Science.gov

Sample records for adhesive failure mechanisms

  1. Failure mechanisms of fibrin-based surgical tissue adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, David Hugh

    A series of studies was performed to investigate the potential impact of heterogeneity in the matrix of multiple-component fibrin-based tissue adhesives upon their mechanical and biomechanical properties both in vivo and in vitro. Investigations into the failure mechanisms by stereological techniques demonstrated that heterogeneity could be measured quantitatively and that the variation in heterogeneity could be altered both by the means of component mixing and delivery and by the formulation of the sealant. Ex vivo tensile adhesive strength was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of heterogeneity. In contrast, in vivo tensile wound-closure strength was found to be relatively unaffected by the degree of heterogeneity, while in vivo parenchymal organ hemostasis in rabbits was found to be affected: greater heterogeneity appeared to correlate with an increase in hemostasis time and amount of sealant necessary to effect hemostasis. Tensile testing of the bulk sealant showed that mechanical parameters were proportional to fibrin concentration and that the physical characteristics of the failure supported a ductile mechanism. Strain hardening as a function of percentage of strain, and strain rate was observed for both concentrations, and syneresis was observed at low strain rates for the lower fibrin concentration. Blister testing demonstrated that burst pressure and failure energy were proportional to fibrin concentration and decreased with increasing flow rate. Higher fibrin concentration demonstrated predominately compact morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, demonstrating shear or viscous failure in a viscoelastic rubbery adhesive. The lower fibrin concentration sealant exhibited predominately fractal morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, supporting an elastoviscous material condition. The failure mechanism for these was hypothesized and shown to be flow-induced ductile fracture. Based on these findings, the failure mechanism was

  2. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  3. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  4. Mechanics of Nascent Cell Adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2009-03-01

    Cells have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical and biochemical cues from their environment. In neurons, the binding and restraint of transmembrane cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) can trigger acute periods of axon growth. Preceding growth, the cell must create a stiff mechanical linkage between the CAM and the cytoskeleton. Using holographic optical tweezers, we manipulate CAM-coated beads on the membrane of the cell. We investigate the dynamics of the mechanical properties of this linkage as a function of time, applied force, and CAM density. We find that CAM-coated beads exhibit stochastic intermittent binding to the cytoskeleton. In time, we observed that the adhesions stiffen and their mechanical properties depend on the applied force. Treatment of cells with small molecules that alter cytoskeletal dynamics are used to probe the roles of actin filament assembly and myosin motor activity in adhesion formation.

  5. Predicting Failure Initiation in Structural Adhesive Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-15

    Elastoplástico de Adhesivos – Modeling, characterization and simulation of the elastoplastic behavior of adhesives. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales...adhesive and a 1018 steel”. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales. Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C. May 2012.  Abstract: In the

  6. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown.

  7. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  8. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  9. Failure Mode/Mechanism Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Boards: Flashover (24996-000,NR) Broken NR Terminal Boards: Mechanical Breakage (24996-000,NR) Cortact Failure MR Terminals: (Intermittent contact... mechanism data on of various discrete semiconductor device types. The data has been compiled from reports of reliability demonstration tests conducted in...Room 3C0, Fnrbes Bu ilinn. Order No. FMD-91 Failure Mode/ Mechanism Distributions DTiC QUALIi INSPECTED 5 1991 Ace 94taa Yor SNTTS ai Prepared by: ,= t

  10. Two distinct mechanisms of fibroblast adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, P. A.; Juliano, R. L.

    1981-03-01

    The adhesion of cells to the connective tissue matrix is commonly thought to be governed by fibronectin, a pericellular glycoprotein with binding sites for cell surfaces, collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Here we report evidence that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells possess an alternative mechanism for adhesion which is independent of fibronectin. Cells of a variant CHO clone called ADVF11 are defective in their ability to adhere to fibronectin-coated substrata, but can adhere to a substratum coated with SAM (substrate-attached material), a pericellular material produced by fibroblasts. The adhesion of wild-type CHO cells to fibronectin-coated substrata and adhesion of ADVF11 cells to SAM-coated substrata are differentially sensitive to proteolytic treatment. This suggests that there are two distinct adhesion mechanisms for CHO cells, only one of which is dependent on fibronectin.

  11. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  12. Single-molecule mechanics of mussel adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin; Scherer, Norbert F.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2006-08-01

    The glue proteins secreted by marine mussels bind strongly to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments in which most adhesives function poorly. Studies of these functionally unique proteins have revealed the presence of the unusual amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), which is formed by posttranslational modification of tyrosine. However, the detailed binding mechanisms of dopa remain unknown, and the chemical basis for mussels' ability to adhere to both inorganic and organic surfaces has never been fully explained. Herein, we report a single-molecule study of the substrate and oxidation-dependent adhesive properties of dopa. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of a single dopa residue contacting a wet metal oxide surface reveal a surprisingly high strength yet fully reversible, noncovalent interaction. The magnitude of the bond dissociation energy as well as the inability to observe this interaction with tyrosine suggests that dopa is critical to adhesion and that the binding mechanism is not hydrogen bond formation. Oxidation of dopa, as occurs during curing of the secreted mussel glue, dramatically reduces the strength of the interaction to metal oxide but results in high strength irreversible covalent bond formation to an organic surface. A new picture of the interfacial adhesive role of dopa emerges from these studies, in which dopa exploits a remarkable combination of high strength and chemical multifunctionality to accomplish adhesion to substrates of widely varying composition from organic to metallic. 3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine | atomic force microscopy | mussel adhesive protein

  13. Adhesive bond failure monitoring with triboluminescent optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohag, Md Abu S.; Hammel, Emily C.; Olawale, David O.; Okoli, Okenwa O.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most severe damage modes in modern wind turbines is the failure of the adhesive joints in the trailing edge of the large composite blades. The geometrical shape of the blade and current manufacturing techniques make the trailing edge of the wind turbine blade more sensitive to damage. Failure to timely detect this damage type may result in catastrophic failures, expensive system downtime, and high repair costs. A novel sensing system called the In-situ Triboluminescent Optical Fiber (ITOF) sensor has been proposed for monitoring the initiation and propagation of disbonds in composite adhesive joints. The ITOF sensor combines the triboluminescent property of ZnS:Mn with the many desirable features of optical fiber to provide in-situ and distributed damage sensing in large composite structures like the wind blades. Unlike other sensor systems, the ITOF sensor does not require a power source at the sensing location or for transmitting damage-induced signals to the hub of the wind turbine. Composite parts will be fabricated and the ITOF integrated within the bondline to provide in-situ and real time damage sensing. Samples of the fabricated composite parts with integrated ITOF will be subjected to tensile and flexural loads, and the response from the integrated sensors will be monitored and analyzed to characterize the performance of the ITOF sensor as a debonding damage monitoring system. In addition, C-scan and optical microscopy will be employed to gain greater insights into the damage propagation behavior and the signals received from the ITOF sensors.

  14. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  15. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  16. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  17. Physics of Cell Adhesion Failure and Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    Emergent phenomena in living systems, including your ability to read these lines, do not obviously follow as a consequence of the fundamental laws of physics. Understanding the physics of living systems clearly falls outside the conventional boundaries of scientific disciplines and requires a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach. Here I will discuss how theoretical and computational techniques from statistical physics can be used to make progress in explaining the physical mechanisms that underlie complex biological phenomena, including major diseases. In the specific cases of macular degeneration and cancer that we have studied recently, we find that the breakdown of the mechanical stability in the local tissue structure caused by weakening of the cell-cell adhesion plays a key role in the initiation and progression of the disease. This finding can help in the development of new therapies that would prevent or halt the initiation and progression of these diseases.

  18. ADHESION OF AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES BONDED TO DENTIN: A STUDY IN FAILURE MODALITY

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims As a bioactive filler capable of remineralizing tooth structures, the main disadvantage of as-made amorphous calcium phosphate (am-ACP) are its large agglomerates. The objective of this study was to mill ACP, and compare the adhesive strength to dentin, work to fracture, and failure modes of both groups to glass-filled composites and one commercial compomer after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months of exposure to simulated saliva solution (SLS). Flat dentin surfaces were acid-etched, primed, and photopolymerized. Composites were applied, photo-cured, and debonded in shear. The resin used in each composite was identical: ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloxyethyl phthalate. Fillers consisted of am-ACP and milled ACP (m-ACP), and a strontium-containing glass (Sr-glass) at respective mass fractions of (40, 60, and 75) %. Findings 90 % of the fracture surfaces in this study showed adhesive failure, with most of these occurring at the dentin/primer interface. 52 % of failures after 24 h immersion occurred at the primer/composite interface. After six months of SLS exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin/primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. Conclusions Milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over am-ACP composites and the compomer, and produced a higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. Evidence is provided which suggests that milled ACP composites may offer enhanced potential in clinical bonding applications. PMID:19107798

  19. Mechanical properties of Hysol EA-9394 structural adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D.; Stavig, M.E.

    1995-02-01

    Dextor`s Hysol EA-9394 is a room temperature curable paste adhesive representative of the adhesives used in wind turbine blade joints. A mechanical testing program has been performed to characterize this adhesive. Tension, compression stress relaxation, flexural, butt tensile, and fracture toughness test results are reported.

  20. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio; Sato, Chiaki

    2015-12-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified.

  1. Mechanical Failure Prognosis Through Oil Debris Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    AD/A-006 19U MECHANICAL FAILURE PROGNOSIS THROUGH OIL DEBRIS MONITORING Alan Beex"bower Exxon Research and Engineering Company Prepared...PERIOD COVERED Final Report 18 June 1973 to 1 August 197A 4. TITLE (•«id Subl/rl«) MECHANICAL FAILURE PROGNOSIS THROUGH OIL DEBRIS ...Company project entitled "Mechanical Failure Prognosis through Debris Analysis." This study was conducted for the Eustis Directorate, U.S. Army Air

  2. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    PubMed

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  3. Molecular mechanisms regulating CD13-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mallika; Gerber, Claire; Rahman, M Mamunur; Vernier, Kaitlyn M; Pereira, Flavia E; Subramani, Jaganathan; Caromile, Leslie A; Shapiro, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    CD13/Aminopeptidase N is a transmembrane metalloproteinase that is expressed in many tissues where it regulates various cellular functions. In inflammation, CD13 is expressed on myeloid cells, is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation and mediates monocyte/endothelial adhesion by homotypic interactions. In animal models the lack of CD13 alters the profiles of infiltrating inflammatory cells at sites of ischaemic injury. Here, we found that CD13 expression is enriched specifically on the pro-inflammatory subset of monocytes, suggesting that CD13 may regulate trafficking and function of specific subsets of immune cells. To further dissect the mechanisms regulating CD13-dependent trafficking we used the murine model of thioglycollate-induced sterile peritonitis. Peritoneal monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells were significantly decreased in inflammatory exudates from global CD13KO animals when compared with wild-type controls. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of wild-type and CD13KO primary myeloid cells, or wild-type myeloid cells pre-treated with CD13-blocking antibodies into thioglycollate-challenged wild-type recipients demonstrated fewer CD13KO or treated cells in the lavage, suggesting that CD13 expression confers a competitive advantage in trafficking. Similarly, both wild-type and CD13KO cells were reduced in infiltrates in CD13KO recipients, confirming that both monocytic and endothelial CD13 contribute to trafficking. Finally, murine monocyte cell lines expressing mouse/human chimeric CD13 molecules demonstrated that the C-terminal domain of the protein mediates CD13 adhesion. Therefore, this work verifies that the altered inflammatory trafficking in CD13KO mice is the result of aberrant myeloid cell subset trafficking and further defines the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:24627994

  4. On the mechanical properties of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adhesives.

    PubMed

    Berchane, N S; Andrews, M J; Kerr, S; Slater, N K H; Jebrail, F F

    2008-04-01

    Biological adhesives, natural and synthetic, are of current active interest. These adhesives offer significant advantages over traditional sealant techniques, in particular, they are easier to use, and can play an integral part in the healing mechanism of tissue. Thus, biological adhesives can play a major role in medical applications if they possess adequate mechanical behavior and stability over time. In this work, we report on the method of preparation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) into a biological adhesive. We present quantitative measurements that show the effect of BSA concentration and cross-linker content on the bonding strength of BSA adhesive to wood. A comparison is then made with synthetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) adhesive, and a commercial cyanoacrylate glue, which was used as a control adhesive. In addition, BSA samples were prepared and characterized for their water content, tensile strength, and elasticity. We show that on dry surface, BSA adhesive exhibits a high bonding strength that is comparable with non-biological commercial cyanoacrylate glues, and synthetic PGMA adhesive. Tensile testing on wet wood showed a slight increase in the bonding strength of BSA adhesive, a considerable decrease in the bonding strength of cyanoacrylate glue, and negligible adhesion of PGMA. Tests performed on BSA samples demonstrate that initial BSA concentration and final water content have a significant effect on the stress-strain behavior of the samples.

  5. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  6. Mechanical behavior of adhesive joints subjected to cyclic thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Humfeld, G.R.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stresses induced in bimaterial systems due to changing temperature has been the subject of much study since the publication of Timoshenko`s classic paper of 1925. An adhesive bond is one example of a bimaterial system in which thermal stress can play an important role. However, adhesives are viscoelastic in nature, and their mechanical behavior is dictated by the temperature- and time-dependence of their material properties; analytical solutions for elastic materials do not adequately describe their true behavior. The effect of the adhesive`s viscoelasticity on stress in an adhesive bond subjected to changing temperature is therefore of compelling interest and importance for the adhesives industry. The objective of this research is to develop an understanding of the viscoelastic effect in an adhesive bond subjected to cycling temperature, particularly when the temperature range spans a transition temperature of the adhesive. Numerical modeling of a simplified geometry was first undertaken to isolate the influence of viscoelasticity on the stress state from any particular specimen geometry effect. Finite element modeling was then undertaken to examine the mechanical behavior of the adhesive in a layered geometry. Both solution methods predicted development of residual tensile stresses in the adhesive. For the layered geometry this was found to correspond with residual tensile peel stresses, which are thought to be the cause of interfacial debonding.

  7. Field failure mechanisms for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, L. N.; Shumka, A.

    1981-01-01

    Beginning in 1976, Department of Energy field centers have installed and monitored a number of field tests and application experiments using current state-of-the-art photovoltaic modules. On-site observations of module physical and electrical degradation, together with in-depth laboratory analysis of failed modules, permits an overall assessment of the nature and causes of early field failures. Data on failure rates are presented, and key failure mechanisms are analyzed with respect to origin, effect, and prospects for correction. It is concluded that all failure modes identified to date are avoidable or controllable through sound design and production practices.

  8. Postsurgical intrapericardial adhesions: mechanisms of formation and prevention.

    PubMed

    Cannata, Aldo; Petrella, Duccio; Russo, Claudio Francesco; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Fratto, Pasquale; Gambacorta, Marcello; Martinelli, Luigi

    2013-05-01

    Postsurgical intrapericardial adhesions are still considered an unavoidable consequence of cardiothoracic operations. They increase the technical difficulty and the risk of reoperations. The pathogenesis of postsurgical adhesions is a multistep process, and the main key players are (1) loss of mesothelial cells, (2) accumulation of fibrin in areas devoid of mesothelial cells, (3) loss of normal pericardial fibrinolysis, and (4) local inflammation. Today, very promising methods to reduce adhesions are available for clinical use. This report reviews the process of formation of adhesions and the methods to prevent them, classified according to the mechanism of action.

  9. Failure analysis of adhesively bonded composite joint: an elasto-plastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S. C.; Kishore, N. N.; Iyengar, N. G. R.

    1993-09-01

    Joints are important load transferring members in large assembled structures. In joining similar and dissimilar materials, the use of adhesives offers many advantages when compared to other conventional methods. Most commonly used adhesives are the polymers, which exhibit nonlinear behavior. Finite element analysis with paired nodes along the crack path is employed to predict the crack initiation and growth leading to failure. The bond strength is predicted by investigating the possibility of propagation of a crack at the interface of adherend and adhesive. Paired nodes are opened in a sequence, modelling the crack growth. The adhesive is treated to be elasto-plastic for its response. Effect of the parameters such as, stacking sequences in composite adherend, crack growth locations, bond length, bond thicknesses and adhesive stiffnesses on the failure load is studied. The growth of plastic zone as the crack propagates is also examined. On the basis of this study optimal geometrical and material parameters are suggested. The elasto-plastic analysis predicts higher failure loads as compared to linear elastic analysis. The computed bond strength assuming elastic behavior for the adhesive shows satisfactory comparison with experimental results.

  10. IUD failures--possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barwin, B N; Gillieson, M

    1983-09-01

    Failure rates with IUDs have decreased markedly due to better design and increased surface area, as well as the addition of copper and progesterone agents. There is a constant pregnancy rate for all devices varying between 0.7 and 3.6 for 100 woman years' use. Ultrasound scans were carried out in 23 patients with positive pregnancy tests. With the exception of 5 pregnancies, 18 IUDs were located in the lower segment of the uterus below the gestational sac. This was probably as a result of 1 or more of the following: poor IUD positioning, partial expulsion of the IUD, malposition of IUD, abnormal geometry of the uterine cavity, myometrial contractions, impeded or diminished immunological response to a foreign body, antiprostaglandins, and rate of calcium or other deposits on the copper IUD. When the IUD was below the gestational sac as demonstrated by ultrasound, IUD removal resulted in no spontaneous abortions.

  11. The Mechanisms of Adhesion of Enteromorpha Clathrata.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-24

    the mobilities at different values of pH: pH 2-3 Glycine hydrochloride -glycine pH 4-5 Acetic acid-sodium acetate ,. . .. .,:,.o.-,-. -o...wall, while glucose was much higher in the cell wall. Glucosamine was found only in the cell wall. The chemical analysis of the cell wall of E...Adhesive Material. Fucose Galactose Glucose Glucosamine Total • pg pg pg ,pg pg Adhesive 13.78 1.597 87.741 103.1 Cell Wall 7.5 0.73 95.7 7.5 110.7 ’ .4

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Right Ventricular Failure

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sushma; Bernstein, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An abundance of data has provided insight into the mechanisms underlying the development of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and its progression to LV failure. In contrast, there is minimal data on the adaptation of the right ventricle (RV) to pressure and volume overload and the transition to RV failure. This is a critical clinical question, as the RV is uniquely at risk in many patients with repaired or palliated congenital heart disease and in those with pulmonary hypertension. Standard heart failure therapies have failed to improve function or survival in these patients, suggesting a divergence in the molecular mechanisms of RV vs. LV failure. Although, on the cellular level, the remodeling responses of the RV and LV to pressure overload are largely similar, there are several key differences: the stressed RV is more susceptible to oxidative stress, has a reduced angiogenic response, and is more likely to activate cell death pathways than the stressed LV. Together, these differences could explain the more rapid progression of the RV to failure vs. the LV. This review will highlight known molecular differences between the RV and LV responses to hemodynamic stress, the unique stressors on the RV associated with congenital heart disease, and the need to better understand these molecular mechanisms if we are to develop RV-specific heart failure therapeutics. PMID:26527692

  13. Adhesion Failure at 180 000 Frames per Second: Direct Observation of the Detachment Process of a Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Kovalev, Alexander E.; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2013-09-01

    Nature has successfully evolved the mushroom-shaped contact geometry in many organisms in order to solve the attachment problem. We studied the detachment process of individual bioinspired artificial mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructures (MSAMSs) resolving the failure dynamics at high spatiotemporal resolution. The experimental data provide strong evidence for a homogeneous stress distribution in MSAMS, which was recently proposed. Our results allow us to explain the advantage of such contact geometry and provide a suggestion for the widely observed mushroom-shaped contact geometry.

  14. Mechanically Robust, Negative-Swelling, Mussel-Inspired Tissue Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Devin G.; Bushnell, Grace G.

    2013-01-01

    Most synthetic polymer hydrogel tissue adhesives and sealants swell considerably in physiologic conditions, which can result in mechanical weakening and adverse medical complications. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of mechanically tough zero- or negative-swelling mussel-inspired surgical adhesives based on catechol-modified amphiphilic poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers. The formation, swelling, bulk mechanical, and tissue adhesive properties of the resulting thermosensitive gels were characterized. Catechol oxidation at or below room temperature rapidly resulted in a chemically cross-linked network, with subsequent warming to physiological temperature inducing a thermal hydrophobic transition in the PPO domains and providing a mechanism for volumetric reduction and mechanical toughening. The described approach can be easily adapted for other thermally sensitive block copolymers and cross-linking strategies, representing a general approach that can be employed to control swelling and enhance mechanical properties of polymer hydrogels used in a medical context. PMID:23184616

  15. Sticky Matrix: Adhesion Mechanism of the Staphylococcal Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin.

    PubMed

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Feuillie, Cécile; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Kucharíková, Soňa; Lasa, Iñigo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The development of bacterial biofilms on surfaces leads to hospital-acquired infections that are difficult to fight. In Staphylococci, the cationic polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) forms an extracellular matrix that connects the cells together during biofilm formation, but the molecular forces involved are unknown. Here, we use advanced force nanoscopy techniques to unravel the mechanism of PIA-mediated adhesion in a clinically relevant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of the structure, adhesion, and elasticity of bacteria expressing PIA shows that the cells are surrounded by a soft and adhesive matrix of extracellular polymers. Cell surface softness and adhesion are dramatically reduced in mutant cells deficient for the synthesis of PIA or under unfavorable growth conditions. Single-cell force spectroscopy demonstrates that PIA promotes cell-cell adhesion via the multivalent electrostatic interaction with polyanionic teichoic acids on the S. aureus cell surface. This binding mechanism rationalizes, at the nanoscale, the well-known ability of PIA to strengthen intercellular adhesion in staphylococcal biofilms. Force nanoscopy offers promising prospects for understanding the fundamental forces in antibiotic-resistant biofilms and for designing anti-adhesion compounds targeting matrix polymers.

  16. Extracellular matrix-specific focal adhesions in vascular smooth muscle produce mechanically active adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Hill, Michael A.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the physiological control of tissue blood flow and vascular resistance. To test whether force applied to specific extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin interactions could induce myogenic-like mechanical activity at focal adhesion sites, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to apply controlled forces to specific ECM adhesion sites on arteriolar VSMCs. The tip of AFM probes were fused with a borosilicate bead (2∼5 μm) coated with fibronectin (FN), collagen type I (CNI), laminin (LN), or vitronectin (VN). ECM-coated beads induced clustering of α5- and β3-integrins and actin filaments at sites of bead-cell contact indicative of focal adhesion formation. Step increases of an upward (z-axis) pulling force (800∼1,600 pN) applied to the bead-cell contact site for FN-specific focal adhesions induced a myogenic-like, force-generating response from the VSMC, resulting in a counteracting downward pull by the cell. This micromechanical event was blocked by cytochalasin D but was enhanced by jasplakinolide. Function-blocking antibodies to α5β1- and αvβ3-integrins also blocked the micromechanical cell event in a concentration-dependent manner. Similar pulling experiments with CNI, VN, or LN failed to induce myogenic-like micromechanical events. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mechanical force applied to integrin-FN adhesion sites induces an actin-dependent, myogenic-like, micromechanical event. Focal adhesions formed by different ECM proteins exhibit different mechanical characteristics, and FN appears of particular relevance in its ability to strongly attach to VSMCs and to induce myogenic-like, force-generating reactions from sites of focal adhesion in response to externally applied forces. PMID:18495809

  17. The Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Octopus vulgaris Suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  18. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  19. Force nanoscopy of cell mechanics and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-05-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to mechanical stimuli in their environment and have several evolved mechanisms to sense and respond to these cues. It is becoming increasingly recognized that many cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, possess a diverse set of proteins to translate mechanical cues into biochemical signalling and to mediate cell surface interactions such as cell adhesion. Moreover, the mechanical properties of cells are involved in regulating cell function as well as serving as indicators of disease states. Importantly, the recent development of biophysical tools and nanoscale methods has facilitated a deeper understanding of the role that physical forces play in modulating cell mechanics and cell adhesion. Here, we discuss how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been used to investigate cell mechanics and cell adhesion at the single-cell and single-molecule levels. This knowledge is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and mechanoresponse in living cells. While pushing living cells with the AFM tip provides a means to quantify their mechanical properties and examine their response to nanoscale forces, pulling single surface proteins with a functionalized tip allows one to understand their role in sensing and adhesion. The combination of these nanoscale techniques with modern molecular biology approaches, genetic engineering and optical microscopies provides a powerful platform for understanding the sophisticated functions of the cell surface machinery, and its role in the onset and progression of complex diseases.

  20. Economics of mechanical ventilation and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    For patients with acute respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation provides the most definitive life-sustaining therapy. Because of the intense resources required to care for these patients, its use accounts for considerable costs. There is great societal need to ensure that use of mechanical ventilation maximizes societal benefits while minimizing costs, and that mechanical ventilation, and ventilator support in general, is delivered in the most efficient and cost-effective manner. This review summarizes the economic aspects of mechanical ventilation and summarizes the existing literature that examines its economic impact cost effectiveness.

  1. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  2. Mechanical circulatory devices in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Chou, Josephine C

    2014-07-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a leading cause of mortality despite advances in the treatment of myocardial infarction and advanced heart failure. Medical therapy can be inadequate, and patients may need mechanical circulatory support (MCS). The proper application of MCS requires knowledge of the underlying cause of acute heart failure, familiarity with the circulatory support devices, and the potential benefits and limitations of device therapy. This article describes the most commonly used temporary ventricular assist devices and their use in the various causes of cardiogenic shock.

  3. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in carbon-epoxy composites are identified as a basis for more reliable prediction of the performance of these materials. The approach involves both the study of local fracture events in model specimens containing small groups of filaments and fractographic examination of high fiber content engineering composites. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of model specimen observations with gross fracture modes. The effects of fiber surface treatment, resin modification and fiber content are studied and acoustic emission methods are applied. Some effort is devoted to analysis of the failure process in composite/metal specimens.

  4. Mechanical circulatory support in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Suliga, Kamil; Rempega, Grzegorz; Rajwa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of end-stage heart failure patients eligible for heart transplant and the disproportionately low number of donor hearts have led to increased interest in ventricular assist devices (VAD). These devices can be used as a bridge to decision, bridge to recovery, or bridge to candidacy. The main advantage of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is the improvement of organ perfusion and function, which leads to better quality of life and survival. The MCS can also be used as a destination therapy in end-stage heart failure patients who are not eligible for heart transplant. It should be remembered that, despite the tangible benefits, VAD implantation may also be associated with the risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, blood clots, right ventricular failure, and cardiovascular events. This study presents an up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on the role of MCS in modern medicine. PMID:27516785

  5. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fundamental failure mechanisms in carbon-epoxy composites were studied for more reliable prediction of the performance of these materials. Single and multiple fiber specimens were tested under tensile loads, and the sequence of failure events was observed. Parameters such as resin crack sensitivity, fiber surface treatment and variations in fibers from batch to batch are being evaluated. The analysis of bulk composite fracture processes using acoustic emission techniques is being studied in order to correlate microscopic observations with bulk composite behavior. Control of the fracture process through matrix and interface modification is being attempted, and study of failure processes in composite/metal specimens is being conducted. Most of the studies involved DEN 438 epoxy novolac as the matrix, but some experiments are now underway using the higher temperature resin ERLA 4617.

  6. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäder, Edith; Liu, Jian-Wen; Hiller, Janett; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhandarov, Serge; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test. In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis. The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this, shear sliding along

  7. Mechanics of Cellular Adhesion to Artificial Artery Templates

    PubMed Central

    Knöner, Gregor; Rolfe, Barbara E.; Campbell, Julie H.; Parkin, Simon J.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2006-01-01

    We are using polymer templates to grow artificial artery grafts in vivo for the replacement of diseased blood vessels. We have previously shown that adhesion of macrophages to the template starts the graft formation. We present a study of the mechanics of macrophage adhesion to these templates on a single cell and single bond level with optical tweezers. For whole cells, in vitro cell adhesion densities decreased significantly from polymer templates polyethylene to silicone to Tygon (167, 135, and 65 cells/mm2). These cell densities were correlated with the graft formation success rate (50%, 25%, and 0%). Single-bond rupture forces at a loading rate of 450 pN/s were quantified by adhesion of trapped 2-μm spheres to macrophages. Rupture force distributions were dominated by nonspecific adhesion (forces <40 pN). On polystyrene, preadsorption of fibronectin or presence of serum proteins in the cell medium significantly enhanced adhesion strength from a mean rupture force of 20 pN to 28 pN or 33 pN, respectively. The enhancement of adhesion by fibronectin and serum is additive (mean rupture force of 43 pN). The fraction of specific binding forces in the presence of serum was similar for polystyrene and polymethyl-methacrylate, but specific binding forces were not observed for silica. Again, we found correlation to in vivo experiments, where the density of adherent cells is higher on polystyrene than on silica templates, and can be further enhanced by fibronectin adsorption. These findings show that in vitro adhesion testing can be used for template optimization and to substitute for in-vivo experiments. PMID:16861267

  8. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  9. Fatigue of the Resin-Enamel Bonded Interface and the Mechanisms of Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Majd, Hessam; Ryou, Heonjune; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    The durability of adhesive bonds to enamel and dentin and the mechanisms of degradation caused by cyclic loading are important to the survival of composite restorations. In this study a novel method of evaluation was used to determine the strength of resin-enamel bonded interfaces under both static and cyclic loading, and to identify the mechanisms of failure. Specimens with twin interfaces of enamel bonded to commercial resin composite were loaded in monotonic and cyclic 4-point flexure to failure within a hydrated environment. Results for the resin-enamel interface were compared with those for the resin composite (control) and values reported for resin-dentin adhesive bonds. Under both modes of loading the strength of the resin-enamel interface was significantly (p≤0.0001) lower than that of the resin composite and the resin-dentin bonded interface. Fatigue failure of the interface occurred predominately by fracture of enamel, adjacent to the interface, and not due to adhesive failures. In the absence of water aging or acid production of biofilms, the durability of adhesive bonds to enamel is lower than that achieved in dentin bonding. PMID:23571321

  10. Probing the intrinsic failure mechanism of fluorinated amorphous carbon film based on the first-principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren-hui; Wang, Li-ping; Lu, Zhi-bin

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated amorphous carbon films exhibit superlow friction under vacuum, but are prone to catastrophic failure. Thus far, the intrinsic failure mechanism remains unclear. A prevailing view is that the failure of amorphous carbon film results from the plastic deformation of substrates or strong adhesion between two contacted surfaces. In this paper, using first-principles and molecular dynamics methodology, combining with compressive stress-strain relation, we firstly demonstrate that the plastic deformation induces graphitization resulting in strong adhesion between two contacted surfaces under vacuum, which directly corresponds to the cause of the failure of the films. In addition, sliding contact experiments are conducted to study tribological properties of iron and fluorinated amorphous carbon surfaces under vacuum. The results show that the failure of the film is directly attributed to strong adhesion resulting from high degree of graphitization of the film, which are consistent with the calculated results. PMID:25803202

  11. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  12. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  13. Crosstalk between focal adhesions and material mechanical properties governs cell mechanics and functions.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Sabato; Panzetta, Valeria; Embrione, Valerio; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical properties of materials strongly influence cell fate and functions. Focal adhesions are involved in the extremely important processes of mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. To address the relationship between the mechanical properties of cell substrates, focal adhesion/cytoskeleton assembly and cell functions, we investigated the behavior of NIH/3T3 cells over a wide range of stiffness (3-1000kPa) using two of the most common synthetic polymers for cell cultures: polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane. An overlapping stiffness region was created between them to compare focal adhesion characteristics and cell functions, taking into account their different time-dependent behavior. Indeed, from a rheological point of view, polyacrylamide behaves like a strong gel (elastically), whereas polydimethylsiloxane like a viscoelastic solid. First, focal adhesion characteristics and dynamics were addressed in terms of material stiffness, then cell spreading area, migration rate and cell mechanical properties were correlated with focal adhesion size and assembly. Focal adhesion size was found to increase in the whole range of stiffness and to be in agreement in the overlapping rigidity region for the investigated materials. Cell mechanics directly correlated with focal adhesion lengths, whereas migration rate followed an inverse correlation. Cell spreading correlated with the substrate stiffness on polyacrylamide hydrogel, while no specific trend was found on polydimethylsiloxane. Substrate mechanics can be considered as a key physical cue that regulates focal adhesion assembly, which in turn governs important cellular properties and functions.

