Science.gov

Sample records for adhesive domain implications

  1. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S.; Moncla, A.

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the first examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Stephanie J.; Lostchuck, Emily; Goult, Benjamin T.; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Fairchild, Michael J.; López-Ceballos, Pablo; Calderwood, David A.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development. PMID:25393120

  3. Crystal Structure of the FERM Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli,D.; Song, H.; Poy, F.; Schaller, M.; Eck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells. Through phosphorylation of proteins assembled at the cytoplasmic tails of integrins, FAK promotes signaling events that modulate cellular growth, survival, and migration. The amino-terminal region of FAK contains a region of sequence homology with band 4.1 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins termed a FERM domain. FERM domains are found in a variety of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins and are thought to mediate intermolecular interactions with partner proteins and phospholipids at the plasma membrane and intramolecular regulatory interactions. Here we report two crystal structures of an NH2-terminal fragment of avian FAK containing the FERM domain and a portion of the regulatory linker that connects the FERM and kinase domains. The tertiary folds of the three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3) are similar to those of known FERM structures despite low sequence conservation. Differences in the sequence and relative orientation of the F3 subdomain alters the nature of the interdomain interface, and the phosphoinositide binding site found in ERM family FERM domains is not present in FAK. A putative protein interaction site on the F3 lobe is masked by the proximal region of the linker. Additionally, in one structure the adjacent Src SH3 and SH2 binding sites in the linker associate with the surfaces of the F3 and F1 lobes, respectively. These structural features suggest the possibility that protein interactions of the FAK FERM domain can be regulated by binding of Src kinases to the linker segment.

  4. The Tiam1 PDZ domain couples to Syndecan1 and promotes cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Tyson R; Klaus, Suzi M; Liu, Xu; Ramaswamy, S; DeMali, Kris A; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2010-05-21

    The T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene 1 (Tiam1) is a guanine exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 that is crucial for the integrity of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and cell-matrix interactions. This GEF contains several protein-protein interaction domains, including a PDZ domain. Earlier studies identified a consensus PDZ-binding motif and a synthetic peptide capable of binding to the Tiam1 PDZ domain, but little is known about its ligand specificity and physiological role in cells. Here, we investigated the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. We determined the crystal structures of the Tiam1 PDZ domain free and in complex with a "model" peptide, which revealed the structural basis for ligand specificity. Protein database searches using the consensus PDZ-binding motif identified two eukaryotic cell adhesion proteins, Syndecan1 and Caspr4, as potential Tiam1 PDZ domain binding proteins. Equilibrium binding experiments confirmed that C-terminal peptides derived from Syndecan1 and Caspr4 bound the Tiam1 PDZ domain. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments indicated that the Tiam1 PDZ/Syndecan1 and PDZ/Caspr4 complexes were structurally distinct and identified key residues likely to be responsible for ligand selectivity. Moreover, cell biological analysis established that Syndecan1 is a physiological binding partner of Tiam1 and that the PDZ domain has a function in cell-matrix adhesion and cell migration. Collectively, our data provide insight into the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. Importantly, our data report on a physiological role for the Tiam1 PDZ domain and establish a novel link between two previously unrelated signal transduction pathways, both of which are implicated in cancer. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Tiam1 PDZ Domain Couples to Syndecan1 and Promotes Cell-Matrix Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Tyson R.; Klaus, Suzi M.; Liu, Xu; Ramaswamy, S.; DeMali, Kris A.; Fuentes, Ernesto J.

    2017-01-01

    The T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene 1 (Tiam1) is a guanine exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 that is crucial for the integrity of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and cell-matrix interactions. This GEF contains several protein-protein interaction domains, including a PDZ domain. Earlier studies identified a consensus PDZ-binding motif and a synthetic peptide capable of binding to the Tiam1 PDZ domain, but little is known about its ligand specificity and physiological role in cells. Here, we investigated the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. We determined the crystal structures of the Tiam1 PDZ domain free and in complex with a “model” peptide, which revealed the structural basis for ligand specificity. Protein database searches using the consensus PDZ-binding motif identified two eukaryotic cell adhesion proteins, Syndecan1 and Caspr4, as potential Tiam1 PDZ domain binding proteins. Equilibrium binding experiments confirmed that C-terminal peptides derived from Syndecan1 and Caspr4 bound the Tiam1 PDZ domain. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments indicated that the Tiam1 PDZ/Syndecan1 and PDZ/Caspr4 complexes were structurally distinct and identified key residues likely to be responsible for ligand selectivity. Moreover, cell biological analysis established that Syndecan1 is a physiological binding partner of Tiam1 and that the PDZ domain has a function in cell-matrix adhesion and cell migration. Collectively, our data provide insight into the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. Importantly, our data report on a physiological role for the Tiam1 PDZ domain and establish a novel link between two previously unrelated signal transduction pathways, both of which are implicated in cancer. PMID:20361982

  6. The Tiam1 PDZ Domain Couples to Syndecan1 and Promotes Cell-Matrix Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Tyson R; Klaus, Suzi M; Liu, Xu; Ramaswamy, S; DeMali, Kris A; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2010-08-12

    The T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene 1 (Tiam1) is a guanine exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 that is crucial for the integrity of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and cell-matrix interactions. This GEF contains several protein-protein interaction domains, including a PDZ domain. Earlier studies identified a consensus PDZ-binding motif and a synthetic peptide capable of binding to the Tiam1 PDZ domain, but little is known about its ligand specificity and physiological role in cells. Here, we investigated the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. We determined the crystal structures of the Tiam1 PDZ domain free and in complex with a 'model' peptide, which revealed the structural basis for ligand specificity. Protein database searches using the consensus PDZ-binding motif identified two eukaryotic cell adhesion proteins, Syndecan1 and Caspr4, as potential Tiam1 PDZ domain binding proteins. Equilibrium binding experiments confirmed that C-terminal peptides derived from Syndecan1 and Caspr4 bound the Tiam1 PDZ domain. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments indicated that the Tiam1 PDZ/Syndecan1 and PDZ/Caspr4 complexes were structurally distinct and identified key residues likely to be responsible for ligand selectivity. Moreover, cell biological analysis established that Syndecan1 is a physiological binding partner of Tiam1 and that the PDZ domain has a function in cell-matrix adhesion and cell migration. Collectively, our data provide insight into the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. Importantly, our data report on a physiological role for the Tiam1 PDZ domain and establish a novel link between two previously unrelated signal transduction pathways, both of which are implicated in cancer.

  7. Transition from rolling to firm adhesion is regulated by the conformation of the I domain of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Salas, Azucena; Shimaoka, Motomu; Chen, Shuqi; Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy

    2002-12-27

    The integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (alpha(L)beta(2)), which is known for its ability to mediate firm adhesion and migration, can also contribute to tethering and rolling in shear flow. The alpha(L) I domain can be mutationally locked with disulfide bonds into two distinct conformations, open and closed, which have high and low affinity for the ligand intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), respectively. The wild type I domain exists primarily in the lower energy closed conformation. We have measured for the first time the effect of conformational change on adhesive behavior in shear flow. We show that wild type and locked open I domains, expressed in alpha(L)beta(2) heterodimers or as isolated domains on the cell surface, mediate rolling adhesion and firm adhesion, respectively. alpha(L)beta(2) is thus poised for the conversion of rolling to firm adhesion upon integrin activation in vivo. Isolated I domains are surprisingly more effective than alpha(L)beta(2) in interactions in shear flow, which may in part be a consequence of the presence of alpha(L)beta(2) in a bent conformation. Furthermore, the force exerted on the C-terminal alpha-helix appears to stabilize the open conformation of the wild type isolated I domain and contribute to its robustness in supporting rolling. An allosteric small molecule antagonist of alpha(L)beta(2) inhibits both rolling adhesion and firm adhesion, which has important implications for its mode of action in vivo.

  8. Discoidin domain receptor-1 as a player in impairment of melanocytes adhesion process in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Elgarhy, Lamia H; Abdullatif, Amani; Abdelazim, Rehab; El-Desouky, Karima I

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to study immunohistochemical expression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients in comparison to controls, to explore its possible implication vitiligo pathogenesis. Twenty patients with non-segmental vitiligo (NSV) were subjected to punch biopsy from lesional and non-lesional vitiligo skin, in addition to punch biopsy from ten healthy subjects. All specimens were examined by H&E staining and by immunohistochemistry for DDR1 expression. Significantly decreased expression of DDR1 in lesional vitiligo skin in comparison to non-lesional skin was observed. In addition, decreased lesional and non-lesional DDR1 expression in vitiligo skin in comparison to controls was found. Reduced DDR1 expression may be implicated in impaired melanocyte adhesion process involved in vitiligo pathogenesis.

  9. The heterotrimeric laminin coiled-coil domain exerts anti-adhesive effects and induces a pro-invasive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Santos-Valle, Patricia; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Cuesta, Angel M; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Villate, Maider; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J; Sanz, Laura; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling.

  10. The Heterotrimeric Laminin Coiled-Coil Domain Exerts Anti-Adhesive Effects and Induces a Pro-Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Valle, Patricia; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Villate, Maider; Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling. PMID:22723936

  11. The structure-function relationships in Drosophila neurotactin show that cholinesterasic domains may have adhesive properties.

    PubMed Central

    Darboux, I; Barthalay, Y; Piovant, M; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R

    1996-01-01

    Neurotactin (Nrt), a Drosophila transmembrane glycoprotein which is expressed in neuronal and epithelial tissues during embryonic and larval stages, exhibits heterophilic adhesive properties. The extracellular domain is composed of a catalytically inactive cholinesterase-like domain. A three-dimensional model deduced from the crystal structure of Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been constructed for Nrt and suggests that its extracellular domain is composed of two sub-domains organized around a gorge: an N-terminal region, whose three-dimensional structure is almost identical to that of Torpedo AChE, and a less conserved C-terminal region. By using truncated Nrt molecules and a homotypic cell aggregation assay which involves a soluble ligand activity, it has been possible to show that the adhesive function is localized in the N-terminal region of the extracellular domain comprised between His347 and His482. The C-terminal region of the protein can be removed without impairing Nrt adhesive properties, suggesting that the two sub-domains are structurally independent. Chimeric molecules in which the Nrt cholinesterase-like domain has been replaced by homologous domains from Drosophila AChE, Torpedo AChE or Drosophila glutactin (Glt), share similar adhesive properties. These properties may require the presence of Nrt cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains since authentic Drosophila AChE does not behave as an adhesive molecule when transfected in S2 cells. Images PMID:8890157

  12. Nuclear transport of paxillin depends on focal adhesion dynamics and FAT domains

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Aneesh R.; Shivashankar, G. V.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear transport of paxillin appears to be crucial for paxillin function but the mechanism of transport remains unclear. Here, we show that the nuclear transport of paxillin is regulated by focal adhesion turnover and the presence of FAT domains. Focal adhesion turnover was controlled using triangular or circular fibronectin islands. Circular islands caused higher focal adhesion turnover and increased the nuclear transport of paxillin relative to triangular islands. Mutating several residues of paxillin had no effect on its nuclear transport, suggesting that the process is controlled by multiple domains. Knocking out FAK (also known as PTK2) and vinculin caused an increase in nuclear paxillin. This could be reversed by rescue with wild-type FAK but not by FAK with a mutated FAT domain, which inhibits paxillin binding. Expressing just the FAT domain of FAK not only brought down nuclear levels of paxillin but also caused a large immobile fraction of paxillin to be present at focal adhesions, as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies. Taken together, focal adhesion turnover and FAT domains regulate the nuclear localization of paxillin, suggesting a possible role for transcriptional control, through paxillin, by focal adhesions. PMID:27068537

  13. Crystallization of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Targeting (FAT) Domain in a Primitive Orthorhombic Space Group

    SciTech Connect

    Magis,A.; Bailey, K.; Kurenova, E.; Hernandez Prada, J.; Cance, W.; Ostrov, D.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data from the targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were collected from a single crystal that diffracted to 1.99 Angstroms resolution and reduced to the primitive orthorhombic lattice. A single molecule was predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient. The data were phased using molecular-replacement methods using an existing model of the FAK FAT domain. All structures of human focal adhesion kinase FAT domains solved to date have been solved in a C-centered orthorhombic space group.

  14. The second domain of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) maintains the structural integrity of the leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) ligand-binding site in the first domain.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, P; McDowall, A; Bates, P A; Brashaw, J; Hogg, N

    2000-01-01

    The first domain of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) binds to the leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) I domain, which contains the principal ligand-binding site of this leucocyte integrin. Whether the function of the second domain is also to directly bind LFA-1 has been unclear. Our data show that mutation in the hydrophilic EF loop of ICAM-1 domain 2 resulted in impaired binding of the isolated I domain when compared with wild-type ICAM-1. LFA-1 on T-cells also binds with reduced affinity to this ICAM-1 mutant. A hybrid construct containing the first domain of vascular cell-adhesion molecule-1 joined to domains 2-5 of ICAM-1 was unable to bind to the I domain, showing that there is no direct interaction between the second domain of ICAM-1 and the I domain. This construct was also not bound by LFA-1 expressed in T-cells. Function-blocking monoclonal antibodies that map to domain 2 of ICAM-1, implicating this domain in ligand binding, were found to act indirectly. In summary our data suggest that the second domain of ICAM-1 has a role in maintaining the structure of the LFA-1 ligand-binding site in the first domain of ICAM-1 but does not appear to have a direct role in ligand binding. PMID:10998349

  15. A novel evolutionarily conserved domain of cell-adhesion GPCRs mediates autoproteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Araç, Demet; Boucard, Antony A; Bolliger, Marc F; Nguyen, Jenna; Soltis, S Michael; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Proteolysis Site (GPS) of cell-adhesion GPCRs and polycystic kidney disease (PKD) proteins constitutes a highly conserved autoproteolysis sequence, but its catalytic mechanism remains unknown. Here, we show that unexpectedly the ∼40-residue GPS motif represents an integral part of a much larger ∼320-residue domain that we termed GPCR-Autoproteolysis INducing (GAIN) domain. Crystal structures of GAIN domains from two distantly related cell-adhesion GPCRs revealed a conserved novel fold in which the GPS motif forms five β-strands that are tightly integrated into the overall GAIN domain. The GAIN domain is evolutionarily conserved from tetrahymena to mammals, is the only extracellular domain shared by all human cell-adhesion GPCRs and PKD proteins, and is the locus of multiple human disease mutations. Functionally, the GAIN domain is both necessary and sufficient for autoproteolysis, suggesting an autoproteolytic mechanism whereby the overall GAIN domain fine-tunes the chemical environment in the GPS to catalyse peptide bond hydrolysis. Thus, the GAIN domain embodies a unique, evolutionarily ancient and widespread autoproteolytic fold whose function is likely relevant for GPCR signalling and for multiple human diseases. PMID:22333914

  16. Dynamics of adhesion molecule domains on neutrophil membranes: surfing the dynamic cell topography.

    PubMed

    Gaborski, Thomas R; Sealander, Michael N; Waugh, Richard E; McGrath, James L

    2013-12-01

    Lateral organization and mobility of adhesion molecules play a significant role in determining the avidity with which cells can bind to target cells or surfaces. Recently, we have shown that the lateral mobility of the principal adhesion molecules on neutrophils is lower for rolling associated adhesion molecules (RAAMs: L-selectin and PSGL-1) than for β2 integrins (LFA-1 and Mac-1). Here we report that all four adhesion molecules exhibit distinct punctate distributions that are mobile on the cell surface. Using uniform illumination image correlation microscopy, we measure the lateral mobility of these topologically distinct domains. For all four molecules, we find that diffusion coefficients calculated from domain mobility agree with measurements we made previously using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. This agreement indicates that the transport of receptors on the surface of the resting neutrophil is dominated by the lateral movement of domains rather than individual molecules. The diffusion of pre-assembled integrin domains to zones of neutrophil/endothelial contact may provide a mechanism to facilitate high avidity adhesion during the earliest stages of firm arrest.

  17. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  18. Human fibronectin contains distinct adhesion- and motility-promoting domains for metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The active migration of tumor cells through extracellular matrices has been proposed to play a role in certain aspects of metastasis. Metastatic tumor cells migrate in vitro in response to substratum-bound adhesive glycoproteins such as fibronectin. The present studies use affinity-purified proteolytic fragments of fibronectin to determine the nature of adhesion- and/or motility-promoting domains within the protein. Two distinct fragments were identified with cell adhesion- promoting activities. By a number of criteria, the adhesive activity promoted by these two fragments was distinct. One fragment, a 75-kD tryptic fragment purified by monoclonal antibody chromatography, promoted the adhesion, spreading, and haptotactic motility of melanoma cells. Experiments using a synthetic cell attachment peptide in solution indicated that at least part of the attachment activity exhibited by the 75-kD fragment is mediated by the sequence arg-gly-asp- ser. It was not possible to demonstrate migration-stimulating activity using a small (11.5 kD) peptic fragment containing this sequence (Pierschbacher, M.D., E. G. Hayman, and E. Ruoslahti, 1981, Cell, 26:259-267) suggesting that another cell-binding activity within the 75 kD fragment distinct from arg-gly-asp-ser might be required for motility. The second fragment that stimulated melanoma adhesion was a 33-kD tryptic/catheptic carboxyl-terminal heparin-binding fragment, which is localized to the A chain of fibronectin. This fragment promotes adhesion and spreading but not the motility of these cells. Melanoma adhesion to this heparin-binding fragment was sensitive to the effects of cycloheximide, which contrasted adhesion to the haptotaxis- promoting fragment. Importantly, these studies illustrate that haptotaxis in response to fibronectin is not due to simple adhesion gradients of this protein. The results are discussed in light of a model for multiple distinct cell surface constituents mediating cell adhesion and motility on

  19. Regulation of adhesion behavior of murine macrophage using supported lipid membranes displaying tunable mannose domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaindl, T.; Oelke, J.; Pasc, A.; Kaufmann, S.; Konovalov, O. V.; Funari, S. S.; Engel, U.; Wixforth, A.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-07-01

    Highly uniform, strongly correlated domains of synthetically designed lipids can be incorporated into supported lipid membranes. The systematic characterization of membranes displaying a variety of domains revealed that the equilibrium size of domains significantly depends on the length of fluorocarbon chains, which can be quantitatively interpreted within the framework of an equivalent dipole model. A mono-dispersive, narrow size distribution of the domains enables us to treat the inter-domain correlations as two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and calculate the potentials of mean force. The obtained results demonstrated that both size and inter-domain correlation can precisely be controlled by the molecular structures. By coupling α-D-mannose to lipid head groups, we studied the adhesion behavior of the murine macrophage (J774A.1) on supported membranes. Specific adhesion and spreading of macrophages showed a clear dependence on the density of functional lipids. The obtained results suggest that such synthetic lipid domains can be used as a defined platform to study how cells sense the size and distribution of functional molecules during adhesion and spreading.

  20. Non-muscle myosin II heavy chain has a cryptic cell-adhesion domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, F; Ho, C H

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered a cryptic cell-adhesion domain in non-muscle myosin II heavy chain. A 205 kDa cell-adhesion-promoting polypeptide (p205) was extracted from BHK cells by Nonidet P-40 or Dounce homogenization. Adhesion to p205 was specifically inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro, indicating a role for the Arg-Gly-Asp cell-adhesion motif. Purified p205 was identified as non-muscle myosin II heavy chain, based on sequence analysis and on the cross-reactivity of p205 with anti-(bovine trachea myosin) antibodies. Further experiments showed that the heavy chain of purified myosin II has cell-adhesion-promoting activity in a cell-blotting assay, and cross-reacted with anti-p205 antibodies. Finally, the adhesion domain was located in the tail portion of myosin II heavy chain, where an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing sequence can be found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626021

  1. Diblock Copolymer Foams with Adhesive Nano-domains Promote Stem Cell Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Adhesions play an important role in cell behavior, including differentiation. Substrates are typically modified with homogeneous protein coatings; extracellular matrices in vivo provide heterogeneous adhesive sites. To mimic adhesive heterogeneity, internal phase emulsion foams were polymerized with polystyrene-polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polystyrene-polyethylene oxide (PEO) to determine if interface de-mixing would form patch-like surfaces. PEO/PAA mole ratios were confirmed by XPS and water contact angle while spatial distribution was measured by chemical force spectroscopy. This method confirmed the presence of patch-like PAA domains. Protein differentially adsorbs on PEO and PAA, so adsorption on foam mixtures was copolymer ratio dependent. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) adhesion was ratio dependent, but the highest density and vinculin expression was observed for 75PEO/25PAA. BMSCs appeared to change lineage expression the most on this composition, suggesting that this foam, which exhibits small adhesive PAA domains, may be more biomemetic than uniformally adhesive scaffolds, e.g. 0PEO/100PAA.

  2. Babesia bovis expresses a neutralization-sensitive antigen that contains a microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A gene coding for a protein with sequence similarity to the Toxoplasma gondii micronemal 1 (MIC1) protein that contains a copy of a domain described as a sialic acid-binding micronemal adhesive repeat was identified in the Babesia bovis genome. The single copy gene, located in chromosome 3, contains...

  3. Thrombomodulin-mediated cell adhesion: involvement of its lectin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Chun-Mei; Yang, Hsi-Yuan; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2003-11-21

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an integral membrane glycoprotein that is a potent anticoagulant factor. TM may also possess functions distinct from its anticoagulant activity. Here the influence of TM on cell adhesion was studied in TM-negative melanoma A2058 cells transfected with green fluorescent protein-tagged TM (TMG) or lectin domain-deleted TM (TMG(DeltaL)). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that both TMG and TMG(DeltaL) were distributed in the plasma membrane. TMG-expressed cells grew as closely clustered colonies, with TM localized prominently in the intercellular boundaries. TMG(DeltaL)-expressed cells grew singly. Overexpression of TMG, but not TMG(DeltaL), decreased monolayer permeability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. The cell-to-cell adhesion in TMG-expressed cells was Ca2+-dependent and was inhibited by monoclonal antibody against the lectin-like domain of TM. The effects of TM-mediated cell adhesion were abolished by the addition of mannose, chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin sulfate C. In addition, anti-lectin-like domain antibody disrupted the close clustering of the endogenous TM-expressed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line derived from normal human epidermis. Double-labeling immunofluorescence staining revealed similar distributions of TM and actin filament in the cortex region of the TMG-expressed cells. Thus, TM can function as a Ca2+-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Binding of specific carbohydrates to the lectin-like domain is essential for this specific function.

  4. Dominant-negative effect on adhesion by myelin Po protein truncated in its cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The myelin Po protein is believed to hold myelin together via interactions of both its extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. We have already shown that the extracellular domains of Po can interact in a homophilic manner (Filbin, M.T., F.S. Walsh, B.D. Trapp, J.A. Pizzey, and G.I. Tennekoon. 1990. Nature (Lond.). 344:871-872). In addition, we have shown that for this homophilic adhesion to take place, the cytoplasmic domain of Po must be intact and most likely interacting with the cytoskeleton; Po proteins truncated in their cytoplasmic domains are not adhesive (Wong, M.H., and M.T. Filbin, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:1089-1097). To determine if the presence of these truncated forms of Po could have an effect on the functioning of the full-length Po, we coexpressed both molecules in CHO cells. The adhesiveness of CHO cells expressing both full-length Po and truncated Po was then compared to cells expressing only full-length Po. In these coexpressors, both the full-length and the truncated Po proteins were glycosylated. They reached the surface of the cell in approximately equal amounts as shown by an ELISA and surface labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, the amount of full-length Po at the cell surface was equivalent to other cell lines expressing only full-length Po that we had already shown to be adhesive. Therefore, there should be sufficient levels of full-length Po at the surface of these coexpressors to measure adhesion of Po. However, as assessed by an aggregation assay, the coexpressors were not adhesive. By 60 min they had not formed large aggregates and were indistinguishable from the control transfected cells not expressing Po. In contrast, in the same time, the cells expressing only the full-length Po had formed large aggregates. This indicates that the truncated forms of Po have a dominant-negative effect on the adhesiveness of the full-length Po. Furthermore, from cross-linking studies, full-length Po, when expressed alone but not when

  5. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  6. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kadaré, Gress; Gervasi, Nicolas; Brami-Cherrier, Karen; Blockus, Heike; El Messari, Said; Arold, Stefan T.; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule. PMID:25391654

  7. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  8. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  9. Philippine Counterinsurgency Success: Implications for the Human Domain of Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    most complex of the domains. As dissimilar as mountainous jungles are to the arctic tundra , humans have adapted to thrive in these, and other... humans directly impacted by military interaction, non-combatants, and one of the primary reasons why there is now a human domain. 10 Why is Today...Philippine Counterinsurgency Success: Implications for the Human Domain of Warfare by Colonel Fran Beaudette United

  10. Isolation of αL I domain mutants mediating firm cell adhesion using a novel flow-based sorting method.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Lauren R; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Robbins, Gregory P; Dang, Nicholas N; Hammer, Daniel A; Boder, Eric T

    2013-08-01

    The inserted (I) domain of αLβ2 integrin (LFA-1) contains the entire binding site of the molecule. It mediates both rolling and firm adhesion of leukocytes at sites of inflammation depending on the activation state of the integrin. The affinity change of the entire integrin can be mimicked by the I domain alone through mutations that affect the conformation of the molecule. High-affinity mutants of the I domain have been discovered previously using both rational design and directed evolution. We have found that binding affinity fails to dictate the behavior of I domain adhesion under shear flow. In order to better understand I domain adhesion, we have developed a novel panning method to separate yeast expressing a library of I domain variants on the surface by adhesion under flow. Using conditions analogous to those experienced by cells interacting with the post-capillary vascular endothelium, we have identified mutations supporting firm adhesion that are not found using typical directed evolution techniques that select for tight binding to soluble ligands. Mutants isolated using this method do not cluster with those found by sorting with soluble ligand. Furthermore, these mutants mediate shear-driven cell rolling dynamics decorrelated from binding affinity, as previously observed for I domains bearing engineered disulfide bridges to stabilize activated conformational states. Characterization of these mutants supports a greater understanding of the structure-function relationship of the αL I domain, and of the relationship between applied force and bioadhesion in a broader context.

  11. Application of Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy in nondestructive testing of adhesion quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Duo; Ren, Jiaojiao; Qao, Xiaoli; Li, Lijuan

    2015-10-01

    Multilayer composites assembled flexibly with have important effect on the performance and safety of aircrafts. The nondestructive detection on the adhesion layer is an important index to evaluate the quality of aircraft assembly. Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a newly developed spectroscopy technique based on femtosecond laser technology which currently applied to qualitative analysis as a means of security detection and material identification. Compared with the traditional tensile testing, the detection of defects in the adhesion layer could be nondestructive, visible, positioning and more accurate. The spectral analysis on the material to be assembled was done respectively. The testing model was established in accord with the extracted optical parameters. With the employment of a reflective THz-TDS device, X-Y spot scanning was done to obtain waveforms of every location on an assembled sample. Layered analysis was done by selecting region of interest in time domain waveforms. Conclusions of Time- Frequency spectrum analysis and scanning imaging performance are relatively satisfying through the experiments. The defects could be located and analyzed accurately and efficiently. The research reveals that THz-TDS (0.1THz~5THz) has good testing performance on the adhesion quality of multilayer composites.

  12. Mechanical Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein Through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Botello, Eric; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela L.; Frey, Eric W.; Patel, Jay M.; Nolasco, Leticia; Turner, Nancy A.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical force-induced activation of the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experiences high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force-induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF’s crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates plasma VWF (PVWF) multimers to bind platelets. Here, we showed that a pathological level of high shear stress exposure of PVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of the multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated PVWF multimers are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than nonsheared PVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of PVWF multimers.

  13. Adhesion domain of human T11 (CD2) is encoded by a single exon.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, N E; Chang, H C; Brown, N R; Hussey, R E; Sayre, P H; Reinherz, E L

    1988-01-01

    The 50-kDa T11 (CD2) T-lymphocyte surface glycoprotein facilitates physical adhesion between T-lineage cells and their cognate cellular counterparts (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes-target cells, helper T lymphocytes-antigen-presenting cells, or thymocytes-thymic epithelium) as well as signaling through the antigen-specific T3-Ti receptor complex. To examine the relationship between the structure and function of the T11 molecule, we have utilized a baculoviral expression system to produce milligram quantities of the hydrophilic extracellular T11 segment. Enzyme cleavage, microsequencing, and HPLC analyses of the expressed protein in conjunction with genomic cloning information show that the domain involved in cellular adhesion is encoded by a single 321-base-pair exon. Images PMID:2455894

  14. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  15. Localization of a tumor cell adhesion domain of laminin by a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Skubitz, A.P.N.; Charonis, A.S.; Tsilibary, E.C.; Furcht, L.T. )

    1987-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to localize the domain(s) of laminin to which tumor cells adhere. Rat Y3-Ag 1.2.3 myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from a rat immunized with a purified 440-kDa fragment of chymotrypsin-digested laminin. Three monoclonal antibodies (AL-1 to AL-3) that bound to intact laminin in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay were chosen for further analysis. The epitopes recognized by these antibodies were characterized by radioimmunoassays, immunoblotting, radioimmunoprecipitation, and immunoaffinity chromatography. In cell adhesion assays, monoclonal antibody AL-2 inhibited the highly metastatic melanoma cell line, K-1735-M4, to both intact laminin and the 440-kDa fragment of laminin. Electron microscopic examination of laminin-monoclonal antibody interactions showed that monoclonal antibody AL-2 reacted with the long arm of laminin directly below the cross-region. Two monoclonal antibodies that failed to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to laminin reacted with epitopes on the lateral short arms or cross-region of laminin as seen by electron microscopy. These results suggest that a new tumor cell binding domain of laminin may be located close to the cross-region on the long arm of laminin.

  16. Zones of Adhesion of the Abdomen: Implications for Abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D Alastair

    2017-02-01

    The elucidation of the superficial fascial system (SFS) by Lockwood in 1991 has been the cornerstone of our understanding of abdominal excisional dynamics for the last 25 years. The SFS can be used for closure and, appropriately mobilized, for tension transmission in abdominoplasty, and lower body lifts. The pattern of SFS adhesion to muscle fascia and the zones of adhesion was also described but there are inconsistencies between the description and clinical experience. This study was performed to better describe the pattern of subcutaneous tissue adhesion to the trunk. Twenty pre-abdominoplasty patients were studied. A series of points were marked around the trunk and the skin moved in four opposing directions. The excursions were measured and the median plotted on a diagram. Two fresh cadavers were also dissected, removing all subcutaneous tissue circumferentially from the trunk muscle fascia and marking the strength of the adhesion with a colored pin. Three grades of adhesion were mapped. In the current study, maximal laxity was shown in the mid-lower abdomen and the anterior and lateral chest. Laxity was limited in the anterior and posterior midlines, over the lower back, and the lateral upper thigh. The cadaver dissection mapped adhesion which correlated with the skin laxity diagram. The detailed skin adhesion map better explains features of surface anatomy. Incorporating this understanding a tension vector of abdominoplasty closure obliquely inwards is proposed to maximally harvest the laxity of the anterior and lateral chest and to create further lowering and narrowing of the waist. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations in protocadherin-19 (PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations in PCDH19 have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. Additionally, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion in in vitro assays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.

  18. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations in protocadherin-19 ( PCDH19 ) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations in PCDH19 have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structuremore » reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. In addition, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion in in vitro assays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.« less

  19. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations inprotocadherin-19(PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations inPCDH19have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. In addition, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion inin vitroassays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.

  20. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Sharon R; Jontes, James D; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations in protocadherin-19 (PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations in PCDH19 have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. In addition, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion in in vitro assays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18529.001 PMID:27787195

  1. Time-Domain vs. Frequency-Domain CSEM: Implications for Marine Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, D. M.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The frequency-domain marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method is now routinely applied to map resistive hydrocarbons buried beneath the seabed in deepwater. Alternatively, it has been suggested that time-domain CSEM methods may offer improved resolution of difficult targets such as deeply buried reservoirs. Furthermore, time-domain methods may overcome a sensitivity limitation imposed by the airwave saturation that is experienced for shallow-water frequency-domain CSEM. In order to examine and test these claims, we have developed a modeling code for computing time-domain responses for layered 1D models with arbitrarily located and oriented transmitters and receivers. Our code extends the open-source frequency domain code Dipole1D by efficiently computing the time-domain step-on and impulse responses by Fourier transformation of the frequency-domain kernels. By applying a realistic noise model to synthetic data generated from this code, we systematically examine the sensitivity and resolution of time-domain and frequency-domain CSEM to representative targets of interest for offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploration surveys of seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal systems. These studies have practical implications for marine EM survey systems that use either towed or stationary transmitters and receivers.

  2. Identification and characterization of a tumor cell receptor for CSVTCG, a thrombospondin adhesive domain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have previously shown that peptides derived from the thrombospondin sequence, CSVTCG, promoted tumor cell adhesion. To further investigate this observation, the CSVTCG-tumor cell adhesion receptor from A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells was isolated and characterized. A single protein peak was isolated by CSVTCG affinity chromatography which also analyzed as a single peak by anion exchange chromatography. The purified protein had a pI of 4.7 and analyzed on SDS-gels as a single band of M(r) = 50,000 under nonreducing conditions and as two protein bands of M(r) = 50,000, and 60,000 under reducing conditions. Purified CSVTCG binding protein (CBP) bound either CSVTCG- or TSP- Sepharose but showed little interaction with either VCTGSC- or BSA- Sepharose. CBP was cell surface exposed. CSVTCG derivatized with [125I] Bolton-Hunter reagent was taken up by cells in a dose-dependent manner and the cell association was inhibited with a monospecific polyclonal anti-CBP antibody. Examination of the cell proteins crosslinked to labeled CSVTCG by SDS-gel electrophoresis revealed one band that comigrated with purified CPB. Using an in vitro binding assay, purified CBP bound mannose, galactose, and glucosamine-specific lectins. CBP bound TSP saturably and reversibly. The binding was Ca+2/Mg+2 ion dependent and inhibited with fluid phase TSP and anti-CBP. Little or no binding was observed on BSA, fibronectin, GRGES, and GRGDS. Heparin, but not lactose, inhibited binding. Anti-CBP IgG and anti-CSVTCG peptide IgG inhibited A549 cell spreading and adhesion on TSP but not on fibronectin and laminin. These results indicate that CBP and the CSVTCG peptide domain of TSP can mediate TSP-promoted tumor cell adhesion. PMID:8421063

  3. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Chopp, Treasa; Qi, Sheng-Mei; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2005-05-15

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion.

  4. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Chopp, Treasa; Qi Shengmei; Cutler, Mary Lou . E-mail: mcutler@usuhs.mil

    2005-05-15

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion.

  5. Structure and dynamics of the fibronectin-III domains of Aplysia californica cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine M; Muzard, Julien; Brooks, Bernard R; Lee, Gil U; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2015-04-21

    Due to their homophilic and heterophilic binding properties, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) such as integrin, cadherin and the immunoglobulin superfamily CAMs are of primary importance in cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, signalling pathways and other crucial biological processes. We study the molecular structures and conformational dynamics of the two fibronectin type III (Fn-III) extracellular domains of the Aplysia californica CAM (apCAM) protein, by constructing and probing an atomically-detailed structural model based on apCAM's homology with other CAMs. The stability and dynamic properties of the Fn-III domains, individually and in tandem, are probed and analysed using all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and normal mode analysis of their corresponding elastic network models. The refined structural model of the Fn-III tandem of apCAM reveals a specific pattern of amino acid interactions that controls the stability of the β-sheet rich structure and could affect apCAM's response to physical or chemical changes of its environment. It also exposes the important role of several specific charged residues in modulating the structural properties of the linker segment connecting the two Fn-III domains, as well as of the inter-domain interface.

  6. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations in protocadherin-19 (PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations in PCDH19 have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesivemore » interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. Additionally, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion in in vitro assays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.« less

  7. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Radon, Yvonne; Sempou, Emily; Jechow, Katharina; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1) the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2) the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and zebrafish.

  8. Critical Role of Heparin Binding Domains of Ameloblastin for Dental Epithelium Cell Adhesion and Ameloblastoma Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Akira; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Emiko; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Aya; Arakaki, Makiko; Harada, Hidemitsu; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    AMBN (ameloblastin) is an enamel matrix protein that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of ameloblasts. In AMBN-deficient mice, ameloblasts are detached from the enamel matrix, continue to proliferate, and form a multiple cell layer; often, odontogenic tumors develop in the maxilla with age. However, the mechanism of AMBN functions in these biological processes remains unclear. By using recombinant AMBN proteins, we found that AMBN had heparin binding domains at the C-terminal half and that these domains were critical for AMBN binding to dental epithelial cells. Overexpression of full-length AMBN protein inhibited proliferation of human ameloblastoma AM-1 cells, but overexpression of heparin binding domain-deficient AMBN protein had no inhibitory effect. In full-length AMBN-overexpressing AM-1 cells, the expression of Msx2, which is involved in the dental epithelial progenitor phenotype, was decreased, whereas the expression of cell proliferation inhibitors p21 and p27 was increased. We also found that the expression of enamelin, a marker of differentiated ameloblasts, was induced, suggesting that AMBN promotes odontogenic tumor differentiation. Thus, our results suggest that AMBN promotes cell binding through the heparin binding sites and plays an important role in preventing odontogenic tumor development by suppressing cell proliferation and maintaining differentiation phenotype through Msx2, p21, and p27. PMID:19648121

  9. Critical role of heparin binding domains of ameloblastin for dental epithelium cell adhesion and ameloblastoma proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Akira; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Emiko; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Aya; Arakaki, Makiko; Harada, Hidemitsu; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2009-10-02

    AMBN (ameloblastin) is an enamel matrix protein that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of ameloblasts. In AMBN-deficient mice, ameloblasts are detached from the enamel matrix, continue to proliferate, and form a multiple cell layer; often, odontogenic tumors develop in the maxilla with age. However, the mechanism of AMBN functions in these biological processes remains unclear. By using recombinant AMBN proteins, we found that AMBN had heparin binding domains at the C-terminal half and that these domains were critical for AMBN binding to dental epithelial cells. Overexpression of full-length AMBN protein inhibited proliferation of human ameloblastoma AM-1 cells, but overexpression of heparin binding domain-deficient AMBN protein had no inhibitory effect. In full-length AMBN-overexpressing AM-1 cells, the expression of Msx2, which is involved in the dental epithelial progenitor phenotype, was decreased, whereas the expression of cell proliferation inhibitors p21 and p27 was increased. We also found that the expression of enamelin, a marker of differentiated ameloblasts, was induced, suggesting that AMBN promotes odontogenic tumor differentiation. Thus, our results suggest that AMBN promotes cell binding through the heparin binding sites and plays an important role in preventing odontogenic tumor development by suppressing cell proliferation and maintaining differentiation phenotype through Msx2, p21, and p27.

  10. All-trans-retinoic acid induces integrin-independent B-cell adhesion to ADAM disintegrin domains.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Lance C; Lingo, Joshuah D; Grandon, Rachel A; Kelley, Melissa D

    2008-04-15

    Cell adhesion is an integral aspect of immunity facilitating extravasation of immune cells during homing and activation. All -trans-Retinoic acid ( t-RA) regulates leukocyte differentiation, proliferation, and transmigration. However, the role of t-RA in immune cell adhesion is poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated the impact of t-RA and its metabolism on B and T cell adhesion. Specifically, we address the impact of t-RA on the adhesive properties of the human mature B and T cell lines RPMI 8866, Daudi and Jurkats. The effect of t-RA exposure on cell adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), a well-established integrin counter receptor involved in immunity, and to nonconventional ADAM integrin ligands was assessed. We show for the first time that t-RA potently induces B cell adhesion in an integrin-independent manner to both VCAM-1 and select ADAM disintegrin domains. Using retinoid extraction and reverse-phase HPLC analysis, we identify the retinoid that is functionally responsible for this augmented adhesion. We also provide evidence that this novel t-RA adhesive response is not prototypical of lymphocytes since both Daudi and Jurkats do not alter their adhesive properties upon t-RA treatment. Further, the t-RA metabolic profiles between these lineages is distinct with 9- cis-retinoic acid being exclusively detected in Jurkat media. This study is the first to demonstrate that t-RA directly induces B cell adhesion in an integrin-independent manner and is not contingent upon t-RA metabolism.

  11. Gravitational waves from domain walls and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the impact of domain-wall annihilation on the currently ongoing and planned gravitational wave experiments, including a case in which domain walls experience a frictional force due to interactions with the ambient plasma. We show the sensitivity reach in terms of physical parameters, namely, the wall tension and the annihilation temperature. We find that a Higgs portal scalar, which stabilizes the Higgs potential at high energy scales, can form domain walls whose annihilation produces a large amount of gravitational waves within the reach of the advanced LIGO experiment (O5). Domain wall annihilation can also generate baryon asymmetry if the scalar is coupled to either SU(2)L gauge fields or the (B - L) current. This is a variant of spontaneous baryogenesis, but it naturally avoids the isocurvature constraint due to the scaling behavior of the domain-wall evolution. We delineate the parameter space where the domain-wall baryogenesis works successfully and discuss its implications for the gravitational wave experiments.

  12. Regulation of tensin-promoted cell migration by its focal adhesion binding and Src homology domain 2.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaiyang; Lo, Su Hao

    2003-01-01

    Tensin1 is an actin- and phosphotyrosine-binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. Recently, we have shown that both tensin1 and a new family member, tensin2, promote cell migration [Chen, Duncan, Bozorgchami and Lo (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 733-738]. Since localization of proteins to particular intracellular compartments often regulates their functions, and Src homology domain 2 may mediate signals related to cell migration, we hypothesize that tensin-mediated cell migration is regulated by the focal adhesion localization and the Src homology domain 2 of tensin. To test this hypothesis, we have analysed the effects of a series of tensin1 mutants on cell migration. Our results have shown that (1) tensin1 contains two focal adhesion-binding sites, (2) the wild-type tensin1 significantly promotes cell migration, (3) mutants with one focal adhesion-binding site do not promote cell migration, (4) the non-focal adhesion localized mutant suppresses cell migration and (5) the mutant that is not able to bind to phosphotyrosine-containing proteins has no effect on cell migration. These results have indicated that focal adhesion localization of tensin1 and the phosphotyrosine-binding activity are two critical factors in regulating tensin-mediated cell migration. PMID:12495434

  13. Mutations in the cytoplasmic domain of P0 reveal a role for PKC-mediated phosphorylation in adhesion and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenbo; Shy, Michael; Kamholz, John; Elferink, Lisa; Xu, Gang; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in P0 (MPZ), the major myelin protein of the peripheral nervous system, cause the inherited demyelinating neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. P0 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule. We now show that point mutations in the cytoplasmic domain that modify a PKC target motif (RSTK) or an adjacent serine residue abolish P0 adhesion function and can cause peripheral neuropathy in humans. Consistent with these data, PKCα along with the PKC binding protein RACK1 are immunoprecipitated with wild-type P0, and inhibition of PKC activity abolishes P0-mediated adhesion. Point mutations in the RSTK target site that abolish adhesion do not alter the association of PKC with P0; however, deletion of a 14 amino acid region, which includes the RSTK motif, does abolish the association. Thus, the interaction of PKCα with the cytoplasmic domain of P0 is independent of specific target residues but is dependent on a nearby sequence. We conclude that PKC-mediated phosphorylation of specific residues within the cytoplasmic domain of P0 is necessary for P0-mediated adhesion, and alteration of this process can cause demyelinating neuropathy in humans. PMID:11673479

  14. Treatment outcomes and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings of eyes with symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion treated with intravitreal ocriplasmin.

    PubMed

    Warrow, David J; Lai, Michael M; Patel, Auvni; Raevis, Joseph; Berinstein, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    To determine treatment outcomes of intravitreal ocriplasmin in symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion. Retrospective interventional case series. setting: Private practice. study population: Thirty-five eyes (35 subjects) with symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion. intervention/observation: Intravitreal ocriplasmin injection from February to November 2013. main outcome measure: Vitreomacular adhesion resolution rate. Secondary endpoints included postinjection visual acuity and rates of outer retinal attenuation and full-thickness macular hole (MH) closure. The 35 subjects included were of mean age 69 years, 66% female, and 71% phakic. Eleven subjects (31%) had macular comorbidities. Average adhesion diameter was 571 μm, with mean 7.9 months duration of symptoms. Nine subjects (26%) had epiretinal membrane and 6 (17%) had MH (mean diameter 186 μm). Mean preinjection logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution visual acuity was 0.46, and improved to 0.33 at final follow-up. Fifteen eyes (43%) achieved adhesion release at mean 10 days post injection. One of 6 MH (17%) closed. Transient outer retinal attenuation occurred in 10 of 35 cases (29%), with 8 of 10 (80%) achieving adhesion release. One subject (3%) developed a retinal detachment. Adhesion resolution was more likely in patients with younger age (P = .04), absence of comorbidities (P = .02), small adhesion diameter (P = .005), short adhesion duration (P = .03), and transient outer retinal attenuation (P = .008). Intravitreal ocriplasmin efficacy in the private practice setting, while including patients with macular comorbidities, is similar to that of previous studies. Transient toxicity to the outer retina occurs frequently-typically with adhesion resolution-necessitating careful postinjection spectral-domain optical coherence tomography monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Laminin L4 domain structure resembles adhesion modules in ephrin receptor and other transmembrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Moran, Toot; Gat, Yair; Fass, Deborah

    2015-07-01

    The ~ 800 kDa laminin heterotrimer forms a distinctive cross-shaped structure that further self-assembles into networks within the extracellular matrix. The domains at the laminin chain termini, which engage in network formation and cell-surface interaction, are well understood both structurally and functionally. By contrast, the structures and roles of additional domains embedded within the limbs of the laminin cross have remained obscure. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure, determined to 1.2 Å resolution, of the human laminin α2 subunit L4b domain, site of an inframe deletion mutation associated with mild congenital muscular dystrophy. The α2 L4b domain is an irregular β-sandwich with many short and broken strands linked by extended loops. The most similar known structures are the carbohydrate-binding domains of bacterial cellulases, the ephrin-binding domain of ephrin receptors, and MAM adhesion domains in various other eukaryotic cell-surface proteins. This similarity to mammalian adhesion modules, which was not predicted on the basis of amino acid sequence alone due to lack of detectable homology, suggests that laminin internal domains evolved from a progenitor adhesion molecule and may retain a role in cell adhesion in the context of the laminin trimer. The atomic coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank, Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA (http://www.rcsb.org/) under codes 4YEP and 4YEQ. © 2015 FEBS.

  16. Magnetoelectric domain wall dynamics and its implications for magnetoelectric memory

    DOE PAGES

    Belashchenko, K. D.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; ...

    2016-03-30

    Domain wall dynamics in a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet is analyzed, and its implications for magnetoelectric memory applications are discussed. Cr2O3 is used in the estimates of the materials parameters. It is found that the domain wall mobility has a maximum as a function of the electric field due to the gyrotropic coupling induced by it. In Cr2O3, the maximal mobility of 0.1 m/(s Oe) is reached at E≈0.06 V/nm. Fields of this order may be too weak to overcome the intrinsic depinning field, which is estimated for B-doped Cr2O3. These major drawbacks for device implementation can be overcome by applying amore » small in-plane shear strain, which blocks the domain wall precession. Domain wall mobility of about 0.7 m/(s Oe) can then be achieved at E = 0.2 V/nm. Furthermore, a split-gate scheme is proposed for the domain-wall controlled bit element; its extension to multiple-gate linear arrays can offer advantages in memory density, programmability, and logic functionality.« less

  17. Magnetoelectric domain wall dynamics and its implications for magnetoelectric memory

    SciTech Connect

    Belashchenko, K. D.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tretiakov, O. A.

    2016-03-30

    Domain wall dynamics in a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet is analyzed, and its implications for magnetoelectric memory applications are discussed. Cr2O3 is used in the estimates of the materials parameters. It is found that the domain wall mobility has a maximum as a function of the electric field due to the gyrotropic coupling induced by it. In Cr2O3, the maximal mobility of 0.1 m/(s Oe) is reached at E≈0.06 V/nm. Fields of this order may be too weak to overcome the intrinsic depinning field, which is estimated for B-doped Cr2O3. These major drawbacks for device implementation can be overcome by applying a small in-plane shear strain, which blocks the domain wall precession. Domain wall mobility of about 0.7 m/(s Oe) can then be achieved at E = 0.2 V/nm. Furthermore, a split-gate scheme is proposed for the domain-wall controlled bit element; its extension to multiple-gate linear arrays can offer advantages in memory density, programmability, and logic functionality.

  18. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  19. Cytoplasmic Domain of Zebrafish Myelin Protein Zero: Adhesive Role Depends on β-Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, XiaoYang; Inouye, Hideyo; Gross, Abby A. R.; Hidalgo, Marla M.; Sharma, Deepak; Lee, Daniel; Avila, Robin L.; Salmona, Mario; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Solution spectroscopy studies on the cytoplasmic domain of human myelin protein zero (P0) (hP0-cyt) suggest that H-bonding between β-strands from apposed molecules is likely responsible for the tight cytoplasmic apposition in compact myelin. As a follow-up to these findings, in the current study we used circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction to analyze the same type of model membranes previously used for hP0-cyt to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the zebrafish cytoplasmic apposition. This space is significantly narrower in teleosts compared with that in higher vertebrates, and can be accounted for in part by the much shorter cytoplasmic domain in the zebrafish protein (zP0-cyt). Circular dichroism measurements on zP0-cyt showed similar structural characteristics to those of hP0-cyt, i.e., the protein underwent a β→α structural transition at lipid/protein (L/P) molar ratios >50, and adopted a β-conformation at lower L/P molar ratios. X-ray diffraction was carried out on lipid vesicle solutions with zP0-cyt before and after dehydration to study the effect of protein on membrane lipid packing. Solution diffraction revealed the electron-density profile of a single membrane bilayer. Diffraction patterns of dried samples suggested a multilamellar structure with the β-folded P0-cyt located at the intermembrane space. Our findings support the idea that the adhesive role of P0 at the cytoplasmic apposition in compact myelin depends on the cytoplasmic domain of P0 being in the β-conformation. PMID:17693467

  20. Intercellular adhesion molecule-4 and CD36 are implicated in the abnormal adhesiveness of sickle cell SAD mouse erythrocytes to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Trang-Tan, Marie-Marcelle; Vilela-Lamego, Camilo; Picot, Julien; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Cartron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormal adhesiveness of red blood cells to endothelium has been implicated in vaso-occlusive crisis of sickle cell disease. The present study examined whether the SAD mouse model exhibits the same abnormalities of red blood cell adhesion as those found in human sickle cell disease. Design and Methods The repertoire of adhesive molecules on murine erythrocytes and bEnd.3 microvascular endothelial cells was determined by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies or by western blotting. Adhesion was investigated in dynamic conditions and measured at different shear stresses. Results CD36, CD47 and intercellular adhesion molecular-4, but not Lutheran blood group antigen/basal cell adhesion molecule, are present on mouse mature erythrocytes. α4β1 are not expressed on SAD and wild type reticulocytes. Endothelial bEnd.3 cells express αVβ3, α4β1, CD47, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and Lutheran blood group antigen/basal cell adhesion molecule, but not CD36. Adhesion of SAD red cells is: (i) 2- to 3-fold higher than that of wild type red cells; (ii) further increased on platelet activating factor-activated endothelium; (iii) not stimulated by epinephrine; (iv) inhibited after treating the endothelium with a peptide reproducing one of the binding sequences of mouse intercellular adhesion molecular-4, or with mon-oclonal antibody against murine αv integrin; and (v) inhibited after pretreatment of red blood cells with anti-mouse CD36 monoclonal antibodies. The combination of treatments with intercellular adhesion molecular-4 peptide and anti-CD36 monoclonal antibodies eliminates excess adhesion of SAD red cells. The phosphorylation state of intercellular adhesion molecular-4 and CD36 is probably not involved in the over-adhesiveness of SAD erythrocytes. Conclusions Intercellular adhesion molecular-4/αvβ3 and CD36/thrombospondin interactions might contribute to the abnormally high adhesiveness of SAD red cells. The SAD mouse is a valuable animal model

  1. Understanding the Functional Roles of Multiple Extracellular Domains in Cell Adhesion Molecules with a Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2017-04-07

    Intercellular contacts in multicellular organisms are maintained by membrane receptors called cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), which are expressed on cell surfaces. One interesting feature of CAMs is that almost all of their extracellular regions contain repeating copies of structural domains. It is not clear why so many extracellular domains need to be evolved through natural selection. We tackled this problem by computational modeling. A generic model of CAMs was constructed based on the domain organization of neuronal CAM, which is engaged in maintaining neuron-neuron adhesion in central nervous system. By placing these models on a cell-cell interface, we developed a Monte-Carlo simulation algorithm that incorporates both molecular factors including conformational changes of CAMs and cellular factor including fluctuations of plasma membranes to approach the physical process of CAM-mediated adhesion. We found that the presence of multiple domains at the extracellular region of a CAM plays a positive role in regulating its trans-interaction with other CAMs from the opposite side of cell surfaces. The trans-interaction can further be facilitated by the intramolecular contacts between different extracellular domains of a CAM. Finally, if more than one CAM is introduced on each side of cell surfaces, the lateral binding (cis-interactions) between these CAMs will positively correlate with their trans-interactions only within a small energetic range, suggesting that cell adhesion is an elaborately designed process in which both trans- and cis-interactions are fine-tuned collectively by natural selection. In short, this study deepens our general understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural basis of focal adhesion targeting domain-mediated signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2017-02-01

    The focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exists in monomeric closed (c) or arm exchanged (ae) dimeric state. FAT interaction with Grb2 necessitates an intermediate open (o) state that interacts with Grb2 and activates signaling pathways leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation was carried out in order to capture the structure of the intermediate formed by opening of Helix1 (H1) from monomeric cFAT leading to the formation of monomeric aeFAT. During TMD, H1 separated from the four helices bundle of cFAT, completely unfolded and performed a full turn before folding back to a helix inclined at an acute angle to the helical bundle in aeFAT. The entire transition can be described in six distinct intermediate structural stages. The most significant correlation of H1 motion was observed with Loop3 (L3) and is the likely reason for the complete disruption of the FAT interaction with paxillin during the transition. High-affinity analogs of the paxillin LD4 region can be a promising strategy to drive the equilibrium towards cFAT, thus antagonizing FAT-Grb2 association. During transition, the overall shift in orientation of all the four helices rejects paxillin binding and approves Grb2 association. Exposure and β-turn conformation of the YENV motif (residues 925-928) in oFAT-facilitated phosphorylation and Grb2 binding. Docking, MD simulation and conservation analysis of oFAT-Grb2 complex provided insight into the structural determinants of binding and specificity. Our work provides a structural basis for pharmacological modulation of dynamic conformational changes and interactions of FAT.

