used in electrical contacts and optical reflectors. Various fabrication steps involve the use of solvents which easily wash away the gold. To overcome this, we have explored the use of a thin layer of polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane-methacrylate (POSS-MA) which is a nanocomposite having both polymer and inorganic silica glass characteristics. The POSS-MA is spun cast onto the surface of PMMA creating a film which is on the order of 100 nm thick. Au dots that are 1 mm in diameter were deposited onto both the virgin PMMA surface and the POSS-MA coated surface and the samples were covered with acetone, a known solvent for PMMA. Optical microscope video images of the dots revealed their delamination from the surface and image analysis was used to determine the time that it took for the dots to be undercut -- typically in the range of seconds to minutes. An obvious increase in the time required to undercut the Au was observed for the POSS-MA treated surface. A model explaining the improved adhesion will be discussed as will future plans for device fabrication.

  3. The Promotion of Au Adhesion on Polymer Surfaces Using Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsequioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Chris; Augustine, Brian; Mo, Alan; Wyrick, Jonathan; Caputo, Bruno; Rosenthal, Ethan

    2008-10-01

    The adhesion of Au on polymer surfaces is weak because of the inert nature of Au and the non-polarity of the hydrocarbon surface of the polymer. We seek to fabricate microfluidic devices in which vacuum deposited gold thin films will be used in electrical contacts and optical reflectors. Various fabrication steps involve the use of solvents which easily wash away the gold. To overcome this, we have explored the use of a thin layer of polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane-methacrylate (POSS-MA) which is a nanocomposite having both polymer and inorganic silica glass characteristics. The POSS-MA is spun cast onto the surface of PMMA creating a film which is on the order of 100 nm thick. Au dots that are 1 mm in diameter were deposited onto both the virgin PMMA surface and the POSS-MA coated surface and the samples were covered with acetone, a known solvent for PMMA. Optical microscope video images of the dots revealed their delamination from the surface and image analysis was used to determine the time that it took for the dots to be undercut -- typically in the range of seconds to minutes. An obvious increase in the time required to undercut the Au was observed for the POSS-MA treated surface. A model explaining the improved adhesion will be discussed as will future plans for device fabrication.

  4. Adhesive properties of environmental Vibrio alginolyticus strains to biotic and abiotic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Snoussi, Mejdi; Noumi, Emira; Cheriaa, Jihane; Usai, Donatella; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio; Zanetti, Stefania; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2008-10-01

    The ability of Vibrio alginolyticus strains isolated from a bathing and fishing area (Khenis, Centre of Tunisia) to adhere to both biotic and abiotic surfaces was evaluated in the present work. The biochemical, physiological and enzymatic activities of all strains was also investigated. Three morphotypes of V. alginolyticus were obtained on Congo red agar and only 14 strains produced black colonies. The majority of strains were able to degrade the skin mucus of both Sparus aurata and Dicentrarchus labrax fishes while the fish mucus preparation of these two specimens exhibits a high level of anti-V. alginolyticus strains. Adhesive properties were observed in 37.5% of the analyzed V. alginolyticus strains to Hep-2 cells and 50% to Caco-2 cells. All strains were able to form a purple pellicule on glass tube when they were stained with Crystal violet. Fifteen percent of V. alginolyticus strains (16/32) were strongly adhesive to polystyrene with a values ranging from 3.04 to 18.25 at 595 nm and only four strains were weak biofilm forming. V. alginolyticus bacterium possess a strong adhesive power to both biotic and inertes surfaces. These proprieties may allow to these strains to persist in this biotope in planctonic state or attached to both biotic and abiotic surfaces.

  5. Work of Adhesion of a Sessile Drop to a Clean Surface.

    PubMed

    Schroder

    1999-05-15

    According to the Young-Dupré equation, as interpreted by Bangham and Razouk, the work of adhesion of a sessile drop to a smooth solid surface is given by WS(V)L = gammaL (1 + cos θ), where θ is the equilibrium contact angle measured at equilibrium of the system with the saturated vapor of the liquid, and WS(V)L is the work of adhesion of that drop to the solid surface which is in equilibrium with that vapor and may contain an adlayer of the vapor. For calculation of WSL, the work of adhesion of a sessile drop to a clean solid surface, the equation WSL = gammaL (1 + cos θ) + Pie is generally used (although Bangham and Razouk never proposed it). Pie is the negative of the free energy of formation of the adlayer, sometimes called the spreading pressure. In the present work it is shown that the latter equation cannot be accurate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Adhesion and friction properties of polymer brushes on rough surfaces: a gradient approach.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Naik, Vikrant V; Nalam, Prathima C; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2013-12-10

    The effect of nanoscale surface roughness on the lubrication properties of a polymer brush in a good solvent has been investigated. Friction and adhesion forces were measured by means of polyethylene colloidal-probe AFM across a 12 nm silica particle gradient before and after the adsorption of a poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) polymer brush. The adsorption and conformation of the polymer chains were studied with multiple transmission and reflection infrared (MTR-IR) spectroscopy. The results show that prior to the adsorption of PLL-g-PEG on the gradient surface, the friction is high at the smooth end of the gradient while it decreases toward the rough end. Moreover, there is a direct correlation between friction and adhesion. Upon adsorption of the brushes, adhesion vanishes. In this case, a higher frictional force between the PEG-coated particle gradient substrate and the polyethylene sphere is observed at the rough end of the gradient in comparison to the smooth end. In spite of the increased adsorbed mass of PLL-g-PEG at the rough end of the gradient, theory and simulations show that the high curvature of the nanoparticles leads to a less swollen PEG brush in comparison to PEG brushes adsorbed on a planar surface, resulting in a lower repulsion, which can explain the observed increase in friction with particle density.

  7. The role of electrostatic charge in the adhesion of spherical particles onto planar surfaces in atmospheric systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira Z.; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-06-19

    In this study, the influence of electrostatic charge on the adhesive force between spherical particles and planar surfaces in atmospheric systems was studied using atomic force microscopy. Electrical bias was applied to modify the surface charge, and it was found that application of a stronger positive bias to a particle induces a stronger total adhesive force. The sensitivity of the system to changes in the bias depended on the surface charge density. For larger-size particles, the contribution of the electrostatic force decreased, and the capillary force became the major contributor to the total adhesive force. The influence of water adsorptionmore » on the total adhesive force and, specifically, on the contribution of the electrostatic force depended on the hydrophobicity of interacting surfaces. For a hydrophilic surface, water adsorption either attenuated the surface charge or screened the effect of surface potential. An excessive amount of adsorbed water provided a path to surface charge leakage, which might cancel out the electrostatic force, leading to a reduction in the adhesive force. Theoretically calculated forces were comparable with measured adhesive forces except for mica which has a highly localized surface potential. The results of this study provide information on the behavior of charged colloidal particles in atmospheric systems.« less

  8. The role of electrostatic charge in the adhesion of spherical particles onto planar surfaces in atmospheric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira Z.; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-06-19

    In this study, the influence of electrostatic charge on the adhesive force between spherical particles and planar surfaces in atmospheric systems was studied using atomic force microscopy. Electrical bias was applied to modify the surface charge, and it was found that application of a stronger positive bias to a particle induces a stronger total adhesive force. The sensitivity of the system to changes in the bias depended on the surface charge density. For larger-size particles, the contribution of the electrostatic force decreased, and the capillary force became the major contributor to the total adhesive force. The influence of water adsorption on the total adhesive force and, specifically, on the contribution of the electrostatic force depended on the hydrophobicity of interacting surfaces. For a hydrophilic surface, water adsorption either attenuated the surface charge or screened the effect of surface potential. An excessive amount of adsorbed water provided a path to surface charge leakage, which might cancel out the electrostatic force, leading to a reduction in the adhesive force. Theoretically calculated forces were comparable with measured adhesive forces except for mica which has a highly localized surface potential. The results of this study provide information on the behavior of charged colloidal particles in atmospheric systems.

  9. Surface modification of argon/oxygen plasma treated vulcanized ethylene propylene diene polymethylene surfaces for improved adhesion with natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Ganesh C.; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Neogi, Sudarsan; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Vulcanized ethylene propylene diene polymethylene (EPDM) rubber surface was treated in a radio frequency capacitatively coupled low pressure argon/oxygen plasma to improve adhesion with compounded natural rubber (NR) during co-vulcanization. The plasma modified surfaces were analyzed by means of contact angle measurement, surface energy, attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray sulfur mapping and atomic force microscopy. Several experimental variables such as plasma power, length of exposure time and composition of the argon-oxygen gas mixture were considered. It was delineated that plasma treatment changed both surface composition and roughness, and consequently increased peel strength. The change in surface composition was mainly ascribed to the formation of C-O and -Cdbnd O functional groups on the vulcanized surfaces. A maximum of 98% improvement in peel strength was observed after plasma treatment.

  10. Effect of tyrosol on adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Arias, Laís Salomão; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2015-09-01

    The prevention of adhesion of Candida cells to acrylic surfaces can be regarded as an alternative to prevent denture stomatitis. The use of quorum sensing molecules, such as tyrosol, could potentially interfere with the adhesion process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of tyrosol on adhesion of single and mixed cultures of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic resin surfaces. Tyrosol was diluted in each yeast inoculum (10(7) cells/ml in artificial saliva) at 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM. Then, each dilution was added to wells of 24-well plates containing the acrylic specimens, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. After, the effect of tyrosol was determined by total biomass quantification, metabolic activity of the cells and colony-forming unit counting. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was used as a positive control. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak post hoc test (α = 0.05). The results of total biomass quantification and metabolic activity revealed that the tyrosol promoted significant reductions (ranging from 22.32 to 86.16%) on single C. albicans and mixed cultures. Moreover, tyrosol at 200 mM and CHG significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of adhered cells to the acrylic surface for single and mixed cultures of both species, with reductions ranging from 1.74 to 3.64-log10. In conclusion, tyrosol has an inhibitory effect on Candida adhesion to acrylic resin, and further investigations are warranted to clarify its potential against Candida infections. PMID:26162470

  11. A dynamic cell adhesion surface regulates tissue architecture in growth plate cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M.; Conoan, Nicholas H.; Chen, Baojiang; Dudley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    The architecture and morphogenetic properties of tissues are founded in the tissue-specific regulation of cell behaviors. In endochondral bones, the growth plate cartilage promotes bone elongation via regulated chondrocyte maturation within an ordered, three-dimensional cell array. A key event in the process that generates this cell array is the transformation of disordered resting chondrocytes into clonal columns of discoid proliferative cells aligned with the primary growth vector. Previous analysis showed that column-forming chondrocytes display planar cell divisions, and the resulting daughter cells rearrange by ∼90° to align with the lengthening column. However, these previous studies provided limited information about the mechanisms underlying this dynamic process. Here we present new mechanistic insights generated by application of a novel time-lapse confocal microscopy method along with immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We show that, during cell division, daughter chondrocytes establish a cell-cell adhesion surface enriched in cadherins and β-catenin. Rearrangement into columns occurs concomitant with expansion of this adhesion surface in a process more similar to cell spreading than to migration. Column formation requires cell-cell adhesion, as reducing cadherin binding via chelation of extracellular calcium inhibits chondrocyte rearrangement. Importantly, physical indicators of cell polarity, such as cell body alignment, are not prerequisites for oriented cell behavior. Our results support a model in which regulation of adhesive surface dynamics and cortical tension by extrinsic signaling modifies the thermodynamic landscape to promote organization of daughter cells in the context of the three-dimensional growth plate tissue. PMID:24764078

  12. Improvement of interfacial adhesion of biodegradable polymers coated on metal surface by nanocoupling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyeon; Cho, Seong Bae; Lee, Bong Soo; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Kwideok; Han, Dong Keun

    2011-12-01

    A method of securing the adhesion of biodegradable polymer coating was investigated for drug-eluting metal stents, using surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization (SI-ROP) of L-lactide. Introduction of oligolactide on the stainless steel (SS) surface was successful and the thickness of the oligolactide grafts remained on the nanometer scale, as determined by ellipsometry. The presence of an oligolactide graft was also identified using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). On top of the grafts, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coating was carried out on different substrates such as SS control, plasma-treated SS, and lactide-grafted (referred to as a nanocoupled) SS using electrospraying. When the adhesion forces were measured with a scratch tester, the nanocoupled SS showed the strongest interfacial adhesion between polymer coating layer and metal substrate. The outcome of the peel-off test was also consistent with the result of the scratch test. When degradation behavior of the polymer coating in vitro was examined for up to 4 weeks in a continuous fluid flow, the SEM images demonstrated that polymer degradation was obvious due to hydration and swelling of the polymer matrix. Although the matrix completely disappeared after 4 weeks for SS control and plasma-treated substrates, the nanocoupled SS was persistent with some polymer matrix. In addition, the release profiles of SRL-loaded PLGA coating appeared slightly different between control and nanocoupled groups. This work suggested that the concept of nanocoupling remarkably improved the interfacial adhesion stability between metal surface and polymer layer and controlled drug release, and showed the feasibility of drug-eluting stents.

  13. Effect of tyrosol on adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Arias, Laís Salomão; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2015-09-01

    The prevention of adhesion of Candida cells to acrylic surfaces can be regarded as an alternative to prevent denture stomatitis. The use of quorum sensing molecules, such as tyrosol, could potentially interfere with the adhesion process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of tyrosol on adhesion of single and mixed cultures of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic resin surfaces. Tyrosol was diluted in each yeast inoculum (10(7) cells/ml in artificial saliva) at 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM. Then, each dilution was added to wells of 24-well plates containing the acrylic specimens, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. After, the effect of tyrosol was determined by total biomass quantification, metabolic activity of the cells and colony-forming unit counting. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was used as a positive control. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak post hoc test (α = 0.05). The results of total biomass quantification and metabolic activity revealed that the tyrosol promoted significant reductions (ranging from 22.32 to 86.16%) on single C. albicans and mixed cultures. Moreover, tyrosol at 200 mM and CHG significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of adhered cells to the acrylic surface for single and mixed cultures of both species, with reductions ranging from 1.74 to 3.64-log10. In conclusion, tyrosol has an inhibitory effect on Candida adhesion to acrylic resin, and further investigations are warranted to clarify its potential against Candida infections.