  14. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  15. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  16. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  17. Wear and Adhesive Failure of Al2O3 Powder Coating Sprayed onto AISI H13 Tool Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an alumina (Al2O3) ceramic powder was sprayed onto an AISI H13 hot-work tool steel substrate that was subjected to sanding and ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment processes. The significance of the UNSM technique on the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating and on the hardness of the substrate was investigated. The adhesive failure of the coating sprayed onto sanded and UNSM-treated substrates was investigated by a micro-scratch tester at an incremental load. It was found, based on the obtained results, that the coating sprayed onto the UNSM-treated substrate exhibited a better resistance to adhesive failure in comparison with that of the coating sprayed onto the sanded substrate. Dry friction and wear property of the coatings sprayed onto the sanded and UNSM-treated substrates were assessed by means of a ball-on-disk tribometer against an AISI 52100 steel ball. It was demonstrated that the UNSM technique controllably improved the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating, where the critical load was improved by about 31%. Thus, it is expected that the application of the UNSM technique to an AISI H13 tool steel substrate prior to coating may delay the adhesive failure and improve the sticking between the coating and the substrate thanks to the modified and hardened surface.

  18. Mechanical Activation of Wood for Adhesive-free board Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolin, V. N.; Bayandin, M. A.; Kazitsin, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes to use hydrodynamic treatment of wood for the manufacture of wood-based panels from sawdust without using adhesive materials. It was found that such a treatment of wood particles (sawdust, dust, wood powder) allows producing panels with high physical-mechanical properties and water resistance. It is proved that the hydrodynamic treatment allows providing maximum energy of autoadhesion interaction in the moulding material due to increase of specific surface with small changes of geometric size of particles in comparison with mechanical methods of milling.

  19. Particle adhesion studies relevant to chemical mechanical polishing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Ryde, Niels P; Babu, S V; Matijević, Egon

    2005-10-25

    This study describes particle adhesion experiments carried out to elucidate interactions between particles in slurries used for polishing of wafers and disks. For this purpose the packed column technique was employed, which simulated chemical mechanical polishing of copper with silica and alumina, as well as of silicic oxide with ceria. The model systems consisted of uniform copper and glass beads as collectors, representing the wafers, and colloidal dispersions of silica, alumia, and silica coated with nanosize ceria, all of well-defined properties that are used as abrasives. It was shown that a strong correlation exists between deposition and detachment results of the adhesion studies and the polish rates measured using actual substrates with the same or similar slurries.

  20. Mechanism of surface enrichment and adhesion of coal combustion particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Shadman, F.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of alkali adsorption on the agglomeration of particles of bauxite, kaolinite, emathlite, lime, and two types of coal ash. An agglomeration (adhesion) temperature is defined which characterizes the adhesion propensity of particles. Using a small fluidized bed, a unique experimental technique is developed to measure this agglomeration point in-situ. The effects of alkali adsorption on the agglomeration characteristics of the substrates are determined. The agglomeration temperature of all substrates decreases as the alkali content increases. At low alkali loadings, alkali adsorption enhances particle agglomeration by forming new compounds of lower melting points. At high alkali concentrations, adhesion and agglomeration are caused by a layer of molten alkali which covers the exterior of the particles. Alkali surface composition of particles is studied using a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM). Results indicate that the alkali surface concentration decreases as agglomeration temperature increases. The use of additives to scavenge alkali vapors is further studied in a pilot scale downflow combustor. SAM surface analyses of additive particles indicate three mechanisms of alkali capture. Adsorption by reaction, surface condensation, and nucleation and coagulation with additive particles. These mechanisms may occur independently or simultaneously depending primarily on the alkali vapor concentration and the temperature profile along the combustion furnace. A mathematical model is developed to represent the kinetics and mechanisms of the alkali adsorption and agglomeration process. Modeling results indicate that the adsorption-reaction process is influenced by diffusion of alkali through the surface product layer. The model predictions of the alkali adsorbed as a function of minimum agglomeration temperature agree very well with the experimental results.

  1. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic film with high adhesion and the adhesive mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yonggang; Wang, Zhongying; Wu, Haihong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, rod-like basic cupric carbonate grew into bundles on the copper substrate by a simple direct oxidation process of copper in the weak alkaline solution of sodium bicarbonate. After surface chemical modification with fluoro-alkyl silane, the corresponding wettability of the as-prepared film changed from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity with the contact angle larger than 150°. However, water droplets attached to the film even when the surface was upside down, showing a large adhesion between water droplets and the resulting film. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the change of the surface chemical compositions before and after the modification with fluoro-alkyl silane. The surface microstructure was characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The adhesive mechanism was analyzed by the schematic diagram of the surface microstructure and the corresponding action model between the film and water droplet. The unique surface structure can make water droplets partially penetrate into the large pores, leading to the capillary effect and the near-Wenzel state.

  2. Failure stress criterion for adhesively bonded joint at different strain rates by using dynamic Arcan test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Ludovic; Bourel, Benjamin; Lauro, Franck; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Carrere, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the failure criterion evolution of assembly bonded with a strain rate dependent adhesive. A new modified ARCAN device is then designed to obtain the average stress at failure under different loading angles and for strain up to 350 s-1. Tests are performed on a hydraulic jack machine and a Digital Image Correlation measurement is used to control the opening and the sliding displacements of the two substrates.

  3. Mechanical failure of cavities in poroelastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, G.; Ortoleva, P.

    1998-12-31

    The stress-induced failure of cavities in poroelastic media is investigated using an analytical solution of the elastic matrix inclusion problem of Eshelby and a rock failure criterion. The elastic properties of the porous matrix surrounding the cavity are modeled using a self-consistent version of the theory of Berryman while the cavity collapse criterion is based on a failure condition calibrated as a function of matrix mineralogy, grain size and porosity. The influence of the latter textural variables as well as pore fluid pressure and cavity shape and orientation relative to the far-field stress are evaluated. The region of failure on the cavity surface is identified. These results are applied to the prediction of vug stability in a sedimentary basin in the context of vuggy reservoir exploration and production.

  4. 76 FR 5494 - Pipeline Safety: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... ``compression coupling'' to ``mechanical fitting,'' aligns a threat category with the annual report; and... announces the OMB approval of the revised Distribution Annual Report and a new Mechanical Fitting Failure... failures annually on the Annual Report Form by March 15, 2011. PHMSA used the DIMP final rule to open up...

  5. A role for leukocyte-endothelial adhesion mechanisms in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F.; Mora, Graciela Navarro; Martinello, Marianna; Rossi, Barbara; Merigo, Flavia; Ottoboni, Linda; Bach, Simona; Angiari, Stefano; Benati, Donatella; Chakir, Asmaa; Zanetti, Lara; Schio, Federica; Osculati, Antonio; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Xia, Lijun; Lowe, John B.; McEver, Rodger P.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Butcher, Eugene C.; Constantin, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder that affects approximately 1 percent of the world population, are not well understood1–3. Using a mouse model of epilepsy, we show that seizures induce elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and enhanced leukocyte rolling and arrest in brain vessels mediated by the leukocyte mucin P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and leukocyte integrins α4β1 and αLβ2. Inhibition of leukocyte-vascular interactions either with blocking antibodies, or in mice genetically deficient in functional PSGL-1, dramatically reduced seizures. Treatment with blocking antibodies following acute seizures prevented the development of epilepsy. Neutrophil depletion also inhibited acute seizure induction and chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage, which is known to enhance neuronal excitability, was induced by acute seizure activity but was prevented by blockade of leukocyte-vascular adhesion, suggesting a pathogenetic link between leukocyte-vascular interactions, BBB damage and seizure generation. Consistent with potential leukocyte involvement in the human, leukocytes were more abundant in brains of epileptics than of controls. Our results suggest leukocyte-endothelial interaction as a potential target for the prevention and treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19029985

  6. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannat, Risat A.; Robbins, Gregory P.; Ricart, Brendon G.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2010-05-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  7. Failure criterion for materials with spatially correlated mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Faillettaz, J; Or, D

    2015-03-01

    The role of spatially correlated mechanical elements in the failure behavior of heterogeneous materials represented by fiber bundle models (FBMs) was evaluated systematically for different load redistribution rules. Increasing the range of spatial correlation for FBMs with local load sharing is marked by a transition from ductilelike failure characteristics into brittlelike failure. The study identified a global failure criterion based on macroscopic properties (external load and cumulative damage) that is independent of spatial correlation or load redistribution rules. This general metric could be applied to assess the mechanical stability of complex and heterogeneous systems and thus provide an important component for early warning of a class of geophysical ruptures.

  8. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  9. Cell-adhesive and mechanically tunable glucose-based biodegradable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeongho; Nichol, Jason W; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The development of materials with biomimetic mechanical and biological properties is of great interest for regenerative medicine applications. In particular, hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials due to their high water content, which mimics that of natural tissues. We have synthesized a hydrophilic biodegradable polymer, designated poly(glucose malate)methacrylate (PGMma), which is composed of glucose and malic acid, commonly found in the human metabolic system. This polymer is made photocrosslinkable by the incorporation of methacrylate groups. The resulting properties of the hydrogels can be tuned by altering the reacting ratio of the starting materials, the degree of methacrylation, and the polymer concentration of the resultant hydrogel. Hydrogels exhibited compressive moduli ranging from 1.8 ± 0.4 kPa to 172.7 ± 36 kPa with compressive strain at failure from 37.5 ± 0.9% to 61.2 ± 1.1%, and hydration by mass ranging from 18.7 ± 0.5% to 114.1 ± 1.3%. PGMma hydrogels also showed a broad range of degradation rates and were cell-adhesive, enabling the spreading of adherent cells. Overall, this work introduces a class of cell-adhesive, mechanically tunable and biodegradable glucose-based hydrogels that may be useful for various tissue engineering and cell culture applications.

  10. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an ongoing research program into the reliability of terrestrial solar cells are presented. Laboratory accelerated testing procedures are used to identify failure/degradation modes which are then related to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. In the most recent tests, ten different types of production cells, both with and without encapsulation, from eight different manufacturers were subjected to a variety of accelerated tests. Results indicated the presence of a number of hitherto undetected failure mechanisms, including Schottky barrier formation at back contacts and loss of adhesion of grid metallization. The mechanism of Schottky barrier formation is explained by hydrogen, formed by the dissociation of water molecules at the contact surface, diffusing to the metal semiconductor interface. This same mechanism accounts for the surprising increase in sensitivity to accelerated stress conditions that was observed in some cells when encapsulated.

  11. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  12. Thesaurus of terms for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.

    1973-01-01

    A Thesaurus of approximately 700 subject terms used to describe the six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure is presented. The initial criteria for the selection of terms are their significance and frequency of use in the literature describing the mechanics of structural failure. The purpose of the Thesaurus is to provide the Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute a list of key works and identifiers that afford effective retrieval of information regarding failure modes and mechanisms for aerospace structures. The Thesaurus includes both a conventional listing of subject terms and a Key Words In Context (KWIC) listing.

  13. Geckos as Springs: Mechanics Explain Across-Species Scaling of Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Casey A; Imburgia, Michael J; Bartlett, Michael D; King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J; Irschick, Duncan J

    2015-01-01

    One of the central controversies regarding the evolution of adhesion concerns how adhesive force scales as animals change in size, either among or within species. A widely held view is that as animals become larger, the primary mechanism that enables them to climb is increasing pad area. However, prior studies show that much of the variation in maximum adhesive force remains unexplained, even when area is accounted for. We tested the hypothesis that maximum adhesive force among pad-bearing gecko species is not solely dictated by toepad area, but also depends on the ratio of toepad area to gecko adhesive system compliance in the loading direction, where compliance (C) is the change in extension (Δ) relative to a change in force (F) while loading a gecko's adhesive system (C = dΔ/dF). Geckos are well-known for their ability to climb on a range of vertical and overhanging surfaces, and range in mass from several grams to over 300 grams, yet little is understood of the factors that enable adhesion to scale with body size. We examined the maximum adhesive force of six gecko species that vary in body size (~2-100 g). We also examined changes between juveniles and adults within a single species (Phelsuma grandis). We found that maximum adhesive force and toepad area increased with increasing gecko size, and that as gecko species become larger, their adhesive systems become significantly less compliant. Additionally, our hypothesis was supported, as the best predictor of maximum adhesive force was not toepad area or compliance alone, but the ratio of toepad area to compliance. We verified this result using a synthetic "model gecko" system comprised of synthetic adhesive pads attached to a glass substrate and a synthetic tendon (mechanical spring) of finite stiffness. Our data indicate that increases in toepad area as geckos become larger cannot fully account for increased adhesive abilities, and decreased compliance must be included to explain the scaling of adhesion in

  14. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-10-23

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  15. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-12-07

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm(-2)) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  16. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  17. 77 FR 34457 - Pipeline Safety: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; Issuance...

  18. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm-2) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the

  19. Mechanism of tantalum adhesion on SiLK{sup TM}

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yue; Yang Shuowang; Chen Xiantong; Lu Dong; Feng Yuanping; Wu Ping

    2005-09-19

    Tantalum adhesion on SiLK{sup TM} was investigated using first-principles method based on density functional theory. Phenylene groups were found to play a major role and the adjacent semi-benzene rings also contribute significantly to Ta adhesion on SiLK{sup TM}. In addition, the degradation effects of H{sub 2}/He reactive plasma clean on Ta adhesion on SiLK{sup TM} was investigated. Based on our findings, argon plasma treatment was suggested and implemented after reactive plasma cleaning process, which resulted in integration of SiLK{sup TM} with Cu up to seven metal layers.

  20. The effect of adhesive layer elasticity on the fracture mechanics of a blister test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model of a blister type specimen for evaluating adhesive bond strength was developed. Plate theory with shear deformation was used to model the deformation of the plate, and elastic deformation of the adhesive layer is taken into account. It is shown that the inclusion of the elastic deformation of the adhesive layer can have a significant influence in the energy balance calculations of fracture mechanics.

  1. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of dental adhesives and glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Magni, Elisa; Ferrari, Marco; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2010-02-01

    Adhesives and lining/base materials should relieve the stresses concentrated at the tooth/restoration interface. The study aimed at comparing the mechanical properties of eight adhesives and six glass-ionomer cements (GICs). The adhesives were applied on dentin disks, whereas 2 mm x 3 mm x 2 mm GICs specimens were prepared in a teflon mold. Vicker's hardness (VH), elastic modulus (E), creep (Cr) and elastic work (We/Wtot) were measured with a micro hardness indenter. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to compare the mechanical properties within each materials' type and among the materials' classes. Enamel and dentin were used as references. Significant differences were detected within each materials' type and among the materials' classes and enamel and dentin. GICs were superior to adhesives in VH and E and showed a VH similar to dentin. GICs presented mechanical properties more similar to enamel and dentin than adhesives.

  2. Intrinsic mechanisms of multilayer ceramic capacitor failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, L. C.

    1985-04-01

    The possible role of grain boundaries (GB) in MLC capacitors, with respect to insulation resistance and its degradation, is reviewed. Activation energy (E sub A) can be related directly to GB barrier height, Phi sub B. The voltage dependent activation energies for poly-Si, ZnO varistors and PTC devices has been attributed directly to E sub A. Varistor and PTC device degradation is caused GB passivation. A similar voltage dependence is reported here for barrier layer and COG capacitor types where E sub A decreases from 0.91 to 0.44eV and from 1.61 to 0.90eV respectively, with concurrent super-ohmic increases in leakage current. Such a voltage dependent E sub A is not seen for X7R devices, even though the current is super-ohmic. Reasons to account for this are discussed. It is concluded that the GB potential barrier may offer a major source of impedance to leakage current for MLC capacitors, and its decrease may result in failure. It has been ascertained that E sub A decreases for degraded X7R devices, with an increase in the I-V slope. These results are consistent with our earlier reports on degraded devices, and with the space charge limited current model for emission from electrodes. X7R chips with no internal electrodes exhibit both ohmic and super-ohmic characteristics, with activation energies independent of voltage. A near-exponential rate of current increase with time, accompanied by a linear decrease in E sub A, was seen for both X7R and Z5U capacitors.

  3. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites.

    PubMed

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C&B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R(a) and R(y) values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  4. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  5. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  6. Static strength and failure mechanism of CFRP under biaxial loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Hwang, W.; Park, H. C.; Han, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Tests of cross-ply composite tubes were performed under combined axial and torsional loading up to failure. Strength properties and failure mechanisms were evaluated with reference to the biaxiality ratio of the loading. The scattering of the biaxial strength data was analyzed using the Weibull distribution. The axial contraction of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubes under biaxial loading was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Artificial neural networks were introduced to predict the failure strength using the algorithm of the error back-propagation. The prediction was also made by the Tsai-Wu theory using the experimental data and by the combined optimized tensor-polynomial theory. A comparison shows that the artificial neural network has the smallest root-mean square (RMS) error of the three prediction methods. The prediction of the axial contraction of the tubes correlates well with the results of a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) of the testing machine. From the phenomenological analysis of the failure and the fractographic observations of the fracture surface, three types of failure modes and microscopic failure were investigated, depending on the biaxiality ratio, and the corresponding failure mechanisms are suggested.

  7. Mechanisms of Dynamic Deformation and Dynamic Failure in Aluminum Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    study the deformation mechanisms under various load- ing conditions. 2. Experimental procedures The material investigated is a pressureless liquid phase...terminology The sintered AlN material system is illustrated in Fig. 2a. “Grain failure” is defined as the fracture of grains (transgranular fracture...representative of all sintered materials , as suggested by German [4]. Both grain boundary failure and grain–interphase failure are examples of so-called

  8. Nanoscale mechanical characterisation of amyloid fibrils discovered in a natural adhesive.

    PubMed

    Mostaert, Anika S; Higgins, Michael J; Fukuma, Takeshi; Rindi, Fabio; Jarvis, Suzanne P

    2006-11-01

    Using the atomic force microscope, we have investigated the nanoscale mechanical response of the attachment adhesive of the terrestrial alga Prasiola linearis (Prasiolales, Chlorophyta). We were able to locate and extend highly ordered mechanical structures directly from the natural adhesive matrix of the living plant. The in vivo mechanical response of the structured biopolymer often displayed the repetitive sawtooth force-extension characteristics of a material exhibiting high mechanical strength at the molecular level. Mechanical and histological evidence leads us to propose a mechanism for mechanical strength in our sample based on amyloid fibrils. These proteinaceous, pleated beta-sheet complexes are usually associated with neurodegenerative diseases. However, we now conclude that the amyloid protein quaternary structures detected in our material should be considered as a possible generic mechanism for mechanical strength in natural adhesives.

  9. The distinct element analysis of toppling failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özge Dinç, Şaziye; Sinan Işık, Nihat; Karaca, Zeki

    2016-04-01

    This project investigates the toppling failure mechanisms of rock masses having different rock materials and discontinuity properties in slopes that are designed in different heights. For this purpose, PFC2D as a distinct element code was used to anticipate the post failure behaviors of rock masses. After the simulation of laboratory tests on the samples in 2 (width) *4 (height) m, macro mechanical properties of rock masses were determined to be assigned the slopes. The properties of discontinuities were set up based on the smooth-joint method in PFC. The movements in the slopes -equipped with persistent and non-persistent discontinuities- were analyzed by using gravity increase method. The results show that the post failure behaviors of all rock samples have been controlled primarily by joint location and joint length. In addition to this, an increase on the slope height has an influence on the failure mechanism such that triggers the materials to transit from the toppling to circular yielding manner in some models. It has been also worth note that all models begin to fail as soon as the wing cracks develop by tension stresses, thus the tensile strength of the relevant rock material is the most critical mechanic parameter on the failure.

  10. Rockfall failure mechanisms in Yosemite Valley, California (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, Battista; Guerin, Antoine; Carrea, Dario; Stock, Greg M.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Collins, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Rockfall hazard is especially high in Yosemite Valley, with tens of rockfalls inventoried every year. A rockfall on 5 October 2013 from Ahwiyah Point consisted of a volume of 740 cubic meters and occurred within the perimeter of a larger event on 28 March 2009 that released 25'400 cubic meters of rock (Zimmer et al., 2012). In both events (2009 and 2013), the initial rockfall volumes dislodged a second one approximately equivalent in size by impacting the cliff below the source area during the fall. Rock fragments of up to several cubic meters were deposited on the talus slope, damaging a heavily used and recently reconstructed hiking path. We performed extensive mapping of structural features for several cliffs of Yosemite Valley to improve the assessment of the most susceptible rockfall areas. In particular we mapped and characterized the main brittle structures, the exfoliation joints and the failure mechanisms of the past rockfalls. Several failure mechanisms exist in Yosemite including the propagation of brittle structures that may lead to tensile, planar sliding, wedge sliding or toppling failures. Frequently, topographically-parallel exfoliation joints and topographically-oblique discontinuities coexist, resulting in complex failures. We also developed a methodology to examine how the distribution of joints within the cliff faces of Yosemite Valley affects overall stability with respect to the identified failure mechanisms. For these analyses, we used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to collect high resolution point clouds of the vertical and overhanging rock faces throughout the Valley. This provided the necessary 3D data to identify the main joint sets, perform spacing and trace length measurements, and calculate volumes of previous and potential rockfalls. We integrated this information with stability calculations to identify the likely failure mechanisms for each area of cliff and to obtain the number of potential failures per square meter of cliff face

  11. Thermomechanical Mechanisms of Reducing Ice Adhesion on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cohen, N; Dotan, A; Dodiuk, H; Kenig, S

    2016-09-20

    Superhydrophobic (SH) coatings have been shown to reduce freezing and ice nucleation rates, by means of low surface energy chemistry tailored with nano/micro roughness. Durability enhancement of SH surfaces is a crucial issue. Consequently, the present research on reducing ice adhesion is based on radiation-induced radical reaction for covalently bonding SiO2 nanoparticles to polymer coatings to obtain durable roughness. Results indicated that the proposed approach resulted in SH surfaces having high contact angles (>155°) and low sliding angles (<5°) with improved durability and transparency. In a subsequent stage, the synthesized SH coating was investigated for its icephobic characteristics using a variety of substrates. Results indicated that supercooled water drops bounced back when impinging on SH polycarbonate substrate and froze on SH copper substrate held at -10 to -30 °C and were easily peeled off when coated by ice formed during exposure to air/supercooled water drops at -20 °C. The ice shear adhesion investigation (at -20 °C) demonstrated reduction of shear adhesion to a variety of SH treated substrates having low thermal expansion coefficient (copper and aluminum) and high thermal expansion coefficient (polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate)). It was concluded that the thermal mismatch between the adhering ice and the various substrates and its resultant interfacial thermal stresses affect the adhesion strength of the ice to the respective substrate.

  12. Mechanical failure probability of glasses in Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, Donald L.; Wiedlocher, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Results of five years of earth-orbital exposure on mechanical properties of glasses indicate that radiation effects on mechanical properties of glasses, for the glasses examined, are less than the probable error of measurement. During the 5 year exposure, seven micrometeorite or space debris impacts occurred on the samples examined. These impacts were located in locations which were not subjected to effective mechanical testing, hence limited information on their influence upon mechanical strength was obtained. Combination of these results with micrometeorite and space debris impact frequency obtained by other experiments permits estimates of the failure probability of glasses exposed to mechanical loading under earth-orbit conditions. This probabilistic failure prediction is described and illustrated with examples.

  13. Testing within the continuum of multiple lubrication and failure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeven, L.D.; Totten, G.E.; Bishop, R.J. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The inherent difficulty of bench testing for the tribological performance of hydraulic fluids is the interaction of multiple lubrication and failure mechanisms. The engineer judges the performance limits in descriptive terms relating to what the load bearing surfaces have experienced. The lubrication and failure pathway that leads to the final surface condition is at the mercy of what lubrication and failure mechanisms have been invoked. Lubrication mechanisms, such as hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary can be isolated with specialized testing, along with failure mechanisms, such as those described in general terms of wear, scuffing, and pitting. The interaction and competitive nature of these mechanisms, which exist in hardware, makes bench testing a nightmare. A rational approach using a highly flexible and computerized test machine, WAM3, is described. The approach demonstrates how performance attributes of fluids and materials can be evaluated as they are made to travel through multiple lubrication and failure pathways. The testing protocol is terminated with the test specimen`s surface reaches the same failure condition the engineer uses to judge performance limits of component hardware. Testing pathways are demonstrated that lead to wear, scuffing and micro-pitting. Along the testing pathway, viscous film-forming attributes and chemical boundary lubrication attributes of the fluid are characterized. Tests conducted with a range of fluid types, including two hydraulic fluids, demonstrate a wide range of traction, viscous film-forming and boundary film attributes. The continuum approach, which maps out performance in terms of hardware relevant criteria, provides a means to determine the impact of development strategies based on fluid and material technologies.

  14. Failure processes in polymers: Environmental stress crack growth and adhesion of elastomeric copolymers to polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyer, Ravishankar

    In CHAPTER 1 slow crack propagation in MDPE pipe was studied in air and Igepals at 50°C to determine the possibility for fatigue to creep correlation in environmental liquids. The stepwise fatigue crack growth in air was preserved in Igepal solutions. Lifetime in Igepal was affected to a much smaller extent as compared to air. The correlation in air was previously established primarily for tests at 21°C. The stepwise mechanism was verified in air at 50°C. The crack growth rate under various loading conditions was related to the maximum stress and R-ratio by a power law relationship. Alternatively a strain rate approach reliably correlated fatigue and creep in air at 50°C except at R=0.1 and frequency less than 1 Hz. In CHAPTER 2 the effect of concentration of Igepal CO 630 on slow crack propagation in MDPE pipe was investigated to determine whether the mechanism was conserved in creep and fatigue as required for the fatigue-to-creep correlation. The mechanism of crack propagation and lifetimes in creep and fatigue at R=0.1 at 50°C were compared to those in air and water. The fatigue and creep behavior followed the same stepwise crack growth mechanism as in air at all the concentrations used. As the concentration increased to 0.01 vol. %, the creep lifetime decreased significantly whereas the lifetime in fatigue gradually increased. At higher concentrations the lifetime was similar in creep and fatigue. In CHAPTER 3 effect of R-ratio on kinetics and mechanism of environmental fatigue and creep crack growth was analyzed in an attempt to predict the environmental stress crack resistance at 50°C. Same methodology was used as previously established for fatigue to creep formulation in air at 50°C. The stepwise mechanism of crack growth in air was conserved in Igepal solutions as R-ratio approached to unity (creep) with few exceptions. At higher R-ratio, the lifetime decreased systematically in Igepal solutions relative to air and was defined as 'Igepal transition

  15. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  16. Mechanism of adhesion of Alysiella bovis to glass surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, R T; To, M; Costerton, J W

    1984-01-01

    Alysiella bovis adheres to surfaces by means of short, ruthenium red-staining, rod-like fimbriae. The fimbriae remain associated with the cell envelope of A. bovis, even when sonicated or exposed sequentially to toluene, Triton X-100, lysozyme, ribonuclease, and deoxyribonuclease. Adhesion of outer membrane-derived cell wall ghosts of A. bovis to glass was inhibited by IO4-, sodium dodecyl sulfate, urea, pronase, and trypsin. Protease treatment digested the fimbriae from the distal end, and exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate depolymerized the fimbriae. Exposure of ghosts to 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate preferentially solubilized a 16,500-dalton protein which was subsequently purified by gel filtration and demonstrated to be a glycoprotein (ca. 17% carbohydrate). Antibodies raised against the 16,500-dalton glycoprotein agglutinated whole cells and inhibited adhesion of ghosts to glass. Images PMID:6209260

  17. Mechanical circulatory support for elderly heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, Craig R; Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2012-09-01

    End-stage systolic heart failure is an increasingly common problem in elderly patients and is associated with high cost, poor quality of life, and poor outcomes. Mechanical circulatory support is a promising therapy as both a bridge to transplantation and destination therapy. Elderly patients are frequently ineligible for heart transplantation because of their age and comorbidities, and the application of mechanical circulatory support for destination therapy in this population is not well defined. A review of the literature was undertaken to better characterize our experience to date with mechanical circulatory support in older heart failure populations. Mechanical circulatory support is being employed increasingly for destination therapy indications in older patients. The newer continuous flow devices appear to have disproportionate advantage in elderly patients, which has translated into marked improvement in 1- and 2-year survival. The rational implementation of MCS devices in elderly heart failure patients needs to focus on (1) continuous flow devices that appear to have particular benefit in this population, (2) extensive pre-MCS assessment including variables relating to frailty, and (3) intervening before these patients develop cardiogenic shock. More data are needed on the cost-benefit analysis of routine use of CF devices as destination therapy in elderly patients with heart failure.