  3. Cocaine hijacks σ1 receptor to initiate induction of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule: implication for increased monocyte adhesion and migration in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Yao, Honghong; Kim, Keejun; Duan, Ming; Hayashi, Teruo; Guo, Minglei; Morgello, Susan; Prat, Alexander; Wang, John; Su, Tsung-Ping; Buch, Shilpa

    2011-04-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated increase in monocyte adhesion and trafficking is exacerbated by cocaine abuse. The underlying mechanisms involve cocaine-mediated upregulation of adhesion molecules with subsequent disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recently, a novel activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) has been implicated in leukocyte transmigration across the endothelium. We now show that upregulation of ALCAM in the brain endothelium seen in HIV(+)/cocaine drug abusers paralleled increased CD68 immunostaining compared with HIV(+)/no cocaine or uninfected controls, suggesting the important role of ALCAM in promoting leukocyte infiltration across the BBB. Furthermore, ALCAM expression was increased in cocaine-treated mice with concomitant increase in monocyte adhesion and transmigration in vivo, which was ameliorated by pretreating with the neutralizing antibody to ALCAM, lending additional support to the role of ALCAM. This new concept was further confirmed by in vitro experiments. Cocaine-mediated induction of ALCAM in human brain microvascular endothelial cells through the translocation of σ receptor to the plasma membrane, followed by phosphorylation of PDGF-β (platelet-derived growth factor-β) receptor. Downstream activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Akt, and NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) pathways resulted in induced expression of ALCAM. Functional implication of upregulated ALCAM was confirmed using cell adhesion and transmigration assays. Neutralizing antibody to ALCAM ameliorated this effect. Together, these findings implicate cocaine-mediated induction of ALCAM as a mediator of increased monocyte adhesion/transmigration into the CNS.

  4. Solution structure of the focal adhesion adaptor PINCH LIM1 domain and characterization of its interaction with the integrin-linked kinase ankyrin repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, A; Yang, Y; Wu, C; Qin, J

    2001-02-16

    PINCH is a recently identified adaptor protein that comprises an array of five LIM domains. PINCH functions through LIM-mediated protein-protein interactions that are involved in cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. The LIM1 domain of PINCH interacts with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), thereby mediating focal adhesions via a specific integrin/ILK signaling pathway. We have solved the NMR structure of the PINCH LIM1 domain and characterized its binding to ILK. LIM1 contains two contiguous zinc fingers of the CCHC and CCCH types and adopts a global fold similar to that of functionally distinct LIM domains from cysteine-rich protein and cysteine-rich intestinal protein families with CCHC and CCCC zinc finger types. Gel-filtration and NMR experiments demonstrated a 1:1 complex between PINCH LIM1 and the ankyrin repeat domain of ILK. A chemical shift mapping experiment identified regions in PINCH LIM1 that are important for interaction with ILK. Comparison of surface features between PINCH LIM1 and other functionally different LIM domains indicated that the LIM motif might have a highly variable mode in recognizing various target proteins.

  5. Peptide array-based screening of human mesenchymal stem cell-adhesive peptides derived from fibronectin type III domain

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Mina; Nomura, Shigeyuki; Kaga, Chiaki; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-06-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cell-adhesive peptides were screened based on the amino acid sequence of fibronectin type III domain 8-11 (FN-III{sub 8-11}) using a peptide array synthesized by the Fmoc-chemistry. Using hexameric peptide library of FN-III{sub 8-11} scan, we identified the ALNGR (Ala-Leu-Asn-Gly-Arg) peptide that induced cell adhesion as well as RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide. After incubation for 2 h, approximately 68% of inoculated cells adhere to the ALNGR peptide disk. Adhesion inhibition assay with integrin antibodies showed that the ALNGR peptide interacts with integrin {beta}1 but not with {alpha}v{beta}3, indicating that the receptors for ALNGR are different from RGDS. Additionally, the ALNGR peptide expressed cell specificities for adhesion: cell adhesion was promoted for fibroblasts but not for keratinocytes or endotherial cells. The ALNGR peptide induced cell adhesion and promoted cell proliferation without changing its property. It is therefore useful for the construction of functional biomaterials.

  6. Intermediate monomer-dimer equilibrium structure of native ICAM-1: implication for enhanced cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Mee; Kwon, Min-Sung; Kim, Hyang-Jin; Jeon, Byeong-Hun; Kim, Hye-Ran; Choi, Hyang-Ok; Na, Bo-Ra; Eom, Soo-Hyun; Song, Nam Woong; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2011-01-15

    Dimeric intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) has been known to more efficiently mediate cell adhesion than monomeric ICAM-1. Here, we found that truncation of the intracellular domain of ICAM-1 significantly enhances surface dimerization based on the two criteria: 1) the binding degree of monomer-specific antibody CA-7 and 2) the ratio of dimer/monomer when a mutation (L42→C42) was introduced in the interface of domain 1. Mutation analysis revealed that the positively charged amino acids, including very membrane-proximal ⁵⁰⁵R, are essential for maintaining the structural transition between the monomer and dimer. Despite a strong dimer presentation, the ICAM-1 mutants lacking an intracellular domain (IC1ΔCTD) or containing R to A substitution in position 505 (⁵⁰⁵R/A) supported a lower degree of cell adhesion than did wild-type ICAM-1. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the native structure of surface ICAM-1 is not a dimer, but is an intermediate monomer-dimer equilibrium structure by which the effectiveness of ICAM-1 can be fully achieved.

  7. Trimers of the fibronectin cell adhesion domain localize to actin filament bundles and undergo rearward translocation.

    PubMed

    Coussen, Françoise; Choquet, Daniel; Sheetz, Michael P; Erickson, Harold P

    2002-06-15

    Previous studies have shown that small beads coated with FN7-10, a four-domain cell adhesion fragment of fibronectin, bind to cell surfaces and translocate rearward. Here we investigate whether soluble constructs containing two to five FN7-10 units might be sufficient for activity. We have produced a monomer, three forms of dimers, a trimer and a pentamer of FN7-10, on the end of spacer arms. These oligomers could bind small clusters of up to five integrins. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the trimer and pentamer bound strongly to the cell surface, and within 5 minutes were prominently localized to actin fiber bundles. Monomers and dimers showed only diffuse localization. Beads coated with a low concentration (probably one complex per bead) of trimer or pentamer showed prolonged binding and rearward translocation, presumably with the translocating actin cytskeleton. Beads containing monomer or dimer showed only brief binding and diffusive movements. We conclude that clusters of three integrin-binding ligands are necessary and sufficient for coupling to and translocating with the actin cytoskeleton.

  8. Drug exposure in a metastatic human lung adenocarcinoma cell line gives rise to cells with differing adhesion, proliferation, and gene expression: Implications for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiling; He, Jianxing; Zhong, Nanshan; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The Am1010 cell line was previously established from a metastatic deposit in an arm muscle from a patient with lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone four cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin and taxol. Am1010 cells were labeled with red fluorescent protein or green fluorescent protein. A total of eight sublines were isolated following in vitro exposure to cisplatin or taxol. The sublines differed with regard to their adhesion and proliferation properties, with certain sublines exhibiting an increased proliferation rate and/or decreased surface adhesion. Gene expression assays demonstrated that tenascin C; cyclin D1; collagen, type 1, α2; integrin α1; related RAS viral (r‑ras) oncogene homolog 2; platelet‑derived growth factor C; and Src homolog 2 domain containing in the focal adhesion pathway, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, F11 receptor, claudin 7 and cadherin 1 in the cell adhesion pathway, varied in expression among the sublines. The results of the present study suggested that drug exposure may alter the aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancer cells, which has important implications for cancer chemotherapy.

  9. Heme-oxygenase-1 implications in cell morphology and the adhesive behavior of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Geraldine; Giudice, Jimena; Valacco, Pia; Paez, Alejandra; Elguero, Belen; Toscani, Martin; Jaworski, Felipe; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Cotignola, Javier; Marti, Marcelo; Binaghi, Maria; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Although previous studies in PCa have focused on cell adherens junctions (AJs), key players in metastasis, they have left the molecular mechanisms unexplored. Inflammation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical in the regulation of cell adhesion and the integrity of the epithelium. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative and inflammatory damage. Here, we investigated whether HO-1 is implicated in the adhesive and morphological properties of tumor cells. Genes differentially regulated by HO-1 were enriched for cell motility and adhesion biological processes. HO-1 induction, increased E-cadherin and β-catenin levels. Immunofluorescence analyses showed a striking remodeling of E-cadherin/β-catenin based AJs under HO-1 modulation. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin coincided with a markedly change in cell morphology. To further our analysis we sought to identify HO-1 binding proteins that might participate in the regulation of cell morphology. A proteomics approach identified Muskelin, as a novel HO-1 partner, strongly implicated in cell morphology regulation. These results define a novel role for HO-1 in modulating the architecture of cell-cell interactions, favoring a less aggressive phenotype and further supporting its anti-tumoral function in PCa. PMID:24961479

  10. The Adh adhesin domain is required for trimeric autotransporter Apa1-mediated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae adhesion, autoaggregation, biofilm formation and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Yang, Shuxin; Zhai, Ruidong; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Pan, Fengguang; Ji, Qun; Wang, Yu; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-05-15

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, which is a highly contagious endemic disease of pigs. Adhesion is a critical first step in the infection process. Trimeric autotransporter adhesions (TAAs) have been identified as novel virulence factors; however, little is known on their roles in A. pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity. Here, our data show that YadA-like head region (Adh) of Apa1 was the optimal adhesion functional domain via segment expression and adhesion assays in vitro. Additionally, Adh induced partial protection against A. pleuropneumoniae 5b L20 and serotypes 1, 3, and 5a in mice. The deletion of Adh gene significantly decreased autoaggregation, biofilm formation and adherence to host cells in vitro. Furthermore, with delaying of clinical symptoms, reducing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lessening the lung injury after infection, Adh deletion strain (5bϕAdh) significantly reduced the pathogenicity to piglets. To elucidate the mechanism of lung injury, the differentially expressed genes in the lung tissues of piglets infected with the 5b L20 or 5bϕAdh strains were investigated using microarray analysis and validated by qRT-PCR. Compared with the 5b L20 infected piglets, 495 genes were differentially expressed in 5bϕAdh infected lung tissue (221 upregulated and 274 downregulated). Especially, the antigen processing and presentation gene IFI30 was increased following infection with the 5bϕAdh strain. Thus, Adh may enhance pathogenicity by depressing host immune recognition. We conclude that the head domain of the A. pleuropneumoniae trimeric autotransporter Apa1 regulates autoagglutination, biofilm formation, adhesion to host cells and pathogenicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of temperature and humidity on adhesion of a gecko-inspired adhesive: implications for the natural system.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Klittich, Mena R; Sitti, Metin; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-08-02

    The adhesive system of geckos has inspired hundreds of synthetic adhesives. While this system has been used relentlessly as a source of inspiration, less work has been done in reverse, where synthetics are used to test questions and hypotheses about the natural system. Here we take such an approach. We tested shear adhesion of a mushroom-tipped synthetic gecko adhesive under conditions that produced perplexing results in the natural adhesive system. Synthetic samples were tested at two temperatures (12 °C and 32 °C) and four different humidity levels (30%, 55%, 70%, and 80% RH). Surprisingly, adhesive performance of the synthetic samples matched that of living geckos, suggesting that uncontrolled parameters in the natural system, such as surface chemistry and material changes, may not be as influential in whole-animal performance as previously thought. There was one difference, however, when comparing natural and synthetic adhesive performance. At 12 °C and 80% RH, adhesion of the synthetic structures was lower than expected based on the natural system's performance. Our approach highlights a unique opportunity for both biologists and material scientists, where new questions and hypotheses can be fueled by joint comparisons of the natural and synthetic systems, ultimately improving knowledge of both.

  12. The effect of temperature and humidity on adhesion of a gecko-inspired adhesive: implications for the natural system

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Klittich, Mena R.; Sitti, Metin; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive system of geckos has inspired hundreds of synthetic adhesives. While this system has been used relentlessly as a source of inspiration, less work has been done in reverse, where synthetics are used to test questions and hypotheses about the natural system. Here we take such an approach. We tested shear adhesion of a mushroom-tipped synthetic gecko adhesive under conditions that produced perplexing results in the natural adhesive system. Synthetic samples were tested at two temperatures (12 °C and 32 °C) and four different humidity levels (30%, 55%, 70%, and 80% RH). Surprisingly, adhesive performance of the synthetic samples matched that of living geckos, suggesting that uncontrolled parameters in the natural system, such as surface chemistry and material changes, may not be as influential in whole-animal performance as previously thought. There was one difference, however, when comparing natural and synthetic adhesive performance. At 12 °C and 80% RH, adhesion of the synthetic structures was lower than expected based on the natural system’s performance. Our approach highlights a unique opportunity for both biologists and material scientists, where new questions and hypotheses can be fueled by joint comparisons of the natural and synthetic systems, ultimately improving knowledge of both. PMID:27480603

  13. Adhesion molecules in gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening follow-up: possible therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Dambra, P; Loria, M P; Moretti, B; D'Oronzio, L; Patella, V; Pannofino, A; Cavallo, E; Pesce, V; Dell'Osso, A; Simone, C

    2003-05-01

    The involvement of the synovium is common in phlogistic processes of various joint diseases. Apart from synoviocytes and the other cells in the synovial tissue, circulating cells recruited from peripheral blood also participate in the phlogistic process. The increased expression of adhesion molecules on both circulating and endothelial cell surface may further this recruitment. We studied 15 patients affected by serious gonarthrosis requiring a prosthetic implant (GPI) and 7 with knee prosthesis aseptic loosening (KPL) to evaluate adhesion molecule expression and phlogistic infiltration in the synovium using immunohistochemistry and microscopic analysis. As control we studied 10 subjects affected by degenerative meniscopathies undergoing a selective arthroscopic surgical meniscectomy. Analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test showed no statistical significant differences in the expression of CD54, CD11a, CD11b and CD18 in three groups examined. The model of variance analysis (Friedman test), showed that CD54 expression is greater in patients with GPI and KPL in comparison with the other molecules. Adhesion molecules and their functions are important in arthropathies not only because their evaluation can allow us to identify the degree of inflammation and to predict its evolution, but also because pharmacological control of their expression could have important therapeutic implications.

  14. The first EGF domain of coagulation factor IX attenuates cell adhesion and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kitano, Hisataka; Mamiya, Atsushi; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    Coagulation factor IX (FIX) is an essential plasma protein for blood coagulation. The first epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif of FIX (EGF-F9) has been reported to attenuate cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of this motif on cell adhesion and apoptosis. Treatment with a recombinant EGF-F9 attenuated cell adhesion to the ECM within 10 min. De-adhesion assays with native FIX recombinant FIX deletion mutant proteins suggested that the de-adhesion activity of EGF-F9 requires the same process of FIX activation as that which occurs for coagulation activity. The recombinant EGF-F9 increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity release into the medium and increased the number of cells stained with annexin V and activated caspase-3, by 8.8- and 2.7-fold respectively, indicating that EGF-F9 induced apoptosis. Activated caspase-3 increased very rapidly after only 5 min of administration of recombinant EGF-F9. Treatment with EGF-F9 increased the level of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not that of phosphorylated MAPK 44/42 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibitors of caspase-3 suppressed the release of LDH. Caspase-3 inhibitors also suppressed the attenuation of cell adhesion and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by EGF-F9. Our data indicated that EGF-F9 activated signals for apoptosis and induced de-adhesion in a caspase-3 dependent manner.

  15. Identification of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor with multiple domains implicated in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Nativ, M; Lustig, M; Grumet, M; Schilling, J; Martinez, R; Plowman, G D; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) expressed on the surface of glial cells binds to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored recognition molecule contactin on neuronal cells leading to neurite outgrowth. We describe the cloning of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor (p190/Caspr) containing a mosaic of domains implicated in protein-protein interactions. The extracellular domain of Caspr contains a neurophilin/coagulation factor homology domain, a region related to fibrinogen beta/gamma, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, neurexin motifs as well as unique PGY repeats found in a molluscan adhesive protein. The cytoplasmic domain of Caspr contains a proline-rich sequence capable of binding to a subclass of SH3 domains of signaling molecules. Caspr and contactin exist as a complex in rat brain and are bound to each other by means of lateral (cis) interactions in the plasma membrane. We propose that Caspr may function as a signaling component of contactin, enabling recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways in neurons. The binding of RPTPbeta to the contactin-Caspr complex could provide a mechanism for cell-cell communication between glial cells and neurons during development. PMID:9118959

  16. Positive selection within sperm-egg adhesion domains of fertilin: an ADAM gene with a potential role in fertilization.

    PubMed

    Civetta, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Genes with a role in fertilization show a common pattern of rapid evolution. The role played by positive selection versus lack of selective constraints has been more difficult to establish. One problem arises from attempts to detect selection in an overall gene sequence analysis. I have analyzed the pattern of molecular evolution of fertilin, a gene coding for a heterodimeric sperm protein belonging to the ADAM (A disintegrin and A metalloprotease) gene family. A nonsynonymous to synonymous rate ratio (d(N)/d(S)) analysis for different protein domains of fertilin alpha and fertilin beta showed d(N)/d(S) < 1, suggesting that purifying selection has shaped fertilin's evolution. However, an analysis of the distribution of single positively selected codon sites using phylogentic analysis by maximum likelihood (PAML) showed sites within adhesion domains (disintegrin and cysteine-rich) of fertilin beta evolving under positive selection. The region 3' to the EGF-like domain of fertilin alpha, where the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail regions are supposed to be localized, showed higher d(N) and d(S) than any other fertilin alpha region. However, it was not possible to identify positively selected codon sites due to ambiguous alignments of the carboxy-end region (ClustalX vs. DiAlign2). When this region was excluded from the PAML analysis, most single positively selected codon sites were concentrated within adhesion domains (cysteine-rich and EGF-like). The use of an ancestral sequence prior to a recent duplication event of fertilin alpha among non-Hominidae primates (Macaca, Papio, and Saguinus) revealed that the duplication is partially responsible for masking the detection of positively selected sites within the disintegrin domain. Finally, most ADAM genes with a potential role in sperm maturation and/or fertilization showed significantly higher d(N) estimates than other ADAM genes.

  17. The conserved LIM domain-containing focal adhesion protein ZYX-1 regulates synapse maintenance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuo; Schaefer, Anneliese M.; Dour, Scott; Nonet, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the identification of zyxin as a regulator of synapse maintenance in mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans. zyx-1 mutants lacked PLM mechanosensory synapses as adult animals. However, most PLM synapses initially formed during development but were subsequently lost as the animals developed. Vertebrate zyxin regulates cytoskeletal responses to mechanical stress in culture. Our work provides in vivo evidence in support of such a role for zyxin. In particular, zyx-1 mutant synaptogenesis phenotypes were suppressed by disrupting locomotion of the mutant animals, suggesting that zyx-1 protects mechanosensory synapses from locomotion-induced forces. In cultured cells, zyxin is recruited to focal adhesions and stress fibers via C-terminal LIM domains and modulates cytoskeletal organization via the N-terminal domain. The synapse-stabilizing activity was mediated by a short isoform of ZYX-1 containing only the LIM domains. Consistent with this notion, PLM synaptogenesis was independent of α-actinin and ENA-VASP, both of which bind to the N-terminal domain of zyxin. Our results demonstrate that the LIM domain moiety of zyxin functions autonomously to mediate responses to mechanical stress and provide in vivo evidence for a role of zyxin in neuronal development. PMID:25252943

  18. The conserved LIM domain-containing focal adhesion protein ZYX-1 regulates synapse maintenance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuo; Schaefer, Anneliese M; Dour, Scott; Nonet, Michael L

    2014-10-01

    We describe the identification of zyxin as a regulator of synapse maintenance in mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans. zyx-1 mutants lacked PLM mechanosensory synapses as adult animals. However, most PLM synapses initially formed during development but were subsequently lost as the animals developed. Vertebrate zyxin regulates cytoskeletal responses to mechanical stress in culture. Our work provides in vivo evidence in support of such a role for zyxin. In particular, zyx-1 mutant synaptogenesis phenotypes were suppressed by disrupting locomotion of the mutant animals, suggesting that zyx-1 protects mechanosensory synapses from locomotion-induced forces. In cultured cells, zyxin is recruited to focal adhesions and stress fibers via C-terminal LIM domains and modulates cytoskeletal organization via the N-terminal domain. The synapse-stabilizing activity was mediated by a short isoform of ZYX-1 containing only the LIM domains. Consistent with this notion, PLM synaptogenesis was independent of α-actinin and ENA-VASP, both of which bind to the N-terminal domain of zyxin. Our results demonstrate that the LIM domain moiety of zyxin functions autonomously to mediate responses to mechanical stress and provide in vivo evidence for a role of zyxin in neuronal development.

  19. Structure and Mutagenesis of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Domains Evidence for Flexibility in the Placement of Polysialic Acid Attachment Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Deirdre A.; Swartzentruber, Kristin G.; Lavie, Arnon; Colley, Karen J.

    2010-11-09

    The addition of {alpha}2,8-polysialic acid to the N-glycans of the neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is critical for brain development and plays roles in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, neuronal regeneration, and the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. Our previous work indicates that the polysialylation of two N-glycans located on the fifth immunoglobulin domain (Ig5) of NCAM requires the presence of specific sequences in the adjacent fibronectin type III repeat (FN1). To understand the relationship of these two domains, we have solved the crystal structure of the NCAM Ig5-FN1 tandem. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals that the sites of Ig5 polysialylation are on the opposite face from the FN1 residues previously found to be critical for N-glycan polysialylation, suggesting that the Ig5-FN1 domain relationship may be flexible and/or that there is flexibility in the placement of Ig5 glycosylation sites for polysialylation. To test the latter possibility, new Ig5 glycosylation sites were engineered and their polysialylation tested. We observed some flexibility in glycosylation site location for polysialylation and demonstrate that the lack of polysialylation of a glycan attached to Asn-423 may be in part related to a lack of terminal processing. The data also suggest that, although the polysialyltransferases do not require the Ig5 domain for NCAM recognition, their ability to engage with this domain is necessary for polysialylation to occur on Ig5 N-glycans.

  20. Organ-specific function of adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126 is domain-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Chinmoy; van Amerongen, Machteld J.; Ghosh, Subhajit; Ricciardi, Filomena; Sajjad, Amna; Novoyatleva, Tatyana; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R.; Mühlfeld, Christian; Engel, Felix B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their abundance and multiple functions in a variety of organ systems, the function and signaling mechanisms of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are poorly understood. Adhesion GPCRs possess large N termini containing various functional domains. In addition, many of them are autoproteolytically cleaved at their GPS sites into an N-terminal fragment (NTF) and C-terminal fragment. Here we demonstrate that Gpr126 is expressed in the endocardium during early mouse heart development. Gpr126 knockout in mice and knockdown in zebrafish caused hypotrabeculation and affected mitochondrial function. Ectopic expression of Gpr126-NTF that lacks the GPS motif (NTFΔGPS) in zebrafish rescued the trabeculation but not the previously described myelination phenotype in the peripheral nervous system. These data support a model in which the NTF of Gpr126, in contrast to the C-terminal fragment, plays an important role in heart development. Collectively, our analysis provides a unique example of the versatile function and signaling properties of adhesion GPCRs in vertebrates. PMID:24082093

  1. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  2. Neuronal cell adhesion molecule contactin/F11 binds to tenascin via its immunoglobulin-like domains

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between neurons and extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in neuronal pattern formation. The prominent role played by the extracellular matrix protein tenascin/cytotactin in the development of the nervous system, tied to its abundance, led us to speculate that brain may contain yet unidentified tenascin receptors. Here we show that the neuronal cell adhesion molecule contactin/F11, a member of the immunoglobulin(Ig)-superfamily, is a cell surface ligand for tenascin in the nervous system. Through affinity chromatography of membrane glycoproteins from chick brain on tenascin-Sepharose, we isolated a major cell surface ligand of 135 kD which we identified as contactin/F11 by NH2-terminal sequencing. The binding specificity between contactin/F11 and tenascin was demonstrated in solid-phase assays. Binding of immunopurified 125I-labeled contactin/F11 to immobilized tenascin is completely inhibited by the addition of soluble tenascin or contactin/F11, but not by fibronectin. When the fractionated isoforms of tenascin were used as substrates, contactin/F11 bound preferentially to the 190-kD isoform. This isoform differs in having no alternatively spliced fibronectin type III domains. Our results imply that the introduction of these additional domains in some way disrupts the contactin/F11 binding site on tenascin. To localize the binding site on contactin/F11, proteolytic fragments were generated and characterized by NH2-terminal sequencing. The smallest contactin/F11 fragment which binds tenascin is 45 kD and also begins with the contactin/F11 NH2-terminal sequence. This implies that contactin/F11 binds to tenascin through a site within the first three Ig-domains. PMID:1382076

  3. Functional Implications of Domain Organization Within Prokaryotic Rhomboid Proteases.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are membrane embedded enzymes that cleave transmembrane substrates. This interesting class of enzyme and its water mediated substrate cleavage mechanism occurring within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer has drawn the attention of researchers. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous serine intramembrane proteases. Bacterial forms of rhomboid proteases are mainly composed of six transmembrane helices that are preceded by a soluble N-terminal domain. Several crystal structures of the membrane domain of the E. coli rhomboid protease ecGlpG have been solved. Independently, the ecGlpG N-terminal cytoplasmic domain structure was solved using both NMR and protein crystallography. Despite these structures, we still do not know the structure of the full-length protein, nor do we know the functional role of these domains in the cell. This chapter will review the structural and functional roles of the different domains associated with prokaryotic rhomboid proteases. Lastly, we will address questions remaining in the field.

  4. Reversible Conformational Change in the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Masks Its Adhesion Domains.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Kumar, Krishan; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Nguyen, Vu; Burkhardt, Martin; Reiter, Karine; Shimp, Richard; Howard, Randall F; Srinivasan, Prakash; Nold, Michael J; Ragheb, Daniel; Shi, Lirong; DeCotiis, Mark; Aebig, Joan; Lambert, Lynn; Rausch, Kelly M; Muratova, Olga; Jin, Albert; Reed, Steven G; Sinnis, Photini; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Duffy, Patrick E; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Narum, David L

    2015-10-01

    The extended rod-like Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is comprised of three primary domains: a charged N terminus that binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans, a central NANP repeat domain, and a C terminus containing a thrombospondin-like type I repeat (TSR) domain. Only the last two domains are incorporated in RTS,S, the leading malaria vaccine in phase 3 trials that, to date, protects about 50% of vaccinated children against clinical disease. A seroepidemiological study indicated that the N-terminal domain might improve the efficacy of a new CSP vaccine. Using a panel of CSP-specific monoclonal antibodies, well-characterized recombinant CSPs, label-free quantitative proteomics, and in vitro inhibition of sporozoite invasion, we show that native CSP is N-terminally processed in the mosquito host and undergoes a reversible conformational change to mask some epitopes in the N- and C-terminal domains until the sporozoite interacts with the liver hepatocyte. Our findings show the importance of understanding processing and the biophysical change in conformation, possibly due to a mechanical or molecular signal, and may aid in the development of a new CSP vaccine.

  5. Two sites on P-selectin (the lectin and epidermal growth factor-like domains) are involved in the adhesion of monocytes to thrombin-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J F; McGregor, J L

    1994-01-01

    P-selectin, also known as GMP-140, PADGEM or CD62, is expressed on the surface of thrombin-activated platelets and endothelial cells (EC). It is a member of the selectin family of adhesion molecules that regulate leucocyte interactions with the blood vessel wall. In this study we have found that peptides derived from both the lectin (residues 19-34 and 51-61) and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like (residues 127-139) domains inhibit the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), elutriated monocytes and a monocytic cell line (U937) to thrombin-activated EC. This inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and the peptide most active at the lowest concentrations was the one derived from the EGF-like motif (127-139). The scrambled forms of these peptides, identical in amino acid composition to the authentic peptides but with altered sequences, were not inhibitory. Thrombin-activated platelets supported adhesion of U937 cells and this adhesion was dramatically inhibited by the two peptides derived from the lectin-like domain (residues 19-34 and 51-61). All three peptides, when conjugated to BSA and coated on plastic plates, mediated U937 cell adhesion. This study shows, for the first time, that two sites on P-selectin, the lectin and EGF-like domains, are involved in the adhesion of monocytes to thrombin-activated EC. PMID:7526845

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the olfactomedin domain from the sea urchin cell-adhesion protein amassin

    SciTech Connect

    Hillier, Brian J.; Sundaresan, Vidyasankar; Stout, C. David; Vacquier, Victor D.

    2006-01-01

    The olfactomedin (OLF) domain from the sea urchin cell-adhesion protein amassin has been crystallized. A native data set extending to 2.7 Å has been collected using an in-house X-ray source. A family of animal proteins is emerging which contain a conserved protein motif known as an olfactomedin (OLF) domain. Novel extracellular protein–protein interactions occur through this domain. The OLF-family member amassin, from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, has previously been identified to mediate a rapid cell-adhesion event resulting in a large aggregation of coelomocytes, the circulating immune cells. In this work, heterologous expression and purification of the OLF domain from amassin was carried out and initial crystallization trials were performed. A native data set has been collected, extending to 2.7 Å under preliminary cryoconditions, using an in-house generator. This work leads the way to the determination of the first structure of an OLF domain.

  7. The PPFLMLLKGSTR motif in globular domain 3 of the human laminin-5 {alpha}3 chain is crucial for integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Won Ho; Min, Byung-Moo . E-mail: bmmin@snu.ac.kr

    2005-03-10

    Laminin-5 regulates various cellular functions, including cell adhesion, spreading, and motility. Here, we expressed the five human laminin {alpha}3 chain globular (LG) domains as monomeric, soluble fusion proteins, and examined their biological functions and signaling. Recombinant LG3 (rLG3) protein, unlike rLG1, rLG2, rLG4, and rLG5, played roles in cell adhesion, spreading, and integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding. More significantly, we identified a novel motif (PPFLMLLKGSTR) in the LG3 domain that is crucial for these responses. Studies with the synthetic peptides delineated the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within LG3 domain as a major site for both integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion. Substitution mutation experiments suggest that the Arg residue is important for these activities. rLG3 protein- and PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide-induced keratinocyte adhesion triggered cell signaling through FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine-397 and -577. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within the LG3 domain is a novel motif that is capable of supporting integrin {alpha}3{beta}1-dependent cell adhesion and spreading.

  8. A Novel DBL-Domain of the P. falciparum 332 Molecule Possibly Involved in Erythrocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Kirsten; Kaneko, Osamu; Nilsson, Sandra; Winter, Gerhard; Haeggström, Malin; Pan, Weiqing; Berzins, Klavs; Wahlgren, Mats; Chen, Qijun

    2007-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is brought about by the asexual stages of the parasite residing in human red blood cells (RBC). Contact between the erythrocyte surface and the merozoite is the first step for successful invasion and proliferation of the parasite. A number of different pathways utilised by the parasite to adhere and invade the host RBC have been characterized, but the complete biology of this process remains elusive. We here report the identification of an open reading frame (ORF) representing a hitherto unknown second exon of the Pf332 gene that encodes a cysteine-rich polypeptide with a high degree of similarity to the Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domain of the erythrocyte-binding-ligand (EBL) family. The sequence of this DBL-domain is conserved and expressed in all parasite clones/strains investigated. In addition, the expression level of Pf332 correlates with proliferation efficiency of the parasites in vitro. Antibodies raised against the DBL-domain are able to reduce the invasion efficiency of different parasite clones/strains. Analysis of the DBL-domain revealed its ability to bind to uninfected human RBC, and moreover demonstrated association with the iRBC surface. Thus, Pf332 is a molecule with a potential role to support merozoite invasion. Due to the high level of conservation in sequence, the novel DBL-domain of Pf332 is of possible importance for development of novel anti-malaria drugs and vaccines. PMID:17534427

  9. Crystallographic characterization of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of adhesion molecule CD44

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tomoyuki; Kitano, Ken; Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Maesaki, Ryoko; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-10-01

    The radixin FERM domain complexed with the CD44 cytoplasmic tail peptide has been crystallized. A diffraction data set from the complex was collected to 2.1 Å. CD44 is an important adhesion molecule that specifically binds hyaluronic acid and regulates cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Increasing evidence has indicated that CD44 is assembled in a regulated manner into the membrane–cytoskeletal junction, a process that is mediated by ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins. Crystals of a complex between the radixin FERM domain and the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of CD44 have been obtained. The crystal of the radixin FERM domain bound to the CD44 cytoplasmic tail peptide belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.70, b = 66.18, c = 86.22 Å, and contain one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.1 Å.

  10. L1CAM Binds ErbB Receptors through Ig-Like Domains Coupling Cell Adhesion and Neuregulin Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Lakomá, Jarmila; Baars, Sigrid; Garcia-Alonso, Luis; Cabedo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    During nervous system development different cell-to-cell communication mechanisms operate in parallel guiding migrating neurons and growing axons to generate complex arrays of neural circuits. How such a system works in coordination is not well understood. Cross-regulatory interactions between different signalling pathways and redundancy between them can increase precision and fidelity of guidance systems. Immunoglobulin superfamily proteins of the NCAM and L1 families couple specific substrate recognition and cell adhesion with the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Thus it has been shown that L1CAM-mediated cell adhesion promotes the activation of the EGFR (erbB1) from Drosophila to humans. Here we explore the specificity of the molecular interaction between L1CAM and the erbB receptor family. We show that L1CAM binds physically erbB receptors in both heterologous systems and the mammalian developing brain. Different Ig-like domains located in the extracellular part of L1CAM can support this interaction. Interestingly, binding of L1CAM to erbB enhances its response to neuregulins. During development this may synergize with the activation of erbB receptors through L1CAM homophilic interactions, conferring diffusible neuregulins specificity for cells or axons that interact with the substrate through L1CAM. PMID:22815787

  11. A novel domain cassette identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 proteins binding ICAM-1 and is a target of cross-reactive, adhesion-inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S; Olsen, Rebecca W; Andersen, Marianne A; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G; Hviid, Lars; Higgins, Matthew K; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan; Jensen, Anja T R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1-binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1-binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding-like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum-exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1-specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration.

  12. The effect of the bleaching agent sodium perborate on macrophage adhesion in vitro: implications in external cervical root resorption.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rubio, A; Segura, J J

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of sodium perborate, which is used as a bleaching agent in the treatment of discolored pulpless teeth, on substrate adherence capacity of macrophages. Inflammatory macrophages were obtained from Wistar rats and resuspended in RPMI-1640 medium. As a test of macrophage adhesion, the adherence capacity of macrophages to a plastic surface was determined. Assays were conducted in Eppendorf tubes for 15 min of incubation at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2. The adherence index was calculated. Results showed that sodium perborate decreased in a dose-dependent manner and decreased significantly (p < 0.05) the adherence index of rat peritoneal macrophages. Sodium perborate was less potent than sodium hypochlorite and eugenol in inhibiting macrophage adhesion. The inhibitory effect of sodium perborate on macrophage adhesion further supports the concept that this agent is not implicated in external cervical root resorption associated with intracoronal bleaching.

  13. Adhesion of Bifidobacteria to Granular Starch and Its Implications in Probiotic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, R.; Laitila, A.; Forssell, P.; Mättö, J.; Saarela, M.; Mattila-Sandholm, T.; Myllärinen, P.

    2001-01-01

    Adhesion of 19 Bifidobacterium strains to native maize, potato, oat, and barley starch granules was examined to investigate links between adhesion and substrate utilization and to determine if adhesion to starch could be exploited in probiotic food technologies. Starch adhesion was not characteristic of all the bifidobacteria tested. Adherent bacteria bound similarly to the different types of starch, and the binding capacity of the starch (number of bacteria per gram) correlated to the surface area of the granules. Highly adherent strains were able to hydrolyze the granular starches, but not all amylolytic strains were adherent, indicating that starch adhesion is not a prerequisite for efficient substrate utilization for all bifidobacteria. Adhesion was mediated by a cell surface protein(s). For the model organisms tested (Bifidobacterium adolescentis VTT E-001561 and Bifidobacterium pseudolongum ATCC 25526), adhesion appeared to be specific for α-1,4-linked glucose sugars, since adhesion was inhibited by maltose, maltodextrin, amylose, and soluble starch but not by trehalose, cellobiose, or lactose. In an in vitro gastric model, adhesion was inhibited both by the action of protease and at pH values of ≤3. Adhesion was not affected by bile, but the binding capacity of the starch was reduced by exposure to pancreatin. It may be possible to exploit adhesion of probiotic bifidobacteria to starch granules in microencapsulation technology and for synbiotic food applications. PMID:11472921

  14. Adhesion of bifidobacteria to granular starch and its implications in probiotic technologies.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, R; Laitila, A; Forssell, P; Mättö, J; Saarela, M; Mattila-Sandholm, T; Myllärinen, P

    2001-08-01

    Adhesion of 19 Bifidobacterium strains to native maize, potato, oat, and barley starch granules was examined to investigate links between adhesion and substrate utilization and to determine if adhesion to starch could be exploited in probiotic food technologies. Starch adhesion was not characteristic of all the bifidobacteria tested. Adherent bacteria bound similarly to the different types of starch, and the binding capacity of the starch (number of bacteria per gram) correlated to the surface area of the granules. Highly adherent strains were able to hydrolyze the granular starches, but not all amylolytic strains were adherent, indicating that starch adhesion is not a prerequisite for efficient substrate utilization for all bifidobacteria. Adhesion was mediated by a cell surface protein(s). For the model organisms tested (Bifidobacterium adolescentis VTT E-001561 and Bifidobacterium pseudolongum ATCC 25526), adhesion appeared to be specific for alpha-1,4-linked glucose sugars, since adhesion was inhibited by maltose, maltodextrin, amylose, and soluble starch but not by trehalose, cellobiose, or lactose. In an in vitro gastric model, adhesion was inhibited both by the action of protease and at pH values of < or =3. Adhesion was not affected by bile, but the binding capacity of the starch was reduced by exposure to pancreatin. It may be possible to exploit adhesion of probiotic bifidobacteria to starch granules in microencapsulation technology and for synbiotic food applications.

  15. Expression, purification and crystallization of a BH domain from the GTPase regulatory protein associated with focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P J; Derewenda, U; Taylor, J; Parsons, T J; Derewenda, Z S

    1999-01-01

    Signaling by small GTPases is down-regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) which enhance the rate of GTP hydrolysis. The activity of GAPs specific for Rho GTPases resides in the BH domain, many homologues of which are found in any mammalian genome. One of them was identified in the GTPase regulator associated with focal-adhesion kinase (GRAF). It shares approximately 20% sequence identity with p50RhoGAP. This GAP activates RhoA and Cdc42Hs, but not Rac. In order to dissect the molecular basis of this specificity, a 231-residue-long fragment corresponding to the BH domain of GRAF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Trigonal crystals, of space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 63.5, c = 90.38 A were grown from solutions of PEG 6000. Data to 2.15 A were collected from a flash-frozen sample on an R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector mounted on a rotating anode X-ray generator.

  16. An evolutionary recent neuroepithelial cell adhesion function of huntingtin implicates ADAM10-Ncadherin.

    PubMed

    Lo Sardo, Valentina; Zuccato, Chiara; Gaudenzi, Germano; Vitali, Barbara; Ramos, Catarina; Tartari, Marzia; Myre, Michael A; Walker, James A; Pistocchi, Anna; Conti, Luciano; Valenza, Marta; Drung, Binia; Schmidt, Boris; Gusella, James; Zeitlin, Scott; Cotelli, Franco; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-05-01

    The Huntington's disease gene product, huntingtin, is indispensable for neural tube formation, but its role is obscure. We studied neurulation in htt-null embryonic stem cells and htt-morpholino zebrafish embryos and found a previously unknown, evolutionarily recent function for this ancient protein. We found that htt was essential for homotypic interactions between neuroepithelial cells; it permitted neurulation and rosette formation by regulating metalloprotease ADAM10 activity and Ncadherin cleavage. This function was embedded in the N terminus of htt and was phenocopied by treatment of htt knockdown zebrafish with an ADAM10 inhibitor. Notably, in htt-null cells, reversion of the rosetteless phenotype occurred only with expression of evolutionarily recent htt heterologues from deuterostome organisms. Conversely, all of the heterologues that we tested, including htt from Drosophila melanogaster and Dictyostelium discoideum, exhibited anti-apoptotic activity. Thus, anti-apoptosis may have been one of htt’s ancestral function(s), but, in deuterostomes, htt evolved to acquire a unique regulatory activity for controlling neural adhesion via ADAM10-Ncadherin, with implications for brain evolution and development.

  17. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of human breast epithelial antigen BA46 reveals an RGD cell adhesion sequence presented on an epidermal growth factor-like domain.

    PubMed

    Couto, J R; Taylor, M R; Godwin, S G; Ceriani, R L; Peterson, J A

    1996-04-01

    The BA46 antigen of the human milk fat globule (HMFG) membrane is expressed in human breast carcinomas and has been used successfully as a target for experimental breast cancer radioimmunotherapy. To characterize this antigen further, we obtained the entire cDNA sequence and focused on its possible role in cell adhesion. The derived protein sequence of BA46 encodes a 387-residue precursor composed of a putative signal peptide, an amino-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain containing the cell adhesion tripeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), and human factor V and factor VIII C1/C2-like domains. The EGF-like domain of BA46 is similar to the calcium-binding EGF-like domains of several coagulation factors, but the BA46 domain lacks a residue required for calcium binding and the coagulation factor domains do not include an RGD sequence. Assuming that all EGF-like domains fold into a similar structure, the RGD-containing sequence in BA46 is inserted between two antiparallel beta strands. This positioning suggests a novel function for the EGF-like domain as a scaffold for RGD presentation.

  19. Mapping of a cell-binding domain in the cell adhesion molecule gp80 of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    At the aggregation stage of Dictyostelium discoideum development, a cell surface glycoprotein of Mr 80,000 (gp80) has been found to mediate the EDTA-resistant type of cell-cell adhesion via homophilic interaction (Siu, C.-H., A. Cho, and A. H. C. Choi. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2523-2533). To investigate the structure-function relationships of gp80, we have isolated full length cDNA clones for gp80 and determined the DNA sequence. The deduced structure of gp80 showed three major domains. An amino-terminal globular domain composed of the bulk of the protein is supported by a short stalk region, which is followed by a membrane anchor at the carboxy terminus. Structural analysis suggested that the cell-binding domain of gp80 resides within the globular domain near the amino terminus. To investigate the relationship of the cell- binding activity to this region of the polypeptide, three protein A/gp80 (PA80) gene fusions were constructed using the expression vector pRIT2T. These PA80 fusion proteins were assayed for their ability to bind to aggregation stage cells. Binding of 125I-labeled fusion proteins PA80I (containing the Val123 to Ile514 fragment of gp80) and PA80II (Val123 to Ala258) was dosage dependent and could be inhibited by precoating cells with the cell cohesion-blocking mAb 80L5C4. On the other hand, there was no appreciable binding of PA80III (Ile174 to Ile514) to cells. Reassociation of cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of PA80I or PA80II. In addition, 125I-labeled PA80II exhibited homophilic interaction with immobilized PA80I, PA80II, or gp80. The results of these studies lead to the mapping of a cell- binding domain in the region between Val123 and Leu173 of gp80 and provide direct evidence that the cell-binding activity of gp80 resides in the protein moiety. PMID:3182938

  20. Composition and Humidity Response of the Black Widow Spider's Gumfoot Silk and its Implications on Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Zhang, Ci; Cool, Lydia Rose; Blackledge, Todd. A.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Humidity plays an important part in the performance of biomaterials such as pollen, gecko toe, wheat awns, bird feathers and dragline silk. Capture silk produced by web building spiders form an interesting class of humidity responsive biological glues. The adhesive properties of the widely studied `viscid silk' produced by orbweb-weaving spiders is highly humidity sensitive. On the other hand, relatively less is known about the dependence of composition and humidity response towards adhesion for `gumfoot' silk produced by cobweb-weaving spiders. In the present study, we investigate the gumfoot silk produced by Black Widow using adhesion mechanics, microscopy and spectroscopic methods. The results show the presence of hygroscopic salts, glycoproteins and previously known spider coating peptides in silk and their importance in the humidity response and adhesion. The current study elucidates the role of constituents of capture silk in its adhesion mechanism and offers insights to novel ways for fabricating bio-inspired adhesives.

  1. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  2. Discoidin domain receptor 2 regulates the adhesion of fibroblasts to 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Min, Na Young; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2013-05-01

    The collagen matrix constitutes the primary extracellular matrix (ECM) portion of mammalian connective tissues in which the interaction of the cell and the surrounding collagen fibers has a significant impact on cell and tissue physiology, including morphogenesis, development and motility. Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) have been identified as the receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated upon collagen binding. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of DDRs on the mechanical interaction between fibroblasts and ECM. In this study, we demonstrated that one of the major phosphotyrosine proteins in human fibroblasts during 3D collagen matrix polymerization is DDR2. Treatment of fibroblasts in 3D collagen matrices with platelet-derived growth factor (PDFG) has been shown to increase DDR2 phosphorylation. Silencing of DDR2 with siRNA in fibroblasts significantly reduced the number of dendritic extensions regardless of whether cells were cultured in the collagen or fibronectin 3D matrices. Decreasing dendritic extensions in DDR2-silenced cells has also been shown to decrease the ability of fibroblast entanglement to collagen fibrils in 3D collagen matrices. Finally, we also showed that the silencing of DDR2 decreased the cell migration in 3D nested collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D floating matrix contraction. Collectively, these results suggest that DDR2 functioning is required for the membrane dynamics to control the mechanical attachment of fibroblasts to the 3D collagen matrices in an integrin-independent manner.

  3. Cognition in scientific and everyday domains: Comparison and learning implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Frederick; Larkin, Jill H.

    An analysis and comparison of everyday life and the domain of science reveals significant differences in their goals and in the cognitive means used to attain these goals. Students' lack of awareness of these differences can lead to pervasive learning difficulties in their study of science. Thus many students (a) have erroneous conceptions of scientific goals, (b) import goals and ways of thinking which are effective in everyday life but inadequate in science, and (c) devise ways of thinking ill suited to science. Additional complications arise because science taught in schools often differs both from actual science and from everyday life. Students' learning difficulties are thus increased because scientific goals are distorted and scientific ways of thinking are inadequately taught. The preceding analysis suggests some empirical investigations and instructional improvements.

  4. Endothelial cell adhesion molecule CD146: implications for its role in the pathogenesis of COPD.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Adelheid; Chu, Hong Wei; Salys, Jonas; Moumen, Zakaria; Leberl, Maike; Bowler, Russ; Cool, Carlyne; Zamora, Martin; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima

    2013-08-01

    CD146 is an adhesion molecule localized at endothelial cell junctions and facilitates cell-cell interactions. The circulating soluble form (sCD146) lacks both the intracellular and the transmembrane domains. In this study we show that CD146 expression was significantly decreased in the lung tissue of smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and also in rats exposed to second-hand smoke (SHS). Concurrently, levels of sCD146 were increased in both the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COPD patients as well as in BALF from rats exposed to SHS. Decreased or abolished CD146 protein expression in rat pulmonary micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells was found after treatment with cigarette smoke extract (CSE), proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 18 (IL-18) or after silencing CD146 expression with siRNA. The decrease in CD146 protein was accompanied by increased endothelial monolayer permeability and enhanced macrophage infiltration in vitro. In CD146 knockout (KO) mice, distinct perivascular oedema was seen and increased numbers of inflammatory cells, along with increased protein levels in BALF. Increased sCD146 was found in BALF and plasma from patients with COPD. The circulating plasma levels of sCD146 correlated positively with the presence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs). sCD146 in combination with AECAs may be useful markers for early detection of COPD. Our study indicates that loss of CD146 function damages pulmonary endothelial integrity. This damage may represent part of the pathophysiological processes that are involved in the basic aetiology of COPD/emphysema. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Analysis of the membrane-interacting domain of the sea urchin sperm adhesive protein bindin

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, L.; DeAngelis, P.L.; Glabe, C.G. )

    1989-11-14

    The authors have investigated the domain of the bindin polypeptide the selectively associates with gel-phase phospholipid vesicles. They found that small trypsin fragments of bindin retain the ability to selectively associate with gel-phase vesicles. The primary amino acid sequence of bindin suggests that these peptides are derived from the central portion of the polypeptide between residues 77 and 126, which is the most hydrophobic region of bindin. They have also employed 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)diazirine (TID) and novel, radioiodinated, photoactivatable derivatives of the polar head group of phosphatidylethanolamine (ASD-PE and ASA-PE) to identify membrane-associated polypeptide segments after the transfer of radiolabel from the probe to the bindin polypeptide. After photolysis, bindin was selectively labeled only from probes incorporated in gel-phase vesicles. The labeling of bindin was much more efficient from the head group probes ASA-PE and ASD-PE (8 and 2% of the total label, respectively) in comparison to the hydrophobic probe TID (less than 0.02% of the total label), suggesting that bindin is localized within the polar part of the bilayer. Protease mapping experiments with V8 protease, trypsin, and endoprotease Lys-C suggest that some of the probe label is distributed along the amino-terminal portion of bindin between residues 1 and 76 and the rest of the label is restricted to the segments between residues 77 and 126 which also selectively bind to gel-phase vesicles. The carboxyl-terminal portion of bindin residues 127 and 236 is not labeled.

  6. Localized adhesion of monocytes to human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated in vitro: implications for atherogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, R. N.; Johnson-Tidey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Blood-derived macrophages in the arterial intima are a characteristic feature of active atherosclerotic plaques. Adherent monocytes on the luminal surface and increased adhesion molecules on the endothelium have suggested that specific molecular mechanisms are involved in monocyte/macrophage traffic into the arterial wall. Adhesion of human monocytes and related cell lines was therefore studied in vitro to histological sections of human plaques. At 37 degrees C, these cells bound selectively to the plaques. Binding to the endothelium occurred and was also present extensively in the diseased intima. Inhibition studies showed that the endothelial and general intimal binding had largely similar molecular properties. Strong inhibition was produced by antibodies to the monocyte-specific adhesion molecule CD14, to beta2 integrins, and to ICAM-1. Likewise, a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence was strongly inhibitory, suggesting that binding of leukocyte integrins to arterial extracellular matrix was synergistic with cell-cell interactions. A P-selectin antibody was exceptional in giving selective inhibition of endothelial adhesion, which correlates with the specific endothelial localization of this adhesion molecule. These results show that monocytes adhere to atherosclerotic plaques through the focal activation of multiple arterial wall adhesion molecules, confirming the adhesion hypothesis. A positive feedback theory for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be suggested, based on the ability of macrophages in the wall to activate the endothelium, induce adhesion molecules, and facilitate additional monocyte entry. The adhesion assay provides a means for the identification of adhesion inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Images Figure 2 PMID:8686764

  7. Transitional forms between the three domains of life and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Devos, Damien P

    2011-11-22

    The question as to the origin and relationship between the three domains of life is lodged in a phylogenetic impasse. The dominant paradigm is to see the three domains as separated. However, the recently characterized bacterial species have suggested continuity between the three domains. Here, we review the evidence in support of this hypothesis and evaluate the implications for and against the models of the origin of the three domains of life. The existence of intermediate steps between the three domains discards the need for fusion to explain eukaryogenesis and suggests that the last universal common ancestor was complex. We propose a scenario in which the ancestor of the current bacterial Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobiae and Chlamydiae superphylum was related to the last archaeal and eukaryotic common ancestor, thus providing a way out of the phylogenetic impasse.

  8. Immunoglobulin G1 Fc domain motions: implications for Fc engineering

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Walker, Ross C.; Lanzilotta, William N.; Prestegard, James H.; Barb, Adam W.

    2014-01-01

    The fragment crystallizable (Fc) region links the key pathogen identification and destruction properties of immunoglobulin G(IgG). Pathogen opsonization positions Fcs to activate pro-inflammatory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on immune cells. The cellular response and committal to a damaging, though protective, immune response is tightly controlled at multiple levels. Control mechanisms are diverse and in many cases unclear, but one frequently suggested contribution originates in Fcγ receptor affinity being modulated through shifts in Fc conformational sampling. Here we report a previously unseen IgG1 Fc conformation. This observation motivated an extensive molecular dynamics (MD) investigation of polypeptide and glycan motions that revealed greater amplitude of motion for the N-terminal Cγ2 domains and N-glycan than previously observed. Residues in the Cγ2/Cγ3 interface and disulphide-bonded hinge were identified as influencing the Cγ2 motion. Our results are consistent with a model of Fc that is structurally dynamic. Conformational states that are competent to bind immune-stimulating FcγRs interconverted with Fc conformations distinct from those observed in FcγR complexes, which may represent a transient, nonbinding population. PMID:24522230

  9. Adhesion in a Vacuum Environment and its Implications for Dust Mitigation Techniques on Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkebile, Stephen; Gaier, James R.

    2012-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, the adhesion of dust to critical spacecraft systems was a greater problem than anticipated and resulted in functional degradation of thermal control surfaces, spacesuit seals, and other spacecraft components. Notably, Earth-based simulation efforts did not predict the magnitude and effects of dust adhesion in the lunar environment. Forty years later, we understand that the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment, coupled with micrometeorite impacts and constant ion and photon bombardment from the sun result in atomically clean and high surface energy dust particles and spacecraft surfaces. However, both the dominant mechanism of adhesion in airless environments and the conditions for high fidelity simulation tests have still to be determined. The experiments presented in here aim to aid in the development of dust mitigation techniques for airless bodies (e.g., lunar surface, asteroids, moons of outer planets). The approach taken consists of (a) quantifying the adhesion between common polymer and metallic spacecraft materials and a synthetic noritic volcanic glass, as a function of surface cleanliness and of triboelectric charge transfer in a UHV environment, and (b) determining parameters for high fidelity tests through investigation of adhesion dependence on vacuum environment and sample treatment. Adhesion force has been measured between pins of spacecraft materials and a plate of synthetic volcanic glass by determining the pull-off force with a torsion balance. Although no significant adhesion is generally observed directly as a result of high surface energies, the adhesion due to induced electrostatic charge is observed to increase with spacecraft material cleanliness, in some cases by over a factor of 10. Furthermore, electrostatically-induced adhesion is found to decrease rapidly above pressures of 10-6 torr. It is concluded that high-fidelity tests should be conducted in high to ultrahigh vacuum and include an ionized surface cleaning

  10. A Naturally Occurring Single-Residue Mutation in the Translocator Domain of Neisseria meningitidis NhhA Affects Trimerization, Surface Localization, and Adhesive Capabilities▿†

    PubMed Central

    Echenique-Rivera, Hebert; Brunelli, Brunella; Scarselli, Maria; Taddei, Anna Rita; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Serruto, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis NhhA (Neisseria hia/hsf homologue A) is an oligomeric outer membrane protein belonging to the family of trimeric autotransporter adhesins. NhhA mediates the interaction of N. meningitidis with human epithelial cells and components of the extracellular matrix. The recombinant protein is able to induce bactericidal antibodies and hence has also been considered a potential vaccine candidate. In this study, we analyzed the production of NhhA in a large panel of N. meningitidis strains belonging to different serogroups and clonal complexes. We found that trimeric NhhA was produced at different levels by the various strains tested. In some strains belonging to the clonal complex ST41/44, the protein is detectable only as a monomer. Sequencing of the nhhA gene and generation of complementing strains in different genetic backgrounds have proved that a single mutation (Gly to Asp) in the translocator domain affected both trimerization and surface localization of NhhA. In vitro infection assays showed that this mutation impairs meningococcal NhhA-mediated adhesion, suggesting that strains carrying the mutation may rely on different strategies or molecules to mediate interaction with host cells. Finally, we demonstrated that N. meningitidis ST41/44 strains producing the mutated form did not induce killing mediated by NhhA-specific bactericidal antibodies. Our data help to elucidate the secretion mechanisms of trimeric autotransporters and to understand the contribution of NhhA in the evolutionary process of host-Neisseria interactions. Also, they might have important implications for the evaluation of NhhA as a vaccine candidate. PMID:21844231

  11. Members of a Novel Protein Family Containing Microneme Adhesive Repeat Domains Act as Sialic Acid-binding Lectins during Host Cell Invasion by Apicomplexan Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M.; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J.; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for α2–3- over α2–6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to α2–9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6′sulfo-sialyl Lewisx might have implications for tissue tropism. PMID:19901027

  12. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S.; Olsen, Rebecca W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1–binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1–binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding–like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum–exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1–specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration. PMID:23209327

  13. Domain 5 of high molecular weight kininogen inhibits collagen-mediated cancer cell adhesion and invasion in association with α-actinin-4.