  14. Tunable surface wettability and water adhesion of Sb2S3 micro-/nanorod films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Zhao, Huiping; Yang, Hao; Liu, Yunling; Yan, Guoping; Chen, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) films were successfully prepared by spin coating Sb2S3 micro-/nanorods with different sizes on glass slides, which was synthesized via a facile and rapid microwave irradiation method. The prepared Sb2S3 micro-/nanorods and films were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle (CA). The as-prepared Sb2S3 films exhibited different surface wettabilities ranging from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity, which was strongly dependent on the diameter of Sb2S3 micro-/nanorod. Sb2S3 film made by nanorods possessed superhydrophobic surface and high water adhesive property. After surface modification with stearic acid, the superhydrophobic surface exhibited an excellent self-cleaning property owing to its low adhesive force. The clarification of three possible states including Wenzel's state, 'Gecko' state and Cassie's state for Sb2S3 film surfaces was also proposed to provide a better understanding of interesting surface phenomena on Sb2S3 films.

  15. The mysterious nature of bacterial surface (gliding) motility: A focal adhesion-based mechanism in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salim T; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-10-01

    Motility of bacterial cells promotes a range of important physiological phenomena such as nutrient detection, harm avoidance, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis. While much research has been devoted to the mechanism of bacterial swimming in liquid via rotation of flagellar filaments, the mechanisms of bacterial translocation across solid surfaces are poorly understood, particularly when cells lack external appendages such as rotary flagella and/or retractile type IV pili. Under such limitations, diverse bacteria at the single-cell level are still able to "glide" across solid surfaces, exhibiting smooth translocation of the cell along its long axis. Though multiple gliding mechanisms have evolved in different bacterial classes, most remain poorly characterized. One exception is the gliding motility mechanism used by the Gram-negative social predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The available body of research suggests that M. xanthus gliding motility is mediated by trafficked multi-protein (Glt) cell envelope complexes, powered by proton-driven flagellar stator homologues (Agl). Through coupling to the substratum via polysaccharide slime, Agl-Glt assemblies can become fixed relative to the substratum, forming a focal adhesion site. Continued directional transport of slime-associated substratum-fixed Agl-Glt complexes would result in smooth forward movement of the cell. In this review, we have provided a comprehensive synthesis of the latest mechanistic and structural data for focal adhesion-mediated gliding motility in M. xanthus, with emphasis on the role of each Agl and Glt protein. Finally, we have also highlighted the possible connection between the motility complex and a new type of spore coat assembly system, suggesting that gliding and cell envelope synthetic complexes are evolutionarily linked. PMID:26520023

  16. Initial stages of cell-matrix adhesion can be mediated and modulated by cell-surface hyaluronan.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Ella; Geiger, Benjamin; Addadi, Lia

    2002-01-01

    A conceptual temporal and spatial gap exists between the first encounter of a cell with an adhesive substrate and the advanced stages of focal adhesion formation. Although ample information is available on focal adhesions structure and function, the mechanism of the first interaction events and the nature of the molecules mediating them are largely unknown. In this paper we identify cell-surface-associated hyaluronan as a mediator and modulator of the first steps of adhesion of A6 and other cells to conventional tissue culture substrates as well as to the surfaces of calcium-(R,R)-tartrate tetrahydrate crystals. Treatment of A6 cells with hyaluronidase suppresses their rapid interactions with these adhesive substrates, and incubation of either the hyaluronidase-treated cells or the substrate with hyaluronan restores cell adhesion. In contrast, excess hyaluronan on both the cells and the substrate strongly inhibits adhesion. We thus propose that cell-surface-associated hyaluronan can mediate and modulate cell-matrix adhesion at the very first encounter with the substrate. It may promote it through the establishment of exquisitely stereospecific chemical interactions or inhibit it by virtue of steric exclusion and/or electrostatic repulsion. PMID:11916844

  17. Anti-adhesion effects of liquid-infused textured surfaces on high-temperature stainless steel for soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Liwen; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on the electrosurgical instruments can induce many serious complications, such as failure of hemostasis and damage to the surrounding soft tissue. The soft tissue adhesion is mainly caused by the high temperature on the instrument surface generally made of stainless steel. Nepenthes inspired liquid-infused surfaces (LIS), highly promising for anti-adhesion, have attracted considerable interests. In this paper, we investigated the anti-adhesion effects of LIS on high-temperature stainless steel for soft tissue for the first time, aiming to develop a new approach to solve the soft tissue adhesion problem. The textured surface, acting as the holding structures, was fabricated by photolithography-assisted chemical etching. Silicone oil, with good biocompatibility and high-temperature resistance, was chosen as the infused liquid. The adhesion force measurements for soft tissue on the LIS at high temperatures indicated that the soft tissue adhesion force was decreased by approximately 80% at 250 °C. Besides, the cycle tests of soft tissue adhesion force demonstrated the excellent stability of prepared LIS. We anticipate that LIS will be of great promise for practical applications on the electrosurgical instruments.

  18. Adhesion and sliding response of a biologically inspired fibrillar surface: experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Rocca, G Della; Guduru, P R; Gao, H

    2008-07-01

    Inspired by the adhesion mechanisms of several animal species such as geckos, beetles and flies, several efforts in designing and fabricating surface engineering strategies have been made recently to mimic the adhesive and frictional behaviour of biological foot pads. An important feature of such biological adhesion systems is the ability to switch between strong attachment and easy detachment, which is crucial for animal locomotion. Recent investigations have suggested that such a 'switching' mechanism can be achieved by the elastic anisotropy of the attachment pad, which renders the magnitude of the detachment force to be direction dependent. This suggestion is supported by the observations that the fibres of the foot pads in geckos and insects are oriented at an angle to the base and that geckos curl their toes backwards (digital hyperextension) while detaching from a surface. One of the promising bio-inspired architectures developed recently is a film-terminated fibrillar PDMS surface; this structure was demonstrated to result in superior detachment force and energy dissipation compared with a bulk PDMS surface. In this investigation, the film-terminated fibrillar architecture is modified by tilting the fibres to make the surface vertically more compliant and elastically anisotropic. The directional detachment and the sliding resistance between the tilted fibrillar surfaces and a spherical glass lens are measured: both show significant directional anisotropy. It is argued that the anisotropy introduced by the tilted fibres and the deformation-induced change in the compliance of the fibre layer are responsible for the observed anisotropy in the detachment force. PMID:17971321

  19. Adsorption of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles onto Hydroxyapatite Surfaces Differentially Alters Surfaces Properties and Adhesion of Human Osteoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Priya; Brooks, Roger A; Kinrade, Stephen D; Morgan, David J; Brown, Andrew P; Rushton, Neil; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is suggested to be an important/essential nutrient for bone and connective tissue health. Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) has silicate ions incorporated into its lattice structure and was developed to improve attachment to bone and increase new bone formation. Here we investigated the direct adsorption of silicate species onto an HA coated surface as a cost effective method of incorporating silicon on to HA surfaces for improved implant osseointegration, and determined changes in surface characteristics and osteoblast cell adhesion. Plasma-sprayed HA-coated stainless steel discs were incubated in silica dispersions of different concentrations (0-42 mM Si), at neutral pH for 12 h. Adsorbed Si was confirmed by XPS analysis and quantified by ICP-OES analysis following release from the HA surface. Changes in surface characteristics were determined by AFM and measurement of surface wettability. Osteoblast cell adhesion was determined by vinculin plaque staining. Maximum Si adsorption to the HA coated disc occurred after incubation in the 6 mM silica dispersion and decreased progressively with higher silica concentrations, while no adsorption was observed with dispersions below 6 mM Si. Comparison of the Si dispersions that produced the highest and lowest Si adsorption to the HA surface, by TEM-based analysis, revealed an abundance of small amorphous nanosilica species (NSP) of ~1.5 nm in diameter in the 6 mM Si dispersion, with much fewer and larger NSP in the 42 mM Si dispersions. 29Si-NMR confirmed that the NSPs in the 6 mM silica dispersion were polymeric and similar in composition to the larger NSPs in the 42 mM Si dispersion, suggesting that the latter were aggregates of the former. Amorphous NSP adsorbed from the 6 mM dispersion on to a HA-coated disc surface increased the surface's water contact angle by 53°, whereas that adsorbed from the 42 mM dispersion decreased the contact angle by 18°, indicating increased and decreased

  20. The Measurement of Surface Rheological and Surface Adhesive Properties of a PDMS Rubber using Micro- and Nano-Particle Embedment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Stephen; McKenna, Gregory

    2009-03-01

    In previous work, we used particle embedment data to determine the rheological response of the surfaces of a polystyrene film, a phase separated copolymer and a commercially available polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber through the application of a viscoelastic contact mechanics model. The goal of the current research is to build off this analysis and use micro- and nano-sphere embedment experiments to probe the surface rheological behavior of PDMS in the rubbery state. The work includes measurements made with different particle diameters and chemistries. An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to measure the embedment depth as nanoparticles are pulled into the surface by the thermodynamic work of adhesion. Present results show that silica probes of different sizes (500 nm and 300 nm) give different results for the surface adhesion properties and the surface rheological properties determined from the particle embedment data and at scales much larger than the nanometer size scale where one might expect such deviations. Possible water entrapment and effects of particle surface composition on the results will be discussed.

  1. Flight Testing Surfaces Engineered for Mitigating Insect Adhesion on a Falcon HU-25C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, Michelle; Wohl, Chris J.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residue contamination on aircraft wings can decrease fuel efficiency in aircraft designed for natural laminar flow. Insect residues can cause a premature transition to turbulent flow, increasing fuel burn and making the aircraft less environmentally friendly. Surfaces, designed to minimize insect residue adhesion, were evaluated through flight testing on a Falcon HU-25C aircraft flown along the coast of Virginia and North Carolina. The surfaces were affixed to the wing leading edge and the aircraft remained at altitudes lower than 1000 feet throughout the flight to assure high insect density. The number of strikes on the engineered surfaces was compared to, and found to be lower than, untreated aluminum control surfaces flown concurrently. Optical profilometry was used to determine insect residue height and areal coverage. Differences in results between flight and laboratory tests suggest the importance of testing in realistic use environments to evaluate the effectiveness of engineered surface designs.

  2. [Adhesion of Bacillus subtilis on the surface of pectin-calcium gel].

    PubMed

    Gunter, E A; Melekhin, A K

    2015-01-01

    Pectin-calcium gels obtained based on pectins of callus cultures are able to adhere to the surface of cells of Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis to various degrees and this is thanks to the structural features of pectin. Rapid adhesion of the cells to gels obtained from the pectin of Tanacetum vulgare (TVC) callus cultures is associated with a high content of the linear region in the carbohydrate chain of pectin, a high molecular weight, and a low degree of methyl etherification of pectin. The number of adherent cells on the surface of gels obtained from pectins of Silene vulgaris callus cultures (SVC), TVC, and Lemna minor (LMC) after 8 h of incubation was close, whereas the number of cells was minimal on a gel produced using the pectin of Silene tatarica (STC) callus culture. This was due to the higher degree of methyl etherification of STC pectin (45%) compared to other pectins (4-12%). The adhesion rate constant (k) of B. subtilis for TCV gel during the first 120 min was the highest in comparison with other gels; the k value for SVC, STC and LMC gels was similar. The lowest level of k was characteristic for the gel from commercial apple pectin. The obtained data can beused for the production of gels with adhesive and antiadhesive properties. PMID:25842905

  3. Microfabricated Nanotopological Surfaces for Study of Adhesion-dependent Cell mechanosensitivity**

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Sun, Yubing

    2014-01-01

    Cells display high sensitivity and exhibit diverse responses to the intrinsic nanotopography of the extracellular matrix through their nanoscale cellular sensing machinery. Here, we reported a simple microfabrication method for precise control and spatial patterning of the local nanoroughness on glass surfaces using photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE). Using RIE-generated nanorough glass surfaces, we demonstrated that local nanoroughness could provide a potent biophysical signal to regulate a diverse array of NIH/3T3 fibroblast behaviors, including cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation and migration. We further showed that cellular responses to nanotopography might be regulated by cell adhesion signaling and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. To further investigate the role of cytoskeleton contractility in nanoroughness sensing, we applied the RIE method to generate nanoroughness on the tops of an array of elastomeric poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microposts. We utilized the PDMS microposts as force sensors and demonstrated that nanoroughness could indeed regulate the cytoskeleton contractility of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggested that a feedback regulation and mechano-chemical integration mechanism involving adhesion signaling, actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular mechanosensory components might play an important role in regulating mechanosensitive behaviors of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. The capability to control and further predict cellular responses to nanoroughness might suggest novel methods for developing biomaterials mimicking nanotopographic structures in vivo and suitable local cellular microenvironments for functional tissue engineering. PMID:22887768

  4. Surface modifications of photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomers and their influence on smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ilagan, Bernadette G; Amsden, Brian G

    2009-09-01

    Photocrosslinked, biodegradable elastomers based on aliphatic polyesters have many desirable features as scaffolds for smooth muscle tissue engineering. However, they lack cell adhesion motifs. To address this shortcoming, two different modification procedures were studied utilizing a high and a low crosslink density elastomer: base etching and the incorporation of acryloyl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) into the elastomer network during photocrosslinking. Base etching improved surface hydrophilicity without altering surface topography, but did not improve bovine aortic smooth muscle cell adhesion. Incorporation of PEG-GRGDS into the elastomer network significantly improved cell adhesion for both high and low crosslink density elastomers, with a greater effect with the higher crosslink density elastomer. Incorporation of GRGDS into the high crosslink density elastomer also enhanced smooth muscle cell proliferation, while proliferation on the low crosslink density unmodified, base etched, and PEG-GRGDS incorporated elastomers was significantly greater than on the high crosslink density unmodified and base etched elastomer. PMID:19375999