  18. Mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene with grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorkin, V.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2017-02-01

    Using the density-functional tight-binding method, we studied the effect of grain boundaries on the mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene. We found that the high-angle tilt boundaries with a higher density of (5∣7) defect pairs (oriented along the armchair direction) are stronger than the low-angle tilt boundaries with a lower defect density, and similarly the high-angle boundaries with a higher density of (4∣8) defect pairs (oriented along the zigzag direction) are stronger than the low-angle boundaries with a lower defect density. The failure is due to the rupture of the most pre-strained bonds in the heptagons of the (5∣7) defect pair or octagons of the (4∣8) pairs. The high-angle grain boundaries are better at accommodating the pre-strained bonds in heptagon and octagon defects, leading to a higher failure stress and strain. The results cannot be described by a Griffith-type fracture mechanics criterion, since this does not take into account the bond pre-stretching. Interestingly, these anomalous mechanical and failure characteristics of tilt grain boundaries in phosphorene are also shared by graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, signifying that they may be universal for 2D materials. The findings revealed here may be useful in tuning the mechanical properties of phosphorene via defect engineering for specific applications.

  19. Veneer vs. core failure in adhesively bonded all-ceramic crown layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J-W; Kwon, J-Y; Bhowmick, S; Lloyd, I K; Rekow, E D; Lawn, B R

    2008-04-01

    Joining a brittle veneer to a strong ceramic core with an adhesive offers potential benefits over current fabrication methods for all-ceramic crowns. We tested the hypothesis that such joining can withstand subsurface radial cracking in the veneer, from enhanced flexure in occlusal loading, as well as in the core. Critical conditions to initiate fractures were investigated in model crown-like layer structures consisting of glass veneers epoxy-joined onto alumina or zirconia cores, all bonded to a dentin-like polymer base. The results showed a competition between critical loads for radial crack initiation in the veneers and cores. Core radial cracking was relatively independent of adhesive thickness. Zirconia cores were much less susceptible to fracture than alumina, attributable to a relatively high strength and low modulus. Veneer cracking did depend on adhesive thickness. However, no significant differences in critical loads for veneer cracking were observed for specimens containing alumina or zirconia cores.

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Leech Posterior Suckers

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenhao

    2015-01-01

    The posterior sucker of a leech represents a fascinating natural system that allows the leech to adhere to different terrains and substrates. However, the mechanism of adhesion and desorption has not yet to be elucidated. In order to better understand how the adhesion is performed, we analyzed the surface structure, adsorption movements, the muscles’ distribution, physical characteristics, and the adsorption force of the leech posterior suckers by experimental investigation. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the obtained experimental results. First, the adhesion by the posterior sucker is wet adhesion, because the surface of the posterior sucker is smooth and the sealing can only be achieved on wet surfaces. Second, the deformation texture, consisting of soft collagen tissues and highly ductile epidermal tissues, plays a key role in adhering to rough surfaces. Finally, the adhesion and desorption is achieved by the synergetic operation of six muscle fibers working in different directions. Concrete saying, directional deformation of the collagen/epithermal interface driven by spatially-distributed muscle fibers facilitates the excretion of fluids in the sucker venter, thus allowing liquid sealing. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion strength is directly related to the size of the contact surface which is generated and affected by the sucker deformation. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers potential cues for developing innovative bio-inspired artificial adhesion systems. PMID:26536352

  1. Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brian

    1999-03-01

    OAK B188 Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature. This summary refers to work done in approximately the twelve months to the present in our contract ''Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature,'' which commenced in August, 1997. Our activities have consisted mainly of measurements of creep-controlled crack growth in ceramic matrix composites (CMCS) at high temperature; imaging of deformation fields in textile CMCS; the assessment of mechanisms of damage in textile composites, especially those with through-thickness reinforcement; the formulation of models of delamination crack growth under fatigue in textile composites; analytical models of the bridging traction law for creeping fibers in a CMC at high temperature; and an analytical model of a bridging fiber tow in a textile composite.

  2. Register of experts for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This register is comprised of a list of approximately 300 experts from approximately 90 organizations who have published results of theoretical and/or experimental research related to six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure: (1) life prediction for structural materials, (2) fracture toughness testing, (3) fracture mechanics analysis; (4) hydrogen embrittlement; (5) protective coatings; and (6) composite materials. The criteria for the selection of names for the register are recent contributions to the literature, participation in or support of relevant research programs, and referral by peers. Each author included is listed by organizational affiliation, address, and principal field of expertise. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures. The register includes two indexes; an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with whom they are affiliated.

  3. Mechanism of fatigue failure of clay-epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Juwono, Ariadne; Edward, Graham

    2006-12-01

    This work investigates the fatigue behaviour and the mechanism of fatigue failure of an epoxy resin with a dispersion of modified layered silicates in the polymer matrix. The fatigue properties are very important for structural application of nanocomposite materials. Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were successfully synthesized with a commercially available 1-Methylimidazole curing agent. The XRD and TEM findings demonstrated a pattern of clay morphology typically found in nanocomposite systems. The fatigue performance and fatigue failure mechanism of the clay-epoxy materials were studied under repetitive bending loads. The results showed that the fatigue life of filled epoxy improved significantly at strain amplitudes below a threshold value. The E-SEM observations of the epoxy and the clay-epoxy fracture surfaces showed different patterns. In conclusion, the addition of silicate strongly determines the fracture mechanism and enhances the fatigue performance.

  4. Deformation and failure mechanisms in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, G.; Majumdar, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the key deformation mechanisms and their interaction leading to failure of both 0 degree and 90 degree Ti 15-3/SCS-6 laminae under monotonic loading. The experimental results suggest that inelastic deformation in the 0-degree lamina is dominated by plastic deformation and that in the 90-degree lamina is dominated by both fiber-matrix debonding and plasticity. The loading-unloading response, monitoring of Poisson's ratio and microscopy were utilized to identify the key deformation mechanisms. The sequence of deformation mechanisms leading to failure are identified for both the 0 and the 90-degree specimens. The threshold strains for plasticity or damage which are referred to as 'microdeformation' in the 0 deg and 90 deg laminae are approximately 0.004 and 0.002, respectively, at room temperature. These strain levels may be considered critical in initiation based structural design with these composites.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Stiffness, Friction and Adhesion in Mechanical Contacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    over a lateral length l scales as a power law: h  lH, where H is called the Hurst exponent . For typical experimental surfaces, H ranges from 0.5 to 0.8...surfaces with a wide range of Hurst exponents using fully atomistic calculations and the Green’s function method. A simple relation like Eq. (2...described above to explore a full range of parameter space with different rms roughness h0, rms slope h’0, Hurst exponent H, adhesion energy

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Mechanical Mapping of Micropatterned Cells Shows Adhesion Geometry-Dependent Mechanical Response on Local and Global Scales.

    PubMed

    Rigato, Annafrancesca; Rico, Felix; Eghiaian, Frédéric; Piel, Mathieu; Scheuring, Simon

    2015-06-23

    In multicellular organisms, cell shape and organization are dictated by cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix adhesion interactions. Adhesion complexes crosstalk with the cytoskeleton enabling cells to sense their mechanical environment. Unfortunately, most of cell biology studies, and cell mechanics studies in particular, are conducted on cultured cells adhering to a hard, homogeneous, and unconstrained substrate with nonspecific adhesion sites, thus far from physiological and reproducible conditions. Here, we grew cells on three different fibronectin patterns with identical overall dimensions but different geometries (▽, T, and Y), and investigated their topography and mechanics by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The obtained mechanical maps were reproducible for cells grown on patterns of the same geometry, revealing pattern-specific subcellular differences. We found that local Young's moduli variations are related to the cell adhesion geometry. Additionally, we detected local changes of cell mechanical properties induced by cytoskeletal drugs. We thus provide a method to quantitatively and systematically investigate cell mechanics and their variations, and present further evidence for a tight relation between cell adhesion and mechanics.

  7. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  8. Delayed mechanical failure of silver-interlayer diffusion bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M.E. ); Rosen, R.S.; Henshall, G.A. . Physical Metallurgy and Joining Section)

    1990-12-01

    Silver-interlayer diffusion bonds were fabricated using planar-magnetron sputtering (PMS). The bonds exhibit very high tensile strengths, despite the soft interlayer, because of the constraint by the base metal. However, these joints undergo delayed failure at relatively low tensile stresses at ambient temperatures, apparently by a ductile microvoid coalescence mechanism at the bond interfaces. Two classes of delayed tensile failure were investigated. In the first case, the applied stress does not produced any plastic deformation in the base metal, and failure appears to be controlled by time-dependent plasticity within the silver interlayer as a result of the effective stress in the interlayer. The plasticity causes cavity nucleation and, eventually, interlinkage and failure. In the second case, time-dependent plasticity is observed in base metals, and concomitant shear occurs within the softer silver under a high triaxial stress state. Here, the time-dependent plasticity of the base metal accelerates plasticity and failure in the interlayer. These models were substantiated by careful analysis of the stress and temperature dependence of the rupture times, finite element analysis of the stress state within the interlayer, and microscopy of the fracture surfaces and interfaces loaded to various fractions of the expected rupture times. These findings are applicable to bonds in which the interlayers are prepared by processes other than physical vapor deposition.

  9. Assessing mechanical vulnerability in water distribution networks under multiple failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Luigi; Ugarelli, Rita; Røstum, Jon; Giustolisi, Orazio

    2014-03-01

    Understanding mechanical vulnerability of water distribution networks (WDN) is of direct relevance for water utilities since it entails two different purposes. On the one hand, it might support the identification of severe failure scenarios due to external causes (e.g., natural or intentional events) which result into the most critical consequences on WDN supply capacity. On the other hand, it aims at figure out the WDN portions which are more prone to be affected by asset disruptions. The complexity of such analysis stems from the number of possible scenarios with single and multiple simultaneous shutdowns of asset elements leading to modifications of network topology and insufficient water supply to customers. In this work, the search for the most disruptive combinations of multiple asset failure events is formulated and solved as a multiobjective optimization problem. The higher vulnerability failure scenarios are detected as those causing the lower supplied demand due to the lower number of simultaneous failures. The automatic detection of WDN topology, subsequent to the detachments of failed elements, is combined with pressure-driven analysis. The methodology is demonstrated on a real water distribution network. Results show that, besides the failures causing the detachment of reservoirs, tanks, or pumps, there are other different topological modifications which may cause severe WDN service disruptions. Such information is of direct relevance to support planning asset enhancement works and improve the preparedness to extreme events.

  10. Novel molecular mechanisms and regeneration therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Oka, Toru; Morita, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. Various molecular mechanisms have been proposed for HF, but its precise mechanisms are still largely unknown. In this review, summarizing the "President's Distinguished Lecture Award" of XX World Congress of International Society for Heart Research 2010 in Kyoto, Japan, we introduce recent our studies on HF, including 1) p53-induced suppression of Hif-1-induced angiogenesis as a novel mechanism of HF, 2) angiogenesis as a potential therapeutic strategy for HF, and 3) IGFBP-4 as a novel factor for cardiomyogenesis by inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling.

  11. Analysis of Mechanical Failure of Polymer Microneedles by Axial Force.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-04-01

    A polymeric microneedle has been developed for drug delivery applications. The ultimate goal of the polymeric microneedle is insertion into the specified region without failure for effective transdermal drug delivery. Mechanical failure of various geometries of microneedles by axial load was modeled using the Euler formula and the Johnson formula to predict the failure force of tapered-column microneedles. These formulas were compared with measured data to identify the mechanical behavior of microneedles by determining the critical factors including the actual length and end-fixed factor. The comparison of the two formulas with the data showed good agreement at the end-fixity (K) of 0.7. This value means that a microneedle column has one fixed end and one pinned end, and that part of the microneedle was overloaded by axial load. When the aspect ratio of length to equivalent diameter is 12:1 at 3 GPa of Young's modulus, there is a transition from the Euler region to the Johnson region by the decreased length and increased base diameter of the microneedle. A polymer having less than 3 GPa of stiffness would follow the Euler formula. A 12:1 aspect ratio of length to equivalent diameter of the microneedle was the mechanical indicator determining the failure mode between elastic buckling and inelastic buckling at less than 3 GPa of Young's modulus of polymer. Microneedles with below a 12:1 aspect ratio of length-to-equivalent diameter and more than 3 GPa of Young's were recommended for reducing sudden failure by buckling and for successfully inserting the microneedle into the skin.

  12. Fracture mechanics parameters for failure prediction of composite resins.

    PubMed

    De Groot, R; Van Elst, H C; Peters, M C

    1988-06-01

    This study contains the first part of a research project in which the applicability of fracture mechanics parameters to predict failure of a restored tooth was investigated. Fracture mechanics parameters have been used in dental research before, but were restricted to comparative studies between various brands of composites. The critical values of the opening mode stress intensity factor (KI), its equivalents, the strain energy release rate (GI), and the J integral (JI), were measured with single-edge notched-bend (SENB) specimens of dental composite in a three-point bend test. The measured values of KIc for Silux (KIc = 0.99 +/- 0.03 MNm-3/2) and P-30 (KIc = 1.88 +/- 0.12 MNm-3/2), compared with values from the literature, show quantitative agreement. The J integral was computed by means of finite element analysis (FEA) on a two-dimensional model of the SENB specimens. The critical value of the J integral (measured with SENB specimens, notch depth-to-width ratio (a/W) = 1/2) was used to predict failure of specimens having an arbitrary geometry. In this study, failure was predicted for SENB specimens with notch depth-to-width ratio (a/W) = 1/4 and 3/4. The predicted deflection and load at failure correspond well with the measured deflection and load.

  13. Mechanisms of self-cleaning in fluid-based smooth adhesive pads of insects.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Christofer J; Federle, Walter

    2012-12-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives such as tapes become easily contaminated by dust particles. By contrast, animal adhesive pads are able to self-clean and can be reused millions of times over a lifetime with little reduction in adhesion. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this ability are still unclear. Here we test in adhesive pads of stick insects (Carausius morosus) (1) whether self-cleaning is enhanced by the liquid pad secretion, and (2) whether alternating push-pull movements aid the removal of particles. We measured attachment forces of insect pads on glass after contamination with 10 µm polystyrene beads. While the amount of fluid present on the pad showed no effect on the pads' susceptibility to contamination, the recovery of adhesive forces after contamination was faster when higher fluid levels were present. However, this effect does not appear to be based on a faster rate of self-cleaning since the number of spheres deposited with each step did not increase with fluid level. Instead, the fluid may aid the recovery of adhesive forces by filling in the gaps between contaminating particles, similar to the fluid's function on rough surfaces. Further, we found no evidence that an alternation of pushing and pulling movements, as found in natural steps, leads to a more efficient recovery of adhesion than repeated pulling slides.

  14. Monitoring in real-time focal adhesion protein dynamics in response to a discrete mechanical stimulus.

    PubMed

    von Bilderling, Catalina; Caldarola, Martín; Masip, Martín E; Bragas, Andrea V; Pietrasanta, Lía I

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix is a hierarchical, force-dependent, multistage process that evolves at several temporal scales. An understanding of this complex process requires a precise measurement of forces and its correlation with protein responses in living cells. We present a method to quantitatively assess live cell responses to a local and specific mechanical stimulus. Our approach combines atomic force microscopy with fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, we evaluated the recruitment of adhesion proteins such as vinculin, focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, and zyxin triggered by applying forces in the nN regime to live cells. We observed in real time the development of nascent adhesion sites, evident from the accumulation of early adhesion proteins at the position where the force was applied. We show that the method can be used to quantify the recruitment characteristic times for adhesion proteins in the formation of focal complexes. We also found a spatial remodeling of the mature focal adhesion protein zyxin as a function of the applied force. Our approach allows the study of a variety of complex biological processes involved in cellular mechanotransduction.

  15. Old and sticky-adhesive mechanisms in the living fossil Nautilus pompilius (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Wani, Ryoji; Schwaha, Thomas; Grunwald, Ingo; Cyran, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Nautiloidea is the oldest group within the cephalopoda, and modern Nautilus differs much in its outer morphology from all other recent species; its external shell and pinhole camera eye are the most prominent distinguishing characters. A further unique feature of Nautilus within the cephalopods is the lack of suckers or hooks on the tentacles. Instead, the animals use adhesive structures present on the digital tentacles. Earlier studies focused on the general tentacle morphology and put little attention on the adhesive gland system. Our results show that the epithelial parts on the oral adhesive ridge contain three secretory cell types (columnar, goblet, and cell type 1) that differ in shape and granule size. In the non-adhesive aboral epithelium, two glandular cell types (cell types 2 and 3) are present; these were not mentioned in any earlier study and differ from the cells in the adhesive area. The secretory material of all glandular cell types consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharide units, whereas one cell type in the non-adhesive epithelium also reacts positive for acidic mucopolysaccharides. The present data indicate that the glue in Nautilus consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharides. The glue seems to be a viscous carbohydrate gel, as known from another cephalopod species. De-attachment is apparently effectuated mechanically, i.e., by muscle contraction of the adhesive ridges and tentacle retraction.

  16. Register of experts for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.

    1973-01-01

    A list of approximately 150 experts from approximately 60 organizations who have published results of theoretical and/or experimental research related to six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure is presented. Each author included is listed by organizational affiliation, address and principal field of expertise. The initial criteria for the selection of names for the register are recent contributions to the literature, participation in or support of relevant research programs, and referral by peers. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures. The Register includes two indexes: an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with whom they are affiliated.

  17. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  18. Prevention of mechanical failures in implanted spinal cord stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jaimie M; Schade, C M; Sasaki, John; Caraway, David L; Oakley, John C

    2006-07-01

    Introduction.  Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an effective procedure for the treatment of neuropathic extremity pain, with success rates approaching 70%. However, mechanical failures, including breakage and migration, can significantly limit the long-term effectiveness of SCS. A systematic analysis of surgical techniques was undertaken by a consensus group, coupled with extensive in vivo and in vitro biomechanical testing of system components. Methods.  A computer model based on morphometric data was used to predict movement in a standard SCS system between an anchored lead and pulse generator placed in various locations. These displacements were then used to determine a realistic range of forces exerted on components of the SCS system. Laboratory fixtures were constructed to subject leads and anchors to repetitive stresses until failure occurred. An in vivo sheep model also was used to determine system compliances and failure thresholds in a biologically realistic setting. A panel of experienced implanters then interpreted the results and related them to clinical observations. Results.  Use of a soft silastic anchor pushed through the fascia to provide a larger bend radius for the lead was associated with a time to failure 65 times longer than an anchored but unsupported lead. In addition, failures of surgical paddle leads occurred when used with an anchor, whereas without an anchor, no failures occurred to 1 million cycles. Based on these findings, the panel recommended a paramedian approach, abdominal pulse generator placement, maximizing bend radius by pushing the anchor through the fascia, and anchoring of the extension connector near the lead anchor. Discussion.  Several factors are important in longevity of SCS systems. We discovered that technical factors can make a large difference in SCS reliability and that strict attention to these "best practices" will provide the best chance for maintaining the integrity of SCS systems over the long term.

  19. Whole animal measurements of shear and adhesive forces in adult tree frogs: insights into underlying mechanisms of adhesion obtained from studying the effects of size and scale.

    PubMed

    Barnes, W Jon P; Oines, Christine; Smith, Joanna M

    2006-11-01

    This allometric study of adhesion in 15 Trinidadian tree frog species investigates how relationships between length, area and mass limit the ability of adult frog species of different sizes to adhere to inclined and overhanging surfaces. Our experiments show that hylid frogs possess an area-based wet adhesive system in which larger species are lighter than expected from isometry and adhere better than expected from their toe pad area. However, in spite of these adaptations, larger species adhere less well than smaller species. In addition to these adhesive forces, tree frogs also generate significant shear forces that scale with mass, suggesting that they are frictional forces. Toe pads detach by peeling and frogs have strategies to prevent peeling from taking place while they are adhering to surfaces, including orienting themselves head-up on slopes. The scaling of tree frog adhesion is also used to distinguish between different models for adhesion, including classic formulae for capillarity and Stefan adhesion. These classic equations grossly overestimate the adhesive forces that tree frogs produce. More promising are peeling models, designed to predict the pull-off forces of adhesive tape. However, more work is required before we can qualitatively and quantitatively describe the adhesive mechanism of tree frogs.

  20. Failure Mechanisms of Ana Slide, Eivissa Channel, Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuerza, S.; Sultan, N.; Canals, M.; Lastras, G.; Cattaneo, A.; Frigola, J.; Costa, S.; Berndt, C.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid seepage has been considered as the most plausible explanation to account for slope instabilities in the Eivissa Channel in between the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean Sea. In situ geotechnical tests and sediment cores obtained in the Ana Slide area, on the Balearic slope of the Eivissa Channel, suggest that the development of the basal failure surface (BFS) was favoured by contrasting hydro-mechanical properties between a coarse unit (U7) charged with methane and a fine-grained unit above (U6). The presence of past methane seepage has been inferred from high magnetic susceptibility values found in sediments from the headwall area and is supported by seismic reflection data. Geotechnical data from piezocone tests, laboratory analyses and numerical calculations indicate degradation of the undrained shear strength generated by methane exsolution and expansion as the only plausible mechanism to explain the origin of Ana Slide. The probability of failure for different critical failure surfaces has been investigated by using the SAMU-3D slope stability model taking into account the role of free gas in the development of the landslide. According to SAMU-3D, the most probable failure surface is related to a minimum degradation of the undrained shear strength of units U6 and U7 of 95% and a basal failure surface developed at the base of U6, which acted as a weak layer. Wheeler's theory suggests that 9% of free-gas saturation in U7 is enough to reduce the undrained shear strength by 95%. However, using the theory of the undrained equilibrium behaviour of gassy sediments we conclude that the excess fluid pressure generated by gas exsolution and expansion is not relevant to bring the slope to fail.

  1. Failure mechanism of the polymer infiltration of carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheim, Jakob; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Polymer melt infiltration is one of the feasible methods for manufacturing filter membranes out of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on large scales. Practically, however, its process suffers from low yields, and the mechanism behind this failure is rather poorly understood. Here, we investigate a failure mechanism of polymer melt infiltration of vertical aligned (VA-) CNTs. In penetrating the VA-CNT interstices, polymer melts exert a capillarity-induced attractive force laterally on CNTs at the moving meniscus, leading to locally agglomerated macroscale bunches. Such a large configurational change can deform and distort individual CNTs so much as to cause buckling or breakdown of the alignment. In view of membrane manufacturing, this irreversible distortion of nanotubes is detrimental, as it could block the transport path of the membranes. The failure mechanism of the polymer melt infiltration is largely attributed to steric hindrance and an energy penalty of confined polymer chains. Euler beam theory and scaling analysis affirm that CNTs with low aspect ratio, thick walls and sparse distribution can maintain their vertical alignment. Our results can enrich a mechanistic understanding of the polymer melt infiltration process and offer guidelines to the facile large-scale manufacturing of the CNT-polymer filter membranes.

  2. An experimental study of double-peeling mechanism inspired by biological adhesive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Raguseo, Saverio; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2017-02-01

    Double- (or multiple-) peeling systems consist of two (or numerous) tapes adhering to a substrate and having a common hinge, where the pulling force is applied. Biological systems, consisting of tape-like (or spatula-like) contact elements, are widely observed in adhesive pads of flies, beetles, spiders, and geckos. It was previously hypothesized and analytically modeled that the simultaneous use of two or more such tape-like contacts in the opposite movement of contralateral legs during ceiling locomotion leads to enhanced, robust, and stable overall attachment, if compared to independently working contact points. In this paper, this biological solution for smart adhesion is demonstrated in an experiment using elastic adhesive tapes. The obtained results not only aided in explaining the functional mechanism of biological adhesive systems, but also in providing an experimental proof for biological observations and previous theoretical models.

  3. Fibrous hyaluronic acid hydrogels that direct MSC chondrogenesis through mechanical and adhesive cues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Iris L.; Khetan, Sudhir; Baker, Brendon M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning has recently gained much interest due to its ability to form scaffolds that mimic the nanofibrous nature of the extracellular matrix, such as the size and depth-dependent alignment of collagen fibers within hyaline cartilage. While much progress has been made in developing bulk, isotropic hydrogels for tissue engineering and understanding how the microenvironment of such scaffolds affects cell response, these effects have not been extensively studied in a nanofibrous system. Here, we show that the mechanics (through intrafiber crosslink density) and adhesivity (through RGD density) of electrospun hyaluronic acid (HA) fibers significantly affect human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) interactions and gene expression. Specifically, hMSC spreading, proliferation, and focal adhesion formation were dependent on RGD density, but not on the range of fiber mechanics investigated. Moreover, traction-mediated fiber displacements generally increased with more adhesive fibers. The expression of chondrogenic markers, unlike trends in cell spreading and cytoskeletal organization, was influenced by both fiber mechanics and adhesivity, in which softer fibers and lower RGD densities generally enhanced chondrogenesis. This work not only reveals concurrent effects of mechanics and adhesivity in a fibrous context, but also highlights fibrous HA hydrogels as a promising scaffold for future cartilage repair strategies. PMID:23623322

  4. Methods of failure and reliability assessment for mechanical heart pumps.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonna M; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Throckmorton, Amy L; Tribble, Curt G; Olsen, Don B

    2005-01-01

    Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), and the Bethesda Conference. It further discusses studies that evaluate the failure, reliability, and safety of artificial blood pumps including in vitro and in vivo testing. A descriptive summary of mechanical and human error studies and methods of artificial blood pumps is detailed.

  5. Control of mesenchymal stem cell phenotype and differentiation depending on cell adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Park, H M; Kim, Y W; Kim, Y H; Varghese, S; Seok, H K; Kim, Y G; Kim, S H

    2014-11-25

    Control of cell-matrix adhesion has become an important issue in the regulation of stem cell function. In this study, a maltose-binding protein (MBP)-linked basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2)-immobilised polystyrene surface (PS-MBP-FGF2) was applied as an artificial matrix to regulate integrin-mediated signalling. We sought to characterise human mesenchymal-stem cell (hMSC) behaviour in response to two different mechanisms of cell adhesion; (i) FGF2-heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG)-mediated adhesion vs. (ii) fibronectin (FN)-integrin-mediated adhesion. Heparin inhibited hMSC adhesion to PS-MBP-FGF2 but not to FN-coated surface. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeletal re-organisation, and cell proliferation were restricted in hMSCs adhering to PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to FN-coated surface. Expression of MSC markers, such as CD105, CD90 and CD166, decreased in hMSCs expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to expression in cells expanded on FN-coated surface. hMSCs that were expanded on FN-coated surface differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic cells more readily than those that were expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Furthermore, we characterised the N-linked glycan structures of hMSCs depending on the cell adhesion mechanism using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative techniques. MS analysis revealed that 2,3-sialylated glycans, a potential marker of stem cell function, were more abundant on hMSCs expanded on FN-coated surface than on those expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Thus, the differentiation potential of hMSCs is controlled by the type of adhesion substrate that might provide an idea for the design of biomaterials to control stem cell fate. Elucidation of the glycan structure on the cell membrane may help characterise hMSC function.

  6. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Shaffer, R. A.; Smith, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A bibliography of approximately 1500 reference citations related to six problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures is presented. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the ten year period 1962-1972 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the six problem areas: (1) life prediction of structural materials; (2) fracture toughness data; (3) fracture mechanics analysis; (4) hydrogen embrittlement; (5) protective coatings; and (6) composite materials. An author index is included.

  7. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  8. Failure Mechanisms and Life Prediction of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings under Thermal Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zju, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) will play an increasingly important role in gas turbine engines because of their ability to further raise engine temperatures. However, the issue of coating durability is of major concern under high-heat-flux conditions. In particular, the accelerated coating delamination crack growth under the engine high heat-flux conditions is not well understood. In this paper, a laser heat flux technique is used to investigate the coating delamination crack propagation under realistic temperature-stress gradients and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating delamination mechanisms are investigated under various thermal loading conditions, and are correlated with coating dynamic fatigue, sintering and interfacial adhesion test results. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation driving forces for coating failure under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  9. A numerical study on intended and unintended failure mechanisms in blanking of sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Soyarslan, C.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    Metal-polymer-metal sandwich plates are widely used in the automotive and aerospace industry. As for different applications the sandwich plates can be divided into two types. They are sound-damping laminates with a polymer core much thinner than the metallic faces and low-density laminates with a core thickness of approximately 40-60% of the total thickness. One frequent process step in production of parts made of these plates is the blanking process whose hereditary effects draw the limits of further forming stages or service performance and life; e.g. the failure of the adhesive in the thermoplastic polymer interface affects the sound-damping efficiency intensively. With this motivation, we present FE simulation of an axi-symmetric blanking process of steel/polyethylene/steel sound-damping laminates. The mechanical behavior of the metallic layers was characterized by finite strain rate independent elasto-plasticity where progressive material deterioration and fracture are given account for using continuum damage mechanics (CDM). This material model is made accessible via implementations as VUMAT subroutines for ABAQUS/Explicit. Possible failure of the thermoplastic polymer which may lead to delamination of the metallic layers is modeled using ABAQUS built-in cohesive zone elements. The results show that existing intended and unintended failure modes, e.g. blanking of the metallic and thermoplastic polymer constituents as well as failure of polymer layer under shear and compression, can be effectively studied with the proposed framework for process enhancement. As a future work, a damage coupled nonlinear visco-elastic constitutive model will be devised for the simulation of the thermoplastic layer in low-density laminates.

  10. 49 CFR 191.12 - Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.12 Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports Each mechanical fitting failure, as required by § 192.1009, must be submitted on a Mechanical Fitting...

  11. 49 CFR 191.12 - Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.12 Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports Each mechanical fitting failure, as required by § 192.1009, must be submitted on a Mechanical Fitting...

  12. 49 CFR 191.12 - Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.12 Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports Each mechanical fitting failure, as required by § 192.1009, must be submitted on a Mechanical Fitting...

  13. 49 CFR 191.12 - Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.12 Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports Each mechanical fitting failure, as required by § 192.1009, must be submitted on a Mechanical Fitting...