    PubMed

    Hatoh, Tsunetoshi; Maeda, Toshinaga; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Ogikubo, Osamu; Uchiyama, Susumu; Otsuka, Takanobu; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ogita, Hisakazu

    2012-10-26

    High molecular weight kininogen (HK) is a plasma glycoprotein with multiple functions, including the regulation of coagulation. We previously demonstrated that domain 5 (D5(H)), a functional domain of HK, and its derived peptides played an important role in the vitronectin-mediated suppression of cancer cell adhesion and invasion. However, the underlying mechanisms of the D5(H)-mediated suppressive effects remain to be elucidated. Here, we showed that D5(H) and its derivatives inhibited the collagen-mediated cell adhesion and invasion of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells. Using purified D5(H) fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and D5(H)-derived peptides for column chromatography, an actin-binding protein, α-actinin-4, was identified as a binding protein of D5(H) with high-affinity for P-5m, a core octapeptide of D5(H). Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that D5(H) co-localized with α-actinin-4 inside MG63 cells. In addition, exogenous GST-D5(H) added to the culture media was transported into MG63 cells, although GST alone as a control was not. As α-actinin-4 regulates actin polymerization necessary for cell adhesion and is related to the integrin-dependent attachment of cells to the extracellular matrix, our results suggest that D5(H) may modulate cell adhesion and invasion together with actinin-4. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A role for the PDZ-binding domain of the coxsackie B virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in cell adhesion and growth.

    PubMed

    Excoffon, Katherine J D Ashbourne; Hruska-Hageman, Alesia; Klotz, Michael; Traver, Geri L; Zabner, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) plays a role in viral infection, maintenance of the junction adhesion complex in polarized epithelia, and modulation of cellular growth properties. As a viral receptor, the C-terminus appears to play no role indicating that the major function of CAR is to tether the virus to the cell. By contrast, the C-terminus is known to play a role in cellular localization and probably has a significant function in CAR-mediated adhesion and cell growth properties. We hypothesized that the CAR PDZ (PSD-95/Disc-large/ZO-1) binding motif interacts with PDZ-domain-containing proteins to modulate the cellular phenotype. CAR was modified by deleting the last four amino acids (CARDeltaGSIV) and evaluated for cell-cell adhesion in polarized primary human airway epithelia and growth characteristics in stably transfected L-cells. Although ablation of the CAR PDZ-binding motif did not affect adenoviral infection, it did have a significant effect both on cell-cell adhesion and on cell growth. Expression of CARDeltaGSIV failed to increase the transepithelial resistance in polarized epithelia to the same degree as wild-type CAR and failed to act as a growth modulator in L-cells. Furthermore, we provide evidence for three new CAR interacting partners, including MAGI-1b, PICK1 and PSD-95. CAR appears to interact with several distinct PDZ-domain-containing proteins and may exert its biological function through these interactions.

  15. An Experimental Study of Hafting Adhesives and the Implications for Compound Tool Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zipkin, Andrew M.; Wagner, Mark; McGrath, Kate; Brooks, Alison S.; Lucas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of hafting adhesives and modifications to compound tool components can demonstrate the extent to which human ancestors understood and exploited material properties only formally defined by science within the last century. Discoveries of Stone Age hafting adhesives at archaeological sites in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa have spurred experiments that sought to replicate or create models of such adhesives. Most of these studies, however, have been actualistic in design, focusing on replicating ancient applications of adhesive technology. In contrast, this study tested several glues based on Acacia resin within a materials science framework to better understand the effect of each adhesive ingredient on compound tool durability. Using an overlap joint as a model for a compound tool, adhesives formulated with loading agents from a range of particle sizes and mineral compositions were tested for toughness on smooth and rough substrates. Our results indicated that overlap joint toughness is significantly increased by using a roughened joint surface. Contrary to some previous studies, there was no evidence that particle size diversity in a loading agent improved adhesive effectiveness. Generally, glues containing quartz or ochre loading agents in the silt and clay-sized particle class yielded the toughest overlap joints, with the effect of particle size found to be more significant for rough rather than smooth substrate joints. Additionally, no particular ochre mineral or mineral mixture was found to be a clearly superior loading agent. These two points taken together suggest that Paleolithic use of ochre-loaded adhesives and the criteria used to select ochres for this purpose may have been mediated by visual and symbolic considerations rather than purely functional concerns. PMID:25383871

  16. An experimental study of hafting adhesives and the implications for compound tool technology.

    PubMed

    Zipkin, Andrew M; Wagner, Mark; McGrath, Kate; Brooks, Alison S; Lucas, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of hafting adhesives and modifications to compound tool components can demonstrate the extent to which human ancestors understood and exploited material properties only formally defined by science within the last century. Discoveries of Stone Age hafting adhesives at archaeological sites in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa have spurred experiments that sought to replicate or create models of such adhesives. Most of these studies, however, have been actualistic in design, focusing on replicating ancient applications of adhesive technology. In contrast, this study tested several glues based on Acacia resin within a materials science framework to better understand the effect of each adhesive ingredient on compound tool durability. Using an overlap joint as a model for a compound tool, adhesives formulated with loading agents from a range of particle sizes and mineral compositions were tested for toughness on smooth and rough substrates. Our results indicated that overlap joint toughness is significantly increased by using a roughened joint surface. Contrary to some previous studies, there was no evidence that particle size diversity in a loading agent improved adhesive effectiveness. Generally, glues containing quartz or ochre loading agents in the silt and clay-sized particle class yielded the toughest overlap joints, with the effect of particle size found to be more significant for rough rather than smooth substrate joints. Additionally, no particular ochre mineral or mineral mixture was found to be a clearly superior loading agent. These two points taken together suggest that Paleolithic use of ochre-loaded adhesives and the criteria used to select ochres for this purpose may have been mediated by visual and symbolic considerations rather than purely functional concerns.

  17. Adhesion control by inflation: implications from biology to artificial attachment device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, Kirstin; Heepe, Lars; Afferrante, Luciano; Carbone, Giuseppe; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for materials that incorporate advanced adhesion properties, such as an ability to adhere in a reversible and controllable manner. In biological systems, these features are known from adhesive pads of the tree frog, Litoria caerulea, and the bush-cricket, Tettigonia viridissima. These species have convergently developed soft, hemispherically shaped pads that might be able to control their adhesion through active changing the curvature of the pad. Inspired by these biological systems, an artificial model system is developed here. It consists of an inflatable membrane clamped to the metallic cylinder and filled with air. Pull-off force measurements of the membrane surface were conducted in contact with the membrane at five different radii of curvature r c with (1) a smooth polyvinylsiloxane membrane and (2) mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructured membrane made of the same polymer. The hypothesis that an increased internal pressure, acting on the membrane, reduces the radius of the membrane curvature, resulting in turn in a lower pull-off force, is verified. Such an active control of adhesion, inspired by biological models, will lead to the development of industrial pick-and-drop devices with controllable adhesive properties.

  18. Neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) domains and intracellular signaling pathways involved in the inhibition of astrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Krushel, L A; Tai, M H; Cunningham, B A; Edelman, G M; Crossin, K L

    1998-03-03

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) inhibits astrocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and this effect is partially reversed by the glucocorticoid antagonist RU-486. The present studies have tested the hypothesis that N-CAM-mediated inhibition of astrocyte proliferation is caused by homophilic binding and involves the activation of glucocorticoid receptors. It was observed that all N-CAM Ig domains inhibited astrocyte proliferation in parallel with their ability to influence N-CAM binding. The proliferation of other N-CAM-expressing cells also was inhibited by the addition of N-CAM. In contrast, the proliferation of astrocytes from knockout mice lacking N-CAM was not inhibited by added N-CAM. These findings support the hypothesis that it is binding of soluble N-CAM to N-CAM on the astrocyte surface that leads to decreased proliferation. Signaling pathways stimulated by growth factors include activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Addition of N-CAM inhibited MAP kinase activity induced by basic fibroblast growth factor in astrocytes. In accord with previous findings that RU-486 could partially prevent the proliferative effects of N-CAM, inhibition of MAP kinase activity by N-CAM was reversed by RU-486. The ability of N-CAM to inhibit astrocyte proliferation was unaffected, however, by agents that block the ability of N-CAM to promote neurite outgrowth. Together, these findings indicate that homophilic N-CAM binding leads to inhibition of astrocyte proliferation via a pathway involving the glucocorticoid receptor and that the ability of N-CAM to influence astrocyte proliferation and neurite outgrowth involves different signal pathways.

  19. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  20. PP2A binds to the LIM domains of lipoma-preferred partner through its PR130/B″ subunit to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Veerle; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Rossé, Carine; Petit, Marleen M. R.; Goris, Jozef; Parker, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we identify the LIM protein lipoma-preferred partner (LPP) as a binding partner of a specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimer that is characterised by the regulatory PR130/B″α1 subunit (encoded by PPP2R3A). The PR130 subunit interacts with the LIM domains of LPP through a conserved Zn2+-finger-like motif in the differentially spliced N-terminus of PR130. Isolated LPP-associated PP2A complexes are catalytically active. PR130 colocalises with LPP at multiple locations within cells, including focal contacts, but is specifically excluded from mature focal adhesions, where LPP is still present. An LPP–PR130 fusion protein only localises to focal adhesions upon deletion of the domain of PR130 that binds to the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A/C), suggesting that PR130–LPP complex formation is dynamic and that permanent recruitment of PP2A activity might be unfavourable for focal adhesion maturation. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PR130 increases adhesion of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells onto collagen I and decreases their migration in scratch wound and Transwell assays. Complex formation with LPP is mandatory for these PR130-PP2A functions, as neither phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of a PR130 mutant that no longer binds to LPP. Our data highlight the importance of specific, locally recruited PP2A complexes in cell adhesion and migration dynamics. PMID:26945059

  1. Investigation of the impact of cleaning on the adhesive bond and the process implications

    SciTech Connect

    EMERSON,JOHN A.; GUESS,TOMMY R.; ADKINS,CAROL L. JONES; CURRO,JOHN G.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LOPEZ,EDWIN P.; LEMKE,PAUL A.

    2000-05-01

    While surface cleaning is the most common process step in DOE manufacturing operations, the link between a successful adhesive bond and the surface clean performed before adhesion is not well understood. An innovative approach that combines computer modeling expertise, fracture mechanics understanding, and cleaning experience to address how to achieve a good adhesive bond is discussed here to develop a capability that would result in reduced cleaning development time and testing, improved bonds, improved manufacturability, and even an understanding that leads to improved aging. A simulation modeling technique, polymer reference interaction site model applied near wall (Wall PRISM), provided the capability to include contaminants on the surface. Calculations determined an approximately 8% reduction in the work of adhesion for 1% by weight of ethanol contamination on the structure of a silicone adhesive near a surface. The demonstration of repeatable coatings and quantitative analysis of the surface for deposition of controlled amounts of contamination (hexadecane and mineral oil) was based on three deposition methods. The effect of the cleaning process used on interfacial toughness was determined. The measured interfacial toughness of samples with a Brulin cleaned sandblasted aluminum surface was found to be {approximately} 15% greater than that with a TCE cleaned aluminum surface. The sensitivity of measured fracture toughness to various test conditions determined that both interfacial toughness and interface corner toughness depended strongly on surface roughness. The work of adhesion value for silicone/silicone interface was determined by a contact mechanics technique known as the JKR method. Correlation with fracture data has allowed a better understanding between interfacial fracture parameters and surface energy.

  2. Fabrication of a Dual Substrate Display to Test Roles of Cell Adhesion Proteins in Vesicle Targeting to Plasma Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Stephen J.; Nelson, W. James

    2009-01-01

    While much is known of the molecular machinery involved in protein sorting during exocytosis, less is known about the spatial regulation of exocytosis at the plasma membrane (PM). This study outlines a novel method, Dual Substrate Display, used to formally test the hypothesis that E-cadherin-mediated adhesion directs basolateral vesicle exocytosis to specific sites at the PM. We show that vesicles containing the basolateral marker protein VSV-G preferentially target to sites of adhesion to E-cadherin rather than collagen VI or a control peptide. These results support the hypothesis that E-cadherin adhesion initiates signaling at the PM resulting in targeted sites for exocytosis. PMID:17803993

  3. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  4. Mathematical modelling of cancer invasion: implications of cell adhesion variability for tumour infiltrative growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Pia; Trucu, Dumitru; Gerisch, Alf; A J Chaplain, Mark

    2014-11-21

    Cancer invasion, recognised as one of the hallmarks of cancer, is a complex, multiscale phenomenon involving many inter-related genetic, biochemical, cellular and tissue processes at different spatial and temporal scales. Central to invasion is the ability of cancer cells to alter and degrade an extracellular matrix. Combined with abnormal excessive proliferation and migration which is enabled and enhanced by altered cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, the cancerous mass can invade the neighbouring tissue. Along with tumour-induced angiogenesis, invasion is a key component of metastatic spread, ultimately leading to the formation of secondary tumours in other parts of the host body. In this paper we explore the spatio-temporal dynamics of a model of cancer invasion, where cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion is accounted for through non-local interaction terms in a system of partial integro-differential equations. The change of adhesion properties during cancer growth and development is investigated here through time-dependent adhesion characteristics within the cell population as well as those between the cells and the components of the extracellular matrix. Our computational simulation results demonstrate a range of heterogeneous dynamics which are qualitatively similar to the invasive growth patterns observed in a number of different types of cancer, such as tumour infiltrative growth patterns (INF). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of CD9 extracellular domains important in regulation of CHO cell adhesion to fibronectin and fibronectin pericellular matrix assembly.

    PubMed

    Cook, George A; Longhurst, Celia M; Grgurevich, Svetozar; Cholera, Shila; Crossno, Joseph T; Jennings, Lisa K

    2002-12-15

    CD9, a 24-kDa member of the tetraspanin family, influences cellular growth and development, activation, adhesion, and motility. Our investigation focuses on the hypothesis that the CD9 second extracellular loop (EC2) is important in modulating cell adhesive events. Using a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell expression system, we previously reported that CD9 expression inhibited cell adhesion to fibronectin and fibronectin matrix assembly. For the first time, a functional epitope on CD9 EC2 that regulates these processes is described. Binding of mAb7, an EC2-specific anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody, reversed the CD9 inhibitory activity on CHO cell adhesion and fibronectin matrix assembly. This reversal of cell phenotype also was observed in CHO cells expressing CD9 EC2 truncations. Furthermore, our data showed that the EC2 sequence (173)LETFTVKSCPDAIKEVFDNK(192) was largely responsible for the CD9-mediated CHO cell phenotype. Two peptides, (135)K-V(172) (peptide 5b) and (168)P-I(185) (peptide 6a), selectively blocked mAb7 binding to soluble CD9 and to CD9 on intact cells. These active peptides reversed the influence of CD9 expression on CHO cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, confocal microscopy revealed that CD9 colocalized with the integrin alpha(5)beta(1) and cytoskeletal F-actin in punctate clusters on the cell surface, particularly at the cell margins. Immunoprecipitation studies confirmed CD9 association with beta(1) integrin. The cellular distribution and colocalization of focal adhesion kinase and alpha-actinin with cytoskeletal actin was also influenced by CD9 expression. Thus, CD9 may exhibit its effect by modulating the composition of adhesive complexes important in facilitating cell adhesion and matrix assembly.

  6. KirrelL, a member of the Ig-domain superfamily of adhesion proteins, is essential for fusion of primary mesenchyme cells in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Ettensohn, Charles A; Dey, Debleena

    2017-01-15

    In the sea urchin embryo, primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) adhere to one another and fuse via filopodia, forming cable-like structures within which skeletal rods are deposited. Although this process was first described more than a century ago, molecules that participate in PMC adhesion and fusion have not been identified. Here we show that KirrelL, a PMC-specific, Ig domain-containing transmembrane protein, is essential for PMC fusion, probably by mediating filopodial adhesions that are a pre-requisite for subsequent membrane fusion. We show that KirrelL is not required for PMC specification, migration, or for direct filopodial contacts between PMCs. In the absence of KirrelL, however, filopodial contacts do not result in fusion. kirrelL is a member of a family of closely related, intronless genes that likely arose through an echinoid-specific gene expansion, possibly via retrotransposition. Our findings are significant in that they establish a direct linkage between the transcriptional network deployed in the PMC lineage and an effector molecule required for a critically important PMC morphogenetic process. In addition, our results point to a conserved role for Ig domain-containing adhesion proteins in facilitating cell fusion in both muscle and non-muscle cell lineages during animal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implication of different domains of the Leishmania major metacaspase in cell death and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Casanova, M; Gonzalez, I J; Sprissler, C; Zalila, H; Dacher, M; Basmaciyan, L; Späth, G F; Azas, N; Fasel, N

    2015-10-22

    Metacaspases (MCAs) are cysteine peptidases expressed in plants, fungi and protozoa, with a caspase-like histidine-cysteine catalytic dyad, but differing from caspases, for example, in their substrate specificity. The role of MCAs is subject to debate: roles in cell cycle control, in cell death or even in cell survival have been suggested. In this study, using a Leishmania major MCA-deficient strain, we showed that L. major MCA (LmjMCA) not only had a role similar to caspases in cell death but also in autophagy and this through different domains. Upon cell death induction by miltefosine or H2O2, LmjMCA is processed, releasing the catalytic domain, which activated substrates via its catalytic dyad His/Cys and a proline-rich C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain interacted with proteins, notably proteins involved in stress regulation, such as the MAP kinase LmaMPK7 or programmed cell death like the calpain-like cysteine peptidase. We also showed a new role of LmjMCA in autophagy, acting on or upstream of ATG8, involving Lmjmca gene overexpression and interaction of the C-terminal domain of LmjMCA with itself and other proteins. These results allowed us to propose two models, showing the role of LmjMCA in the cell death and also in the autophagy pathway, implicating different protein domains.

  8. Implication of different domains of the Leishmania major metacaspase in cell death and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, M; Gonzalez, I J; Sprissler, C; Zalila, H; Dacher, M; Basmaciyan, L; Späth, G F; Azas, N; Fasel, N

    2015-01-01

    Metacaspases (MCAs) are cysteine peptidases expressed in plants, fungi and protozoa, with a caspase-like histidine–cysteine catalytic dyad, but differing from caspases, for example, in their substrate specificity. The role of MCAs is subject to debate: roles in cell cycle control, in cell death or even in cell survival have been suggested. In this study, using a Leishmania major MCA-deficient strain, we showed that L. major MCA (LmjMCA) not only had a role similar to caspases in cell death but also in autophagy and this through different domains. Upon cell death induction by miltefosine or H2O2, LmjMCA is processed, releasing the catalytic domain, which activated substrates via its catalytic dyad His/Cys and a proline-rich C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain interacted with proteins, notably proteins involved in stress regulation, such as the MAP kinase LmaMPK7 or programmed cell death like the calpain-like cysteine peptidase. We also showed a new role of LmjMCA in autophagy, acting on or upstream of ATG8, involving Lmjmca gene overexpression and interaction of the C-terminal domain of LmjMCA with itself and other proteins. These results allowed us to propose two models, showing the role of LmjMCA in the cell death and also in the autophagy pathway, implicating different protein domains. PMID:26492367

  9. The intracellular domain of cell adhesion molecule 1 is present in emphysematous lungs and induces lung epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiyama, Man; Yoneshige, Azusa; Inoue, Takao; Sato, Yasufumi; Mimae, Takahiro; Okada, Morihito; Ito, Akihiko

    2015-08-11

    Pulmonary emphysema is characterized histologically by destruction of alveolar walls and enlargement of air spaces due to lung epithelial cell apoptosis. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is an immunoglobulin superfamily member expressed in lung epithelial cells. CADM1 generates a membrane-associated C-terminal fragment, αCTF, through A disintegrin- and metalloprotease-10-mediated ectodomain shedding, subsequently releasing the intracellular domain (ICD) through γ-secretase-mediated intramembrane shedding of αCTF. αCTF localizes to mitochondria and induces apoptosis in lung epithelial cells. αCTF contributes to the development and progression of emphysema as a consequence of increased CADM1 ectodomain shedding. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the ICD makes a similar contribution. The ICD was synthesized as a 51-amino acid peptide, and its mutant was synthesized by substituting seven amino acids and deleting two amino acids. These peptides were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and were introduced into various cell lines. ICD peptide-derived fluorescence was well visualized in lung epithelial cells at the site of Mitotracker mitochondrial labeling, but was detected in locations other than mitochondria in other cell types. Mutant peptide-derived fluorescence was detected in locations other than mitochondria, even in lung epithelial cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assays revealed that transduction of the ICD peptide increased the proportion of apoptotic cells 2- to 5-fold in the lung epithelial cell lines, whereas the mutant peptide did not. Abundance of the ICD was below the Western blot detection limit in emphysematous (n = 4) and control (n = 4) human lungs. However, the ICD was detected only in emphysematous lungs when it was immunoprecipitated with anti-CADM1 antibody (4/4 vs. 0/4, P = 0.029). As the abundance of ICD molecules was sparse but present, increased CADM1 shedding

  10. Molecular composition of the node of Ranvier: identification of ankyrin- binding cell adhesion molecules neurofascin (mucin+/third FNIII domain- ) and NrCAM at nodal axon segments

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Neurofascin, NrCAM, L1, and NgCAM are a family of Ig/FNIII cell adhesion molecules that share ankyrin-binding activity in their cytoplasmic domains, and are candidates to form membrane-spanning complexes with members of the ankyrin family of spectrin-binding proteins in a variety of cellular contexts in the nervous system. Specialized forms of ankyrin, 270 kD and/or 480 kD ankyrinG are components of the membrane undercoat of axons at the node of Ranvier. This paper focuses on definition of the isoforms of ankyrin-binding cell adhesion molecules localized with ankyrinG at the nodal axon segment. The exon usage of two major forms of neurofascin was determined by isolation of full-length cDNAs and used to prepare isoform-specific antibodies. An isoform of neurofascin containing a mucin-like domain and lacking the third FNIII domain was concentrated at axon initial segments and colocalized at nodes of Ranvier with ankyrinG and the voltage-dependent sodium channel. An alternative form of neurofascin lacking the mucin-like domain and containing the third FNIII domain was present in unmyelinated axons. The antibody initially raised against neurofascin was used to screen a rat brain cDNA expression library. In addition to neurofascin, this screen yielded a clone with 80% sequence identity to NrCAM from chicken. The sequences of two full-length cDNAs are presented. NrCAM is most closely related to neurofascin among the other members of the L1/neurofascin/NgCAM family, with over 70% identity between cytoplasmic domains. NrCAM, visualized with antibodies specific for the ecto-domain, also was found to be coexpressed with neurofascin at nodes of Ranvier and at axon initial segments. This is the first characterization of defined neuronal cell adhesion molecules localized to axonal membranes at the node of Ranvier of myelinated axons. PMID:8947556

  11. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  12. A human domain antibody and Lewis b glycoconjugate that inhibit binding of Helicobacter pylori to Lewis b receptor and adhesion to human gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Younson, Justine; O'Mahony, Rachel; Liu, Haiqun; Basset, Christelle; Grant, Steven; Campion, Colin; Jennings, Lisa; Vaira, Dino; Kelly, Charles G; Roitt, Ivan M; Holton, John

    2009-11-15

    Increasing antibiotic resistance has prompted development of alternative approaches to antimicrobial therapy, including blocking microbial adhesion to host receptors. The BabA adhesin of Helicobacter pylori binds to fucosylated blood group antigens, such as the Lewis(b) antigens in human primate gastric mucosa. We have isolated a human domain antibody specific for BabA that inhibits binding of BabA to Lewis(b) and prevents adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric epithelium. In addition, Lewis(b) oligosaccharides covalently linked to poly-D-lysine inhibited BabA binding to Le(b). The poly-D-lysine-Le(b) hexasaccharide and an Le(b) human serum albumin conjugate not only inhibited adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelium but also displaced adherent bacteria when added to human stomach sections. Combinations of Le(b) and sialyl Le(x) or domain antibody 25 and sialyl Le(x) acted synergistically. Domain antibody 25 inhibitor may have potential for prophylactic use and, in combination with Le(b) glycoconjugates, therapeutic use in treatment of drug-resistant H. pylori infection.

  13. Effect of Applying Force to Self-Adhesive Electrodes on Transthoracic Impedance: Implications for Electrical Cardioversion.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, F Daniel; Fiset, Sandra L; Cleland, Mark J; Zakutney, Timothy J; Nery, Pablo B; Nair, Girish M; Redpath, Calum J; Sadek, Mouhannad M; Birnie, David H

    2016-10-01

    Current guidelines disagree on the role for applying force to electrodes during electrical cardioversion (ECV) for atrial fibrillation, particularly when using self-adhesive pads. We evaluated the impact of this practice on transthoracic impedance (TTI) with varying force and in individuals with differing body mass indices (BMI). We additionally assessed whether specific prompts could improve physicians' ECV technique. The study comprised three parts: (1) TTI was measured in 11 participants throughout the respiratory cycle and with variable force applied to self-adhesive electrodes in anteroposterior (AP) and anterolateral (AL) configurations. (2) Three participants in different BMI classes then had TTI measured with prespecified incremental force applied. (3) Ten blinded cardiology trainees simulated ECV on one participant with and without prompting (guideline reminders and force analogies) while force applied and TTI were measured. The AP approach was associated with 13% lower TTI than AL (P < 0.001). Strongly negative correlations were observed between force applied and TTI in the AL position, irrespective of BMI (P ≤ 0.003). In all cases, 80% of the total reduction in TTI observed was achieved with 8 kg-force (∼80 N). All prompts resulted in significantly greater force applied and modest reductions in TTI. Applying force to self-adhesive electrodes reduces TTI and should be considered as a means of improving ECV success. Numerically greater mean force applied with a "push-up" force analogy suggests that "concrete" cues may be useful in improving ECV technique. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  15. Implication of an Outer Surface Lipoprotein in Adhesion of Bifidobacterium bifidum to Caco-2 Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Tamagnini, Isabella; Mora, Diego; Minuzzo, Mario; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Hellman, Jukka; Karp, Matti; Parini, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    We found that the human intestinal isolate Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 strongly adhered to Caco-2 cells. Proteinase K and lithium chloride treatments showed that proteins play a key role in MIMBb75 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. By studying the cell wall-associated proteins, we identified a surface protein, which we labeled BopA. We purified the protein chromatographically and found that it functioned as an adhesion promoter on Caco-2 cells. In silico analysis of the gene coding for this protein and globomycin experiments showed that BopA is a cysteine-anchored lipoprotein expressed as a precursor polypeptide. A database search indicated that BopA appears to function biologically as an oligopeptide/tripeptide-solute-binding protein in the ABC transport system. We discovered a protein corresponding to BopA and its gene in eight other highly adherent B. bifidum strains. Finally, we found that B. bifidum MIMBb75 and BopA affected the production of interleukin-8 in Caco-2 epithelial cells. BopA is the first protein described to date to be directly involved in the adhesion of bifidobacteria to Caco-2 cells and to show immunomodulatory activity. PMID:18539800

  16. Implication of an outer surface lipoprotein in adhesion of Bifidobacterium bifidum to Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Tamagnini, Isabella; Mora, Diego; Minuzzo, Mario; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Hellman, Jukka; Karp, Matti; Parini, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    We found that the human intestinal isolate Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 strongly adhered to Caco-2 cells. Proteinase K and lithium chloride treatments showed that proteins play a key role in MIMBb75 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. By studying the cell wall-associated proteins, we identified a surface protein, which we labeled BopA. We purified the protein chromatographically and found that it functioned as an adhesion promoter on Caco-2 cells. In silico analysis of the gene coding for this protein and globomycin experiments showed that BopA is a cysteine-anchored lipoprotein expressed as a precursor polypeptide. A database search indicated that BopA appears to function biologically as an oligopeptide/tripeptide-solute-binding protein in the ABC transport system. We discovered a protein corresponding to BopA and its gene in eight other highly adherent B. bifidum strains. Finally, we found that B. bifidum MIMBb75 and BopA affected the production of interleukin-8 in Caco-2 epithelial cells. BopA is the first protein described to date to be directly involved in the adhesion of bifidobacteria to Caco-2 cells and to show immunomodulatory activity.

  17. Study of the demolding process—implications for thermal stress, adhesion and friction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuhua; Liu, Gang; Xiong, Yin; Tian, Yangchao

    2007-01-01

    With the improvements of large-scale parallel replication and automation for hot embossing machines, hot embossing has become not only popular in laboratories but also possible and attractive in industry. Most difficulties in polymer micro-molding are caused by the demolding of molds rather than the filling of them. Due to the lack of accurate analysis tools and simulation tools for demolding, it is difficult to improve the process or give design rules for the molds, which could harm the further applications of hot embossing. This paper gives our studies of the demolding process using LIGA mold inserts. The demolding forces mainly consist of thermal shrinkage stress and adhesive forces. First, a finite elements method (FEM) is applied to analyze thermal stress caused by the shrinkage differences between the mold and polymer using ABAQUS/Standard, and a thermal stress barrier is proposed as an auxiliary structure to protect against the converging stress at the bottom corner of microstructures. Then, regarding the adhesion and friction forces, the nanotribology of PMMA is studied by AFM with nickel and PTFE-coated Si3N4 tips. And based on the measurements, the adhesion and friction forces in a demolding cycle are also simulated by FEM using ABAQUS/Standard. At last Ni-PTFE is recommended as the mold material for achieving a lower surface energy and lower friction force. This work proposes several methods that can optimize the demolding process and introduces some good suggestions for mold tool design.

  18. Positive selection in the adhesion domain of Mus sperm Adam genes through gene duplications and function-driven gene complex formations.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Phil; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-09-30

    Sperm and testes-expressed Adam genes have been shown to undergo bouts of positive selection in mammals. Despite the pervasiveness of positive selection signals, it is unclear what has driven such selective bouts. The fact that only sperm surface Adam genes show signals of positive selection within their adhesion domain has led to speculation that selection might be driven by species-specific adaptations to fertilization or sperm competition. Alternatively, duplications and neofunctionalization of Adam sperm surface genes, particularly as it is now understood in rodents, might have contributed to an acceleration of evolutionary rates and possibly adaptive diversification. Here we sequenced and conducted tests of selection within the adhesion domain of sixteen known sperm-surface Adam genes among five species of the Mus genus. We find evidence of positive selection associated with all six Adam genes known to interact to form functional complexes on Mus sperm. A subset of these complex-forming sperm genes also displayed accelerated branch evolution with Adam5 evolving under positive selection. In contrast to our previous findings in primates, selective bouts within Mus sperm Adams showed no associations to proxies of sperm competition. Expanded phylogenetic analysis including sequence data from other placental mammals allowed us to uncover ancient and recent episodes of adaptive evolution. The prevailing signals of rapid divergence and positive selection detected within the adhesion domain of interacting sperm Adams is driven by duplications and potential neofunctionalizations that are in some cases ancient (Adams 2, 3 and 5) or more recent (Adams 1b, 4b and 6).

  19. Positive selection in the adhesion domain of Mus sperm Adam genes through gene duplications and function-driven gene complex formations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sperm and testes-expressed Adam genes have been shown to undergo bouts of positive selection in mammals. Despite the pervasiveness of positive selection signals, it is unclear what has driven such selective bouts. The fact that only sperm surface Adam genes show signals of positive selection within their adhesion domain has led to speculation that selection might be driven by species-specific adaptations to fertilization or sperm competition. Alternatively, duplications and neofunctionalization of Adam sperm surface genes, particularly as it is now understood in rodents, might have contributed to an acceleration of evolutionary rates and possibly adaptive diversification. Results Here we sequenced and conducted tests of selection within the adhesion domain of sixteen known sperm-surface Adam genes among five species of the Mus genus. We find evidence of positive selection associated with all six Adam genes known to interact to form functional complexes on Mus sperm. A subset of these complex-forming sperm genes also displayed accelerated branch evolution with Adam5 evolving under positive selection. In contrast to our previous findings in primates, selective bouts within Mus sperm Adams showed no associations to proxies of sperm competition. Expanded phylogenetic analysis including sequence data from other placental mammals allowed us to uncover ancient and recent episodes of adaptive evolution. Conclusions The prevailing signals of rapid divergence and positive selection detected within the adhesion domain of interacting sperm Adams is driven by duplications and potential neofunctionalizations that are in some cases ancient (Adams 2, 3 and 5) or more recent (Adams 1b, 4b and 6). PMID:24079728

  20. Sequence of a cDNA clone encoding the polysialic acid-rich and cytoplasmic domains of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM.

    PubMed Central

    Hemperly, J J; Murray, B A; Edelman, G M; Cunningham, B A

    1986-01-01

    Purified fractions of the neural cell-adhesion molecule N-CAM from embryonic chicken brain contain two similar polypeptides (Mr, 160,000 and 130,000), each containing an amino-terminal external binding region, a carbohydrate-rich central region, and a carboxyl-terminal region that is associated with the cell. Previous studies indicate that the two polypeptides arise by alternative splicing of mRNAs transcribed from a single gene. We report here the 3556-nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone (pEC208) that encodes 964 amino acids from the carbohydrate and cell-associated domains of the larger N-CAM polypeptide followed by 664 nucleotides of 3' untranslated sequence. The predicted protein sequence contains attachment sites for polysialic acid-containing oligosaccharides, four tandem homologous regions of polypeptide resembling those seen in the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a single hydrophobic sequence that appears to be the membrane-spanning segment. The cytoplasmic domain carboxyl terminal to this segment includes a block of approximately equal to 250 amino acids present in the larger but not in the smaller N-CAM polypeptide. We designate these the ld (large domain) polypeptide and the sd (small domain) polypeptide. The intracellular domains of the ld and sd polypeptides are likely to be critical for cell-surface modulation of N-CAM by interacting in a differential fashion with other intrinsic proteins or with the cytoskeleton. PMID:3458261

  1. A triad of lys12, lys41, arg78 spatial domain, a novel identified heparin binding site on tat protein, facilitates tat-driven cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jing; Xin, Xianliang; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Shuai; Peng, Shuying; Li, Jing; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Hualiang; Geng, Meiyu

    2008-01-01

    Tat protein, released by HIV-infected cells, has a battery of important biological effects leading to distinct AIDS-associated pathologies. Cell surface heparan sulfate protoglycans (HSPGs) have been accepted as endogenous Tat receptors, and the Tat basic domain has been identified as the heparin binding site. However, findings that deletion or substitution of the basic domain inhibits but does not completely eliminate Tat-heparin interactions suggest that the basic domain is not the sole Tat heparin binding site. In the current study, an approach integrating computational modeling, mutagenesis, biophysical and cell-based assays was used to elucidate a novel, high affinity heparin-binding site: a Lys12, Lys41, Arg78 (KKR) spatial domain. This domain was also found to facilitate Tat-driven β1 integrin activation, producing subsequent SLK cell adhesion in an HSPG-dependent manner, but was not involved in Tat internalization. The identification of this new heparin binding site may foster further insight into the nature of Tat-heparin interactions and subsequent biological functions, facilitating the rational design of new therapeutics against Tat-mediated pathological events.

  2. Mutational analysis of the PRYSPRY domain of pyrin and implications for familial mediterranean fever (FMF).

    PubMed

    Goulielmos, G N; Fragouli, E; Aksentijevich, I; Sidiropoulos, P; Boumpas, D T; Eliopoulos, E

    2006-07-14

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal, recessively inherited disease, characterized by recurrent fever and serositis that affects mainly patients of the Mediterranean basin. The gene responsible for FMF, named MEFV, was cloned and several missense mutations were found to be responsible for the disease. Based on a recent molecular analysis of MEFV gene mutations in 43 patients from Crete aiming to correlate specific genotypes and clinical manifestations of FMF, we were prompted to construct a three-dimensional model (3-D model) of the PRYSPRY domain of pyrin. The majority of the known MEFV mutations located on this domain have been classified, according to disease severity, and localized on this 3-D model. The functional consequences of these mutations and their implications on disease severity are discussed. Moreover, we report a putative novel missense mutation, S702C, which we identified in exon 10 of the MEFV gene and localized on the constructed 3-D model.

  3. Crystal Structure of RAIDD Death Domain Implicates Potential Mechanism of PIDDosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Park,H.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Caspase-2 is implicated in stress-induced apoptosis that acts as an upstream initiator of mitochondrial permeabilization. Recent studies have shown that caspase-2 activation requires a molecular complex known as the PIDDosome comprising the p53-inducible protein PIDD, the adapter protein RAIDD and caspase-2. RAIDD has an N-terminal caspase recruitment domain (CARD) that interacts with the CARD of caspase-2 and a C-terminal death domain (DD) that interacts with the DD in PIDD. As a first step towards elucidating the molecular mechanisms of caspase-2 activation, we report the crystal structure of RAIDD DD at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. The high-resolution structure reveals important features of RAIDD DD that may be important for DD folding and dynamics and for assembly of the PIDDosome.

  4. Basal neutrophil function in human aging: Implications in endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Neto, Joes; Cardoso, André S C; Monteiro, Hugo P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Junqueira, Virginia B C; Simon, Karin A

    2016-07-01

    Much attention has been drawn to the pro-inflammatory condition that accompanies aging. This study compared parameters from non-stimulated neutrophils, obtained from young (18-30 years old [y.o.]) and elderly (65-80 y.o.) human volunteers. Measured as an inflammatory marker, plasmatic concentration of hs-CRP was found higher in elderly individuals. Non-stimulated neutrophil production of ROS and NO was, respectively, 38 and 29% higher for the aged group. From the adhesion molecules evaluated, only CD11b expression was elevated in neutrophils from the aged group, whereas no differences were found for CD11a, CD18, or CD62. A 69% higher non-stimulated in vitro neutrophil/endothelial cell adhesion was observed for neutrophils isolated from elderly donors. Our results suggest that with aging, neutrophils may be constitutively producing more reactive species in closer proximity to endothelial cells of vessel walls, which may both contribute to vascular damage and reflect a neutrophil intracellular disrupted redox balance, altering neutrophil function in aging.

  5. First two domains at the lp_1643 protein N terminus inhibit pathogen adhesion to porcine mucus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; He, Xiaoying; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Fang; Ju, Xingrong; Yuan, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Gastrointestinal probiotics are important members of intestinal microflora in both healthy animals and human beings, and these bacteria may reduce the risk of infection caused by certain opportunistic pathogens through exclusive inhibition, competition, and displacement. The lp_1643 protein on the cell surface of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFSI was assumed to possess a mucus-binding capability. This study aimed to determine if purified His-N2 protein exclusively inhibits pathogen adhesion to porcine mucus. The interaction of the His-N2 protein with porcine mucus was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the adhesion was assessed by a traditional plating method to count the bacteria adhered to the porcine mucus. Indirect ELISA showed that His-N2 protein adhered to porcine mucus, and its interacting molecules existed. The His-N2 protein effectively inhibited the adhesion of Escherichia coli DH5α, Listeria monocytogenes CMCC54004, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Shigella flexneri CMCC(B)51572 to porcine mucus. Results showed that inhibition of pathogen adhesion to porcine mucus depended on dose and strain. The adhesion of L. monocytogenes CMCC54004, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and S. flexneri CMCC(B)51572 was reduced by 95.7, 97.0, and 95.7%, respectively, by pre-adding 100 μl of 3.92 mg/ml of His-N2 protein, whereas that of E. coli DH5α was only 50.4%. The inhibition of adhesion of some pathogens by His-N2 was different at pH 6.6 and 7.5. The inhibition of E. coli DH5α, L. monocytogenes CMCC54004, and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 at pH 6.6 was significantly higher than that at pH 7.5, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed in S. flexneri CMCC(B)51572. These results suggest that various types of inhibition mechanisms of His-N2 were involved in different pathogens.

  6. C3G forms complexes with Bcr-Abl and p38α MAPK at the focal adhesions in chronic myeloid leukemia cells: implication in the regulation of leukemic cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies by our group and others have shown that C3G interacts with Bcr-Abl through its SH3-b domain. Results In this work we show that C3G and Bcr-Abl form complexes with the focal adhesion (FA) proteins CrkL, p130Cas, Cbl and Abi1 through SH3/SH3-b interactions. The association between C3G and Bcr-Abl decreased upon Abi1 or p130Cas knock-down in K562 cells, which suggests that Abi1 and p130Cas are essential partners in this interaction. On the other hand, C3G, Abi1 or Cbl knock-down impaired adhesion to fibronectin, while p130Cas silencing enhanced it. C3G, Cbl and p130Cas-SH3-b domains interact directly with common proteins involved in the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that C3G form complexes with the FA proteins paxillin and FAK and their phosphorylated forms. Additionally, C3G, Abi1, Cbl and p130Cas regulate the expression and phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK. p38α MAPK also participates in the regulation of adhesion in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. It interacts with C3G, CrkL, FAK and paxillin and regulates the expression of paxillin, CrkL and α5 integrin, as well as paxillin phosphorylation. Moreover, double knock-down of C3G/p38α decreased adhesion to fibronectin, similarly to the single silencing of one of these genes, either C3G or p38α. These suggest that C3G and p38α MAPK are acting through a common pathway to regulate cell adhesion in K562 cells, as previously described for the regulation of apoptosis. Conclusions Our results indicate that C3G-p38αMAPK pathway regulates K562 cell adhesion through the interaction with FA proteins and Bcr-Abl, modulating the formation of different protein complexes at FA. PMID:23343344

  7. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  8. Research domain criteria and the study of trauma in children: Implications for assessment and treatment research.

    PubMed

    Stover, Carla Smith; Keeshin, Brooks

    2016-11-09

    By definition, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) requires exposure to a traumatic event. Yet, the DSM diagnostic requirements for children and adolescents for PTSD may fail to capture traumatized youth with significant distress and functional impairment. Many important studies have utilized PTSD diagnosis as a mechanism for grouping individuals for comparative studies examining brain functioning, neuroendocrinology, genetics, attachment, and cognition; however, focusing only on those with the diagnosis of PTSD can miss the spectrum of symptoms and difficulties that impact children who experience trauma and subsequent impairment. Some studying child trauma have focused on examining brain and biology of those with exposure and potential impairment rather than only those with PTSD. This line of inquiry, complementary to PTSD specific studies, has aided our understanding of some of the changes in brain structure and neuroregulatory systems at different developmental periods following traumatic exposure. Application of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework proposed by NIMH to the study of child trauma exposure and subsequent impairment is an opportunity to examine domains of function and how they are impacted by trauma. Research to date has focused largely in the areas of negative valence, regulatory, and cognitive systems, however those studying complex or developmental trauma have identified an array of domains that are impacted which map onto many of the RDoC categories. This paper will review the relevant literature associated with child trauma as it relates to the RDoC domains, outline areas of needed research, and describe their implications for treatment and the advancement of the field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation of a γ-Protocadherin C-terminal Lipid Binding Domain Regulates Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibition and Dendrite Arborization.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Austin B; Schreiner, Dietmar; Weiner, Joshua A

    2015-08-21

    The γ-protocadherins (γ-Pcdhs) are a family of 22 adhesion molecules with multiple critical developmental functions, including the proper formation of dendritic arbors by forebrain neurons. The γ-Pcdhs bind to and inhibit focal adhesion kinase (FAK) via a constant C-terminal cytoplasmic domain shared by all 22 proteins. In cortical neurons lacking the γ-Pcdhs, aberrantly high activity of FAK and of PKC disrupts dendrite arborization. Little is known, however, about how γ-Pcdh function is regulated by other factors. Here we show that PKC phosphorylates a serine residue situated within a phospholipid binding motif at the shared γ-Pcdh C terminus. Western blots using a novel phospho-specific antibody against this site suggest that a portion of γ-Pcdh proteins is phosphorylated in the cortex in vivo. We find that PKC phosphorylation disrupts both phospholipid binding and the γ-Pcdh inhibition of (but not binding to) FAK. Introduction of a non-phosphorylatable (S922A) γ-Pcdh construct into wild-type cortical neurons significantly increases dendrite arborization. This same S922A construct can also rescue dendrite arborization defects in γ-Pcdh null neurons cell autonomously. Consistent with these data, introduction of a phosphomimetic (S/D) γ-Pcdh construct or treatment with a PKC activator reduces dendrite arborization in wild-type cortical neurons. Together, these data identify a novel mechanism through which γ-Pcdh control of a signaling pathway important for dendrite arborization is regulated.

  10. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains

    PubMed Central

    Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via “inverse piezoelectric effect”. Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s−1) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E. Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump. PMID:28809333

  11. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-02-22

    In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via "inverse piezoelectric effect". Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s(-1)) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E.Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump.

  12. β1-Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Is Lipid-Bilayer Dependent.

    PubMed

    Son, Seoyoung; Moroney, George J; Butler, Peter J

    2017-09-05

    Integrin-mediated adhesion is a central feature of cellular adhesion, locomotion, and endothelial cell mechanobiology. Although integrins are known to be transmembrane proteins, little is known about the role of membrane biophysics and dynamics in integrin adhesion. We treated human aortic endothelial cells with exogenous amphiphiles, shown previously in model membranes, and computationally, to affect bilayer thickness and lipid phase separation, and subsequently measured single-integrin-molecule adhesion kinetics using an optical trap, and diffusion using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Benzyl alcohol (BA) partitions to liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, thins them, and causes the greatest increase in hydrophobic mismatch between liquid-ordered (Lo) and Ld domains among the three amphiphiles, leading to domain separation. In human aortic endothelial cells, BA increased β1-integrin-Arg-Gly-Asp-peptide affinity by 18% with a transition from single to double valency, consistent with a doubling of the molecular brightness of mCherry-tagged β1-integrins measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Accordingly, BA caused an increase in the size of focal-adhesion-kinase/paxillin-positive peripheral adhesions and reduced migration speeds as measured using wound-healing assays. Vitamin E, which thickens Lo domains and disperses them by lowering edge energy on domain boundaries, left integrin affinity unchanged but reduced binding probability, leading to smaller focal adhesions and equivalent migration speed relative to untreated cells. Vitamin E reversed the BA-induced decrease in migration speed. Triton X-100 also thickens Lo domains, but partitions to both lipid phases and left unchanged binding kinetics, focal adhesion sizes, and migration speed. These results demonstrate that only the amphiphile that thinned Ld lipid domains increased β1-integrin-Arg-Gly-Asp-peptide affinity and valency, thus implicating Ld domains in modulation of integrin adhesion

  13. TgrC1 mediates cell-cell adhesion by interacting with TgrB1 via mutual IPT/TIG domains during development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoqun; Wu, Xiangfu; Piao, Ruihan; Siu, Chi-Hung

    2013-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion plays crucial roles in cell differentiation and morphogenesis during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The heterophilic adhesion protein TgrC1 (Tgr is transmembrane, IPT, IG, E-set, repeat protein) is expressed during cell aggregation, and disruption of the tgrC1 gene results in the arrest of development at the loose aggregate stage. We have used far-Western blotting coupled with MS to identify TgrB1 as the heterophilic binding partner of TgrC1. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down studies showed that TgrB1 and TgrC1 are capable of binding with each other in solution. TgrB1 and TgrC1 are encoded by a pair of adjacent genes which share a common promoter. Both TgrB1 and TgrC1 are type I transmembrane proteins, which contain three extracellular IPT/TIG (immunoglobulin, plexin, transcription factor-like/transcription factor immunoglobulin) domains. Antibodies raised against TgrB1 inhibit cell reassociation at the post-aggregation stage of development and block fruiting body formation. Ectopic expression of TgrB1 and TgrC1 driven by the actin15 promoter leads to heterotypic cell aggregation of vegetative cells. Using recombinant proteins that cover different portions of TgrB1 and TgrC1 in binding assays, we have mapped the cell-binding regions in these two proteins to Lys(537)-Ala(783) in TgrB1 and Ile(336)-Val(360) in TgrC1, corresponding to their respective TIG3 and TIG2 domain.

  14. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase's role in myriad cancers: clinical significance and future implications.

    PubMed

    Gardenswartz, Aliza; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-03-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene, encodes a tumor suppressor located on 16q23.1, spanning FRA16D, one of the most active common fragile sites in the human genome, that is altered in numerous types of cancer. WWOX's alteration in these myriad cancers is due to disparate mechanisms including loss of heterozygosity, homozygous deletion and epigenetic changes. In vitro, WWOX has been found to be reduced or absent in numerous cancer cell lines and WWOX restoration has been found to inhibit tumor cell growth and invasion. Wwox knockout mice developed femoral focal lesions resembling osteosarcomas within one month of their life and aging Wwox heterozygous mice have an increased incidence of spontaneous lung and mammary tumors as well as B-cell lymphomas. We herein review WWOX's role that has been unearthed thus far in different types of malignancies, its clinical significance and future implications.

  15. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  16. Neutrophil elastase cleavage of the gC1q domain impairs the EMILIN1-α4β1 integrin interaction, cell adhesion and anti-proliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Maiorani, Orlando; Pivetta, Eliana; Capuano, Alessandra; Modica, Teresa Maria Elisa; Wassermann, Bruna; Bucciotti, Francesco; Colombatti, Alfonso; Doliana, Roberto; Spessotto, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix glycoprotein EMILIN1 exerts a wide range of functions mainly associated with its gC1q domain. Besides providing functional significance for adhesion and migration, the direct interaction between α4β1 integrin and EMILIN1-gC1q regulates cell proliferation, transducing net anti-proliferative effects. We have previously demonstrated that EMILIN1 degradation by neutrophil elastase (NE) is a specific mechanism leading to the loss of functions disabling its regulatory properties. In this study we further analysed the proteolytic activity of NE, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP on EMILIN1 and found that MMP-3 and MT1-MMP partially cleaved EMILIN1 but without affecting the functional properties associated with the gC1q domain, whereas NE was able to fully impair the interaction of gC1q with the α4β1 integrin by cleaving this domain outside of the E933 integrin binding site. By a site direct mutagenesis approach we mapped the bond between S913 and R914 residues and selected the NE-resistant R914W mutant still able to interact with the α4β1 integrin after NE treatment. Functional studies showed that NE impaired the EMILIN1-α4β1 integrin interaction by cleaving the gC1q domain in a region crucial for its proper structural conformation, paving the way to better understand NE effects on EMILIN1-cell interaction in pathological context. PMID:28074935

  17. 3D structural conformation and functional domains of polysialyltransferase ST8Sia IV required for polysialylation of neural cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Ping; Huang, Ri-Bo; Troy, Frederic A

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of α2,8-polysialic acid (polySia) glycans are catalyzed by two highly homologous mammalian polysialyltransferases (polySTs), ST8Sia II (STX) and ST8Sia IV (PST), which are two members of the ST8Sia gene family of sialytransferases. During polysialylation, both STX and PST catalyze the transfer of multiple Sia residues from the activated sugar nucleotide precursor, CMP-Neu5Ac (Sia), to terminal Sia residues on N- and Olinked oligosaccharide chains on acceptor glycoproteins, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which is the major carrier protein of polySia. Based on our new findings and previously published studies, this review summarizes the present concepts regarding the molecular mechanism underlying regulation of protein-specific polysialylation of NCAM that includes the following: (1) Determination of the catalytic domains and specific regions within ST8Sia IV for recognizing and catalyzing the efficient polysialylation of NCAM; (2) Identification of key amino acid residues within the PSTD motif of ST8Sia IV that are essential for polysialylation; (3) Verification of key amino acids in the PBR domain of ST8Sia IV required for NCAM-specific polysialylation; and (4) a 3D conformational study of ST8Sia IV based on the Phyre2 server to discover the relationship between the structure and its functional domains of the polyST. Based on these results, our 3D model of ST8Sia IV was used to identify and characterize the catalytic domains and amino acid residues critical for catalyzing polysialylation, and have provided new structural information for supporting a detailed mechanism of polyST-NCAM interaction required for polysialylation of NCAM, findings that have not been previously reported.

  18. Structure of FGFR3 transmembrane domain dimer: implications for signaling and human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Goncharuk, Marina V; Hristova, Kalina; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-11-05

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) transduces biochemical signals via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane, and plays an important role in human development and disease. Eight different pathogenic mutations, implicated in cancers and growth disorders, have been identified in the FGFR3 transmembrane segment. Here, we describe the dimerization of the FGFR3 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking DPC/SDS (9/1) micelles. In the solved NMR structure, the two transmembrane helices pack into a symmetric left-handed dimer, with intermolecular stacking interactions occurring in the dimer central region. Some pathogenic mutations fall within the helix-helix interface, whereas others are located within a putative alternative interface. This implies that although the observed dimer structure is important for FGFR3 signaling, the mechanism of FGFR3-mediated transduction across the membrane is complex. We propose an FGFR3 signaling mechanism that is based on the solved structure, available structures of isolated soluble FGFR domains, and published biochemical and biophysical data.

  19. The A-domain of beta 2 integrin CR3 (CD11b/CD18) is a receptor for the hookworm-derived neutrophil adhesion inhibitor NIF.

    PubMed

    Rieu, P; Ueda, T; Haruta, I; Sharma, C P; Arnaout, M A

    1994-12-01

    The A-domain is a approximately 200-amino acid peptide present within structurally diverse proadhesive proteins including seven integrins. A recombinant form of the A-domain of beta 2 integrins CR3 and LFA-1 has been recently shown to bind divalent cations and to contain binding sites for protein ligands that play essential roles in leukocyte trafficking to inflammatory sites, phagocytosis and target cell killing. In this report we demonstrate that the neutrophil adhesion inhibitor, NIF produced by the hookworm Ancyclostoma caninium is a selective CD11b A-domain binding protein. NIF bound directly, specifically and with high affinity (Kd of approximately 1 nM) to recombinant CD11b A-domain (r11bA). The binding reaction was characterized by rapid association and very slow dissociation, and was blocked by an anti-r11bA monoclonal antibody. No binding was observed to rCD11aA. The NIF-r11bA interaction required divalent cations, and was absent when the mutant r11bA D140GS/AGA (that lacks divalent cation binding capacity) was used. The NIF binding site in r11bA was mapped to four short peptides, one of which being an iC3b binding site. The interaction of NIF with CR3 in intact cells followed similar binding kinetics to those with r11bA, and occurred with similar affinity in resting and activated human neutrophils, suggesting that the NIF epitope is activation independent. Binding of NIF to CR3 blocked its ability to bind to its ligands iC3b, fibrinogen, and CD54, and inhibited the ability of human neutrophils to ingest serum opsonized particles. NIF thus represents the first example of a disintegrin that targets the integrin A-domain, and is likely to be used by the hookworm to evade the host's inflammatory response. The unique structure of NIF, which lacks a disintegrin motif, emphasizes basic structural differences in antagonists targeting A+ and A- integrins, that should be valuable in drug design efforts aimed at generating novel therapeutics. Identification of the

  20. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  1. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome The Digestive System & How it Works Abdominal Adhesions What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that ... or stool through the intestines. What causes abdominal adhesions? Abdominal surgery is the most frequent cause of ...