  5. Adsorption of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles onto Hydroxyapatite Surfaces Differentially Alters Surfaces Properties and Adhesion of Human Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Priya; Brooks, Roger A.; Kinrade, Stephen D.; Morgan, David J.; Brown, Andrew P.; Rushton, Neil; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is suggested to be an important/essential nutrient for bone and connective tissue health. Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) has silicate ions incorporated into its lattice structure and was developed to improve attachment to bone and increase new bone formation. Here we investigated the direct adsorption of silicate species onto an HA coated surface as a cost effective method of incorporating silicon on to HA surfaces for improved implant osseointegration, and determined changes in surface characteristics and osteoblast cell adhesion. Plasma-sprayed HA-coated stainless steel discs were incubated in silica dispersions of different concentrations (0–42 mM Si), at neutral pH for 12 h. Adsorbed Si was confirmed by XPS analysis and quantified by ICP-OES analysis following release from the HA surface. Changes in surface characteristics were determined by AFM and measurement of surface wettability. Osteoblast cell adhesion was determined by vinculin plaque staining. Maximum Si adsorption to the HA coated disc occurred after incubation in the 6 mM silica dispersion and decreased progressively with higher silica concentrations, while no adsorption was observed with dispersions below 6 mM Si. Comparison of the Si dispersions that produced the highest and lowest Si adsorption to the HA surface, by TEM-based analysis, revealed an abundance of small amorphous nanosilica species (NSP) of ~1.5 nm in diameter in the 6 mM Si dispersion, with much fewer and larger NSP in the 42 mM Si dispersions. 29Si-NMR confirmed that the NSPs in the 6 mM silica dispersion were polymeric and similar in composition to the larger NSPs in the 42 mM Si dispersion, suggesting that the latter were aggregates of the former. Amorphous NSP adsorbed from the 6 mM dispersion on to a HA-coated disc surface increased the surface’s water contact angle by 53°, whereas that adsorbed from the 42 mM dispersion decreased the contact angle by 18°, indicating increased and decreased

  6. Effects of surface preparation on the long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Jason Dante

    The long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints is critical to modern aircraft structures, which are increasingly adopting bonding as an alternative option to mechanical fastening. The effects of the surface preparation of the adherends are critical, affecting initial strength, long-term durability, fracture toughness, and failure modes of bonded joints. In this study, several potential factors are evaluated, with focus on the following: (1) Effects of possible chemical contamination from release fabrics, release films, and peel plies during adherend cure. (2) Chemical and mechanical effects of abrasion on the fracture toughness and failure mode. (3) Characterization of paste and film adhesives. There are several standard test methods used to evaluate specimen fracture, but the majority concentrate on bonded metals and interlaminar composite fracture. Testing concentrated on mode I tests; a custom double cantilever beam specimen was devised and utilized, and two forms of a wedge crack test (traveling and static) were also used. Additionally, single lap shear tests were run to contrast the mode I tests. Non-destructive testing included X-ray photography of crack fronts, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface chemistry analyses, and scanning electron microscope imaging of prepared surfaces. All mode I test methods tended to be in agreement in the ranking of different surface preparation methods. Test results revealed that release agents deposited on adherend surfaces during their cure cycle prevented proper adhesion. While mechanical abrasion did improve their fracture toughness and lower their contamination greatly, the test values did not reach the levels of samples that were not contaminated before bonding, and the interfacial modes of failure did not always change to desirable modes.

  7. The effect of surface roughness on the adhesion of solid surfaces for systems with and without liquid lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, V. N.; Sivebaek, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2004-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics results for the interaction between two solid elastic walls during pull-off for systems with and without octane (C8H18) lubricant. We used two types of substrate—flat and corrugated—and varied the lubricant coverage from ˜1/8 to ˜4 ML (monolayers) of octane. For the flat substrate without lubricant the maximum adhesion was found to be approximately three times larger than for the system with the corrugated substrate. As a function of the octane coverage (for the corrugated substrate) the pull-off force first increases as the coverage increases from 0 to ˜1 ML, and then decreases as the coverage is increased beyond monolayer coverage. It is shown that at low octane coverage, the octane molecules located in the substrate corrugation wells during squeezing are pulled out of the wells during pull-off, forming a network of nanocapillary bridges around the substrate nanoasperities, thus increasing the adhesion between two surfaces. For greater lubricant coverages a single capillary bridge is formed. The adhesion force saturates for lubricant coverages greater than 3 ML. For the flat substrate, during pull-off we observe discontinuous, thermally activated changes in the number n of lubricant layers (n-1→n layering transitions), whereas for the corrugated substrate these transitions are "averaged" by the substrate surface roughness.

  8. Adhesion to and viability of Listeria monocytogenes on food contact surfaces.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Teixeira, Pilar; Oliveira, Rosario; Azeredo, Joana

    2008-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important pathogen responsible for major outbreaks associated with food products. Adhesion to surfaces leads to significant modifications in cell physiology. The aim of this work was to determine the adhesion ability of 10 isolates of L. monocytogenes to eight materials commonly used in kitchens and to evaluate the viability of the adhered cells. The materials assayed were stainless steel 304, marble, granite, glass, polypropylene from a bowl and from a cutting board, and two kinds of silestone. All L. monocytogenes strains attached to all surfaces, although to different extents. L. monocytogenes adhered most tightly to granite and marble, followed by stainless steel 304, glass, silestones, and finally polypropylene surfaces. Surfaces at the threshold between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity, with high electron acceptor capability and a regular pattern of roughness, were more prone to attachment. Polypropylene surfaces displayed the highest percentage of viable bacteria (nearly 100%), whereas marble and granite had a lower percentage of cultivable cells, 69.5 and 78.7%, respectively. The lowest percentage of culturable bacteria was found on white silestone (18.5%). These results indicate that there are differences in adhered cell viability on different materials. Cell viability assays are important to better understand the cross-contamination process because only adhered bacteria that remain viable are responsible for postprocess contamination.

  9. In vitro investigation of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on inorganic biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lü, Xiaoying; Jingwu, Ma; Huang, Nan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the surface properties, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion behaviors of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium (Ti) films. The surface energy and microstructures of these films were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A modified Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) protein assay was used to study the amount of adsorbed proteins. Platelet adhesion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AFM results show that the DLC film is smoother than Ti. Protein adsorption results from CBB protein assay show that the ratio of adsorbed albumin (Alb) to IgG ( RA/I) on DLC is larger than Ti, which coincide with the sequence of the ratio of interfacial tension between solid surface and Alb ( γS,Alb) to interfacial tension between surface and IgG ( γS,IgG) ( γS,Alb/ γS,IgG). The DLC film has a preferential adsorption for Alb. The results suggest that the ratio of γS,Alb/ γS,IgG may indicate an Alb/IgG affinity ratio of materials. More platelets adhere on Ti film than on DLC, which may correspond to the surface roughness of materials. The conclusion is the blood compatibility of DLC seems to be better than Ti.

  10. Influence of Surface Treatments and Adhesive Systems on Lithium Disilicate Microshear Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Garboza, Celso Sebastião; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Fugolin, Ana Paula Piovezan; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Lopes, Murilo Baena

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength of ceramic prosthetic structures reinforced by lithium disilicate cemented with resin cement under conditions of different surface treatments and adhesive systems. Seventy-two rectangular blocks of lithium disilicate (6.5 mm long × 5 mm wide × 1 mm thick) were fabricated, air abraded with 50-μm Al2O3 particles and divided into six groups (n=12) depending on the surface pretreatments. The groups were as follows: 10HF/S/SBM: 10% hydrofluoric acid etched for 20 s (10HF) + silane (S) + Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBM); 10HF/S/SB: 10HF + S + Single Bond Universal (SB); 10HF/SBM; 10HF/SB; S/SBM and S/SB. Two 1-mm-long plastic tubes were placed on the specimens, filled with RelyX ARC resin cement and cured for 20 s per tube. The plastic tube was removed, and the microshear bond strength was tested. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Fractured specimens were observed under optical microscopy. For both adhesives, the bond strengths (MPa) of groups treated with acid-etching and silane (10HF/S/SB: 24.82, 10HF/S/SBM: 24.90) were higher (p<0.001) than those of groups treated with acid-etching (10HF/SB: 16.47, 10HF/SBM: 19.94) only or only silane (S/SB: 18.42, S/SBM: 13.24). All groups showed a predominance of failure adhesive. The silanization should be a clinical step in cementing ceramic structures reinforced by lithium disilicate, even with the application of universal adhesive that contains silane in its formulation. PMID:27652711

  11. Length-scale mediated adhesion and directed growth of neural cells by surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Krsko, Peter; McCann, Thomas E; Thach, Thu-Trang; Laabs, Tracy L; Geller, Herbert M; Libera, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    We engineered surfaces that permit the adhesion and directed growth of neuronal cell processes but that prevent the adhesion of astrocytes. This effect was achieved based on the spatial distribution of sub-micron-sized cell-repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] hydrogels patterned on an otherwise cell-adhesive substrate. Patterns were identified that promoted cellular responses ranging from complete non-attachment, selective attachment, and directed growth at both cellular and subcellular length scales. At the highest patterning density where the individual hydrogels almost overlapped, there was no cellular adhesion. As the spacing between individual hydrogels was increased, patterns were identified where neurites could grow on the adhesive surface between hydrogels while astrocytes were unable to adhere. Patterns such as lines or arrays were identified that could direct the growth of these subcellular neuronal processes. At higher hydrogel spacings, both neurons and astrocytes adhered and grew in a manner approaching that of unpatterned control surfaces. Patterned lines could once again direct growth at cellular length scales. Significantly, we have demonstrated that the patterning of sub-micron/nano scale cell-repulsive features at microscale lengths on an otherwise cell-adhesive surface can differently control the adhesion and growth of cells and cell processes based on the difference in their characteristic sizes. This concept could potentially be applied to an implantable nerve-guidance device that would selectively enable regrowing axons to bridge a spinal-cord injury without interference from the glial scar.

  12. Length-Scale Mediated Adhesion and Directed Growth of Neural Cells by Surface-Patterned Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Krsko, Peter; McCann, Thomas; Thach, Thu-Trang; Laabs, Tracy; Geller, Herbert M.; Libera, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We engineered surfaces that permit the adhesion and directed growth of neuronal cell processes – axons – but that prevent the adhesion of astrocytes. This effect was achieved based on the spatial distribution of cell-repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] nanohydrogels patterned on an otherwise cell-adhesive substrate. Patterns were identified that promoted cellular responses ranging from complete non-attachment, selective attachment, and directed growth at both cellular and subcellular length scales. At the highest patterning density where the individual nanohydrogels almost overlapped, there was no cellular adhesion. As the spacing between individual nanohydrogels was increased, patterns were identified where axons could grow on the adhesive surface between nanohydrogels while astrocytes were unable to adhere. Patterns such as lines or arrays were identified that could direct the growth of these subcellular neuronal processes. At higher nanohydrogel spacings, both neurons and astrocytes adhered and grew in a manner approaching that of unpatterned control surfaces. Patterned lines could once again direct growth at cellular length scales. Significantly, we have demonstrated that the patterning of nanoscale cell-repulsive features at microscale lengths on an otherwise cell-adhesive surface can differently control the adhesion and growth of cells and cell processes based on the difference in their characteristic sizes. This concept could potentially be applied to an implantable nerve-guidance device that would selectively enable regrowing axons to bridge a spinal-cord injury without interference from the glial scar. PMID:19026443

  13. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic

  14. Microcantilever-based sensors: effect of morphology, adhesion, and cleanliness of the sensing surface on surface stress.

    PubMed

    Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Godin, Michel; Burgess, Ian J; Monga, Tanya; Lennox, R Bruce; Grütter, Peter

    2007-11-01

    The surface stress response of micromechanical cantilever-based sensors was studied as a function of the morphology, adhesion, and cleanliness of the gold sensing surface. Two model systems were investigated: the adsorption of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers at the gas-solid interface and the potential-controlled adsorption of anions at the liquid-solid interface. The potential-induced surface stress, on a smooth and continuous polycrystalline Au(111)-textured microcantilever in 0.1 M HClO4, is in excellent agreement with macroscopic Au(111) single-crystal electrode results. It is shown that ambient contaminants on the sensing surface dramatically alter the surface stress-potential response. This observation can be misinterpreted as evidence that for polycrystalline Au(111) microcantilever electrodes, surface stress is dominated by surface energy change. Results for anions adsorption on gold are in contrast to the gas-phase model system. We demonstrate that the average grain size of the gold sensing surface strongly influences the magnitude of the surface stress change induced by the adsorption of octanethiol. A 25-fold amplification of the change in surface stress is observed on increasing the average gold grain size of the sensing surface from 90 to 500 nm.

  15. Studies of the degradation of metal-adhesive interfaces with surface analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, D. R.; Wilson, A. R.; Rider, A. N.; Lambrianidis, L. T.; Farr, N. G.