  14. The Evolutionary Origin of Epithelial Cell-Cell Adhesion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Phillip W.; Clarke, Donald N.; Weis, William I.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Nelson, W. James

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A simple epithelium forms a barrier between the outside and the inside of an organism, and is the first organized multicellular tissue found in evolution. We examine the relationship between the evolution of epithelia and specialized cell-cell adhesion proteins comprising the classical cadherin/β-catenin/α-catenin complex (CCC). A review of the divergent functional properties of the CCC in metazoans and non-metazoans, and an updated phylogenetic coverage of the CCC using recent genomic data reveal: 1) The core CCC likely originated before the last common ancestor of unikonts and their closest bikont sister taxa. 2) Formation of the CCC may have constrained sequence evolution of the classical cadherin cytoplasmic domain and β-catenin in metazoa. 3) The α-catenin binding domain in β-catenin appears to be the favored mutation site for disrupting β-catenin function in the CCC. 4) The ancestral function of the α/β-catenin heterodimer appears to be an actin-binding module. In some metazoan groups, more complex functions of α-catenin were gained by sequence divergence in the non-actin binding (N-, M-) domains. 5) Allosteric regulation of α-catenin, rather than loss of function mutations, may have evolved for more complex regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24210433

  15. Mechanical Stability Determines Stress Fiber and Focal Adhesion Orientation.

    PubMed

    Stamenović, Dimitrije; Lazopoulos, Konstantinos A; Pirentis, Athanassios; Suki, Béla

    2009-12-01

    It is well documented in a variety of adherent cell types that in response to anisotropic signals from the microenvironment cells alter their cytoskeletal organization. Previous theoretical studies of these phenomena were focused primarily on the elasticity of cytoskeletal actin stress fibers (SFs) and of the substrate while the contribution of focal adhesions (FAs) through which the cytoskeleton is linked to the external environment has not been considered. Here we propose a mathematical model comprised of a single linearly elastic SF and two identical linearly elastic FAs of a finite size at the endpoints of the SF to investigate cytoskeletal realignment in response to uniaxial stretching of the substrate. The model also includes the contribution of the chemical potential energies of the SF and the FAs to the total potential energy of the SF-FA assembly. Using the global (Maxwell's) stability criterion, we predict stable configurations of the SF-FA assembly in response to substrate stretching. Model predictions obtained for physiologically feasible values of model parameters are consistent with experimental data from the literature. The model shows that elasticity of SFs alone can not predict their realignment during substrate stretching and that geometrical and elastic properties of SFs and FAs need to be included.

  16. Failure analysis for micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Tangyunyong, P.; Barton, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Micro-Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is an emerging technology with demonstrated potential for a wide range of applications including sensors and actuators for medical, industrial, consumer, military, automotive and instrumentation products. Failure analysis (FA) of MEMS is critically needed for the successful design, fabrication, performance analysis and reliability assurance of this new technology. Many devices have been examined using techniques developed for integrated circuit analysis, including optical inspection, scanning laser microscopy (SLM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared (IR) microscopy, light emission (LE) microscopy, acoustic microscopy and acoustic emission analysis. For example, the FIB was used to microsection microengines that developed poor performance characteristics. Subsequent SEM analysis clearly demonstrated the absence of wear on gear, hub, and pin joint bearing surfaces, contrary to expectations. Another example involved the use of infrared microscopy for thermal analysis of operating microengines. Hot spots were located, which did not involve the gear or hub, but indicated contact between comb structures which drive microengines. Voltage contrast imaging proved useful on static and operating MEMS in both the SEM and the FIB and identified electrostatic clamping as a potentially significant contributor to failure mechanisms in microengines. This work describes MEMS devices, FA techniques, failure modes, and examples of FA of MEMS.

  17. [Heart failure due to ischemia--the adaptive mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Mitu, M; Mitu, F

    1999-01-01

    Chronic myocardial ischemia is the leading cause of disturbances in myocardial contractility (myocardial infarction) or hemodynamic overload upon the left ventricle. The heart reactions consist in a series of adaptative mechanisms in order to maintain its pump function: Frank-Starling mechanism, myocardial hypertrophy and neurohumoral activation. In heart failure, the cardiac output is maintained by an increase of the preload which enhances the contractility (Frank-Starling law). Myocardial ischemia influences the systolic and diastolic function. The decrease of cardiac output leads to neurohumoral responses which, in the initial stages of cardiac failure are compensatory; along with the progression of the disease, they exert adverse effects. Increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system induces high cardiac rates, chronotropic incompetence. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system held to myocardial and vascular hypertrophy, vasoconstriction, fluid retention. Endothelin is the most powerful vasoconstrictor; its plasmatic concentrations correlate with the severity of the disease. Vasodilator mediators released in cardiac failure are the natriuretic peptide, nitric oxide, dopamine, prostacicline, bradikinin.

  18. ADHESION AND DE-ADHESION MECHANISMS AT POLYMER/METAL INTERFACES: Mechanistic Understanding Based on In Situ Studies of Buried Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmeier, G.; Stratmann, M.

    2005-08-01

    The review highlights the state-of-the-art research regarding the application of modern in situ spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques to improve the understanding of the interaction of organic molecules with metal surfaces. We also consider the chemical and electrochemical processes that lead to a de-adhesion of polymers from metal surfaces. Spectroscopic techniques such as surface-enhanced infrared or Raman spectroscopy provide molecular understanding of organic molecules and water at buried metal surfaces. This information is complementary to adhesion studies by means of atomic force microscopy and de-adhesion studies of polymer layers from metals by means of a scanning Kelvin probe. Adhesion and de-adhesion mechanisms are discussed, especially those involving humid and corrosive environments, which are the predominant and most important for metal/polymer composites in engineering applications.

  19. Adhesion and anti-adhesion of viscous fluids on solid surfaces--a study of ink transfer mechanism in waterless offset printing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Mao, Yu; Murray, Gerard; Tian, Junfei

    2008-02-15

    The transfer of a liquid under dynamic conditions onto a solid surface relies on wetting/adhesion under transient external forces. We found the phenomena associated with forced wetting and dewetting could not be explained by thermodynamic approaches which are based on surface energy and work of adhesion. This is because these approaches do not take account of the dynamic nature of the forced wetting and dewetting. This study uses ink transfer in waterless offset printing as an example to present a new understanding of adhesion and anti-adhesion of a liquid to a solid surface under dynamic conditions. We focus on the adhesion strength, instead of work of adhesion, at the ink-plate interface and experimentally quantified ink adhesion forces on the image and non-image areas of the printing plate. Based on adhesion force measurements we proposed that the formation of a weak boundary layer and/or the softening the non-image area due to solvent swelling are likely to be the mechanisms that causes ink refusal on the non-image area. AFM images are presented to show changes of the non-image surface before and after contacting with ink.

  20. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives.

  1. Adhesion mechanisms of curli subunit CsgA to abiotic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    DeBenedictis, Elizabeth P.; Liu, Jenny; Keten, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Curli fibers are functional amyloids that play a key role in biofilm structure and adhesion to various surfaces. Strong bioinspired adhesives comprising curli fibers have recently been created; however, the mechanisms curli uses to attach onto abiotic surfaces are still uncharacterized. Toward a materials-by-design approach for curli-based adhesives and multifunctional materials, we examine curli subunit adsorption onto graphene and silica surfaces through atomistic simulation. We find that both structural features and sequence influence adhesive strength, enabling the CsgA subunit to adhere strongly to both polar and nonpolar surfaces. Specifically, flexible regions facilitate adhesion to both surfaces, charged and polar residues (Arg, Lys, and Gln) enable strong interactions with silica, and six-carbon aromatic rings (Tyr and Phe) adsorb strongly to graphene. We find that adsorption not only lowers molecular mobility but also leads to loss of secondary structure, factors that must be well balanced for effective surface attachment. Both events appear to propagate through the CsgA structure as correlated motion between clusters of residues, often H-bonded between rows on adjacent β strands. To quantify this, we present a correlation analysis approach to detecting collective motion between residue groups. We find that certain clusters of residues have a higher impact on the stability of the rest of the protein structure, often polar and bulky groups within the helix core. These findings lend insight into bacterial adhesion mechanisms and reveal strategies for theory-driven design of engineered curli fibers that harness point mutations and conjugates for stronger adhesion. PMID:28138525

  2. Mechanisms of carotid body chemoreflex dysfunction during heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Harold D.; Marcus, Noah J.; Del Rio, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have drawn interest in the potential for carotid body (CB) ablation or desensitization as an effective strategy for clinical treatment and management of cardio-respiratory diseases including hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and renal failure. These disease states have in common sympathetic overactivity, which plays an important role in the development and progression of the disease and is often associated with breathing dysregulation, which in turn likely mediates or aggravates the autonomic imbalance. Evidence from both chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and animal models indicates that the CB chemoreflex is enhanced in CHF and contributes to the tonic elevation in sympathetic activity and the development of periodic breathing associated with the disease. Although this maladaptive change likely derives from altered function at all levels of the reflex arc, a tonic increase in afferent activity from CB glomus cells is likely to be a main driving force. This report will focus on our understanding of mechanisms that alter CB function in CHF and their potential translational impact on treatment of CHF. PMID:25398713

  3. The effect of interlayer adhesion on the mechanical behaviors of macroscopic graphene oxide papers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun; Liu, Lu-Qi; Zu, Sheng-Zhen; Peng, Ke; Zhou, Ding; Han, Bao-Hang; Zhang, Zhong

    2011-03-22

    High mechanical performances of macroscopic graphene oxide (GO) papers are attracting great interest owing to their merits of lightweight and multiple functionalities. However, the loading role of individual nanosheets and its effect on the mechanical properties of the macroscopic GO papers are not yet well understood. Herein, we effectively tailored the interlayer adhesions of the GO papers by introducing small molecules, that is, glutaraldehyde (GA) and water molecules, into the gallery regions. With the help of in situ Raman spectroscopy, we compared the varied load-reinforcing roles of nanosheets, and further predicted the Young's moduli of the GO papers. Systematic mechanical tests have proven that the enhancement of the tensile modulus and strength of the GA-treated GO paper arose from the improved load-bearing capability of the nanosheets. On the basis of Raman and macroscopic mechanical tests, the influences of interlayer adhesions on the fracture mechanisms of the strained GO papers were inferred.

  4. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  5. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  6. Scale Adhesion, Sulfur Content, and TBC Failure on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main effects of sulfur impurity content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of single crystal superalloys, with emphasis on scale and TBC adhesion. Eleven hundred degrees C cyclic oxidation of PWA 1480 produces scale spallation leading to a weight loss of more than 30 Mg/sq cm after 500 one-hr cycles for a sulfur content of 6 ppmw. The sulfur content was reduced to levels below 0.1 ppmw by hydrogen annealing, resulting in weight gains of only 0.5 to 1.0 Mg/sq cm after 1000 one-hr cycles. Samples were produced with various sulfur contents by adjusting the annealing temperature, time, and sample thickness (i.e., diffusion product Dt/L(exp 2)). The subsequent cyclic oxidation behavior, mapped over a sulfur content/thickness diagram, shows a transition to adherent behavior at sulfur levels equivalent to 1 monolayer of total segregation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Adhesion to the yeast cell surface as a mechanism for trapping pathogenic bacteria by Saccharomyces probiotics.

    PubMed

    Tiago, F C P; Martins, F S; Souza, E L S; Pimenta, P F P; Araujo, H R C; Castro, I M; Brandão, R L; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2012-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of probiotics as an adjuvant for the prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal pathology. The great advantage of therapy with probiotics is that they have few side effects such as selection of resistant bacteria or disturbance of the intestinal microbiota, which occur when antibiotics are used. Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the surface of probiotics instead of onto intestinal receptors could explain part of the probiotic effect. Thus, this study evaluated the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the cell wall of Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains UFMG 905, W303 and BY4741. To understand the mechanism of adhesion of pathogens to yeast, cell-wall mutants of the parental strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 were used because of the difficulty of mutating polyploid yeast, as is the case for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces boulardii. The tests of adhesion showed that, among 11 enteropathogenic bacteria tested, only Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi adhered to the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741. The presence of mannose, and to some extent bile salts, inhibited this adhesion, which was not dependent on yeast viability. Among 44 cell-wall mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, five lost the ability to fix the bacteria. Electron microscopy showed that the phenomenon of yeast-bacteria adhesion occurred both in vitro and in vivo (in the digestive tract of dixenic mice). In conclusion, some pathogenic bacteria were captured on the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, thus preventing their adhesion to specific receptors on the intestinal epithelium and their subsequent invasion of the host.

  8. Experimental Investigations Of Failure Mechanisms Associated With Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Tamarkin, T.

    2010-12-01

    Slow slip events such as very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) are detected in the Nankai accretionary prism [Ito and Obara, 2006]. It is proposed that high pore fluid pressure weakens the out-of-sequence-thrusts and mega-splay faults by reducing effective normal stress on the fault plane and consequently generates slip instability producing low stress drop VLFEs. However, the frictional behaviors and failure mechanisms associated with reduction of effective normal stress are not well understood. In this study, we conducted frictional experiments on porous sedimentary rocks with a saw-cut. Sediments with different clay content from NantroSEIZE drilling project ODP Legs 315, 316, and 322 are used as fault gouge. A new triaxial loading configuration was designed to investigate the effect of high pore pressure on frictional instability and failure modes. During the deformation experiments, samples were subjected to constant axial stress and decreasing radial stresses. Distinguishing from the conventional loading configuration in which mean stress increases during deformation, with the alternative loading path, mean stress decreases during deformation. Under fully drained conditions where pore pressure remains constant, the effective stress decreases in these experiments, analoguous to increasing pore pressure. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) frictional strength is comparable to that observed under conventional loading; 2) the rate of fracture energy release is considerably slower, which bears similar characteristics with observed slow slip events. Microstructural analyses on the deformed samples provide experimental constraints on deformation mechanisms associated with slow slip events.

  9. Knowledge Discovery Process for Characterization of Materials Failure Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.

    1999-01-01

    It is the intent of this project to provide a platform to visualize the various data collected from stress-strain testing of composite ceramic matrix materials. The data collected from the stress-strain tests are acoustic emissions (AE). As a material is subjected to a stress-strain test, various failure mechanisms occur in the material. The recorded sounds emitted during the test may correspond to various failure mechanisms. This project, thus, will give a possible way to visualize the data and data derived from the recorded AE. The stress-strain testing was performed on several composite matrix material combinations. Each of these tests produced anywhere from 1000 to 10,000+ AE events. For each AE event recorded, several characteristics in both the time and frequency domains are created. This project has two goals. First, this project will provide a summation page for a selected waveform. This page will include all of the characteristics determined from the AE event waveform along with graphs of the AE event waveform and its corresponding Power Spectrum. The other function of this project is to retrieve and display selected AE event waveforms for comparison.

  10. Mechanisms and pathways of growth failure in primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Klingseisen, Anna; Jackson, Andrew P

    2011-10-01

    The greatest difference between species is size; however, the developmental mechanisms determining organism growth remain poorly understood. Primordial dwarfism is a group of human single-gene disorders with extreme global growth failure (which includes Seckel syndrome, microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism I [MOPD] types I and II, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome). Ten genes have now been identified for microcephalic primordial dwarfism, encoding proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes including genome replication (ORC1 [origin recognition complex 1], ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), DNA damage response (ATR [ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related]), mRNA splicing (U4atac), and centrosome function (CEP152, PCNT, and CPAP). Here, we review the cellular and developmental mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these conditions and address whether further study of these genes could provide novel insight into the physiological regulation of organism growth.

  11. Mechanical Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein Through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Botello, Eric; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela L.; Frey, Eric W.; Patel, Jay M.; Nolasco, Leticia; Turner, Nancy A.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical force-induced activation of the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experiences high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force-induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF’s crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates plasma VWF (PVWF) multimers to bind platelets. Here, we showed that a pathological level of high shear stress exposure of PVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of the multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated PVWF multimers are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than nonsheared PVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of PVWF multimers.

  12. Mechanical and water soaking properties of medium density fiberboard with wood fiber and soybean protein adhesive.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Yonghui; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Ratto, Jo A; Sheng, Kuichuan; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2009-07-01

    Soybean protein is a renewable and abundant material that offers an alternative to formaldehyde-based resins. In this study, soybean protein was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as an adhesive for wood fiber medium density fiberboard (MDF) preparation. Second-order response surface regression models were used to study the effects and interactions of initial moisture content (IMC) of coated wood fiber, press time (PT) and temperature on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Results showed that IMC of coated fiber was the dominant influencing factor. Mechanical and soaking properties improved as IMC increased and reached their highest point at an IMC of 35%. Press time and temperature also had a significant effect on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Second-order regression results showed that there were strong relationships between mechanical and soaking properties of MDF and processing parameters. Properties of MDF made using soybean protein adhesive are similar to those of commercial board.

  13. Transient adhesion and conductance phenomena in initial nanoscale mechanical contacts between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2013-11-29

    We report on transient adhesion and conductance phenomena associated with tip wetting in mechanical contacts produced by the indentation of a clean W(111) tip into a Au(111) surface. A combination of atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy was used to carry out indentation and to image residual impressions in ultra-high vacuum. The ∼7 nm radii tips used in these experiments were prepared and characterized by field ion microscopy in the same instrument. The very first indentations of the tungsten tips show larger conductance and pull-off adhesive forces than subsequent indentations. After ∼30 indentations to a depth of ∼1.7 nm, the maximum conductance and adhesion forces reach steady state values approximately 12 ×  and 6 ×  smaller than their initial value. Indentation of W(111) tips into Cu(100) was also performed to investigate the universality of tip wetting phenomena with a different substrate. We propose a model from contact mechanics considerations which quantitatively reproduces the observed decay rate of the conductance and adhesion drops with a 1/e decay constant of 9-14 indentation cycles. The results show that the surface composition of an indenting tip plays an important role in defining the mechanical and electrical properties of indentation contacts.

  14. A bio-inspired swellable microneedle adhesive for mechanical interlocking with tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung Yun; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D.; Sisk, Geoffroy C.; Park, Kyeng Min; Cho, Woo Kyung; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving significant adhesion to soft tissues while minimizing tissue damage poses a considerable clinical challenge. Chemical-based adhesives require tissue-specific reactive chemistry, typically inducing a significant inflammatory response. Staples are fraught with limitations including high-localized tissue stress and increased risk of infection, and nerve and blood vessel damage. Here inspired by the endoparasite Pomphorhynchus laevis, which swells its proboscis to attach to its host’s intestinal wall, we have developed a biphasic microneedle array that mechanically interlocks with tissue through swellable microneedle tips, achieving ~3.5-fold increase in adhesion strength compared with staples in skin graft fixation, and removal force of ~4.5 N cm-2 from intestinal mucosal tissue. Comprising a poly(styrene)-block-poly(acrylic acid) swellable tip and non-swellable polystyrene core, conical microneedles penetrate tissue with minimal insertion force and depth, yet high adhesion strength in their swollen state. Uniquely, this design provides universal soft tissue adhesion with minimal damage, less traumatic removal, reduced risk of infection and delivery of bioactive therapeutics.

  15. A Bio-Inspired Swellable Microneedle Adhesive for Mechanical Interlocking with Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seung Yun; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D.; Sisk, Geoffroy C.; Park, Kyeng Min; Cho, Woo Kyung; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving significant adhesion to soft tissues while minimizing tissue damage poses a considerable clinical challenge. Chemical-based adhesives require tissue-specific reactive chemistry, typically inducing a significant inflammatory response. Staples are fraught with limitations including high-localized tissue stress and increased risk of infection, and nerve and blood vessel damage. Here, inspired by the endoparasite Pomphorhynchus laevis which swells its proboscis to attach to its host’s intestinal wall, we have developed a biphasic microneedle array that mechanically interlocks with tissue through swellable microneedle tips, achieving ~ 3.5 fold increase in adhesion strength compared to staples in skin graft fixation, and removal force of ~ 4.5 N/cm2 from intestinal mucosal tissue. Comprising a poly(styrene)-block-poly(acrylic acid) swellable tip and non-swellable polystyrene core, conical microneedles penetrate tissue with minimal insertion force and depth, yet high adhesion strength in their swollen state. Uniquely, this design provides universal soft tissue adhesion with minimal damage, less traumatic removal, reduced risk of infection and delivery of bioactive therapeutics. PMID:23591869

  16. Viscous-poroelastic interaction as mechanism to create adhesion in frogs' toe pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulchinsky, A.; Gat, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    The toe pads of frogs consist of soft hexagonal structures and a viscous liquid contained between and within the hexagonal structures. It has been hypothesized that this configuration creates adhesion by allowing for long range capillary forces, or alternatively, by allowing for exit of the liquid and thus improving contact of the toe pad. In this work we suggest interaction between viscosity and elasticity as a mechanism to create temporary adhesion, even in the absence of capillary effects or van der Waals forces. We initially illustrate this concept experimentally by a simplified configuration consisting of two surfaces connected by a liquid bridge and elastic springs. We then utilize poroelastic mixture theory and model frog's toe pads as an elastic porous medium, immersed within a viscous liquid and pressed against a rigid rough surface. The flow between the surface and the toe pad is modeled by the lubrication approximation. Inertia is neglected and analysis of the elastic-viscous dynamics yields a governing partial differential equation describing the flow and stress within the porous medium. Several solutions of the governing equation are presented and show a temporary adhesion due to stress created at the contact surface between the solids. This work thus may explain how some frogs (such as the torrent frog) maintain adhesion underwater and the reason for the periodic repositioning of frogs' toe pads during adhesion to surfaces.

  17. Plasma arc versus halogen light-curing of adhesive-precoated orthodontic brackets: a 12-month clinical study of bond failures.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Scribante, Andrea

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the performance of adhesive-precoated brackets cured with 2 different light-curing units (conventional halogen light and plasma arc light). Thirty patients treated with fixed appliances were included in the investigation. Each patient's mouth was divided by the split-mouth design into 4 quadrants. In 15 randomly selected patients, the maxillary left and mandibular right quadrants were cured with the halogen light, and the remaining quadrants were cured with the plasma arc light. In the other 15 patients, the quadrants were inverted. A total of 600 adhesive precoated stainless steel brackets were examined: 300 were cured with a conventional halogen light for 20 seconds, and the others were cured with the plasma arc light for 5 seconds. The number, cause, and date of bracket failures were recorded for each light-curing unit over 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, and the log-rank test. No statistically significant differences in bond failure rates were found between the adhesive-precoated brackets cured with the halogen light and those cured with the plasma arc light; neither were any significant differences in performance found with each light-curing unit between the maxillary and mandibular arches. Plasma arc lights can be considered an advantageous alternative to conventional light curing, because they enable the clinician to reduce the curing time of adhesive-precoated orthodontic brackets without significantly affecting their bond failure rate.

  18. Failure Mechanisms in High Chrome Oxide Gasifier Refractories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing

    2011-04-01

    Gasification is a high-temperature, high-pressure chemical process used to convert a carbon feedstock into CO and H2 (syngas) for use in power generation and the production of chemicals. It is also a leading candidate as a source of hydrogen in a hydrogen economy and is one of several technologies expected to see increased use in advanced fossil fuel power systems in the future. Gasification is being evaluated because of its high efficiency, its ability to capture CO2 for sequestration or reuse in other applications, and its potential for carbon feedstock fuel flexibility. At the heart of the gasification process is a gasifier, a high pressure chemical reaction vessel used to contain the interactions between carbon and water in a shortage of oxygen, producing syngas. The gasifier is lined with high chrome oxide materials to protect the containment vessel. Gasifiers are complex systems, and failure of the refractories used to line them was identified by industry as a limitation to their reliability and availability and to their increased use. NETL researchers have examined spent high-Cr2O3 (over 90 pct Cr2O3) refractories from numerous gasifiers to determine in-service failure mechanisms. This analysis revealed that premature failure of the high chrome oxide refractories was related to ash in the carbon feedstock, which liquefies during gasification and interacts with the refractories, leading to wear by chemical dissolution or spalling (structural and chemical). A discussion of this postmortem wear of spent refractory materials and of thermodynamic modeling used to explain microstructural changes leading to wear are explained in this article. This information will serve the basis to develop improved performance refractory materials.

  19. Effect of adhesive on the morphology and mechanical properties of electrospun fibrous mat of cellulose acetate.

    PubMed

    Baek, Woo-Il; Pant, Hem Raj; Nam, Ki-Taek; Nirmala, R; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Il; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2011-09-27

    Ultrafine fibers of cellulose acetate/poly(butyl acrylate) (CA/PBA) composite in which PBA acted as an adhesive and CA acted as a matrix, were successfully prepared as fibrous mat via electrospinning. The morphology observation from the electrospun CA/PBA composite fibers, after treatment with heat hardener, revealed that the fibers were cylindrical and had point-bonded structures. SEM, FT-IR spectra, Raman spectra, TGA analysis, and mechanical properties measurement were used to study the different properties of hybrid mats. The tensile strength of blend fibrous electrospun mats was found to be effectively increased. This resultant enhancement of the mechanical properties of polymer fibrous mats, caused by generating the point-bonded structures (due to adhesive), could increase the number of potential applications of mechanically weak electrospun CA fibers.

  20. Molecular mechanisms underlying synergistic adhesion of sickle red blood cells by hypoxia and low nitric oxide bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Gutsaeva, Diana R; Montero-Huerta, Pedro; Parkerson, James B; Yerigenahally, Shobha D; Ikuta, Tohru; Head, C Alvin

    2014-03-20

    The molecular mechanisms by which nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability modulates the clinical expression of sickle cell disease (SCD) remain elusive. We investigated the effect of hypoxia and NO bioavailability on sickle red blood cell (sRBC) adhesion using mice deficient for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) because their NO metabolite levels are similar to those of SCD mice but without hypoxemia. Whereas sRBC adhesion to endothelial cells in eNOS-deficient mice was synergistically upregulated at the onset of hypoxia, leukocyte adhesion was unaffected. Restoring NO metabolite levels to physiological levels markedly reduced sRBC adhesion to levels seen under normoxia. These results indicate that sRBC adherence to endothelial cells increases in response to hypoxia prior to leukocyte adherence, and that low NO bioavailability synergistically upregulates sRBC adhesion under hypoxia. Although multiple adhesion molecules mediate sRBC adhesion, we found a central role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Hypoxia and low NO bioavailability upregulated P-selectin expression in endothelial cells in an additive manner through p38 kinase pathways. These results demonstrate novel cellular and signaling mechanisms that regulate sRBC adhesion under hypoxia and low NO bioavailability. Importantly, these findings point us toward new molecular targets to inhibit cell adhesion in SCD.

  1. Joining technologies for the 1990s: Welding, brazing, soldering, mechanical, explosive, solid-state, adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor); Stein, Bland A. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Society, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers Conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  2. United we stand: Adhesion and molecular mechanisms driving cell fusion across species.

    PubMed

    Zito, Francesca; Lampiasi, Nadia; Kireev, Igor; Russo, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    Cell-cell fusion is a physiological process playing an essential role for fertilization, shaping organs, tissue repair and immune defense in multicellular organisms. Recent research in the field aims to understand why two or more cells fuse each other and to decipher the general mechanisms regulating this process. Few basic and general steps can be identified, i.e. migration, adhesion and fusion, which are common to different types of cells. As pre-fused and fused cells undergo dramatic changes in their ultrastructure and behavior, the coordinated action of multiple factors is required, including adhesion molecules, cell surface receptors, intracellular kinases, transcription factors, and miRNAs. Although a number of reviews on cell-cell fusion have been published over the years, comprehensive reviews that broadly summarize this process including extracellular and intracellular cues are lacking. For example, a link between cell fusion and adhesive molecules and/or miRNAs has rarely been highlighted in the recent literature. In this review, we will summarize some molecular mechanisms controlling the process of somatic cell-cell fusion during embryonic development. We will specially focus on adhesive molecules, ECM components and miRNAs, providing a summary of important findings on their role in mediating this process in few model systems, in vertebrate and invertebrate organisms.

  3. Characterization of Mechanical Properties at the Micro/Nano Scale: Stiction Failure of MEMS, High-Frequency Michelson Interferometry and Carbon NanoFibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheyraddini Mousavi, Arash

    Different forces scale differently with decreasing length scales. Van der Waals and surface tension are generally ignored at the macro scale, but can become dominant at the micro and nano scales. This fact, combined with the considerable compliance and large surface areas of micro and nano devices, can leads to adhesion in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and NanoElectroMechanical Systems (NEMS) - a.k.a. stiction-failure. The adhesive forces between MEMS devices leading to stiction failure are characterized in this dissertation analytically and experimentally. Specifically, the adhesion energy of poly-Si μcantilevers are determined experimentally through Mode II and mixed Mode I&II crack propagation experiments. Furthermore, the description of a high-frequency Michelson Interferometer is discussed for imaging of crack propagation of the μcantilevers with their substrate at the nano-scale and harmonic imaging of MEMS/NEMS. Van der Waals forces are also responsible for the adhesion in nonwoven carbon nanofiber networks. Experimental and modeling results are presented for the mechanical and electrical properties of nonwoven (random entanglements) of carbon nanofibers under relatively low and high-loads, both in tensions and compression. It was also observed that the structural integrity of these networks is controlled by mechanical entanglement and flexural rigidity of individual fibers as well as Hertzian forces at the fiber/fiber interface.

  4. Mechanisms of compressive failure in woven composites and stitched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Inman, R. V.; Morris, W. L.; Schroeder, S.

    1992-01-01

    Stitched laminates and angle interlock woven composites have been studied in uniaxial, in-plane, monotonic compression. Failure mechanisms have been found to depend strongly on both the reinforcement architecture and the degree of constraint imposed by the loading grips. Stitched laminates show higher compressive strength, but are brittle, possessing no load bearing capacity beyond the strain for peak load. Post-mortem inspection shows a localized shear band of buckled and broken fibers, which is evidently the product of an unstably propagating kink band. Similar shear bands are found in the woven composites if the constraint of lateral displacements is weak; but, under strong constraint, damage is not localized but distributed throughout the gauge section. While the woven composites tested are weaker than the stitched laminates, they continue to bear significant loads to compressive strains of approx. 15 percent, even when most damage is confined to a shear band.

  5. Failure Mechanism for Thermal Fatigue of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giolli, C.; Scrivani, A.; Rizzi, G.; Borgioli, F.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.

    2009-06-01

    Thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), consisting of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and yttria-partially stabilized zirconia top coat with different porosity values, were produced by air plasma spray (APS). The thermal fatigue resistance limit of the TBCs was tested by furnace cycling tests (FCT) according to the specifications of an original equipment manufacturer (OEM). The morphology, residual stresses, and micromechanical properties (microhardness, indentation fracture toughness) of the TBC systems before and after FCT were analyzed. The thermal fatigue resistance increases with the amount of porosity in the top coat. The compressive in-plane stresses increase in the TBC systems after thermal cycling; nevertheless the increasing rate has a trend contrary to the porosity level of top coat. The data suggest that the spallation happens at the TGO/top coat interface. The failure mechanism of thick TBCs was found to be similar to that of conventional thin TBC systems made by APS.

  6. Structural remodeling and mechanical function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Bridget Louise; Smaill, Bruce Henry; LeGrice, Ian John

    2012-02-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is the three-dimensional scaffold that defines the geometry and muscular architecture of the cardiac chambers and transmits forces produced during the cardiac cycle throughout the heart wall. The cardiac ECM is an active system that responds to the stresses to which it is exposed and in the normal heart is adapted to facilitate efficient mechanical function. There are marked differences in the short- and medium-term changes in ventricular geometry and cardiac ECM that occur as a result of volume overload, hypertension, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. Despite this, there is a widespread view that a common remodeling "phenotype" governs the final progression to end-stage heart failure in different forms of heart disease. In this review article, we make the case that this interpretation is not consistent with the clinical and experimental data on the topic. We argue that there is a need for new theoretical and experimental models that will enable stresses acting on the ECM and resultant deformations to be estimated more accurately and provide better spatial resolution of local signaling mechanisms that are activated as a result. These developments are necessary to link the effects of structural remodeling with altered cardiac mechanical function.