  2. Using Self-Assembled Monolayers to Model Cell Adhesion to the 9th and 10th Type III Domains of Fibronectin†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Most mammalian cells must adhere to the extracellular matrix (ECM) to maintain proper growth and development. Fibronectin is a predominant ECM protein that engages integrin cell receptors through its Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) peptide binding sites. To study the roles these motifs play in cell adhesion, proteins derived from the 9th (containing PHSRN) and 10th (containing RGD) type III fibronectin domains were engineered to be in frame with cutinase, a serine esterase that forms a site-specific, covalent adduct with phosphonate ligands. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that present phosphonate ligands against an inert background of tri(ethylene glycol) groups were used as model substrates to immobilize the cutinase-fibronectin fusion proteins. Baby hamster kidney cells attached efficiently to all protein surfaces, but only spread efficiently on protein monolayers containing the RGD peptide. Cells on RGD-containing protein surfaces also displayed defined focal adhesions and organized cytoskeletal structures compared to cells on PHSRN-presenting surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were shown to be unaffected by the presence of PHSRN when compared to RGD alone on SAMs presenting higher densities of protein, but PHSRN supported an increased efficiency in cell attachment when presented at low protein densities with RGD. Treatment of suspended cells with soluble RGD or PHSRN peptides revealed that both peptides were able to inhibit the attachment of FN10 surfaces. These results support a model wherein PHSRN and RGD bind competitively to integrins―rather than a two-point synergistic interaction―and the presence of PHSRN serves to increase the density of ligand on the substrate and therefore enhance the sticking probability of cells during attachment. PMID:20560553

  3. Genetic evidence for the adhesion protein IgSF9/Dasm1 to regulate inhibitory synapse development independent of its intracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Archana; Traut, Matthias H; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Stein, Valentin; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-03-19

    Normal brain function requires balanced development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. An imbalance in synaptic transmission underlies many brain disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. Compared with excitatory synapses, relatively little is known about the molecular control of inhibitory synapse development. We used a genetic approach in mice to identify the Ig superfamily member IgSF9/Dasm1 as a candidate homophilic synaptic adhesion protein that regulates inhibitory synapse development. IgSF9 is expressed in pyramidal cells and subsets of interneurons in the CA1 region of hippocampus. Electrophysiological recordings of acute hippocampal slices revealed that genetic inactivation of the IgSF9 gene resulted in fewer functional inhibitory synapses; however, the strength of the remaining synapses was unaltered. These physiological abnormalities were correlated with decreased expression of inhibitory synapse markers in IgSF9(-/-) mice, providing anatomical evidence for a reduction in inhibitory synapse numbers, whereas excitatory synapse development was normal. Surprisingly, knock-in mice expressing a mutant isoform of IgSF9 lacking the entire cytoplasmic domain (IgSF9(ΔC/ΔC) mice) had no defects in inhibitory synapse development, providing genetic evidence that IgSF9 regulates synapse development via ectodomain interactions rather than acting itself as a signaling receptor. Further, we found that IgSF9 mediated homotypic binding and cell aggregation, but failed to induce synapse formation, suggesting that IgSF9 acts as a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) to maintain synapses. Juvenile IgSF9(-/-) mice exhibited increased seizure susceptibility indicative of an imbalance in synaptic excitation and inhibition. These results provide genetic evidence for a specific role of IgSF9 in inhibitory synapse development/maintenance, presumably by its CAM-like activity.

  4. A truncating mutation in the laminin-332α chain highlights the role of the LG45 proteolytic domain in regulating keratinocyte adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Di Zenzo, G; El Hachem, M; Diociaiuti, A; Boldrini, R; Calabresi, V; Cianfarani, F; Fortugno, P; Piccinni, E; Zambruno, G; Castiglia, D

    2014-05-01

    Altered function of laminin-332 (α3β3γ2) consequent to mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes causes junctional epidermolysis bullosa non-Herlitz (JEB-nH). JEB-nH patients suffer from skin blistering and have an increased risk of developing aggressive skin carcinomas in adulthood. Laminin-332 is proteolytically processed and its extracellular mature form lacks the α3 chain C-terminal globules 4 and 5 (LG45). The LG45 tandem has cell adhesion and protumorigenic properties. However, mutations that affect this domain are very rare and their functional effects in patients have not been explored to date. To characterize molecularly an adult patient with JEB-nH and altered laminin-332 expression presenting multiple skin carcinomas, and to analyse LG45-mediated biological functions using keratinocytes from the patient. A mutational search in laminin-332 genes was performed by hetero-duplex analysis. LAMA3 mRNA and laminin-332 protein levels in patient keratinocytes were investigated by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and radioimmunoprecipitation assay, respectively. Keratinocyte migration was examined by scratch and Boyden chamber assays. We identified a homozygous LAMA3 mutation, p.Leu1648TrpfsX32, which truncates the last 45 amino acids of the carboxyl terminal LG5 subdomain. Gene expression studies revealed that the mutant transcripts were stable and even increased, precursor laminin-332 molecules were retained intracellularly and the amount of mature extracellular heterotrimers was reduced to about 50%. Finally, the patient's keratinocytes migrated faster than normal keratinocytes. Structural disruption of LG5 highlights the critical functions of the LG45 proteolytic region in precursor laminin-332 secretion and keratinocyte adhesion and migration. Perturbation of LG45 function might explain the non-aggressive behaviour of carcinomas in this patient. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. DUF1220-domain copy number implicated in human brain-size pathology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Laura J; O'Bleness, Majesta S; Davis, Jonathan M; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Keeney, J G; Jackson, Jay; Sikela, Megan; Raznahan, Armin; Giedd, Jay; Rapoport, Judith; Nagamani, Sandesh S C; Erez, Ayelet; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Sugalski, Rachel; Lupski, James R; Fingerlin, Tasha; Cheung, Sau Wai; Sikela, James M

    2012-09-07

    DUF1220 domains show the largest human-lineage-specific increase in copy number of any protein-coding region in the human genome and map primarily to 1q21, where deletions and reciprocal duplications have been associated with microcephaly and macrocephaly, respectively. Given these findings and the high correlation between DUF1220 copy number and brain size across primate lineages (R(2) = 0.98; p = 1.8 × 10(-6)), DUF1220 sequences represent plausible candidates for underlying 1q21-associated brain-size pathologies. To investigate this possibility, we used specialized bioinformatics tools developed for scoring highly duplicated DUF1220 sequences to implement targeted 1q21 array comparative genomic hybridization on individuals (n = 42) with 1q21-associated microcephaly and macrocephaly. We show that of all the 1q21 genes examined (n = 53), DUF1220 copy number shows the strongest association with brain size among individuals with 1q21-associated microcephaly, particularly with respect to the three evolutionarily conserved DUF1220 clades CON1(p = 0.0079), CON2 (p = 0.0134), and CON3 (p = 0.0116). Interestingly, all 1q21 DUF1220-encoding genes belonging to the NBPF family show significant correlations with frontal-occipital-circumference Z scores in the deletion group. In a similar survey of a nondisease population, we show that DUF1220 copy number exhibits the strongest correlation with brain gray-matter volume (CON1, p = 0.0246; and CON2, p = 0.0334). Notably, only DUF1220 sequences are consistently significant in both disease and nondisease populations. Taken together, these data strongly implicate the loss of DUF1220 copy number in the etiology of 1q21-associated microcephaly and support the view that DUF1220 domains function as general effectors of evolutionary, pathological, and normal variation in brain size. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DUF1220-Domain Copy Number Implicated in Human Brain-Size Pathology and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Laura J.; O’Bleness, Majesta S.; Davis, Jonathan M.; Dickens, C. Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Keeney, J.G.; Jackson, Jay; Sikela, Megan; Raznahan, Armin; Giedd, Jay; Rapoport, Judith; Nagamani, Sandesh S.C.; Erez, Ayelet; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Sugalski, Rachel; Lupski, James R.; Fingerlin, Tasha; Cheung, Sau Wai; Sikela, James M.

    2012-01-01

    DUF1220 domains show the largest human-lineage-specific increase in copy number of any protein-coding region in the human genome and map primarily to 1q21, where deletions and reciprocal duplications have been associated with microcephaly and macrocephaly, respectively. Given these findings and the high correlation between DUF1220 copy number and brain size across primate lineages (R2 = 0.98; p = 1.8 × 10−6), DUF1220 sequences represent plausible candidates for underlying 1q21-associated brain-size pathologies. To investigate this possibility, we used specialized bioinformatics tools developed for scoring highly duplicated DUF1220 sequences to implement targeted 1q21 array comparative genomic hybridization on individuals (n = 42) with 1q21-associated microcephaly and macrocephaly. We show that of all the 1q21 genes examined (n = 53), DUF1220 copy number shows the strongest association with brain size among individuals with 1q21-associated microcephaly, particularly with respect to the three evolutionarily conserved DUF1220 clades CON1(p = 0.0079), CON2 (p = 0.0134), and CON3 (p = 0.0116). Interestingly, all 1q21 DUF1220-encoding genes belonging to the NBPF family show significant correlations with frontal-occipital-circumference Z scores in the deletion group. In a similar survey of a nondisease population, we show that DUF1220 copy number exhibits the strongest correlation with brain gray-matter volume (CON1, p = 0.0246; and CON2, p = 0.0334). Notably, only DUF1220 sequences are consistently significant in both disease and nondisease populations. Taken together, these data strongly implicate the loss of DUF1220 copy number in the etiology of 1q21-associated microcephaly and support the view that DUF1220 domains function as general effectors of evolutionary, pathological, and normal variation in brain size. PMID:22901949

  7. Crystal structure of designed PX domain from cytokine-independent survival kinase and implications on evolution-based protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Shultis, David; Dodge, Gregory; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The Phox homology domain (PX domain) is a phosphoinositide-binding structural domain that is critical in mediating protein and cell membrane association and has been found in more than 100 eukaryotic proteins. The abundance of PX domains in nature offers an opportunity to redesign the protein using EvoDesign, a computational approach to design new sequences based on structure profiles of multiple evolutionarily related proteins. In this study, we report the X-ray crystallographic structure of a designed PX domain from the cytokine-independent survival kinase (CISK), which has been implicated as functioning in parallel with PKB/Akt in cell survival and insulin responses. Detailed data analysis of the designed CISK-PX protein demonstrates positive impacts of knowledge-based secondary structure and solvation predictions and structure-based sequence profiles on the efficiency of the evolutionary-based protein design method. The structure of the designed CISK-PX domain is close to the wild-type (1.54 Å in Cα RMSD), which was accurately predicted by I-TASSER based fragment assembly simulations (1.32 Å in Cα RMSD). This study represents the first successfully designed conditional peripheral membrane protein fold and has important implications in the examination and experimental validation of the evolution-based protein design approaches.

  8. Crystal Structure of a Two-domain Multicopper Oxidase: Implications for the Evolution of Multicooper Blue Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Daniel J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2009-06-01

    The two-domain multicopper oxidases are proposed to be key intermediates in the evolution of three-domain multicopper oxidases. A number of two-domain multicopper oxidases have been identified from genome sequences and are classified as type A, type B, or type C on the basis of the predicted location of the type 1 copper center. The crystal structure of blue copper oxidase, a type C two-domain multicopper oxidase from Nitrosomonas europaea, has been determined to 1.9 A resolution. Blue copper oxidase is a trimer, of which each subunit comprises two cupredoxin domains. Each subunit houses a type 1 copper site in domain 1 and a type 2/type 3 trinuclear copper cluster at the subunit-subunit interface. The coordination geometry at the trinuclear copper site is consistent with reduction of the copper ions. Although the overall architecture of blue copper oxidase is similar to nitrite reductases, detailed structural alignments show that the fold and domain orientation more closely resemble the three-domain multicopper oxidases. These observations have important implications for the evolution of nitrite reductases and multicopper oxidases.

  9. Wood adhesion and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An appreciation of rheology, material science, organic chemistry, polymer science, and mechanics leads to better understanding of the factors controlling the performance of the bonded assemblies. Given the complexity of wood as a substrate, it is hard to understand why some wood adhesives work better than other wood adhesives, especially when under the more severe...

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to human laminin α4 chain globular domain inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to α4-laminins.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Taichi; Wondimu, Zenebech; Oikawa, Yuko; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Virtanen, Ismo; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    α4-Laminins, such as laminins 411 and 421, are mesenchymal laminins expressed by vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, leukocytes and other normal cell types. These laminins are recognized by α6β1 and α6β4 integrins and MCAM (CD146), and promote adhesion and migration of the cells. α4-Laminins are also expressed and secreted by some tumor cells and strongly promote tumor cell migration. Moreover, the abluminal side of blood and/or lymphatic vessels and the nerve perineurium, common tracks of tumor cell dissemination, express α4-laminins, and these laminin isoforms, when expressed in the stroma, may contribute to tumor invasion. In the present study, we examined ten mAbs to human laminin α4 chain for their reactivity with the isolated laminin α4 globular domain, their ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and their effect on the binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to both α4-laminins. Most of the mAbs reacted with the laminin α4 globular domain, but only two, mAbs FC10 and 084, significantly inhibited tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411. When used in combination, these antibodies practically abolished the cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411 and significantly reduced the cellular responses on laminin-421. Accordingly, mAbs FC10 and 084 significantly inhibited the binding of purified α6β1 integrin and MCAM to laminins 411 and 421. These results indicate that mAbs to the laminin α4 globular domain are able to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and that α6β1 integrin and MCAM bind α4-laminins at very close sites on the globular domain. These reagents contribute to a better understanding of the biology of α4-laminins and may have a therapeutic potential in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  11. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development.

  12. The adhesion GPCR GPR126 has distinct, domain-dependent functions in Schwann cell development mediated by interaction with Laminin-211

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Sarah C.; Luo, Rong; Liebscher, Ines; Giera, Stefanie; Jeong, Sung-jin; Mogha, Amit; Ghidinelli, Monica; Feltri, M. Laura; Schöneberg, Torsten; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Myelin ensheathes axons to allow rapid propagation of action potentials and proper nervous system function. In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SCs) radially sort axons into a 1:1 relationship before wrapping an axonal segment to form myelin. SC myelination requires the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126, which undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage into an N-terminal fragment (NTF) and a 7-transmembrane-containing C-terminal fragment (CTF). Here, we show that GPR126 has domain-specific functions in SC development whereby the NTF is necessary and sufficient for axon sorting while the CTF promotes wrapping through cAMP elevation. These biphasic roles of GPR126 are governed by interactions with Laminin-211, which we define as a novel ligand for GPR126 that modulates receptor signaling via a tethered agonist. Our work suggests a model in which Laminin-211 mediates GPR126-induced cAMP levels to control early and late stages of SC development. PMID:25695270

  13. Crystal structure and functional implication of the RUN domain of human NESCA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qifan; Han, Chuanhui; Liu, Lan; Wang, Yizhi; Deng, Hongyu; Bai, Lin; Jiang, Tao

    2012-08-01

    NESCA, a newly discovered signaling adapter protein in the NGF-pathway, contains a RUN domain at its N-terminus. Here we report the crystal structure of the NESCA RUN domain determined at 2.0-Å resolution. The overall fold of the NESCA RUN domain comprises nine helices, resembling the RUN domain of RPIPx and the RUN1 domain of Rab6IP1. However, compared to the other RUN domains, the RUN domain of NESCA has significantly different surface electrostatic distributions at the putative GTPase-interacting interface. We demonstrate that the RUN domain of NESCA can bind H-Ras, a downstream signaling molecule of TrkA, with high affinity. Moreover, NESCA RUN can directly interact with TrkA. These results provide new insights into how NESCA participates in the NGF-TrkA signaling pathway.

  14. Solution structure, domain features, and structural implications of mutants of the chromo domain from the fission yeast histone methyltransferase Clr4.

    PubMed

    Horita, D A; Ivanova, A V; Altieri, A S; Klar, A J; Byrd, R A

    2001-03-30

    The encapsulation of otherwise transcribable loci within transcriptionally inactive heterochromatin is rapidly gaining recognition as an important mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, heterochromatinization of the mat2/mat3 loci silences the mating-type information encoded within these loci. Here, we present the solution structure of the chromo domain from the cryptic loci regulator protein Clr4. Clr4 is known to regulate silencing and switching at the mating-type loci and to affect chromatin structure at centromeres. Clr4 and its human and Drosophila homologs have been identified as histone H3-specific methyltransferases, further implicating this family of proteins in chromatin remodeling. Our structure highlights a conserved surface that may be involved in chromo domain-ligand interactions. We have also analyzed two chromo domain mutants (W31G and W41G) that previously were shown to affect silencing and switching in full-length Clr4. Both mutants are significantly destabilized relative to wild-type. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Akt directly regulates focal adhesion kinase through association and serine phosphorylation: implication for pressure-induced colon cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shouye

    2011-01-01

    Although focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is typically considered upstream of Akt, extracellular pressure stimulates cancer cell adhesion via Akt-dependent FAK activation. How Akt regulates FAK is unknown. We studied Akt-FAK interaction in colon cancer cells under 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure. Pressure enhanced Akt-FAK association, blocked by inhibiting FAK or silencing Akt1 but not Akt2, and stimulated FAK serine phosphorylation in Caco-2 and human colon cancer cells from surgical specimens Akt1-dependently. FAK includes three serine (S517/601/695) and one threonine (T600)-containing consensus sequences for Akt phosphorylation. Studying S–>A nonphosphorylatable point mutants suggests that these sites coordinately upregulate FAK Y397 tyrosine phosphorylation, which conventionally initiates FAK activation, and mediate pressure-induced cancer cell adhesion. FAK(T600A) mutation did not prevent pressure-induced FAK(Y397) phosphorylation or adhesion. Akt1 appeared to directly bind FAK, and this binding did not depend on the FAK autophosphorylation site (Y397). In addition, our results demonstrated that Akt phosphorylated FAK at three novel serine phosphorylation sites, which were also not required for FAK-Akt binding. This novel interaction suggests that FAK and Akt may be dual kinase targets to prevent cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. PMID:21209368

  16. Characterization of the Cadherin–Catenin Complex of the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis and Implications for the Evolution of Metazoan Cell–Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Donald Nathaniel; Miller, Phillip W.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, William James

    2016-01-01

    The cadherin–catenin complex (CCC) mediates cell–cell adhesion in bilaterian animals by linking extracellular cadherin-based adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton. However, it is unknown whether the basic organization of the complex is conserved across all metazoans. We tested whether protein interactions and actin-binding properties of the CCC are conserved in a nonbilaterian animal, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We demonstrated that N. vectensis has a complete repertoire of cadherin–catenin proteins, including two classical cadherins, one α-catenin, and one β-catenin. Using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering, we showed that α-catenin and β-catenin formed a heterodimer that bound N. vectensis Cadherin-1 and -2. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin bound F-actin with equivalent affinity as either a monomer or an α/β-catenin heterodimer, and its affinity for F-actin was, in part, regulated by a novel insert between the N- and C-terminal domains. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin inhibited Arp2/3 complex-mediated nucleation of actin filaments, a regulatory property previously thought to be unique to mammalian αE-catenin. Thus, despite significant differences in sequence, the key interactions of the CCC are conserved between bilaterians and cnidarians, indicating that the core function of the CCC as a link between cell adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton is ancestral in the eumetazoans. PMID:27189570

  17. Recurrent hormone-binding domain truncated ESR1 amplifications in primary endometrial cancers suggest their implication in hormone independent growth

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Frederik; Hoivik, Erling A.; Gibson, William J.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Schumacher, Steven E.; Asmann, Yan W.; Grossmann, Patrick; Trovik, Jone; Necela, Brian M.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B.; Cherniack, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in both endometrial and breast cancers, and represents the most prevalent therapeutic target in breast cancer. However, anti-estrogen therapy has not been shown to be effective in endometrial cancer. Recently it has been shown that hormone-binding domain alterations of ERα in breast cancer contribute to acquired resistance to anti-estrogen therapy. In analyses of genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we observe that endometrial carcinomas manifest recurrent ESR1 gene amplifications that truncate the hormone-binding domain encoding region of ESR1 and are associated with reduced mRNA expression of exons encoding the hormone-binding domain. These findings support a role for hormone-binding alterations of ERα in primary endometrial cancer, with potentially important therapeutic implications. PMID:27160768

  18. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  19. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design☆

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S.; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  20. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Implications for complex cognition from the hafting of tools with compound adhesives in the Middle Stone Age, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wadley, Lyn; Hodgskiss, Tamaryn; Grant, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Compound adhesives made from red ochre mixed with plant gum were used in the Middle Stone Age (MSA), South Africa. Replications reported here suggest that early artisans did not merely color their glues red; they deliberately effected physical transformations involving chemical changes from acidic to less acidic pH, dehydration of the adhesive near wood fires, and changes to mechanical workability and electrostatic forces. Some of the steps required for making compound adhesive seem impossible without multitasking and abstract thought. This ability suggests overlap between the cognitive abilities of modern people and people in the MSA. Our multidisciplinary analysis provides a new way to recognize complex cognition in the MSA without necessarily invoking the concept of symbolism. PMID:19433786

  2. Reduction in membranous immunohistochemical staining for the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule correlates with poor patient outcome in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A.; Ramjeesingh, R.; Chen, C.H.; Hurlbut, D.; Hammad, N.; Mulligan, L.M.; Nicol, C.; Feilotter, H.E.; Davey, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (epcam) is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on both normal epithelium and epithelial neoplasms such as gastric, breast, and renal carcinomas. Recent studies have proposed that the proteolytic cleavage of the intracellular domain of epcam (epcam-icd) can trigger signalling cascades leading to aggressive tumour behavior. The expression profile of epcam-icd has not been elucidated for primary colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we examined epcam-icd immunohistochemical staining in a large cohort of patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and assessed its performance as a potential prognostic marker. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for epcam-icd was assessed on tissue microarrays consisting of 137 primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples. Intensity of staining for each core was scored by 3 independent pathologists. The membranous epcam-icd staining score was calculated as a weighted average from 3 core samples per tumour. Univariate analysis of the average scores and clinical outcome measures was performed. Results The level of membranous epcam-icd staining was positively associated with well-differentiated tumours (p = 0.01); low preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.001); and several measures of survival, including 2-year (p = 0.02) and 5-year survival (p = 0.05), and length of time post-diagnosis (p = 0.03). A number of other variables—including stage, grade, and lymph node status—showed correlations with epcam staining and markers of poor outcome, but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Low membranous epcam-icd staining might be a useful marker to identify tumours with aggressive clinical behavior and potential poor prognosis and might help to select candidates who could potentially benefit from treatment targeting epcam. PMID:27330354

  3. Single domain antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) inhibits proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Murad, Yanal M; Chang, Chia-Ching; Yang, Ming-Chi; Baral, Toya Nath; Cowan, Aaron; Tseng, Shin-Hua; Wong, Andrew; Mackenzie, Roger; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Zhang, Jianbing

    2014-03-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer cells, and it is associated with the progression of pancreatic cancer. We tested a single domain antibody (sdAb) targeting CEACAM6, 2A3, which was isolated previously from a llama immune library, and an Fc conjugated version of this sdAb, to determine how they affect the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3. We also compared the effects of the antibodies to gemcitabine. Gemcitabine and 2A3 slowed down cancer cell proliferation. However, only 2A3 retarded cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis within the cancer mass and BxPC3 cell MMP-9 activity, three features important for tumour growth and metastasis. The IC50s for 2A3, 2A3-Fc and gemcitabine were determined as 6.5μM, 8μM and 12nM, respectively. While the 2A3 antibody inhibited MMP-9 activity by 33% compared to non-treated control cells, gemcitabine failed to inhibit MMP-9 activity. Moreover, 2A3 and 2A3-Fc inhibited invasion of BxPC3 by 73% compared to non-treated cells. When conditioned media that were produced using 2A3- or 2A3-Fc-treated BxPC3 cells were used in a capillary formation assay, the capillary length was reduced by 21% and 49%, respectively. Therefore 2A3 is an ideal candidate for treating tumours that over-express CEACAM6. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Domain Organization in Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type E is Unique: Its Implication in Faster Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Eswaramoorthy, S; Furey, W; Navaza, J; Sax, M; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven antigenically distinct neurotoxins [C. botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) A-G] sharing a significant sequence homology. Based on sequence and functional similarity, it was believed that their three-dimensional structures will also be similar. Indeed, the crystal structures of BoNTs A and B exhibit similar fold and domain association where the translocation domain is flanked on either side by binding and catalytic domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of BoNT E holotoxin and show that the domain association is different and unique, although the individual domains are similar to those of BoNTs A and B. In BoNT E, both the binding domain and the catalytic domain are on the same side of the translocation domain, and all three have mutual interfaces. This unique association may have an effect on the rate of translocation, with the molecule strategically positioned in the vesicle for quick entry into cytosol. Botulism, the disease caused by BoNT E, sets in faster than any other serotype because of its speedy internalization and translocation, and the present structure offers a credible explanation. We propose that the translocation domain in other BoNTs follows a two-step process to attain translocation-competent conformation as in BoNT E. We also suggest that this translocation-competent conformation in BoNT E is a probable reason for its faster toxic rate compared to BoNT A. However, this needs further experimental elucidation.

  5. Evidence of a role for CD44 and cell adhesion in mediating resistance to lenalidomide in multiple myeloma: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, C C; Baladandayuthapani, V; Lin, H Y; Jones, R J; Kuiatse, I; Wang, H; Yang, J; Shah, J J; Thomas, S K; Wang, M; Weber, D M; Orlowski, R Z

    2014-02-01

    Resistance of myeloma to lenalidomide is an emerging clinical problem, and though it has been associated in part with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the mediators of this phenotype remained undefined. Lenalidomide-resistant models were found to overexpress the hyaluronan (HA)-binding protein CD44, a downstream Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target. Consistent with a role of CD44 in cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells were more adhesive to bone marrow stroma and HA-coated plates. Blockade of CD44 with monoclonal antibodies, free HA or CD44 knockdown reduced adhesion and sensitized to lenalidomide. Wnt/β-catenin suppression by FH535 enhanced the activity of lenalidomide, as did interleukin-6 neutralization with siltuximab. Notably, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) downregulated total β-catenin, cell-surface and total CD44, reduced adhesion of lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells and enhanced the activity of lenalidomide in a lenalidomide-resistant in vivo murine xenograft model. Finally, ATRA sensitized primary myeloma samples from patients that had relapsed and/or refractory disease after lenalidomide therapy to this immunomodulatory agent ex vivo. Taken together, our findings support the hypotheses that CD44 and CAM-DR contribute to lenalidomide resistance in multiple myeloma, that CD44 should be evaluated as a putative biomarker of sensitivity to lenalidomide, and that ATRA or other approaches that target CD44 may overcome clinical lenalidomide resistance.

  6. Expression and induction of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on acute myeloid leukemic cells: implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, R E; Zwinderman, K H; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H

    2000-02-01

    Previously, we observed an increased recognition of malignant cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) when the target cells were cultured in vitro for 24 hours. In this study, we analyzed the expression of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and determined whether 24-hour culture of the cells was associated with upregulation of these molecules. We analyzed whether this incubation period improved recognition of AML cells by CTL. Expression of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on leukemic blasts of 34 patients comprising each AML FAB subclassification were analyzed directly and after 24 hours of culture, and the recognition of these AML cells by an HLA-A2 restricted CTL clone was determined. Blocking studies were performed with antibodies against CD54, CD58, and CD11a. Immunophenotyping showed a low expression of CD80 and CD40 and a variable CD86 expression on most AML cells. CD54 expression was generally low, CD58 expression was high, and CD11a expression was variable, with a higher expression in AML M0, M1, M4, and M5. Twenty-four hours of culture resulted in a significant upregulation of CD40, CD54, and CD58. Impaired recognition of AML cells by the HLA-A2 restricted CTL clone was enhanced 100-200% by 24 hours of preincubation of the leukemic cells. Blocking studies showed the importance of multiple adhesion molecules on the AML cells. Low expression of multiple costimulatory and adhesion molecules on AML could be upregulated by 24 hours of culture, which was associated with increased recognition of the AML blasts by CTL. Blocking multiple adhesion molecules completely abolished CTL recognition, showing the importance of the combination of these molecules for T-cell interaction with AML.

  7. Extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 binds to metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif of integrin β1 to modulate malignant properties of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jiao; Song, Fei; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2012-02-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that HAb18G/CD147 interacts with the integrin variants α3β1 and α6β1. However, the mechanism of the interaction remains largely unknown. In this study, mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a mammalian two-hybrid method, was used to study the CD147-integrin β1 subunit interaction. CD147 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells was interfered with by small hairpin RNA. Nude mouse xenograft model and metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in carcinogenesis and metastasis. We found that the extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 (I-type domain) binds at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site in the βA domain of the integrin β1 subunit, and Asp(179) in the I-type domain of HAb18G/CD147 plays an important role in the interaction. The levels of the proteins that act downstream of integrin, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phospho-FAK, were decreased, and the cytoskeletal structures of HCC cells were rearranged bearing the HAb18G/CD147 deletion. Simultaneously, the migration and invasion capacities, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, colony formation rate in vitro, and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo were decreased. These results indicate that the interaction of HAb18G/CD147 extracellular I-type domain with the integrin β1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif activates the downstream FAK signaling pathway, subsequently enhancing the malignant properties of HCC cells.

  8. The PIR domain of Grb14 is an intrinsically unstructured protein: implication in insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Moncoq, Karine; Broutin, Isabelle; Larue, Valéry; Perdereau, Dominique; Cailliau, Katia; Browaeys-Poly, Edith; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Ducruix, Arnaud

    2003-11-20

    Grb14 belongs to the Grb7 family of adapter proteins and was identified as a negative regulator of insulin signal transduction. Its inhibitory effect on the insulin receptor kinase activity is controlled by a newly discovered domain called PIR. To investigate the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of this new domain, we cloned and purified recombinant PIR-SH2, PIR, and SH2 domains. The isolated PIR and PIR-SH2 domains were physiologically active and inhibited insulin-induced reinitiation of meiosis in the Xenopus oocytes system. However, NMR experiments on (15)N-labelled PIR revealed that it did not present secondary structure. These results suggest that the PIR domain belongs to the growing family of intrinsically unstructured proteins.

  9. The structure of a PKD domain from polycystin-1: implications for polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bycroft, M; Bateman, A; Clarke, J; Hamill, S J; Sandford, R; Thomas, R L; Chothia, C

    1999-01-01

    Most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are the result of mutations in the PKD1 gene. The PKD1 gene codes for a large cell-surface glycoprotein, polycystin-1, of unknown function, which, based on its predicted domain structure, may be involved in protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions. Approximately 30% of polycystin-1 consists of 16 copies of a novel protein module called the PKD domain. Here we show that this domain has a beta-sandwich fold. Although this fold is common to a number of cell-surface modules, the PKD domain represents a distinct protein family. The tenth PKD domain of human and Fugu polycystin-1 show extensive conservation of surface residues suggesting that this region could be a ligand-binding site. This structure will allow the likely effects of missense mutations in a large part of the PKD1 gene to be determined. PMID:9889186

  10. Implications of 3D domain swapping for protein folding, misfolding and function.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is the process by which two identical protein chains exchange a part of their structure to form an intertwined dimer or higher-order oligomer. The phenomenon has been observed in the crystal structures of a range of different proteins. In this chapter we review the experiments that have been performed in order to understand the sequence and structural determinants of domain-swapping and these show how the general principles obtained can be used to engineer proteins to domain swap. We discuss the role of domain swapping in regulating protein function and as one possible mechanism of protein misfolding that can lead to aggregation and disease. We also review a number of interesting pathways of macromolecular assembly involving β-strand insertion or complementation that are related to the domain-swapping phenomenon.

  11. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  12. Structure of a longitudinal actin dimer assembled by tandem w domains: implications for actin filament nucleation.

    PubMed

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-10-15

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  13. Perfringolysin O association with ordered lipid domains: implications for transmembrane protein raft affinity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Lindsay D; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin

    2010-11-17

    Upon interaction with cholesterol, perfringolysin O (PFO) inserts into membranes and forms a rigid transmembrane (TM) β-barrel. PFO is believed to interact with liquid ordered lipid domains (lipid rafts). Because the origin of TM protein affinity for rafts is poorly understood, we investigated PFO raft affinity in vesicles having coexisting ordered and disordered lipid domains. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFO Trp to domain-localized acceptors indicated that PFO generally has a raft affinity between that of LW peptide (low raft affinity) and cholera toxin B (high raft affinity) in vesicles containing ordered domains rich in brain sphingomyelin or distearoylphosphatidylcholine. FRET also showed that ceramide, which increases exposure of cholesterol to water and thus displaces it from rafts, does not displace PFO from ordered domains. This can be explained by shielding of PFO-bound cholesterol from water. Finally, FRET showed that PFO affinity for ordered domains was higher in its non-TM (prepore) form than in its TM form, demonstrating that the TM portion of PFO interacts unfavorably with rafts. Microscopy studies in giant unilamellar vesicles confirmed that PFO exhibits intermediate raft affinity, and showed that TM PFO (but not non-TM PFO) concentrated at the edges of liquid ordered domains. These studies suggest that a combination of binding to raft-associating molecules and having a rigid TM structure that is unable to pack well in a highly ordered lipid environment can control TM protein domain localization. To accommodate these constraints, raft-associated TM proteins in cells may tend to locate within liquid disordered shells encapsulated within ordered domains. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Curcumin inhibits development and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum: Implications for YakA signaling and GST enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Garige, Mamatha; Walters, Eric

    2015-11-13

    The molecular basis for nutraceutical properties of the polyphenol curcumin (Curcuma longa, Turmeric) is complex, affecting multiple factors that regulate cell signaling and homeostasis. Here, we report the effect of curcumin on cellular and developmental mechanisms in the eukaryotic model, Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium proliferation was inhibited in the presence of curcumin, which also suppressed the prestarvation marker, discoidin I, members of the yakA-mediated developmental signaling pathway, and expression of the extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins (DdCAD and csA). This resulted in delayed chemotaxis, adhesion, and development of the organism. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on developmental genes, curcumin induced gstA gene expression, overall GST activity, and generated production of reactive oxygen species. These studies expand our knowledge of developmental and biochemical signaling influenced by curcumin, and lends greater consideration of GST enzyme function in eukaryotic cell signaling, development, and differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Curcumin inhibits development and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum: Implications for YakA signaling and GST enzyme function

    SciTech Connect

    Garige, Mamatha; Walters, Eric

    2015-11-13

    The molecular basis for nutraceutical properties of the polyphenol curcumin (Curcuma longa, Turmeric) is complex, affecting multiple factors that regulate cell signaling and homeostasis. Here, we report the effect of curcumin on cellular and developmental mechanisms in the eukaryotic model, Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium proliferation was inhibited in the presence of curcumin, which also suppressed the prestarvation marker, discoidin I, members of the yakA-mediated developmental signaling pathway, and expression of the extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins (DdCAD and csA). This resulted in delayed chemotaxis, adhesion, and development of the organism. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on developmental genes, curcumin induced gstA gene expression, overall GST activity, and generated production of reactive oxygen species. These studies expand our knowledge of developmental and biochemical signaling influenced by curcumin, and lends greater consideration of GST enzyme function in eukaryotic cell signaling, development, and differentiation.

  16. A novel amphioxus cadherin that localizes to epithelial adherens junctions has an unusual domain organization with implications for chordate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hiroki; Wada, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Kunifumi; Akiyama-Oda, Yasuko; Satoh, Nori; Humphreys, Tom; Zhang, Shicui; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2002-01-01

    Although data are available from only vertebrates, urochordates, and three nonchordate animals, there are definite differences in the structures of classic cadherins between vertebrates plus urochordates and nonchordates. In this study we examined structural diversity of classic cadherins among bilaterian animals by obtaining new data from an amphioxus (Cephalochordata, Chordata), an acorn worm (Hemichordata), a sea star (Echinodermata), and an oyster (Mollusca). The structures of newly identified nonchordate cadherins are grouped together with those of the known sea urchin and Drosophila cadherins, whereas the structure of an amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) cadherin, designated BbC, is differently categorized from those of other known chordate cadherins. BbC is identified as a cadherin by its cytoplasmic domain whose sequence is highly related to the cytoplasmic sequences of all known classic cadherins, but it lacks all of the five repeats constituting the extracellular homophilic-binding domain of other chordate cadherins. The ectodomains of BbC match the ectodomains found in nonchordate cadherins but not present in other chordate cadherins. We show that the BbC functions as a cell-cell adhesion molecule when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and localizes to adherens junctions in the ectodermal epithelia in amphioxus embryos. We argue that BbC is the amphioxus homologue of the classic cadherins involved in the formation of epithelial adherens junctions. The structural relationships of the cadherin molecules allow us to propose a possibility that cephalochordates might be basal to the sister-groups vertebrates and urochordates.

  17. Cohesiveness tunes assembly and morphology of FG nucleoporin domain meshworks – Implications for nuclear pore permeability

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Nico B.; Labokha, Aksana A.; Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk; Richter, Ralf P.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes control the exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. A selective permeability barrier that arises from a supramolecular assembly of intrinsically unfolded nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine dipeptides (FG domains) fills the nuclear pore. There is increasing evidence that selective transport requires cohesive FG domain interactions. To understand the functional roles of cohesive interactions, we studied monolayers of end-grafted FG domains as a bottom-up nanoscale model system of the permeability barrier. Based on detailed physicochemical analysis of the model films and comparison of the data with polymer theory, we propose that cohesiveness is tuned to promote rapid assembly of the permeability barrier and to generate a stable and compact pore-filling meshwork with a small mesh size. Our results highlight the functional importance of weak interactions, typically a few kBT per chain, and contribute important information to understand the mechanism of size-selective transport. PMID:24138862

  18. Structure, interactions and evolutionary implications of a domain-swapped lectin dimer from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Dhabaleswar; Mishra, Padmanabh; Surolia, Avadhesha; Vijayan, Mamannamana

    2014-10-01

    Crystal structure determination of the lectin domain of MSMEG_3662 from Mycobacterium smegmatis and its complexes with mannose and methyl-α-mannose, the first effort of its kind on a mycobacterial lectin, reveals a structure very similar to β-prism II fold lectins from plant sources, but with extensive unprecedented domain swapping in dimer formation. The two subunits in a dimer often show small differences in structure, but the two domains, not always related by 2-fold symmetry, have the same structure. Each domain carries three sugar-binding sites, similar to those in plant lectins, one on each Greek key motif. The occurrence of β-prism II fold lectins in bacteria, with characteristics similar to those from plants, indicates that this family of lectins is of ancient origin and had evolved into a mature system before bacteria and plants diverged. In plants, the number of binding sites per domain varies between one and three, whereas the number is two in the recently reported lectin domains from Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. An analysis of the sequences of the lectins and the lectin domains shows that the level of sequence similarity among the three Greek keys in each domain has a correlation with the number of binding sites in it. Furthermore, sequence conservation among the lectins from different species is the highest for that Greek key which carries a binding site in all of them. Thus, it would appear that carbohydrate binding influences the course of the evolution of the lectin. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Molecular Mechanisms for Adhesion and Colonization of Human Gastric Mucosa by Helicobacter pylori and its Clinical Implications].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Elisabete; Magalhães, Ana; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Reis, Celso A

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very prevalent worldwide and is associated with the progression of the gastric carcinogenesis cascade, being one of the main risk factors for the development of gastric carcinoma. Several factors are determinant for the infection and for the development of gastric disease, including environmental factors, host genetic factors and virulence factors of the bacteria. In this review, we present an overview of the current knowledge on the determinants of the infection and on the recently described molecular mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa, as well as its possible future therapeutic application. The adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelium is critical for gastric pathogenesis, allowing bacterial access to nutrients and the action of bacterial virulence factors, promoting recurrence of the infection and the progression of the gastric carcinogenesis pathway. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection is the best preventive strategy available against gastric cancer, mainly if it is achieved before the development of pre-neoplastic lesions. The increase in antibiotics resistance, together with the eradication failures in some patients, has promoted the development of alternative treatments. The new therapeutic strategies, focused on the molecular mechanism of Helicobacter pylori adhesion, are very promising; however, future studies are needed to evaluate its in vivo efficiency and toxicity.

  20. Doubly stochastic Poisson distribution of platelet adhesion on material surfaces and its implication on fluorescence image analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhengyu; Cawse, James N; Yu, Liming; Richards, William D

    2009-04-01

    An image based assay has been developed to quantify platelet adhesion on material surfaces. Briefly, citrated platelet rich plasma (PRP) is incubated with materials for 2 h to allow platelet adhesion on the surface, followed by fluorescence labeling of platelets with Celltracker Green. Multiple images are acquired by an automatic fluorescence microscope, IN Cell Analyzer 1000. Platelets are identified and counted by an automatic image analysis algorithm. We have observed that the variance of the counts is considerably greater than expected from simple distribution laws. Statistical analysis of that difference shows that these measurements will often follow a doubly stochastic Poisson process in which the variance is inherently very large. To overcome this, multiple images (n > or = 8 images/well, about 3% of total area) are necessary to achieve accurate counting. This method has been compared to the commonly used enzyme based platelet adhesion assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. It is concluded that the present method is only effective in quantifying adherent platelets when a large number of samples are used. However, this method does provide additional information on platelet morphology and spatial distribution, which is lacking in the LDH assay.

  1. Experimental methods for the Palaeolithic dry distillation of birch bark: implications for the origin and development of Neandertal adhesive technology.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Soressi, M; Pomstra, D; Langejans, G H J

    2017-08-31

    The destructive distillation of birch bark to produce tar has recently featured in debates about the technological and cognitive abilities of Neandertals and modern humans. The abilities to precisely control fire temperatures and to manipulate adhesive properties are believed to require advanced mental traits. However, the significance given to adhesive technology in these debates has quickly outgrown our understanding of birch bark tar and its manufacture using aceramic techniques. In this paper, we detail three experimental methods of Palaeolithic tar production ranging from simple to complex. We recorded the fuel, time, materials, temperatures, and tar yield for each method and compared them with the tar known from the Palaeolithic. Our results indicate that it is possible to obtain useful amounts of tar by combining materials and technology already in use by Neandertals. A ceramic container is not required, and temperature control need not be as precise as previously thought. However, Neandertals must have been able to recognize certain material properties, such as adhesive tack and viscosity. In this way, they could develop the technology from producing small traces of tar on partially burned bark to techniques capable of manufacturing quantities of tar equal to those found in the Middle Palaeolithic archaeological record.

  2. Integrative curriculum reform, domain dependent knowing, and teachers` epistemological theories: Implications for middle-level teaching

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.R.

    1998-12-01

    Integrative curriculum as both a theoretical construct and a practical reality, and as a theme-based, problem-centered, democratic way of schooling, is becoming more widely considered as a feasible alternative to traditional middle-level curricula. Importantly for teaching and learning, domain dependence requires teachers to view one area of knowledge as fully interdependent with other areas of knowledge during the learning process. This requires teachers to adopt personal epistemological theories that reflect integrative, domain dependent knowing. This study explored what happened when teachers from highly traditional domain independent school settings encountered an ambitious college-level curriculum project that was designed to help the teachers understand the potential that integrative, domain dependent teaching holds for precollege settings. This study asked: What influence does an integrative, domain dependent curriculum project have on teachers` domain independent, epistemological theories for teaching and learning? Finding an answer to this question is essential if we, as an educational community, are to understand how integrative curriculum theory is transformed by teachers into systemic curriculum reform. The results suggest that the integrative curriculum project that teachers participated in did not explicitly alter their classroom practices in a wholesale manner. Personal epistemological theories of teachers collectively precluded teachers from making any wholesale changes in their individual classroom teaching. However, teachers became aware of integrative curriculum as an alternative, and they expressed interest in infusing integrative practices into their classrooms as opportunities arise.

  3. Theory of alternating field demagnetization of multidomain grains and implications for the origin of pseudo-single-domain remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Dunlop, David J.

    1993-03-01

    Both analytical and numerical models are developed to investigate the effects on alternating field (AF) stability of both microcoercivity associated with pinned walls and magnetic screening by soft walls in multidomain (MD) grains. It is shown that, due to screening, AF stabilities of remanence in MD grains are usually significantly higher than their microcoercivities, the only exception being for two-domain grains, in which there is no screening. One important implication is that hard 'pseudo-single-domain' remanence observed in grains larger than single-domain size but with AF stabilities higher than the expected maximum microcoercivity associated with domain wail pinning may be simply due to the screening by soft walls in individual grains. Moreover, we predict that MD grains containing a small number of defects do not necessarily show a low AF stability, for the reduction in the AF stability by a small microcoercivity in this case may be outweighed by a large screening due to a relatively large number of soft walls available in the grains.

  4. Theory of alternating field demagnetization of multidomain grains and implications for the origin of pseudo-single-domain remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, David J.

    1993-03-01

    Both analytical and numerical models are developed to investigate the effects on alternating field (AF) stability of both microcoercivity associated with pinned walls and magnetic screening by soft walls in multidomain (MD) grains. It is shown that due to screening, AF stabilities of remanence in MD grains are usually significantly higher than their microcoercivities, the only exception being for two-domain grains, in which there is no screening. One important implication is that hard ``pseudo-single-domain'' remanence observed in grains larger than single-domain size but with AF stabilities higher than the expected maximum microcoercivity associated with domain wall pinning may be simply due to the screening by soft walls in individual grains. Moreover, we predict that MD grains containing a small number of defects do not necessarily show a low AF stability, for the reduction in the AF stability by a small microcoercivity in this case may be outweighed by a large screening due to a relatively large number of soft walls available in the grains. This prediction is supported by the experimental evidence that two types of magnetites (crushed and hydrothermally grown) with very different defect densities have similar values of median destructive field.

  5. IMAGING AND MEASUREMENT OF THE PRERETINAL SPACE IN VITREOMACULAR ADHESION AND VITREOMACULAR TRACTION BY A NEW SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Marcin; Marciniak, Elżbieta; Rakowicz, Piotr; Stankiewicz, Agnieszka; Marciniak, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Adam

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate a new method for volumetric imaging of the preretinal space (also known as the subhyaloid, subcortical, or retrocortical space) and investigate differences in preretinal space volume in vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and vitreomacular traction (VMT). Nine patients with VMA and 13 with VMT were prospectively evaluated. Automatic inner limiting membrane line segmentation, which exploits graph search theory implementation, and posterior cortical vitreous line segmentation were performed on 141 horizontal spectral domain optical coherence tomography B-scans per patient. Vertical distances (depths) between the posterior cortical vitreous and inner limiting membrane lines were calculated for each optical coherence tomography B-scan acquired. The derived distances were merged and visualized as a color depth map that represented the preretinal space between the posterior surface of the hyaloid and the anterior surface of the retina. The early treatment d retinopathy study macular map was overlaid onto final virtual maps, and preretinal space volumes were calculated for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study map sector. Volumetric maps representing preretinal space volumes were created for each patient in the VMA and VMT groups. Preretinal space volumes were larger in all early treatment diabetic retinopathy study map macular regions in the VMT group compared with those in the VMA group. The differences reached statistical significance in all early treatment diabetic retinopathy study sectors, except for the superior outer macula and temporal outer macula where significance values were P = 0.05 and P = 0.08, respectively. Overall, the relative differences in preretinal space volumes between the VMT and VMA groups varied from 2.7 to 4.3 in inner regions and 1.8 to 2.9 in outer regions. Our study provides evidence of significant differences in preretinal space volume between eyes with VMA and those with VMT. This may be useful not only in the investigation

  6. The Dc-Module of Doublecortin: Dynamics, Domain Boundaries, and Functional Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Cierpicki,T.; Kim, M.; Cooper, D.; Derewenda, U.; Bushweller, J.; Derwenda, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The doublecortin-like (DC) domains, which usually occur in tandem, constitute novel microtubule-binding modules. They were first identified in doublecortin (DCX), a protein expressed in migrating neurons, and in the doublecortin-like kinase (DCLK). They are also found in other proteins, including the RP1 gene product which-when mutated-causes a form of inherited blindness. We previously reported an X-ray structure of the N-terminal DC domain of DCLK (N-DCLK), and a solution structure of an analogous module of human doublecortin (N-DCX). These studies showed that the DC domain has a tertiary fold closely reminiscent of ubiquitin and similar to several GTPase-binding domains. We now report an X-ray structure of a mutant of N-DCX, in which the C-terminal fragment (residues 139-147) unexpectedly shows an altered, 'open' conformation. However, heteronuclear NMR data show that this C-terminal fragment is only transiently open in solution, and assumes a predominantly 'closed' conformation. While the 'open' conformation may be artificially stabilized by crystal packing interactions, the observed switching between the 'open' and 'closed' conformations, which shortens the linker between the two DC-domains by {approx}20 A, is likely to be of functional importance in the control of tubulin polymerization and microtubule bundling by doublecortin.

  7. Detrital provenance of Early Mesozoic basins in the Jiangnan domain, South China: Paleogeographic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xianbing; Tang, Shuai; Lin, Shoufa

    2016-04-01

    Detrital provenance analysis is an effective way to understand paleogeographic change and geodynamics. In this paper, we present petrological, whole-rock geochemical and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological analysis of Early and Middle Jurassic terrestrial clastic rocks in the Jingdezhen Basin and the Huangshan Basin in the Jiangnan domain, South China. Petrology and whole-rock geochemistry show that the source rocks are dominated by intermediate to acid component. The Chemical Index of Alteration ranges from 69 to 86, suggesting a moderate weathering history for the source rocks. The Early-Middle Jurassic sediments in the Jingdezhen and Huangshan basins were mostly sourced from magmatogenic greywackes and felsic magmatic rocks, respectively. Detrital zircons have seven age peaks at 240 Ma, 430 Ma, 1390 Ma, 1880 Ma, 2500 Ma, -3200 Ma and 788-999 Ma (a wide peak). Provenance analysis indicates that the source rocks are in the Jiangnan domain, the Northwest Zhejiang Basin and the Wuyishan domain. Combining these with previous results and paleocurrent directions, we infer that the NE-trending Wuyishan and Xuefengshan domains and the nearly E-W-Jiangnan domain and Nanling tectonic belt were orogenic uplifts and watersheds during the Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic. The Early Mesozoic geodynamics in the South China Block was related to the westward subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate and the northward continent-continent collision following the closure of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean.

  8. N-Glycosylation at the SynCAM (Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule) Immunoglobulin Interface Modulates Synaptic Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    A Fogel; Y Li; Q Wang; T Lam; Y Modis; T Biederer

    2011-12-31

    Select adhesion molecules connect pre- and postsynaptic membranes and organize developing synapses. The regulation of these trans-synaptic interactions is an important neurobiological question. We have previously shown that the synaptic cell adhesion molecules (SynCAMs) 1 and 2 engage in homo- and heterophilic interactions and bridge the synaptic cleft to induce presynaptic terminals. Here, we demonstrate that site-specific N-glycosylation impacts the structure and function of adhesive SynCAM interactions. Through crystallographic analysis of SynCAM 2, we identified within the adhesive interface of its Ig1 domain an N-glycan on residue Asn(60). Structural modeling of the corresponding SynCAM 1 Ig1 domain indicates that its glycosylation sites Asn(70)/Asn(104) flank the binding interface of this domain. Mass spectrometric and mutational studies confirm and characterize the modification of these three sites. These site-specific N-glycans affect SynCAM adhesion yet act in a differential manner. Although glycosylation of SynCAM 2 at Asn(60) reduces adhesion, N-glycans at Asn(70)/Asn(104) of SynCAM 1 increase its interactions. The modification of SynCAM 1 with sialic acids contributes to the glycan-dependent strengthening of its binding. Functionally, N-glycosylation promotes the trans-synaptic interactions of SynCAM 1 and is required for synapse induction. These results demonstrate that N-glycosylation of SynCAM proteins differentially affects their binding interface and implicate post-translational modification as a mechanism to regulate trans-synaptic adhesion.

  9. Adhesive compatibility of cribellar and viscous prey capture threads and its implication for the evolution of orb-weaving spiders.

    PubMed

    Opell, Brent D; Tran, Andrew M; Karinshak, Shannon E

    2011-07-01

    Evolution of orb-weaving spiders that comprise the Orbiculariae clade involved a transition in the composition of prey capture thread that has been challenging to explain. The primitive cribellar threads spun by members of the Deinopoidea subclade resemble the capture threads of their non-orb-web-weaving ancestors and are formed of thousands of fine, dry, protein cribellar fibrils. In contrast, the derived viscous capture threads spun by members of the Araneoidea subclade have regularly spaced, aqueous adhesive droplets. When second instar deinopoid spiderlings emerge from egg sacs they are unable to spin cribellar threads, and, therefore, do not construct orb-webs; whereas second instar araneoids spin capture threads and construct orb-webs. If, as we hypothesize, viscous material evolved to enable second instar spiderlings to construct orb-webs, early araneoids may have spun composite cribellar-viscous capture threads. To examine the functional feasibility of such intermediate capture threads, we compared the adhesion of cribellar threads, viscous threads, and combined cribellar-viscous threads. The stickiness of these combined threads was greater than that of native cribellar or viscous threads alone. The viscous material of Araneus marmoreus threads exhibited a substantial increase in stickiness when combined with cribellar fibrils and that of Argiope aurantia threads a small increase in stickiness when combined with cribellar fibrils. Thus, if early araneoids retained their ability to spin cribellar threads after having evolved glands that produced viscous material, their composite threads could have formed a functional adhesive system that achieved its stickiness at no loss of material economy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. A synthetic peptide from the heparin-binding domain III (repeats III4-5) of fibronectin promotes stress-fibre and focal-adhesion formation in melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, José V; Maqueda, Alfredo; Albar, Juan P; Garcia-Pardo, Angeles

    2003-01-01

    Cell adhesion to fibronectin results in formation of actin stress fibres and focal adhesions. In fibroblasts, this response requires two co-operative signals provided by interactions of the RGD sequence with alpha5beta1 integrin and the heparin-binding domain II (Hep II) domain with syndecan-4. Within Hep II, this activity was mapped to repeat III13 and to the peptide FN-C/H-V(WQPPRARITGY, repeat III14). We previously described that the synthetic heparin-binding peptide/III5 (HBP/III5) (WTPPRAQITGYRLTVGLTRR, repeat III5) binds heparin and mediates cell adhesion via chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. We have now studied whether HBP/III5 co-operates with alpha5beta1 and drives a full cytoskeletal response in melanoma cells. SKMEL-178 cells attached and spread on the RGD-containing FNIII7-FNIII10 (FNIII7-10) fragment, but did not form stress fibres or focal adhesions. Co-immobilization of HBP/III5 with FNIII7-10 or adding soluble HBP/III5 to cells prespread on FNIII7-10, effectively induced these structures. Cell transfection with dominant-negative N19RhoA, a member of the small GTPase family, abolished the HBP/III5 effect. Both chondroitinase and heparitinase diminished focal adhesions, indicating that both types of proteoglycans bound HBP/III5 in melanoma cells. We have mapped the active sequence of HBP/III5 to YRLTVGLTRR, which is a novel sequence in fibronectin with focal-adhesion-promoting activity. The last two arginine (R) residues of this sequence are required for activity, since their replacement by alanine completely abrogated the HBP/III5 cytoskeletal effect. Moreover, this sequence is also active in the context of large fibronectin fragments. Our results establish that the Hep III region provides co-operative signals to alpha5beta1 for the progression of the cytoskeletal response and that these include activation of RhoA. PMID:12519080

  11. Crystal Structure of the Human, FIC-Domain Containing Protein HYPE and Implications for Its Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, Tom D.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein, HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized. Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of autoAMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition. PMID:25435325

  12. A widespread peroxiredoxin-like domain present in tumor suppression- and progression-implicated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Muszewska, Anna; Lenart, Anna; Szczepińska, Teresa; Godzik, Adam; Grynberg, Marcin

    2010-10-21

    Peroxide turnover and signalling are involved in many biological phenomena relevant to human diseases. Yet, all the players and mechanisms involved in peroxide perception are not known. Elucidating very remote evolutionary relationships between proteins is an approach that allows the discovery of novel protein functions. Here, we start with three human proteins, SRPX, SRPX2 and CCDC80, involved in tumor suppression and progression, which possess a conserved region of similarity. Structure and function prediction allowed the definition of P-DUDES, a phylogenetically widespread, possibly ancient protein structural domain, common to vertebrates and many bacterial species. We show, using bioinformatics approaches, that the P-DUDES domain, surprisingly, adopts the thioredoxin-like (Thx-like) fold. A tentative, more detailed prediction of function is made, namely, that of a 2-Cys peroxiredoxin. Incidentally, consistent overexpression of all three human P-DUDES genes in two public glioblastoma microarray gene expression datasets was discovered. This finding is discussed in the context of the tumor suppressor role that has been ascribed to P-DUDES proteins in several studies. Majority of non-redundant P-DUDES proteins are found in marine metagenome, and among the bacterial species possessing this domain a trend for a higher proportion of aquatic species is observed. The new protein structural domain, now with a broad enzymatic function predicted, may become a drug target once its detailed molecular mechanism of action is understood in detail.