    1993-06-01

    The application of bonded repairs and reinforcements to aircraft components places an emphasis on adherend surface treatment procedures because these treatments can significantly change bond strength and durability. A typical minimum treatment sequence for Alclad 2024-T3 aluminium alloy adherends includes a solvent degrease, an abrasion with a Scotchbrite ® pad, a clean with a methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK) soaked tissue and a grit-blast with 45 μm alumina powder. The adherends are treated with γ-glycidoxy-propyl-trimethoxy-silane (γ-GPTS) coupling agent then bonded with an epoxy film adhesive. The composition of the adherent, the bond durability and the locus of fracture were examined at several stages of the adherent surface treatment. Boeing wedge tests show that grit-blasting the adherends creates a more durable adhesive bond than the Scotchbrite ®/MEK treatment and that the application of γ-GPTS improves bond durability in both cases. XPS has shown that the cleaning sequence decreases the concentration of hydrocarbon contaminant on the grit-blasted adherend to an average thickness of less than 1.5 nm. XPS analyses of the fracture surfaces indicates that for the grit-blast, grit-blast plus γ-GPTS and Scotchbrite ®/MEK plus γ-GPTS treatments, failure occurs primarily in the oxide film, whereas for the Scotchbrite ®/MEK treatment failure occurs at the adhesive/oxide interface possibly due to weakness induced by contaminant. XPS measurements show that a γ-GPTS overlayer retards the growth of the oxide on aluminium in humid air, until the γ-GPTS overlayer is desorbed. The improved bond durability with the coupling agent may be due to the inhibition of hydration sites on this oxide surface.

  16. Polyglycerol dendrimers immobilized on radiation grafted poly-HEMA hydrogels: Surface chemistry characterization and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higa, Olga Z.; Faria, Henrique Antonio Mendonça; de Queiroz, Alvaro A. A.

    2014-05-01

    Radiation induced grafting of poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) on low density polyethylene (LDPE) films and subsequent immobilization of poly(glycerol) dendrimer (PGLD) has been performed with the aim to improve cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of the polymer, in order to enhance their properties for bone tissue engineering scaffolding applications. Radiation grafting of PHEMA onto LDPE was promoted by γ-ray radiation. The covalent immobilization of PGLD on LDPE-g-PHEMA surface was performed by using a dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCC)/N,N-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) method. The occurrence of grafting polymerization of PHEMA and further immobilization of PGLD was quantitatively confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence, respectively. The LDPE-g-PHEMA surface topography after PGLD coupling was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hydrophilicity of the LDPE-g-PHEMA film was remarkably improved compared to that of the ungrafted LDPE. The core level XPS ESCA spectrum of PHEMA-grafted LDPE showed two strong peaks at 286.6 eV (from hydroxyl groups and ester groups) and 289.1 eV (from ester groups) due to PHEMA brushes grafted onto LDPE surfaces. The results from the cell adhesion studies show that MCT3-E1 cells tended to spread more slowly on the LDPE-g-PHEMA than on the LDPE-g-PHEMA-i-PGLD.

  17. Reversed cell imprinting, AFM imaging and adhesion analyses of cells on patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiongtu; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Li, Xin; Wang, Li; Ma, Xueming; Chen, Yong

    2010-05-01

    Cell adhesion and motility depend strongly on the interactions between cells and cell culture substratum. To observe the cell morphology at the interface between cells and artificial substratum or patterned surfaces, we have developed a technique named reversed cell imprinting. After culture and chemical fixation of the cells on a patterned hole array, a liquid polymer was poured on and UV cured, allowing taking off the cell-polymer assembly for a direct observation of the underside cell surface using atomic force microscopy. As expected, we observed local deformation of the cell membrane in the hole area with a penetration depth strongly dependent on the size and depth of the hole as well as the culture time. Quantitative analyses of Hela cells on patterned surfaces of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) revealed that the penetration was also position dependent over the cell attachment area due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the membrane stress. With the increase of the culture time, the penetration depth was reduced, in a close correlation with the increase of the cell spreading area. Nevertheless, both cell seeding and adhesion efficiency on high density hole arrays could be significantly increased comparing to that on a smooth surface. Patterned substrates are increasingly required to produce and interrogate new biomaterials for therapeutic benefit. Overall, this work suggests a strategy to endow conventional imaging methods with added functionality to enable easy observation of the underside cell morphology on topographic patterns. PMID:20390138

  18. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  19. Influence of silane surface modification of veneer on interfacial adhesion of wood-plastic plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lu; Chang, Liang; Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Yongping; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, wood-plastic plywood was fabricated with high density polyethylene (HDPE) film and poplar veneer by hot-pressing. To improve the interfacial adhesion between the wood veneer and HDPE film, silane A-171 (vinyltrimethoxysilane) was used to treat the surface of poplar veneer by spraying. The effects of silane agent on the veneer surface properties as well as the physical-mechanical performance of wood-plastic plywood were evaluated. The adsorption of several prehydrolyzed alkoxysilanes onto the veneer surface and the existence of a covalent bonding between the wood veneer and silane agent were confirmed using FTIR, XPS and contact angle. Silane surface treatment resulted in enhancement of shear strength and water resistance. When one layer HDPE film was used as adhesive, it caused 293.2% increase in shear strength, 34.6% and 40.8% reduction in water absorption and thickness swelling, respectively. In addition, the wood failure also increased from 5% to 100% due to the silane modification. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed that treated plywood have higher storage modulus, lower tan δ peak value and lagged temperature for tan δ peak value with respect to untreated plywood. Experimental results of interfacial morphology by SEM further revealed better interaction between silane A-171 treated veneer and HDPE film.

  20. The effect of Zircaloy-4 substrate surface condition on the adhesion strength and corrosion of SiC coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Olayyan, Y.; Fuchs, G. E.; Baney, R.; Tulenko, J.

    2005-11-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings of silicon carbide were deposited on various Zircaloy-4 substrates having different surface preparations to increase the corrosion resistance. The effects of several different surface treatments of the Zircaloy-4 substrate, such as surface roughness, the presence of interlayer, and pickling, on the adhesion and corrosion resistance of the SiC coatings have been evaluated using a scratch test method, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The scratch test was found to be a good tool for qualitative measurement of adhesion strength of thin coating films. Higher adhesion strengths were obtained for a moderate level of substrate roughness and the corrosion resistance of these films was closely related with the adhesion of the film on the substrate, as measured by impedance.

  1. Investigating the role of surface micro/nano structure in cell adhesion behavior of superhydrophobic polypropylene/nanosilica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Iman; Seyfi, Javad; Hejazi, Ehsan; Sadeghi, Gity Mir Mohamad; Jafari, Seyed Hassan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali

    2015-03-01

    The main aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of different topographical features on the biological performance of polypropylene (PP)/silica coatings. To this end, a novel method including combined use of nanoparticles and non-solvent was used for preparation of superhydrophobic PP coatings. The proposed method led to a much more homogeneous appearance with a better adhesion to the glass substrate. Moreover, a notable reduction was observed in the required contents of nanoparticles (100-20 wt% with respect to the polymer) and non-solvent (35.5-9 vol%) for achieving superhydrophobicity. Surface composition and morphology of the coatings were also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, it was found that the superhydrophobic coatings with only nano-scale roughness strongly prevented adhesion and proliferation of 4T1 mouse mammary tumor cells as compared to the superhydrophobic surfaces with micro-scale structure. Such results demonstrate that the cell behavior could be controlled onto the polymer and nanocomposite-based surfaces via tuning the surface micro/nano structure.

  2. Investigating the effects of membrane deformability on artificial capsule adhesion to the functionalized surface.

    PubMed

    Balsara, Hiren D; Banton, Rohan J; Eggleton, Charles D

    2016-10-01

    Understanding, manipulating and controlling cellular adhesion processes can be critical in developing biomedical technologies. Adhesive mechanisms can be used to the target, pattern and separate cells such as leukocytes from whole blood for biomedical applications. The deformability response of the cell directly affects the rolling and adhesion behavior under viscous linear shear flow conditions. To that end, the primary objective of the present study was to investigate numerically the influence of capsule membrane's nonlinear material behavior (i.e. elastic-plastic to strain hardening) on the rolling and adhesion behavior of representative artificial capsules. Specifically, spherical capsules with radius of [Formula: see text] were represented using an elastic membrane governed by a Mooney-Rivlin strain energy functions. The surfaces of the capsules were coated with P-selectin glycoprotein-ligand-1 to initiate binding interaction with P-selectin-coated planar surface with density of [Formula: see text] under linear shear flow varying from 100 to [Formula: see text]. The numerical model is based on the Immersed Boundary Method for rolling of deformable capsule in shear flow coupled with Monte Carlo simulation for receptor/ligand interaction modeled using Bell model. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of the capsule play an important role in the rolling behavior and the binding kinetics between the capsule contact surface and the substrate. The rolling behavior of the strain hardening capsules is relatively smoother and slower compared to the elastic-plastic capsules. The strain hardening capsules exhibits higher contact area at any given shear rate compared to elastic-plastic capsules. The increase in contact area leads to decrease in rolling velocity. The capsule contact surface is not in complete contact with the substrate because of thin lubrication film that is trapped between the capsule and substrate. This creates a concave shape on the bottom

  3. Nano-anisotropic surface coating based on drug immobilized pendant polymer to suppress macrophage adhesion response.

    PubMed

    Kaladhar, K; Renz, H; Sharma, C P

    2015-04-01

    Exploring drug molecules for material design, to harness concepts of nano-anisotropy and ligand-receptor interactions, are rather elusive. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the bottom-up design of a single-step and bio-interactive polymeric surface coating, based on drug based pendant polymer. This can be applied on to polystyrene (PS) substrates, to suppress macrophage adhesion and spreading. The drug molecule is used in this coating for two purposes. The first one is drug as a "pendant" group, to produce nano-anisotropic properties that can enable adhesion of the coatings to the substrate. The second purpose is to use the drug as a "ligand", to produce ligand-receptor interaction, between the bound ligand and receptors of albumin, to develop a self-albumin coat over the surface, by the preferential binding of albumin in biological environment, to reduce macrophage adhesion. Our in silico studies show that, diclofenac (DIC) is an ideal drug based "ligand" for albumin. This can also act as a "pendant" group with planar aryl groups. The combination of these two factors can help to harness, both nano-anisotropic properties and biological functions to the polymeric coating. Further, the drug, diclofenac (DIC) is immobilized to the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), to develop the pendant polymer (PVA-DIC). The interaction of bound DIC with the albumin is a ligand-receptor based interaction, as per the studies by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and SDS-PAGE. The non-polar π-π* interactions are regulating; the interactions between PVA bound DIC-DIC interactions, leading to "nano-anisotropic condensation" to form distinct "nano-anisotropic segments" inside the polymeric coating. This is evident from, the thermo-responsiveness and uniform size of nanoparticles, as well as regular roughness in the surface coating, with similar properties as that of nanoparticles. In addition, the hydrophobic DIC-polystyrene (PS) interactions, between the PVA

  4. Mating in Chlamydomonas: a system for the study of specific cell adhesion. I. Ultrastructural and electrophoretic analyses of flagellar surface components involved in adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    To determine the ultrastructural and biochemical bases for flagellar adhesiveness in the mating reaction in Chlamydomonas, gametic and vegetative flagella and flagellar membranes were studied by use of electron microscope and electrophoretic procedures. Negative staining with uranyl acetate revealed no differences in gametic and vegetative flagellar surfaces; both had flagellar membranes, flagellar sheaths, and similar numbers and distributions of mastigonemes. Freezecleave procedures suggested that there may be a greater density of intramembranous particles on the B faces of gametic flagellar membranes than on the B faces of vegetative flagellar membranes. Gamone, the adhesive material that gametes release into their medium, was demonstrated, on the basis of ultrastructural and biochemical analyses, to be composed of flagellar surface components, i.e., membrane vesicles and mastigonemes. Comparison of vegetative (nonadhesive) and gametic (adhesive) "gamones" by use of SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed both preparations to be composed of membrane, mastigoneme, and some microtubule proteins, as well as several unidentified protein and carbohydrate-staining components. However, there was an additional protein of approximately 70,000 mol wt in gametic gamone which was not present in vegetative gamone. When gametic gamone was separated into a membrane and a mastigoneme fraction on CSCl gradients, only the membrane fraction had isoagglutinating activity; the mastigoneme fraction was inactive, suggesting that mastigonemes are not involved in adhesion. PMID:1245545

  5. Dynamic Surfaces for the Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth through Adhesion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jemma N; Sahoo, Jugal Kishore; McNamara, Laura E; Burgess, Karl V; Yang, Jingli; Alakpa, Enateri V; Anderson, Hilary J; Hay, Jake; Turner, Lesley-Anne; Yarwood, Stephen J; Zelzer, Mischa; Oreffo, Richard O C; Ulijn, Rein V; Dalby, Matthew J

    2016-07-26

    Out of their niche environment, adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), spontaneously differentiate. This makes both studying these important regenerative cells and growing large numbers of stem cells for clinical use challenging. Traditional cell culture techniques have fallen short of meeting this challenge, but materials science offers hope. In this study, we have used emerging rules of managing adhesion/cytoskeletal balance to prolong MSC cultures by fabricating controllable nanoscale cell interfaces using immobilized peptides that may be enzymatically activated to change their function. The surfaces can be altered (activated) at will to tip adhesion/cytoskeletal balance and initiate differentiation, hence better informing biological mechanisms of stem cell growth. Tools that are able to investigate the stem cell phenotype are important. While large phenotypical differences, such as the difference between an adipocyte and an osteoblast, are now better understood, the far more subtle differences between fibroblasts and MSCs are much harder to dissect. The development of technologies able to dynamically navigate small differences in adhesion are critical in the race to provide regenerative strategies using stem cells. PMID:27322014

  6. Osteogenic lineage restriction by osteoprogenitors cultured on nanometric grooved surfaces: the role of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, John W; Roberts, Jemma N; Smith, Carol-Anne; Robertson, Mary; White, Kate; Biggs, Manus J; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dalby, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    The differentiation of progenitor cells is dependent on more than biochemical signalling. Topographical cues in natural bone extracellular matrix guide cellular differentiation through the formation of focal adhesions, contact guidance, cytoskeletal rearrangement and ultimately gene expression. Osteoarthritis and a number of bone disorders present as growing challenges for our society. Hence, there is a need for next generation implantable devices to substitute for, or guide, bone repair in vivo. Cellular responses to nanometric topographical cues need to be better understood in vitro in order to ensure the effective and efficient integration and performance of these orthopedic devices. In this study, the FDA-approved plastic polycaprolactone was embossed with nanometric grooves and the response of primary and immortalized osteoprogenitor cells observed. Nanometric groove dimensions were 240 nm or 540 nm deep and 12.5 μm wide. Cells cultured on test surfaces followed contact guidance along the length of groove edges, elongated along their major axis and showed nuclear distortion; they formed more focal complexes and lower proportions of mature adhesions relative to planar controls. Down-regulation of the osteoblast marker genes RUNX2 and BMPR2 in primary and immortalized cells was observed on grooved substrates. Down-regulation appeared to directly correlate with focal adhesion maturation, indicating the involvement of ERK 1/2 negative feedback pathways following integrin-mediated FAK activation. PMID:24252447