  7. Doxorubicin induced heart failure: Phenotype and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Maria A.; Edwards, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Long term survival of childhood cancers is now more than 70%. Anthracyclines, including doxorubicin, are some of the most efficacious anticancer drugs available. However, its use as a chemotherapeutic agent is severely hindered by its dose-limiting toxicities. Most notably observed is cardiotoxicity, but other organ systems are also degraded by doxorubicin use. Despite the years of its use and the amount of information written about this drug, an understanding of its cellular mechanisms is not fully appreciated. The mechanisms by which doxorubicin induces cytotoxicity in target cancer cells have given insight about how the drug damages cardiomyocytes. The major mechanisms of doxorubicin actions are thought to be as an oxidant generator and as an inhibitor of topoisomerase 2. However, other signaling pathways are also invoked with significant consequences for the cardiomyocyte. Further the interaction between oxidant generation and topoisomerase function has only recently been appreciated and the consequences of this interaction are still not fully understood. The unfortunate consequences of doxorubicin within cardiomyocytes have promoted the search for new drugs and methods that can prevent or reverse the damage caused to the heart after treatment in cancer patients. Alternative protocols have lessened the impact on newly diagnosed cancer patients. However the years of doxorubicin use have generated a need for monitoring the onset of cardiotoxicity as well as understanding its potential long-term consequences. Although a fairly clear understanding of the short-term pathologic mechanisms of doxorubicin actions has been achieved, the long-term mechanisms of doxorubicin induced heart failure remain to be carefully delineated. PMID:27213178

  8. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  9. Strong mechanical adhesion of gold electroless contacts on CdZnTe deposited by alcoholic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, G.; Nasi, L.; Bettelli, M.; Zambelli, N.; Calestani, D.; Zappettini, A.

    2017-02-01

    CdZnTe crystals are nowadays employed as X-ray detectors for a number of applications, such as medical imaging, security, and environmental monitoring. One of the main difficulties connected with CdZnTe-based detector processing is the poor contact adhesion that affect bonding procedures and device long term stability. We have shown that it is possible to obtain mechanically stable contacts by common electroless deposition using alcoholic solutions instead of water solutions. The contacts show blocking current-voltage characteristic that is required for obtaining spectroscopic detectors. Nanoscale-resolved chemical analysis indicated that the improved mechanical adhesion is due to a better control of the stoichiometry of the CdZnTe layer below the contact.

  10. Computational and numerical aspects of using the integral equation method for adhesive layer fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Giurgiutiu, V.; Ionita, A.; Dillard, D.A.; Graffeo, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    Fracture mechanics analysis of adhesively bonded joints has attracted considerable attention in recent years. A possible approach to the analysis of adhesive layer cracks is to study a brittle adhesive between 2 elastic half-planes representing the substrates. A 2-material 3-region elasticity problem is set up and has to be solved. A modeling technique based on the work of Fleck, Hutchinson, and Suo is used. Two complex potential problems using Muskelishvili`s formulation are set up for the 3-region, 2-material model: (a) a distribution of edge dislocations is employed to simulate the crack and its near field; and (b) a crack-free problem is used to simulate the effect of the external loading applied in the far field. Superposition of the two problems is followed by matching tractions and displacements at the bimaterial boundaries. The Cauchy principal value integral is used to treat the singularities. Imposing the traction-free boundary conditions over the entire crack length yielded a linear system of two integral equations. The parameters of the problem are Dundurs` elastic mismatch coefficients, {alpha} and {beta}, and the ratio c/H representing the geometric position of the crack in the adhesive layer.

  11. Comparing the mechanical influence of vinculin, focal adhesion kinase and p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, Anna H.; Diez, Gerold; Alonso, Jose-Luis

    2009-02-13

    Cytoskeletal reorganization is an ongoing process when cells adhere, move or invade extracellular substrates. The cellular force generation and transmission are determined by the intactness of the actomyosin-(focal adhesion complex)-integrin connection. We investigated the intracellular course of action in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the nuclear matrix protein p53 using magnetic tweezer and nanoparticle tracking techniques. Results show that the lack of these proteins decrease cellular stiffness and affect cell rheological behavior. The decrease in cellular binding strength was higher in FAK- to vinculin-deficient cells, whilst p53-deficient cells showed no effect compared to wildtype cells. The intracellular cytoskeletal activity was lowest in wildtype cells, but increased in the following order when cells lacked FAK+p53 > p53 > vinculin. In summary, cell mechanical processes are differently affected by the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and FAK than by the nuclear matrix protein, p53.

  12. Tablet mechanics depend on nano and micro scale adhesion, lubrication and structure.

    PubMed

    Badal Tejedor, Maria; Nordgren, Niklas; Schuleit, Michael; Rutland, Mark W; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Tablets are the most convenient form for drug administration. However, despite the ease of manufacturing problems such as powder adhesion occur during the production process. This study presents surface and structural characterization of tablets formulated with commonly used excipients (microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), lactose, mannitol, magnesium (Mg) stearate) pressed under different compaction conditions. Tablet surface analyses were performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical properties of the tablets were evaluated with a tablet hardness test. Local adhesion detected by AFM decreased when Mg stearate was present in the formulation. Moreover, the tablet strength of plastically deformable excipients such as MCC was significantly decreased after addition of Mg stearate. Combined these facts indicate that Mg stearate affects the particle-particle bonding and thus elastic recovery. The MCC excipient also displayed the highest hardness which is characteristic for a highly cohesive material. This is discussed in the view of the relatively high adhesion found between MCC and a hydrophilic probe at the nanoscale using AFM. In contrast, the tablet strength of brittle materials like lactose and mannitol is unaffected by Mg stearate. Thus fracture occurs within the excipient particles and not at particle boundaries, creating new surfaces not previously exposed to Mg stearate. Such uncoated surfaces may well promote adhesive interactions with tools during manufacture.

  13. Mechanics of leukocyte deformation and adhesion to endothelium in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Cao, J; Struble, E J; Lipowsky, H H

    1999-01-01

    The mechanics of leukocyte [white blood cell (WBC)] deformation and adhesion to endothelial cells (EC) in shear flow has been investigated. Experimental data on transient WBC-EC adhesion were obtained from in vivo measurements. Microscopic images of WBC-EC contact during incipient WBC rolling revealed that for a given wall shear stress, the contact area increases with time as new bonds are formed at the leading edge, and then decreases with time as the trailing edge of the WBC membrane peels away from the EC. A two-dimensional model (2D) was developed consisting of an elastic ring adhered to a surface under fluid stresses. This ring represents an actin-rich WBC cortical layer and contains an incompressible fluid as the cell interior. All molecular bonds are modeled as elastic springs distributed in the WBC-EC contact region. Variations of the proportionality between wall shear stress (tau(w)) in the vicinity of the WBC and the resulting drag force (F(s)), i.e., F(s)/tau(w), reveal its decrease with WBC deformation and increasing vessel channel height (2D). The computations also find that the peeling zone between adherent WBC and EC may account for less than 5% of the total contact interface. Computational studies describe the WBC-EC adhesion and the extent of WBC deformation during the adhesive process.

  14. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  15. On study of nonclassical problems of fracture and failure mechanics and related mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    Nonclassical problems of fracture and failure mechanics that have been analyzed by the author and his collaborators at the S. P. Timoshenko Institute of Mechanics (Kiev, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) during the past forty years are considered in brief. The results of the analysis are presented in a form that would be quite informative for the majority of experts interested in various fundamental and applied aspects of fracture and failure problems including the identification of related mechanisms. This paper was prepared on invitation of the Editorial Board of the journal "Annals. The European Academy of Sciences" and may be considered as an Extended Pascal Medal Lecture (The 2007 Blaise Pascal Medal in Materials Sciences of the EAS)

  16. Simulated Hail Ice Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanism at Quasi-Static Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan M.

    Hail is a significant threat to aircraft both on the ground and in the air. Aeronautical engineers are interested in better understanding the properties of hail to improve the safety of new aircraft. However, the failure mechanism and mechanical properties of hail, as opposed to clear ice, are not well understood. A literature review identifies basic mechanical properties of ice and a failure mechanism based upon the state of stress within an ice sphere is proposed. To better understand the properties of Simulated Hail Ice (SHI), several tests were conducted using both clear and cotton fiber reinforced ice. Pictures were taken to show the internal crystal structure of SHI. SHI crush tests were conducted to identify the overall force-displacement trends at various quasi-static strain rates. High speed photography was also used to visually track the failure mechanism of spherical SHI. Compression tests were done to measure the compression strength of SHI and results were compared to literature data. Fracture toughness tests were conducted to identify the crack resistance of SHI. Results from testing clear ice samples were successfully compared to previously published literature data to instill confidence in the testing methods. The methods were subsequently used to test and characterize the cotton fiber reinforced ice.

  17. Mechanism underlying renal failure caused by pathogenic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Jae-Chen, Shin; Young-Joo, Jeon; Seon-Min, Park; Kang Seok, Seo; Jung-Hyun, Shim; Jung-Il, Chae

    2015-03-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly causes nosocomial infections. Systemic candidiasis is encountered with increasing frequency in immunocompromised hosts, leading to renal failure that results in severe morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the mechanisms underlying kidney susceptibility following infection with several C. albicans strains, such as B311 and SC5314. Fungal growth of the highly virulent SC5314 strain was 10(3)-fold higher compared to the nonpathogenic B311 strain in the kidneys. An intravenous challenge of SC5314 in mice, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine levels, which resulted in mortality at 8 or 35 days after infection in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas all the B311-infected mice had BUN and creatinine levels in the normal range and survived. Whether virulent C. albicans may escape clearance by activating signaling pathways that lead to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, was investigated. B311 infections significantly elevated TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression in the kidneys, whereas the expression in SC5314-infected mice remained unchanged. Furthermore, B311 infection significantly elevated the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results indicated that the less virulent strains of C. albicans induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice. These results determined that an impairment of the protective mechanisms occurred in the kidneys with virulent C. albicans infection.

  18. Calcium cycling proteins and heart failure: mechanisms and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent signaling is highly regulated in cardiomyocytes and determines the force of cardiac muscle contraction. Ca2+ cycling refers to the release and reuptake of intracellular Ca2+ that drives muscle contraction and relaxation. In failing hearts, Ca2+ cycling is profoundly altered, resulting in impaired contractility and fatal cardiac arrhythmias. The key defects in Ca2+ cycling occur at the level of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a Ca2+ storage organelle in muscle. Defects in the regulation of Ca2+ cycling proteins including the ryanodine receptor 2, cardiac (RyR2)/Ca2+ release channel macromolecular complexes and the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2a (SERCA2a)/phospholamban complex contribute to heart failure. RyR2s are oxidized, nitrosylated, and PKA hyperphosphorylated, resulting in "leaky" channels in failing hearts. These leaky RyR2s contribute to depletion of Ca2+ from the SR, and the leaking Ca2+ depolarizes cardiomyocytes and triggers fatal arrhythmias. SERCA2a is downregulated and phospholamban is hypophosphorylated in failing hearts, resulting in impaired SR Ca2+ reuptake that conspires with leaky RyR2 to deplete SR Ca2+. Two new therapeutic strategies for heart failure (HF) are now being tested in clinical trials: (a) fixing the leak in RyR2 channels with a novel class of Ca2+-release channel stabilizers called Rycals and (b) increasing expression of SERCA2a to improve SR Ca2+ reuptake with viral-mediated gene therapy. There are many potential opportunities for additional mechanism-based therapeutics involving the machinery that regulates Ca2+ cycling in the heart.

  19. Failure mechanisms in composite panels subjected to underwater impulsive loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latourte, Félix; Grégoire, David; Zenkert, Dan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2011-08-01

    This work examines the performance of composite panels when subjected to underwater impulsive loads. The scaled fluid-structure experimental methodology developed by Espinosa and co-workers was employed. Failure modes, damage mechanisms and their distributions were identified and quantified for composite monolithic and sandwich panels subjected to typical blast loadings. The temporal evolutions of panel deflection and center deflection histories were obtained from shadow Moiré fringes acquired in real time by means of high speed photography. A linear relationship of zero intercept between peak center deflections versus applied impulse per areal mass was obtained for composite monolithic panels. For composite sandwich panels, the relationship between maximum center deflection versus applied impulse per areal mass was found to be approximately bilinear but with a higher slope. Performance improvement of sandwich versus monolithic composite panels was, therefore, established specially at sufficiently high impulses per areal mass ( I0/ M¯>170 m s -1). Severe failure was observed in solid panels subjected to impulses per areal mass larger than 300 m s -1. Extensive fiber fracture occurred in the center of the panels, where cracks formed a cross pattern through the plate thickness and delamination was very extensive on the sample edges due to bending effects. Similar levels of damage were observed in sandwich panels but at much higher impulses per areal mass. The experimental work reported in this paper encompasses not only characterization of the dynamic performance of monolithic and sandwich panels but also post-mortem characterization by means of both non-destructive and microscopy techniques. The spatial distribution of delamination and matrix cracking were quantified, as a function of applied impulse, in both monolithic and sandwich panels. The extent of core crushing was also quantified in the case of sandwich panels. The quantified variables represent ideal

  20. A mixture Weibull proportional hazard model for mechanical system failure prediction utilising lifetime and monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Hua, Cheng; Xu, Guanghua

    2014-02-01

    As mechanical systems increase in complexity, it is becoming more and more common to observe multiple failure modes. The system failure can be regarded as the result of interaction and competition between different failure modes. It is therefore necessary to combine multiple failure modes when analysing the failure of an overall system. In this paper, a mixture Weibull proportional hazard model (MWPHM) is proposed to predict the failure of a mechanical system with multiple failure modes. The mixed model parameters are estimated by combining historical lifetime and monitoring data of all failure modes. In addition, the system failure probability density is obtained by proportionally mixing the failure probability density of multiple failure modes. Monitoring data are input into the MWPHM to estimate the system reliability and predict the system failure time. A simulated sample set is used to verify the ability of the MWPHM to model multiple failure modes. Finally, the MWPHM and the traditional Weibull proportional hazard model (WPHM) are applied to a high-pressure water descaling pump, which has two failure modes: sealing ring wear and thrust bearing damage. Results show that the MWPHM is greatly superior in system failure prediction to the WPHM.

  1. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  2. Investigation of Interface States and Failure Mechanisms in Mnos Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsing-Liang

    The objective of this dissertation is to conduct a quantitative study of the interface state characteristics at Si-SiO(,2) interface and the failure mechanisms in the silicon MNOS nonvolatile memory devices under different write/erase (W/E) cycling conditions. The main thrust of this research is to quantitatively characterize the interface states in MNOS devices and to correlate the results of the measurements to the failure mechanisms in the exercised MNOS devices for W/E cycles up to 1 x 10('11) cycles. The Constant-Capacitance Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (CC-DLTS) technique is employed for the first time to characterize the interface states in the MNOS device. The existing theory for the CC-DLTS technique is modified to analyze the interface state density and electron capture cross sections of the trap states at Si-SiO(,2) interface. An exact equivalent circuit model for the p('+)-gridded MNOS capacitors is developed to predict the high frequency C -V behavior in the exercised MNOS devices. The results show little change in the interface state density was observed for W/E cycles less than 1 x 10('7) and increased rapidly for W/E cycles greater than 1 x 10('7). For W/E cycles greater than 5 x 10('9), a gradual increase in interface state density with W/E cyclings was observed. The negative shift of threshold voltage in the exercised MNOS devices can be attributed to the creation of interface states for W/E cycles less than 10('9) and primarily due to the generation of interface states for W/E cycles exceeding 1 x 10('9). The increase in interface state densities and the degradation of the thin oxide layer after prolonged W/E cycling increase the back tunneling current which results in the increase of retention decay rate. Furthermore, mobility degradation in the inversion layer was observed in the MNOS transistors for W/E cycling exceeds 10('9). This is attributed to the generation of surface state densities. Improvement in retention and endurance of the

  3. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  4. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  5. A zipper network model of the failure mechanics of extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Michael C; Jesudason, Rajiv; Majumdar, Arnab; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Stone, Phillip J; Nugent, Matthew A; Suki, Béla

    2009-01-27

    Mechanical failure of soft tissues is characteristic of life-threatening diseases, including capillary stress failure, pulmonary emphysema, and vessel wall aneurysms. Failure occurs when mechanical forces are sufficiently high to rupture the enzymatically weakened extracellular matrix (ECM). Elastin, an important structural ECM protein, is known to stretch beyond 200% strain before failing. However, ECM constructs and native vessel walls composed primarily of elastin and proteoglycans (PGs) have been found to fail at much lower strains. In this study, we hypothesized that PGs significantly contribute to tissue failure. To test this, we developed a zipper network model (ZNM), in which springs representing elastin are organized into long wavy fibers in a zipper-like formation and placed within a network of springs mimicking PGs. Elastin and PG springs possessed distinct mechanical and failure properties. Simulations using the ZNM showed that the failure of PGs alone reduces the global failure strain of the ECM well below that of elastin, and hence, digestion of elastin does not influence the failure strain. Network analysis suggested that whereas PGs drive the failure process and define the failure strain, elastin determines the peak and failure stresses. Predictions of the ZNM were experimentally confirmed by measuring the failure properties of engineered elastin-rich ECM constructs before and after digestion with trypsin, which cleaves the core protein of PGs without affecting elastin. This study reveals a role for PGs in the failure properties of engineered and native ECM with implications for the design of engineered tissues.

  6. Effects on film structure on mechanical and adhesion properties of latex films

    SciTech Connect

    Charmeau, J.Y.; Holl, Y.; Kientz, E.

    1995-12-31

    In order to investigate the effect of the particular structure of latex films on mechanical (stress-strain behavior) and adhesion (measured by peeling) properties, this work compares these characteristics for latex films and corresponding {open_quotes}solution films{close_quotes}. Solution films were obtained by dissolving the latex film in an appropriate solvent and forming a new film by evaporating the solvent. Four different systems were studied. It was shown that latex films have Young`s moduli systematically much higher than the corresponding solution films. This is due to the fact that the hydrophilic shells of the latex particles form a continuous phase in the latex film which increases the modulus thanks to polar interactions. However, adhesion energy for latex films is always smaller than for solution films. This is interpreted in terms of structure of the film-support interface and dissipative processes within the bulk of the films.

  7. 9-cis-retinoic acid promotes cell adhesion through integrin dependent and independent mechanisms across immune lineages.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett T; Chen, Jianming; Miller, Jabin; Morrow, Rebekah L; Lingo, Joshuah D; Merrell, Kaitlin; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Bridges, Lance C

    2013-05-01

    Retinoids are essential in the proper establishment and maintenance of immunity. Although retinoids are implicated in immune related processes, their role in immune cell adhesion has not been well established. In this study, the effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) on human hematopoietic cell adhesion was investigated. 9-cis-RA treatment specifically induced cell adhesion of the human immune cell lines HuT-78, NB4, RPMI 8866 and U937. Due to the prominent role of integrin receptors in mediating immune cell adhesion, we sought to evaluate if cell adhesion was integrin-dependent. By employing a variety of integrin antagonist including function-blocking antibodies and EDTA, we establish that 9-cis-RA prompts immune cell adhesion through established integrin receptors in addition to a novel integrin-independent process. The novel integrin-independent adhesion required the presence of retinoid and was attenuated by treatment with synthetic corticosteroids. Finally, we demonstrate that 9-cis-RA treatment of primary murine B-cells induces ex vivo adhesion that persists in the absence of integrin function. Our study is the first to demonstrate that 9-cis-RA influences immune cell adhesion through at least two functionally distinct mechanisms.

  8. Mechanical and cell-to-cell adhesive properties of aggregated Methanosarcina.

    PubMed

    Milkevych, V; Donose, B C; Juste-Poinapen, N; Batstone, D J

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical and adhesive properties as well as the turgor pressure of microbes play an important role in cell growth and aggregation. By applying AFM together with finite element modelling, one can determine the cell wall structural homogeneity, mechanical and cell-to-cell adhesive properties for aggregated Methanosarcina barkeri cells. This also allows a novel approach to determine in-aggregate turgor pressure determination. Analyzing the AFM force-indentation response of the aggregates under loads less than 10 nN, our study reveals structural inhomogeneity of the polymeric part of the cell wall material and suggests that the cell wall consists of two layers of methanochondroitin (external: with a thickness of 3 ± 1 nm and internal: with a thickness of 169 ± 30 nm). On average, the hyperelastic finite element model showed that the internal layer is more rigid (μ = 14 ± 4 MPa) than the external layer (μ = 2.8 ± 0.9 MPa). To determine the turgor pressure and adhesiveness of the cells, a specific mode of indentation (under a load of 45 nN), aimed towards the centre of the individual aggregate, was performed. By modelling the AFM induced decohesion of the aggregate, the turgor pressure and the cell-to-cell adhesive interface properties could be determined. On average, the turgor pressure is estimated to be 59 ± 22 kPa, the interface strength is 78 ± 12 kPa and the polymer network extensibility is 2.8 ± 0.9 nm. We predict that internal cell wall comprised highly compressed methanochondroitin chains and we are able to identify a conceptual model for stress dependent inner cell wall growth.

  9. Gigaseal Mechanics: Creep of the Gigaseal under the Action of Pressure, Adhesion, and Voltage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patch clamping depends on a tight seal between the cell membrane and the glass of the pipet. Why does the seal have such high electric resistance? Why does the patch adhere so strongly to the glass? Even under the action of strong hydrostatic, adhesion, and electrical forces, it creeps at a very low velocity. To explore possible explanations, we examined two physical models for the structure of the seal zone and the adhesion forces and two respective mechanisms of patch creep and electric conductivity. There is saline between the membrane and glass in the seal, and the flow of this solution under hydrostatic pressure or electroosmosis should drag a patch. There is a second possibility: the lipid core of the membrane is liquid and should be able to flow, with the inner monolayer slipping over the outer one. Both mechanisms predict the creep velocity as a function of the properties of the seal and the membrane, the pipet geometry, and the driving force. These model predictions are compared with experimental data for azolectin liposomes with added cholesterol or proteins. It turns out that to obtain experimentally observed creep velocities, a simple viscous flow in the seal zone requires ∼10 Pa·s viscosity; it is unclear what structure might provide that because that viscosity alone severely constrains the electric resistance of the gigaseal. Possibly, it is the fluid bilayer that allows the motion. The two models provide an estimate of the adhesion energy of the membrane to the glass and membrane’s electric characteristics through the comparison between the velocities of pressure-, adhesion-, and voltage-driven creep. PMID:25295693

  10. Failure Criterion for Brick Masonry: A Micro-Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawa, Marek

    2015-02-01

    The paper deals with the formulation of failure criterion for an in-plane loaded masonry. Using micro-mechanics approach the strength estimation for masonry microstructure with constituents obeying the Drucker-Prager criterion is determined numerically. The procedure invokes lower bound analysis: for assumed stress fields constructed within masonry periodic cell critical load is obtained as a solution of constrained optimization problem. The analysis is carried out for many different loading conditions at different orientations of bed joints. The performance of the approach is verified against solutions obtained for corresponding layered and block microstructures, which provides the upper and lower strength bounds for masonry microstructure, respectively. Subsequently, a phenomenological anisotropic strength criterion for masonry microstructure is proposed. The criterion has a form of conjunction of Jaeger critical plane condition and Tsai-Wu criterion. The model proposed is identified based on the fitting of numerical results obtained from the microstructural analysis. Identified criterion is then verified against results obtained for different loading orientations. It appears that strength of masonry microstructure can be satisfactorily described by the criterion proposed.

  11. Mechanical Unloading Promotes Myocardial Energy Recovery in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M.; Youker, Keith A.; Yin, Zheng; Estep, Jerry D.; Stevens, Robert D.; Wenner, Brett; Ilkayeva, Olga; Loebe, Matthias; Peterson, Leif E.; Lyon, Christopher J.; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Hsueh, Willa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired bioenergetics is a prominent feature of the failing heart, but the underlying metabolic perturbations are poorly understood. Methods and Results We compared metabolomic, gene transcript, and protein data from six paired failing human left ventricular (LV) tissue samples obtained during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion (heart failure (HF) samples) and at heart transplant (post-LVAD samples). Non-failing left ventricular (NFLV) wall samples procured from explanted hearts of patients with right HF served as novel comparison samples. Metabolomic analyses uncovered a distinct pattern in HF tissue: 2.6 fold increased pyruvate concentrations coupled with reduced Krebs cycle intermediates and short-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting a global reduction in substrate oxidation. These findings were associated with decreased transcript levels for enzymes that catalyze fatty acid oxidation and pyruvate metabolism and for key transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator1α (PGC1A, 1.3 fold) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRA, 1.2 fold) and γ (ERRG, 2.2 fold). Thus, parallel decreases in key transcription factors and their target metabolic enzyme genes can explain the decreases in associated metabolic intermediates. Mechanical support with LVAD improved all of these metabolic and transcriptional defects. Conclusions These observations underscore an important pathophysiologic role for severely defective metabolism in HF, while the reversibility of these defects by LVAD suggests metabolic resilience of the human heart. PMID:24825877

  12. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF.

  13. Development of Mechanical and Failure Properties in Sheep Cerebral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Nye, Kevin S; Converse, Matthew I; Dahl, Mar Janna; Albertine, Kurt H; Monson, Kenneth L

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating problem for people of all ages, but the nature of the response to such injury is often different in children than in adults. Cerebral vessel damage and dysfunction are common following TBI, but age-dependent, large-deformation vessel response has not been characterized. Our objective was to investigate the mechanical properties of cerebral arteries as a function of development. Sheep middle cerebral arteries from four age groups (fetal, newborn, juvenile, and adult) were subjected to biaxial loading around physiological conditions and then to failure in the axial direction. Results show little difference among age groups under physiological loading conditions, but response varied significantly with age in response to large axial deformation. Vessels from all age groups reached the same ultimate stretch level, but the amount of stress carried at a given level of stretch increased significantly with age through the developmental period (fetal to juvenile). Our results are the first to identify changes in cerebral vessel response to large deformations with age and may lead to new insights regarding differences in response to TBI with age.

  14. Noncontact Adhesion and Mechanical Properties Characterization of Nano and Micro-Scale Structures Interacting with Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi Vahdat, Armin

    At nano/micrometer scales, adhesion, a weak intermolecular interaction (van der Waals force), compared to several other type of forces often dominates the deformation and mechanics of nano/micro-scale structures. Accurate adhesion characterization of nano/micro-scale particles and thin-films (nm-scale) with various substrates is critically important in various industries. In semiconductor industries, understanding and characterizing particle-substrate adhesion bond and interfacial adhesion of thin films plays a critical role in fabricating defect-free structures. In this dissertation, ultrasonic-based techniques along with novel mathematical models are introduced to accurate adhesion energy characterization of nano/micro-scale particles and thin-films (Graphene layer is used as thin-film) in a non-contact manner. In the case of nano/micro-scale particles adhesion characterization, particle-substrate adhesion bond is characterized based on complex vibrational dynamics of micro-spherical particles on flat substrates subjected to ultrasonic base excitations. In the thin-films adhesion characterization case, the interfacial adhesion energy between thin films and various substrates is extracted based on the micro-spherical particles complex dynamics affected by the presence of thin-films on the vibrating substrates. Also in order to study the anisotropic adhesion properties and the rolling dynamic of nano/micro-scale particles as the most important dynamic in particle removal techniques, a novel non-contact manipulation/transport technique is introduced. In this technique, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) fields are employed to roll the particles on dry substrates in a non-contact manner in order to eliminate the inaccuracies and undesirable property modifications of contact-based techniques. Adhesion and mechanics of nano/micro-scale objects is affected by the viscoelastic properties of the contacting materials. Therefore, a novel and non-destructive technique along with a

  15. Failure mechanisms during melt injection along dykes in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert S.; Agustsdottir, Thorbjorg; Greenfield, Tim; Green, Robert; Brandsdottir, Bryndis; Woods, Jennifer; Pugh, David

    2015-04-01

    We show moment tensor solutions from seismicity produced during two extremely well monitored dyke injections in the mid-crust of Iceland. They demonstrate failure by double couple mechanisms with little or no volumetric component. The inferred failure planes are consistently orientated parallel to the dyke, from which we infer that the seismicity is produced primarily by breaking chilled magma emplaced during an earlier injection episode. The first dyke injection was at Upptyppingar in 2007 in the Northern Rift Zone of Iceland. Melt was injected in the mid-crust from 17.5 to 13.5 km depth over a 9 month period before freezing in situ. The dyke was inclined with a dip of approximately 50 degrees. The second dyke was injected sub-horizontally from Bárðarbunga at a depth of about 7 km over a two week period in late August 2014 until it erupted 45 km away in Holuhraun. The Holuhraun eruption precisely reoccupied old craters from a late eighteenth century (c. 1797) eruption. The petrology of the eighteenth century basalts suggests that the melt also came from Bárðarbunga. It is likely therefore that the 2014 dyke closely followed the earlier eighteenth century dyke path. Both dyke injections were monitored by a dense seismic network of broad-band three-component seismic stations deployed and operated from 2006 to the present by the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland. These enable well constrained hypocentral locations and moment tensor solutions to be made. At its present peak the network consists of over 75 broadband seismometers. Fifteen additional seismometers were deployed in the days immediately following the onset of the dyke injection, including four seismometers on the Vatnajökull ice cap beneath which the dyke propagated and the remainder on Holuhraun surrounding the eventual eruption site: indeed two of the seismometers had to be rescued shortly before they were encroached by the advancing

  16. Flexible polyacrylamide substrata for the analysis of mechanical interactions at cell-substratum adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beningo, Karen A.; Lo, Chun-Min; Wang, Yu-Li

    2002-01-01

    We have described a powerful tool for the study of mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment. Although the approach has already been used in a variety of ways to measure traction forces and to characterize active and passive responses of cultured cells to mechanical stimulation, it can be extended easily and combined with other microscopic approaches, including fluorescent analog imaging (Beningo et al., 2001), photobleaching, calcium imaging, micromanipulation, and electrophysiology. This method will be particularly useful for studying the functions of various components at focal adhesions, and the effects of mechanical forces on focal adhesion-mediated signal transduction. In addition, the method can be extended to a 3D setting, e.g., by sandwiching cultured cells between two layers of polyacrylamide to create an environment mimicking that in the tissue of a multicellular organism. Whereas chemical interactions between cells and the environment have been investigated extensively, many important questions remain as to the role of physical forces in cellular functions and the interplay between chemical and physical mechanisms of communication. The present approach, as well as other approaches capable of probing physical interactions, should fill in this important gap in the near future.