  13. Crystal structure of the human, FIC-domain containing protein HYPE and implications for its functions.

    PubMed

    Bunney, Tom D; Cole, Ambrose R; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W; Katan, Matilda

    2014-12-02

    Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein,HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized.Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of auto AMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition.

  14. A widespread peroxiredoxin-like domain present in tumor suppression- and progression-implicated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Peroxide turnover and signalling are involved in many biological phenomena relevant to human diseases. Yet, all the players and mechanisms involved in peroxide perception are not known. Elucidating very remote evolutionary relationships between proteins is an approach that allows the discovery of novel protein functions. Here, we start with three human proteins, SRPX, SRPX2 and CCDC80, involved in tumor suppression and progression, which possess a conserved region of similarity. Structure and function prediction allowed the definition of P-DUDES, a phylogenetically widespread, possibly ancient protein structural domain, common to vertebrates and many bacterial species. Results We show, using bioinformatics approaches, that the P-DUDES domain, surprisingly, adopts the thioredoxin-like (Thx-like) fold. A tentative, more detailed prediction of function is made, namely, that of a 2-Cys peroxiredoxin. Incidentally, consistent overexpression of all three human P-DUDES genes in two public glioblastoma microarray gene expression datasets was discovered. This finding is discussed in the context of the tumor suppressor role that has been ascribed to P-DUDES proteins in several studies. Majority of non-redundant P-DUDES proteins are found in marine metagenome, and among the bacterial species possessing this domain a trend for a higher proportion of aquatic species is observed. Conclusions The new protein structural domain, now with a broad enzymatic function predicted, may become a drug target once its detailed molecular mechanism of action is understood in detail. PMID:20964819

  15. Cohesiveness tunes assembly and morphology of FG nucleoporin domain meshworks - Implications for nuclear pore permeability.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Nico B; Labokha, Aksana A; Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk; Richter, Ralf P

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear pore complexes control the exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. A selective permeability barrier that arises from a supramolecular assembly of intrinsically unfolded nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine dipeptides (FG domains) fills the nuclear pore. There is increasing evidence that selective transport requires cohesive FG domain interactions. To understand the functional roles of cohesive interactions, we studied monolayers of end-grafted FG domains as a bottom-up nanoscale model system of the permeability barrier. Based on detailed physicochemical analysis of the model films and comparison of the data with polymer theory, we propose that cohesiveness is tuned to promote rapid assembly of the permeability barrier and to generate a stable and compact pore-filling meshwork with a small mesh size. Our results highlight the functional importance of weak interactions, typically a few kBT per chain, and contribute important information to understand the mechanism of size-selective transport. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Domain Analysis: Metatheoretical Implications for Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cultural-historical activity theory is an important theory in modern psychology. In recent years, it has drawn more attention from related disciplines including information science. Argument: This paper argues that activity theory and domain analysis which uses the theory as one of its bases could bring about some important…

  17. Structures of DNA-binding mutant zinc finger domains: implications for DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, R. C.; Horvath, S. J.; Klevit, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of Cys2-His2 zinc finger domains have revealed that the structures of individual finger domains in solution determined by NMR spectroscopy are strikingly similar to the structure of fingers bound to DNA determined by X-ray diffraction. Therefore, detailed structural analyses of single finger domains that contain amino acid substitutions known to affect DNA binding in the whole protein can yield information concerning the structural ramifications of such mutations. We have used this approach to study two mutants in the N-terminal finger domain of ADR1, a yeast transcription factor that contains two Cys2-His2 zinc finger sequences spanning residues 102-159. Two point mutants at position 118 in the N-terminal zinc finger (ADR1b: 102-130) that adversely affect the DNA-binding activity of ADR1 have previously been identified: H118A and H118Y. The structures of wild-type ADR1b and the two mutant zinc finger domains were determined using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry and were refined using a complete relaxation matrix method approach (REPENT) to improve agreement between the models and the nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy data from which they were generated. The molecular architecture of the refined wild-type ADR1b domain is presented in detail. Comparisons of wild-type ADR1b and the two mutants revealed that neither mutation causes a significant structural perturbation. The structures indicate that the DNA binding properties of the His 118 mutants are dependent on the identity of the side chain at position 118, which has been postulated to make a direct DNA contact in the wild-type ADR1 protein. The results suggest that the identity of the side chain at the middle DNA contact position in Cys2-His2 zinc fingers may be changed with impunity regarding the domain structure and can affect the affinity of the protein-DNA interaction. PMID:8318900

  18. FERM Domain Interaction Promotes FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dunty, Jill M.; Gabarra-Niecko, Veronica; King, Michelle L.; Ceccarelli, Derek F. J.; Eck, Michael J.; Schaller, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    From the results of deletion analyses, the FERM domain of FAK has been proposed to inhibit enzymatic activity and repress FAK signaling. We have identified a sequence in the FERM domain that is important for FAK signaling in vivo. Point mutations in this sequence had little effect upon catalytic activity in vitro. However, the mutant exhibits reduced tyrosine phosphorylation and dramatically reduced Src family kinase binding. Further, the abilities of the mutant to transduce biochemical signals and to promote cell migration were severely impaired. The results implicate a FERM domain interaction in cell adhesion-dependent activation of FAK and downstream signaling. We also show that the purified FERM domain of FAK interacts with full-length FAK in vitro, and mutation of this sequence disrupts the interaction. These findings are discussed in the context of models of FAK regulation by its FERM domain. PMID:15169899

  19. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  20. Resveratrol induces ordered domains formation in biomembranes: Implication for its pleiotropic action.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Rute; Nunes, Cláudia; Reis, Salette

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound with great value in cancer therapy, cardiovascular protection, and neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanism by which resveratrol exerts such pleiotropic effects is not yet clear and there is a huge need to understand the influence of this compound on the regulation of lipid domains formation on membrane structure. The aim of the present study was to reveal potential molecular interactions between resveratrol and lipid rafts found in cell membranes by means of Förster resonance energy transfer, DPH fluorescence quenching, and triton X-100 detergent resistance assay. Liposomes composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin were used as model membranes. The results revealed that resveratrol induces phase separation and formation of liquid-ordered domains in bilayer structures. The formation of such tightly packed lipid rafts is important for different signal transduction pathways, through the regulation of membrane-associating proteins, that can justify several pharmacological activities of this compound.

  1. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in CNGB3-associated achromatopsia and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    McClintock, Michael; Peden, Marc C; Kay, Christine N

    2014-01-01

    We describe the spectral domain OCT findings in two siblings with CNGB3-associated achromatopsia. A 33-year-old female and her 31-year-old sibling were evaluated for mild nystagmus and decreased visual acuity which had been present since childhood. They were each evaluated with full field Ganzfeld electroretinography which demonstrated flat photopic responses and preserved rod function. Genetic testing performed at Carver lab at the University of Iowa confirmed a diagnosis of achromatopsia with identical mutations in the CNGB3 gene. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography was performed which revealed foveal changes in both siblings, with slight phenotypic variations in these genotypically identical siblings. OCT findings in achromatopsia emphasize the importance of early identification and treatment in this disorder.

  2. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani, Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Single cell patterning holds important implications for biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. The challenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hosting only single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period of time. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses a covalently-bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells with improved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viability on gold patterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that cell adhesion is regulated by the type, availability and stability of effective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound short peptides would promote cell spreading and thus, single cell adhesion and viability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlying mechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion and prolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparing cellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on three model surfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin, physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently-bound Lys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and binding properties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin in producing adhesion of only single cells, while the covalently bound peptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosis of adhered cells. Controlling cell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis and viability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materials interaction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays of single cells. PMID:17371055

  3. Structural and functional implications of the QUA2 domain on RNA recognition by GLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Daubner, Gerrit M.; Brümmer, Anneke; Tocchini, Cristina; Gerhardy, Stefan; Ciosk, Rafal; Zavolan, Mihaela; Allain, Frédéric H.-T.

    2014-01-01

    The STAR family comprises ribonucleic acid (RNA)-binding proteins that play key roles in RNA-regulatory processes. RNA recognition is achieved by a KH domain with an additional α-helix (QUA2) that seems to extend the RNA-binding surface to six nucleotides for SF1 (Homo sapiens) and seven nucleotides for GLD-1 (Caenorhabditis elegans). To understand the structural basis of this probable difference in specificity, we determined the solution structure of GLD-1 KH-QUA2 with the complete consensus sequence identified in the tra-2 gene. Compared to SF1, the GLD-1 KH-QUA2 interface adopts a different conformation resulting indeed in an additional sequence-specific binding pocket for a uracil at the 5′end. The functional relevance of this binding pocket is emphasized by our bioinformatics analysis showing that GLD-1 binding sites with this 5′end uracil are more predictive for the functional response of the messenger RNAs to gld-1 knockout. We further reveal the importance of the KH-QUA2 interface in vitro and that its alteration in vivo affects the level of translational repression dependent on the sequence of the GLD-1 binding motif. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the QUA2 domain distinguishes GLD-1 from other members of the STAR family and contributes more generally to the modulation of RNA-binding affinity and specificity of KH domain containing proteins. PMID:24838563

  4. Crystal structure and functional implications of Pyrococcus furiosus hef helicase domain involved in branched DNA processing.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-01-01

    DNA and RNA frequently form various branched intermediates that are important for the transmission of genetic information. Helicases play pivotal roles in the processing of these transient intermediates during nucleic acid metabolism. The archaeal Hef helicase/ nuclease is a representative protein that processes flap- or fork-DNA structures, and, intriguingly, its C-terminal half belongs to the XPF/Mus81 nuclease family. Here, we report the crystal structure of the helicase domain of the Hef protein from Pyrococcus furiosus. The structure reveals a novel helical insertion between the two conserved helicase core domains. This positively charged extra region, structurally similar to the "thumb" domain of DNA polymerase, plays critical roles in fork recognition. The Hef helicase/nuclease exhibits sequence similarity to the Mph1 helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; XPF/Rad1, involved in DNA repair; and a putative Hef homolog identified in mammals. Hence, our findings provide a structural basis for the functional mechanisms of this helicase/nuclease family.

  5. Functional mapping of the lectin activity site on the β-prism domain of vibrio cholerae cytolysin: implications for the membrane pore-formation mechanism of the toxin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Paul, Karan; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2013-01-18

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a prominent member in the family of β-barrel pore-forming toxins. It induces lysis of target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. VCC also exhibits prominent lectin-like activity in interacting with β1-galactosyl-terminated glycoconjugates. Apart from the cytolysin domain, VCC harbors two lectin-like domains: the β-Trefoil and the β-Prism domains; however, precise contribution of these domains in the lectin property of VCC is not known. Also, role(s) of these lectin-like domains in the mode of action of VCC remain obscure. In the present study, we show that the β-Prism domain of VCC acts as the structural scaffold to determine the lectin activity of the protein toward β1-galactosyl-terminated glycoconjugates. Toward exploring the physiological implication of the β-Prism domain, we demonstrate that the presence of the β-Prism domain-mediated lectin activity is crucial for an efficient interaction of the toxin toward the target cells. Our results also suggest that such lectin activity may act to regulate the oligomerization ability of the membrane-bound VCC toxin. Based on the data presented here, and also consistent with the existing structural information, we propose a novel mechanism of regulation imposed by the β-Prism domain's lectin activity, implicated in the process of membrane pore formation by VCC.

  6. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit: implications for cell adhesion and fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Orfila, Caroline; Huisman, Miranda M H; Willats, William G T; van Alebeek, Gert-Jan W M; Schols, Henk A; Seymour, Graham B; Knox, J Paul

    2002-07-01

    The Cnr ( C olourless n on- r ipening) tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic polysaccharides to the non-softening and altered cell adhesion phenotype. Cell wall material (CWM) and solubilised fractions of mature green and red ripe fruit were analysed by chemical, enzymatic and immunochemical techniques. No major differences in CWM sugar composition were detected although differences were found in the solubility and composition of the pectic polysaccharides extracted from the CWM at both stages of development. In comparison with the wild type, the ripening-associated solubilisation of homogalacturonan-rich pectic polysaccharides was reduced in Cnr. The proportion of carbohydrate that was chelator-soluble was 50% less in Cnr cell walls at both the mature green and red ripe stages. Chelator-soluble material from ripe-stage Cnr was more susceptible to endo-polygalacturonase degradation than the corresponding material from wild-type fruit. In addition, cell walls from Cnr fruit contained larger amounts of galactosyl- and arabinosyl-containing polysaccharides that were tightly bound in the cell wall and could only be extracted with 4 M KOH, or remained in the insoluble residue. The complexity of the cell wall alterations that occur during fruit ripening and the significance of different extractable polymer pools from cell walls are discussed in relation to the Cnr phenotype.

  7. Biophysical Characterization of the Olfactomedin Domain of Myocilin, an Extracellular Matrix Protein Implicated in Inherited Forms of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Orwig, Susan D.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2011-01-01

    Myocilin is an eye protein found in the trabecular extracellular matrix (TEM), within the anatomic region that controls fluid flow. Variants of myocilin, localized to its olfactomedin (OLF) domain, have been linked to inherited forms of glaucoma, a disease associated with elevated intraocular pressure. OLF domains have also been implicated in psychiatric diseases and cancers by their involvement in signaling, neuronal growth, and development. However, molecular characterization of OLFs has been hampered by challenges in recombinant expression, a hurdle we have recently overcome for the myocilin OLF domain (myoc-OLF). Here, we report the first detailed solution biophysical characterization of myoc-OLF to gain insight into its structure and function. Myoc-OLF is stable in the presence of glycosaminoglycans, as well as in a wide pH range in buffers with functional groups reminiscent of such glycosaminoglycans. Circular dichroism (CD) reveals significant β-sheet and β-turn secondary structure. Unexpectedly, the CD signature is reminiscent of α-chymotrypsin as well as another ocular protein family, the βγ-crystallins. At neutral pH, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and CD melts indicate a highly cooperative transition with a melting temperature of ∼55°C. Limited proteolysis combined with mass spectrometry reveals that the compact core structural domain of OLF consists of approximately residues 238-461, which retains the single disulfide bond and is as stable as the full myoc-OLF construct. The data presented here inform new testable hypotheses for interactions with specific TEM components, and will assist in design of therapeutic agents for myocilin glaucoma. PMID:21283635

  8. Crystal structure of the globular domain of C1QTNF5: Implications for late-onset retinal macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD) is caused by a single S163R mutation in the C1q and tumor necrosis factor-related protein 5 (C1QTNF5) gene. The C1QTNF5 gene encodes a secreted and membrane-associated protein involved in adhesion of retinal pigmented epithelial cells (RPE) to Bruch’s membrane. The crystal structure of the trimeric globular domain of human C1QTNF5 at 1.34 Å resolution reveals unique features of this novel C1q family member. It lacks a Ca2+-binding site, displays a remarkable non-uniform distribution of surface electrostatic potentials and possesses a unique sequence (F181F182G183G184W185P186) that forms a hydrophobic plateau surrounded by Lys and Arg residues with a solvent cavity underneath. S163 forms a hydrogen bond with F182 in a hydrophobic area extending to the hydrophobic plateau. The pathogenic mutation S163R disrupts this hydrogen bonding and positively charges these hydrophobic areas. Thus, our analysis provides insights into the structural basis of the L-ORMD disease mechanism. PMID:22892318

  9. Crystal structure of the globular domain of C1QTNF5: Implications for late-onset retinal macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-12-01

    Autosomal dominant late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD) is caused by a single S163R mutation in the C1q and tumor necrosis factor-related protein 5 (C1QTNF5) gene. The C1QTNF5 gene encodes a secreted and membrane-associated protein involved in adhesion of retinal pigmented epithelial cells (RPE) to Bruch's membrane. The crystal structure of the trimeric globular domain of human C1QTNF5 at 1.34Å resolution reveals unique features of this novel C1q family member. It lacks a Ca²⁺-binding site, displays a remarkable non-uniform distribution of surface electrostatic potentials and possesses a unique sequence (F₁₈₁F₁₈₂G₁₈₃G₁₈₄W₁₈₅P₁₈₆) that forms a hydrophobic plateau surrounded by Lys and Arg residues with a solvent cavity underneath. S₁₆₃ forms a hydrogen bond with F₁₈₂ in a hydrophobic area extending to the hydrophobic plateau. The pathogenic mutation S163R disrupts this hydrogen bonding and positively charges these hydrophobic areas. Thus, our analysis provides insights into the structural basis of the L-ORMD disease mechanism.

  10. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  11. Uncertainty principles in linear canonical transform domains and some of their implications in optics.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adrian

    2008-03-01

    The linear canonical transform (LCT) is the name of a parameterized continuum of transforms that include, as particular cases, many widely used transforms in optics such as the Fourier transform, fractional Fourier transform, and Fresnel transform. It provides a generalized mathematical tool for representing the response of any first-order optical system in a simple and insightful way. In this work we present four uncertainty relations between LCT pairs and discuss their implications in some common optical systems.

  12. Cysteine scanning of transmembrane domain three of the human dipeptide transporter: implications for substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Links, Jennifer L S; Kulkarni, Ashutosh A; Davies, Daryl L; Lee, Vincent H L; Haworth, Ian S

    2007-04-01

    The human intestinal dipeptide transporter (hPepT1) transports dipeptides and pharmacologically active drugs from the intestine to the blood. The role of transmembrane domain 3 (TMD3) of hPepT1 was studied using cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and methane thiosulfonate (MTS) cysteine modification. Each amino acid in TMD3 was individually mutated to a cysteine and Gly-Sar uptake by each mutated and modified transporter was determined relative to wild-type hPepT1. Uptake data for mutated transporters modified with the lipid-insoluble cysteine-modifying reagent MTSET suggested tilting of TMD3 relative to the substrate translocation pathway; the extracellular region of TMD3 showed little MTSET reactivity, indicative of solvent inaccessibility, whereas the intracellular part of TMD3 was relatively solvent accessible. Modification at 10 positions of TMD3 with MTSEA, a lipid-soluble cysteine-modifying reagent, gave unusual and statistically significant increases in Gly-Sar uptake relative to untreated mutants. We interpret these data in terms of the spatial properties of the hPepT1 substrate translocation channel and possible interactions of TMD3 with other transmembrane domains.

  13. Critical superparamagnetic/single-domain grain sizes in interacting magnetite particles: implications for magnetosome crystals

    PubMed Central

    Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Williams, Wyn

    2009-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetically interacting crystals (magnetosome crystals), which they use for navigation (magnetotaxis). To improve magnetotaxis efficiency, the magnetosome crystals (usually magnetite or greigite in composition) should be magnetically stable single-domain (SSD) particles. Smaller single-domain particles become magnetically unstable owing to thermal fluctuations and are termed superparamagnetic (SP). Previous calculations for the SSD/SP threshold size or blocking volume did not include the contribution of magnetic interactions. In this study, the blocking volume has been calculated as a function of grain elongation and separation for chains of identical magnetite grains. The inclusion of magnetic interactions was found to decrease the blocking volume, thereby increasing the range of SSD behaviour. Combining the results with previously published calculations for the SSD to multidomain threshold size in chains of magnetite reveals that interactions significantly increase the SSD range. We argue that chains of interacting magnetosome crystals found in magnetotactic bacteria have used this effect to improve magnetotaxis. PMID:19091684

  14. Nanomechanical Contribution of Collagen and von Willebrand Factor A in Marine Underwater Adhesion and Its Implication for Collagen Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee Young; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Foo, Mathias; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-03-14

    Recent works on mussel adhesion have identified a load bearing matrix protein (PTMP1) containing von Willebrand factor (vWF) with collagen binding capability that contributes to the mussel holdfast by manipulating mussel collagens. Using a surface forces apparatus, we investigate for the first time, the nanomechanical properties of vWF-collagen interaction using homologous proteins of mussel byssus, PTMP1 and preCollagens (preCols), as collagen. Mimicking conditions similar to mussel byssus secretion (pH < 5.0) and seawater condition (pH 8.0), PTMP1 and preCol interact weakly in the "positioning" phase based on vWF-collagen binding and strengthen in "locked" phase due to the combined effects of electrostatic attraction, metal binding, and mechanical shearing. The progressive enhancement of binding between PTMP1 with porcine collagen under the aforementioned conditions is also observed. The binding mechanisms of PTMP1-preCols provide insights into the molecular interaction of the mammalian collagen system and the development of an artificial extracellular matrix based on collagens.

  15. TGF-beta2-induced cell surface tissue transglutaminase increases adhesion and migration of RPE cells on fibronectin through the gelatin-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Priglinger, Siegfried G; Alge, Claudia S; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Kristin, Nadine; Hirneiss, Christoph; Eibl, Kirsten; Kampik, Anselm; Welge-Lussen, Ulrich

    2004-03-01

    Migration and adhesion of dislocated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to a fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix is an initial step in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). In the present study, the functional role of cell surface tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in adhesion and migration of RPE cells on fibronectin (Fn) and collagen type I (Col I) after stimulation with TGF-beta2 was investigated. Cultured human RPE cells were treated with 1.0 ng/mL TGF-beta2 for 24 hours. Cell surface tTG expression was determined by cell fraction analysis. Attachment on Col I, full-length Fn, and its 45-kDa gelatin-binding and 110-kDa cell-binding fragment was measured with an MTT assay. Migration of RPE cells was measured by a Boyden chamber assay, and cell spreading was determined. Experiments were performed in the presence or absence of anti-tTG antibodies and anti-integrin alpha5 and beta1 antibodies. TGF-beta2 markedly induced expression of cell-surface tTG on RPE cells and increased attachment and migration on Fn and Col I. Blocking cell surface tTG inhibited attachment, migration, and spreading on Fn and its 45-kDa gelatin-binding fragment, whereas no effect was seen on Col I and the 110-kDa cell-binding Fn fragment. In contrast, blocking of integrin alpha5 and beta1 suppressed adhesion and migration on full-length Fn and the 110-kDa Fn fragment. These data demonstrate that TGF-beta2 increases expression of cell surface tTG, which in turn strengthens adhesion, migration, and spreading of RPE cells on Fn through the 45-kDa gelatin-binding Fn fragment. At the onset of PVR, this mechanism may help RPE cells to attach and migrate on Fn-containing matrices.

  16. Modeling the epidermal growth factor -- epidermal growth factor receptor l2 domain interaction: implications for the ligand binding process.

    PubMed

    Jorissen, Robert N; Treutlein, Herbert R; Epa, V Chandana; Burgess, Antony W

    2002-06-01

    Signaling from the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is triggered by the binding of ligands such as EGF or transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and subsequent receptor dimerization. An understanding of these processes has been hindered by the lack of structural information about the ligand-bound, dimerized EGF receptor. Using an NMR-derived structure of EGF and a homology model of the major ligand binding domain of the EGF receptor and experimental data, we modeled the binding of EGF to this EGF receptor fragment. In this low resolution model of the complex, EGF sits across the second face of the EGF receptor L2 domain and EGF residues 10-16, 36-37, 40-47 bind to this face. The structural model is largely consistent with previously published NMR data describing the residues of TGF-alpha which interact strongly with the EGF receptor. Other EGF residues implicated in receptor binding are accounted by our proposal that the ligand binding is a two-step process with the EGF binding to at least one other site of the receptor. This three-dimensional model is expected to be useful in the design of ligand-based antagonists of the receptor.

  17. Application of Research Domain Criteria to childhood and adolescent impulsive and addictive disorders: Implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Yip, Sarah W; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-11-09

    The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative provides a large-scale, dimensional framework for the integration of research findings across traditional diagnoses, with the long-term aim of improving existing psychiatric treatments. A neurodevelopmental perspective is essential to this endeavor. However, few papers synthesizing research findings across childhood and adolescent disorders exist. Here, we discuss how the RDoC framework may be applied to the study of childhood and adolescent impulsive and addictive disorders in order to improve neurodevelopmental understanding and to enhance treatment development. Given the large scope of RDoC, we focus on a single construct highly relevant to addictive and impulsive disorders - initial responsiveness to reward attainment. Findings from genetic, molecular, neuroimaging and other translational research methodologies are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cumulative Disadvantage and Youth Well-Being: A Multi-Domain Examination with Life Course Implications

    PubMed Central

    Nurius, Paula S.; Prince, Dana M.; Rocha, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The accumulation of disadvantage has been shown to increase psychosocial stressors that impact life course well-being. This study tests for significant differences, based on disadvantage exposure, on youths’ emotional and physical health, as well as family supports, peer assets, and academic success, which hold potential for resilience and amelioration of negative health outcomes. Methods A 12 item cumulative disadvantage summed index derived from surveys of a racially and socioeconomically diverse sample of urban high school seniors (n=9,658) was used to distinguish youth at low, moderate, and high levels. Results Findings supported hypothesized stepped patterns such that as multiple disadvantages accumulate, a concomitant decline is evident across the assessed outcome variables (except positive academic identity). Post-hoc tests indicated a pattern of groups being significantly different from one another. Discussion Overall, results lend support for an additive stress load associated with stacked disadvantage, with implications for continuing trends into adulthood as well as preventive interventions PMID:26617431

  19. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  20. Physiopathologic implications of the structural and functional domains of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Sorgato, M Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting man and various animal species. A large body of evidence supports the notion that the causative agent of these diseases is the prion, which, devoid of nucleic acids, is composed largely, if not entirely, of a conformationally abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPc). PrPc is a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed sialoglycoprotein, the normal function of which is, however, still ill defined. Several modules have been recognised in PrPc structure. Their extensive analysis by different experimental approaches, including transgenic animal models, has allowed to assigning to several modules a putative role in PrPc physiology. Concurrently, it has underscored the possibility that alteration of specific domains may determine the switching from a beneficial role of PrPc into one that becomes detrimental to neurons, and/or promote the conversion of PrPc into the pathogenic PrP(Sc) conformer.

  1. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  2. Regulation of cellular interactions with laminin by integrin cytoplasmic domains: the A and B structural variants of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin differentially modulate the adhesive strength, morphology, and migration of macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, L M; Mercurio, A M

    1994-01-01

    Several integrin alpha subunits have structural variants that are identical in their extracellular and transmembrane domains but that differ in their cytoplasmic domains. The functional significance of these variants, however, is unknown. In the present study, we examined the possibility that the A and B variants of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin laminin receptor differ in function. For this purpose, we expressed the alpha 6A and alpha 6B cDNAs, as well as a truncated alpha 6 cDNA (alpha 6-delta CYT) in which the cytoplasmic domain sequence was deleted after the GFFKR pentapeptide, in P388D1 cells, an alpha 6 deficient macrophage cell line. Populations of stable alpha 6A, alpha 6B, and alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants that expressed equivalent levels of cell surface alpha 6 were obtained by fluorescence-activated cell sorter and shown to form heterodimers with endogenous beta 1 subunits. Upon attachment to laminin, the alpha 6A transfectants extended numerous pseudopodia. In contrast, the alpha 6B transfectants remained rounded and extended few processes. The transfectants were also examined for their ability to migrate toward a laminin substratum using Transwell chambers. The alpha 6A transfectants were three- to fourfold more migratory than the alpha 6B transfectants. The alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants did not attach to laminin in normal culture medium, but they did attach in the presence of Mn2+. The alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants migrated to a lesser extent than either the alpha 6A or alpha 6B transfectants in the presence of Mn2+. The alpha 6 transfectants differed significantly in the concentration of substratum bound laminin required for half-maximal adhesion in the presence of Mn2+:alpha 6A (2.1 micrograms/ml), alpha 6B (6.3 micrograms/ml), and alpha 6-delta CYT (8.8 micrograms/ml). Divalent cation titration studies revealed that these transfectants also differed significantly in both the [Ca2+] and [Mn2+] required to obtain half-maximal adhesion to laminin

  3. The Three-dimensional Structure of the Extracellular Adhesion Domain of the Sialic Acid-binding Adhesin SabA from Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Siew Siew; Nguyen, Stanley Thai Son; Perry, Andrew J.; Day, Christopher J.; Panjikar, Santosh; Tiralongo, Joe; Whisstock, James C.; Kwok, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute chronic gastritis and the development of stomach and duodenal ulcers. Chronic infection furthermore predisposes to the development of gastric cancer. Crucial to H. pylori survival within the hostile environment of the digestive system are the adhesins SabA and BabA; these molecules belong to the same protein family and permit the bacteria to bind tightly to sugar moieties LewisB and sialyl-LewisX, respectively, on the surface of epithelial cells lining the stomach and duodenum. To date, no representative SabA/BabA structure has been determined, hampering the development of strategies to eliminate persistent H. pylori infections that fail to respond to conventional therapy. Here, using x-ray crystallography, we show that the soluble extracellular adhesin domain of SabA shares distant similarity to the tetratricopeptide repeat fold family. The molecule broadly resembles a golf putter in shape, with the head region featuring a large cavity surrounded by loops that vary in sequence between different H. pylori strains. The N-terminal and C-terminal helices protrude at right angles from the head domain and together form a shaft that connects to a predicted outer membrane protein-like β-barrel trans-membrane domain. Using surface plasmon resonance, we were able to detect binding of the SabA adhesin domain to sialyl-LewisX and LewisX but not to LewisA, LewisB, or LewisY. Substitution of the highly conserved glutamine residue 159 in the predicted ligand-binding pocket abrogates the binding of the SabA adhesin domain to sialyl-LewisX and LewisX. Taken together, these data suggest that the adhesin domain of SabA is sufficient in isolation for specific ligand binding. PMID:24375407

  4. Novel Roles of the Chemorepellent Axon Guidance Molecule RGMa in Cell Migration and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lah, Grace J.

    2012-01-01

    The repulsive guidance molecule A (RGMa) is a contact-mediated axon guidance molecule that has significant roles in central nervous system (CNS) development. Here we have examined whether RGMa has novel roles in cell migration and cell adhesion outside the nervous system. RGMa was found to stimulate cell migration from Xenopus animal cap explants in a neogenin-dependent and BMP-independent manner. RGMa also stimulated the adhesion of Xenopus animal cap cells, and this adhesion was dependent on neogenin and independent of calcium. To begin to functionally characterize the role of specific domains in RGMa, we assessed the migratory and adhesive activities of deletion mutants. RGMa lacking the partial von Willebrand factor type D (vWF) domain preferentially perturbed cell adhesion, while mutants lacking the RGD motif affected cell migration. We also revealed that manipulating the levels of RGMa in vivo caused major migration defects during Xenopus gastrulation. We have revealed here novel roles of RGMa in cell migration and adhesion and demonstrated that perturbations to the homeostasis of RGMa expression can severely disrupt major morphogenetic events. These results have implications for understanding the role of RGMa in both health and disease. PMID:22215618

  5. Characterization of caveolin-rich membrane domains isolated from an endothelial-rich source: implications for human disease

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Caveolae are 50-100-nm membrane microdomains that represent a subcompartment of the plasma membrane. Previous morphological studies have implicated caveolae in (a) the transcytosis of macromolecules (including LDL and modified LDLs) across capillary endothelial cells, (b) the uptake of small molecules via a process termed potocytosis involving GPI-linked receptor molecules and an unknown anion transport protein, (c) interactions with the actin-based cytoskeleton, and (d) the compartmentalization of certain signaling molecules, including G- protein coupled receptors. Caveolin, a 22-kD integral membrane protein, is an important structural component of caveolae that was first identified as a major v-Src substrate in Rous sarcoma virus transformed cells. This finding initially suggested a relationship between caveolin, transmembrane signaling, and cellular transformation. We have recently developed a procedure for isolating caveolin-rich membrane domains from cultured cells. To facilitate biochemical manipulations, we have applied this procedure to lung tissue--an endothelial and caveolin-rich source-allowing large scale preparation of these complexes. These membrane domains retain approximately 85% of caveolin and approximately 55% of a GPI-linked marker protein, while they exclude > or = 98% of integral plasma membrane protein markers and > or = 99.6% of other organelle-specific membrane markers tested. Characterization of these complexes by micro-sequencing and immuno- blotting reveals known receptors for modified forms of LDL (scavenger receptors: CD 36 and RAGE), multiple GPI-linked proteins, an anion transporter (plasma membrane porin), cytoskeletal elements, and cytoplasmic signaling molecules--including Src-like kinases, hetero- trimeric G-proteins, and three members of the Rap family of small GTPases (Rap 1--the Ras tumor suppressor protein, Rap 2, and TC21). At least a fraction of the actin in these complexes appeared monomeric (G- actin), suggesting that

  6. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in subjects over 60 years of age, and its implications for designing clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Caramoy, Albert; Foerster, Jonathan; Allakhiarova, Elvira; Hoyng, Carel B; Dröge, Katharina; Kirchhof, Bernd; Fauser, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    Aims To study the variability of central retinal thickness (CRT), its concordance to the fellow eye, and the implications for designing future clinical trials using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Cross-sectional retrospective analysis of European Genetic Database. 632 eyes of 316 subjects over 60 years of age without macular pathology were examined using SD-OCT. Results Mean CRT was 280.22 µm and 281.02 µm for the right and left eyes, respectively. There was a strong concordance for all measured values between right and left eyes. Men had significantly thicker CRT than women. Variation up to 23 µm difference between both eyes was seen. To detect a change of at least 30 µm in CRT, a sample size of 90 or 176 per group is needed for a single-arm or double-arm study, respectively (α=0.05, power=0.80, no loss to follow up, assuming SD in future studies=100 µm). Conclusions Clinical trials using CRT as an endpoint are feasible in terms of sample size needed. PMID:22863948

  7. The metal-ion-dependent adhesion site in the Von Willebrand factor-A domain of α2δ subunits is key to trafficking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Cantí, C.; Nieto-Rostro, M.; Foucault, I.; Heblich, F.; Wratten, J.; Richards, M. W.; Hendrich, J.; Douglas, L.; Page, K. M.; Davies, A.; Dolphin, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    All auxiliary α2δ subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels contain an extracellular Von Willebrand factor-A (VWA) domain that, in α2δ-1 and -2, has a perfect metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). Modeling of the α2δ-2 VWA domain shows it to be highly likely to bind a divalent cation. Mutating the three key MIDAS residues responsible for divalent cation binding resulted in a MIDAS mutant α2δ-2 subunit that was still processed and trafficked normally when it was expressed alone. However, unlike WT α2δ-2, the MIDAS mutant α2δ-2 subunit did not enhance and, in some cases, further diminished CaV1.2, -2.1, and -2.2 currents coexpressed with β1b by using either Ba2+ or Na+ as a permeant ion. Furthermore, expression of the MIDAS mutant α2δ-2 reduced surface expression and strongly increased the perinuclear retention of CaVα1 subunits at the earliest time at which expression was observed in both Cos-7 and NG108–15 cells. Despite the presence of endogenous α2δ subunits, heterologous expression of α2δ-2 in differentiated NG108–15 cells further enhanced the endogenous high-threshold Ca2+ currents, whereas this enhancement was prevented by the MIDAS mutations. Our results indicate that α2δ subunits normally interact with the CaVα1 subunit early in their maturation, before the appearance of functional plasma membrane channels, and an intact MIDAS motif in the α2δ subunit is required to promote trafficking of the α1 subunit to the plasma membrane by an integrin-like switch. This finding provides evidence for a primary role of a VWA domain in intracellular trafficking of a multimeric complex, in contrast to the more usual roles in binding extracellular ligands in other exofacial VWA domains. PMID:16061813

  8. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A conserved C-terminal domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus developmental regulator MedA is required for nuclear localization, adhesion and virulence.

    PubMed

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Lee, Mark J; Sheppard, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA(346-557), that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA(346-557) alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA(346-557) domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function.

  10. A Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus Developmental Regulator MedA Is Required for Nuclear Localization, Adhesion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Lee, Mark J.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA346–557, that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA346–557 alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA346–557 domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function. PMID:23185496

  11. Adrenohepatic fusion: Adhesion or invasion in primary virilizant giant adrenal carcinoma? Implications for surgical resection. Two case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alastrué Vidal, Antonio; Navinés López, Jordi; Julián Ibáñez, Juan Francisco; De la Ossa Merlano, Napoleón; Botey Fernandez, Mireia; Sampere Moragues, Jaume; Sánchez Torres, Maria del Carmen; Barluenga Torres, Eva; Fernández-Llamazares Rodríguez, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adrenohepatic fusion means union between the adrenal gland and the liver, intermingling its parenchymas. It is not possible to identify this condition by image tests. Its presence implies radical and multidisciplinar approach. Presentation of cases We report two female cases of 45 and 50 years old with clinical virilization and palpable mass on the abdominal right upper quadrant corresponding to adrenocortical carcinoma with hepatic fusion. The contrast-enhanced tomography showed an indistinguishable mass involving the liver and the right adrenal gland. In the first case, the patient had a two-time operation, the former removing only the adrenal carcinoma, and the second performing a radical surgery after an early relapse. In the second case, a radical right en bloc adrenohepatectomy was performed. Both cases were pathologically reported as liver-infiltrating adrenal carcinoma. Only in the second case the surgery was radical effective as first intention to treat, with 3 years of disease-free survival. Discussion ACC is a rare entity with poor prognosis. The major indicators of malignancy are tumour diameter over 6 cm, local invasion or metastasis, secretion of corticosteroids, virilization and hypertension and hypokalaemia. The parenchymal fusion of the adrenal cortical layer can be misdiagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma with adhesion with the Glisson capsule. AHF in such cases may be misinterpreted during surgery, what may impair its resectability, and therefore the survival. The surgical treatment must be performed en bloc, often using liver vascular control. Postoperative treatment must be offered immediately after surgery. Conclusion We report two consecutive rare cases of adrenohepatic fusion in giant right adrenocortical carcinoma, not detectable by imaging, what has important implications for the surgical decision-making. As radical surgery is the best choice to offer a curative treatment, it has to be performed by a multidisciplinary well

  12. Family-wide investigation of PDZ domain-mediated protein–protein interactions implicates β-catenin in maintaining the integrity of tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, Taranjit S.; Karp, Ethan S.; Chan, Marina; Chang, Bryan H.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Summary β-catenin is a multifunctional protein that plays a critical role in cell–cell contacts and signal transduction. β-catenin has previously been shown to interact with PDZ domain-containing proteins through its C-terminus. Using protein microarrays comprising 206 mouse PDZ domains, we identified 26 PDZ domain-mediated interactions with β-catenin and subsequently confirmed them both in vitro and in cellular lysates. Many of the newly discovered interactions involved proteins with annotated roles in the formation or maintenance of tight junctions. We found that four tight junction-associated PDZ proteins – Scrib, Magi-1, Pard3, and ZO-3 – co-localize with β-catenin at the plasma membrane in MDCK epithelial cells. Disrupting these interactions, either by RNAi, overexpression of isolated PDZ domains, or overexpression of the C-terminus of β-catenin, altered localization of the full-length proteins, weakened tight junctions, and decreased cellular adhesion. These results suggest a novel role for β-catenin as a scaffold to establish the location and function of tight junction-associated proteins. PMID:23790492

  13. On the convergence between PSY-5 domains and PID-5 domains and facets: implications for assessment of DSM-5 personality traits.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Bagby, R Michael; Quilty, Lena C; Veltri, Carlo O C; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F

    2013-06-01

    The DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders workgroup and their consultants have developed the 220-item, self-report Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5) for direct assessment of the proposed personality trait system for DSM-5; however, most practicing clinical psychologists will likely continue to rely on separate omnibus measures to index symptoms and traits associated with psychopathology. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) is one such measure and assesses the Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) domains, which are conceptual cognates of the DSM-5 trait domains. The current study examined the associations between the MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 scales and the DSM-5 trait domains and facets indexed by the PID-5. A clear pattern of convergence was found indicating that each of the PSY-5 scales was most highly correlated with its conceptually expected PID-5 counterpart (rs = .44-.67; Mdn r = .53) and facet correlations generally showed the same pattern. Similarly, when each of the PSY-5 scales was regressed onto the PID-5 domains, the conceptually expected pattern of associations emerged even more clearly. Finally, a joint exploratory factor analysis with the PSY-5 and PID-5 trait facet scales indicated a five-factor solution that clearly resembled both of the PSY-5/DSM-5 trait domains. These results show clear evidence that the MMPI-2-RF has utility in the assessment of dimensional personality traits proposed for the upcoming DSM-5.

  14. Recognition of RNA cap in the Wesselsbron virus NS5 methyltransferase domain: implications for RNA-capping mechanisms in Flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Bollati, Michela; Milani, Mario; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Ricagno, Stefano; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Nonnis, Simona; Decroly, Etienne; Selisko, Barbara; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Bolognesi, Martino

    2009-01-09

    The mRNA-capping process starts with the conversion of a 5'-triphosphate end into a 5'-diphosphate by an RNA triphosphatase, followed by the addition of a guanosine monophosphate unit in a 5'-5' phosphodiester bond by a guanylyltransferase. Methyltransferases are involved in the third step of the process, transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N7-guanine (cap 0) and to the ribose 2'OH group (cap 1) of the first RNA nucleotide; capping is essential for mRNA stability and proper replication. In the genus Flavivirus, N7-methyltransferase and 2'O-methyltransferase activities have been recently associated with the N-terminal domain of the viral NS5 protein. In order to further characterize the series of enzymatic reactions that support capping, we analyzed the crystal structures of Wesselsbron virus methyltransferase in complex with the S-adenosyl-l-methionine cofactor, S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (the product of the methylation reaction), Sinefungin (a molecular analogue of the enzyme cofactor), and three different cap analogues (GpppG, (N7Me)GpppG, and (N7Me)GpppA). The structural results, together with those on other flaviviral methyltransferases, show that the capped RNA analogues all bind to an RNA high-affinity binding site. However, lack of specific interactions between the enzyme and the first nucleotide of the RNA chain suggests the requirement of a minimal number of nucleotides following the cap to strengthen protein/RNA interaction. Our data also show that, following incubation with guanosine triphosphate, Wesselsbron virus methyltransferase displays a guanosine monophosphate molecule covalently bound to residue Lys28, hinting at possible implications for the transfer of a guanine group to ppRNA. The structures of the Wesselsbron virus methyltransferase complexes obtained are discussed in the context of a model for N7-methyltransferase and 2'O-methyltransferase activities.

  15. Lack of recombinant factor VIII B-domain induces phospholipid vesicle aggregation: implications for the immunogenicity of factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Grushin, K; Miller, J; Dalm, D; Parker, E T; Healey, J F; Lollar, P; Stoilova-McPhie, S

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a multidomain blood plasma glycoprotein. Activated FVIII acts as a cofactor to the serine protease factor IXa within the membrane-bound tenase complex assembled on the activated platelet surface. Defect or deficiency in FVIII causes haemophilia A, a severe hereditary bleeding disorder. Intravenous administration of plasma-derived FVIII or recombinant FVIII concentrates restores normal coagulation in haemophilia A patients and is used as an effective therapy. In this work, we studied the biophysical properties of clinically potent recombinant FVIII forms: human FVIII full-length (FVIII-FL), human FVIII B-domain deleted (FVIII-BDD) and porcine FVIII-BDD bound to negatively charged phospholipid vesicles at near-physiological conditions. We used cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) as a direct method to evaluate the homogeneity and micro-organization of the protein-vesicle suspensions, which are important for FVIII therapeutic properties. Applying concurrent Cryo-EM, circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering studies to the three recombinant FVIII forms when bound to phospholipid vesicles revealed novel properties for their functional, membrane-bound state. The three FVIII constructs have similar activity, secondary structure distribution and bind specifically to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Human and porcine FVIII-BDD induce strong aggregation of the vesicles, but the human FVIII-FL form does not. The proposed methodology is effective in characterizing and identifying differences in therapeutic recombinant FVIII membrane-bound forms near physiological conditions, because protein-containing aggregates are considered to be a factor in increasing the immunogenicity of protein therapeutics. This will provide better characterization and development of safer and more effective FVIII products with implications for haemophilia A treatment. PMID:24750465

  16. Heterologous Expression of Bartonella Adhesin A in Escherichia coli by Exchange of Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin Domains Results in Enhanced Adhesion Properties and a Pathogenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Schmidgen, Thomas; Kaiser, Patrick O.; Ballhorn, Wibke; Franz, Bettina; Göttig, Stephan; Linke, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Human-pathogenic Bartonella henselae causes cat scratch disease and vasculoproliferative disorders. An important pathogenicity factor of B. henselae is the trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) Bartonella adhesin A (BadA), which is modularly constructed, consisting of a head, a long and repetitive neck-stalk module, and a membrane anchor. BadA is involved in bacterial autoagglutination, binding to extracellular matrix proteins and host cells, and in proangiogenic reprogramming. The slow growth of B. henselae and limited tools for genetic manipulation are obstacles for detailed examination of BadA and its domains. Here, we established a recombinant expression system for BadA mutants in Escherichia coli allowing functional analysis of particular BadA domains. Using a BadA mutant lacking 21 neck-stalk repeats (BadA HN23), the BadA HN23 signal sequence was exchanged with that of E. coli OmpA, and the BadA membrane anchor was additionally replaced with that of Yersinia adhesin A (YadA). Constructs were cloned in E. coli, and hybrid protein expression was detected by immunoblotting, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Functional analysis revealed that BadA hybrid proteins mediate autoagglutination and binding to collagen and endothelial cells. In vivo, expression of this BadA construct correlated with higher pathogenicity of E. coli in a Galleria mellonella infection model. PMID:24682330

  17. SUV420H2 suppresses breast cancer cell invasion through down regulation of the SH2 domain-containing focal adhesion protein tensin-3.

    PubMed

    Shinchi, Yoshimi; Hieda, Miki; Nishioka, Yu; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Yuhki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shuji; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2015-05-15

    The genome-wide loss of histone H4 lysine 20 tri-methylation (H4K20me3) is observed in multiple types of cancer, including breast tumors. Since H4K20me3 is preferentially targeted to repetitive elements in the pericentromeric and telomeric heterochromatin and plays a role in chromatin integrity, the pathological effects of disrupted H4K20me3 in tumors have been attributed to genomic instability. However, in this report, we show that loss of H4K20me3 modulates gene expression profiles, leading to increased cell invasion. Reduced H4K20me3 levels in tumor cells are often accompanied by a decrease in the expression of the H4K20-specific methyltransferase, SUV420H2. Exogenous delivery of SUV420H2 into MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells induced selective and specific changes in the expression of cancer-related genes. One of the most downregulated genes in response to SUV420H2 expression was the Src substrate, tensin-3, a focal adhesion protein that contributes to cancer cell migration. Depletion of tensin-3 suppressed breast cancer cell invasiveness. Furthermore, silencing of tensin-3 was associated with enrichment of H4K20me3 immediately upstream of the tensin-3 transcription start site, suggesting that the loss of H4K20me3 in tumor cells induced the expression of cancer-promoting genes. These findings connect the loss of H4K20me3 with tumor progression, through the transcriptional activation of cancer-promoting genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal structure of caspase recruiting domain (CARD) of apoptosis repressor with CARD (ARC) and its implication in inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae-ho; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Yeun Gil; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-06-03

    Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruiting domain (ARC) is a multifunctional inhibitor of apoptosis that is unusually over-expressed or activated in various cancers and in the state of the pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, ARC might be an optimal target for therapeutic intervention. Human ARC is composed of two distinct domains, N-terminal caspase recruiting domain (CARD) and C-terminal P/E (proline and glutamic acid) rich domain. ARC inhibits the extrinsic apoptosis pathway by interfering with DISC formation. ARC CARD directly interacts with the death domains (DDs) of Fas and FADD, as well as with the death effector domains (DEDs) of procaspase-8. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the CARD domain of ARC at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Our structure was a dimer with novel homo-dimerization interfaces that might be critical to its inhibitory function. Interestingly, ARC did not exhibit a typical death domain fold. The sixth helix (H6), which was detected at the typical death domain fold, was not detected in the structure of ARC, indicating that H6 may be dispensable for the function of the death domain superfamily.

  19. Detection of dsRNA-binding domains in RNA helicase A and Drosophila maleless: implications for monomeric RNA helicases.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, T J; Thompson, J D

    1994-01-01

    Searches with dsRNA-binding domain profiles detected two copies of the domain in each of RNA helicase A, Drosophila maleless and C. elegans ORF T20G5-11 (of unknown function). RNA helicase A is unusual in being one of the few characterised DEAD/DExH helicases that are active as monomers. Other monomeric DEAD/DExH RNA helicases (p68, NPH-II) have domains that match another RNA-binding motif, the RGG repeat. The DEAD/DExH domain appears to be insufficient on its own to promote helicase activity and additional RNA-binding capacity must be supplied either as domains adjacent to the DEAD/DExH-box or by bound partners as in the eIF-4AB dimer. The presence or absence of extra RNA-binding domains should allow classification of DEAD/DExH proteins as monomeric or multimeric helicases. Images PMID:8041617

  20. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  1. MiR-7a is an important mediator in Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-regulated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingting; Cui, Hongen; Huang, Xianjie; Zhu, Bo; Guan, Shengwen; Cheng, Wei; Lai, Yueyang; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), a classical adaptor protein mediating apoptotic stimuli-induced cell death, has been reported to engage in several non-apoptotic processes such as T cell and cardiac development and tumorigenesis. Recently, there are several reports about the FADD's involvement in cell migration, however the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we present a new finding that FADD could regulate the expression of FAK, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase overexpressed in many cancers, and played an important role in cell migration in murine MEF and melanoma cells with different metastatic potential, B16F10 and B16F1. Moreover, miR-7a, a tumor suppressor which prohibits cell migration and invasion, was up-regulated in FADD-deficient cells. And FAK was verified to be the direct target gene of miR-7a in B16F10 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-7a was a necessary mediator in FADD-regulated FAK expression. In contrast to its classical apoptotic role, FADD interference could reduce the rate of cell migration, which could be rescued by inhibiting miR-7a expression. Taken together, our data provide a novel explanation regarding how FADD regulates cell migration in murine melanoma cells. PMID:27286445

  2. Adhesions following cesarean delivery: a review of their occurrence, consequences and preventative management using adhesion barriers.

    PubMed

    Poole, Judith H

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the occurrence and consequences of postoperative adhesions following cesarean delivery (CD), and an overview of the published clinical data on prevention in this setting using adhesion barriers. Adhesions occur frequently after CD and the incidence increases with each subsequent CD. Repeat CDs are complicated by adhesions, which increase operating time, time to delivery and risk of bladder injury. Clinical data on the efficacy of adhesion prevention strategies specific to the setting of CD are limited. Two small, nonrandomized studies found that the use of absorbable anti-adhesion barriers was associated with a significant reduction in adhesion formation and a shorter time to delivery at repeat CD, compared with no barrier use. Implications for practice and research are discussed. There is a significant need for well-controlled, randomized clinical studies investigating adhesion prevention in the labor and delivery setting.

  3. Handbook of Adhesion, 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packham, D. E.

    2005-06-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require. This second edition includes many new articles covering developments which have risen in prominence in the intervening years, such as scanning probe techniques, the surface forces apparatus and the relation between adhesion and fractal surfaces. Advances in understanding polymer - polymer interdiffusion are reflected in articles drawing out the implications for adhesive bonding. In addition, articles derived from the earlier edition have been revised and updated where needed. Throughout the book there is a renewed emphasis on environmental implications of the use of adhesives and sealants. The scope of the Handbook, which features nearly 250 articles from over 60 authors, includes the background science - physics, chemistry and material science - and engineering, and also aspects of adhesion relevant to the use of adhesives, including topics such as: Sealants and mastics Paints and coatings Printing and composite materials Welding and autohesion Engineering design The Handbook of Adhesion is intended for scientists and engineers in both academia and industry, requiring an understanding of the various facets of adhesion.

  4. Functional Effects of Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Glycosylation on Homophilic Adhesion and Adenoviral Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Excoffon, Katherine J. D. Ashbourne; Gansemer, Nicholas; Traver, Geri; Zabner, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is both a viral receptor and homophilic adhesion protein. The extracellular portion of CAR consists of two immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, each with a consensus sequence for N-glycosylation. We used chemical, genetic, and biochemical studies to show that both sites are glycosylated and contribute to the function of CAR. Although the glycosylation of CAR does not alter cell surface levels or junctional localization, it affects both adhesion and adenovirus infection in unique ways. CAR-mediated adhesion appears to require at least one site of glycosylation since cells expressing CAR without glycosylation do not cluster with each other. In contrast, glycosylation of the Ig-like domain proximal to the membrane is key to the cooperative behavior of adenovirus binding and infection. Contrary to the hypothesis that cooperativity improves viral infection, our data show that although glycosylation of the D2 domain is required for adenovirus cooperative binding, it has a negative consequence upon infection. This is the first report dissecting the adhesion and receptor activities of CAR, revealing that factors other than the binding interface play a significant role in the function of CAR. These data have important implications for both cancers with altered glycosylation states and cancer treatments using oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:17376928

  5. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes Bind to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells In Vitro, Demonstrating a Dual Adhesion Phenotype Mediated by Distinct P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K.; Ghumra, Ashfaq

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (<10 μg/ml of total IgG). Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:24343658

  6. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    PubMed

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (<10 μg/ml of total IgG). Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  7. Tracing the origin of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome: implications for protein evolution at the modular level.

    PubMed

    Pal, Lipika R; Guda, Chittibabu

    2006-11-07

    The functional repertoire of the human proteome is an incremental collection of functions accomplished by protein domains evolved along the Homo sapiens lineage. Therefore, knowledge on the origin of these functionalities provides a better understanding of the domain and protein evolution in human. The lack of proper comprehension about such origin has impelled us to study the evolutionary origin of human proteome in a unique way as detailed in this study. This study reports a unique approach for understanding the evolution of human proteome by tracing the origin of its constituting domains hierarchically, along the Homo sapiens lineage. The uniqueness of this method lies in subtractive searching of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome resulting in higher efficiency of detecting their origins. From these analyses the nature of protein evolution and trends in domain evolution can be observed in the context of the entire human proteome data. The method adopted here also helps delineate the degree of divergence of functional families occurred during the course of evolution. This approach to trace the evolutionary origin of functional domains in the human proteome facilitates better understanding of their functional versatility as well as provides insights into the functionality of hypothetical proteins present in the human proteome. This work elucidates the origin of functional and conserved domains in human proteins, their distribution along the Homo sapiens lineage, occurrence frequency of different domain combinations and proteome-wide patterns of their distribution, providing insights into the evolutionary solution to the increased complexity of the human proteome.

  8. Bacteriocin-producing strains of Lactobacillus plantarum inhibit adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus to extracellular matrix: quantitative insight and implications in antibacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandipan; Ramesh, Aiyagari

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, the adhesion of bacteriocin-producing probiotic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum onto extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as collagen and mucin and their potential to prevent pathogen invasion onto the ECM was ascertained. Fluorescence-based in vitro assays indicated that L. plantarum strains CRA21, CRA38 and CRA52 displayed considerable adhesion to ECM molecules, which was comparable to the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Flow cytometry-based quantitative assessment of the adhesion potential suggested that L. plantarum CRA21 exhibited superior adhesion onto the ECM as compared with other lactic acid bacteria strains. Furthermore, fluorescence-based assays suggested that the highest inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion onto collagen and mucin by bacteriocin-producing L. plantarum strains was observed in the exclusion mode as compared with the competition and displacement modes. This observation was supported by the higher binding affinity (k(d)) for the ECM exhibited by the L. plantarum strains as compared with S. aureus. Interestingly, a crude plantaricin A extract from food isolates of L. plantarum displayed potent antibacterial activity on ECM-adhered S. aureus cells. It is envisaged that the L. plantarum isolates displaying bacteriocinogenic and ECM-adhering traits can perhaps be explored to develop safe antibacterial therapeutic agents.