  7. Dynamic Surfaces for the Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth through Adhesion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jemma N; Sahoo, Jugal Kishore; McNamara, Laura E; Burgess, Karl V; Yang, Jingli; Alakpa, Enateri V; Anderson, Hilary J; Hay, Jake; Turner, Lesley-Anne; Yarwood, Stephen J; Zelzer, Mischa; Oreffo, Richard O C; Ulijn, Rein V; Dalby, Matthew J

    2016-07-26

    Out of their niche environment, adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), spontaneously differentiate. This makes both studying these important regenerative cells and growing large numbers of stem cells for clinical use challenging. Traditional cell culture techniques have fallen short of meeting this challenge, but materials science offers hope. In this study, we have used emerging rules of managing adhesion/cytoskeletal balance to prolong MSC cultures by fabricating controllable nanoscale cell interfaces using immobilized peptides that may be enzymatically activated to change their function. The surfaces can be altered (activated) at will to tip adhesion/cytoskeletal balance and initiate differentiation, hence better informing biological mechanisms of stem cell growth. Tools that are able to investigate the stem cell phenotype are important. While large phenotypical differences, such as the difference between an adipocyte and an osteoblast, are now better understood, the far more subtle differences between fibroblasts and MSCs are much harder to dissect. The development of technologies able to dynamically navigate small differences in adhesion are critical in the race to provide regenerative strategies using stem cells.

  8. Path-programmable water droplet manipulations on an adhesion controlled superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Lee, Jaehong; Seung Lee, Jung; Kwon, Hyukho; Cho, Seung-Woo; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-07-01

    Here, we developed a novel and facile method to control the local water adhesion force of a thin and stretchable superhydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate with micro-pillar arrays that allows the individual manipulation of droplet motions including moving, merging and mixing. When a vacuum pressure was applied below the PDMS substrate, a local dimple structure was formed and the water adhesion force of structure was significantly changed owing to the dynamically varied pillar density. With the help of the lowered water adhesion force and the slope angle of the formed dimple structure, the motion of individual water droplets could be precisely controlled, which facilitated the creation of a droplet-based microfluidic platform capable of a programmable manipulation of droplets. We showed that the platform could be used in newer and emerging microfluidic operations such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with extremely high sensing capability (10-15 M) and in vitro small interfering RNA transfection with enhanced transfection efficiency of ~80%.

  9. Dynamic Surfaces for the Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth through Adhesion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Out of their niche environment, adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), spontaneously differentiate. This makes both studying these important regenerative cells and growing large numbers of stem cells for clinical use challenging. Traditional cell culture techniques have fallen short of meeting this challenge, but materials science offers hope. In this study, we have used emerging rules of managing adhesion/cytoskeletal balance to prolong MSC cultures by fabricating controllable nanoscale cell interfaces using immobilized peptides that may be enzymatically activated to change their function. The surfaces can be altered (activated) at will to tip adhesion/cytoskeletal balance and initiate differentiation, hence better informing biological mechanisms of stem cell growth. Tools that are able to investigate the stem cell phenotype are important. While large phenotypical differences, such as the difference between an adipocyte and an osteoblast, are now better understood, the far more subtle differences between fibroblasts and MSCs are much harder to dissect. The development of technologies able to dynamically navigate small differences in adhesion are critical in the race to provide regenerative strategies using stem cells. PMID:27322014

  10. Path-programmable water droplet manipulations on an adhesion controlled superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Lee, Jaehong; Seung Lee, Jung; Kwon, Hyukho; Cho, Seung-Woo; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-01-01

    Here, we developed a novel and facile method to control the local water adhesion force of a thin and stretchable superhydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate with micro-pillar arrays that allows the individual manipulation of droplet motions including moving, merging and mixing. When a vacuum pressure was applied below the PDMS substrate, a local dimple structure was formed and the water adhesion force of structure was significantly changed owing to the dynamically varied pillar density. With the help of the lowered water adhesion force and the slope angle of the formed dimple structure, the motion of individual water droplets could be precisely controlled, which facilitated the creation of a droplet-based microfluidic platform capable of a programmable manipulation of droplets. We showed that the platform could be used in newer and emerging microfluidic operations such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with extremely high sensing capability (10(-15) M) and in vitro small interfering RNA transfection with enhanced transfection efficiency of ~80%. PMID:26202206

  11. Path-programmable water droplet manipulations on an adhesion controlled superhydrophobic surface

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Lee, Jaehong; Seung Lee, Jung; Kwon, Hyukho; Cho, Seung-Woo; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-01-01

    Here, we developed a novel and facile method to control the local water adhesion force of a thin and stretchable superhydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate with micro-pillar arrays that allows the individual manipulation of droplet motions including moving, merging and mixing. When a vacuum pressure was applied below the PDMS substrate, a local dimple structure was formed and the water adhesion force of structure was significantly changed owing to the dynamically varied pillar density. With the help of the lowered water adhesion force and the slope angle of the formed dimple structure, the motion of individual water droplets could be precisely controlled, which facilitated the creation of a droplet-based microfluidic platform capable of a programmable manipulation of droplets. We showed that the platform could be used in newer and emerging microfluidic operations such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with extremely high sensing capability (10−15 M) and in vitro small interfering RNA transfection with enhanced transfection efficiency of ~80%. PMID:26202206

  12. The impact of the RGD peptide on osteoblast adhesion and spreading on zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite surface.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Elena; Hausen, Moema; Costa, Andrea M; Alves, Gutemberg; Mello, Alexandre; Ospina, C A; Mir, M; Granjeiro, José M; Rossi, Alexandre M

    2013-05-01

    The incorporation of zinc into the hydroxyapatite structure (ZnHA) has been proposed to stimulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Another approach to improve cell adhesion and hydroxyapatite (HA) performance is coating HA with adhesive proteins or peptides such as RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid). The present study investigated the adhesion of murine osteoblastic cells to non-sintered zinc-substituted HA disks before and after the adsorption of RGD. The incorporation of zinc into the HA structure simultaneously changed the topography of disk's surface on the nanoscale and the disk's surface chemistry. Fluorescence microscopy analyses using RGD conjugated to a fluorescein derivative demonstrated that ZnHA adsorbed higher amounts of RGD than non-substituted HA. Zinc incorporation into HA promoted cell adhesion and spreading, but no differences in the cell density, adhesion and spreading were detected when RGD was adsorbed onto ZnHA. The pre-treatment of disks with fetal bovine serum (FBS) greatly increased the cell density and cell surface area for all RGD-free groups, overcoming the positive contribution of zinc to cell adhesion. The presence of RGD on the ZnHA surface impaired the effects of FBS pre-treatment possibly due to competition between FBS proteins and RGD for surface binding sites.

  13. JKR theory for the stick-slip peeling and adhesion hysteresis of gecko mimetic patterned surfaces with a smooth glass surface.

    PubMed

    Das, Saurabh; Chary, Sathya; Yu, Jing; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-12-01

    Geckos are highly efficient climbers and can run over any kind of surface with impeccable dexterity due to the typical design of their hierarchical foot structure. We have fabricated tilted, i.e., asymmetric, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microflaps of two different densities that mimic the function of the micrometer sized setae on the gecko foot pad. The adhesive properties of these microflaps were investigated in a modified surface forces apparatus; both for normal pure loading and unloading (detachment), as well as unloading after the surfaces were sheared, both along and against the tilt direction. The tilted microflaps showed directional, i.e., anisotropic adhesive behavior when sheared against an optically smooth (RMS roughness ≈ 10 ± 8 nm) SiO2 surface. Enhanced adhesion was measured after shearing the flaps along the tilted (gripping) direction and low adhesion when sheared against the tilted (releasing) direction. A Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory using an effective surface energy and modulus of rigidity (stiffness) quantitatively described the contact mechanics of the tilted microflaps against the SiO2 surface. We also find an increasing adhesion and stick-slip of the surfaces during detachment which we explain qualitatively in terms of the density of flaps, considering it to increase from 0% (no flaps, smooth surface) to 100% (close-packed flaps, effectively smooth surface). Large energy dissipation at the PDMS-silica interface caused by the viscoelastic behavior of the polymer results in stick-slip peeling and hence an enhanced adhesion energy is observed during the separation of the microflaps surface from the smooth SiO2 surface after shearing of the surfaces. For structured multiple contact surfaces, hysteresis as manifested by different loading and unloading paths can be due entirely to the elastic JKR micro-contacts. These results have important implications in the design of biomimetic adhesives.

  14. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  15. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  16. Adhesion and chemical vapor testing of second surface silver/glass solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Second surface silvered glass mirrors supplied by four different commercial manufacturers were evaluated for silver-to-glass adhesion and resistance to chemical vapor attack. The mirrors were chemically silvered on identical substrates of low iron float glass. Experiments were performed in order to assess the viability of using adhesion and chemical attack as screening tests for predicting the relative long-term durability of solar mirrors. The results of these tests will be compared at a future time with the survivability of field mirrors deployed in stationary exposure racks at ten locations throughout the United States. The adhesion tests were performed using a commercially-available thin film tensile pull tester in which a stud bonded to the film is pulled and the yield load recorded. Numerous subtleties regarding the selection of the adhesive used to bond the study and the validity of the testing procedure are discussed. Several different methods of normalizing the results were attempted in an effort to reduce the scatter in the data. The same set of samples were exposed to salt spray, water, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and HNO/sub 3/ vapors and then ranked according to their performance. Visual comparison of tested samples did not yield consistent results; however, definite trends were observed favoring one of the manufacturers. Some SEM/EDX analysis was performed on these mirrors subject to accelerated degradation in order to compare them to mirrors subject to natural degradation. However, insufficient data has been collected to show that any of the tests performed will accurately predict the relative life expectancy of the mirrors in an outdoor environment.

  17. Poly(2-substituted-2-oxazoline) surfaces for dermal fibroblasts adhesion and detachment.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Andrzej; Utrata-Wesołek, Alicja; Oleszko, Natalia; Wałach, Wojciech; Trzebicka, Barbara; Anioł, Jacek; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Klama-Baryła, Agnieszka; Kawecki, Marek

    2014-04-01

    The thermoresponsive surfaces of brush structure (linear polymer chains tethered on the surface) based on poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)s and copolymers of 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline and 2-nonyl-2-oxazoline were obtained using the grafting-to method. The living oxazoline (co)polymers have been synthesized by cationic ring-opening polymerization and subsequently terminated by the reactive amine groups present on the surface. The changes in the surface morphology, philicity and thickness occurring during surface modification were monitored via atomic force microscopy, contact angle and ellipsometry. The thickness of the (co)poly(2-substituted-2-oxazoline) layers ranged from 4 to 11 nm depending on the molar mass of immobilized polymer and reversibly varied with the temperature changes. This confirmed thermoresponsive properties of obtained surfaces. The obtained polymer surfaces were used as a support for dermal fibroblast culture and detachment. The fibroblasts' adhesion and proliferation on the polymer surfaces were observed when the culture temperature was above the cloud point temperature of the immobilized polymer. Lowering the temperature resulted in the detachment of the dermal fibroblast sheets from the polymer layers, which makes these surfaces suitable for the treatment of wounds and in skin tissue engineering. PMID:24390278

  18. Reduced platelet adhesion on the surface of polyurethane bearing structure of sulfobetaine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J; Zhang, J; Zhu, J; Shen, J; Lin, S C; Zhu, W; Fang, J L

    2003-10-01

    Poly(etherurethane)s are widely used as blood-contacting biomaterials due to their good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. Nevertheless, their blood compatibility is still not adequate for the more demanding applications. Surface modification is an effective way to improve the blood compatibility and retain the bulk properties of biomaterials. The purpose of present study was to design and synthesize a novel nonthrombogenic biomaterial by modifying the surface of poly(etherurethane) with zwitterionic monomer. Films of polyurethane were grafted with sulfobetaine by a three-step procedure. In the first step, the film surfaces were treated with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) in toluene at 50 degrees C in the presence of di-n-butyl tin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst. The extent of the reaction was measured by ATR-IR spectra; a maximum number of free NCO group was obtained after a reaction time of 90 min. In the second step, the hydroxyl group of 4-dimethylamino-1-butanol (DMAB) was allowed to react in toluene with isocyanate groups bound on the surface. In the third step, sulfobetaine was formed on the surface through the ring-opening reaction between tertiary amine of DMAB and 1,3- propane-sultone (PS). It was characterized by ATR-IR, XPS. The data showed that the grafted surfaces were composed of sulfobetaine. The results of the contact angle measurements showed that they were strongly hydrophilic. The state of platelet adhesion and shape variation for the attached platelets was described. The modified surface shows excellent blood compatibility feature by the low platelet adhesion. PMID:14621338

  19. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a 'pick-and-place' capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  20. Multifunctional superamphiphobic TiO2 nanostructure surfaces with facile wettability and adhesion engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Ying; Lai, Yue-Kun; Pan, Fei; Yang, Lei; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Fuchs, Harald; Chi, Li-Feng

    2014-12-10

    Compared to conventional top-down photo-cleavage method, a facile bottom-up ink-combination method to in situ and rapidly achieve water wettability and adhesion transition, with a great contrast on the superamphiphobic TiO2 nanostructured film, is described. Moreover, such combination method is suitable for various kinds of superamphiphobic substrate. Oil-based ink covering or removing changes not only the topographical morphology but also surface chemical composition, and these resultant topographical morphology and composition engineering realize the site-selectively switchable wettability varying from superamphiphobicity to amphiphilicity, and water adhesion between sliding superamphiphobicity and sticky superamphiphobicity in micro-scale. Additionally, positive and negative micro-pattern can be achieved by taking advantage of the inherent photocatalytic property of TiO2 with the assistance of anti-UV light ink mask. Finally, the potential applications of the site-selectively sticky superamphiphobic surface were demonstrated. In a proof-of-concept study, the microdroplet manipulation (storage, moving, mixing, and transfer), specific gas sensing, wettability template for positive and negative ZnO patterning, and site-selective cell immobilization have been demonstrated. This study will give an important input to the field of advanced functional material surfaces with special wettability.