  17. Effects of Gravitational Mechanical Unloading in Endothelial Cells: Association between Caveolins, Inflammation and Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Grenon, S. Marlene; Jeanne, Marion; Aguado-Zuniga, Jesus; Conte, Michael S.; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces including gravity affect endothelial cell (ECs) function, and have been implicated in vascular disease as well as physiologic changes associated with low gravity environments. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of gravitational mechanical unloading on ECs phenotype as determined by patterns of gene expression. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells were exposed to 1-gravity environment or mechanical unloading (MU) for 24 hours, with or without periods of mechanical loading (ML). MU led to a significant decrease in gene expression of several adhesion molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the contrary, eNOS, Caveolin-1 and -2 expression were significantly increased with MU. There was a decrease in the length and width of the cells with MU. Addition of ML during the MU period was sufficient to reverse the changes triggered by MU. Our results suggest that gravitational loading could dramatically affect vascular endothelial cell function. PMID:23511048

  18. Hydrolytically degradable hyperbranched PEG-polyester adhesive with low swelling and robust mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Tianyu; Duffy, Patrick; Dong, Yixiao; Annaidh, Aisling Ní; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin; Wang, Wenxin

    2015-10-28

    Photocrosslinkable and water soluble hyperbranched PEG-polyester polymers (HPEGDA) have been developed as robust degradable adhesives. The HPEGDA polymers have been synthesized from controlled homopolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA700 ) via in situ deactivation enhanced atom transfer radical polymerization (DE-ATRP). By introducing a high initiator-to-monomer ratio, the obtained HPEGDA polymer is composed of extremely short carbon-carbon backbones interconnected together by the long PEG chains as well as pendent photocrosslinkable acrylate moieties. Due to the extremely short C-C backbone, the long PEG chains can therefore be seen as the main chain, thus, HPEGDA polymers behave more like polyester which is a category of polymers that contain the ester functional group in their main chain. Photo-cured HPEGDA can be readily adhered to tissue forming a patch with robust mechanical and adhesive strengths. The degradation profile by hydrolysis of polyester blocks as well as a significantly low swelling ratio of HPEGDA gels in an aqueous environment allow them to have great potential for sealing and repair of internal tissue. Furthermore, HPEGDA gels appear to have minor significant cytotoxicity in vitro. These unique properties indicate that the reported HPEGDA polymers are well poised for the development of adhesive tissue engineering matrixes, wound dressings, and sealants.

  19. Effects of adhesion on the measurement of thin film mechanical properties by nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, T.Y.; Ross, C.A.; Pharr, G.M.

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been performed on soft aluminum films deposited on hard ceramic substrates to explore the influences of interfacial adhesion on mechanical property measurement by nanoindentation. The substrate materials included soda-lime silicate glass, aluminum oxynitride (ALON), and (100) sapphire. Thin films of high purity aluminum were sputtered onto each substrate to a thickness of 500 nm. Because the films were deposited simultaneously, the only major difference in the specimens was the nature of the substrate, which exerts an important influence on film adhesion through interfacial chemistry. Of the substrates examined, aluminum adheres strongly to glass and sapphire, but poorly to ALON. In addition, two different types of aluminum films on sapphire were examined - one with and the other without a 10 nm interlayer of amorphous carbon which significantly reduces film adhesion. Testing revealed important differences in the hardness of the specimens when measured by standard nanoindentation methods. Characterization of the residual hardness impressions by high resolution scanning electron microscopy showed that the hardness differences arise from an influence of interfacial debonding and film delamination on pile-up in the film. Furthermore, when the pile-up is accounted for in contact area determinations, the film hardness is actually independent of the substrate, thus indicating that the hardness differences observed in nanoindentation testing are an artifact of the testing analysis procedure. Results of the experiments are documented and discussed. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    DOE PAGES

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; ...

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted formore » by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.« less

  1. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted for by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.

  2. Viscous-elastic interaction as a mechanism to create adhesion in frogs' toe pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Amir; Tulchinsky, Arie

    2013-11-01

    The toe pads of frogs consist of soft hexagonal structures and a network of channels between and within the soft structures, containing a viscous liquid. It has been hypothesized that this configuration creates adhesion by allowing for long range capillary forces, or alternatively, that the channel network allows for exit of the viscous liquid and thus improve contact of the toe pad. In this work we suggest interaction between viscous flow and elastic forces as a mechanism to create temporary adhesion, even in the absence of capillary or van der Waals forces. We study the dynamics of a solid body covered with an array of protruding elastic cylinders, immersed within a viscous liquid, and pressed against a flat surface. Inertia is neglected and the elastic-viscous dynamics yield the governing differential equation describing the relative motion between the body and the surface. The compressed elastic cylinders apply a force acting to separate the solid body from the surface. The relative motion between the body and the surface creates a viscous flow and pressure field resisting the elastic force and significantly reducing the speed of separation. We show that the viscous-elastic interaction can prevent motion tangential and normal to the surface and can create temporary adhesion.

  3. Quantifying Adhesion Mechanisms and Dynamics of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Alexandra S.; Monzel, Cornelia; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Wuchter, Patrick; Saffrich, Rainer; Eckstein, Volker; Tanaka, Motomu; Ho, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Using planar lipid membranes with precisely defined concentrations of specific ligands, we have determined the binding strength between human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and the bone marrow niche. The relative significance of HSC adhesion to the surrogate niche models via SDF1α-CXCR4 or N-cadherin axes was quantified by (a) the fraction of adherent cells, (b) the area of tight adhesion, and (c) the critical pressure for cell detachment. We have demonstrated that the binding of HSC to the niche model is a cooperative process, and the adhesion mediated by the CXCR4- SDF1α axis is stronger than that by homophilic N-cadherin binding. The statistical image analysis of stochastic morphological dynamics unraveled that HSC dissipated energy by undergoing oscillatory deformation. The combination of an in vitro niche model and novel physical tools has enabled us to quantitatively determine the relative significance of binding mechanisms between normal HSC versus leukemia blasts to the bone marrow niche. PMID:25824493

  4. Failure Mechanisms and Color Stability in Light-Emitting Diodes during Operation in High- Temperature Environments in Presence of Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Zhang, Hao; Davis, J Lynn

    2015-05-26

    The energy efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED) technology compared to incandescent light bulbs has triggered an increased focus on solid state luminaries for a variety of lighting applications. Solid-state lighting (SSL) utilizes LEDs, for illumination through the process of electroluminescence instead of heating a wire filament as seen with traditional lighting. The fundamental differences in the construction of LED and the incandescent lamp results in different failure modes including lumen degradation, chromaticity shift and drift in the correlated color temperature. The use of LED-based products for safety-critical and harsh environment applications necessitates the characterization of the failure mechanisms and modes. In this paper, failure mechanisms and color stability has been studied for commercially available vertical structured thin film LED (VLED) under harsh environment conditions with and without the presence of contaminants. The VLED used for the study was mounted on a ceramic starboard in order to connect it to the current source. Contamination sources studied include operation in the vicinity of vulcanized rubber and adhesive epoxies in the presence of temperature and humidity. Performance of the VLEDs has been quantified using the measured luminous flux and color shift of the VLEDs subjected to both thermal and humidity stresses under a forward current bias of 350 mA. Results indicate that contamination can result in pre-mature luminous flux degradation and color shift in LEDs.

  5. Mechanisms for the reciprocity failure in photorefractive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Lynn, Brittany; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2016-09-01

    We measured the diffraction efficiency response of two photorefractive polymer devices according to the duration of the single laser pulse used to record the hologram. The pulse duration was varied from 6 nanoseconds to 1 second, while the pulse energy density was maintained constant at 30 mJ/cm2. This changed the peak power from 5 ×109 mW to 30 mW. We observed a strong reciprocity failure of the efficiency according to the pulse duration, with a reduction as large as a factor 35 between 1 second and 30 μs pulse duration. At even lower pulse duration (< 30 μs), the efficiency leveled out and remained constant down to the nanosecond exposure time. The same behavior was observed for samples composed of the same material but with and without buffer layers deposited on the electrodes, and different voltages applied during the holographic recording. We explained these experimental results based on the charge transport mechanism involved in the photorefractive process. The plateau is attributed to the single excitation of the charge carriers by short pulses (τp < 30 μs). The increase of efficiency for longer pulse duration (τp > 30 μs) is explained by multiple excitations of the charge carriers that allows longer distance to be traveled from the excitation sites. This longer separation distance between the carriers increases the amplitude of the space-charge field, and improves the index modulation. The understanding of the response of the diffraction efficiency according to the pulse duration is particularly important for the optimization of photorefractive materials to be used at high refresh rate such as in videorate 3D display.

  6. Mechanism of surface enrichment and adhesion of coal combustion particulates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shadman, F.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1992-09-01

    This study focuses on the effect of alkali adsorption on the agglomeration of particles of bauxite, kaolinite, emathlite, lime, and two types of coal ash. An agglomeration (adhesion) temperature is defined which characterizes the adhesion propensity of particles. Using a small fluidized bed, a unique experimental technique is developed to measure this agglomeration point in-situ. The effects of alkali adsorption on the agglomeration characteristics of the substrates are determined. The agglomeration temperature of all substrates decreases as the alkali content increases. At low alkali loadings, alkali adsorption enhances particle agglomeration by forming new compounds of lower melting points. At high alkali concentrations, adhesion and agglomeration are caused by a layer of molten alkali which covers the exterior of the particles. Alkali surface composition of particles is studied using a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM). Results indicate that the alkali surface concentration decreases as agglomeration temperature increases. The use of additives to scavenge alkali vapors is further studied in a pilot scale downflow combustor. SAM surface analyses of additive particles indicate three mechanisms of alkali capture. Adsorption by reaction, surface condensation, and nucleation and coagulation with additive particles. These mechanisms may occur independently or simultaneously depending primarily on the alkali vapor concentration and the temperature profile along the combustion furnace. A mathematical model is developed to represent the kinetics and mechanisms of the alkali adsorption and agglomeration process. Modeling results indicate that the adsorption-reaction process is influenced by diffusion of alkali through the surface product layer. The model predictions of the alkali adsorbed as a function of minimum agglomeration temperature agree very well with the experimental results.

  7. Failure mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings exposed to elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The failure of a ZrO2-8%Y2O3/Ni-14% Al-0.1% Zr coating system on Rene 41 in Mach 0.3 burner rig tests was characterized. High flame and metal temperatures were employed in order to accelerate coating failure. Failure by delamination was shown to precede surface cracking or spalling. This type of failure could be duplicated by cooling down the specimen after a single long duration isothermal high temperature cycle in a burner rig or a furnace, but only if the atmosphere was oxidizing. Stresses due to thermal expansion mismatch on cooling coupled with the effects of plastic deformation of the bond coat and oxidation of the irregular bond coat are the probable life limiting factors. Heat up stresses alone could not fail the coating in the burner rig tests. Spalling eventually occurs on heat up but only after the coating has already failed through delamination.

  8. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: terminology, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Shiv K; Choudhury, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct clinical entity and differs from acute liver failure and decompensated cirrhosis in timing, presence of acute precipitant, course of disease and potential for unaided recovery. The definition involves outlining the acute and chronic insults to include a homogenous patient group with liver failure and an expected outcome in a specific timeframe. The pathophysiology of ACLF relates to persistent inflammation, immune dysregulation with initial wide-spread immune activation, a state of systematic inflammatory response syndrome and subsequent sepsis due to immune paresis. The disease severity and outcome can be predicted by both hepatic and extrahepatic organ failure(s). Clinical recovery is expected with the use of nucleoside analogues for hepatitis B, and steroids for severe alcoholic hepatitis and, possibly, severe autoimmune hepatitis. Artificial liver support systems help remove toxins and metabolites and serve as a bridge therapy before liver transplantation. Hepatic regeneration during ongoing liver failure, although challenging, is possible through the use of growth factors. Liver transplantation remains the definitive treatment with a good outcome. Pre-emptive antiviral agents for hepatitis B before chemotherapy to prevent viral reactivation and caution in using potentially hepatotoxic drugs can prevent the development of ACLF.

  9. Mechanisms and Functions of Vinculin Interactions with Phospholipids at Cell Adhesion Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Tina; Brown, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein vinculin is a major regulator of cell adhesion and attaches to the cell surface by binding to specific phospholipids. Structural, biochemical, and biological studies provided much insight into how vinculin binds to membranes, what components it recognizes, and how lipid binding is regulated. Here we discuss the roles and mechanisms of phospholipids in regulating the structure and function of vinculin and of its muscle-specific metavinculin splice variant. A full appreciation of these processes is necessary for understanding how vinculin regulates cell motility, migration, and wound healing, and for understanding of its role in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26728462

  10. Mechanism of gas pipeline failures on Balboa Boulevard during the 1994 Northridge earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Nobuaki

    1995-12-31

    A possible mechanism of gas pipeline failures on Balboa Boulevard during the 1994 Northridge earthquake is proposed. This mechanism is the one that has been adopted by the Japan Gas Association in the Recommended Practice for the Earthquake-Resistant Design of Gas Pipelines. The possible mode of ground displacement that might have caused the above pipeline failures is also discussed.

  11. Mechanism maps for electromigration-induced failure of metal and alloy interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andleigh, Vaibhav K.; Srikar, V. T.; Park, Young-Joon; Thompson, Carl V.

    1999-12-01

    Numerical simulation of electromigration-induced stress evolution provides a versatile technique for analyzing the reliability of interconnects under a wide range of conditions. We study the evolution of stress in confined, layered, stud-terminated, pure metal, and alloy interconnects. Failure times are estimated using different failure criteria associated with different failure modes for broad ranges of line lengths and current densities. The simulation results can be conveniently catalogued through construction of failure mechanism maps that display domains of dominance of different failure modes. Failure mechanism maps are constructed for several different failure criteria, illustrating regimes of line immortality, void-nucleation-limited failure, void-growth-limited failure, and compressive failure as a function of line length and current density. The effects of changes in failure criteria, geometry, and composition are studied for representative interconnect stacks at accelerated and service temperatures. Failure maps may be used to: (i) provide an overview of predicted reliability behavior, (ii) assess how data from accelerated tests can be accurately scaled to service conditions, and (iii) predict the effects of changes in interconnect and shunt-layer materials and dimensions on interconnect reliability.

  12. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Analysis of Failure Propagation in Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-07-28

    This is a presentation given at the 12th World Congress for Computational Mechanics on coupled mechanical-electrochemical-thermal analysis of failure propagation in lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.

  13. Measuring integrated cellular mechanical stress response at focal adhesions by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, François; Bessard, Judicael; Marceau, Normand; Sheng, Yunlong

    2011-09-01

    The ability of cells to sustain mechanical stress is largely modulated by the cytoskeleton. We present a new application of optical tweezers to study cell's mechanical properties. We trap a fibronectin-coated bead attached to an adherent H4II-EC3 rat hepatoma cell in order to apply the force to the cell surface membrane. The bead position corresponding to the cell's local mechanical response at focal adhesions is measured with a quadrant detector. We assessed the cell response by tracking the evolution of the equilibrium force for 40 cells selected at random and selected a temporal window to assess the cell initial force expression at focal adhesions. The mean value of the force within this time window over 40 randomly selected bead/cell bounds was 52.3 pN. Then, we assessed the responses of the cells with modulation of the cytoskeletons, namely the ubiquitous actin-microfilaments and microtubules, plus the differentiation-dependent keratin intermediate filaments. Notably, a destabilization of the first two networks led to around 50 and 30% reductions in the mean equilibrium forces, respectively, relative to untreated cells, whereas a loss of the third one yielded a 25% increase. The differences in the forces from untreated and treated cells are resolved by the optical tweezers experiment.

  14. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  15. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-06

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand.

  16. Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds from Guided Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, A. K.; Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in the fracture and failure of composites and other bonded materials is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of these adhesion joints is a prerequisite to reliable design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures.

  17. Are conformational changes, induced by osmotic pressure variations, the underlying mechanism of controlling the adhesive activity of mussel adhesive proteins?

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, Mieke C

    2005-11-22

    The mussel adhesive protein Mefp-1, under physiological conditions, presumably has a self-avoiding random walk conformation with helix-like or turned deca-peptide segments. Such a conformation may coil up under osmotic pressure induced by surrounding macromolecules. As a consequence, the orientation of the 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine groups (dopa), essential for the adhesive strength as well as the cohesive strength in Mefp-1, will be altered. Changing the concentration of the protein itself or of different-type surrounding macromolecules may therefore be a tool to control the protein's adhesive activity. The effect of osmotic pressure on the conformation and dopa reactivity of Mefp-1 is studied by the addition of (poly)ethylene oxide (PEO) as a model macromolecule (Mw = 100 kD). From UV-spectroscopy measurements, it can be concluded that dopa reactivity in Mefp-1 changes with increasing PEO concentration. Fitting of the measured absorbance intensity data of the oxidation product dopaquinone versus time with a kinetic model points to the decreased accessibility of dopa groups in the Mefp-1 structure, a faster oxidation, and diminished cross linking under the influence of increasing PEO concentration up to 2.4 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 73 Pa. At higher PEO concentrations, the accessibility of the dopa groups for oxidation as well as cross-link formation decreases until about 20% of the dopa groups are oxidized at a PEO concentration of 3.8 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 113 Pa. FTIR measurements on the basis of amide I shifts qualitatively point to a transition to a more continuously turned structure of Mefp-1 in the presence of PEO. Therefore, it seems that conformational changes caused by variations of osmotic pressure determine the extent of steric hindrance of the dopa groups and hence the adhesive reactivity of Mefp-1.

  18. Relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive. As controls, micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites were tested. The universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond. The fracture toughness and flexural properties of resin composites, and shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive with resin composite using both total-etch and self-etch modes were determined. In the results, short fiber-reinforced resin composite showed significantly higher fracture toughness than did micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The flexural strength and modulus of short fiber-reinforced and nano-hybrid resin composites were significantly lower than were those of micro-hybrid resin composites. Regardless of etching mode, the shear bond strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite did not show any significant differences from micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite and micro-hybrid resin composites were significantly higher than that of nano-hybrid resin composites. The results of this study suggest that the mechanical properties of short fiber-reinforced resin composite improve their bond durability with universal adhesive.

  19. Burn prevention mechanisms and outcomes: pitfalls, failures and successes.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Costagliola, Michel; Hayek, Shady N

    2009-03-01

    Burns are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide and are among the most devastating of all injuries, with outcomes spanning the spectrum from physical impairments and disabilities to emotional and mental consequences. Management of burns and their sequelae even in well-equipped, modern burn units of advanced affluent societies remains demanding and extremely costly. Undoubtedly, in most low and middle income countries (LMICs) with limited resources and inaccessibility to sophisticated skills and technologies, the same standard of care is obviously not possible. Unfortunately, over 90% of fatal fire-related burns occur in developing or LMICs with South-East Asia alone accounting for over half of these fire-related deaths. If burn prevention is an essential part of any integrated burn management protocol anywhere, focusing on burn prevention in LMICs rather than treatment cannot be over-emphasized where it remains the major and probably the only available way of reducing the current state of morbidity and mortality. Like other injury mechanisms, the prevention of burns requires adequate knowledge of the epidemiological characteristics and associated risk factors, it is hence important to define clearly, the social, cultural and economic factors, which contribute to burn causation. While much has been accomplished in the areas of primary and secondary prevention of fires and burns in many developed or high-income countries (HICs) such as the United States due to sustained research on the epidemiology and risk factors, the same cannot be said for many LMICs. Many health authorities, agencies, corporations and even medical personnel in LMICs consider injury prevention to have a much lower priority than disease prevention for understandable reasons. Consequently, burns prevention programmes fail to receive the government funding that they deserve. Prevention programmes need to be executed with patience, persistence, and precision, targeting high

  20. Failure Mechanisms of Hollow Fiber Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Zeh, Matthew; Wickramanayake, Shan; Hopkinson, David

    2016-03-23

    Hollow fiber supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were tested using the bubble point method to investigate potential failure modes, including the maximum transmembrane pressure before loss of the ionic liquid from the support. Porous hollow fiber supports were fabricated with different pore morphologies using Matrimid(®) and Torlon(®) as the polymeric material and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidalzolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C₆mim][Tf₂N]) as the ionic liquid (IL) component. Hollow fiber SILMs were tested for their maximum pressure before failure, with pressure applied either from the bore side or shell side. It was found that the membranes exhibited one or more of three different modes of failure when pressurized: liquid loss (occurring at the bubble point), rupture, and collapse.

  1. Failure Mechanisms of Hollow Fiber Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zeh, Matthew; Wickramanayake, Shan; Hopkinson, David

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were tested using the bubble point method to investigate potential failure modes, including the maximum transmembrane pressure before loss of the ionic liquid from the support. Porous hollow fiber supports were fabricated with different pore morphologies using Matrimid® and Torlon® as the polymeric material and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidalzolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C6mim][Tf2N]) as the ionic liquid (IL) component. Hollow fiber SILMs were tested for their maximum pressure before failure, with pressure applied either from the bore side or shell side. It was found that the membranes exhibited one or more of three different modes of failure when pressurized: liquid loss (occurring at the bubble point), rupture, and collapse. PMID:27023620

  2. Micro-measurements of mechanical properties for adhesives and composites using digital imaging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.

    1994-01-01

    The need for a constituent based durability or accelerated life prediction procedure to be used for the engineering design of polymer matrix composites is discussed in the light of current plans for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) concerns about the U.S. infrastructure (bridges, pipelines, etc.) and other technological considerations of national concern. It is pointed out that good measurement procedures for insitu resin properties are needed for both adhesives and composites. A double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen which shows promise for the easy determination of adhesive shear properties is presented and compared with measurements of strains within the bondline using a new optical digital imaging micro-measurement system (DIMMS). The DCB specimen is also used to assess damage in a bonded joint using a dynamic mechanical thermal analysis system (DMTA). The possible utilization of the same DIMMS and DMTA procedures to determine the insitu properties of the resin in a composite specimen are discussed as well as the use of the procedures to evaluate long term mechanical and physical aging. Finally, a discussion on the state-of-the art of the measurement of strains in micron and sub-micron domains is given.

  3. Comparison of three work of adhesion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, J.A.; O`Toole, E.; Zamora, D.; Poon, B.

    1998-02-01

    Practical work of adhesion measurements are being studied for several types of polymer/metal combinations in order to obtain a better understanding of the adhesive failure mechanisms for systems containing encapsulated and bonded components. The primary question is whether studies of model systems can be extended to systems of technological interest. The authors report on their first attempts to obtain the work of adhesion between a PDMS polymer and stainless steel. The work of adhesion measurements were made using three techniques -- contact angle, adhesive fracture energy at low deformation rates and JKR. Previous work by Whitesides` group show a good correlation between JKR and contact angle measurements for PDMS. Their initial work focused on duplicating the PDMS measurements of Chaudury. In addition, in this paper the authors extend the work of adhesion measurement to third technique -- interfacial failure energy. The ability to determine the reversible work of adhesion for practical adhesive joints allows understanding of several issues that control adhesion: surface preparation, nature of the interphase region, and bond durability.

  4. Focus on Mechanical Failures: Mechanisms and Detection. Proceedings of the Meeting (45th) of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group Held in Annapolis, Maryland on April 9 - 11, 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-04

    reproduction is for U.S. Government purposes. Acceslon For NTIS CRA&M DTIC TAB Unannowk’I•.: JustifIcdtiron L Dist ibjtio ! Avaiiobll,ly O’,ale. Avait a...Dickson, S. Lalonde and L . Shiqiong Catastrophic Temperature Increase During the Separation of High Strength Alloys 79 in Tensile Loading D. D. Make/and...Nemarich and W. W. Boblitt S~iii Beyond Failure Avoidance: Evolution of an Expert System of Mechanical Systems 135 Integrity Management R. L . Kincaid

  5. Mechanisms of thermal barrier coating degradation and failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi, J. T.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives and initial results of a Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Life Prediction Model Development Program are described. The goals of this program are to: identify and understand TBC failure modes; generate quantitative TBC life data; and develop and verify a TBC life prediction model. The coating being studied is a two layer thermal barrier system incorporating a nominal ten mil outer layer of seven percent yttria partially stabilized zirconia plasma deposited over an inner layer of highly oxidation resistant low pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coating. This coating currently is in flight service on turbine vane platforms in the JT-9D and PW2037 engines and is bill-of- material on turbine vane airfoils in the advanced PW4000 and IAE V2500 engines. Effort currently is in progress on the first task, which involves the identification and understanding of TBC failures. Five modes of coating damage were considered: thermomechanical ceramic failure; oxidative bond coat failure; hot corrosion; foreign object damage (FOD); and erosion.

  6. Formation and Failure of Elastomer Networks via Thermal, Mechanical and Surface Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Cootinue on reverse side If O.cesearyn7md Identity by block number) .4Fracture mechanism IGA TMA SBR Degradation ZnO particles ESCA Oxidative embrittlement Z...TARADC6M and EARCH TECHNICAL REPORT : NO. 12498 FORMATION AND FAILURE OF -ELASTOMER NETWORKS VIA " THERMAL, MECHANICAL AND SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION...PERIOD COVERED Foratonand Failure of Elastomer Networks via Final ½,chnical Rtepo¶t * hermal, Mechanical and Surface Characterization@ Aug. e4

  7. Role of seta angle and flexibility in the gecko adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Congcong; Alex Greaney, P.

    2014-08-01

    A model is developed to describe the reversible nature of gecko dry adhesion. The central aspect of this model is that the seta can be easily peeled away from the contacting surface by a small moment at the contact tip. It is shown that this contact condition is very sensitive, but can result in robust adhesion if individual setae are canted and highly flexible. In analogy to the "cone of friction," we consider the "adhesion region"—the domain of normal and tangential forces that maintain adhesion. Results demonstrate that this adhesion region is highly asymmetric enabling the gecko to adhere under a variety of loading conditions associated with scuttling horizontally, vertically, and inverted. Moreover, under each of these conditions, there is a low energy path to de-adhesion. In this model, obliquely canted seta (as possessed by geckos) rather than vertically aligned fibers (common in synthetic dry adhesive) provides the most robust adhesion.

  8. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization.

  9. Mechanically functional amyloid fibrils in the adhesive of a marine invertebrate as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    S Mostaert, Anika; Crockett, Rowena; Kearn, Graham; Cherny, Izhack; Gazit, Ehud; C Serpell, Louise; P Jarvis, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are primarily known in a pathogenic context for their association with a wide range of debilitating human diseases. Here we show a marine invertebrate (Entobdella soleae) utilizes functional amyloid fibrils comparable to those of a unicellular prokaryote (Escherichia coli). Thioflavin-T binding and Raman spectroscopy provided evidence for the presence of amyloid in the adhesive of Entobdella soleae. We elucidated that for these two very different organisms, amyloid fibrils provide adhesive and cohesive strength to their natural adhesives. Comparing the nanoscale mechanical responses of these fibrils with those of pathogenic amyloid by atomic force microscopy revealed that the molecular level origin of the cohesive strength was associated with the generic intermolecular β-sheet structure of amyloid fibrils. Functional adhesive residues were found only in the case of the functional amyloid. Atomic force microscopy provided a useful means to characterize the internal structural forces within individual amyloid fibrils and how these relate to the mechanical performance of both functional and pathogenic amyloid. The mechanistic link of amyloid-based cohesive and adhesive strength could be widespread amongst natural adhesives, irrespective of environment, providing a new strategy for biomimicry and a new source of materials for understanding the formation and stability of amyloid fibrils more generally.

  10. Register of specialized sources for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Denny, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Specialized information sources that generate information relative to six problem areas in aerospace mechanics of structural failure are identified. Selection for inclusion was based upon information obtained from the individual knowledge and professional contacts of Martin Marietta Aerospace staff members and the information uncovered by the staff of technical reviewers. Activities listed perform basic or applied research related to the mechanics of structural failure and publish the results of such research. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, original sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures.

  11. Differential adhesion between moving particles as a mechanism for the evolution of social groups.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Thomas; Brunnet, Leonardo Gregory; De Monte, Silvia

    2014-02-01

    The evolutionary stability of cooperative traits, that are beneficial to other individuals but costly to their carrier, is considered possible only through the establishment of a sufficient degree of assortment between cooperators. Chimeric microbial populations, characterized by simple interactions between unrelated individuals, restrain the applicability of standard mechanisms generating such assortment, in particular when cells disperse between successive reproductive events such as happens in Dicyostelids and Myxobacteria. In this paper, we address the evolutionary dynamics of a costly trait that enhances attachment to others as well as group cohesion. By modeling cells as self-propelled particles moving on a plane according to local interaction forces and undergoing cycles of aggregation, reproduction and dispersal, we show that blind differential adhesion provides a basis for assortment in the process of group formation. When reproductive performance depends on the social context of players, evolution by natural selection can lead to the success of the social trait, and to the concomitant emergence of sizeable groups. We point out the conditions on the microscopic properties of motion and interaction that make such evolutionary outcome possible, stressing that the advent of sociality by differential adhesion is restricted to specific ecological contexts. Moreover, we show that the aggregation process naturally implies the existence of non-aggregated particles, and highlight their crucial evolutionary role despite being largely neglected in theoretical models for the evolution of sociality.

  12. Effect of plasma pretreatment on adhesion and mechanical properties of UV-curable coatings on plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururaj, T.; Subasri, R.; Raju, K. R. C. Soma; Padmanabham, G.

    2011-02-01

    An attempt was made to study the effect of plasma surface activation on the adhesion of UV-curable sol-gel coatings on polycarbonate (PC) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates. The sol was synthesized by the hydrolysis and condensation of a UV-curable silane in combination with Zr-n-propoxide. Coatings deposited by dip coating were cured using UV-radiation followed by thermal curing between 80 °C and 130 °C. The effect of plasma surface treatment on the wettability of the polymer surface prior to coating deposition was followed up by measuring the water contact angle. The water contact angle on the surface of as-cleaned substrates was 80° ± 2° and that after plasma treatment was 43° ± 1° and 50° ± 2° for PC and PMMA respectively. Adhesion as well as mechanical properties like scratch resistance and taber abrasion resistance were evaluated for coatings deposited over plasma treated and untreated surfaces.

  13. Method of Testing and Predicting Failures of Electronic Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, Frances A.

    1996-01-01

    A method employing a knowledge base of human expertise comprising a reliability model analysis implemented for diagnostic routines is disclosed. The reliability analysis comprises digraph models that determine target events created by hardware failures human actions, and other factors affecting the system operation. The reliability analysis contains a wealth of human expertise information that is used to build automatic diagnostic routines and which provides a knowledge base that can be used to solve other artificial intelligence problems.