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β dictates podocyte motility and focal adhesion turnover by modulating paxillin activity: implications for the protective effect of low-dose lithium in podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Ge, Yan; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Rujun

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant focal adhesion turnover is centrally involved in podocyte actin cytoskeleton disorganization and foot process effacement. The structural and dynamic integrity of focal adhesions is orchestrated by multiple cell signaling molecules, including glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multitasking kinase lately identified as a mediator of kidney injury. However, the role of GSK3β in podocytopathy remains obscure. In doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-injured podocytes, lithium, a GSK3β inhibitor and neuroprotective mood stabilizer, obliterated the accelerated focal adhesion turnover, rectified podocyte hypermotility, and restored actin cytoskeleton integrity. Mechanistically, lithium counteracted the doxorubicin-elicited GSK3β overactivity and the hyperphosphorylation and overactivation of paxillin, a focal adhesion-associated adaptor protein. Moreover, forced expression of a dominant negative kinase dead mutant of GSK3β highly mimicked, whereas ectopic expression of a constitutively active GSK3β mutant abolished, the effect of lithium in doxorubicin-injured podocytes, suggesting that the effect of lithium is mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of GSK3β. Furthermore, paxillin interacted with GSK3β and served as its substrate. In mice with doxorubicin nephropathy, a single low dose of lithium ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Consistently, lithium therapy abrogated GSK3β overactivity, blunted paxillin hyperphosphorylation, and reinstated actin cytoskeleton integrity in glomeruli associated with an early attenuation of podocyte foot process effacement. Thus, GSK3β-modulated focal adhesion dynamics might serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy.

  10. From the Cover: Implications for complex cognition from the hafting of tools with compound adhesives in the Middle Stone Age, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Lyn; Hodgskiss, Tamaryn; Grant, Michael

    2009-06-16

    Compound adhesives made from red ochre mixed with plant gum were used in the Middle Stone Age (MSA), South Africa. Replications reported here suggest that early artisans did not merely color their glues red; they deliberately effected physical transformations involving chemical changes from acidic to less acidic pH, dehydration of the adhesive near wood fires, and changes to mechanical workability and electrostatic forces. Some of the steps required for making compound adhesive seem impossible without multitasking and abstract thought. This ability suggests overlap between the cognitive abilities of modern people and people in the MSA. Our multidisciplinary analysis provides a new way to recognize complex cognition in the MSA without necessarily invoking the concept of symbolism.

  11. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Stclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A process was developed for preparing aromatic polyamide acids for use as adhesives by reacting an aromatic dianhydride to an approximately equimolar amount of an aromatic diamine in a water or lower alkanol miscible ether solvent. The polyamide acids are converted to polyimides by heating to the temperature range of 200 - 300 C. The polyimides are thermally stable and insoluble in ethers and other organic solvents.

  12. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  13. Tracing the origin of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome: implications for protein evolution at the modular level

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Lipika R; Guda, Chittibabu

    2006-01-01

    Background The functional repertoire of the human proteome is an incremental collection of functions accomplished by protein domains evolved along the Homo sapiens lineage. Therefore, knowledge on the origin of these functionalities provides a better understanding of the domain and protein evolution in human. The lack of proper comprehension about such origin has impelled us to study the evolutionary origin of human proteome in a unique way as detailed in this study. Results This study reports a unique approach for understanding the evolution of human proteome by tracing the origin of its constituting domains hierarchically, along the Homo sapiens lineage. The uniqueness of this method lies in subtractive searching of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome resulting in higher efficiency of detecting their origins. From these analyses the nature of protein evolution and trends in domain evolution can be observed in the context of the entire human proteome data. The method adopted here also helps delineate the degree of divergence of functional families occurred during the course of evolution. Conclusion This approach to trace the evolutionary origin of functional domains in the human proteome facilitates better understanding of their functional versatility as well as provides insights into the functionality of hypothetical proteins present in the human proteome. This work elucidates the origin of functional and conserved domains in human proteins, their distribution along the Homo sapiens lineage, occurrence frequency of different domain combinations and proteome-wide patterns of their distribution, providing insights into the evolutionary solution to the increased complexity of the human proteome. PMID:17090320

  14. Identification of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    simply two free phosphate groups of unliganded DAPP1 PH (DiNitto et al, 2003)). As phosphate groups on the inositol head group are the major PH domain...weakly (ə µM). To identify which phosphoinositide determinants (i.e. inositol phosphates ring moieties, the glycerol moiety or nearby acyl chains...are involved in PH domain binding, I performed SPR lipid competition studies, preincubating inositol headgroups/phosphoinositide constructs of

  15. Clustering amino acid contents of protein domains: biochemical functions of proteins and implications for origin of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Torshin, I Y

    2001-04-01

    Structural classes of protein domains correlate with their amino acid compositions. Several successful algorithms (that use only amino acid composition) have been elaborated for the prediction of structural class or potential biochemical significance. This work deals with dynamic classification (clustering) of the domains on the basis of their amino acid composition. Amino acid contents of domains from a non-redundant PDB set were clustered in 20-dimensional space of amino acid contents. Despite the variations of an empirical parameter and non-redundancy of the set, only one large cluster (tens-hundreds of proteins) surrounded by hundreds of small clusters (1-5 proteins), was identified. The core of the largest cluster contains at least 64% DNA (nucleotide)-interacting protein domains from various sources. About 90% of the proteins of the core are intracellular proteins. 83% of the DNA/nucleotide interacting domains in the core belong to the mixed alpha-beta folds (a+b, a/b), 14% are all-alpha (mostly helices) and all-beta (mostly beta-strands) proteins. At the same time, when core domains that belong to one organism (E.coli) are considered, over 80% of them prove to be DNA/nucleotide interacting proteins. The core is compact: amino acid contents of domains from the core lie in relatively narrow and specific ranges. The core also contains several Fe-S cluster-binding domains, amino acid contents of the core overlap with ferredoxin and CO-dehydrogenase clusters, the oldest known proteins. As Fe-S clusters are thought to be the first biocatalysts, the results are discussed in relation to contemporary experiments and models dealing with the origin of biological macromolecules. The origin of most primordial proteins is considered here to be a result of co-adsorption of nucleotides and amino acids on specific clays, followed by en-block polymerization of the adsorbed mixtures of amino acids.

  16. β1 integrin adhesion enhances IL-6 mediated STAT3 signaling in Myeloma cells: Implications for Microenvironment Influence on Tumor Survival and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Shain, Kenneth H.; Yarde, Danielle N.; Meads, Mark B.; Huang, Mei; Jove, Richard; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Dalton, William S.

    2009-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironmental components interleukin (IL)-6 and fibronectin (FN) individually influence the proliferation and survival of Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells; however, in vivo these effectors most likely work together. We examined signaling events, cell cycle progression, and levels of drug response in MM cells either adhered to FN via β1 integrins, stimulated with IL-6, or treated with the two combined. While G1/S cell cycle arrest associated with FN adhesion was overcome when IL-6 as added, the cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) was maintained in the presence of IL-6. Concomitant exposure of MM cells to IL-6 and FN adhesion revealed a dramatic increase in STAT3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, as compared to either IL-6 or FN adhesion alone in four MM cell lines. Importantly, this increase in STAT3 activation correlated with a novel association between STAT3 and gp130 in cells adhered to FN prior to stimulation with IL-6, relative to non-adherent cells. Taken together, these results suggest a mechanism by which collaborative signaling by β1 integrin and gp130 confers an increased survival advantage to MM cells. PMID:19155309

  17. Defining the role of a FYVE domain in the localization and activity of a cAMP phosphodiesterase implicated in osmoregulation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Schoijet, Alejandra C.; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Torres, Héctor N.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotide second messengers are regulated predominantly by a large superfamily of phosphodiesterases. Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes four different phosphodiesterase (PDE) families. One of these PDEs, T. cruzi phosphodiesterase C2 (TcrPDEC2) has been characterized as a FYVE-domain containing protein. Here, we report a novel role for TcrPDEC2 in osmoregulation in T. cruzi and reveal the relevance of its FYVE domain. Our data show that treatment of epimastigotes with TcrPDEC2 inhibitors improves their regulatory volume decrease, whereas cells overexpressing this enzyme are unaffected by the same inhibitors. Consistent with these results, TcrPDEC2 localizes to the contractile vacuole complex, showing strong labeling in the region corresponding to the spongiome. Furthermore, transgenic parasites overexpressing a truncated version of TcrPDEC2 without the FYVE domain show a failure in its targeting to the contractile vacuole complex and a marked decrease in phosphodiesterase activity, supporting the importance of this domain to the localization and activity of TcrPDEC2. Taking together, the results here presented are consistent with the importance of the cyclic AMP signaling pathway in regulatory volume decrease and implicate TcrPDEC2 as a specifically localized phosphodiesterase involved in osmoregulation in T. cruzi. PMID:21166893

  18. Identification of Src, Fyn, and Lyn SH3-binding proteins: implications for a function of SH3 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Z; Thomas, S M; Rickles, R J; Taylor, J A; Brauer, A W; Seidel-Dugan, C; Michael, W M; Dreyfuss, G; Brugge, J S

    1994-01-01

    Src homology 3 (SH3) domains mediate protein-protein interactions necessary for the coupling of cellular proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction. We previously established solution-binding conditions that allow affinity isolation of Src SH3-binding proteins from cellular extracts (Z. Weng, J. A. Taylor, C. E. Turner, J. S. Brugge, and C. Seidel-Dugan, J. Biol. Chem. 268:14956-14963, 1993). In this report, we identified three of these proteins: Shc, a signaling protein that couples membrane tyrosine kinases with Ras; p62, a protein which can bind to p21rasGAP; and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, a pre-mRNA-binding protein. All of these proteins contain proline-rich peptide motifs that could serve as SH3 domain ligands, and the binding of these proteins to the Src SH3 domain was inhibited with a proline-rich Src SH3 peptide ligand. These three proteins, as well as most of the other Src SH3 ligands, also bound to the SH3 domains of the closely related protein tyrosine kinases Fyn and Lyn. However, Src- and Lyn-specific SH3-binding proteins were also detected, suggesting subtle differences in the binding specificity of the SH3 domains from these related proteins. Several Src SH3-binding proteins were phosphorylated in Src-transformed cells. The phosphorylation of these proteins was not detected in cells transformed by a mutant variant of Src lacking the SH3 domain, while there was little change in tyrosine phosphorylation of other Src-induced phosphoproteins. In addition, the coprecipitation of v-Src with two tyrosyl-phosphorylated proteins with M(r)s of 62,000 and 130,000 was inhibited by incubation with a Src SH3 peptide ligand, suggesting that the binding of these substrate proteins is dependent on interactions with the SH3 domain. These results strongly suggest a role for the Src SH3 domain in the recruitment of substrates to this protein tyrosine kinase, either through direct interaction with the SH3 domain or indirectly through

  19. Allostery Is an Intrinsic Property of the Protease Domain of DegS Implications for Enzyme Function and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2010-12-02

    DegS is a periplasmic Escherichia coli protease, which functions as a trimer to catalyze the initial rate-limiting step in a proteolytic cascade that ultimately activates transcription of stress response genes in the cytoplasm. Each DegS subunit consists of a protease domain and a PDZ domain. During protein folding stress, DegS is allosterically activated by peptides exposed in misfolded outer membrane porins, which bind to the PDZ domain and stabilize the active protease. It is not known whether allostery is conferred by the PDZ domains or is an intrinsic feature of the trimeric protease domain. Here, we demonstrate that free DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} equilibrates between active and inactive trimers with the latter species predominating. Substrate binding stabilizes active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} in a positively cooperative fashion. Mutations can also stabilize active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} and produce an enzyme that displays hyperbolic kinetics and degrades substrate with a maximal velocity within error of that for fully activated, intact DegS. Crystal structures of multiple DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} variants, in functional and non-functional conformations, support a two-state model in which allosteric switching is mediated by changes in specific elements of tertiary structure in the context of an invariant trimeric base. Overall, our results indicate that protein substrates must bind sufficiently tightly and specifically to the functional conformation of DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} to assist their own degradation. Thus, substrate binding alone may have regulated the activities of ancestral DegS trimers with subsequent fusion of the protease domain to a PDZ domain, resulting in ligand-mediated regulation.

  20. Nature and distribution of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia and regional geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    We present a new classification of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along two regional wide-angle seismic transects, one running NW-SE from the Horseshoe to the Seine abyssal plains, and the other running N-S from S Portugal to the Seine Abyssal Plain, combined with previously available information. The seismic velocity and density structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain and the internal Gulf of Cadiz indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous oceanic crust, similar to that described in ultra-slow spreading centers, whereas in the Horseshoe and Tagus abyssal plains, the basement structure resembles that of exhumed mantle sections identified in the Northern Atlantic margin. The integration of all this new information allows defining the presence of three oceanic domains offshore SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental break-up (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, mainly made of rocks exhumed from the mantle with little synchronous magmatism, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening. Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain. The formation and evolution of these three domains during the Mesozoic is key to understand the sequence

  1. Dynamics and mechanism of p130Cas localization to focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Dominique M; Ryzhova, Larisa M; Meenderink, Leslie M; Kaverina, Irina; Hanks, Steven K

    2010-07-02

    The docking protein p130Cas is a major Src substrate involved in integrin signaling and mechanotransduction. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas in focal adhesions (FAs) has been linked to enhanced cell migration, invasion, proliferation, and survival. However, the mechanism of p130Cas targeting to FAs is uncertain, and dynamic aspects of its localization have not been explored. Using live cell microscopy, we show that fluorophore-tagged p130Cas is a component of FAs throughout the FA assembly and disassembly stages, although it resides transiently in FAs with a high mobile fraction. Deletion of either the N-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3) domain or the Cas-family C-terminal homology (CCH) domain significantly impaired p130Cas FA localization, and deletion of both domains resulted in full exclusion. Focal adhesion kinase was implicated in the FA targeting function of the p130Cas SH3 domain. Consistent with their roles in FA targeting, both the SH3 and CCH domains were found necessary for p130Cas to fully undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and promote cell migration. By revealing the capacity of p130Cas to function in FAs throughout their lifetime, clarifying FA targeting mechanism, and demonstrating the functional importance of the highly conserved CCH domain, our results advance the understanding of an important aspect of integrin signaling.

  2. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  3. Conformational heterogeneity of the Roc domains in C. tepidum Roc–COR and implications for human LRRK2 Parkinson mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, Katharina; Ho, Franz Y.; Gilsbach, Bernd K.; Pots, Henderikus; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kortholt, Arjan; Klare, Johann P.

    2015-01-01

    Ras of complex proteins (Roc) is a Ras-like GTP-binding domain that always occurs in tandem with the C-terminal of Roc (COR) domain and is found in bacteria, plants and animals. Recently, it has been shown that Roco proteins belong to the family of G-proteins activated by nucleotide (nt)-dependent dimerization (GADs). We investigated the RocCOR tandem from the bacteria Chlorobium tepidum with site-directed spin labelling and pulse EPR distance measurements to follow conformational changes during the Roco G-protein cycle. Our results confirm that the COR domains are a stable dimerization device serving as a scaffold for the Roc domains that, in contrast, are structurally heterogeneous and dynamic entities. Contrary to other GAD proteins, we observed only minor structural alterations upon binding and hydrolysis of GTP, indicating significant mechanistic variations within this protein class. Mutations in the most prominent member of the Roco family of proteins, leucine-rich repeat (LRR) kinase 2 (LRRK2), are the most frequent cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Using a stable recombinant LRRK2 Roc-COR-kinase fragment we obtained detailed kinetic data for the G-protein cycle. Our data confirmed that dimerization is essential for efficient GTP hydrolysis and PD mutations in the Roc domain result in decreased GTPase activity. Previous data have shown that these LRRK2 PD-mutations are located in the interface between Roc and COR. Importantly, analogous mutations in the conserved C. tepidum Roc/COR interface significantly influence the structure and nt-induced conformational changes of the Roc domains. PMID:26310572

  4. Formation of magnetic single-domain magnetite in ocean ridge basalts with implications for sea-floor magnetism.

    PubMed

    Shau, Y H; Peacor, D R; Essene, E J

    1993-07-16

    Although magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading, the processes by which magnetic phases in ocean floor basalts are formed remain poorly constrained. Scanning transmission electron microscopic observations show that magnetic single-domain magnetite in sheeted dike basalts of Deep Sea Drilling Project hole 504B formed through oxidation-exsolution of ilmenite, exsolution of ulvöspinel lamellae, and recrystallization of end-member magnetite by interaction with convecting fluids. The data suggest that the sheeted dike basalts, with single-domain magnetite as an efficient and stable magnetic carrier, contribute significantly to sea-floor magnetism.

  5. Non-destructive Inhibition of Metallofullerenol Gd@C82(OH)22 on WW domain: Implication on Signal Transduction Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seung-Gu; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2012-12-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenol Gd@C82(OH)22 has recently been shown to effectively inhibit tumor growth; however, its potential adverse bioeffects remain to be understood before its wider applications. Here, we present our study on the interaction between Gd@C82(OH)22 and WW domain, a representative protein domain involved in signaling and regulatory pathway, using all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 has an intrinsic binding preference to the binding groove, particularly the key signature residues Y28 and W39. In its binding competition with the native ligand PRM, Gd@C82(OH)22 is shown to easily win the competition over PRM in occupying the active site, implying that Gd@C82(OH)22 can impose a potential inhibitory effect on the WW domain. Further analyses with binding free energy landscapes reveal that Gd@C82(OH)22 can not only directly block the binding site of the WW domain, but also effectively distract the PRM from its native binding pocket.

  6. M-Learning: Implications in Learning Domain Specificities, Adaptive Learning, Feedback, Augmented Reality, and the Future of Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the potential and effectiveness of m-learning in the field of Education and Learning domains. The purpose of this research is to illustrate how mobile technology can and is affecting novel change in instruction, from m-learning and the link to adaptive learning, to the uninitiated learner and capacities of…

  7. Non-destructive Inhibition of Metallofullerenol Gd@C82(OH)22 on WW domain: Implication on Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-gu; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2012-01-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenol Gd@C82(OH)22 has recently been shown to effectively inhibit tumor growth; however, its potential adverse bioeffects remain to be understood before its wider applications. Here, we present our study on the interaction between Gd@C82(OH)22 and WW domain, a representative protein domain involved in signaling and regulatory pathway, using all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 has an intrinsic binding preference to the binding groove, particularly the key signature residues Y28 and W39. In its binding competition with the native ligand PRM, Gd@C82(OH)22 is shown to easily win the competition over PRM in occupying the active site, implying that Gd@C82(OH)22 can impose a potential inhibitory effect on the WW domain. Further analyses with binding free energy landscapes reveal that Gd@C82(OH)22 can not only directly block the binding site of the WW domain, but also effectively distract the PRM from its native binding pocket. PMID:23233876

  8. Identification of two nuclear factor-binding domains on the chicken cardiac actin promoter: implications for regulation of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Quitschke, W W; DePonti-Zilli, L; Lin, Z Y; Paterson, B M

    1989-01-01

    The cis-acting regions that appear to be involved in negative regulation of the chicken alpha-cardiac actin promoter both in vivo and in vitro have been identified. A nuclear factor(s) binding to the proximal region mapped over the TATA element between nucleotides -50 and -25. In the distal region, binding spanned nucleotides -136 to -112, a region that included a second CArG box (CArG2) 5' to the more familiar CCAAT-box (CArG1) consensus sequence. Nuclear factors binding to these different domains were found in both muscle and nonmuscle preparations but were detectable at considerably lower levels in tissues expressing the alpha-cardiac actin gene. In contrast, concentrations of the beta-actin CCAAT-box binding activity were similar in all extracts tested. The role of these factor-binding domains on the activity of the cardiac actin promoter in vivo and in vitro and the prevalence of the binding factors in nonmuscle extracts are consistent with the idea that these binding domains and their associated factors are involved in the tissue-restricted expression of cardiac actin through both positive and negative regulatory mechanisms. In the absence of negative regulatory factors, these same binding domains act synergistically, via other factors, to activate the cardiac actin promoter during myogenesis. Images PMID:2552286

  9. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Yeast General Corepressor Tup1p and Its Functional Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Kusaka, Nanoha; Nakamura, Taichi; Tanaka, Naoko; Sagegami, Keita; Uegaki, Koichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mukai, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Cyc8p-Tup1p protein complex is a general transcriptional corepressor of genes involved in many different physiological processes. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the Tup1p N-terminal domain (residues 1–92), essential for Tup1p self-assembly and interaction with Cyc8p. This domain tetramerizes to form a novel antiparallel four-helix bundle. Coiled coil interactions near the helical ends hold each dimer together, whereas interdimeric association involves only two sets of two residues located toward the chain centers. A mutagenesis study confirmed that the nonpolar residues responsible for the association of the protomers as dimers are also required for transcriptional repression. An additional structural study demonstrated that the domain containing an Leu62 → Arg mutation that had been shown not to bind Cyc8p exhibits an altered structure, distinct from the wild type. This altered structure explains why the mutant cannot bind Cyc8p. The data presented herein highlight the importance of the architecture of the Tup1p N-terminal domain for self-association. PMID:22707714

  10. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the yeast general corepressor Tup1p and its functional implications.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Kusaka, Nanoha; Nakamura, Taichi; Tanaka, Naoko; Sagegami, Keita; Uegaki, Koichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mukai, Yukio

    2012-08-03

    The yeast Cyc8p-Tup1p protein complex is a general transcriptional corepressor of genes involved in many different physiological processes. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the Tup1p N-terminal domain (residues 1-92), essential for Tup1p self-assembly and interaction with Cyc8p. This domain tetramerizes to form a novel antiparallel four-helix bundle. Coiled coil interactions near the helical ends hold each dimer together, whereas interdimeric association involves only two sets of two residues located toward the chain centers. A mutagenesis study confirmed that the nonpolar residues responsible for the association of the protomers as dimers are also required for transcriptional repression. An additional structural study demonstrated that the domain containing an Leu(62) → Arg mutation that had been shown not to bind Cyc8p exhibits an altered structure, distinct from the wild type. This altered structure explains why the mutant cannot bind Cyc8p. The data presented herein highlight the importance of the architecture of the Tup1p N-terminal domain for self-association.

  11. Impaired theory of mind but intact decision-making in Asperger syndrome: implications for the relationship between these cognitive domains.

    PubMed

    Torralva, Teresa; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Roca, María; Ibanez, Agustín; Marenco, Victoria; Rattazzi, Alexia; Manes, Facundo

    2013-02-28

    The relationship between decision making and theory of mind (TOM) has been hardly investigated in patients with asperger syndrome (AS). Here, we show that the AS group (n=25) exhibited deficits on a complex TOM task, yet were unimpaired in a decision-making test. No association was found between these two domains.

  12. Classification, Nomenclature, and Structural Aspects of Adhesion GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-01-01

    Representation of the nine distinct aGPCR subfamilies and their unique N-terminal domain architecture. The illustration also shows the extracellular structural feature shared by all aGPCRs (except ADGRA1), known as the GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, that mediates autoproteolysis and subsequent attachment of the cleaved NTF and CTF fragments The adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) is unique among all GPCR families with long N-termini and multiple domains that are implicated in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Initially, aGPCRs in the human genome were phylogenetically classified into nine distinct subfamilies based on their 7TM sequence similarity. This phylogenetic grouping of genes into subfamilies was found to be in congruence in closely related mammals and other vertebrates as well. Over the years, aGPCR repertoires have been mapped in many species including model organisms, and, currently, there is a growing interest in exploring the pharmacological aspects of aGPCRs. Nonetheless, the aGPCR nomenclature has been highly diverse because experts in the field have used different names for different family members based on their characteristics (e.g., epidermal growth factor-seven-span transmembrane (EGF-TM7)), but without harmonization with regard to nomenclature efforts. In order to facilitate naming of orthologs and other genetic variants in different species in the future, the Adhesion-GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposed a unified nomenclature for aGPCRs. Here, we review the classification and the most recent/current nomenclature of aGPCRs and as well discuss the structural topology of the extracellular domain (ECD)/N-terminal fragment (NTF) that is comparable with this 7TM subfamily classification. Of note, we systematically describe the structural domains in the ECD of aGPCR subfamilies and

  13. High-throughput computational structure-based characterization of protein families: START domains and implications for structural genomics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hunjoong; Li, Zhaohui; Silkov, Antonina; Fischer, Markus; Petrey, Donald; Honig, Barry; Murray, Diana

    2010-01-01

    SkyLine, a high-throughput homology modeling pipeline tool, detects and models true sequence homologs to a given protein structure. Structures and models are stored in SkyBase with links to computational function annotation, as calculated by MarkUs. The SkyLine/SkyBase/MarkUs technology represents a novel structure-based approach that is more objective and versatile than other protein classification resources. This structure-centric strategy provides a multidimensional organization and coverage of protein space at the levels of family, function, and genome. The concept of “modelability”, the ability to model sequences on related structures, provides a reliable criterion for membership in a protein family (“leverage”) and underlies the unique success of this approach. The overall procedure is illustrated by its application to START domains, which comprise a Biomedical Theme for the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) as part of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). START domains are typically involved in the non-vesicular transport of lipids. While 19 experimentally determined structures are available, the family, whose evolutionary hierarchy is not well determined, is highly sequence diverse, and the ligand-binding potential of many family members is unknown. The SkyLine/SkyBase/MarkUs approach provides significant insights and predicts: 1) many more family members (~4,000) than any other resource; 2) the function for a large number of unannotated proteins; 3) instances of START domains in genomes from which they were thought to be absent; and 4) the existence of two types of novel proteins, those containing dual START domain and those containing N-terminal START domains. PMID:20383749

  14. Most Factor VIII B Domain Missense Mutations Are Unlikely to Be Causative Mutations for Severe Hemophilia A: Implications for Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Kyoichi; Selvaraj, Sundar R; Miao, Hongzhi Z; Pipe, Steven W

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background & Objective The factor VIII (FVIII) B domain shares very little amino acid homology to other known proteins and is not directly necessary for procoagulant activity. Despite this, missense mutations within the B domain have been reported in patients with hemophilia A. Given that the B domain is dispensable for secretion and function of FVIII, we hypothesized that these mutations should not be causative of hemophilia A in these patients. Methods Plasmid vectors containing B domain missense mutations that were reported to be associated with moderate/severe hemophilia A (T751S, D826E, V993L, H1047Y, T1353A, N1441K, L1462P, E1579D, A1591S, P1641L and S1669L) were analyzed for their effect on synthesis and secretion compared to FVIII wild-type (WT) following transient transfection into COS-1 and CHO cells in vitro. Further, H1047Y, N1441K and E1579D mutants were expressed in vivo in a hemophilia A mouse model by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection. Results FVIII activity and antigen levels for all mutants expressed into the conditioned media of COS-1 and CHO cells were similar to FVIII WT. Also, plasma expression of these mutants was similar to FVIII WT in hemophilia A mice. An in vivo tail clip bleeding assay also demonstrated that blood loss from hemophilia A mice expressing FVIII WT, H1047Y, N1441K and E1579D were similar. Conclusion We conclude that most missense mutations within the FVIII B domain would be unlikely to lead to severe hemophilia A and that the majority of such missense mutations represent polymorphisms or non-pathologic mutations. PMID:21645226

  15. Mapping the Personality Psychopathology Five domains onto DSM-IV personality disorders in Dutch clinical and forensic samples: implications for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Sellbom, Martin; Smid, Wineke; de Saeger, Hilde; Smit, Naomi; Kamphuis, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    The Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) model represents 5 broadband dimensional personality domains that align with the originally proposed DSM-5 personality trait system, which was eventually placed in Section III for further study. The main objective of this study was to examine the associations between the PSY-5 model and personality disorder criteria. More specifically, we aimed to determine if the PSY-5 domain scales converged with the alternative DSM-5 Section III model for personality disorders, with a particular emphasis on the personality trait profiles proposed for each of the specific personality disorder types. Two samples from The Netherlands consisting of clinical patients from a personality disorder treatment program (n = 190) and forensic psychiatric hospital (n = 162) were used. All patients had been administered the MMPI-2 (from which MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 scales were scored) and structured clinical interviews to assess personality disorder criteria. Results based on Poisson or negative binomial regression models showed statistically significant and meaningful associations for the hypothesized PSY-5 domains for each of the 6 personality disorders, with a few minor exceptions that are discussed in detail. Implications for these findings are also discussed.

  16. Structure-Function Study of Mammalian Munc18-1 and C. elegans UNC-18 Implicates Domain 3b in the Regulation of Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Margaret E.; Prescott, Gerald R.; Johnson, James R.; Jones, Mathew; Walmesley, Alice; Haynes, Lee P.; Morgan, Alan; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Barclay, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Munc18-1 is an essential synaptic protein functioning during multiple stages of the exocytotic process including vesicle recruitment, docking and fusion. These functions require a number of distinct syntaxin-dependent interactions; however, Munc18-1 also regulates vesicle fusion via syntaxin-independent interactions with other exocytotic proteins. Although the structural regions of the Munc18-1 protein involved in closed-conformation syntaxin binding have been thoroughly examined, regions of the protein involved in other interactions are poorly characterised. To investigate this we performed a random transposon mutagenesis, identifying domain 3b of Munc18-1 as a functionally important region of the protein. Transposon insertion in an exposed loop within this domain specifically disrupted Mint1 binding despite leaving affinity for closed conformation syntaxin and binding to the SNARE complex unaffected. The insertion mutation significantly reduced total amounts of exocytosis as measured by carbon fiber amperometry in chromaffin cells. Introduction of the equivalent mutation in UNC-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans also reduced neurotransmitter release as assessed by aldicarb sensitivity. Correlation between the two experimental methods for recording changes in the number of exocytotic events was verified using a previously identified gain of function Munc18-1 mutation E466K (increased exocytosis in chromaffin cells and aldicarb hypersensitivity of C. elegans). These data implicate a novel role for an exposed loop in domain 3b of Munc18-1 in transducing regulation of vesicle fusion independent of closed-conformation syntaxin binding. PMID:21445306

  17. CdiA promotes receptor-independent intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Zachary C; Townsley, Loni; Wallace, Adam B; King, Andrew; Van der Woude, Marjan W; Low, David A; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Hayes, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    CdiB/CdiA proteins mediate inter-bacterial competition in a process termed contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI). Filamentous CdiA exoproteins extend from CDI(+) cells and bind specific receptors to deliver toxins into susceptible target bacteria. CDI has also been implicated in auto-aggregation and biofilm formation in several species, but the contribution of CdiA-receptor interactions to these multi-cellular behaviors has not been examined. Using Escherichia coli isolate EC93 as a model, we show that cdiA and bamA receptor mutants are defective in biofilm formation, suggesting a prominent role for CdiA-BamA mediated cell-cell adhesion. However, CdiA also promotes auto-aggregation in a BamA-independent manner, indicating that the exoprotein possesses an additional adhesin activity. Cells must express CdiA in order to participate in BamA-independent aggregates, suggesting that adhesion could be mediated by homotypic CdiA-CdiA interactions. The BamA-dependent and BamA-independent interaction domains map to distinct regions within the CdiA filament. Thus, CdiA orchestrates a collective behavior that is independent of its growth-inhibition activity. This adhesion should enable 'greenbeard' discrimination, in which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate with one another based on a single shared trait. This kind-selective social behavior could provide immediate fitness benefits to bacteria that acquire the systems through horizontal gene transfer.

  18. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  19. Oxygen levels and the regulation of cell adhesion in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Crossin, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I discuss the hallmarks of hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and review work showing that many types of stem cell proliferate more robustly in lowered oxygen. I then discuss recent studies showing that alterations in the levels and the types of cell and substrate adhesion molecules are a notable response to reduced O2 levels in both cultured primary neural stem cells and brain tissues in response to hypoxia in vivo. The ability of O2 levels to regulate adhesion molecule expression is linked to the Wnt signaling pathway, which can control and be controlled by adhesion events. The ability of O2 levels to influence cell adhesion also has far-reaching implications for development, ischemic trauma and neural regeneration, as well as for cancer and other diseases. Finally I discuss the possibility that the fluctuations in O2 levels known to have occurred over evolutionary time could, by influencing adhesion systems, have contributed to early symbiotic events in unicellular organisms and to the emergence of multicellularity. It is not my intention to be exhaustive in these domains, which are far from my own field of study. Rather this article is meant to provoke and stimulate thinking about molecular evolution involving O2 sensing and signaling during eras of geologic and atmospheric change that might inform modern studies on development and disease. PMID:22647940

  20. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Lemmin, Thomas; Soto, Cinque S; Clinthorne, Graham; DeGrado, William F; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM) domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  1. Structure-Based Sequence Alignment of the Transmembrane Domains of All Human GPCRs: Phylogenetic, Structural and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cvicek, Vaclav; Goddard, William A.; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is undergoing a revolution due to increased information about their signaling and the experimental determination of structures for more than 25 receptors. The availability of at least one receptor structure for each of the GPCR classes, well separated in sequence space, enables an integrated superfamily-wide analysis to identify signatures involving the role of conserved residues, conserved contacts, and downstream signaling in the context of receptor structures. In this study, we align the transmembrane (TM) domains of all experimental GPCR structures to maximize the conserved inter-helical contacts. The resulting superfamily-wide GpcR Sequence-Structure (GRoSS) alignment of the TM domains for all human GPCR sequences is sufficient to generate a phylogenetic tree that correctly distinguishes all different GPCR classes, suggesting that the class-level differences in the GPCR superfamily are encoded at least partly in the TM domains. The inter-helical contacts conserved across all GPCR classes describe the evolutionarily conserved GPCR structural fold. The corresponding structural alignment of the inactive and active conformations, available for a few GPCRs, identifies activation hot-spot residues in the TM domains that get rewired upon activation. Many GPCR mutations, known to alter receptor signaling and cause disease, are located at these conserved contact and activation hot-spot residue positions. The GRoSS alignment places the chemosensory receptor subfamilies for bitter taste (TAS2R) and pheromones (Vomeronasal, VN1R) in the rhodopsin family, known to contain the chemosensory olfactory receptor subfamily. The GRoSS alignment also enables the quantification of the structural variability in the TM regions of experimental structures, useful for homology modeling and structure prediction of receptors. Furthermore, this alignment identifies structurally and functionally important residues in all human GPCRs

  2. CD93 interacts with the PDZ domain-containing adaptor protein GIPC: implications in the modulation of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bohlson, Suzanne S; Zhang, Mingyu; Ortiz, Christopher E; Tenner, Andrea J

    2005-01-01

    CD93 was originally identified as a myeloid cell-surface marker and subsequently associated with an ability to modulate phagocytosis of suboptimally opsonized immunoglobulin G and complement particles in vitro. Recent studies using mice deficient in CD93 have demonstrated that this molecule modulates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo. To investigate signal transduction mechanisms mediated by CD93, CD93 cytoplasmic tail (CYTO)-binding proteins were identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Fifteen of 34 positive clones contained a splice variant or a partial cDNA encoding GIPC, a PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain-containing protein, shown previously to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. A single clone of the N-terminal kinase-like protein p105 and an uncharacterized stem cell transcript also showed specificity for binding to the CYTO by yeast two-hybrid. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro glutathione S-transferase fusion protein-binding assay, the binding of GIPC to the CYTO was shown to involve a newly identified class I PDZ-binding domain in the CD93 carboxyl terminus. Four positively charged amino acids in the juxtamembrane domain of CD93 were shown to be critical in stabilizing these interactions. Treatment of human monocytes with a cell-permeable peptide encoding the C-terminal 11 amino acids of CD93 resulted in an enhancement of phagocytosis, supporting the hypothesis that this protein-protein interaction domain is involved in the modulation of phagocytosis. These protein interactions may participate as molecular switches in modulating cellular phagocytic activity.

  3. Atomic structure of the vimentin central α-helical domain and its implications for intermediate filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Chernyatina, Anastasia A; Nicolet, Stefan; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2012-08-21

    Together with actin filaments and microtubules, intermediate filaments (IFs) are the basic cytoskeletal components of metazoan cells. Over 80 human diseases have been linked to mutations in various IF proteins to date. However, the filament structure is far from being resolved at the atomic level, which hampers rational understanding of IF pathologies. The elementary building block of all IF proteins is a dimer consisting of an α-helical coiled-coil (CC) "rod" domain flanked by the flexible head and tail domains. Here we present three crystal structures of overlapping human vimentin fragments that comprise the first half of its rod domain. Given the previously solved fragments, a nearly complete atomic structure of the vimentin rod has become available. It consists of three α-helical segments (coils 1A, 1B, and 2) interconnected by linkers (L1 and L12). Most of the CC structure has a left-handed twist with heptad repeats, but both coil 1B and coil 2 also exhibit untwisted, parallel stretches with hendecad repeats. In the crystal structure, linker L1 was found to be α-helical without being involved in the CC formation. The available data allow us to construct an atomic model of the antiparallel tetramer representing the second level of vimentin assembly. Although the presence of the nonhelical head domains is essential for proper tetramer stabilization, the precise alignment of the dimers forming the tetramer appears to depend on the complementarity of their surface charge distribution patterns, while the structural plasticity of linker L1 and coil 1A plays a role in the subsequent IF assembly process.

  4. Conformational Stability and Interplay of Helical N- and C-Terminal Domains with Implications on Major Ampullate Spidroin Assembly.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Joschka; Scheibel, Thomas

    2017-03-13

    Major ampullate spidroin (MaSp) assembly starts in the abdomen of the spider, where spidroins are stored as a liquid dope at a high concentration. The dope is squeezed into the spinning duct, and assembly is finished upon drawing of fibers. Unwanted aggregation of the spidroin solution in the gland is suppressed by prestructuring of the spidroins in micelle-like assemblies, with their hydrophobic stretches being hidden from the solvent and the hydrophilic nonrepetitive amino (NRN) and carboxy (NRC) terminal domains being exposed on the micelle surface. Conversion of the fluid dope into a solid fiber is induced within the spinning duct by acidification and ion exchange (sodium chloride against potassium phosphate), with the impact on the structure of the NRN and NRC domains acting as a regulatory switch for fiber assembly. While NRN dimerizes pH-dependently in an antiparallel fashion (i.e. quaternary structural changes), the tertiary structure of dimeric NRC is changed by shear stress and a drop in pH, inducing the alignment of the intrinsically unstructured core domains accompanied by β-sheet formation of motifs of the core domain. Here, the conformational stability of NRN1 and NRC1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 were studied using independent techniques such as circular dichroism, fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy, and scanning electron, transmission electron, and atomic force microscopy. In this context, it could be shown that strong, non-natural acidification drives NRC1 to unfold and aggregate into β-sheet-rich structures, preventing recombinant spidroins from assembling into aligned fibrils. Interestingly, NRN1 and NRC1 apparently do not interact with each other, making spidroin assembly easy to control step-by-step and straightforward due to missing unproductive side reactions.

  5. The head domain of plakophilin-1 binds to desmoplakin and enhances its recruitment to desmosomes. Implications for cutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, A P; Hatzfeld, M; Bornslaeger, E A; Kopp, D S; Borgwardt, J E; Corcoran, C M; Settler, A; Green, K J

    1999-06-25

    The contribution of desmosomes to epidermal integrity is evident in the inherited blistering disorder associated with the absence of a functional gene for plakophilin-1. To define the function of plakophilin-1 in desmosome assembly, interactions among the desmosomal cadherins, desmoplakin, and the armadillo family members plakoglobin and plakophilin-1 were examined. In transient expression assays, plakophilin-1 formed complexes with a desmoplakin amino-terminal domain and enhanced its recruitment to cell-cell borders; this recruitment was not dependent on the equimolar expression of desmosomal cadherins. In contrast to desmoplakin-plakoglobin interactions, the interaction between desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 was not mediated by the armadillo repeat domain of plakophilin-1 but by the non-armadillo head domain, as assessed by yeast two-hybrid and recruitment assays. We propose a model whereby plakoglobin serves as a linker between the cadherins and desmoplakin, whereas plakophilin-1 enhances lateral interactions between desmoplakin molecules. This model suggests that epidermal lesions in patients lacking plakophilin-1 are a consequence of the loss of integrity resulting from a decrease in binding sites for desmoplakin and intermediate filaments at desmosomes.

  6. The SAS-5 N-terminal domain is a tetramer, with implications for centriole assembly in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shimanovskaya, Ekaterina; Qiao, Renping; Lesigang, Johannes; Dong, Gang

    2013-07-01

    The centriole is a conserved microtubule-based organelle essential for both centrosome formation and cilium biogenesis. It has a unique 9-fold symmetry and its assembly is governed by at least five component proteins (SPD-2, ZYG-1, SAS-5, SAS-6 and SAS-4), which are recruited in a hierarchical order. Recently published structural studies of the SAS-6 N-terminal domain have greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of centriole assembly. However, it remains unclear how the weak interaction between the SAS-6 N-terminal head groups could drive the assembly of a closed ring-like structure, and what determines the stacking of multiple rings on top one another in centriole duplication. We recently reported that SAS-5 binds specifically to a very narrow region of the SAS-6 central coiled coil through its C-terminal domain (CTD, residues 391-404). Here, we further demonstrate by both static light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering that the SAS-5 N-terminal domain (NTD, residues 1-260) forms a tetramer. Specifically, we found that the tetramer is formed by SAS-5 residues 82-260, whereas residues 1-81 are intrinsically disordered. Taking these results together, we propose a working model for SAS-5-mediated assembly of the multi-layered central tube structure.

  7. Structures of Staphylococcus aureus D-tagatose-6-phosphate kinase implicate domain motions in specificity and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miallau, Linda; Hunter, William N; McSweeney, Sean M; Leonard, Gordon A

    2007-07-06

    High resolution structures of Staphylococcus aureus d-tagatose-6-phosphate kinase (LacC) in two crystal forms are herein reported. The structures define LacC in apoform, in binary complexes with ADP or the co-factor analogue AMP-PNP, and in a ternary complex with AMP-PNP and D-tagatose-6-phosphate. The tertiary structure of the LacC monomer, which is closely related to other members of the pfkB subfamily of carbohydrate kinases, is composed of a large alpha/beta core domain and a smaller, largely beta "lid." Four extended polypeptide segments connect these two domains. Dimerization of LacC occurs via interactions between lid domains, which come together to form a beta-clasp structure. Residues from both subunits contribute to substrate binding. LacC adopts a closed structure required for phosphoryl transfer only when both substrate and co-factor are bound. A reaction mechanism similar to that used by other phosphoryl transferases is proposed, although unusually, when both substrate and co-factor are bound to the enzyme two Mg(2+) ions are observed in the active site. A new motif of amino acid sequence conservation common to the pfkB subfamily of carbohydrate kinases is identified.

  8. Traditional Glue, Adhesive and Poison Used for Composite Weapons by Ju/'hoan San in Nyae Nyae, Namibia. Implications for the Evolution of Hunting Equipment in Prehistory.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Lyn; Trower, Gary; Backwell, Lucinda; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Ju/'hoan hunters from Nyae Nyae, near Tsumkwe in Namibia, demonstrate the manufacture of three fixative pastes made from plant extracts, and poison made from grubs and plant extracts. Ammocharis coranica and Terminalia sericea produce simple glue. Ozoroa schinzii latex mixed with carbonized Aristeda adscensionis grass is a compound adhesive. Composite poison is made from Chrysomelid grub viscera mixed with salivary extracts of Acacia mellifera inner bark and the tuber sap of Asparagus exuvialis. In order to document potential variability in the chaîne opératoire, and to eliminate inherent biases associated with unique observations, we studied manufacturing processes in three separate Nyae Nyae villages. Although there are methodological similarities in the Nyae Nyae area, we observed a few differences in contemporary traditions of poison manufacture. For example, some hunters make powder from Asparagus exuvialis tuber sap by boiling, reducing, hardening and grinding it, while others simply use heated sap. The Ju/'hoan hunting kit provides insights for archaeologists, but we must exercise caution when looking for continuity between prehistoric and historical technical systems. Some traditions have been lost to modern hunters, while others are new. We should also expect variability in the Stone Age because of geographically restricted resources. Simple glue, compound adhesive, and poison recipes identified in the Stone Age have no modern equivalents. By about 60,000 years ago at Diepkloof, simple glue was used for hafting tools, but at similarly-aged Sibudu there are recipes that combine red ochre powder with plant and/or animal ingredients. At Border Cave, novel poisons and compound adhesives were used in the Early Later Stone Age. It is possible that the complexity that we record in the manufacture of fixative pastes and poison used by Ju/'hoan hunters represents a hafting system both similar to and different from that observed at the Stone Age sites of Diepkloof

  9. Traditional Glue, Adhesive and Poison Used for Composite Weapons by Ju/’hoan San in Nyae Nyae, Namibia. Implications for the Evolution of Hunting Equipment in Prehistory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ju/’hoan hunters from Nyae Nyae, near Tsumkwe in Namibia, demonstrate the manufacture of three fixative pastes made from plant extracts, and poison made from grubs and plant extracts. Ammocharis coranica and Terminalia sericea produce simple glue. Ozoroa schinzii latex mixed with carbonized Aristeda adscensionis grass is a compound adhesive. Composite poison is made from Chrysomelid grub viscera mixed with salivary extracts of Acacia mellifera inner bark and the tuber sap of Asparagus exuvialis. In order to document potential variability in the chaîne opératoire, and to eliminate inherent biases associated with unique observations, we studied manufacturing processes in three separate Nyae Nyae villages. Although there are methodological similarities in the Nyae Nyae area, we observed a few differences in contemporary traditions of poison manufacture. For example, some hunters make powder from Asparagus exuvialis tuber sap by boiling, reducing, hardening and grinding it, while others simply use heated sap. The Ju/’hoan hunting kit provides insights for archaeologists, but we must exercise caution when looking for continuity between prehistoric and historical technical systems. Some traditions have been lost to modern hunters, while others are new. We should also expect variability in the Stone Age because of geographically restricted resources. Simple glue, compound adhesive, and poison recipes identified in the Stone Age have no modern equivalents. By about 60,000 years ago at Diepkloof, simple glue was used for hafting tools, but at similarly-aged Sibudu there are recipes that combine red ochre powder with plant and/or animal ingredients. At Border Cave, novel poisons and compound adhesives were used in the Early Later Stone Age. It is possible that the complexity that we record in the manufacture of fixative pastes and poison used by Ju/’hoan hunters represents a hafting system both similar to and different from that observed at the Stone Age sites of

  10. PLGA-PEG-PLGA microspheres as a delivery vehicle for antisense oligonucleotides to CTGF: Implications on post-surgical peritoneal adhesion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeke, John Imuetinyan-Jesu, Jr.

    Abdominal adhesions are the aberrant result of peritoneal wound healing commonly associated with surgery and inflammation. A subject of a large number of studies since the first half of the last century, peritoneal adhesion prevention has, for the most part, evaded the scientific community and continues to cost Americans an estimated $2-4 billion annually. It is known that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays a key role in the wound healing cascade; however, suppression of this multifunctional growth factor's activity may have more harmful consequences than can be tolerated. As a result, much attention has fallen on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of TGF-beta's fibrotic action. It has been demonstrated in several in vitro models, that the suppression of CTGF hinders fibroblast proliferation, a necessary condition for fibrosis. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides (antisense oligos, AO) to CTGF have been shown to knock down CTGF mRNA levels by specifically hindering the translation of CTGF protein. Antisense technologies have met with a great deal of excitement as a viable means of preventing diseases such as adhesions by hindering protein translation at the mRNA level. However, the great challenge associated with the use of these drugs lies in the short circulation time when administered "naked". Viral delivery systems, although excellent platforms in metabolic studies, are not ideal for diagnostic use because of the inherent danger associated with viral vectors. Microparticles made of biodegradable polymers have therefore presented themselves as a viable means of delivering these drugs to target cells over extended periods. Herein, we present two in vivo studies confirming the up-regulation of TGF-beta protein and CTGF mRNA following injury to the uterine tissues of female rats. We were able to selectively knockdown post-operative CTGF protein levels following surgery, however, our observations led us to conclude that

  11. A FAK/Src chimera with gain-of-function properties promotes formation of large peripheral adhesions associated with dynamic actin assembly.

    PubMed

    Siesser, Priscila M F; Meenderink, Leslie M; Ryzhova, Larisa; Michael, Kristin E; Dumbauld, David W; García, Andrés J; Kaverina, Irina; Hanks, Steven K

    2008-01-01

    Formation of a complex between the tyrosine kinases FAK and Src is a key integrin-mediated signaling event implicated in cell motility, survival, and proliferation. Past studies indicate that FAK functions in the complex primarily as a "scaffold," acting to recruit and activate Src within cell/matrix adhesions. To study the cellular impact of FAK-associated Src signaling we developed a novel gain-of-function approach that involves expressing a chimeric protein with the FAK kinase domain replaced by the Src kinase domain. This FAK/Src chimera is subject to adhesion-dependent activation and promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas and paxillin to higher steady-state levels than is achieved by wild-type FAK. When expressed in FAK -/- mouse embryo fibroblasts, the FAK/Src chimera resulted in a striking cellular phenotype characterized by unusual large peripheral adhesions, enhanced adhesive strength, and greatly reduced motility. Live cell imaging of the chimera-expressing FAK -/- cells provided evidence that the large peripheral adhesions are associated with a dynamic actin assembly process that is sensitive to a Src-selective inhibitor. These findings suggest that FAK-associated Src kinase activity has the capacity to promote adhesion integrity and actin assembly.

  12. Effect of water absorption on pollen adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Carson Meredith, J

    2015-03-15

    Pollens possess a thin liquid coating, pollenkitt, which plays a major role in adhesion by forming capillary menisci at interfaces. Unfortunately, the influence of humidity on pollenkitt properties and capillary adhesion is unknown. Because humidity varies widely in the environment, the answers have important implications for better understanding plant reproduction, allergy and asthma, and pollen as atmospheric condensation nuclei. Here, pollenkitt-mediated adhesion of sunflower pollen to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of humidity. The results quantify for the first time the significant water absorption of pollenkitt and the resulting complex dependence of adhesion on humidity. On hydrophilic Si, adhesion increased with increasing RH for pollens with or without pollenkitt, up to 200nN at 70% RH. In contrast, on hydrophobic PS, adhesion of pollenkitt-free pollen is independent of RH. Surprisingly, when pollenkitt was present adhesion forces on hydrophobic PS first increased with RH up to a maximum value at 35% RH (∼160nN), and then decreased with further increases in RH. Independent measurement of pollenkitt properties is used with models of capillary adhesion to show that humidity-dependent changes in pollenkitt wetting and viscosity are responsible for this complex adhesion behavior.

  13. A four-domain Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from Solen grandis is implicated in immune response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Liu, Meijun; Yang, Dinglong; Xu, Jie; Hu, Xiaoke

    2012-12-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI) serves as a negative regulator in immune signal pathway by restraining the activities of serine proteinase (SP) and plays an essential role in the innate immunity. In the present study, a Kunitz-type SPI was identified from the mollusk razor clam Solen grandis (designated as SgKunitz). The full-length cDNA of SgKunitz was of 1284 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp. The ORF encoded four Kunitz domains, and their amino acids were well conserved when compared with those in other Kunitz-type SPIs, especially the six cysteines involved in forming of three disulfide bridges in each domain. In addition, the tertiary structure of all the four domains adopted a typical model of Kunitz-type SPI family, indicating SgKunitz was a new member of Kunitz-type SPI superfamily. The mRNA transcripts of SgKunitz were detected in all tested tissues of razor clam, including muscle, mantle, gonad, gill, hepatopancreas and hemocytes, and with the highest expression level in gill. When the razor clams were stimulated by LPS, PGN or β-1, 3-glucan, the expression level of SgKunitz mRNA in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01), suggesting SgKunitz might involved in the processes of inhibiting the activity of SPs during the immune responses triggered by various pathogens. Furthermore, the recombinant protein of SgKunitz could effectively inhibit the activities of SP trypsin and chymotrypsin in vitro. The present results suggested SgKunitz could serve as an inhibitor of SP involving in the immune response of S. grandis, and provided helpful evidences to understand the regulation mechanism of immune signal pathway in mollusk.

  14. Glyconectin glycans as the self-assembling nano-molecular-velcrosystem mediating self-nonself recognition and adhesion implicated in evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Misevic, Nikola; Popescu, Octavian

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to make a specific contribution about glyconectin glycan as the self-assembling nano-molecular-velcro system mediating initial steps of self-nonself recognition and cell adhesion in Porifera, the first descendants of the most simple primordial multicellular organisms. Two original findings will be described: (i) Velcro like concept based on highly polyvalent and specific intermolecular glycan to glycan associations with extremely low affinity of the single binding site and (ii) novel structures of the large and newly emerging family of glyconectin like glycan molecules. The emphasis will be put on the interdisciplinary approach for studying structure to function relationship at the different size scale levels by combining the knowledge and technologies (instrumentation and methods) of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics. Applying such strategy which is crossing the boundaries of different science disciplines enabled us to develop a new Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nano-bio-technology and perform the first quantitative measurements of intermolecular binding forces at the single molecular level under physiological conditions. We propose that nano-velcro systems of the glyconectin glycans, which are the constituents on the cell surface that are the most exposed to the environment, were responsible for the molecular self-nonself recognition and adhesion processes that underpinned the emergence of multicellular life forms.

  15. The effect of terminal sterilization on structural and biophysical properties of a decellularized collagen-based scaffold; implications for stem cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Matuska, Andrea M; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-02-01

    Terminal sterilization induces physical and chemical changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of ex vivo-derived biomaterials due to their aggressive mechanism of action. Prior studies have focused on how sterilization affects the mechanical integrity of tissue-based biomaterials but have rarely characterized effects on early cellular interaction, which is indicative of the biological response. Using a model fibrocartilage disc scaffold, these investigations compare the effect of three common sterilization methods [peracetic acid (PAA), gamma irradiation (GI), and ethylene oxide (EtO)] on a range of material properties and characterized early cellular interactions. GI and EtO produced unfavorable structural damage that contributed to inferior cell adhesion. Conversely, exposure to PAA resulted in limited structural alterations while inducing chemical modifications that favored cell attachment. Results suggest that the sterilization approach can be selected to modulate biomaterial properties to favor cellular adhesion and has relevance in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Furthermore, the study of cellular interactions with modified biomaterials in vitro provides information of how materials may react in subsequent clinical applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The effect of terminal sterilization on structural and biophysical properties of a decellularized collagen-based scaffold; implications for stem cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Matuska, Andrea M.; McFetridge, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Terminal sterilization induces physical and chemical changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of ex vivo-derived biomaterials due to their aggressive mechanism of action. Prior studies have focused on how sterilization affects the mechanical integrity of tissue-based biomaterials but have rarely characterized effects on early cellular interaction, which is indicative of the biological response. Using a model fibro-cartilage disc scaffold, these investigations compare the effect of three common sterilization methods [peracetic acid (PAA), gamma irradiation (GI), and ethylene oxide (EtO)] on a range of material properties and characterized early cellular interactions. GI and EtO produced unfavorable structural damage that contributed to inferior cell adhesion. Conversely, exposure to PAA resulted in limited structural alterations while inducing chemical modifications that favored cell attachment. Results suggest that the sterilization approach can be selected to modulate biomaterial properties to favor cellular adhesion and has relevance in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Furthermore, the study of cellular interactions with modified biomaterials in vitro provides information of how materials may react in subsequent clinical applications. PMID:24895116

  17. Investigation of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    two free phosphate groups of unliganded DAPP1 PH (DiNitto et al, 2003)). As phosphate groups on the inositol head group are the major PH domain... inositol headgroups / phosphoinositides of different lengths with the OSBP PH before applying it to lipid (3% PtdIns(4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 in PC...4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 surfaces, suggesting the importance of nonspecific electrostatic interactions; 3) all inositol phosphates and

  18. [Interaction of chagasic autoantibodies with the third extracellular domain of the human heart muscarinic receptor. Functional and pathological implications].