  1. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  2. Adhesion-dependent rupturing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on biological antimicrobial nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nowlin, Kyle; Boseman, Adam; Covell, Alan; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some nanostructured surfaces (NSS), many of which are derived from surfaces found on insect cuticles, rupture and kill adhered prokaryotic microbes. Most important, the nanoscale topography is directly responsible for this effect. Although parameters such as cell adhesion and cell wall rigidity have been suggested to play significant roles in this process, there is little experimental evidence regarding the underlying mechanisms involving NSS-induced microbial rupture. In this work, we report the NSS-induced rupturing of a eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the amount of NSS-induced rupture of S. cerevisiae is dependent on both the adhesive qualities of the yeast cell and the nanostructure geometry of the NSS. Thus, we are providing the first empirical evidence that these parameters play a direct role in the rupturing of microbes on NSS. Our observations of this phenomenon with S. cerevisiae, particularly the morphological changes, are strikingly similar to that reported for bacteria despite the differences in the yeast cell wall structure. Consequently, NSS provide a novel approach for the control of microbial growth and development of broad-spectrum microbicidal surfaces. PMID:25551144

  3. Interfacial study of cell adhesion to liquid crystals using widefield surface plasmon resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soon, Chin Fhong; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Youseffi, Mansour; Nayan, Nafarizal; Saim, Hashim; Britland, Stephen; Blagden, Nick; Denyer, Morgan Clive Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Widefield surface plasmon resonance (WSPR) microscopy provides high resolution imaging of interfacial interactions. We report the application of the WSPR imaging system in the study of the interaction between keratinocytes and liquid crystals (LC). Imaging of fixed keratinocytes cultured on gold coated surface plasmon substrates functionalized with a thin film of liquid crystals was performed in air using a 1.45NA objective based system. Focal adhesion of the cells adhered to glass and LC were further studied using immunofluorescence staining of the vinculin. The imaging system was also simulated with 2×2 scattering matrix to investigate the optical reflection of the resonant plasmonic wave via the glass/gold/cell and glass/gold/LC/cell layers. WSPR imaging indicated that keratinocytes are less spread and formed distinct topography of cell-liquid crystal couplings when cultured on liquid crystal coated substrates. The simulation indicates that glass/LC shifted the surface plasmon excitation angle to 75.39° as compared to glass/air interface at 44°. The WSPR microcopy reveals that the cells remodelled their topography of adhesion at different interfaces. PMID:23711786

  4. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a 'pick-and-place' capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface. PMID:27482811

  5. Wet-surface-enhanced ellipsometric contrast microscopy identifies slime as a major adhesion factor during bacterial surface motility.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Adrien; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Mouhamar, Fabrice; Mignot, Tâm; Theodoly, Olivier

    2012-06-19

    In biology, the extracellular matrix (ECM) promotes both cell adhesion and specific recognition, which is essential for central developmental processes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, live studies of the dynamic interactions between cells and the ECM, for example during motility, have been greatly impaired by imaging limitations: mostly the ability to observe the ECM at high resolution in absence of specific staining by live microscopy. To solve this problem, we developed a unique technique, wet-surface enhanced ellipsometry contrast (Wet-SEEC), which magnifies the contrast of transparent organic materials deposited on a substrate (called Wet-surf) with exquisite sensitivity. We show that Wet-SEEC allows both the observation of unprocessed nanofilms as low as 0.2 nm thick and their accurate 3D topographic reconstructions, directly by standard light microscopy. We next used Wet-SEEC to image slime secretion, a poorly defined property of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that move across solid surfaces in absence of obvious extracellular appendages (gliding). Using combined Wet-SEEC and fluorescent-staining experiments, we observed slime deposition by gliding Myxococcus xanthus cells at unprecedented resolution. Altogether, the results revealed that in this bacterium, slime associates preferentially with the outermost components of the motility machinery and promotes its adhesion to the substrate on the ventral side of the cell. Strikingly, analogous roles have been proposed for the extracellular proteoglycans of gliding diatoms and apicomplexa, suggesting that slime deposition is a general means for gliding organisms to adhere and move over surfaces.

  6. Evaluation of the single yeast cell's adhesion to ITO substrates with various surface energies via ESEM nanorobotic manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-12-01

    Cell-surface adhesion force is important for cell activities and the development of bio materials. In this paper, a method for in situ single cell (W303) adhesion force measurement was proposed based on nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environment scanning electron microscope (ESEM). An end effector was fabricated from a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever by focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The spring constant of it was calibrated by nanomanipulation approach. Three kinds of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ITO plates were prepared by using VUV-irradiation and OTS coating techniques. The shear adhesion strength of the single yeast cell to each substrate was measured based on the deflection of the end effector. The results demonstrated that the cell adhesion force was larger under the wet condition in the ESEM environment than in the aqueous condition. It also showed that the cell adhesion force to hydrophilic surface was larger than that to the hydrophobic surface. Studies of single cell's adhesion on various plate surfaces and environments could give new insights into the tissue engineering and biological field.

  7. Effect of Pulsed Waterjet Surface Preparation on the Adhesion Strength of Cold Gas Dynamic Sprayed Aluminum Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, T.; MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Jodoin, B.

    2015-08-01

    It has been observed that the method of substrate surface preparation can have a profound effect on the adhesion strength of cold-sprayed metallic coatings. In this investigation, pure aluminum powder was sprayed onto aluminum alloy substrates using cold spray. The substrates used in this work had undergone a variety of surface preparations to impart varying degrees of surface roughness. The pulsed waterjet technique was used to increase the substrates' surface roughness beyond what can be achieved using traditional grit blasting procedures. Surfaces prepared using pulsed waterjet resulted in substantial increases in the pure aluminum coating adhesion strength. This increase may be the result of increased mechanical anchoring sites available as well as their favorable geometries. It is hypothesized that compressive residual stress may also contribute to increased adhesion strength.

  8. Capillary-driven self-assembly of microchips on oleophilic/oleophobic patterned surface using adhesive droplet in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Bo; Sariola, Veikko; Aura, Susanna; Ras, Robin H. A.; Klonner, Maria; Lipsanen, Harri; Zhou, Quan

    2011-07-01

    This letter describes a capillary-driven self-assembly technique using oleophilic/oleophobic patterned surface and adhesive in ambient air environment. We use a topographical microstructure of porous ormocer functionalized with a fluorinated trichlorosilane for the oleophobic area and gold patterns for the oleophilic area. The resulted oleophilic/oleophobic patterns show significant wettability contrast for adhesive (Delo 18507), with a contact angle of 119° on oleophobic part and 53° on the oleophilic part. Self-alignment of SU-8 microchips on the oleophilic/oleophobic patterns has been demonstrated. The results provide a promising solution for self-alignment of microparts using commercial adhesives in ambient air environment.

  9. A theoretical model of reversible adhesion in shape memory surface relief structures and its application in transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yeguang; Zhang, Yihui; Feng, Xue; Kim, Seok; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-01

    Transfer printing is an important and versatile tool for deterministic assembly and integration of micro/nanomaterials on unusual substrates, with promising applications in fabrication of stretchable and flexible electronics. The shape memory polymers (SMP) with triangular surface relief structures are introduced to achieve large, reversible adhesion, thereby with potential applications in temperature-controlled transfer printing. An analytic model is established, and it identifies two mechanisms to increase the adhesion: (1) transition of contact mode from the triangular to trapezoidal configurations, and (2) explicit enhancement in the contact area. The surface relief structures are optimized to achieve reversible adhesion and transfer printing. The theoretical model and results presented can be exploited as design guidelines for future applications of SMP in reversible adhesion and stretchable electronics.

  10. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  11. Effect of surface treatment and liner material on the adhesion between veneering ceramic and zirconia.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung-in; Yeo, In-sung; Yi, Yang-jin; Kim, Sung-hun; Lee, Jai-bong; Han, Jung-suk

    2014-12-01

    Fully sintered zirconia blocks, each with one polished surface, were treated with one of the followings: 1) no treatment, 2) airborne-particle abrasion with 50μm alumina, and 3) airborne-particle abrasion with 125μm alumina. Before veneering with glass ceramic, either liner Α or liner B were applied on the treated surfaces. All veneered blocks were subjected to shear force in a universal testing machine. For the groups with liner A, irrespective of the particle size, air abrasion on Y-TZP surfaces provided greater bond strength than polishing. Application of liner B on an abraded zirconia surface yielded no significant influence on the adhesion. In addition, specimens with liner A showed higher bond strength than those with liner B, if applied on roughened surfaces. Fractured surfaces were observed as mixed patterns in all groups. For the liner A, surface treatment was helpful in bonding with veneering ceramic, while it was ineffective for the liner B. PMID:25282467

  12. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  13. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  14. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-09-15

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is.

  15. Unraveling the Role of Surface Mucus-Binding Protein and Pili in Muco-Adhesion of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Duviau, Marie-Pierre; Meyrand, Mickael; Guérardel, Yann; Castelain, Mickaël; Loubière, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Dague, Etienne; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria to mucus may favor their persistence within the gut and their beneficial effects to the host. Interactions between pig gastric mucin (PGM) and a natural isolate of Lactococcus lactis (TIL448) were measured at the single-cell scale and under static conditions, using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In parallel, these interactions were monitored at the bacterial population level and under shear flow. AFM experiments with a L. lactis cell-probe and a PGM-coated surface revealed a high proportion of specific adhesive events (60%) and a low level of non-adhesive ones (2%). The strain muco-adhesive properties were confirmed by the weak detachment of bacteria from the PGM-coated surface under shear flow. In AFM, rupture events were detected at short (100−200 nm) and long distances (up to 600−800 nm). AFM measurements on pili and mucus-binding protein defective mutants demonstrated the comparable role played by these two surface proteinaceous components in adhesion to PGM under static conditions. Under shear flow, a more important contribution of the mucus-binding protein than the pili one was observed. Both methods differ by the way of probing the adhesion force, i.e. negative force contact vs. sedimentation and normal-to-substratum retraction vs. tangential detachment conditions, using AFM and flow chamber, respectively. AFM blocking assays with free PGM or O-glycan fractions purified from PGM demonstrated that neutral oligosaccharides played a major role in adhesion of L. lactis TIL448 to PGM. This study dissects L. lactis muco-adhesive phenotype, in relation with the nature of the bacterial surface determinants. PMID:24260308

  16. Efficacy of surface-generated nitric oxide against Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Privett, Benjamin J.; Nutz, Steven T.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    This report details the efficacy of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing xerogel surfaces composed of N-(6-aminohexyl)aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (AHAP3) and isobutyltrimethoxysilane (BTMOS) against Candida albicans adhesion, viability, and biofilm formation. A parallel plate flow cell assay was used to examine the effect of NO on planktonic fungal cells. Nitric oxide fluxes as low as 14 pmol cm−2 s−1 were sufficient to reduce fungal adhesion by ~49% over controls after 90 min. By utilizing a fluorescence live/dead assay and replicate plating, NO flux was determined to reduce fungal viability in a dose dependent manner. The formation of C. albicans biofilms on NO-releasing xerogel-coated silicon rubber (SiR) coupons was impeded when compared to control (non-NO-releasing) and bare SiR surfaces. Finally, the synergistic efficacy of NO and silver sulfadiazine against C. albicans adhered fungal cells and biofilms is reported with increased killing and biofilm inhibition over NO alone. PMID:21082455

  17. A functional integrin ligand on the surface of platelets: intercellular adhesion molecule-2.

    PubMed Central

    Diacovo, T G; deFougerolles, A R; Bainton, D F; Springer, T A

    1994-01-01

    Activated platelets express P-selectin and release leukocyte chemoattractants; however, they have not been known to express integrin ligands important in the stabilization of leukocyte interactions with the vasculature. We now demonstrate the presence of intercellular adhesion molecular-2 (ICAM-2) (CD102), and lack of expression of other beta 2-integrin ligands, ICAM-1 (CD54) and ICAM-3 (CD50), on the surface of resting and stimulated platelets. ICAM-2 isolated from platelets migrates as a band of 59,000 M(r) in reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Staining of bone marrow aspirates with anti-ICAM-2 mAb demonstrates strong reactivity to megakaryocytes. Using frozen thin sections and immunogold labeling, the antigen was shown to be present on the plasma membrane and surface-connected canalicular system of resting platelets. The average number of ICAM-2 molecules per platelet is 3,000 +/- 230 and does not change after activation. In adhesion assays, resting and stimulated platelets were capable of binding through ICAM-2 to purified leukocyte function-associated antigen-1. Activation of T lymphocytes with PMA stimulated binding to platelets that was Mg2+ dependent and could be specifically inhibited by mAbs to either ICAM-2 or leukocyte function-associated antigen-1. ICAM-2 is the only known beta 2-integrin ligand present on platelets, suggesting that it may play an important role in leukocyte-platelet interactions in inflammation and thrombosis. Images PMID:8083366

  18. The Effects Of Micro Arc Oxidation Of Gamma Titanium Aluminide Surfaces On Osteoblast Adhesion And Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Medina, Pricilla; Sundaram, Paul A.; Diffoot-Carlo, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    The adhesion and proliferation of human fetal osteoblasts, hFOB 1.19, on micro arc oxidized (MAO) gamma titanium aluminide (γTiAl) surfaces were examined in vitro. Cells were seeded on MAO treated γTiAl disks and incubated for 3 days at 33.5°C and subsequently for 7 days at 39.5°C. Samples were then analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the Alkaline Phosphatase Assay (ALP) to evaluate cell adhesion and differentiation, respectively. Similar Ti-6Al-4V alloy samples were used for comparison. Untreated γTiAl and Ti-6Al-4V disks, to study the effect of micro arc oxidation and glass coverslips as cell growth controls were also incubated concurrently. The ALP Assay results, at 10 days post seeding, showed significant differences in cell differentiation, with p values < 0.05 between MAO γTiAl and MAO Ti-6Al-4V with respect to the corresponding untreated alloys. While SEM images showed that hFOB 1.19 cells adhered and proliferated on all MAO and untreated surfaces, as well as on glass coverslips at 10 days post seeding, cell differentiation, determined by the ALP assay, was significantly higher for the MAO alloys. PMID:24577944

  19. Electrochemical & osteoblast adhesion study of engineered TiO2 nanotubular surfaces on titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Zia Ur; Haider, Waseem; Pompa, Luis; Deen, K M

    2016-01-01

    TiO2 nanotubes were grafted on the surface of cpTi, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al4V-ELI with the aim to provide a new podium for human pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3) adhesion and proliferation. The surface morphology and chemistry of these alloys were examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. TiO2 nanotubes were further characterized by cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The vertically aligned nanotubes were subjected to pre-osteoblast cell proliferation in order to better understand cell-material interaction. The study demonstrated that these cells interact differently with nanotubes of different titanium alloys. The significant acceleration in the growth rate of pre-osteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation is also witnessed. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by using a tetrazolium-based bio-assay, MTS. Each group of data was operated for p<0.05, concluded one way ANOVA to investigate the significance difference.