  14. Failure modes in surface micromachined microelectromechanical actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; LaVigne, G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Clews, P.; Tanner, D.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    In order for the rapidly emerging field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) to meet its extraordinary expectations regarding commercial impact, issues pertaining to how they fail must be understood. The authors identify failure modes common to a broad range of MEMS actuators, including adhesion (stiction) and friction induced failures caused by improper operational methods, mechanical instabilities, and electrical instabilities. Demonstrated methods to mitigate these failure modes include implementing optimized designs, model based operational methods, and chemical surface treatments.

  15. High Strain-Rate and Quasi-Static Ductile Failure Mechanisms in Porous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detailed understanding of the interrelated physical mechanisms that can result in ductile material failure in rate-dependent porous crystalline materials subjected...strains and slip-rates, and hydrostatic stresses on failure paths and ligament damage in face centered cubic (f.c.c.) crystalline materials have been

  16. Lock-up failure of a four-bar linkage deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Michael

    1993-01-01

    A successful failure investigation of a four-bar linkage deployment mechanism has been performed. Possible failure causes such as the mismatch of material coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), excessive hinge friction, limit switch interference, and thermal gradient induced resistive preload were investigated and are discussed. The final conclusions and corrective actions taken are described. Finally, valuable lessons learned during the investigation are discussed.

  17. Joining veneers to ceramic cores and dentition with adhesive interlayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J-W; Wang, Y; Lloyd, I K; Lawn, B R

    2007-08-01

    Adhesive joining of veneers to cores offers potential simplicity and economy in the fabrication of all-ceramic crowns. We tested the hypothesis that resin-based adhesives can be used for such fabrication without compromising mechanical integrity of the crown structure. A simple test procedure for quantifying this hypothesis was proposed. A model glass veneer layer 1 mm thick (representative of porcelain), adhesively bonded onto a glass-like core substrate (ceramic or dental enamel), was loaded at its top surface with a hard sphere (occlusal force) until a radial crack initiated at the veneer undersurface. The critical loads for fracture, visually observable in the transparent glass, afforded a measure of the predisposition for the adhesive to cause veneer failure in an occlusal overload. Two adhesives were tested, one a commercial epoxy resin and the other a relatively stiff in-house-developed composite. The results confirmed that stiffer adhesives provide higher resistance to failure.

  18. A Finite Element Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints Including Geometric Nonlinearity, Nonlinear Viscoelasticity, Moisture Diffusion, and Delayed Failure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    code. List no more than two levels of an organizacional hierarchy. Display the name of the orgaaization exactly as it should appear in Government in...Performing Organizacion Name and Address 10. Project/Task/Work Unit No. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Center forAdhesion Science

  19. Probing mechanical principles of focal contacts in cell–matrix adhesion with a coupled stochastic–elastic modelling framework

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huajian; Qian, Jin; Chen, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesion depends on the collective behaviours of clusters of receptor–ligand bonds called focal contacts between cell and extracellular matrix. While the behaviour of a single molecular bond is governed by statistical mechanics at the molecular scale, continuum mechanics should be valid at a larger scale. This paper presents an overview of a series of recent theoretical studies aimed at probing the basic mechanical principles of focal contacts in cell–matrix adhesion via stochastic–elastic models in which stochastic descriptions of molecular bonds and elastic descriptions of interfacial traction–separation are unified in a single modelling framework. The intention here is to illustrate these principles using simple analytical and numerical models. The aim of the discussions is to provide possible clues to the following questions: why does the size of focal adhesions (FAs) fall into a narrow range around the micrometre scale? How can cells sense and respond to substrates of varied stiffness via FAs? How do the magnitude and orientation of mechanical forces affect the binding dynamics of FAs? The effects of cluster size, cell–matrix elastic modulus, loading direction and cytoskeletal pretension on the lifetime of FA clusters have been investigated by theoretical arguments as well as Monte Carlo numerical simulations, with results showing that intermediate adhesion size, stiff substrate, cytoskeleton stiffening, low-angle pulling and moderate cytoskeletal pretension are factors that contribute to stable FAs. From a mechanistic point of view, these results provide possible explanations for a wide range of experimental observations and suggest multiple mechanisms by which cells can actively control adhesion and de-adhesion via cytoskeletal contractile machinery in response to mechanical properties of their surroundings. PMID:21632610

  20. Mechanical and Thermal Stability of Adhesive Membranes with Nonzero Bending Rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, T.; Åström, J. A.; Kekäläinen, P.; Timonen, J.

    2010-07-01

    Membranes at a microscopic scale are affected by thermal fluctuations and self-adhesion due to van der Waals forces. Methods to prepare membranes of even molecular scale, e.g., graphene, have recently been developed, and the question of their mechanical and thermal stability is of crucial importance. To this end we modeled microscopic membranes with an attractive interaction and applied Langevin dynamics. Their behavior was also analyzed under external loading. Even though these membranes folded during isotropic compression as a result of energy minimization, the process at high confinement was similar to crumpling of macroscopic nonadhesive sheets. The main difference appeared when the compression was released. In such cases, for membranes of sufficiently large size, folded or scrolled conformations emerged. At high temperature entropic effects made such conformations unfavorable, however.

  1. Mechanical and thermal stability of adhesive membranes with nonzero bending rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Astrom, Jan; Kekalainen, Pekka; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-03-01

    Membranes at a microscopic scale are affected by thermal fluctuations and self-adhesion due to Van der Waals forces. Methods to prepare membranes of even molecular scale, e.g. graphene, have been recently developed, and the question of their mechanical and thermal stability is of crucial importance. To this end we modeled microscopic membranes with a short-range attractive interaction and applied Langevin dynamics. Their behavior was also analyzed under external loading. Even though these membranes folded during isotropic compression as a result of energy minimization, the process at high confinement did not differ much from crumpling of macroscopic thin sheets. The main difference appeared when the external load was released. In such cases, for membranes of sufficiently large size L , folded or scrolled conformations emerged. At high enough temperature T entropic effects made such conformations unfavorable, however. Possible conformations of free-standing membranes (``phase diagrams'') were determined in the TL -plane.

  2. Mono- and multiple TiN(/Ti) coating adhesion mechanism on a Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhong; Zheng, Hua; Sinkovits, Theo; Hee, Ay Ching; Zhao, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Mono- and multiple TiN(/Ti) coatings deposited on Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy substrates by the filtered arc deposition system were examined using scratch testing and depth-sensing indentation in terms of the relationship between the coating adhesion, deformation mechanism, and microstructure, and mechanical properties at the film/substrate interface. The results show that multilayer TiN/Ti coatings offer a greater resistance to cracking and delamination than monolithic TiN coatings under the same conditions on the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys substrates. And increasing the number of layers for TiN multilayer coating improves the coatings adhesion. In contrast, for the coatings on the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys substrates that were heat-treated to a higher hardness, the limited deformation in the substrates improved remarkably the coating adhesion indiscriminately. The substrate mechanical properties play the major roles in controlling the coating adhesion, and increasing thickness and layers of the TiN multilayer have a limited improvement to the adhesion of coating.

  3. Agent autonomy approach to probabilistic physics-of-failure modeling of complex dynamic systems with interacting failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromek, Katherine Emily

    A novel computational and inference framework of the physics-of-failure (PoF) reliability modeling for complex dynamic systems has been established in this research. The PoF-based reliability models are used to perform a real time simulation of system failure processes, so that the system level reliability modeling would constitute inferences from checking the status of component level reliability at any given time. The "agent autonomy" concept is applied as a solution method for the system-level probabilistic PoF-based (i.e. PPoF-based) modeling. This concept originated from artificial intelligence (AI) as a leading intelligent computational inference in modeling of multi agents systems (MAS). The concept of agent autonomy in the context of reliability modeling was first proposed by M. Azarkhail [1], where a fundamentally new idea of system representation by autonomous intelligent agents for the purpose of reliability modeling was introduced. Contribution of the current work lies in the further development of the agent anatomy concept, particularly the refined agent classification within the scope of the PoF-based system reliability modeling, new approaches to the learning and the autonomy properties of the intelligent agents, and modeling interacting failure mechanisms within the dynamic engineering system. The autonomous property of intelligent agents is defined as agent's ability to self-activate, deactivate or completely redefine their role in the analysis. This property of agents and the ability to model interacting failure mechanisms of the system elements makes the agent autonomy fundamentally different from all existing methods of probabilistic PoF-based reliability modeling. 1. Azarkhail, M., "Agent Autonomy Approach to Physics-Based Reliability Modeling of Structures and Mechanical Systems", PhD thesis, University of Maryland, College Park, 2007.

  4. Mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards Thissell, W.; Zurek, Anna K.; Addessio, Frank

    1996-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of quasi-isotropic and unidirectional epoxy-matrix carbon-fiber laminated composites subjected to compressive loading at strain rates of 10-3 and 2000 s-1 are described. Failure in the studied composites was dominated by delamination which proceeded by brittle fracture of the epoxy-matrix. The matrix-fiber bonding in these composites is very strong and prevented the occurrence of significant fiber-pullout. The mode I delamination strain energy release rate of the unidirectional composites was determined using the double cantilever beam and hole in plate compression method. The DCB method indicated a significant R curve effect attributed to fiber bridging while the presently available hole in plate analytical methods show questionable validity for highly anisotropic materials.

  5. Mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Thissell, W.R.; Zurek, A.K.; Addessio, F.

    1995-09-01

    The mechanical behavior of quasi-isotropic and unidirectional epoxy-matrix carbon-fiber laminated composites subjected compressive loading at strain rates of 10{sup {minus}3} and 2000 s{sup {minus}1} are described. Failure in the studied composites was dominated by delamination which proceeded by brittle fracture of the epoxy-matrix. The matrix-fiber bonding in these composites is very strong and prevented the occurrence of significant fiber-pullout. The mode I delamination strain energy release rate of the unidirectional composites was determined using the double cantilever beam and hole in plate compression method. The DCB method indicated a significant R curve effect attributed to fiber bridging while the presently available hole in plate analytical methods show questionable validity for highly anisotropic materials.

  6. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms for BGA and CSP Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies. Acceleration induced failure mechanisms varied from conventional surface mount (SM) failures for CSPs. Examples of unrealistic life projections for other CSPs are also presented. The cumulative cycles to failure for ceramic BGA assemblies performed under different conditions, including plots of their two Weibull parameters, are presented. The results are for cycles in the range of -30 C to 100 C, -55 C to 100 C, and -55 C to 125 C. Failure mechanisms as well as cycles to failure for thermal shock and thermal cycling conditions in the range of -55 C to 125 C were compared. Projection to other temperature cycling ranges using a modified Coffin-Manson relationship is also presented.

  7. Failure mechanisms in laminated carbon/carbon composites under biaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grape, J.A.; Gupta, V.

    1995-07-01

    The failure mechanisms of 2D carbon/carbon (C/C) woven laminates have been determined under inplane biaxial compression loads, and the associated failure envelopes that account for the effect of matrix-type and loading directions were also obtained. The failure was in the form of micro-kinking of fiber bundles, interspersed with localized interply delaminations to form an overall shear fault. The shear fault was aligned with the major axis of loading except at above 75% of balanced biaxial compressive stress where failure occurred along both axes. Although the biaxial strength varied significantly with the ratio of in-plane principal stresses, R, there was no variation in the local failure mechanisms. Accordingly, it was found that the samples fail upon achieving a critical strain along the primary axis of loading.

  8. The Influence of Temperature on Microelectronic Device Failure Mechanisms. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-04

    201 5.9 Derating for Failure Mechanisms in First-level Interconnects 207 5.10 Derating for Failure Mechanisms in the Package Case 222 5.11 Derating for...semiconductor device; first- level interconnects that may be wirebonds, flip-chip, or tape automated bonds; die attach; substrate; substrate attach; case ; lid...1990] 5.5. Due to the non-linear dependence of life under TDDB on temperature, worst case manufacturing defect magnitude, or electric field, derating

  9. Self-etching dental adhesive containing a natural essential oil: anti-biofouling performance and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Peralta, S L; Carvalho, P H A; van de Sande, F H; Pereira, C M P; Piva, E; Lund, R G

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the anti-biofouling performance of an experimental adhesive system containing a naturally occurring essential vegetable oil and examined the following physical and mechanical properties: water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), microtensile bond strength to dentin (μTBS), and degree of conversion. The following six groups were tested: a self-etching experimental adhesive containing refined essential oil from the seeds of the Butia capitata tree (EAO); an oil-free version of the experimental adhesive (EANO); one group without adhesive as the control (C); and the three following commercial self-etching adhesives: Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), Clearfil SE Bond, and Adper SE Plus. The antibacterial effect was estimated by microbiological culture on selective/non-selective media, and the results expressed as colony-forming units per unit weight of dry biofilm (CFU mg(-1)). The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). After 24 h, pH changes were similar in the storage medium of all tested adhesive systems. EAO showed similar levels of antimicrobial activity in a model biofilm microcosm as the commercial self-etching adhesive CPB. Both were effective against total microorganisms, aciduric bacteria, lactobacilli, and Streptococcus mutans. WS and SL were not affected by the presence of the essential oil; the values of EAO were similar to or less than those of commercial equivalents. The incorporation of an essential oil into an experimental adhesive did not influence its monomer conversion result. Immediate μTBS values of EAO and EANO were similar and were greater than those of commercial equivalents. After storage for 6 months, the μTBS of the EAO decreased significantly and became similar to the values of commercial equivalents, while the strength of the EANO was not affected.

  10. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, L.; Haenninen, H.; Paro, J.; Kauppinen, V.

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  11. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-Coated high speed steel and tin-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Laizhu; Hänninen, Hannu; Paro, Jukka; Kauppinen, Veijo

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  12. Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Simon, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing them with two conventional, also dual-cured, resin cements. Four different curing procedures were applied: auto-polymerisation (dark curing) and light curing (LED unit, Freelight 2, 20 s) by applying the unit directly on the samples' surface, at a distance of 5 and 10 mm. Twenty minutes after curing, the samples were stored for 1 week at 37°C in a water-saturated atmosphere. The micro-mechanical properties-Vickers hardness, modulus of elasticity, creep and elastic/plastic deformation-were measured. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p < 0.05). A very strong influence of the material as well as filler volume and weight on the micro-mechanical properties was measured, whereas the influence of the curing procedure and type of cement-conventional or self-adhesive-was generally low. The influence of light on the polymerisation process was material dependent, with four different behaviour patterns to be distinguished. As a material category, significantly higher micro-mechanical properties were measured for the conventional compared to the self-adhesive resin cements, although this difference was low. Within the self-adhesive resin cements group, the variation in micro-mechanical properties was high. The selection of suitable resin cements should be done by considering, besides its adhesive properties, its micro-mechanical properties and curing behaviour also.

  13. A mechanically active heterotypic E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion enables fibroblasts to drive cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Kato, Takuya; Brugués, Agustí; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Derzsi, Stefanie; Arwert, Esther; Weston, Anne; González-Tarragó, Victor; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Alcaraz, Jordi; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Sahai, Erik; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumour invasion and metastasis. We show that CAFs exert a physical force on cancer cells that enables their collective invasion. Force transmission is mediated by a heterophilic adhesion involving N-cadherin at the CAF membrane and E-cadherin at the cancer cell membrane. This adhesion is mechanically active; when subjected to force it triggers β-catenin recruitment and adhesion reinforcement dependent on α-catenin/vinculin interaction. Impairment of E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion abrogates the ability of CAFs to guide collective cell migration and blocks cancer cell invasion. N-cadherin also mediates repolarization of the CAFs away from the cancer cells. In parallel, nectins and afadin are recruited to the cancer cell/CAF interface and CAF repolarization is afadin dependent. Heterotypic junctions between CAFs and cancer cells are observed in patient-derived material. Together, our findings show that a mechanically active heterophilic adhesion between CAFs and cancer cells enables cooperative tumour invasion.

  14. Deformation and failure mechanisms of graphite/epoxy composites under static loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of deformation and failure of graphite epoxy composites under static loading were clarified. The influence of moisture and temperature upon these mechanisms were also investigated. Because the longitudinal tensile properties are the most critical to the performance of the composite, these properties were investigated in detail. Both ultimate and elastic mechanical properties were investigated, but the study of mechanisms emphasized those leading to failure of the composite. The graphite epoxy composite selected for study was the system being used in several NASA sponsored flight test programs.

  15. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of composites as adherends was studied. Several other variables were studied by fractography: aluminum powder adhesive filler, fiber glass cloth scrim or adhesive carrier, new adhesives PPQ-413 and LARC-13, and strength-test temperature. When the new results were juxtaposed with previous work, it appeared that complex interactions between adhesive, adherend, bonding, and testing conditions govern the observed strength and fracture-surface features. The design parameters likely to have a significant effect upon strength-test results are listed.

  16. Defect induced plasticity and failure mechanism of boron nitride nanotubes under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-07-28

    The effects of Stone-Wales (SW) and vacancy defects on the failure behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under tension are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to model the atomic interaction and the temperature is maintained close to 300 K. The effect of a SW defect is studied by determining the failure strength and failure mechanism of nanotubes with different radii. In the case of a vacancy defect, the effect of an N-vacancy and a B-vacancy is studied separately. Nanotubes with different chiralities but similar diameter is considered first to evaluate the chirality dependence. The variation of failure strength with the radius is then studied by considering nanotubes of different diameters but same chirality. It is observed that the armchair BNNTs are extremely sensitive to defects, whereas the zigzag configurations are the least sensitive. In the case of pristine BNNTs, both armchair and zigzag nanotubes undergo brittle failure, whereas in the case of defective BNNTs, only the zigzag ones undergo brittle failure. An interesting defect induced plastic behavior is observed in defective armchair BNNTs. For this nanotube, the presence of a defect triggers mechanical relaxation by bond breaking along the closest zigzag helical path, with the defect as the nucleus. This mechanism results in a plastic failure.

  17. A New Rock Strength Criterion from Microcracking Mechanisms Which Provides Theoretical Evidence of Hybrid Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi

    2017-02-01

    A proper criterion describing when material fails is essential for deep understanding and constitutive modeling of rock damage and failure by microcracking. Physically, such a criterion should be the global effect of local mechanical response and microstructure evolution inside the material. This paper aims at deriving a new mechanisms-based failure criterion for brittle rocks, based on micromechanical unilateral damage-friction coupling analyses rather than on the basic results from the classical linear elastic fracture mechanics. The failure functions respectively describing three failure modes (purely tensile mode, tensile-shear mode as well as compressive-shear mode) are achieved in a unified upscaling framework and illustrated in the Mohr plane and also in the plane of principal stresses. The strength envelope is proved to be continuous and smooth with a compressive to tensile strength ratio dependent on material properties. Comparisons with experimental data are finally carried out. By this work, we also provide a theoretical evidence on the hybrid failure and the smooth transition from tensile failure to compressive-shear failure.

  18. Investigation of failure mechanisms in integrated vacuum circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengreen, A.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication techniques of integrated vacuum circuits are described in detail. Data obtained from a specially designed test circuit are presented. The data show that the emission observed in reverse biased devices is due to cross-talk between the devices and can be eliminated by electrostatic shielding. The lifetime of the cathodes has been improved by proper activation techniques. None of the cathodes on life test has shown any sign of failure after more than 3500 hours. Life tests of triodes show a decline of anode current by a factor of two to three after a few days. The current recovers when the large positive anode voltage (100 V) has been removed for a few hours. It is suggested that this is due to trapped charges in the sapphire substrate. Evidence of the presence of such charges is given, and a model of the charge distribution is presented consistent with the measurements. Solution of the problem associated with the decay of triode current may require proper treatment of the sapphire surface and/or changes in the deposition technique of the thin metal films.

  19. Mechanical properties and failure behavior of unidirectional porous ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Seuba, Jordi; Deville, Sylvain; Guizard, Christian; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the honeycomb out-of-plane model derived by Gibson and Ashby can be applied to describe the compressive behavior of unidirectional porous materials. Ice-templating allowed us to process samples with accurate control over pore volume, size, and morphology. These samples allowed us to evaluate the effect of this microstructural variations on the compressive strength in a porosity range of 45–80%. The maximum strength of 286 MPa was achieved in the least porous ice-templated sample (P(%) = 49.9), with the smallest pore size (3 μm). We found that the out-of-plane model only holds when buckling is the dominant failure mode, as should be expected. Furthermore, we controlled total pore volume by adjusting solids loading and sintering temperature. This strategy allows us to independently control macroporosity and densification of walls, and the compressive strength of ice-templated materials is exclusively dependent on total pore volume. PMID:27075397

  20. Sarcopenia in heart failure: mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Collamati, Agnese; Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Tosato, Matteo; D'Angelo, Emanuela; Sisto, Alex N; Landi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a highly prevalent condition among the elderly and is associated with considerable morbidity, institutionalization and mortality. In its advanced stages, CHF is often accompanied by the loss of muscle mass and strength. Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that has been actively studied in recent years due to its association with a wide range of adverse health outcomes. The goal of this review is to discuss the relationship between CHF and sarcopenia, with a focus on shared pathophysiological pathways and treatments. Malnutrition, systemic inflammation, endocrine imbalances, and oxidative stress appear to connect sarcopenia and CHF. At the muscular level, alterations of the ubiquitin proteasome system, myostatin signaling, and apoptosis have been described in both sarcopenia and CHF and could play a role in the loss of muscle mass and function. Possible therapeutic strategies to impede the progression of muscle wasting in CHF patients include protein and vitamin D supplementation, structured physical exercise, and the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers. Hormonal supplementation with growth hormone, testosterone, and ghrelin is also discussed as a potential treatment. PMID:27605943

  1. Mechanical properties and failure behavior of unidirectional porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuba, Jordi; Deville, Sylvain; Guizard, Christian; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the honeycomb out-of-plane model derived by Gibson and Ashby can be applied to describe the compressive behavior of unidirectional porous materials. Ice-templating allowed us to process samples with accurate control over pore volume, size, and morphology. These samples allowed us to evaluate the effect of this microstructural variations on the compressive strength in a porosity range of 45-80%. The maximum strength of 286 MPa was achieved in the least porous ice-templated sample (P(%) = 49.9), with the smallest pore size (3 μm). We found that the out-of-plane model only holds when buckling is the dominant failure mode, as should be expected. Furthermore, we controlled total pore volume by adjusting solids loading and sintering temperature. This strategy allows us to independently control macroporosity and densification of walls, and the compressive strength of ice-templated materials is exclusively dependent on total pore volume.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Conductive Adhesive Film Under Hygrothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Lan; Chen, Xu; Gao, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical properties of anisotropic conductive adhesive film (ACF) were investigated experimentally under various environmental conditions. The temperature sweep test was conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on dynamical mechanical properties of the ACF. The ACF exhibited transitions to the glass state, viscoelastic state, and rubber state with increasing temperature, and its glass-transition temperature ( T g) was determined to be 149°C. The creep-recovery behaviors of the ACF were investigated, and it was found that the initial strains, instantaneous strains, and creep or recovery rates increased with increasing temperature. No obvious creep phenomenon was observed at low temperatures (≤0°C). The creep strain and creep rates at any time decreased with increasing hygrothermal aging time. The uniaxial tensile behaviors of the ACF were also investigated under hygrothermal aging and thermal cycling. The results show that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the ACF decrease with increasing hygrothermal aging time; however, they increase at first and then decrease with increasing thermal cycling time. T g decreases slightly for the ACF after hygrothermal aging; however, it increases after thermal cycling.

  3. Directing epithelial to mesenchymal transition through engineered microenvironments displaying orthogonal adhesive and mechanical cues.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Marilyn C; Brown, Ashley C; Barker, Thomas H

    2012-08-01

    Cell interactions with their extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironments play a major role in directing cellular processes that can drive wound healing and tissue regeneration but, if uncontrolled, lead to pathological progression. One such process, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), if finely controlled could have significant potential in regenerative medicine approaches. Despite recent findings that highlight the influence of biochemical and mechanical properties of the ECM on EMT, it is still unclear how these two orthogonal cues act synergistically to control epithelial cell phenotype. Here, we cultured lung epithelial cells on combinations of different mutants of fibronectin's cell binding domain that preferentially engage specific integrins and substrates of varying stiffness. Our results suggest that while stiff substrates induce spontaneous EMT, this response can be overcome by with fragments of fibronectin that support α3 and α5 integrin engagement. Furthermore, we found that substrate-induced EMT correlates with transforming growth factor beta activation by resident epithelial cells and is dependent on Rho/ROCK signaling. Suppressing cell-contractility was sufficient to maintain an epithelial phenotype. Our results suggest that integrin-specific engagement of fibronectin adhesive domains and the mechanics of the ECM act synergistically to direct EMT.

  4. Mechanical Checkpoint For Persistent Cell Polarization In Adhesion-Naive Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bun, Philippe; Liu, JunJun; Turlier, Hervé; Liu, ZengZhen; Uriot, Karen; Joanny, Jean-François; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarization is a fundamental biological process implicated in nearly every aspect of multicellular development. The role of cell-extracellular matrix contacts in the establishment and the orientation of cell polarity have been extensively studied. However, the respective contributions of substrate mechanics and biochemistry remain unclear. Here we propose a believed novel single-cell approach to assess the minimal polarization trigger. Using nonadhered round fibroblast cells, we show that stiffness sensing through single localized integrin-mediated cues are necessary and sufficient to trigger and direct a shape polarization. In addition, the traction force developed by cells has to reach a minimal threshold of 56 ± 1.6 pN for persistent polarization. The polarization kinetics increases with the stiffness of the cue. The polarized state is characterized by cortical actomyosin redistribution together with cell shape change. We develop a physical model supporting the idea that a local and persistent inhibition of actin polymerization and/or myosin activity is sufficient to trigger and sustain the polarized state. Finally, the cortical polarity propagates to an intracellular polarity, evidenced by the reorientation of the centrosome. Our results define the minimal adhesive requirements and quantify the mechanical checkpoint for persistent cell shape and organelle polarization, which are critical regulators of tissue and cell development. PMID:25028874

  5. Failure recovery solutions using cognitive mechanisms based on software-defined optical network platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Guo, Lei; Hou, Weigang; Zhang, Qihan; Wang, Siqi

    2017-01-01

    Fault tolerance is one of the most desirable properties in the optical network since a large amount of data will be lost if the failure recovery cannot be well achieved. The software-defined network is an innovative paradigm-which decouples the control module from the underlying data forwarding plane-to make fast decisions on detecting and restoring link failures. Therefore, we focus on failure recovery solutions based on software-defined optical networks. The out-of-band control mechanism is utilized for the communication between the controller and the data forwarding elements. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solutions-including a failure detection scheme, a dynamic all pairs shortest paths algorithm, and a failure recovery application-based on our software-defined optical network platform. Experimental demonstration and numerical evaluation both show its overall feasibility and efficiency.

  6. Degradation mechanisms and stability forecasting and adhesion contacts of metal films with binary dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarova, S.; Nemirovsky, Y.; Simanovskis, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors present their conception of degradation and stability on the adhesion contacts of metal films with binary nonmetallic crystals. There are numerous works devoted to the atomic scale determination of adhesion forces and development of adhesion interaction laws. But in the real life the kinetic processes, taking place on the adhesion contact, can lead to such dramatic changes in adhesion strength values that the initial adhesion characteristics do not worth much for practice. Sometimes, adhesion contact with a metal which supposed to be highly adhesive failes in a short period of aging time. What the authors have learned from their studies of the contact processes is that in many cases the aging could not be separately addressed to the individual properties of film metal or to those of the substrate material. It depends mainly on the relationships between the parameters of interacting pair. The question is: what parameters should be taken into account to explain degradation phenomena and to predict them? The purpose of the present work is to show how the relative chemical activity of film metal and substrate cation affects the contact degradation in a vacuum and in different environmental conditions.

  7. [Topography and mechanisms of adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria in the human kidney and renal pelvis].

    PubMed

    Vierbuchen, M; Peters, G; Ortmann, M; Pulverer, G; Fischer, R

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of bacterial carbohydrate recognition proteins (bacterial lectins) and endogenous carbohydrate binding proteins (endogenous lectins) of human urothelium as well as kidney tubulus epithelium was analyzed with respect to the adhesion of urotoxogenic Escherichia coli bacteria. Using biotinylated neoglycoproteins, we demonstrated a wide spectrum of endogenous lectins with Galactose-, Mannose-, Fucose-, N-Acetylgalactosamine-, and N-Acetylglucosamine binding activities in the urothelium. In the kidney the distal nephron and especially the medullar collecting ducts exhibited a similar spectrum of endogenous carbohydrate binding activities as detected for the urothelium. Adhesion- as well as inhibition-experiments with selective blocking of either bacterial lectins or endogenous lectins of the target cells by different carbohydrates both reduced the bacterial adhesion. However, maximal inhibition of bacterial adhesion was achieved by simultanous blocking of microbial and target cell lectins with mannose or mannan. From these results it is reasonable to conclude that specific adhesion which may result in an organotropism (urotropism) of E. coli infection is due to a dual recognition mechanism which is accomplished by the combined interaction of the bachterial and host cell lectins with the corresponding carbohydrates of E. coli and that of the target cells respectively. Further studies showed that normal human serum possesses natural antiadhesins which are represented by the glycan parts of the serum-glycoproteins.

  8. Glioblastoma expression of vitronectin and the alpha v beta 3 integrin. Adhesion mechanism for transformed glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gladson, C L; Cheresh, D A

    1991-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most malignant astroglial-derived tumor, grows as an adherent mass and locally invades normal brain. An examination of adult cerebral glioblastoma biopsy material for the expression of adhesive proteins that might potentiate adhesion and invasion demonstrated tumor cell-associated vitronectin (5/5). In contrast, vitronectin was not detected associated with glial cells in low grade astroglial tumors (0/4), reactive astrogliosis (0/4), or in normal adult cortex and cerebral white matter (0/5). Also, a wide variety of other adhesive ligands were absent from the glioblastoma tumor parenchyma. The alpha v beta 3 integrin was the only vitronectin receptor identified in glioblastoma tumors in situ, and was also not expressed on low grade astroglial-derived tumors, reactive astrogliosis, or on glia or neurons in normal adult cortex and cerebral white matter. In a cell attachment assay, cultured glioblastoma cells attached to the parenchyma of glioblastoma tumor cryostat sections at the sites of vitronectin expression, but failed to attach to normal brain. This adhesion was inhibited by antibodies directed against vitronectin, the alpha v beta 3 integrin, and with an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide. These data provide evidence for a cell adhesion mechanism in glioblastoma tumors that might potentiate glioblastoma cell invasion of normal brain. Images PMID:1721625

  9. On mechanics and material length scales of failure in heterogeneous interfaces using a finite strain high performance solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Matthew; Matouš, Karel

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations capable of resolving the large range of spatial scales, from the failure-zone thickness up to the size of the representative unit cell, in damage mechanics problems of particle reinforced adhesives are presented. We show that resolving this wide range of scales in complex three-dimensional heterogeneous morphologies is essential in order to apprehend fracture characteristics, such as strength, fracture toughness and shape of the softening profile. Moreover, we show that computations that resolve essential physical length scales capture the particle size-effect in fracture toughness, for example. In the vein of image-based computational materials science, we construct statistically optimal unit cells containing hundreds to thousands of particles. We show that these statistically representative unit cells are capable of capturing the first- and second-order probability functions of a given data-source with better accuracy than traditional inclusion packing techniques. In order to accomplish these large computations, we use a parallel multiscale cohesive formulation and extend it to finite strains including damage mechanics. The high-performance parallel computational framework is executed on up to 1024 processing cores. A mesh convergence and a representative unit cell study are performed. Quantifying the complex damage patterns in simulations consisting of tens of millions of computational cells and millions of highly nonlinear equations requires data-mining the parallel simulations, and we propose two damage metrics to quantify the damage patterns. A detailed study of volume fraction and filler size on the macroscopic traction-separation response of heterogeneous adhesives is presented.