    PubMed

    Goin, J C; Pérez Leirós, C; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L

    1996-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate by ELISA and immunoblotting the presence in the sera of chagasic patients of circulating autoantibodies against the third extracellular domain of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by using a synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence 169-192 of the receptor. Immunoaffinity purified antipeptide antibodies displayed cardiac muscarinic activity as decreased contractility and cAMP production and increased cGMP levels. These effects were specifically blocked by the synthetic peptide and by atropine. A strong association between the existence of circulating autoantibodies and the presence of dysautonomia was shown, making these autoantibodies an appropriate marker of heart autonomic dysfunction.

  19. Small things matter: Implications of APP intracellular domain AICD nuclear signaling in the progression and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Hassan; Glotzbach, Annika; Kolbe, Katharina; Leonhardt, Gregor; Loosse, Christina; Müller, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease with tens of millions of people affected worldwide. The pathogenesis is still poorly understood and various therapeutical approaches targeting the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a product of the amyloidogenic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), failed. Moreover, a couple of studies critically questioned the relevance of Aβ in the pathogenesis of AD. Thus, new ideas need to be studied and one highly interesting hypothesis is the APP mediated signal transduction to the nucleus. As a consequence nuclear -potentially toxic- structures emerge, which were recently found to a high extent in human AD tissue and thus, may contribute to neurodegeneration. Relevant for the signaling machinery are modifications at the very C-terminal end of the precursor protein, the APP intracellular domain (AICD). In this review we update the knowledge on mechanisms on AICD referring to our 2008 article: The amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD) as modulator of gene expression, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal dynamics-Relevance for Alzheimer's disease (T. Muller, et al., 2008). We summarize how AICD is generated and degraded, we describe its intramolecular motifs, translational modifications, and how those as well as APP dimerization influence AICD generation and function. Moreover, we resume the AICD interactome and elucidate AICDs involvement in nuclear signaling, transcriptional regulation, cell death, DNA repair and cell cycle re-entry and we give insights in its physiological function. Results are summarized in the comprehensive poster "The world of AICD". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesion-induced receptor segregation and adhesion plaque formation: A model membrane study.

    PubMed Central

    Kloboucek, A; Behrisch, A; Faix, J; Sackmann, E

    1999-01-01

    A model system to study the control of cell adhesion by receptor-mediated specific forces, universal interactions, and membrane elasticity is established. The plasma membrane is mimicked by reconstitution of homophilic receptor proteins into solid supported membranes and, together with lipopolymers, into giant vesicles with the polymers forming an artificial glycocalix. The homophilic cell adhesion molecule contact site A, a lipid-anchored glycoprotein from cells of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, is used as receptor. The success of the reconstitution, the structure and the dynamics of the model membranes are studied by various techniques including film balance techniques, micro fluorescence, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, electron microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy. The interaction of the functionalized giant vesicles with the supported bilayer is studied by reflection interference contrast microscopy, and the adhesion strength is evaluated quantitatively by a recently developed technique. At low receptor concentrations adhesion-induced receptor segregation in the membranes leads to decomposition of the contact zone between membranes into domains of strong (receptor-mediated) adhesion and regions of weak adhesion while continuous zones of strong adhesion form at high receptor densities. The adhesion strengths (measured in terms of the spreading pressure S) of the various states of adhesion are obtained locally by analysis of the vesicle contour near the contact line in terms of elastic boundary conditions of adhesion: the balance of tensions and moments. The spreading pressure of the weak adhesion zones is S approximately 10(-9) J/m(2) and is determined by the interplay of gravitation and undulation forces whereas the spreading pressure of the tight adhesion domains is of the order S approximately 10(-6) J/m(2). PMID:10512849

  1. Leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium induces E-selectin linkage to the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    cytoskeletal linkage of E-selectin through its cytoplasmic domain, a process which may have important implications for cell-cell signaling as well as mechanical anchoring during leukocyte- endothelial adhesive interactions. PMID:8609175

  2. GPR56 is a GPCR that is overexpressed in gliomas and functions in tumor cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Sumana; Lorente, Gustavo; Nagavarapu, Usha; Nelson, April; Kuo, Jane; Cummins, Jeramiah; Nikolich, Karoly; Urfer, Roman; Foehr, Erik D

    2005-03-03

    GPR56 (also known as TM7XN1) is a newly discovered orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of the secretin family that has a role in the development of neural progenitor cells and has been linked to developmental malformations of the human brain. GPR56 diverges from other secretin-like family members in that it has an extremely large N-terminal extracellular region (381 amino acids) and contains a novel feature among this new subclass, consisting of four cysteine residues that define a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS motif) located just before the first transmembrane spanning domain. The rest of the amino-terminal domain contains a large number of possible N- and O-linked glycosylation sites similar to mucin-like proteins. These features suggest a role in cell-cell, or cell-matrix interactions. Here, we demonstrate upregulation of GPR56 in glioblastoma multiforme tumors using functional genomics. Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the expression of GPR56 protein in a majority of glioblastoma/astrocytoma tumor samples with undetectable levels of expression in normal adult brain tissue. Immunofluorescence analysis of human glioma cells using anti-GPR56 antibodies demonstrate that GPR56 is expressed on the leading edge of membrane filopodia and colocalizes with alpha-actinin. Purified recombinant GPR56 extracellular domain protein inhibits glioma cell adhesion and causes abnormal cytoskeletal morphology and cell rounding. These results indicate that the extracellular domain may compete for unidentified ligand(s), and block the normal function of GPR56 in cell attachment. In reporter assays, overexpression of GPR56 activates the NF-kappaB, PAI-1 and TCF transcriptional response elements. These pathways have been implicated in cytoskeletal signaling, adhesion and tumor biology. The above results indicate that GPR56 serves as an adhesion GPCR and is involved in adhesion signaling.

  3. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of Arabidopsis mutant QUASIMODO 1 suspension-cultured cells: implications for cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, Edouard; Guillon, Fabienne; Thoiron, Séverine; Lahaye, Marc

    2005-12-01

    Mutation in the Arabidopsis thaliana QUASIMODO 1 gene (QUA1), which encodes a putative glycosyltransferase, reduces cell wall pectin content and cell adhesion. Suspension-cultured calli were generated from roots of wild-type (wt) and qua1-1 A. thaliana plants. The altered cell adhesion phenotype of the qua1-1 plant was also found with its suspension-cultured calli. Cell walls of both wt and qua1-1 calli were analysed by chemical, enzymatic and immunohistochemical techniques in order to assess the role of pectic polysaccharides in the mutant phenotype. Compared with the wt, qua1-1 calli cell walls contained more arabinose (23.6 versus 21.6 mol%), rhamnose (3.1 versus 2.7 mol%), and fucose (1.4 versus 1.2 mol%) and less uronic acid (24.2 versus 27.6 mol%), and they were less methyl-esterified (DM: 22.9% versus 30.3%). When sequential pectin extraction of calli cell walls was performed, qua1-1 water-soluble and chelator-soluble extracts contained more arabinose and less uronic acid than wt. Water-soluble pectins were less methyl-esterified in qua1-1 than in wt. Chelator-soluble pectins were more acetyl-esterified in qua1-1. Differences in the cell wall chemistry of wt and mutant calli were supported by a reduction in JIM7 labelling (methyl-esterified homogalacturonan) of the whole wall in small cells and particularly by a reduced labelling with 2F4 (calcium-associated homogalacturonan) in the middle lamella at tricellular junctions of large qua1-1 cells. Differences in the oligosaccharide profile obtained after endopolygalacturonase degradation of alkali extracts from qua1-1 and wt calli indicated variations in the structure of covalently bonded homogalacturonan. About 29% more extracellular polymers rich in pectins were recovered from the calli culture medium of qua1-1 compared with wt. These results show that perturbation of QUASIMODO 1-1 gene expression in calli resulted in alterations of homogalacturonan content and cell wall location. The consequences of these

  4. The location of NuoL and NuoM subunits in the membrane domain of the Escherichia coli complex I: implications for the mechanism of proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Holt, Peter J; Morgan, David J; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2003-10-31

    The molecular organization of bacterial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I or NDH-1) is not established, apart from a rough separation into dehydrogenase, connecting and membrane domains. In this work, complex I was purified from Escherichia coli and fragmented by replacing dodecylmaltoside with other detergents. Exchange into decyl maltoside led to the removal of the hydrophobic subunit NuoL from the otherwise intact complex. Diheptanoyl phosphocholine led to the loss of NuoL and NuoM subunits, whereas other subunits remained in the complex. The presence of N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide or Triton X-100 led to further disruption of the membrane domain into fragments containing NuoL/M/N, NuoA/K/N, and NuoH/J subunits. Among the hydrophilic subunits, NuoCD was most readily dissociated from the complex, whereas NuoB was partially dissociated from the peripheral arm assembly in N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide. A model of subunit arrangement in bacterial complex I based on these data is proposed. Subunits NuoL and NuoM, which are homologous to antiporters and are implicated in proton pumping, are located at the distal end of the membrane arm, spatially separated from the redox centers of the peripheral arm. This is consistent with proposals that the mechanism of proton pumping by complex I is likely to involve long range conformational changes.

  5. Autoantibodies that recognize functional domains of hnRNPA1 implicate molecular mimicry in the pathogenesis of neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Dunnavant, Floyd D; Jang, Haeman; Zunt, Joseph; Levin, Michael C

    2006-06-19

    As a model for molecular mimicry in neurological disease, we study people infected with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) who develop HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), an immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In HAM/TSP, data suggests molecular mimicry is the result of cross-reactive antibodies between HTLV-1-tax and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), a protein over-expressed in human CNS neurons. The hnRNP A1 epitope recognized by autoantibodies was unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that antibodies purified from HAM/TSP patients would react with functionally significant domains of hnRNP A1. Western blotting of functionally significant deletion mutants and overlapping fusion proteins using HAM/TSP IgG revealed two core epitopes within the C-terminal region of hnRNP A1. The first (aminoacids 191-SSQRGRSGSGNF-202), overlapped the RGG domain and the second (aminoacids 293-GQYFAKPRNQGG-304), with the M9 shuttling sequence, two functionally important regions of hnRNP A1. Monoclonal antibodies to HTLV-1-tax also reacted with the epitopes. These data fulfill an important criterion of molecular mimicry, namely that mimicking epitopes are not random, but include biologically significant regions of target proteins. This suggests an important role for the cross-reactive immune response between HTLV-1 and hnRNP A1 in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated neurological diseases via molecular mimicry.

  6. Differential expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines between nasal and small intestinal mucosae: implications for T- and sIgA+ B-lymphocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Dorothée; Chevaleyre, Claire; Wang, CaiHong; Berri, Mustapha; Zhang, XiaoMei; Nicaise, Laetitia; Meurens, François; Salmon, Henri

    2007-12-01

    Nasal and small intestinal mucosae are the first sites of contact with infectious agents and the sites of T-cell-mediated and secreted immunoglobulin A (IgA)-mediated defences against pathogens. We investigated the factors controlling the infiltration of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and surface IgA(+) (sIgA(+)) B lymphocytes into swine epithelium and lamina propria (LP) within and between these two mucosal effector sites. Vascular addressins, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 were reciprocally expressed in both mucosae. Strong expression of alpha(4)beta(1) relative to alpha(4)beta(7) was characteristic of CD3(+) T cells in nasal mucosa LP and epithelium and of sIgA(+) cells in nasal mucosa epithelium. The same profile was observed on corresponding blood cells. Conversely, higher levels of integrins beta(7) and alpha(4)beta(7) than alpha(4)beta(1) were characteristic of CD3(+) T cells and sIgA(+) cells in the small intestine. However, about 40% of the LP-activated sIgA(+) cells displayed sIgA(high), integrin alpha(4) and integrin alpha(4) expression. Whereas CCL19, CXCL12, CCL21 and CCL28 messenger RNAs were similarly expressed in both mucosae, CCL25 messenger RNA was only expressed in the small intestine. Thus, the nasal and small intestine mucosae represent separate compartments for infiltration by CD3(+) T cells and sIgA(+) effector cells, with the exception of a population of small intestine activated sIgA(+) cells, which may gain access to both mucosae.

  7. Differential expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines between nasal and small intestinal mucosae: implications for T- and sIgA+ B-lymphocyte recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bourges, Dorothée; Chevaleyre, Claire; Wang, CaiHong; Berri, Mustapha; Zhang, XiaoMei; Nicaise, Laetitia; Meurens, François; Salmon, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Nasal and small intestinal mucosae are the first sites of contact with infectious agents and the sites of T-cell-mediated and secreted immunoglobulin A (IgA)-mediated defences against pathogens. We investigated the factors controlling the infiltration of CD3+ T lymphocytes and surface IgA+ (sIgA+) B lymphocytes into swine epithelium and lamina propria (LP) within and between these two mucosal effector sites. Vascular addressins, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 were reciprocally expressed in both mucosae. Strong expression of α4β1 relative to α4β7 was characteristic of CD3+ T cells in nasal mucosa LP and epithelium and of sIgA+ cells in nasal mucosa epithelium. The same profile was observed on corresponding blood cells. Conversely, higher levels of integrins β7 and α4β7 than α4β1 were characteristic of CD3+ T cells and sIgA+ cells in the small intestine. However, about 40% of the LP-activated sIgA+ cells displayed sIgAhigh, integrin α4 and integrin α4 expression. Whereas CCL19, CXCL12, CCL21 and CCL28 messenger RNAs were similarly expressed in both mucosae, CCL25 messenger RNA was only expressed in the small intestine. Thus, the nasal and small intestine mucosae represent separate compartments for infiltration by CD3+ T cells and sIgA+ effector cells, with the exception of a population of small intestine activated sIgA+ cells, which may gain access to both mucosae. PMID:17635614

  8. Deregulation of focal adhesion pathway mediated by miR-659-3p is implicated in bone marrow infiltration of stage M neuroblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lagazio, Corrado; Persico, Luca; Carlini, Barbara; Varesio, Luigi; Morandi, Fabio; Morini, Martina; Gigliotti, Anna Rita; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Viscardi, Elisabetta; Cecinati, Valerio; Conte, Massimo; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2015-01-01

    To get insights on the metastatic process of human neuroblastoma (NB), the miRNA expression profile of bone marrow (BM)-infiltrating cells has been determined and compared to that of primary tumors. Twenty-two BM-infiltrating cells, 22 primary tumors, and 4 paired samples from patients with metastatic NB aged > 12 months were analyzed for the expression of 670 miRNAs by stem-loop RT-qPCR. The miRNAs whose expression was significantly different were subjected to selection criteria, and 20 selected miRNAs were tested in 10 additional BM-infiltrating cells and primary tumors. Among the miRNAs confirmed to be differentially expressed, miR-659-3p was further analyzed. Transfection of miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor demonstrated the specific suppression and over-expression, respectively, of the miR-659-3p target gene CNOT1, a regulator of transcription of genes containing AU-rich element (ARE) sequence. Among the ARE-containing genes, miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor specifically modified the expression of AKT3, BCL2, CYR61 and THSB2, belonging to the focal adhesion pathway. Most importantly, in BM-infiltrating cells CNOT1 expression was significantly higher, and that of AKT3, BCL2, THSB2 and CYR61 was significantly lower than in primary tumors. Thus, our study suggests a role of the focal adhesion pathway, regulated by miR-659-3p through CNOT1, in the human NB metastatic process. PMID:25980492

  9. Analysis of Altered MicroRNA Expression Profiles in Proximal Renal Tubular Cells in Response to Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystal Adhesion: Implications for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bohan; Wu, Bolin; Liu, Jun; Yao, Weimin; Xia, Ding; Li, Lu; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Zhangqun; Yu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) is the major crystalline component in kidney stones and its adhesion to renal tubular cells leads to tubular injury. However, COM-induced toxic effects in renal tubular cells remain ambiguous. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in gene regulation at the posttranscriptional levels. Objective The present study aimed to assess the potential changes in microRNAs of proximal renal tubular cells in response to the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Methodology Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and DAPI staining were used to measure the toxic effects of HK-2 cells exposed to COM crystals. MicroRNA microarray and mRNA microarray were applied to evaluate the expression of HK-2 cells exposed to COM crystals. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technology was used to validate the microarray results. Target prediction, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and pathway analysis were applied to predict the potential roles of microRNAs in biological processes. Principal Findings Our study showed that COM crystals significantly altered the global expression profile of miRNAs in vitro. After 24 h treatment with a dose (1 mmol/L), 25 miRNAs were differentially expressed with a more than 1.5-fold change, of these miRNAs, 16 were up-regulated and 9 were down-regulated. A majority of these differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with cell death, mitochondrion and metabolic process. Target prediction and GO analysis suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs potentially targeted many genes which were related to apoptosis, regulation of metabolic process, intracellular signaling cascade, insulin signaling pathway and type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Our study provides new insights into the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis associated with nephrolithiasis. PMID:24983625

  10. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  11. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  12. Adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion-class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) constitute the second largest GPCR sub-family in humans. Adhesion-GPCRs are defined by the chimeric structure of an unusually large extracellular cell-adhesion domain and a GPCR-like seven-pass transmembrane domain. Adhesion-GPCRs are hence expected to display both cellular adhesion and signaling functions in many biological systems. Adhesion-GPCRs are normally expressed in the central nervous, immune, and reproductive systems in a cell type- or tissue-restricted fashion. However, aberrant expression of distinct adhesion-GPCR molecules has been identified in various human cancers with some of the receptors closely associated with cancer development. Tumor-associated adhesion-GPCRs are thought to involve in tumorigenesis by affecting the growth of tumor cells, angiogenesis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis either positively or negatively. Furthermore, some adhesion-GPCRs are considered potential biomarkers for specific types of cancers. In this review article, the expressional characteristics and functional role of cancer-associated adhesion-GPCRs are discussed in depth.

  13. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) promotes breast cancer cell metastasis and the mechanism implicates epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xinping; Zhao, Hu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xia; Zhang, Yan; Bu, Xin; Shi, Man; Yao, Libo; Su, Jin

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of genes involved in breast cancer metastasis have been reported to be related to the microenvironment. We studied the role of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), a collagen-binding receptor, in breast cancer progression under hypoxic conditions. We showed that DDR2 protein expression closely correlated with the expression of hypoxic marker HIF-1α in clinical breast cancer specimens. The in vitro data demonstrated that hypoxia treatment increased the levels of both expression and phosphorylation of DDR2 in human breast cancer cell lines. In vivo, orthotopic breast tumour xenografts with DDR2 knockdown displayed reduced dissemination and significant prevention in pulmonary and lymphatic metastasis; conversely, these processes were significantly facilitated by the enforced expression of the activated form of DDR2. Further mechanism studies indicated that DDR2 plays an indispensable role in a series of hypoxia-induced behaviours of breast cancer cells, including migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The transcription factor Snail was found to mediate DDR2-induced down-regulation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. It was also documented that there is a correlation between DDR2 and E-cadherin expression with the presence of lymph node metastases in 160 cases of invasive human breast carcinoma. In addition, we provided evidence that DDR2 silencing in breast cancer cells prevents the hypoxia-induced activation of ERK MAPK, suggesting its potential involvement in mediating the effect of DDR2 on hypoxia-induced signalling. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that DDR2 participates in hypoxia-induced breast cancer metastasis through the regulation of cell migration, invasion, and EMT, and thus may serve as an accessible therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  14. From WaterML to TimeseriesML: Evolution and implications for cross-domain data interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, D. K.; Taylor, P.; Lowe, D.; Tomkins, J.; Teng, W. L.; Ames, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    WaterML 2.0 part 1 was adopted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) in 2012 as an international standard profile of the Observations and Measurements conceptual model, for exchange of water observations time series data. It is implemented by national data producers such as the US Geological Survey for surface water time series, the NOAA/National Weather Service for forecast time series, the French Geological Survey for groundwater level monitoring, and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for surface water observations. But WaterML 2.0 is not "just for water". The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has recognized its potential role as a common time series description that could work for multiple application domains such as meteorology, climate, oceanography, and others. Accordingly, the WMO requested the OGC to migrate the non-hydrology parts of WaterML 2.0 to a new standard to be called TimeseriesML. This would then be considered by WMO for adoption as an operational standard globally. What does this mean for the geosciences? How far can this time series description be applied? What about time series of satellite retrievals? What will happen to WaterML 2.0 (and applications that work with it) when TimeseriesML is finished? These are among the questions we address in this presentation.

  15. A polymorphism of the TIM-1 IgV domain: implications for the susceptibility to filovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Makoto; Fujikura, Daisuke; Noyori, Osamu; Kajihara, Masahiro; Maruyama, Junki; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Yoshida, Reiko; Takada, Ayato

    2014-12-12

    Filoviruses, including Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates of up to 90%. Human T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is one of the host proteins that have been shown to promote filovirus entry into cells. In this study, we cloned TIM-1 genes from three different African green monkey kidney cell lines (Vero E6, COS-1, and BSC-1) and found that TIM-1 of Vero E6 had a 23-amino acid deletion and 6 amino acid substitutions compared with those of COS-1 and BSC-1. Interestingly, Vero E6 TIM-1 had a greater ability to promote the infectivity of vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with filovirus glycoproteins than COS-1-derived TIM-1. We further found that the increased ability of Vero E6 TIM-1 to promote virus infectivity was most likely due to a single amino acid difference between these TIM-1s. These results suggest that a polymorphism of the TIM-1 molecules is one of the factors that influence cell susceptibility to filovirus infection, providing a new insight into the molecular basis for the filovirus host range.

  16. Implications of the differing roles of the β1 and β3 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains for integrin function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Chen, Jiang; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Palamuttam, Riya; Hudson, Billy G; Fässler, Reinhard; Pozzi, Ambra; Sanders, Charles R; Zent, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors composed of α and β subunits. Although most integrins contain β1, canonical activation mechanisms are based on studies of the platelet integrin, αIIbβ3. Its inactive conformation is characterized by the association of the αIIb transmembrane and cytosolic domain (TM/CT) with a tilted β3 TM/CT that leads to activation when disrupted. We show significant structural differences between β1 and β3 TM/CT in bicelles. Moreover, the ‘snorkeling’ lysine at the TM/CT interface of β subunits, previously proposed to regulate αIIbβ3 activation by ion pairing with nearby lipids, plays opposite roles in β1 and β3 integrin function and in neither case is responsible for TM tilt. A range of affinities from almost no interaction to the relatively high avidity that characterizes αIIbβ3 is seen between various α subunits and β1 TM/CTs. The αIIbβ3-based canonical model for the roles of the TM/CT in integrin activation and function clearly does not extend to all mammalian integrins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18633.001 PMID:27929375

  17. Implications of the differing roles of the β1 and β3 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains for integrin function.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Chen, Jiang; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Palamuttam, Riya; Hudson, Billy G; Fässler, Reinhard; Pozzi, Ambra; Sanders, Charles R; Zent, Roy

    2016-12-08

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors composed of α and β subunits. Although most integrins contain β1, canonical activation mechanisms are based on studies of the platelet integrin, αIIbβ3. Its inactive conformation is characterized by the association of the αIIb transmembrane and cytosolic domain (TM/CT) with a tilted β3 TM/CT that leads to activation when disrupted. We show significant structural differences between β1 and β3 TM/CT in bicelles. Moreover, the 'snorkeling' lysine at the TM/CT interface of β subunits, previously proposed to regulate αIIbβ3 activation by ion pairing with nearby lipids, plays opposite roles in β1 and β3 integrin function and in neither case is responsible for TM tilt. A range of affinities from almost no interaction to the relatively high avidity that characterizes αIIbβ3 is seen between various α subunits and β1 TM/CTs. The αIIbβ3-based canonical model for the roles of the TM/CT in integrin activation and function clearly does not extend to all mammalian integrins.

  18. CD33: increased inclusion of exon 2 implicates the Ig V-set domain in Alzheimer's disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Raj, Towfique; Ryan, Katie J; Replogle, Joseph M; Chibnik, Lori B; Rosenkrantz, Laura; Tang, Anna; Rothamel, Katie; Stranger, Barbara E; Bennett, David A; Evans, Denis A; De Jager, Philip L; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M

    2014-05-15

    We previously demonstrated that the Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated risk allele, rs3865444(C), results in a higher surface density of CD33 on monocytes. Here, we find alternative splicing of exon 2 to be the primary mechanism of the genetically driven differential expression of CD33 protein. We report that the risk allele, rs3865444(C), is associated with greater cell surface expression of CD33 in both subjects of European and African-American ancestry and that there is a single haplotype influencing CD33 surface expression. A meta-analysis of the two populations narrowed the number of significant SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (LD) (r(2) > 0.8) with rs3865444 to just five putative causal variants associated with increased protein expression. Using gene expression data from flow-sorted CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes from 398 healthy subjects of three populations, we show that the rs3865444(C) risk allele is strongly associated with greater expression of CD33 exon 2 (pMETA = 2.36 × 10(-60)). Western blotting confirms increased protein expression of the full-length CD33 isoform containing exon 2 relative to the rs3865444(C) allele (P < 0.0001). Of the variants in strong LD with rs3865444, rs12459419, which is located in a putative SRSF2 splice site of exon 2, is the most likely candidate to mediate the altered alternative splicing of CD33's Immunoglobulin V-set domain 2 and ultimately influence AD susceptibility.

  19. The z~4 Quasar Luminosity Function: Implications for supermassive black hole growth, reionization, and future time domain surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra; Connolly, Andrew J.; McGreer, Ian D.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Fan, Xiaohui; LSST Data Management

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift (z > 4) quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying objects, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We develop these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 < z < 4.5 for -27.5 < M1450 < -23.5. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeated imaging of the 275 sq. deg. equatorial region of the sky (50 < R.A. < +60; -1.26 < Dec. < +1.26) known as Stripe 82, we extracted 40 million new lightcurves using the LSST data management software and selected a statistical sample of z~4 quasars based on colors and variability metrics. We confirmed these using a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i < 22.5. We present the first variability-selected QLF measurement at high redshift (z > 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity M*1450 = -26.7 from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z~4.

  20. Regulation of Adherence and Virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica Lectin Cytoplasmic Domain, Which Contains a β2 Integrin Motif

    PubMed Central

    Vines, Richard R.; Ramakrishnan, Girija; Rogers, Joshua B.; Lockhart, Lauren A.; Mann, Barbara J.; Petri, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the β2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin’s role in virulence. PMID:9693367

  1. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  2. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  3. Characterization of NAC domain transcription factors implicated in control of vascular cell differentiation in Arabidopsis and Populus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emily H; Fujino, Takeshi; Beers, Eric P; Brunner, Amy M

    2010-07-01

    Wood has a wide variety of uses and is arguably the most important renewable raw material. The composition of xylem cell types in wood determines the utility of different types of wood for distinct commercial applications. Using expression profiling and phylogenetic analysis, we identified many xylem-associated regulatory genes that may control the differentiation of cells involved in wood formation in Arabidopsis and poplar. Prominent among these are NAC domain transcription factors (NACs). We studied NACs with putative involvement as negative (XND1 from Arabidopsis and its poplar orthologs PopNAC118, PopNAC122, PopNAC128, PopNAC129), or positive (SND2 and SND3 from Arabidopsis and their poplar orthologs PopNAC105, PopNAC154, PopNAC156, PopNAC157) regulators of secondary cell wall synthesis. Using quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, we evaluated expression of these Populus NACs in a developmental gradient and in association with reaction wood and found that representatives from both groups were associated with wood-forming tissue and phloem fibers. Additionally, XND1 orthologs were expressed in mesophyll cells of developing leaves. We prepared transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar plants for overexpression of selected NACs. XND1 overexpression in poplar resulted in severe stunting. Additionally, poplar XND1 overexpressors lacked phloem fibers and showed reductions in cell size and number, vessel number, and frequency of rays in the xylem. Overexpression of PopNAC122, an XND1 ortholog, yielded an analogous phenotype in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of PopNAC154 in poplar reduced height growth and increased the relative proportion of bark versus xylem.

  4. Neprilysin and Aβ Clearance: Impact of the APP Intracellular Domain in NEP Regulation and Implications in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P.; Haupenthal, Viola J.; Zimmer, Valerie C.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    One of the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) leading to plaque formation and toxic oligomeric Aβ complexes. Besides the de novo synthesis of Aβ caused by amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), Aβ levels are also highly dependent on Aβ degradation. Several enzymes are described to cleave Aβ. In this review we focus on one of the most prominent Aβ degrading enzymes, the zinc-metalloprotease Neprilysin (NEP). In the first part of the review we discuss beside the general role of NEP in Aβ degradation the alterations of the enzyme observed during normal aging and the progression of AD. In vivo and cell culture experiments reveal that a decreased NEP level results in an increased Aβ level and vice versa. In a pathological situation like AD, it has been reported that NEP levels and activity are decreased and it has been suggested that certain polymorphisms in the NEP gene result in an increased risk for AD. Conversely, increasing NEP activity in AD mouse models revealed an improvement in some behavioral tests. Therefore it has been suggested that increasing NEP might be an interesting potential target to treat or to be protective for AD making it indispensable to understand the regulation of NEP. Interestingly, it is discussed that the APP intracellular domain (AICD), one of the cleavage products of APP processing, which has high similarities to Notch receptor processing, might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of NEP. However, the mechanisms of NEP regulation by AICD, which might be helpful to develop new therapeutic strategies, are up to now controversially discussed and summarized in the second part of this review. In addition, we review the impact of AICD not only in the transcriptional regulation of NEP but also of further genes. PMID:24391587

  5. Ultrastructure and function of the fractalkine mucin domain in CX(3)C chemokine domain presentation.

    PubMed

    Fong, A M; Erickson, H P; Zachariah, J P; Poon, S; Schamberg, N J; Imai, T; Patel, D D

    2000-02-11

    Fractalkine (FKN), a CX(3)C chemokine/mucin hybrid molecule on endothelium, functions as an adhesion molecule to capture and induce firm adhesion of a subset of leukocytes in a selectin- and integrin-independent manner. We hypothesized that the FKN mucin domain may be important for its function in adhesion, and tested the ability of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) fusion proteins containing the entire extracellular region (FKN-SEAP), the chemokine domain (CX3C-SEAP), or the mucin domain (mucin-SEAP) to support firm adhesion under flow. CX3C-SEAP induced suboptimal firm adhesion of resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared with FKN-SEAP, and mucin-SEAP induced no firm adhesion. CX3C-SEAP and FKN-SEAP bound to CX(3)CR1 with similar affinities. By electron microscopy, fractalkine was 29 nm in length with a long stalk (mucin domain), and a globular head (CX(3)C). To test the function of the mucin domain, a chimeric protein replacing the mucin domain with a rod-like segment of E-selectin was constructed. This chimeric protein gave the same adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells as intact FKN, both when immobilized on glass and when expressed on the cell surface. This implies that the function of the mucin domain is to provide a stalk, extending the chemokine domain away from the endothelial cell surface to present it to flowing leukocytes.

  6. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  7. NMR spectroscopy reveals that RNase A is chiefly denatured in 40% acetic acid: implications for oligomer formation by 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    López-Alonso, Jorge Pedro; Bruix, Marta; Font, Josep; Ribó, Marc; Vilanova, Maria; Jiménez, María Angeles; Santoro, Jorge; González, Carlos; Laurents, Douglas V

    2010-02-10

    Protein self-recognition is essential in many biochemical processes and its study is of fundamental interest to understand the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation. Ribonuclease A (RNase A) is a monomeric protein that may form several oligomers by 3D domain swapping of its N-terminal alpha-helix, C-terminal beta-strand, or both. RNase A oligomerization is induced by 40% acetic acid, which has been assumed to mildly unfold the protein by detaching the terminal segments and consequently facilitating intersubunit swapping, once the acetic acid is removed by lyophilization and the protein is redissolved in a benign buffer. Using UV difference, near UV circular dichroism, folding kinetics, and multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy, the conformation of RNase A in 40% acetic acid and in 8 M urea has been characterized. These studies demonstrate that RNase A is chiefly unfolded in 40% acetic acid; it partially retains the native helices, whereas the beta-sheet is fully denatured and all X-Pro peptide bonds are predominantly in the trans conformation. Refolding occurs via an intermediate, I(N), with non-native X-Pro peptide bonds. I(N) is known to be populated during RNase A refolding following denaturation in concentrated solutions of urea or guanidinium chloride, and we find that urea- or GdmCl-denatured RNase A can oligomerize during refolding. By revealing the importance of a chiefly denaturated state and a refolding intermediate with non-native X-Pro peptide bonds, these findings revise the model for RNase A oligomerization via 3D domain swapping and have general implications for amyloid formation.

  8. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  9. Implication of complex vertebral malformation and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency DNA-based testing on disease frequency in the Holstein population.

    PubMed

    Schütz, E; Scharfenstein, M; Brenig, B

    2008-12-01

    Two inherited lethal disorders, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and complex vertebral malformation (CVM), play a major role in breeding of Holstein cattle. Both inherited diseases are based on single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been known for 12 and 7 yr, respectively. A total of 25,753 cattle were genotyped for BLAD (18,200 tests) and CVM (14,493 tests) in our laboratory since the beginning of the genotyping programs for these diseases. Based on founder effects, the CVM mutation is thought to be linked to milk production. The BLAD was genotyped using RFLP until 2001; then a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay on a LightCycler was used, as for CVM genotyping. By using single nucleotide polymorphism-aided breeding, the allelic frequency of the BLAD and CVM mutations in the active sire population was reduced from 9.4% in 1997 to 0.3% in 2007 (BLAD) and from 8.3% in 2002 to 2.3% in 2007 (CVM), with calculated half-life of the mutant allele of 2.1 yr for BLAD and 3.6 yr for CVM. An observed increase of BLAD frequency in 1999 could be attributed to the massive use of a BLAD-positive sire tested falsely negative in another laboratory. These data show that marker-assisted selection is capable of substantially reducing the frequency of a mutation within a period of not more than 5 yr. The different selection strategies against the lethal recessive allele in CVM and BLAD are reflected in the different reduction rates of the specific allele frequencies.

  10. Interaction of Ubinuclein-1, a nuclear and adhesion junction protein, with the 14-3-3 epsilon protein in epithelial cells: implication of the PKA pathway.

    PubMed

    Conti, Audrey; Sueur, Charlotte; Lupo, Julien; Brazzolotto, Xavier; Burmeister, Wim P; Manet, Evelyne; Gruffat, Henri; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique

    2013-03-01

    Ubinuclein-1 is a NACos (Nuclear and Adhesion junction Complex components) protein which shuttles between the nucleus and tight junctions, but its function in the latter is not understood. Here, by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis, we show that Ubinuclein-1 interacts with the 14-3-3ɛ protein both in HT29 colon cells, and AGS gastric cells. This interaction is mediated by an Ubinuclein-1 phosphoserine motif. We show that the arginine residues (R56, R60 and R132) which form the 14-3-3ɛ ligand binding site are responsible for the binding of 14-3-3ɛ to phosphorylated Ubinuclein-1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in vitro Ubinuclein-1 can be directly phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This in vitro phosphorylation allows binding of wildtype 14-3-3ɛ. Moreover, treatment of the cells with inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, KT5720 or H89, modifies the subcellular localization of Ubinuclein-1. Indeed, KT5720 and H89 greatly increase the staining of Ubinuclein-1 at the tight junctions in AGS gastric cells. In the presence of the kinase inhibitor KT5720, the amount of Ubinuclein-1 in the NP40 insoluble fraction is increased, together with actin. Moreover, treatment of the cells with KT5720 or H89 induces the concentration of Ubinuclein-1 at tricellular intersections of MDCK cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate novel cell signaling trafficking by Ubinuclein-1 via association with 14-3-3ɛ following Ubinuclein-1 phosphorylation by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase-A. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Testosterone attenuates expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 by conversion to estradiol by aromatase in endothelial cells: implications in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Tapan K; Dinh, Hillary; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Nathan, Lauren

    2002-03-19

    We previously reported that testosterone attenuated atherogenesis in LDLR(-/-) male mice, and that this effect of testosterone was most likely caused by its conversion to estradiol. Estradiol inhibits vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, and expression of VCAM-1 is one of the early events in atherogenesis. We assessed the cellular mechanism(s) involved by which testosterone attenuates atherogenesis. We evaluated whether testosterone inhibited TNFalpha-induced VCAM-1 expression via its conversion to estradiol by the enzyme aromatase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Aromatase mRNA was dedected by reverse transcription-PCR in these cells. Testosterone (30 nM-1 microM) attenuated VCAM-1 mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. The non aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone, had no effect on VCAM-1 mRNA expression. Testosterone was less effective in attenuating VCAM-1 expression in the presence of anastrozole, an inhibitor of aromatase, indicating that testosterone inhibited VCAM-1 via conversion to estradiol. Estradiol also attenuated VCAM-1 mRNA expression, but this action was not abolished in the presence of anastrozole, indicating that anastrozole itself did not modulate VCAM-1 mRNA expression. The effect of testosterone on VCAM-1 mRNA expression was inhibited in the presence of the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI-182780. Testosterone also attenuated TNFalpha-induced VCAM-1 protein expression, and this attenuation was abolished in the presence of anastrozole. In conclusion, testosterone inhibited VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression in HUVEC by its conversion to estradiol via the enzyme aromatase present in the endothelial cells. Results from our study may help explain the mechanism by which testosterone may have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

  12. Triamcinolone acetonide modulates permeability and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression of the ECV304 cell line: implications for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Penfold, P L; Wen, L; Madigan, M C; Gillies, M C; King, N J; Provis, J M

    2000-09-01

    Whilst animal studies and a pilot clinical trial suggest that intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (TA) may be useful in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), its mode of action remains to be fully elucidated. The present study has investigated the capacity of TA to modulate the expression of adhesion molecules and permeability using a human epithelial cell line (ECV304) as a model of the outer blood-retinal barrier (BRB). The influence of TA on the expression of ICAM-1 and MHC-I was studied on resting and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)- or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)- and/or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-activated cells using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Additionally, ECV304 cells were grown to confluence in uncoated Transwell chambers; transepithelial resistance (TER) across resting and PMA-activated cells was monitored. TA significantly decreased the paracellular permeability of ECV304 cells and down-regulated ICAM-1 expression, consistent with immunocytochemical observations. PMA-induced permeability changes were dose-dependent and TA decreased permeability of both resting and PMA-activated monolayers. MHC-I expression by ECV304 cells however, was not significantly affected by TA treatment. The modulation of TER and ICAM-1 expression in vitro correlate with clinical observations, suggesting re-establishment of the BRB and down-regulation of inflammatory markers are the principal effects of intravitreal TA in vivo. The results further indicate that TA has the potential to influence cellular permeability, including the barrier function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in AMD-affected retinae.

  13. Clinical implications of the detection of antibodies directed against domain 1 of β2-glycoprotein 1 in thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Montalvão, Silmara; Elídio, Priscila Soares; da Silva Saraiva, Sabrina; de Moraes Mazetto, Bruna; Colella, Marina Pereira; de Paula, Erich Vinícius; Appenzeller, Simone; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade

    2016-12-01

    Antibodies directed against domain 1 of β2 glycoprotein 1 (aβ2GP1-Dm1) have been involved in the immunopathogenesis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, the clinical relevance of aβ2GP1-Dm1 in thrombotic APS has not yet been fully explored. To determine the frequency of aβ2GP1-Dm1 in a cohort of patients with thrombotic APS, and to evaluate whether testing for aβ2GP1-Dm1 could have a clinical impact upon the risk assessment of the disease. Patients were tested for aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies by chemiluminescence (BioFlash/AcuStar®, ES). The presence of aβ2GP1-Dm1 was evaluated in different clinical presentations of the disease. Eight-four patients with a history of venous or arterial thrombosis were included. Forty-five (54%) patients had aβ2GP1 antibodies and 40% of them were positive for aβ2GP1-Dm1. Levels of aβ2GP1-Dm1 were higher in patients with systemic autoimmune disease (AUC=0.665; 95% CI=0.544-0.786; P=0.01), positive antinuclear antibody (AUC=0.654; 95% CI=0.535-0.772; P=0.01), triple antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity (AUC=0.680; 95% CI=0.534-0.825; P=0.02) and positive lupus anticoagulant (AUC=0.639; 95% CI=0.502-0.776; P=0.07). In this cohort, aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies were not associated with the site of the first thrombosis (OR=0,62, 95% CI=0.20-1.94, P=0.42), thrombosis recurrence (OR=1.0, 95% CI=0.37-2.71, P=1.0) or pregnancy morbidity (OR=1.5, 95% CI=0.33-7.34, P=0.58). In multivariate analysis, positivity for aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies was associated with the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune disease (OR=4.01, 95% CI=1.14-14.2; P=0.03) and triple aPL positivity (OR=3.59, 95% CI=0.87-14.85; P=0.07). In the present cohort of thrombotic-APS patients, aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies were related to the diagnosis of systemic autoimmunity and complex serological profile of the disease, as triple aPL positivity and positive antinuclear antibody. Thus, our results suggest that testing for aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies may be useful for improving APS risk

  14. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  15. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  16. Dynamics of DNA double-strand breaks revealed by clustering of damaged chromosome domains.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jacob A; Stap, Jan; Krawczyk, Przemek M; van Oven, Carel H; Hoebe, Ron A; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland

    2004-01-02

    Interactions between ends from different DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can produce tumorigenic chromosome translocations. Two theories for the juxta-position of DSBs in translocations, the static "contact-first" and the dynamic "breakage-first" theory, differ fundamentally in their requirement for DSB mobility. To determine whether or not DSB-containing chromosome domains are mobile and can interact, we introduced linear tracks of DSBs in nuclei. We observed changes in track morphology within minutes after DSB induction, indicating movement of the domains. In a subpopulation of cells, the domains clustered. Juxtaposition of different DSB-containing chromosome domains through clustering, which was most extensive in G1 phase cells, suggests an adhesion process in which we implicate the Mre11 complex. Our results support the breakage-first theory to explain the origin of chromosomal translocations.

  17. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  18. Understanding adhesive dentistry.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Michael

    2010-03-01

    This review paper firstly provides an outline of the development of resin-based adhesives. A simple classification method is described based on whether an acid etching agent requiring a washing and drying step is used. These systems are called etch and rinse systems. The other adhesives that do not have the washing and drying steps are referred to as self-etching adhesives. The advantages and disadvantages of these groups of adhesives are discussed. Methods of adhering to the tooth surface are provided, especially where the resin-based adhesive reliability is difficult to control.

  19. TMIGD1 is a novel adhesion molecule that protects epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Emad; Bondzie, Philip A; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Meyer, Rosana D; Hartsough, Edward; Henderson, Joel M; Schwartz, John H; Chitalia, Vipul; Rahimi, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative damage to renal tubular epithelial cells is a fundamental pathogenic mechanism implicated in both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. Because epithelial cell survival influences the outcome of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases, identifying its molecular regulators could provide new insight into pathobiology and possible new therapeutic strategies for these diseases. We have identified transmembrane and immunoglobulin domain-containing 1 (TMIGD1) as a novel adhesion molecule, which is highly conserved in humans and other species. TMIGD1 is expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells and promotes cell survival. The extracellular domain of TMIGD1 contains two putative immunoglobulin domains and mediates self-dimerization. Our data suggest that TMIGD1 regulates transepithelial electric resistance and permeability of renal epithelial cells. TMIGD1 controls cell migration, cell morphology, and protects renal epithelial cells from oxidative- and nutrient-deprivation-induced cell injury. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell injury downregulates TMIGD1 expression and targets it for ubiquitination. Moreover, TMIGD1 expression is significantly affected in both acute kidney injury and in deoxy-corticosterone acetate and sodium chloride (deoxy-corticosterone acetate salt)-induced chronic hypertensive kidney disease mouse models. Taken together, we have identified TMIGD1 as a novel cell adhesion molecule expressed in kidney epithelial cells that protects kidney epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury to promote cell survival.

  20. CdiA promotes receptor-independent intercellular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Zachary C.; Townsley, Loni; Wallace, Adam B.; King, Andrew; der Woude, Marjan W. Van; Low, David A.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary CdiB/CdiA proteins mediate inter-bacterial competition in a process termed contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI). Filamentous CdiA exoproteins extend from CDI+ cells and bind specific receptors to deliver toxins into susceptible target bacteria. CDI has also been implicated in auto-aggregation and biofilm formation in several species, but the contribution of CdiA-receptor interactions to these multi-cellular behaviors has not been examined. Using Escherichia coli isolate EC93 as a model, we show that cdiA and bamA receptor mutants are defective in biofilm formation, suggesting a prominent role for CdiA-BamA mediated cell-cell adhesion. However, CdiA also promotes auto-aggregation in a BamA-independent manner, indicating that the exoprotein possesses an additional adhesin activity. Cells must express CdiA in order to participate in BamA-independent aggregates, suggesting that adhesion could be mediated by homotypic CdiA-CdiA interactions. The BamA-dependent and BamA-independent interaction domains map to distinct regions within the CdiA filament. Thus, CdiA orchestrates a collective behavior that is independent of its growth-inhibition activity. This adhesion should enable “greenbeard” discrimination, in which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate with one another based on a single shared trait. This kind-selective social behavior could provide immediate fitness benefits to bacteria that acquire the systems through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:26135212

  1. [Adhesion to the antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Carballo, M

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the therapy antiretroviral is to improve the quality of life and the survival of the persons affected by the VIH through the suppression of the viral replication. Nevertheless one of the present problems is the resistant apparition of stumps to the new medicines caused by an incorrect management of the therapeutic plan; by an incorrect adhesion of the personal processing. Since the therapeutic success will depend, among others factors, and of important form of the degree of implication and commitment of the person affected, is a matter of identifying prematurely the possible situations concomitants (personal factors and of addiction, psycho-social, related to the processing and its possible secondary effects, associated factors to the own illness or even to the relation professional-patient) that can interfere in a correct adhesion. For it is necessary of the interaction multidisciplinary of the welfare team, and fundamental the work of nursing at the moment of to detect the possible determinant factors and the intervention definition of strategies arrived at by consensus with the own person, that they promote it or it improve. The quantification of the degree of adhesion (measure in %) values through various direct and indirect methods and should keep in mind in it takes of therapeutic decisions being able to come to be advised the suspension of the processing until obtaining to conscience to the person affected of the importance of a correct therapeutic compliance.

  2. Thermal conductivity of ice VII using the time-domain thermo-reflectance method in the diamond anvil cell: Implications for the icy planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Cahill, D. G.; Bartov, G.; Li, J.

    2008-12-01

    As a planetary body ages, the heat trapped and generated in its interior escapes to the surface. Thermal conductivity is a fundamental parameter that governs the thermal evolution and internal dynamics of the planetary body. Due to exceedingly small sample size under high pressure, measuring the thermal conductivity of compressed solids is challenging. Here we report new experimental data on the thermal conductivity of liquid H2O and ice VII up to 11 GPa and at 300 K, using the time-domain thermo- reflectance technique (TDTR) and the diamond anvil cell. The measurements were carried out at the Material Research Laboratory, University of Illinois. We load ruby balls as the pressure marker and a mica sheet as a thermal insulating layer. A thin film of aluminum (Al) is coated on the mica sheet and served as a transducer (Antonelli et al., 2006). A short optical pump pulse with duration ~ 100 fs and energy ~ 1 nJ is focused to a ~10 micron-diameter spot on the Al film, raising its temperature by several degrees Kelvin, which in turn causes a slight change in reflectivity. Over the next few nanoseconds following the absorption of the pulse, the Al film cools via heat conduction through the film itself, across the interface, and into the sample. From time-dependent measurement of reflectivity, we can extract the value of the thermal conductivity of the sample by modeling one-dimensional heat flow. With increasing pressure, liquid H2O crystallized into multiple grains of tetragonal ice VI. Upon further compression to ~ 3.3 GPa, the grain boundaries disappeared due to the formation of the cubic ice VII. We have determined the effect of pressure on the thermal conductivity of ice VII between 3 and 11 GPa. We will discuss the implications of our data for the thermal evolution of icy planetary bodies where ice VII may be a significant component.

  3. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through homophilic trans-interactions.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Francis X; Martin, Ryan A; Springer, Evan M; Leffler, Maxwell S; Woelmer, Bryce R; Recker, Isaac J; Leaman, Douglas W

    2017-07-11

    The overall objective of the study was to identify mechanisms through which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) augments the adhesive and fusogenic properties of myogenic cells. Hypotheses were tested using cultured myoblasts and fibroblasts, which do not constitutively express ICAM-1, and myoblasts and fibroblasts forced to express full length ICAM-1 or a truncated form lacking the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. ICAM-1 mediated myoblast adhesion and fusion were quantified using novel assays and cell mixing experiments. We report that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion to myoblasts and myotubes through homophilic trans-interactions. Such adhesive interactions enhanced levels of active Rac in adherent and fusing myoblasts, as well as triggered lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts through the signaling function of the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. Rac inhibition negated ICAM-1 mediated lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts. The fusogenic property of ICAM-1-ICAM-1 interactions was restricted to myogenic cells, as forced expression of ICAM-1 by fibroblasts did not augment their fusion to ICAM-1+ myoblasts/myotubes. We conclude that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through its ability to self-associate and initiate Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Domains and Naive Theories.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Susan A; Noles, Nicholaus S

    2011-09-01

    Human cognition entails domain-specific cognitive processes that influence memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and knowledge organization. This review examines domain-specific causal theories, which are of particular interest for permitting an examination of how knowledge structures change over time. We first describe the properties of commonsense theories, and how commonsense theories differ from scientific theories, illustrating with children's classification of biological and non-biological kinds. We next consider the implications of domain-specificity for broader issues regarding cognitive development and conceptual change. We then examine the extent to which domain-specific theories interact, and how people reconcile competing causal frameworks. Future directions for research include examining how different content domains interact, the nature of theory change, the role of context (including culture, language, and social interaction) in inducing different frameworks, and the neural bases for domain-specific reasoning.

  5. Domains and Naive Theories

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Noles, Nicholaus S.

    2013-01-01

    Human cognition entails domain-specific cognitive processes that influence memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and knowledge organization. This review examines domain-specific causal theories, which are of particular interest for permitting an examination of how knowledge structures change over time. We first describe the properties of commonsense theories, and how commonsense theories differ from scientific theories, illustrating with children’s classification of biological and non-biological kinds. We next consider the implications of domain-specificity for broader issues regarding cognitive development and conceptual change. We then examine the extent to which domain-specific theories interact, and how people reconcile competing causal frameworks. Future directions for research include examining how different content domains interact, the nature of theory change, the role of context (including culture, language, and social interaction) in inducing different frameworks, and the neural bases for domain-specific reasoning. PMID:24187603

  6. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  7. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  8. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  9. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  10. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  11. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  12. Prediction of glycolipid-binding domains from the amino acid sequence of lipid raft-associated proteins: application to HpaA, a protein involved in the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Garmy, Nicolas; Yahi, Nouara

    2006-09-12

    Protein-glycolipid interactions mediate the attachment of various pathogens to the host cell surface as well as the association of numerous cellular proteins with lipid rafts. Thus, it is of primary importance to identify the protein domains involved in glycolipid recognition. Using structure similarity searches, we could identify a common glycolipid-binding domain in the three-dimensional structure of several proteins known to interact with lipid rafts. Yet the three-dimensional structure of most raft-targeted proteins is still unknown. In the present study, we have identified a glycolipid-binding domain in the amino acid sequence of a bacterial adhesin (Helicobacter pylori adhesin A, HpaA). The prediction was based on the major properties of the glycolipid-binding domains previously characterized by structural searches. A short (15-mer) synthetic peptide corresponding to this putative glycolipid-binding domain was synthesized, and we studied its interaction with glycolipid monolayers at the air-water interface. The synthetic HpaA peptide recognized LacCer but not Gb3. This glycolipid specificity was in line with that of the whole bacterium. Molecular modeling studies gave some insights into this high selectivity of interaction. It also suggested that Phe147 in HpaA played a key role in LacCer recognition, through sugar-aromatic CH-pi stacking interactions with the hydrophobic side of the galactose ring of LacCer. Correspondingly, the replacement of Phe147 with Ala strongly affected LacCer recognition, whereas substitution with Trp did not. Our method could be used to identify glycolipid-binding domains in microbial and cellular proteins interacting with lipid shells, rafts, and other specialized membrane microdomains.

  13. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J.; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Cadherins embody a superfamily of cell-surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich EC (extracellular cadherin) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate “classical” cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a “strand-swapped” conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the “X-dimer”. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor which drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside of the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms which are just now beginning to be understood. PMID:22555008

  14. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Cadherins are a superfamily of cell surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich extracellular cadherin (EC) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate 'classical' cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a 'strand-swapped' conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the 'X-dimer'. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor that drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms that are only now beginning to be understood.

  15. Postoperative Adhesion Development Following Cesarean and Open Intra-Abdominal Gynecological Operations

    PubMed Central

    Awonuga, Awoniyi O.; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of adhesion development, the impact of physiological changes associated with pregnancy on markers of adhesion development, and the clinical implications of adhesion development following cesarean delivery (CD). Although peritoneal adhesions develop after the overwhelming majority of intra-abdominal and pelvic surgery, there is evidence in the literature that suggests that patients having CD may develop adhesions less frequently. However, adhesions continue to be a concern after CD, and are likely significant, albeit on average less than after gynecological operations, but with potential to cause significant delay in the delivery of the baby with serious, lifelong consequences. Appreciation of the pathophysiology of adhesion development described herein should allow a more informed approach to the rapidly evolving field of intra-abdominal adhesions and should serve as a reference for an evidence-based approach to consideration for the prevention and treatment of adhesions. PMID:21775773

  16. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  17. Soy protein adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  18. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  19. Genomic and phenotypic analysis reveals a key role for CCN1 (CYR61) in BAG3-modulated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Jareer N; Virador, Victoria M; Guancial, Elizabeth A; Kimm, Daniel; Ho, Allen S; Mishra, Mark; Chuang, Eric Y; Cook, John; Gius, David; Kohn, Elise C

    2009-08-01

    Chaperone protein quantity may regulate the balance of proteins involved in invasion and malignancy. BAG3 is a co-chaperone and pro-survival protein that has been implicated in adhesion, migration, and metastasis. We reported that BAG3 overexpression in MDA435 human breast cancer cells results in a significant decrease in migration and adhesion to matrix molecules that is reversed upon deletion of the BAG3 proline-rich domain (dPXXP). We now hypothesize that transcriptional analysis would identify proteins involved in matrix-related processes that are regulated by BAG3 and/or its PXXP domain mutant. Expression array analysis of MDA435 cells overexpressing either wild-type BAG3 (FL) or dPXXP identified CCN1 as a BAG3 target protein. CCN1 is a known AP-1 target. Increased AP-1 transcriptional activity and AP-1 DNA-binding was found in MDA435 dPXXP cells. Consistent with these findings, CCN1 quantity and secretion were increased in dPXXP mutants but suppressed in FL cells; both BAG3 forms resulted in up-regulated CCN1 in HeLa cells. CCN1 silencing in the BAG3 FL overexpressors reduced the already low phospho-integrin beta1 in response to attachment on collagen IV. Matrigel invasion of HeLa cells engineered with the BAG3 constructs was enhanced in FL cells and minimal in dPXXP cells. CCN1 silencing blocked a greater percentage of the serum-induced invasion in FL cells than in dPXXP cells. This implies a context-dependent function of BAG3 on CCN1 and thus mesenchymal behaviour. CCN1 may be necessary for adhesion and matrix-related signalling in FL cells, abrogating a negative signal of the PXXP domain when BAG3 is intact. We propose that BAG3 regulates CCN1 expression to regulate tumour cell adhesion and migration.