  20. Biomimetic engineering of non-adhesive glycocalyx-like surfaces using oligosaccharide surfactant polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Nolan B.; Qiu, Yongxing; Ruegsegger, Mark; Marchant, Roger E.

    1998-04-01

    The external region of a cell membrane, known as the glycocalyx, is dominated by glycosylated molecules which direct specific interactions such as cell-cell recognition and contribute to the steric repulsion that prevents undesirable non-specific adhesion of other molecules and cells. Mimicking the non-adhesive properties of a glycocalyx provides a potential solution to the clinical problems, such as thrombosis, that are associated with implantable devices owing to non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins. Here we describe a biomimetic surface modification of graphite using oligosaccharide surfactant polymers, which, like a glycocalyx, provides a dense and confluent layer of oligosaccharides. The surfactant polymers consist of a flexible poly(vinyl amine) with dextran and alkanoyl side chains. We show that alkanoyl side chains assemble on graphite through hydrophobic interaction and epitaxial adsorption. This constrains the polymer backbone to lie parallel to the substrate, with solvated dextran side chains protruding into the aqueous phase, creating a glycocalyx-like coating. The resulting biomimetic surface is effective in suppressing protein adsorption from human plasma protein solution.

  1. Improved polymeric surface for adhesion through electron stimulated chemical modification of polymeric surface

    DOEpatents

    Kelber, J.A.

    1987-04-08

    Treating polymer surfaces, e.g., Teflon, particularly very thin surfaces, e.g., 50-10,000 A, with low energy electron radiation, e.g., 100-1000 eV, in a high vacuum environment, e.g., less than 10 /sup /minus/6/ Torr, to enhance the ability of the surface to be adhered to a variety of substrates.

  2. Adjustment of surface chemical and physical properties with functionalized polymers to control cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoli

    Cell-surface interaction is crucial in many cellular functions such as movement, growth, differentiation, proliferation and survival. In the present work, we have developed several strategies to design and prepare synthetic polymeric materials with selected cues to control cell attachment. To promote neuronal cell adhesion on the surfaces, biocompatible, non-adhesive PEG-based materials were modified with neurotransmitter acetylcholine functionalities to produce hydrogels with a range of porous structures, swollen states, and mechanical strengths. Mice hippocampal cells cultured on the hydrogels showed differences in number, length of processes and exhibited different survival rates, thereby highlighting the importance of chemical composition and structure in biomaterials. Similar strategies were used to prepare polymer brushes to assess how topographical cues influence neuronal cell behaviors. The brushes were prepared using the "grown from" method through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) reactions and further patterned via UV photolithography. Protein absorption tests and hippocampal neuronal cell culture of the brush patterns showed that both protein and neuronal cells can adhere to the patterns and therefore can be guided by the patterns at certain length scales. We also prepared functional polymers to discourage attachment of undesirable cells on the surfaces. For example, we synthesized PEG-perfluorinated alkyl amphiphilic surfactants to modify polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)- block-polyisoprene (SEBI or K3) triblock copolymers for marine antifouling/fouling release surface coatings. Initial results showed that the polymer coated surfaces can facilitate removal of Ulva sporelings on the surfaces. In addition, we prepared both bioactive and dual functional biopassive/bioactive antimicrobial coatings based on SEBI polymers. Incubating the polymer coated surfaces with gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus), gram

  3. Patterning liquids on inkjet-imprinted surfaces with highly adhesive superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Bin; Sun, Jiazhen; Gao, Meng; Zhang, Xingye; Jiang, Lei; Song, Yanlin

    2016-05-01

    The rapidly increasing research interest in microfluidics, microreactors and solution-processable fabrication technologies requires the development of patterning techniques to obtain large-scale functional liquid arrays. To achieve this objective, photolithography, microcontact printing and mask-based UV irradiation have been utilized to physically or chemically pattern surfaces into templates where ordered arrays of liquid materials are constructed. However, these methods require elaborately fabricated templates or expensive vacuum-deposited masks that restrict their practical applications. Herein, we fabricate physically patterned superhydrophobic surfaces with high adhesion by modifying inkjet-imprinted surfaces through nanoparticle deposition, and utilize these surfaces as templates for liquid patterning. Various functional liquid materials are patterned into defined shapes through a simple dipping-withdrawing process. Moreover, functional material patterns such as photonic crystal patterns, arrays of inorganic nanoparticles and crystals are formed after solvent evaporation of the liquid droplets. Furthermore, chemical reactions can be carried out on the patterns. These surfaces demonstrate excellent performance in liquid patterning, which will find numerous applications in optoelectronic devices, lab-on-chip devices, microreactors, and related fields.The rapidly increasing research interest in microfluidics, microreactors and solution-processable fabrication technologies requires the development of patterning techniques to obtain large-scale functional liquid arrays. To achieve this objective, photolithography, microcontact printing and mask-based UV irradiation have been utilized to physically or chemically pattern surfaces into templates where ordered arrays of liquid materials are constructed. However, these methods require elaborately fabricated templates or expensive vacuum-deposited masks that restrict their practical applications. Herein, we fabricate

  4. Influence of reaction with XeF{sub 2} on surface adhesion of Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tianfu; Park, Jeong Y.; Huang Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-10-06

    The change in surface adhesion after fluorination of Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces using XeF{sub 2} was investigated with atomic force microscopy. The chemical interaction between XeF{sub 2} and Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Fresh Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces were obtained by etching top silicon layers of Si/Al and Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with XeF{sub 2}. The surface adhesion and chemical composition were measured after the exposure to air or annealing (at 200 deg. C under vacuum). The correlation between the adhesion force increase and presence of AlF{sub 3} on the surface was revealed.

  5. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment on Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Quality of Peel Ply Prepared Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Ashley C.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could modify peel ply prepared composite surfaces to create strong adhesive bonds. Two peel ply surface preparation composite systems previously shown to create weak bonds (low fracture energy and adhesion failure) that were potential candidates for plasma treatment were Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepared with Precision Fabrics Group, Inc. (PFG) 52006 nylon peel ply and Hexcel T300/F155 CFRP prepared with PFG 60001 polyester peel ply. It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could functionalize and/or remove peel ply remnants left on the CFRP surfaces upon peel ply removal. Surface characterization measurements and double cantilever beam (DCB) testing were used to determine the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on surface characteristics and bond quality of peel ply prepared CFRP composites. Previous research showed that Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 52006 peel ply and bonded with Cytec MetlBond 1515-3M structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies when tested in the DCB configuration. Previous research also showed that DCB samples made of Hexcel T300/F155 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 60001 peel ply and bonded with Henkel Hysol EA 9696 structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies. Recent research suggested that plasma treatment could be able to activate these "un-bondable" surfaces and result in good adhesive bonds. Nylon peel ply prepared 177 °C cure and polyester peel ply prepared 127 °C cure CFRP laminates were treated with atmospheric pressure plasma after peel ply removal prior to bonding. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was capable of significantly increasing fracture energies and changing failure modes. For Toray T800/3900-2 laminates prepared with PFG 52006 and bonded with

  6. Pulse voltage determination for electrostatic micro manipulation considering surface conductivity and adhesion of glass particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Ryo; Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Takahashi, Kunio; Saito, Shigeki

    2015-05-01

    A model with surface conductivity and adhesional force is proposed to investigate the mechanism for electrostatic micro manipulation of a dielectric object using a single probe. The manipulation system consists of three elements: a conductive probe as a manipulator, a conductive plate as a substrate, and a dielectric particle as the target object for manipulation. The particle can be successfully picked up/placed if a rectangular pulse voltage is applied between the probe and the plate. The reliability of the picking up/placing operation is improved by applying a pulse voltage that is determined by a theoretical model considering surface conductivity and adhesion. To verify the theoretical prediction, manipulation experiment is conducted using soda-lime glass particles with radii of 20 μm and 40 μm.

  7. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Andersson, Per Ola; Juhlin, Lars; Svedendahl, Mikael; Boisen, Anja; Käll, Mikael

    2016-01-21

    Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field. PMID:26676552

  8. Laser Ablation Surface Preparation of Ti-6A1-4V for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Watson, Kent A.; Morales, Guillermo; Williams, Thomas; Hicks, Robert; Wohl, Christopher J.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires certification before it can be incorporated in primary structures for commercial aviation without disbond-arrestment features or redundant load paths. Surface preparation is widely recognized as the key step to producing robust and predictable bonds. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface which can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-dip, manual abrasion and grit blast treatments which are expensive, hazardous, polluting, and less precise. This report documents preliminary testing of a surface preparation technique using laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends. Failure mode, surface roughness, and chemical makeup were analyzed using fluorescence enhanced visualization, microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Single lap shear tests were conducted on bonded and aged specimens to observe bond strength retention and failure mode. Some promising results showed increasing strength and durability of lap shear specimens as laser ablation coverage area and beam intensity increased. Chemical analyses showed trends for surface chemical species which correlated with improved bond strength and durability. Combined, these results suggest that laser ablation is a viable process for inclusion with or/and replacement of one or more currently used titanium surface treatments. On-going work will focus on additional mechanical tests to further demonstrate improved bond durability.

  9. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Ivey A.; Gurr, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs), and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms governing

  10. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Ivey A; Gurr, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs), and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms governing

  11. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p<0.05). Human saliva incubation promoted a significant increase of bacterial adherence on all three of the composites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (p<0.05). Of the three, the nanofilled composite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (p<0.05). Mylar matrix strips (control group) promoted the lowest bacterial adhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva. PMID:21740238

  12. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Andersson, Per Ola; Juhlin, Lars; Svedendahl, Mikael; Boisen, Anja; Käll, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field.Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06524k

  13. Surface characteristics of Bacillus cereus and its adhesion to stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Peng, J S; Tsai, W C; Chou, C C

    2001-04-11

    The ability of a Bacillus cereus strain, isolated from spoiled milk, to adhere to the surface of stainless steel chips was evaluated during its growth in diluted tryptic soy broth (DTSB). The number of cells that adhered to the surface increased markedly as the culture reached the end of the log phase and entered stationary phase, and continued to increase with further incubation. The surface properties of cells from the log, stationary, and late stationary phases were measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and electrostatic interaction chromatography (ESIC). It was found that surface hydrophobicity of B. cereus vegetative cells from the late stationary phase was the highest followed by those from the stationary phase and the log phase cultures. While the vegetative cells prepared from stationary phase and log phase cultures, respectively, had the highest and the lowest surface charges. Adhesion of B. cereus vegetative cells to stainless steel was positively correlated with the cell surface hydrophobicity (R = 0.979). Surface hydrophobicity and surface positive charge noted on the spores harvested from diluted tryptic soy agar (DTSA) and Mn2+-tryptone glucose extract agar were higher than those harvested from the sucrose or lactose-added DTSA. A wide variation in the surface charge values was noted on the surface of various spores prepared from cultures grown on the four different media tested, while their ability to adhere to stainless steel chips in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Similarly, the number of spores or vegetative cells adhering to stainless steel suspended in PBS, milk or diluted milk (1000 x) did not differ significantly (p > 0.05).

  14. The adhesion of mussel foot protein-3 to TiO2 surfaces: the effect of pH

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Menyo, Matthew S.; Masic, Admir; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    The underwater adhesion of marine mussels relies on mussel foot proteins (mfps) rich in the catecholic amino acid 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa). As a side-chain, Dopa is capable of strong bidentate interactions with a variety of surfaces, including many minerals and metal oxides. Titanium is among the most widely used medical implant material and quickly forms a TiO2 passivation layer under physiological conditions. Understanding the binding mechanism of Dopa to TiO2 surfaces is therefore of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using a surface forces apparatus, we explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of mussel foot protein 3 (mfp-3) to TiO2 surfaces at three different pHs (pH3, 5.5 and 7.5). At pH3, mfp-3 showed the strongest adhesion force on TiO2, with an adhesion energy of ~ −7.0 mJ/m2. Increasing the pH gives rise to two opposing effects: (1) increased oxidation of Dopa, thus decreasing availability for the Dopa-mediated adhesion, and (2) increased bidentate Dopa-Ti coordination, leading to the further stabilization of the Dopa group and thus an increasing of adhesion force. Both effects were reflected in the resonance-enhanced Raman spectra obtained at the three deposition pHs. The two competing effects give rise to a higher adhesion force of mfp-3 on TiO2 surface at pH 7.5 than at pH 5.5. Our results suggest that Dopa-containing proteins and synthetic polymers have great potential as coating materials for medical implant materials, particularly if redox activity can be controlled. PMID:23452271

  15. Particles induced surface nanoroughness of titanium surface and its influence on adhesion of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solař, P.; Kylián, O.; Marek, A.; Vandrovcová, M.; Bačáková, L.; Hanuš, J.; Vyskočil, J.; Slavínská, D.; Biederman, H.

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is one of the most common materials employed for production of implants, which is due to its good biocompatibility. However, the colonization of titanium surface by osteoblast cells may be influenced by its roughness and therefore precise control of roughness of titanium surface as well as identification of its optimal value for growth of cells is of high importance. In this study the nanorough titanium surfaces were prepared on polished disks of TiAlV by two step method of deposition. In the first step TiAlV were coated by nanoparticles generated by gas aggregation sources. Such prepared films of nanoparticles were subsequently covered with a titanium overlayer. Different values of surface roughness in the range 1-100 nm were achieved by variation of the size and number of the nanoparticles. Such prepared surfaces were subsequently used for investigation of influence of roughness of titanium surfaces on the adhesion of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. It was found out that 7 days after seeding the highest number of adhering cells was observed for samples with root-mean-square roughness of 30 nm.

  16. Role of surface chemistry in adhesion between ZnO nanowires and carbon fibers in hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Gregory J; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2013-02-01

    Low interface strength is a persistent problem in composite materials and cascades to limit a variety of bulk material properties such as lamina shear strength. Whiskerization has long been pursued as a method to reinforce the interphase and improve both the single fiber interface strength as well as the bulk properties. Recent developments have shown that ZnO nanowire whiskerization can effectively improve the properties of a bulk composite without requiring the high temperatures that previous deposition processes needed. Although the efficacy of a ZnO nanowire interphase has been established, the mechanism for adhesion of the interphase to the fiber has not been identified. Specifically, the addition of the ZnO nanowires to the surface of the fibers requires that the ZnO nanowires have strong chemical adhesion to the fiber surface. This work will create a variety of chemical environments on the surface of the fibers through new and common chemical functionalization procedures and quantify the surface chemistry through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of fiber surface chemistry on the adhesion of the ZnO is assessed through single fiber fragmentation testing. The interface strength is found to strongly correlate with the concentration of ketone groups on the surface of the fibers. Following the experimental observations, liftoff of a ZnO crystal from a graphene surface was simulated with a variety of surface functionalizations. The computational models confirm the preference for ketone groups in promoting adhesion between ZnO and graphite.

  17. The Influence of Surface Topography and Surface Chemistry on the Anti-Adhesive Performance of Nanoporous Monoliths.

    PubMed

    Eichler-Volf, Anna; Xue, Longjian; Dornberg, Gregor; Chen, He; Kovalev, Alexander; Enke, Dirk; Wang, Yong; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Steinhart, Martin

    2016-08-31

    We designed spongy monoliths allowing liquid delivery to their surfaces through continuous nanopore systems (mean pore diameter ∼40 nm). These nanoporous monoliths were flat or patterned with microspherical structures a few tens of microns in diameter, and their surfaces consisted of aprotic polymer or of TiO2 coatings. Liquid may reduce adhesion forces FAd; possible reasons include screening of solid-solid interactions and poroelastic effects. Softening-induced deformation of flat polymeric monoliths upon contact formation in the presence of liquids enhanced the work of separation WSe. On flat TiO2-coated monoliths, WSe was smaller under wet conditions than under dry conditions, possibly because of liquid-induced screening of solid-solid interactions. Under dry conditions, WSe is larger on flat TiO2-coated monoliths than on flat monoliths with a polymeric surface. However, under wet conditions, liquid-induced softening results in larger WSe on flat monoliths with a polymeric surface than on flat monoliths with an oxidic surface. Monolithic microsphere arrays show antiadhesive properties; FAd and WSe are reduced by at least 1 order of magnitude as compared to flat nanoporous counterparts. On nanoporous monolithic microsphere arrays, capillarity (WSe is larger under wet than under dry conditions) and solid-solid interactions (WSe is larger on oxide than on polymer) dominate contact mechanics. Thus, the microsphere topography reduces the impact of softening-induced surface deformation and screening of solid-solid interactions associated with liquid supply. Overall, simple modifications of surface topography and chemistry combined with delivery of liquid to the contact interface allow adjusting WSe and FAd over at least 1 order of magnitude. Adhesion management with spongy monoliths exploiting deployment (or drainage) of interfacial liquids as well as induction or prevention of liquid-induced softening of the monoliths may pave the way for the design of artificial

  18. Carbohydrate specificity of sea urchin sperm bindin: a cell surface lectin mediating sperm-egg adhesion.

    PubMed

    Glabe, C G; Grabel, L B; Vacquier, V D; Rosen, S D

    1982-07-01

    We have examined the carbohydrate specificity of bindin, a sperm protein responsible for the adhesion of sea urchin sperm to eggs, by investigating the interaction of a number of polysaccharides and glycoconjugates with isolated bindin. Several of these polysaccharides inhibit the agglutination of eggs by bindin particles. An egg surface polysaccharide was found to be the most potent inhibitor of bindin-mediated egg agglutination. Fucoidin, a sulfated fucose heteropolysaccharide, was the next most potent inhibitor, followed by the egg jelly fucan, a sulfated fucose homopolysaccharide, and xylan, a beta(1 leads to 4) linked xylose polysaccharide. A wide variety of other polysaccharides and glycoconjugates were found to have no effect on egg agglutination. We also report that isolated bindin has a soluble lectinlike activity which is assayed by agglutination of erythrocytes. The bindin lectin activity is inhibited by the same polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination by particulate bindin. This suggests that the egg adhesion activity of bindin is directly related to its lectin activity. We have established that fucoidin binds specifically to bindin particles with a high apparent affinity (Kd = 5.5 X 10(-8) M). The other polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination also inhibit the binding of 125I-fucoidin to bindin particles, suggesting that they compete for the same site on bindin. The observation that polysaccharides of different composition and linkage type interact with bindin suggests that the critical structural features required for binding may reside at a higher level of organization. Together, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that sperm-egg adhesion in sea urchins is mediated by a lectin-polysaccharide type of interaction.

  19. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  20. In situ synthesis of mesoporous polyvinyl alcohol/hydroxyapatite composites for better biomedical coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Riaz; Tabassum, Sobia; Gilani, Mazhar Amjad; Ahmed, Ejaz; Sharif, Ahsan; Manzoor, Faisal; Shah, Asma Tufail; Asif, Anila; Sharif, Faiza; Iqbal, Farasat; Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) shows diverse biomedical applications as bone filler and coating material for metal implants to enhance osteoconduction. Four different PVAHA composites were synthesized in situ by an economical co-precipitation wet methodology. The FTIR spectra of PVAHA composites showed characteristic signals of HA and PVA. The BET surface area of PVAHA composites were in range of 41.3-63.7 m2/g. The composites showed type IV nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, a characteristic for mesoporous material. The pore diameter range (6.3-8.1 nm) of PVAHA composites also confirmed their mesoporous nature. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution curves indicated a narrow pore size distribution. To obtain a homogeneous crack free coating with EPD on stainless steel (SS) plates, different parameters such as PVA percentages in PVAHA composites, solvent, deposition time and voltage were optimized. The PVAHA composites were stable after EPD as confirmed by FTIR spectra recorded before and after EPD. The SEM images of the coating showed a homogeneous morphology. The thickness of the coating was controlled by varying voltage and time. The best results were obtained with c-PVAHA composite at 30 volts for 5-10 min and current density was around 4.5 to 5 mA. The adhesion strength of c-PVAHA coating was measured by using ASTM standard F1044-99. The average value was approximately 9.328 ± 1.58 MPa.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and application of water-soluble and easily removable cationic pressure-sensitive adhesives. Quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-30

    The Institute studied the adsorption of cationic pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) on wood fiber, and the buildup of PSA in a closed water system during paper recycling; the results are presented. Georgia Tech worked to develop an environmentally friendly polymerization process to synthesize a novel re-dispersible PSA by co-polymerizing an oil-soluble monomer (butyl acrylate) and a cationic monomer MAEPTAC; results are presented. At the University of Georgia at Athens the project focused on the synthesis of water-soluble and easily removable cationic polymer PSAs.

  2. Soluble settlement cue in slowly moving water within coral reefs induces larval adhesion to surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M. A. R.; Hadfield, M. G.

    2004-08-01

    Larvae of many benthic marine animals are induced to settle and metamorphose by dissolved chemical cues released by organisms on the substratum. Can dissolved cues released into the turbulent, wave-dominated flow typical of many shallow coastal areas affect the adhesion of settling larvae to benthic surfaces? We addressed this question using larvae of the nudibranch, Phestilla sibogae, which settle and metamorphose in response to a water-borne, species-specific metabolite of their prey, Porites compressa, abundant corals forming reefs in shallow habitats in Hawaii. Field measurements of water velocities showed oscillatory wave-driven flow above reefs with peak instantaneous velocities of 0.10-0.40 m/s, much slower back-and-forth water movement through the spaces within reefs with peak velocities of 0.02-0.04 m/s, and net shoreward transport of water through reefs of ˜0.01 m/s. We used a water channel in the laboratory to measure the wall shear stresses required to dislodge larvae of P. sibogae from various surfaces. We found that cue from P. compressa is necessary for the larvae to attach to surfaces and, if cue is dissolved in water bathing the larvae, they can adhere to surfaces other than living P. compressa. After 2 h of exposure to cue and a surface, the adhesive strength of the larvae reached its peak value and did not change during the next 20 h. The mean nominal wall shear stress required to dislodge larvae of P. sibogae attached to P. compressa tissue (1.59±0.64 Pa, n=10 experiments) was not significantly different from that necessary to wash them off coralline algae (2.53±2.45 Pa, n=8) encrusting coral skeleton collected within reefs, but they stuck more tightly to glass (4.26±1.04 Pa, n=13). It is likely that most P. sibogae larvae initially settle onto surfaces within reefs because (1) settlement cue released by P. compressa and sinking larvae of P. sibogae accumulate in the slowly moving water within a reef; (2) larvae exposed to cue are able to

  3. Cytocompatibility assessment of chemical surface treatments for phosphate glass to improve adhesion between glass and polyester.

    PubMed

    S Hasan, M; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Walker, G S; Scotchford, C A

    2013-11-01

    Fully resorbable phosphate glass fiber reinforced polymer composites have shown real potential for replacing some of the existing metallic bone fracture fixation devices. However, some of these composites have not provided suitable mechanical strength profiles over the required healing period for bone. Typically, it has been seen that these composites can lose up to 50% or more of their strength within the first week of degradation. Functionalizing the glass surface to promote polymer adhesion or to introduce hydrophobicity at the glass surface could potentially introduce control over the mechanical properties of the composite and their retention. In this study eight chemical agents namely, Glycerol 2-phosphate disodium salt; 3-phosphonopropionic acid; 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane; etidronic acid; hexamethylene diisocyanate; sorbitol/sodium ended PLA oligomers and amino phosphonic acid, were selected to functionalise the bulk phosphate glass surface. Selected chemical agents had one functional group (-OH or O C N) to react with the glass and another functionality (either -OH, NH2, or Na) to react with the polymer matrix and/or produce hydrophobicity at the fiber surface. Bulk phosphate glass surface-treated with the above agents were assessed for the cytotoxicity of degradation products cell-material interaction in short- and long-term direct cytocompatibility studies. Results obtained from these cytocompatibility studies (using human osteosarcoma (MG63) and primary human osteoblast cell lines) revealed no cytotoxicity from the degradation products and a response comparable to controls in terms of cell functions (attachment, viability, metabolic activity, proliferation, and differentiation) and morphology.

  4. Dry-Surface Simulation Method for the Determination of the Work of Adhesion of Solid-Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a methodology, referred to as the dry-surface method, to calculate the work of adhesion of heterogeneous solid-liquid interfaces by molecular simulation. This method employs a straightforward thermodynamic integration approach to calculate the work of adhesion as the reversible work to turn off the attractive part of the actual solid-liquid interaction potential. It is formulated in such a way that it may be used either to evaluate the ability of force fields to reproduce reference values of the work of adhesion or to optimize force-field parameters with reference values of the work of adhesion as target quantities. The methodology is tested in the case of water on a generic model of nonpolar substrates with the structure of gold. It is validated through a quantitative comparison to phantom-wall calculations and against a previous characterization of the thermodynamics of the gold-water interface. It is found that the work of adhesion of water on nonpolar substrates is a nonlinear function of the microscopic solid-liquid interaction energy parameter. We also comment on the ability of mean-field approaches to predict the work of adhesion of water on nonpolar substrates. In addition, we discuss in detail the information on the solid-liquid interfacial thermodynamics delivered by the phantom-wall approach. We show that phantom-wall calculations yield the solid-liquid interfacial tension relative to the solid surface tension rather than the absolute solid-liquid interfacial tension as previously believed.

  5. Single-gene tuning of Caulobacter cell cycle period and noise, swarming motility, and surface adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Scherer, Norbert F

    2010-01-01

    Sensor histidine kinases underlie the regulation of a range of physiological processes in bacterial cells, from chemotaxis to cell division. In the gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the membrane-bound histidine kinase, DivJ, is a polar-localized regulator of cell cycle progressi