  20. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2011-01-01

    The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea) and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones). But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use. PMID:22073094

  1. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  2. S-Layer Homology Domain Proteins Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 Are Implicated in Plant Polysaccharide Deconstruction by the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Inci; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic bacteria that grow on plant polysaccharides. The genomes of Caldicellulosiruptor species reveal certain surface layer homology (SLH) domain proteins that have distinguishing features, pointing to a role in lignocellulose deconstruction. Two of these proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (Csac_0678 and Csac_2722) were examined from this perspective. In addition to three contiguous SLH domains, the Csac_0678 gene encodes a glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5) catalytic domain and a family 28 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM); orthologs to Csac_0678 could be identified in all genome-sequenced Caldicellulosiruptor species. Recombinant Csac_0678 was optimally active at 75°C and pH 5.0, exhibiting both endoglucanase and xylanase activities. SLH domain removal did not impact Csac_0678 GH activity, but deletion of the CBM28 domain eliminated binding to crystalline cellulose and rendered the enzyme inactive on this substrate. Csac_2722 is the largest open reading frame (ORF) in the C. saccharolyticus genome (predicted molecular mass of 286,516 kDa) and contains two putative sugar-binding domains, two Big4 domains (bacterial domains with an immunoglobulin [Ig]-like fold), and a cadherin-like (Cd) domain. Recombinant Csac_2722, lacking the SLH and Cd domains, bound to cellulose and had detectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrolytic activity. Antibodies directed against Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 confirmed that these proteins bound to the C. saccharolyticus S-layer. Their cellular localization and functional biochemical properties indicate roles for Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 in recruitment and hydrolysis of complex polysaccharides and the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, these results suggest that related SLH domain proteins in other Caldicellulosiruptor genomes may also be important contributors to plant biomass utilization. PMID:22138994

  3. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  4. Adhesion determinants of the Streptococcus species

    PubMed Central

    Moschioni, Monica; Pansegrau, Werner; Barocchi, Michèle A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Streptococci are clinically important Gram‐positive bacteria that are capable to cause a wide variety of diseases in humans and animals. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequences of the streptococcal species reveal a clustering pattern, reflecting, with a few exceptions, their pathogenic potential and ecological preferences. Microbial adhesion to host tissues is the initial critical event in the pathogenesis of most infections. Streptococci use multiple adhesins to attach to the epithelium, and their expression is regulated in response to environmental and growth conditions. Bacterial adhesins recognize and bind cell surface molecules and extracellular matrix components through specific domains that for certain adhesin families have been well defined and found conserved across the streptococcal species. In this review, we present the different streptococcal adhesin families categorized on the basis of their adhesive properties and structural characteristics, and, when available, we focus the attention on conserved functional domains. PMID:21255337

  5. Monophyly of class I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, USPA, ETFP, photolyase, and PP-ATPase nucleotide-binding domains: implications for protein evolution in the RNA.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Anantharaman, Vivek; Koonin, Eugene V

    2002-07-01

    Protein sequence and structure comparisons show that the catalytic domains of Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, a related family of nucleotidyltransferases involved primarily in coenzyme biosynthesis, nucleotide-binding domains related to the UspA protein (USPA domains), photolyases, electron transport flavoproteins, and PP-loop-containing ATPases together comprise a distinct class of alpha/beta domains designated the HUP domain after HIGH-signature proteins, UspA, and PP-ATPase. Several lines of evidence are presented to support the monophyly of the HUP domains, to the exclusion of other three-layered alpha/beta folds with the generic "Rossmann-like" topology. Cladistic analysis, with patterns of structural and sequence similarity used as discrete characters, identified three major evolutionary lineages within the HUP domain class: the PP-ATPases; the HIGH superfamily, which includes class I aaRS and related nucleotidyltransferases containing the HIGH signature in their nucleotide-binding loop; and a previously unrecognized USPA-like group, which includes USPA domains, electron transport flavoproteins, and photolyases. Examination of the patterns of phyletic distribution of distinct families within these three major lineages suggests that the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all modern life forms encoded 15-18 distinct alpha/beta ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins of the HUP class. This points to an extensive radiation of HUP domains before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA), during which the multiple class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases emerged only at a late stage. Thus, substantial evolutionary diversification of protein domains occurred well before the modern version of the protein-dependent translation machinery was established, i.e., still in the RNA world.

  6. Interaction between a Domain of the Negative Regulator of the Ras-ERK Pathway, SPRED1 Protein, and the GTPase-activating Protein-related Domain of Neurofibromin Is Implicated in Legius Syndrome and Neurofibromatosis Type 1*♦

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yasuko; Brems, Hilde; Suzuki, Mayu; Kanamori, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Masahiro; Morita, Rimpei; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Ose, Toyoyuki; Messiaen, Ludwine; Legius, Eric; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Constitutional heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the SPRED1 gene cause a phenotype known as Legius syndrome, which consists of symptoms of multiple café-au-lait macules, axillary freckling, learning disabilities, and macrocephaly. Legius syndrome resembles a mild neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) phenotype. It has been demonstrated that SPRED1 functions as a negative regulator of the Ras-ERK pathway and interacts with neurofibromin, the NF1 gene product. However, the molecular details of this interaction and the effects of the mutations identified in Legius syndrome and NF1 on this interaction have not yet been investigated. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid system and an immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293 cells, we found that the SPRED1 EVH1 domain interacts with the N-terminal 16 amino acids and the C-terminal 20 amino acids of the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin, which form two crossing α-helix coils outside the GAP domain. These regions have been shown to be dispensable for GAP activity and are not present in p120GAP. Several mutations in these N- and C-terminal regions of the GRD in NF1 patients and pathogenic missense mutations in the EVH1 domain of SPRED1 in Legius syndrome reduced the binding affinity between the EVH1 domain and the GRD. EVH1 domain mutations with reduced binding to the GRD also disrupted the ERK suppression activity of SPRED1. These data clearly demonstrate that SPRED1 inhibits the Ras-ERK pathway by recruiting neurofibromin to Ras through the EVH1-GRD interaction, and this study also provides molecular basis for the pathogenic mutations of NF1 and Legius syndrome. PMID:26635368

  7. Adhesion of latex films. Influence of surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Charmeau, J.Y.; Kientz, E.; Holl, Y.

    1996-12-31

    In the applications of film forming latexes in paint, paper, coating, adhesive, textile industries, one of the most important property of latex films is adhesion onto a support. From the point of view of adhesion, latex films have two specificities. The first one arises from the particular structure of the film which is usually not homogeneous but retains to a certain extent the memory of the particles it was made from. These structure effects are clearly apparent when one compares mechanical or adhesion properties of pure latex films and of films of the same polymers but prepared from a solution. Latex films show higher Young`s moduli and lower adhesion properties than solution films. The second specificity of latex films comes from the presence of the surfactant which was used in the synthesis and as stabilizer for the latex. Most industrial latexes contain low amounts of surfactant, typically in the range 0.1 to 2-3 wt%. However, being usually incompatible with the polymer, the surfactant is not homogeneously distributed in the film. It tends to segregate towards the film-air or film-support interfaces or to form domains in the bulk of the film. Distribution of surfactants in latex films has been studied by several authors. The influence of the surfactant on adhesion, as well as on other properties, is thus potentially very important. This article presents the results of the authors investigation of surfactant effects on adhesion properties of latex films. To the authors knowledge, there is no other example, in the open literature, of this kind of study.

  8. Pattern formation in cell membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis; Hategan, A.; Sengupta, K.; Sackmann, E.

    2004-03-01

    Strong adhesion of highly active cells often nucleates focal adhesions or related structures that are, over time, reinforced by cytoskeleton (actin, etc.). Red cells lack such complex adhesion systems, but they are shown here to also exhibit complex spatial patterns within an adhesive contact zone. While strong adhesion and spreading of the red cell to a dense poly-L-lysine surface appears complete in < 1 s by reflective interference microscopy, over longer times of 10-15 min or more distinct patterns in fluorescently labeled membrane components emerge. The fluorescent lipid Fl-PE (fluorescein phosphoethanolamine), in particular, is seen to diffuse and reorganize (eg. worm-like domains of <500 nm) within the contact zone, independent of whether the cell is intact or ruptured. Lipid patterns are accompanied by visible perturbations in band 3 distribution and weaker perturbations in membrane skeleton actin. Although fluorescent poly-L-lysine is shown to be uniform under cells, pressing down on the membrane quenches the lipid patterns and reveals the topographical basis for pattern formation. Regions of strong contact are thus separated by regions where the membrane is more distant from the surface.

  9. Mussel adhesion - essential footwork.

    PubMed

    Waite, J Herbert

    2017-02-15

    Robust adhesion to wet, salt-encrusted, corroded and slimy surfaces has been an essential adaptation in the life histories of sessile marine organisms for hundreds of millions of years, but it remains a major impasse for technology. Mussel adhesion has served as one of many model systems providing a fundamental understanding of what is required for attachment to wet surfaces. Most polymer engineers have focused on the use of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa), a peculiar but abundant catecholic amino acid in mussel adhesive proteins. The premise of this Review is that although Dopa does have the potential for diverse cohesive and adhesive interactions, these will be difficult to achieve in synthetic homologs without a deeper knowledge of mussel biology; that is, how, at different length and time scales, mussels regulate the reactivity of their adhesive proteins. To deposit adhesive proteins onto target surfaces, the mussel foot creates an insulated reaction chamber with extreme reaction conditions such as low pH, low ionic strength and high reducing poise. These conditions enable adhesive proteins to undergo controlled fluid-fluid phase separation, surface adsorption and spreading, microstructure formation and, finally, solidification. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  11. Tenomodulin Expression in the Periodontal Ligament Enhances Cellular Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, Yuske; Ohba, Shinsuke; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Hojo, Hironori; Yano, Fumiko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Docheva, Denitsa; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Chung, Ung-il

    2013-01-01

    Tenomodulin (Tnmd) is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL) has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain. PMID:23593173

  12. Adhesive Bonding for Shelters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    weru uvaluated, the type of etch bath " sweetener " and the type of rinse\\water used. The type of etch bath " sweetener " was found to have a dramatic effect...EA9601NW Adhesives on 50521134 Bare Adherenas 39 13 Stress-Durability Behavior Sun-mary 40 14 Effect of Ltch Bath Sweetening Alloy on Interracial Durability...34"’ -,,• , •’• •"• " ,,,,, 9 Adhesive/Primer/Adherend Alloy/Surface Preparation Combinations Adherend OFPL Sweetening Rinse Adhesive:Primer Alloy Alloy

  13. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  14. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  15. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  16. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  17. cis Interaction of the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1 with integrin beta(3).

    PubMed

    Brümmer, J; Ebrahimnejad, A; Flayeh, R; Schumacher, U; Löning, T; Bamberger, A M; Wagener, C

    2001-08-01

    CEACAM1 is a cell adhesion molecule that has been implicated in a number of physiological processes (eg, tumor suppressor in epithelial tissues, potent angiogenic factor in microvessel formation, microbial receptor in human granulocytes and epithelial cells). The mechanism of CEACAM1 action is still largely unresolved but recent findings demonstrated that the cytoplasmic CEACAM1 domain is linked indirectly to the actin-based cytoskeleton. We have isolated integrin beta(3) as an associated protein using CEACAM1 tail affinity purification. This association depends on phosphorylation of Tyr-488 in the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed in vivo colocalization of both molecules in human granulocytes and epithelial cells. Furthermore, the concentrated colocalization at the tumor-stroma interface of invading melanoma masses suggests a functional role of CEACAM1-integrin beta(3) interaction in melanoma invasion. Moreover, colocalization of the two adhesion molecules is also found at the apical surface of glandular cells of pregnancy endometrium. Colocalization of CEACAM1 and integrin beta(3) at the transitional zone from proliferative to invasive extravillous trophoblast of the maternal-fetal interface supports a role for CEACAM1/integrin beta(3) complexes in cell invasion.

  18. cis Interaction of the Cell Adhesion Molecule CEACAM1 with Integrin β3

    PubMed Central

    Brümmer, Jens; Ebrahimnejad, Alireza; Flayeh, Raid; Schumacher, Udo; Löning, Thomas; Bamberger, Ana-Maria; Wagener, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    CEACAM1 is a cell adhesion molecule that has been implicated in a number of physiological processes (eg, tumor suppressor in epithelial tissues, potent angiogenic factor in microvessel formation, microbial receptor in human granulocytes and epithelial cells). The mechanism of CEACAM1 action is still largely unresolved but recent findings demonstrated that the cytoplasmic CEACAM1 domain is linked indirectly to the actin-based cytoskeleton. We have isolated integrin β3 as an associated protein using CEACAM1 tail affinity purification. This association depends on phosphorylation of Tyr-488 in the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed in vivo colocalization of both molecules in human granulocytes and epithelial cells. Furthermore, the concentrated colocalization at the tumor-stroma interface of invading melanoma masses suggests a functional role of CEACAM1-integrin β3 interaction in melanoma invasion. Moreover, colocalization of the two adhesion molecules is also found at the apical surface of glandular cells of pregnancy endometrium. Colocalization of CEACAM1 and integrin β3 at the transitional zone from proliferative to invasive extravillous trophoblast of the maternal-fetal interface supports a role for CEACAM1/integrin β3 complexes in cell invasion. PMID:11485912

  19. Within-Trait Heterogeneity in Age Group Differences in Personality Domains and Facets: Implications for the Development and Coherence of Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Mõttus, René; Realo, Anu; Allik, Jüri; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Johnson, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated differences in the Five-Factor Model (FFM) domains and facets across adulthood. The main questions were whether personality scales reflected coherent units of trait development and thereby coherent personality traits more generally. These questions were addressed by testing if the components of the trait scales (items for facet scales and facets for domain scales) showed consistent age group differences. For this, measurement invariance (MI) framework was used. In a sample of 2,711 Estonians who had completed the NEO Personality Inventory 3 (NEO PI-3), more than half of the facet scales and one domain scale did not meet the criterion for weak MI (factor loading equality) across 12 age groups spanning ages from 18 to 91 years. Furthermore, none of the facet and domain scales met the criterion for strong MI (intercept equality), suggesting that items of the same facets and facets of the same domains varied in age group differences. When items were residualized for their respective facets, 46% of them had significant (p < 0.0002) residual age-correlations. When facets were residualized for their domain scores, a majority had significant (p < 0.002) residual age-correlations. For each domain, a series of latent factors were specified using random quarters of their items: scores of such latent factors varied notably (within domains) in correlations with age. We argue that manifestations of aetiologically coherent traits should show similar age group differences. Given this, the FFM domains and facets as embodied in the NEO PI-3 do not reflect aetiologically coherent traits. PMID:25751273

  20. Structures and solution properties of two novel periplasmic sensor domains with c-type heme from chemotaxis proteins of Geobacter sulfurreducens : implications for signal transduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Pessanha, M.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Wilton, R.; Catarino, T.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ.Nova de Lisboa; Insti. de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica

    2008-04-11

    Periplasmic sensor domains from two methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins from Geobacter sulfurreducens (encoded by genes GSU0935 and GSU0582) were expressed in Escherichia coli. The sensor domains were isolated, purified, characterized in solution, and their crystal structures were determined. In the crystal, both sensor domains form swapped dimers and show a PAS-type fold. The swapped segment consists of two helices of about 45 residues at the N terminus with the hemes located between the two monomers. In the case of the GSU0582 sensor, the dimer contains a crystallographic 2-fold symmetry and the heme is coordinated by an axial His and a water molecule. In the case of the GSU0935 sensor, the crystals contain a non-crystallographic dimer, and surprisingly, the coordination of the heme in each monomer is different; monomer A heme has His-Met ligation and monomer B heme has His-water ligation as found in the GSU0582 sensor. The structures of these sensor domains are the first structures of PAS domains containing covalently bound heme. Optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR spectroscopy have revealed that the heme groups of both sensor domains are high-spin and low-spin in the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively, and that the spin-state interconversion involves a heme axial ligand replacement. Both sensor domains bind NO in their ferric and ferrous forms but bind CO only in the reduced form. The binding of both NO and CO occurs via an axial ligand exchange process, and is fully reversible. The reduction potentials of the sensor domains differ by 95 mV (-156 mV and -251 mV for sensors GSU0582 and GSU0935, respectively). The swapped dimerization of these sensor domains and redox-linked ligand switch might be related to the mechanism of signal transduction by these chemotaxis proteins.

  1. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    The successful use of many security papers, foils and films depends on the technology of chemical fastening systems -- especially pressure sensitive adhesives. These are adhesives activated not by heat or by the evaporation of water or some other solvent, but simply by the act of application -- by pressure. These adhesives provide the means whereby laminations, substrates and seals are made effective. In addition to their physical properties these adhesives are often required to possess optical properties to allow the security materials to be visibly active and indeed the adhesive system may itself contribute as a carrier for a variety of security materials. Recent advances in adhesives chemistry have made it possible to achieve virtually all the required physical performance characteristics combined with a choice of optical properties ranging from total opacity to invisibility and including controlled translucency and tinting. The implications for security printing and packaging are important. Opacity is easy to achieve, for example by loading the adhesive with aluminum powder, by the selection of totally opaque materials like metallized film or by various printing processes. But achieving transparency is a different matter, and transparency is mandatory for applications involving the protection of documents, photographs, etc. with a clear film over-laminate. Obvious examples would be for passports, visas and other personal identification. But some security devices may themselves require protection; for example holograms or embossings. And transparency in the test laboratory is not enough. The Australian driving licence is stuck to the windshield, so the transparency of the adhesive must be sustained over long periods without deterioration due to prolonged u/v exposure, climatic conditions or aging. The commercial label market has helped to push the technology forward. There is a strong demand for the 'no-label look' for packaging of clear plastic and glass

  2. Pro32Pro33 Mutations in the Integrin β3 PSI Domain Result in αIIbβ3 Priming and Enhanced Adhesion: Reversal of the Hypercoagulability Phenotype by the Src Inhibitor SKI-606

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Kendra H.; Jessen, Tammy; Crawford, Emily L.; Chung, Chang Y.; Sutcliffe, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma-membrane integrin αIIbβ3 (CD41/CD61, GPIIbIIIa) is a major functional receptor in platelets during clotting. A common isoform of integrin β3, Leu33Pro is associated with enhanced platelet function and increased risk for coronary thrombosis and stroke, although these findings remain controversial. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which this sequence variation modifies platelet function, we produced transgenic knockin mice expressing a Pro32Pro33 integrin β3. Consistent with reports utilizing human platelets, we found significantly reduced bleeding and clotting times, as well as increased in vivo thrombosis, in Pro32Pro33 homozygous mice. These alterations paralleled increases in platelet attachment and spreading onto fibrinogen resulting from enhanced integrin αIIbβ3 function. Activation with protease-activated receptor 4– activating peptide, the main thrombin signaling receptor in mice, showed no significant difference in activation of Pro32Pro33 mice as compared with controls, suggesting that inside-out signaling remains intact. However, under unstimulated conditions, the Pro32Pro33 mutation led to elevated Src phosphorylation, facilitated by increased talin interactions with the β3 cytoplasmic domain, indicating that the αIIbβ3 intracellular domains are primed for activation while the ligand-binding domain remains unchanged. Acute dosing of animals with a Src inhibitor was sufficient to rescue the clotting phenotype in knockin mice to wild-type levels. Together, our data establish that the Pro32Pro33 structural alteration modifies the function of integrin αIIbβ3, priming the integrin for outside-in signaling, ultimately leading to hypercoagulability. Furthermore, our data may support a novel approach to antiplatelet therapy by Src inhibition where hemostasis is maintained while reducing risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24695082

  3. Pro32Pro33 mutations in the integrin β3 PSI domain result in αIIbβ3 priming and enhanced adhesion: reversal of the hypercoagulability phenotype by the Src inhibitor SKI-606.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kendra H; Jessen, Tammy; Crawford, Emily L; Chung, Chang Y; Sutcliffe, James S; Carneiro, Ana M

    2014-06-01

    The plasma-membrane integrin αIIbβ3 (CD41/CD61, GPIIbIIIa) is a major functional receptor in platelets during clotting. A common isoform of integrin β3, Leu33Pro is associated with enhanced platelet function and increased risk for coronary thrombosis and stroke, although these findings remain controversial. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which this sequence variation modifies platelet function, we produced transgenic knockin mice expressing a Pro32Pro33 integrin β3. Consistent with reports utilizing human platelets, we found significantly reduced bleeding and clotting times, as well as increased in vivo thrombosis, in Pro32Pro33 homozygous mice. These alterations paralleled increases in platelet attachment and spreading onto fibrinogen resulting from enhanced integrin αIIbβ3 function. Activation with protease-activated receptor 4- activating peptide, the main thrombin signaling receptor in mice, showed no significant difference in activation of Pro32Pro33 mice as compared with controls, suggesting that inside-out signaling remains intact. However, under unstimulated conditions, the Pro32Pro33 mutation led to elevated Src phosphorylation, facilitated by increased talin interactions with the β3 cytoplasmic domain, indicating that the αIIbβ3 intracellular domains are primed for activation while the ligand-binding domain remains unchanged. Acute dosing of animals with a Src inhibitor was sufficient to rescue the clotting phenotype in knockin mice to wild-type levels. Together, our data establish that the Pro32Pro33 structural alteration modifies the function of integrin αIIbβ3, priming the integrin for outside-in signaling, ultimately leading to hypercoagulability. Furthermore, our data may support a novel approach to antiplatelet therapy by Src inhibition where hemostasis is maintained while reducing risk for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Bacterial Adhesion at Synthetic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, D.; Smart, C. A.; Alexander, C.; Vulfson, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    A systematic investigation into the effect of surface chemistry on bacterial adhesion was carried out. In particular, a number of physicochemical factors important in defining the surface at the molecular level were assessed for their effect on the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The primary experiments involved the grafting of groups varying in hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, chain length, and chemical functionality onto glass substrates such that the surfaces were homogeneous and densely packed with functional groups. All of the surfaces were found to be chemically well defined, and their measured surface energies varied from 15 to 41 mJ · m−2. Protein adsorption experiments were performed with 3H-labelled bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c prior to bacterial attachment studies. Hydrophilic uncharged surfaces showed the greatest resistance to protein adsorption; however, our studies also showed that the effectiveness of poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO) polymers was not simply a result of its hydrophilicity and molecular weight alone. The adsorption of the two proteins approximately correlated with short-term cell adhesion, and bacterial attachment for L. monocytogenes and E. coli also correlated with the chemistry of the underlying substrate. However, for S. aureus and S. typhimurium a different pattern of attachment occurred, suggesting a dissimilar mechanism of cell attachment, although high-molecular-weight PEO was still the least-cell-adsorbing surface. The implications of this for in vivo attachment of cells suggest that hydrophilic passivating groups may be the best method for preventing cell adsorption to synthetic substrates provided they can be grafted uniformly and in sufficient density at the surface. PMID:10543814

  5. Qualitative analysis of student beliefs and attitudes after an objective structured clinical evaluation: implications for affective domain learning in undergraduate nursing education.

    PubMed

    Cazzell, Mary; Rodriguez, Amber

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the feelings, beliefs, and attitudes of senior-level undergraduate pediatric nursing students upon completion of a medication administration Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE). The affective domain is the most neglected domain in higher education, although it is deemed the "gateway to learning." Quantitative assessments of clinical skills performed during OSCEs usually address two of the three domains of learning: cognitive (knowledge) and psychomotor skills. Twenty students volunteered to participate in focus groups (10 per group) and were asked three questions relevant to their feelings, beliefs, and attitudes about their OSCE experiences. Students integrated the attitude of safety first into future practice but felt that anxiety, loss of control, reaction under pressure, and no feedback affected their ability to connect the OSCE performance with future clinical practice. The findings affect future affective domain considerations in the development, modification, and assessment of OSCEs across the undergraduate nursing curriculum.

  6. Role of seta angle and flexibility in the gecko adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Congcong; Alex Greaney, P.

    2014-08-01

    A model is developed to describe the reversible nature of gecko dry adhesion. The central aspect of this model is that the seta can be easily peeled away from the contacting surface by a small moment at the contact tip. It is shown that this contact condition is very sensitive, but can result in robust adhesion if individual setae are canted and highly flexible. In analogy to the "cone of friction," we consider the "adhesion region"—the domain of normal and tangential forces that maintain adhesion. Results demonstrate that this adhesion region is highly asymmetric enabling the gecko to adhere under a variety of loading conditions associated with scuttling horizontally, vertically, and inverted. Moreover, under each of these conditions, there is a low energy path to de-adhesion. In this model, obliquely canted seta (as possessed by geckos) rather than vertically aligned fibers (common in synthetic dry adhesive) provides the most robust adhesion.

  7. Phospholipids Induce Conformational Changes of SecA to Form Membrane-Specific Domains: AFM Structures and Implication on Protein-Conducting Channels

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Liao, Meijiang; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Pan, Xijian; Houghton, John E.; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2013-01-01

    SecA, an essential component of the Sec machinery, exists in a soluble and a membrane form in Escherichia coli. Previous studies have shown that the soluble SecA transforms into pore structures when it interacts with liposomes, and integrates into membranes containing SecYEG in two forms: SecAS and SecAM; the latter exemplified by two tryptic membrane-specific domains, an N-terminal domain (N39) and a middle M48 domain (M48). The formation of these lipid-specific domains was further investigated. The N39 and M48 domains are induced only when SecA interacts with anionic liposomes. Additionally, the N-terminus, not the C-terminus of SecA is required for inducing such conformational changes. Proteolytic treatment and sequence analyses showed that liposome-embedded SecA yields the same M48 and N39 domains as does the membrane-embedded SecA. Studies with chemical extraction and resistance to trypsin have also shown that these proteoliposome-embedded SecA fragments exhibit the same stability and characteristics as their membrane-embedded SecA equivalents. Furthermore, the cloned lipid-specific domains N39 and M48, but not N68 or C34, are able to form partial, but imperfect ring-like structures when they interact with phospholipids. These ring-like structures are characteristic of a SecA pore-structure, suggesting that these domains contribute part of the SecA-dependent protein-conducting channel. We, therefore, propose a model in which SecA alone is capable of forming a lipid-specific, asymmetric dimer that is able to function as a viable protein-conducting channel in the membrane, without any requirement for SecYEG. PMID:23977317

  8. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  9. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  10. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  11. Characterization of the {alpha}-helix region in domain 3 of the haemolytic lectin CEL-III: implications for self-oligomerization and haemolytic processes.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Keigo; Tsuda, Nobuaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2008-01-01

    CEL-III is a haemolytic lectin, which has two beta-trefoil domains (domains 1 and 2) and a beta-sheet-rich domain (domain 3). In domain 3 (residues 284-432), there is a hydrophobic region containing two alpha-helices (H8 and H9, residues 317-357) and a loop between them, in which alternate hydrophobic residues, especially Val residues, are present. To elucidate the role of the alpha-helix region in the haemolytic process, peptides corresponding to different parts of this region were synthesized and characterized. The peptides containing the sequence that corresponded to the loop and second alpha-helix (H9) showed the strongest antibacterial activity for Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis through a marked permeabilization of the bacterial cell membrane. The recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins containing domain 3 or the alpha-helix region peptide formed self-oligomers, whereas mutations in the alternate Val residues in the alpha-helix region lead to decreased oligomerization ability of the fusion proteins. These results suggest that the alpha-helix region, particularly its alternate Val residues are important for oligomerization of CEL-III in target cell membranes, which is also required for a subsequent haemolytic action.

  12. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  13. Adhesion to porcelain and metal.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Raymond L

    2007-04-01

    Some compelling clinical benefits of porcelain and metal adhesion are presented. Current concepts for metal adhesion are reviewed, including modifications of metal surface and resin chemistry. Porcelain adhesion is reviewed, including little-known methods that use silane but no hydrofluoric acid etching. Clinical protocols for use of metal and porcelain adhesives are presented.

  14. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  15. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  16. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties.

  17. Extreme positive allometry of animal adhesive pads and the size limits of adhesion-based climbing

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Clemente, Christofer J.; Dittrich, Alex; Kuo, Chi-Yun; Crosby, Alfred J.; Irschick, Duncan J.; Federle, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Organismal functions are size-dependent whenever body surfaces supply body volumes. Larger organisms can develop strongly folded internal surfaces for enhanced diffusion, but in many cases areas cannot be folded so that their enlargement is constrained by anatomy, presenting a problem for larger animals. Here, we study the allometry of adhesive pad area in 225 climbing animal species, covering more than seven orders of magnitude in weight. Across all taxa, adhesive pad area showed extreme positive allometry and scaled with weight, implying a 200-fold increase of relative pad area from mites to geckos. However, allometric scaling coefficients for pad area systematically decreased with taxonomic level and were close to isometry when evolutionary history was accounted for, indicating that the substantial anatomical changes required to achieve this increase in relative pad area are limited by phylogenetic constraints. Using a comparative phylogenetic approach, we found that the departure from isometry is almost exclusively caused by large differences in size-corrected pad area between arthropods and vertebrates. To mitigate the expected decrease of weight-specific adhesion within closely related taxa where pad area scaled close to isometry, data for several taxa suggest that the pads’ adhesive strength increased for larger animals. The combination of adjustments in relative pad area for distantly related taxa and changes in adhesive strength for closely related groups helps explain how climbing with adhesive pads has evolved in animals varying over seven orders of magnitude in body weight. Our results illustrate the size limits of adhesion-based climbing, with profound implications for large-scale bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:26787862

  18. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  19. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  20. Crystal structure, biochemical and genetic characterization of yeast and E. cuniculi TAF(II)5 N-terminal domain: implications for TFIID assembly.

    PubMed

    Romier, Christophe; James, Nicole; Birck, Catherine; Cavarelli, Jean; Vivarès, Christian; Collart, Martine A; Moras, Dino

    2007-05-18

    General transcription factor TFIID plays an essential role in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II at numerous promoters. However, understanding of the assembly and a full structural characterization of this large 15 subunit complex is lacking. TFIID subunit TAF(II)5 has been shown to be present twice in this complex and to be critical for the function and assembly of TFIID. Especially, the TAF(II)5 N-terminal domain is required for its incorporation within TFIID and immuno-labelling experiments carried out by electron microscopy at low resolution have suggested that this domain might homodimerize, possibly explaining the three-lobed architecture of TFIID. However, the resolution at which the electron microscopy (EM) analyses were conducted is not sufficient to determine whether homodimerization occurs or whether a more intricate assembly implying other subunits is required. Here we report the X-ray structures of the fully evolutionary conserved C-terminal sub-domain of the TAF(II)5 N terminus, from yeast and the mammalian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi. This sub-domain displays a novel fold with specific surfaces having conserved physico-chemical properties that can form protein-protein interactions. Although a crystallographic dimer implying one of these surfaces is present in one of the crystal forms, several biochemical analyses show that this sub-domain is monomeric in solution, even at various salt conditions and in presence of different divalent cations. Consequently, the N-terminal sub-domain of the TAF(II)5 N terminus, which is homologous to a dimerization motif but has not been fully conserved during evolution, was studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and yeast genetics. Our results show that this sub-domain dimerizes at very high concentration but is neither required for yeast viability, nor for incorporation of two TAF(II)5 molecules within TFIID and for the assembly of this complex. Altogether, although our results do not argue in

  1. Redox-sensitive structural change in the A-domain of HMGB1 and its implication for the binding to cisplatin modified DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Tochio, Naoya; Takeuchi, Aya; Uewaki, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The structure of the oxidized A-domain of human HMGB1 was solved. •Phe38 ring was flipped in the oxidized structure from that in the reduced form. •The flipped ring disables the intercalation into the cisplatinated lesions. •The functionally relevant redox-dependent structural change was described. -- Abstract: HMGB1 (high-mobility group B1) is a ubiquitously expressed bifunctional protein that acts as a nuclear protein in cells and also as an inflammatory mediator in the extracellular space. HMGB1 changes its functions according to the redox states in both intra- and extra-cellular environments. Two cysteines, Cys23 and Cys45, in the A-domain of HMGB1 form a disulfide bond under oxidative conditions. The A-domain with the disulfide bond shows reduced affinity to cisplatin modified DNA. We have solved the oxidized A-domain structure by NMR. In the structure, Phe38 has a flipped ring orientation from that found in the reduced form; the phenyl ring in the reduced form intercalates into the platinated lesion in DNA. The phenyl ring orientation in the oxidized form is stabilized through intramolecular hydrophobic contacts. The reorientation of the Phe38 ring by the disulfide bond in the A-domain may explain the reduced HMGB1 binding affinity towards cisplatinated DNA.

  2. Recombinant mussel proximal thread matrix protein promotes osteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee Young; Song, Young Hoon; Foo, Mathias; Seo, Eunseok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Seo, Jeong Hyun

    2016-02-16

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a key load bearing domain for mamalian cell adhesion by binding various macromolecular ligands in extracellular matrix such as, collagens, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans. Interestingly, vWF like domains are also commonly found in load bearing systems of marine organisms such as in underwater adhesive of mussel and sea star, and nacre of marine abalone, and play a critical load bearing function. Recently, Proximal Thread Matrix Protein1 (PTMP1) in mussel composed of two vWF type A like domains has characterized and it is known to bind both mussel collagens and mammalian collagens. Here, we cloned and mass produced a recombinant PTMP1 from E. coli system after switching all the minor codons to the major codons of E. coli. Recombinant PTMP1 has an ability to enhance mouse osteoblast cell adhesion, spreading, and cell proliferation. In addition, PTMP1 showed vWF-like properties as promoting collagen expression as well as binding to collagen type I, subsequently enhanced cell viability. Consequently, we found that recombinant PTMP1 acts as a vWF domain by mediating cell adhesion, spreading, proliferation, and formation of actin cytoskeleton. This study suggests that both mammalian cell adhesion and marine underwater adhesion exploits a strong vWF-collagen interaction for successful wet adhesion. In addition, vWF like domains containing proteins including PTMP1 have a great potential for tissue engineering and the development of biomedical adhesives as a component for extra-cellular matrix.

  3. Selective Uncoupling of P120ctn from E-Cadherin Disrupts Strong Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Molly A.; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Daniel, Juliet M.; Ireton, Reneé C.; Wheelock, Margaret J.; Johnson, Keith R.; Hummingbird, Diana K.; Reynolds, Albert B.

    2000-01-01

    p120ctn is a catenin whose direct binding to the juxtamembrane domain of classical cadherins suggests a role in regulating cell–cell adhesion. The juxtamembrane domain has been implicated in a variety of roles including cadherin clustering, cell motility, and neuronal outgrowth, raising the possibility that p120 mediates these activities. We have generated minimal mutations in this region that uncouple the E-cadherin–p120 interaction, but do not affect interactions with other catenins. By stable transfection into E-cadherin–deficient cell lines, we show that cadherins are both necessary and sufficient for recruitment of p120 to junctions. Detergent-free subcellular fractionation studies indicated that, in contrast to previous reports, the stoichiometry of the interaction is extremely high. Unlike α- and β-catenins, p120 was metabolically stable in cadherin-deficient cells, and was present at high levels in the cytoplasm. Analysis of cells expressing E-cadherin mutant constructs indicated that p120 is required for the E-cadherin–mediated transition from weak to strong adhesion. In aggregation assays, cells expressing p120-uncoupled E-cadherin formed only weak cell aggregates, which immediately dispersed into single cells upon pipetting. As an apparent consequence, the actin cytoskeleton failed to insert properly into peripheral E-cadherin plaques, resulting in the inability to form a continuous circumferential ring around cell colonies. Our data suggest that p120 directly or indirectly regulates the E-cadherin–mediated transition to tight cell–cell adhesion, possibly blocking subsequent events necessary for reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and compaction. PMID:10629228

  4. Crystal structure of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata: implications of domain structure for its membrane pore-formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Eto, Seiichiro; Sugawara, Hajime; Kurisu, Genji; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kusunoki, Masami; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-08-27

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent and galactose-specific lectin purified from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, which exhibits hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities. Six molecules of CEL-III are assumed to oligomerize to form an ion-permeable pore in the cell membrane. We have determined the crystal structure of CELIII by using single isomorphous replacement aided by anomalous scattering in lead at 1.7 A resolution. CEL-III consists of three distinct domains as follows: the N-terminal two carbohydrate-binding domains (1 and 2), which adopt beta-trefoil folds such as the B-chain of ricin and are members of the (QXW)(3) motif family; and domain 3, which is a novel fold composed of two alpha-helices and one beta-sandwich. CEL-III is the first Ca(2+)-dependent lectin structure with two beta-trefoil folds. Despite sharing the structure of the B-chain of ricin, CEL-III binds five Ca(2+) ions at five of the six subdomains in both domains 1 and 2. Considering the relatively high similarity among the five subdomains, they are putative binding sites for galactose-related carbohydrates, although it remains to be elucidated whether bound Ca(2+) is directly involved in interaction with carbohydrates. The paucity of hydrophobic interactions in the interfaces between the domains and biochemical data suggest that these domains rearrange upon carbohydrate binding in the erythrocyte membrane. This conformational change may be responsible for oligomerization of CEL-III molecules and hemolysis in the erythrocyte membranes.

  5. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn{sup 2+}-binding FCD domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David R.; Grossoehme, Nickolas E.; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Giedroc, David P.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2009-04-01

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions but that it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub d} < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  6. Surface wettability plays a significant role in gecko adhesion underwater

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Badge, Ila; Wucinich, Nicholas A.; Sullivan, Timothy W.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although we now have thousands of studies focused on the nano-, micro-, and whole-animal mechanics of gecko adhesion on clean, dry substrates, we know relatively little about the effects of water on gecko adhesion. For many gecko species, however, rainfall frequently wets the natural surfaces they navigate. In an effort to begin closing this gap, we tested the adhesion of geckos on submerged substrates that vary in their wettability. When tested on a wet hydrophilic surface, geckos produced a significantly lower shear adhesive force (5.4 ± 1.33 N) compared with a dry hydrophilic surface (17.1 ± 3.93 N). In tests on an intermediate wetting surface and a hydrophobic surface, we found no difference in shear adhesion between dry and wet contact. Finally, in tests on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), we found that geckos clung significantly better to wet PTFE (8.0 ± 1.09 N) than dry PTFE (1.6 ± 0.66 N). To help explain our results, we developed models based on thermodynamic theory of adhesion for contacting surfaces in different media and found that we can predict the ratio of shear adhesion in water to that in air. Our findings provide insight into how geckos may function in wet environments and also have significant implications for the development of a synthetic gecko mimic that retains adhesion in water. PMID:23576727

  7. Adhesion Molecules in CNS Disorders: Biomarker and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingyi; Chen, Sheng; Klebe, Damon; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence has been provided regarding the crucial role of leukocyte extravasation and subsequent inflammatory response in several central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The infiltrated leukocytes release pro-inflammatory mediators and activate resident cells, leading to tissue injury. Leukocyte-endothelia interaction is critical for leukocyte extravasation and migration from the intravascular space into the tissue during inflammation. The basic physiology of leukocyte-endothelia interaction has been investigated extensively. Traditionally, three kinds of adhesion molecules, selectin, integrin, and immunoglobulin families, are responsible for this multiple-step interaction. Furthermore, blocking adhesion molecule function by genetic knockout, antagonizing antibodies, or inhibitory pharmacological drugs provides neuroprotection, which is associated with a reduction in leukocyte accumulation with in the tissue. Detection of the soluble form of adhesion molecules has also been proven to predict outcomes in CNS disorders. Lately, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), a novel adhesion molecule and endothelial cell surface enzyme, has been implicated as a brake during leukocyte extravasation. In this review, we summarize the functions of traditional adhesion molecules as well as VAP-1 in the leukocyte adhesion cascade. We also discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of adhesion molecules in CNS disorders. PMID:23469854

  8. Surface wettability plays a significant role in gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Badge, Ila; Wucinich, Nicholas A; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-04-16

    Although we now have thousands of studies focused on the nano-, micro-, and whole-animal mechanics of gecko adhesion on clean, dry substrates, we know relatively little about the effects of water on gecko adhesion. For many gecko species, however, rainfall frequently wets the natural surfaces they navigate. In an effort to begin closing this gap, we tested the adhesion of geckos on submerged substrates that vary in their wettability. When tested on a wet hydrophilic surface, geckos produced a significantly lower shear adhesive force (5.4 ± 1.33 N) compared with a dry hydrophilic surface (17.1 ± 3.93 N). In tests on an intermediate wetting surface and a hydrophobic surface, we found no difference in shear adhesion between dry and wet contact. Finally, in tests on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), we found that geckos clung significantly better to wet PTFE (8.0 ± 1.09 N) than dry PTFE (1.6 ± 0.66 N). To help explain our results, we developed models based on thermodynamic theory of adhesion for contacting surfaces in different media and found that we can predict the ratio of shear adhesion in water to that in air. Our findings provide insight into how geckos may function in wet environments and also have significant implications for the development of a synthetic gecko mimic that retains adhesion in water.

  9. Flexibilized copolyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Two copolyimides, LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2, with flexible backbones were processed and characterized as adhesives. The processability and adhesive properties were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the three polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to water-boil and to thermal aging at 204 C for up to 1000 hours. The three adhesive systems possess exceptional lap shear strengths at room temperature and elevated temperatures both before and after thermal exposure. LARC-STPI, because of its high glass transition temperature provided high lap shear strengths up to 260 C. After water-boil, LARC-TPI exhibited the highest lap shear strengths at room temperature and 177 C, whereas the LARC-STPI retained a higher percentage of its original strength when tested at 204 C. These flexible thermoplastic copolyimides show considerable potential as adhesives based on this study and because of the ease of preparation with low cost, commercially available materials.

  10. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  11. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  12. Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors: elusive hybrids come of age.

    PubMed

    Simundza, Julia; Cowin, Pamela

    2013-12-01

    Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most recently identified and least understood subfamily of GPCRs. Adhesion GPCRs are characterized by unusually long ectodomains with adhesion-related repeats that facilitate cell- cell and cell-cell matrix contact, as well as a proteolytic cleavage site-containing domain that is a structural hallmark of the family. Their unusual chimeric structure of adhesion-related ectodomain with a seven-pass transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic signaling makes these proteins highly versatile in mediating cellular signaling in response to extracellular adhesion or cell motility events. The ligand binding and cytoplasmic signaling modes for members of this family are beginning to be elucidated, and recent studies have demonstrated critical roles for Adhesion GPCRs in planar polarity and other important cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during development and morphogenesis, as well as heritable diseases and cancer.

  13. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  15. The clinical performance of adhesives.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Perdigão, J; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1998-01-01

    Traditional mechanical methods of retaining restorative materials have been replaced to a large extent by tooth conserving adhesive restorative techniques. Because adhesives have been evolving so rapidly for the last few years, the timing is right for evaluating the clinical status of present day adhesives. Current literature with regard to the clinical performance of adhesives has been reviewed. An overview of currently available adhesive systems is provided and a categorization of these adhesives according to their clinical application procedure and their intended mechanism of adhesion is proposed. Parameters of direct relevance to the clinical effectiveness of adhesives are discussed in relation to the clinical effectiveness of today's adhesives. The clinical performance of present day adhesives has significantly improved, allowing adhesive restorations to be placed with a high predictable level of clinical success. Most modern adhesive systems are superior to their predecessors, especially in terms of retention that is no longer the main cause of premature clinical failure. Recent adhesives also appear less sensitive to substrate and other clinical co-variables. As the remaining major shortcoming of modern adhesives, none of these modern systems however appears yet to be able to guarantee hermetically sealed restorations with margins free of discoloration for a long time.

  16. Structure and activity of JAC1 J-domain implicate the involvement of the cochaperone activity with HSC70 in chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takano, Akira; Kohda, Daisuke; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-12-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement towards weak light and away from strong light is essential for plants to adapt to the fluctuation of ambient light conditions. In the previous study, we showed that blue light receptor phototropins mediated blue light-induced chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis by regulating short actin filaments localized at the chloroplast periphery (cp-actin filaments) rather than actin cables in the cytoplasm. However, the signaling pathway for the chloroplast photorelocation movement is still unclear. We also identified JAC1 (J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1) as an essential component for the accumulation response and dark positioning in Arabidopsis. We recently determined the crystal structure of the J-domain of JAC1. The JAC1 J-domain has a positively charged surface, which forms a putative interface with the Hsc70 chaperone by analogy to that of bovine auxilin. Furthermore, the mutation of the highly conserved HPD motif in the JAC1 J-domain impaired the in vivo activity of JAC1. These data suggest that JAC1 cochaperone activity with HSC70 is essential for chloroplast photorelocation movement.

  17. Transformation of the mechanism of triple-helix peptide folding in the absence of a C-terminal nucleation domain and its implications for mutations in collagen disorders.

    PubMed

    Buevich, Alexei V; Silva, Teresita; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2004-11-05

    Folding abnormalities of the triple helix have been demonstrated in collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta in which the mutation leads to the substitution of a single Gly in the (Gly-X-Y)n sequence pattern by a larger residue. Model peptides can be used to clarify the details of normal collagen folding and the consequences of the interruption of that folding by a Gly substitution. NMR and CD studies show that placement of a (GPO)4 nucleation domain at the N terminus rather than the C terminus of a native collagen sequence allows the formation of a stable triple helix but alters the folding mechanism. Although C- to N-terminal directional folding occurs when the nucleation domain is at the C terminus, there is no preferential folding direction when the nucleation domain is at the N terminus. The lack of zipper-like directional folding does not interfere with triple-helix formation, and when a Gly residue is replaced by Ser to model an osteogenesis imperfecta mutation, the peptide with the N-terminal (GPO)4 domain can still form a good triple helix N-terminal to the mutation site. These peptide studies raise the possibility that mutant collagen could fold in a C to N direction in a zipper-like manner up to the mutation site and that completion of the triple helix N-terminal to the mutation would involve an alternative mechanism.

  18. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  19. Electrostatics effects on Ca(2+) binding and conformational changes in EF-hand domains: Functional implications for EF-hand proteins.

    PubMed

    Ababou, Abdessamad; Zaleska, Mariola

    2015-12-01

    Mutations of Gln41 and Lys75 with nonpolar residues in the N-terminal domain of calmodulin (N-Cam) revealed the importance of solvation energetics in conformational change of Ca(2+) sensor EF-hand domains. While in general these domains have polar residues at these corresponding positions yet the extent of their conformational response to Ca(2+) binding and their Ca(2+) binding affinity can be different from N-Cam. Consequently, here we address the charge state of the polar residues at these positions. The results show that the charge state of these polar residues can affect substantially the conformational change and the Ca(2+) binding affinity of our N-Cam variants. Since all the variants kept their conformational activity in the presence of Ca(2+) suggests that the differences observed among them mainly originate from the difference in their molecular dynamics. Hence we propose that the molecular dynamics of Ca(2+) sensor EF-hand domains is a key factor in the multifunctional aspect of EF-hand proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Models of the Joint Structure of Domain-Related and Global Distress: Implications for the Reconciliation of Quality of Life and Mental Health Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, William; St-Arnaud, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Research on subjective wellbeing includes studies of both domain-related and global distress. The mental health literature, though, focuses almost exclusively on global distress. This seems to be partly due to a common belief that psychological distress, and the moods that comprise distress, necessarily lack referential content. However, if that…

  1. Divergence in substrate specificity by the vOTU domain of various strains of highly-pathogenic PRRSV and the implications to pathogenicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is widespread with a high variation in sequence and virulence among the divergent strains and causes an economically destructive disease. A viral ovarian domain protease (vOTU) has been previously identified within the nonstructural protein...

  2. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  3. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  4. Tracing the Origin of the Fungal α1 Domain Places Its Ancestor in the HMG-Box Superfamily: Implication for Fungal Mating-Type Evolution

    PubMed Central

    van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Dixelius, Christina; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Debuchy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Fungal mating types in self-incompatible Pezizomycotina are specified by one of two alternate sequences occupying the same locus on corresponding chromosomes. One sequence is characterized by a gene encoding an HMG protein, while the hallmark of the other is a gene encoding a protein with an α1 domain showing similarity to the Matα1p protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA-binding HMG proteins are ubiquitous and well characterized. In contrast, α1 domain proteins have limited distribution and their evolutionary origin is obscure, precluding a complete understanding of mating-type evolution in Ascomycota. Although much work has focused on the role of the S. cerevisiae Matα1p protein as a transcription factor, it has not yet been placed in any of the large families of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We present sequence comparisons, phylogenetic analyses, and in silico predictions of secondary and tertiary structures, which support our hypothesis that the α1 domain is related to the HMG domain. We have also characterized a new conserved motif in α1 proteins of Pezizomycotina. This motif is immediately adjacent to and downstream of the α1 domain and consists of a core sequence Y-[LMIF]-x(3)-G-[WL] embedded in a larger conserved motif. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that extant α1-box genes originated from an ancestral HMG gene, which confirms the current model of mating-type evolution within the fungal kingdom. We propose to incorporate α1 proteins in a new subclass of HMG proteins termed MATα_HMG. PMID:21170349

  5. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  6. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  7. Domain structure and function of matrix metalloprotease 23 (MMP23): role in potassium channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Galea, Charles A; Nguyen, Hai M; George Chandy, K; Smith, Brian J; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-04-01

    MMP23 is a member of the matrix metalloprotease family of zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which are involved in a wide variety of cellular functions. Its catalytic domain displays a high degree of structural homology with those of other metalloproteases, but its atypical domain architecture suggests that it may possess unique functional properties. The N-terminal MMP23 pro-domain contains a type-II transmembrane domain that anchors the protein to the plasma membrane and lacks the cysteine-switch motif that is required to maintain other MMPs in a latent state during passage to the cell surface. Instead of the C-terminal hemopexin domain common to other MMPs, MMP23 contains a small toxin-like domain (TxD) and an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule (IgCAM) domain. The MMP23 pro-domain can trap Kv1.3 but not closely-related Kv1.2 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, preventing their passage to the cell surface, while the TxD can bind to the channel pore and block the passage of potassium ions. The MMP23 C-terminal IgCAM domain displays some similarity to Ig-like C2-type domains found in IgCAMs of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which are known to mediate protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. MMP23 and Kv1.3 are co-expressed in a variety of tissues and together are implicated in diseases including cancer and inflammatory disorders. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism of action of this unique member of the MMP family.

  8. Natural Underwater Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Ransom, Todd C; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)(3) coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  9. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  10. Adhesion of D. discoideum on Hydrophobic Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Ploscariu, Nicoleta

    2015-03-01

    Adhesion by amoeboid cells, such as D. discoideum, is poorly understood but critical for other behaviors such as phagocytosis and migration. Furthermore, both leucocytes and breast cancer cells employ the amoeboid mode of movement at various points in their life-cycles. Hence, improved knowledge of amoeboid adhesion may lead to be new strategies for controlling other important cellular processes. This study regards adhesion by D. discoideum on silanized glass substrates. Reflection interference contrast microscopy is used in conjunction with other methods to determine the contact angle, cell-medium interfacial energy, and adhesion energy of these cells. The contact angle of individual cells settling under gravity onto a substrate is observed to increase as the size of the contact patch increases. This behavior occurs on slower time-scales than expected for the settling of inert vesicles. The implications of this observation on the nature of the underlying forces will be discussed. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-646966.

  11. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  12. Cell adhesion under flow.

    PubMed

    Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion under flow is a central function of the microcirculation during inflammation, hemostasis, and immune regulation. This special issue of Microcirculation explores the common and distinct mechanisms that myeloid cells, lymphocytes, platelets, and sickle erythrocytes use to adhere to microvascular endothelium and the underlying basement membrane structures. A common theme in these processes is the need for rapid integrin activation, often initiated by binding of ligands to their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, followed by adhesion strengthening associated with integrin redistribution and outside-in signaling. These elements have been identified for all cells tested except sickle erythrocytes.

  13. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  14. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts.

    PubMed

    Torres, J R; Jay, G D; Kim, K-S; Bothun, G D

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  15. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  16. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  17. Bistable regulation of integrin adhesiveness by a bipolar metal ion cluster.

    PubMed

    Chen, JianFeng; Salas, Azucena; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-12-01

    Integrin alpha(4)beta(7) mediates rolling adhesion in Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) + Mg(2+), and firm adhesion in Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), mimicking the two key steps in leukocyte accumulation in inflamed vasculature. We mutated an interlinked linear array of three divalent cation-binding sites present in integrin beta-subunit I-like domains. The middle, metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) is required for both rolling and firm adhesion. One polar site, that adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS), is required for rolling because its mutation results in firm adhesion. The other polar site, the ligand-induced metal binding site (LIMBS), is required for firm adhesion because its mutation results in rolling. The LIMBS mediates the positive regulatory effects of low Ca(2+) concentrations, whereas the ADMIDAS mediates the negative regulatory effects of higher Ca(2+) concentrations, which are competed by Mn(2+). The bipolar sites thus stabilize two alternative phases of adhesion.

  18. Cutting Edge: Molecular Structure of the IL-1R-Associated Kinase-4 Death Domain and Its Implications for TLR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lasker, Michael V.; Gajjar, Mark M.; Nair, Satish K.

    2010-07-19

    IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) 4 is an essential component of innate immunity. IRAK-4 deficiency in mice and humans results in severe impairment of IL-1 and TLR signaling. We have solved the crystal structure for the death domain of Mus musculus IRAK-4 to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first glimpse of the structural details of a mammalian IRAK family member. The crystal structure reveals a six-helical bundle with a prominent loop, which among IRAKs and Pelle, a Drosophila homologue, is unique to IRAK-4. This highly structured loop contained between helices two and three, comprises an 11-aa stretch. Although innate immune domain recognition is thought to be very similar between Drosophila and mammals, this structural component points to a drastic difference. This structure can be used as a framework for future mutation and deletion studies and potential drug design.

  19. Distribution of CpG Motifs in Upstream Gene Domains in a Reef Coral and Sea Anemone: Implications for Epigenetics in Cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Adam G; Hoadley, Kenneth D; Warner, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are under assault from stressors including global warming, ocean acidification, and urbanization. Knowing how these factors impact the future fate of reefs requires delineating stress responses across ecological, organismal and cellular scales. Recent advances in coral reef biology have integrated molecular processes with ecological fitness and have identified putative suites of temperature acclimation genes in a Scleractinian coral Acropora hyacinthus. We wondered what unique characteristics of these genes determined their coordinate expression in response to temperature acclimation, and whether or not other corals and cnidarians would likewise possess these features. Here, we focus on cytosine methylation as an epigenetic DNA modification that is responsive to environmental stressors. We identify common conserved patterns of cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) motif frequencies in upstream promoter domains of different functional gene groups in two cnidarian genomes: a coral (Acropora digitifera) and an anemone (Nematostella vectensis). Our analyses show that CpG motif frequencies are prominent in the promoter domains of functional genes associated with environmental adaptation, particularly those identified in A. hyacinthus. Densities of CpG sites in upstream promoter domains near the transcriptional start site (TSS) are 1.38x higher than genomic background levels upstream of -2000 bp from the TSS. The increase in CpG usage suggests selection to allow for DNA methylation events to occur more frequently within 1 kb of the TSS. In addition, observed shifts in CpG densities among functional groups of genes suggests a potential role for epigenetic DNA methylation within promoter domains to impact functional gene expression responses in A. digitifera and N. vectensis. Identifying promoter epigenetic sequence motifs among genes within specific functional groups establishes an approach to describe integrated cellular responses to enviro