  10. Subchondral bone microarchitecture and failure mechanism under compression: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Malekipour, Fatemeh; Oetomo, Denny; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2017-02-21

    Subchondral bone (SCB) microdamage is commonly observed in traumatic joint injuries and has been strongly associated with post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Knowledge of the three-dimensional stress and strain distribution within the SCB tissue helps to understand the mechanism of SCB failure, and may lead to an improved understanding of mechanisms of PTOA initiation, prevention and treatment. In this study, we used high-resolution micro-computed tomography (µCT)-based finite element (FE) modelling of cartilage-bone to evaluate the failure mechanism and the locations of SCB tissue at high-risk of initial failure under compression. The µCT images of five cartilage-bone specimens with an average SCB thickness of 1.23±0.20mm were used to develop five µCT-based FE models. The FE models were analysed under axial compressions of approximately 30MPa applied to the cartilage surface while the bone edges were constrained. Strain and stress-based failure criteria were then applied to evaluate the failure mechanism of the SCB tissue under excessive compression through articular cartilage. µCT-based FE models predicted two locations in the SCB at high-risk of initial failure: (1) the interface of the calcified-uncalcified cartilage due to excessive tension, and (2) the trabecular bone beneath the subchondral plate due to excessive compression. µCT-based FE models of cartilage-bone enabled us to quantify the distribution of the applied compression which was transferred through the articular cartilage to its underlying SCB, and to investigate the mechanism and the mode of SCB tissue failure. Ultimately, the results will help to understand the mechanism of injury formation in relation to PTOA.

  11. The molecular mechanisms of hemodialysis vascular access failure

    PubMed Central

    Franzoni, Marco; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    The arteriovenous fistula has been used for more than 50 years to provide vascular access for patients undergoing hemodialysis. More than 1.5 million patients worldwide have end stage renal disease and this population will continue to grow. The arteriovenous fistula is the preferred vascular access for patients, but its patency rate at 1 year is only 60%. The majority of arteriovenous fistulas fail because of intimal hyperplasia. In recent years, there have been many studies investigating the molecular mechanisms responsible for intimal hyperplasia and subsequent thrombosis. These studies have identified common pathways including inflammation, uremia, hypoxia, sheer stress, and increased thrombogenicity. These cellular mechanisms lead to increased proliferation, migration, and eventually stenosis. These pathways work synergistically through shared molecular messengers. In this review, we will examine the literature concerning the molecular basis of hemodialysis vascular access malfunction. PMID:26806833

  12. Poor adhesion of fentanyl transdermal patches may mimic end-of-dosage failure after 48 hours and prompt early patch replacement in hospitalized cancer pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Arnet, Isabelle; Schacher, Sabrina; Balmer, Eva; Koeberle, Dieter; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2016-01-01

    Context Renewal of fentanyl transdermal patch (transdermal therapeutic system [TTS]) should occur every 3 days (72 hours) according to manufacturer’s guidelines. Some studies mentioned patients reporting end-of-dose failure, and thus, some authors recommend shortening the interval of application to 2 days (48 hours). However, reasons for early replacement are mostly unknown. Objectives The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of early replacement of fentanyl TTS in a cancer center in Basel, Switzerland, and to assess the reasons for early replacement in stationary patients. Methods We retrieved all fentanyl TTS administered in a cancer center in Basel, Switzerland, between November 11, 2011, and January 31, 2015, from the electronic medical database. Results A total of 739 patients (mean age 71.4±11.5 years, 55% women) were administered 2,250 fentanyl TTS (dosage 6–500 µg/hour). Most replacements occurred after 72 hours (61.6%) and a few after 48 hours (7.4%). Patients with early replacement after 48 hours were significantly younger (63.8 years versus 71.5 years, p<0.001) and obtained higher mean dosages of fentanyl TTS (89 µg/hour versus 44.1 µg/hour, p<0.001) and rescue medication (calculated as oral morphine equivalent in milligrams: 185.1 mg versus 39.6 mg during the first 24 hours after replacement, p<0.001). No pharmacological rationale for early replacement was observed. According to 57 physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, the most often reasons for early TTS replacement were end-of-dosage pain (41.4%) and poor adhesion (31.4%). Conclusion In the absence of any physiological, pharmacological, or environmental reasons recorded in the database to explain an early replacement of fentanyl TTS, skin adhesion problems may point practical reasons and mimic end-of-dosage failure. PMID:27877065

  13. Interface failure modes explain non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties in bioinspired nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Z. Q.; Ni, Y.; Peng, L. M.; Liang, H. Y.; He, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Bioinspired discontinuous nanolaminate design becomes an efficient way to mitigate the strength-ductility tradeoff in brittle materials via arresting the crack at the interface followed by controllable interface failure. The analytical solution and numerical simulation based on the nonlinear shear-lag model indicates that propagation of the interface failure can be unstable or stable when the interfacial shear stress between laminae is uniform or highly localized, respectively. A dimensionless key parameter defined by the ratio of two characteristic lengths governs the transition between the two interface-failure modes, which can explain the non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties observed in various laminate composites. PMID:27029955

  14. Tip cooling effect and failure mechanism of field-emitting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Wei, Yang; Jiang, Kaili; Peng, Lian-Mao; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-01-01

    The cooling effect accompanying field electron emission has been considered for a single carbon nanotube (CNT) used as a field emission (FE) electron source. An improved model for the failure mechanism of field emitting CNTs has been proposed and validated. Our model predicts a maximum temperature (T-max) located at an interior point rather than the tip of the CNTs, and the failure of the CNT emitters tends to take place at the T-max point, inducing a segment by segment breakdown process. A combination of Joule heating and electrostatic force effect is proposed responsible for initiating the failure of the field emitting CNT and validated by in situ FE observation.

  15. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandan; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report [1] including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  16. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  17. Effect of Coatings and Processing on Failure Mechanisms of Polycarbonate Material. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    brittle transition in the mechanical behavior of ballistically impacted polycarbonate materials with protective coatings . Polycarbonate embrittlement...pressures associated with the impact of polycarbonate material with and without protective coatings ; (2 ) Definition of polycarbonate substrate and coating ...is associated with the presence of protective coatings on the PC. It is desirable to investigate the mechanisms underlying this brittle failure and

  18. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  19. A mathematical model of the coupled mechanisms of cell adhesion, contraction and spreading

    PubMed Central

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Farsad, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown that cell spreading is highly dependent on the contractililty of its cytoskeleton and the mechanical properties of the environment it is located in. The dynamics of such process is critical for the development of tissue engineering strategy but is also a key player in wound contraction, tissue maintenance and angiogenesis. To better understand the underlying physics of such phenomena, the paper describes a mathematical formulation of cell spreading and contraction that couples the processes of stress fiber formation, protrusion growth through actin polymerization at the cell edge and dynamics of cross-membrane protein (integrins) enabling cell-substrate attachment. The evolving cell’s cytoskeleton is modeled as a mixture of fluid, proteins and filaments that can exchange mass and generate contraction. In particular, besides self-assembling into stress fibers, actin monomers able to polymerize into an actin meshwork at the cell’s boundary in order to push the membrane forward and generate protrusion. These processes are possible via the development of cell-substrate attachment complexes that arise from the mechano-sensitive equilibrium of membrane proteins, known as integrins. After deriving the governing equation driving the dynamics of cell evolution and spreading, we introduce a numerical solution based on the extended finite element method, combined with a level set formulation. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model is able to capture the dependency of cell spreading and contraction on substrate stiffness and chemistry. The very good agreement between model predictions and experimental observations suggests that mechanics plays a strong role into the coupled mechanisms of contraction, adhesion and spreading of adherent cells. PMID:23463540

  20. Predictors of extubation failure and reintubation in newborn infants subjected to mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; Schettino, Renata de Carvalho; Ferreira, Sandra Clecêncio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for extubation failure and reintubation in newborn infants subjected to mechanical ventilation and to establish whether ventilation parameters and blood gas analysis behave as predictors of those outcomes. Methods Prospective study conducted at a neonatal intensive care unit from May to November 2011. A total of 176 infants of both genders subjected to mechanical ventilation were assessed after extubation. Extubation failure was defined as the need to resume mechanical ventilation within less than 72 hours. Reintubation was defined as the need to reintubate the infants any time after the first 72 hours. Results Based on the univariate analysis, the variables gestational age <28 weeks, birth weight <1,000g and low Apgar scores were associated with extubation failure and reintubation. Based on the multivariate analysis, the variables length of mechanical ventilation (days), potential of hydrogen (pH) and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) remained associated with extubation failure, and the five-minute Apgar score and age at extubation were associated with reintubation. Conclusion Low five-minute Apgar scores, age at extubation, length of mechanical ventilation, acid-base disorders and hyperoxia exhibited associations with the investigated outcomes of extubation failure and reintubation. PMID:24770689

  1. An autonomous recovery mechanism against optical distribution network failures in EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Andrew Tanny; Hwang, I.-Shyan; Nikoukar, AliAkbar

    2014-10-01

    Ethernet Passive Optical Network (EPON) is chosen for servicing diverse applications with higher bandwidth and Quality-of-Service (QoS), starting from Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH), FTTB (business/building) and FTTO (office). Typically, a single OLT can provide services to both residential and business customers on the same Optical Line Terminal (OLT) port; thus, any failures in the system will cause a great loss for both network operators and customers. Network operators are looking for low-cost and high service availability mechanisms that focus on the failures that occur within the drop fiber section because the majority of faults are in this particular section. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an autonomous recovery mechanism that provides protection and recovery against Drop Distribution Fiber (DDF) link faults or transceiver failure at the ONU(s) in EPON systems. In the proposed mechanism, the ONU can automatically detect any signal anomalies in the physical layer or transceiver failure, switching the working line to the protection line and sending the critical event alarm to OLT via its neighbor. Each ONU has a protection line, which is connected to the nearest neighbor ONU, and therefore, when failure occurs, the ONU can still transmit and receive data via the neighbor ONU. Lastly, the Fault Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation for recovery mechanism is presented. Simulation results show that our proposed autonomous recovery mechanism is able to maintain the overall QoS performance in terms of mean packet delay, system throughput, packet loss and EF jitter.

  2. Mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms of Li-ion battery separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnaus, Sergiy; Wang, Yanli; Turner, John A.

    2017-04-01

    Anisotropic mechanical properties were experimentally determined and compared for three types of commercially available Li-ion battery separators: Celgard 2325, Celgard PP2075 dry-processed polymer separators, and DreamWeaver Gold 40 non-woven separator. Significant amount of anisotropy of properties was determined, with the Young's modulus being different by up to a factor of 5 and ultimate strength being different by a factor of 10 between orthogonal directions within a polymer separator layer. Strain rate sensitivity was investigated by applying strain rates ranging from 1 ṡ10-4 s-1 to 0.1 s-1. Significant strengthening was observed and the strain rate strengthening coefficients were determined for both elastic modulus and yield stress in case of polymer separators. Digital image correlation technique was used to measure and map the strains over the specimen's gage section. Significant strain concentration in bands running perpendicular to the tensile axis was observed in polymer separator samples oriented in transverse direction. Such localized necking allows for extremely high strains close to 300% to develop in the material. The failure mode was remarkably different for all three types of separators which adds additional variable in safe design of Li-ion batteries for prevention of internal short circuits.

  3. Mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms of Li-ion battery separators

    DOE PAGES

    Kalnaus, Sergiy; Wang, Yanli; Turner, John A.

    2017-03-09

    We determine and compare anisotropic mechanical properties for three types of commercially available Li-ion battery separators: Celgard 2325, Celgard PP2075 dry-processed polymer separators, and DreamWeaver Gold 40 non-woven separator. Significant amount of anisotropy of properties was determined, with the Young's modulus being different by up to a factor of 5 and ultimate strength being different by a factor of 10 between orthogonal directions within a polymer separator layer. Strain rate sensitivity was investigated by applying strain rates ranging from 1•10-4 s-1 to 0.1 s-1. Significant strengthening was observed and the strain rate strengthening coefficients were determined for both elastic modulusmore » and yield stress in case of polymer separators. Digital image correlation technique was used to measure and map the strains over the specimen's gage section. A significant strain concentration in bands running perpendicular to the tensile axis was observed in polymer separator samples oriented in transverse direction. Such localized necking allows for extremely high strains close to 300% to develop in the material. Furthermore, the failure mode was remarkably different for all three types of separators which adds additional variable in safe design of Li-ion batteries for prevention of internal short circuits.« less

  4. Evidence of an emerging levee failure mechanism causing disastrous floods in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Albertson, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A levee failure occurred along the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on 19 January 2014, resulting in flood damage in excess of $500 million. In response to this failure, immediate surveillance of other levees in the region led to the identification of a second breach developing on the neighboring Panaro River, where rapid mitigation efforts were successful in averting a full levee failure. The paired breach events that occurred along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers provided an excellent window on an emerging levee failure mechanism. In the Secchia River, by combining the information content of photographs taken from helicopters in the early stage of breach development and 10 cm resolution aerial photographs taken in 2010 and 2012, animal burrows were found to exist in the precise levee location where the breach originated. In the Panaro River, internal erosion was observed to occur at a location where a crested porcupine den was known to exist and this erosion led to the collapse of the levee top. This paper uses detailed numerical modeling of rainfall, river flow, and variably saturated flow in the levee to explore the hydraulic and geotechnical mechanisms that were triggered along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers by activities of burrowing animals leading to levee failures. As habitats become more fragmented and constrained along river corridors, it is possible that this failure mechanism could become more prevalent and, therefore, will demand greater attention in both the design and maintenance of earthen hydraulic structures as well as in wildlife management.

  5. Original mechanism of failure initiation revealed through modelling of naturally occurring microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatikh, Larissa; Lomov, Stepan V.; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2010-05-01

    Motivated to reveal original mechanisms of failure resistance, we developed a material model that encompasses most reoccurring microstructural features of natural composites. The interesting result of the work is a notion that material failure is governed by the quality of interactions between hierarchical levels in the material microstructure. With intelligent use of the structure, these interactions can be tuned to create a powerful synergetic effect on the material failure behaviour. For example, while exploring different mechanisms of failure initiation in composites with bimodal size reinforcements (an indirect way to model two levels of hierarchy simultaneously) we found that failure initiation could be shifted from stress concentration sites of the higher level to the lower level. One could say that the material behaviour became insensitive to the presence of reinforcements on the higher level—a phenomenon that is counterintuitive to what is commonly known. The new mechanism of failure initiation could only be activated in composites with a highly controlled structural organization—in the studied case, reinforcements of the lower level needed to establish lamellar pathways between reinforcements of the higher level. These pathways lead to formation of an intriguing network-like microstructure. Intelligent communication between reinforcements in such a network created the necessary synergy to change the failure initiation mechanism in a discontinuous fashion. Another finding was that by establishing such a network, tensile stresses near dangerous stress concentration sites were locally transformed into compressive stresses. Resemblance of the revealed mechanism to phenomena on the nano-scale was also discussed. In the course of this work a new method was developed to investigate interactions between reinforcements and their collective input into effective and local properties of a composite. The reinforcement phase was modelled with the use of rigid

  6. Influence of metabolic dysfunction on cardiac mechanics in decompensated hypertrophy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Bugenhagen, Scott M; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Rice, J Jeremy; Janssen, Paul M L; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in energetic state of the myocardium are associated with decompensated heart failure in humans and in animal models. However, the functional consequences of the observed changes in energetic state on mechanical function are not known. The primary aim of the study was to quantify mechanical/energetic coupling in the heart and to determine if energetic dysfunction can contribute to mechanical failure. A secondary aim was to apply a quantitative systems pharmacology analysis to investigate the effects of drugs that target cross-bridge cycling kinetics in heart failure-associated energetic dysfunction. Herein, a model of metabolite- and calcium-dependent myocardial mechanics was developed from calcium concentration and tension time courses in rat cardiac muscle obtained at different lengths and stimulation frequencies. The muscle dynamics model accounting for the effect of metabolites was integrated into a model of the cardiac ventricles to simulate pressure-volume dynamics in the heart. This cardiac model was integrated into a simple model of the circulation to investigate the effects of metabolic state on whole-body function. Simulations predict that reductions in metabolite pools observed in canine models of heart failure can cause systolic dysfunction, blood volume expansion, venous congestion, and ventricular dilation. Simulations also predict that myosin-activating drugs may partially counteract the effects of energetic state on cross-bridge mechanics in heart failure while increasing myocardial oxygen consumption. Our model analysis demonstrates how metabolic changes observed in heart failure are alone sufficient to cause systolic dysfunction and whole-body heart failure symptoms.

  7. Nuclear–cytoskeletal linkages facilitate cross talk between the nucleus and intercellular adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rachel M.; Zubek, Amanda E.; Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Schreiner, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex allows cells to actively control nuclear position by coupling the nucleus to the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Nuclear position responds to the formation of intercellular adhesions through coordination with the cytoskeleton, but it is not known whether this response impacts adhesion function. In this paper, we demonstrate that the LINC complex component SUN2 contributes to the mechanical integrity of intercellular adhesions between mammalian epidermal keratinocytes. Mice deficient for Sun2 exhibited irregular hair follicle intercellular adhesions, defective follicle structure, and alopecia. Primary mouse keratinocytes lacking Sun2 displayed aberrant nuclear position in response to adhesion formation, altered desmosome distribution, and mechanically defective adhesions. This dysfunction appeared rooted in a failure of Sun2-null cells to reorganize their microtubule network to support coordinated intercellular adhesion. Together, these results suggest that cross talk between the nucleus, cytoskeleton, and intercellular adhesions is important for epidermal tissue integrity. PMID:25963820

  8. An adhesive contact mechanics formulation based on atomistically induced surface traction

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Houfu; Ren, Bo; Li, Shaofan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel multiscale computational contact formulation based on the generalized Derjuguin approximation for continua that are characterized by atomistically enriched constitutive relations in order to study macroscopic interaction between arbitrarily shaped deformable continua. The proposed adhesive contact formulation makes use of the microscopic interaction forces between individual particles in the interacting bodies. In particular, the double-layer volume integral describing the contact interaction (energy, force vector, matrix) is converted into a double-layer surface integral through a mathematically consistent approach that employs the divergence theorem and a special partitioning technique. The proposed contact model is formulated in the nonlinear continuum mechanics framework and implemented using the standard finite element method. With no large penalty constant, the stiffness matrix of the system will in general be well-conditioned, which is of great significance for quasi-static analysis. Three numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. Results indicate that with the same mesh configuration, the finite element computation based on the surface integral approach is faster and more accurate than the volume integral based approach. In addition, the proposed approach is energy preserving even in a very long dynamic simulation.

  9. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet; Ariestanti, Donna M.; Aust, Gabriela; Bae, Byoung-il; Bista, Bigyan R.; Bridges, James P.; Duman, Joseph G.; Engel, Felix B.; Giera, Stefanie; Goffinet, André M.; Hall, Randy A.; Hamann, Jörg; Hartmann, Nicole; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Rong; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Prömel, Simone; Ressl, Susanne; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Sigoillot, Séverine M.; Song, Helen; Talbot, William S.; Tall, Gregory G.; White, James P.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix—a structural feature of all GPCRs—the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region. In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis–inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site (GPS) motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF are associated non-covalently as a heterodimer at the plasma membrane. While the biological function of the GAIN domain–mediated autocleavage is not fully understood, mounting evidence suggests that the NTF and CTF possess distinct biological activities in addition to their function as a receptor unit. We discuss recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs. PMID:25424900

  10. Integrating carbon nanotube forests into polysilicon MEMS: Growth kinetics, mechanisms, and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Meshot, Eric R.; Stoner, Brian R.; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2016-11-19

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on polycrystalline silicon substrates was studied to improve the design of CNT field emission sources for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications and vacuum microelectronic devices (VMDs). Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was used for CNT growth, resulting in CNTs that incorporate the catalyst particle at their base. The kinetics of CNT growth on polysilicon were compared to growth on Si (100) using the model of Deal and Grove, finding activation energies of 1.61 and 1.54 eV for the nucleation phase of growth and 1.90 and 3.69 eV for the diffusion-limited phase on Si (100) and polysilicon, respectively. Diffusivity values for growth on polysilicon were notably lower than the corresponding values on Si (100) and the growth process became diffusion-limited earlier. Evidence favors a surface diffusion growth mechanism involving diffusion of carbon precursor species along the length of the CNT forest to the catalyst at the base. Explanations for the differences in activation energies and diffusivities were elucidated by SEM analysis of the catalyst nanoparticle arrays and through wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) of CNT forests. As a result, methods are presented to improve adhesion of CNT films during operation as field emitters, resulting in a 2.5× improvement.

  11. Integrating carbon nanotube forests into polysilicon MEMS: Growth kinetics, mechanisms, and adhesion

    DOE PAGES

    Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Meshot, Eric R.; ...

    2016-11-19

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on polycrystalline silicon substrates was studied to improve the design of CNT field emission sources for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications and vacuum microelectronic devices (VMDs). Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was used for CNT growth, resulting in CNTs that incorporate the catalyst particle at their base. The kinetics of CNT growth on polysilicon were compared to growth on Si (100) using the model of Deal and Grove, finding activation energies of 1.61 and 1.54 eV for the nucleation phase of growth and 1.90 and 3.69 eV for the diffusion-limited phase on Si (100)more » and polysilicon, respectively. Diffusivity values for growth on polysilicon were notably lower than the corresponding values on Si (100) and the growth process became diffusion-limited earlier. Evidence favors a surface diffusion growth mechanism involving diffusion of carbon precursor species along the length of the CNT forest to the catalyst at the base. Explanations for the differences in activation energies and diffusivities were elucidated by SEM analysis of the catalyst nanoparticle arrays and through wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) of CNT forests. As a result, methods are presented to improve adhesion of CNT films during operation as field emitters, resulting in a 2.5× improvement.« less

  12. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society. PMID:24699375

  13. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  14. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-04

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  15. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet; Ariestanti, Donna M; Aust, Gabriela; Bae, Byoung-il; Bista, Bigyan R; Bridges, James P; Duman, Joseph G; Engel, Felix B; Giera, Stefanie; Goffinet, André M; Hall, Randy A; Hamann, Jörg; Hartmann, Nicole; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Rong; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Prömel, Simone; Ressl, Susanne; Schiöth, Helgi B; Sigoillot, Séverine M; Song, Helen; Talbot, William S; Tall, Gregory G; White, James P; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-12-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region. In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF are associated noncovalently as a heterodimer at the plasma membrane. While the biological function of the GAIN domain-mediated autocleavage is not fully understood, mounting evidence suggests that the NTF and CTF possess distinct biological activities in addition to their function as a receptor unit. We discuss recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs.

  16. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M.; Bahr, David F.

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  17. Intrinsic mechanisms of multi-layer ceramic capacitor failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, L. C.

    1984-04-01

    The major objective of this research is to obtain an improved understanding of degradation mechanisms of MLC capacitors. This is being approached from several directions: (1) Capacitors (mainly Z5U and X7R types) that are new or in various degrees of degradation (as judged by insulation resistance) have been cross sectioned for SEM and optical examination, and for compositional measurements using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and electron beam microprobe. (2) Electrical measurements on similar devices include current-voltage, current-temperature and impedance-frequency. (3) Thermoelectric measurements have been made on non-electroded X7R chips in order to separate the carrier concentration from the drift mobility, and to observe their change following reduction of the ceramic.

  18. The effect of cores and coating dispersion composition on the mechanical and adhesion properties of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose films.

    PubMed

    Banovec, M; Planinsek, O; Vrecer, F

    2014-08-01

    The influence of different additives on the mechanical properties of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) free films was studied using tensile testing. Free films were prepared using the cast method and sliced into bands, and their tensile strength and maximal elongation at break was measured. The results showed that the addition of PEG 400 and polysorbate 80 into the coating formulation had the most influence on the films' mechanical properties compared to the HPMC film used as a control. Tablet cores composed of microcrystalline cellulose and lactose with and without Mg stearate and compressed at three different compression forces were tested for wettability with coating formulations containing PEG 400 and polysorbate 80. For formulations with no Mg stearate added, the contact angle decreased with increasing core hardness and it also coincided with greater adhesion force of the coating. The addition of Mg stearate in the core led to reduced adhesion of the film coating with PEG 400, whereas the influence on the adhesion force of the film coating containing polysorbate 80 was negligible. The results also show that the adhesion force, regardless of the tablet core formulation, is highest at medium core hardness.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Failure of Biopolymers: Atomistic Reactions to Macroscale Response.

    PubMed

    Jung, GangSeob; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of chemical bonding under various mechanical loadings is an intriguing mechanochemical property of biological materials, and the property plays a critical role in determining their deformation and failure mechanisms. Because of their astonishing mechanical properties and roles in constituting the basis of a variety of physiologically relevant materials, biological protein materials have been intensively studied. Understanding the relation between chemical bond networks (structures) and their mechanical properties offers great possibilities to enable new materials design in nanotechnology and new medical treatments for human diseases. Here we focus on how the chemical bonds in biological systems affect mechanical properties and how they change during mechanical deformation and failure. Three representative cases of biomaterials related to the human diseases are discussed in case studies, including: amyloids, intermediate filaments, and collagen, each describing mechanochemical features and how they relate to the pathological conditions at multiple scales.

  20. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  1. On the isotropy of the dynamic mechanical and failure properties of swaged tungsten heavy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittel, D.; Levin, R.; Dorogoy, A.

    2004-12-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic mechanical and failure properties of a swaged tungsten-base heavy alloy rod have been investigated, with emphasis on the orientation of the specimens in the rod. Three orientations were considered, 0, 45, and 90 deg, with respect to the longitudinal axis of the rod. Compression, tension, and dominant shear tests were carried out. With the exception of the 0 deg orientation, all the orientations displayed quite similar mechanical characteristics in tension and compression. Dynamic shear revealed a critical strain for adiabatic shear failure of ɛ c ≈0.13, independent of the orientation and quite inferior to the quasi-static ductility. The present study confirms previous results obtained for one (generally unspecified) orientation and extends them to three orientations. Failure mechanisms were thoroughly characterized and it appears that significant damage does not develop prior to final failure. It is concluded that, for practical purposes, the swaged heavy alloy considered here can be regarded as isotropic from a mechanical and failure point of view, in spite of its microstructural anisotropy resulting from the swaging process.

  2. Load redistribution rules for progressive failure in shallow landslides: Threshold mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are often preceded by progressive failures that culminate in abrupt mass release. Local failure progression is captured by a landslide hydro-mechanical triggering model that represents the soil mantle as interacting columns linked by tensile and compressive mechanical "bonds." Mechanical bonds may fail at a prescribed threshold leaving a modeling challenge of how to redistribute their load to neighboring intact soil columns. We employed an elastic spring-block model to analytically derive redistribution rules defined by the stiffness ratio of compressive to tensile bonds. These linear-elastic rules were generalized to real soil using measurable Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. Results indicate that "local" failure characteristics of ductile-like soils (e.g., clay) are reproduced by low stiffness ratios, whereas "global" failure of brittle sandy soils corresponds to large stiffness ratios. Systematic analyses yield guidelines for selecting load redistribution rules for failure of geological materials and mass-movement phenomena represented by discrete threshold-mechanics.

  3. Product Reliability Trends, Derating Considerations and Failure Mechanisms with Scaled CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark; Vu, Duc; Nguyen, Duc; Ruiz, Ron; Chen, Yuan; Bernstein, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    As microelectronics is scaled into the deep sub-micron regime, space and aerospace users of advanced technology CMOS are reassessing how scaling effects impact long-term product reliability. The effects of electromigration (EM), time-dependent-dielectric-breakdown (TDDB) and hot carrier degradation (HCI and NBTI) wearout mechanisms on scaled technologies and product reliability are investigated, accelerated stress testing across several technology nodes is performed, and FA is conducted to confirm the failure mechanism(s).

  4. Conditions and possible mechanisms of VCD-induced ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Ling-Yan; Xing, Xiao-Xue; Fan, Guan-Wei

    2015-12-01

    Perimenopause is an important period in women's lives, in which they experience a series of physiological changes. Current animal models of perimenopause fail to adequately replicate this particular stage in female life, while current in vitro models are too simplistic and cannot account for systemic effects. Neither the naturally-ageing animal model, nor the ovariectomised animal model, mimic the natural transitional process that is the menopause. In vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed that the occupational chemical, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), can cause selective destruction of the ovarian primordial and primary follicles of rats and mice by accelerating the apoptotic process, which successfully mimics the perimenopausal state in women. However, it is the in vivo VCD-induced rodent perimenopausal models that are currently the most widely used in research, rather than any of the available in vitro models. Studies on the mechanisms involved have found that VCD induces ovotoxicity via interference with the c-kit/kit ligand and apoptotic signalling pathways, among others. Overall, the VCD-induced perimenopausal animal models have provided some insight into female perimenopause, but they are far from ideal models of the human situation.

  5. Failure mechanism of Ta diffusion barrier between Cu and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurila, Tomi; Zeng, Kejun; Kivilahti, Jorma K.; Molarius, Jyrki; Suni, Ilkka

    2000-09-01

    The reaction mechanisms in the Si/Ta/Cu metallization system and their relation to the microstructure of thin films are discussed on the basis of experimental results and the assessment of the ternary Si-Ta-Cu phase diagram at 700 °C. With the help of sheet resistance measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, a scanning electron microscope, and a transmission electron microscope, the Ta barrier layer was observed to fail at temperatures above 650 °C due to the formation of TaSi2, the diffusion of Cu through the silicide layer, and the resulting formation of Cu3Si precipitates. However, in order for the TaSi2 phase to form first, the Ta diffusion barrier layer must be thick enough (e.g., 50-100 nm) to prevent Cu diffusion into the Si substrate up to the temperature of TaSi2 formation (˜650 °C). Independent of the Ta layer thickness, Cu3Si was present as large nodules, whereas the TaSi2 existed as a uniform layer. The resulting reaction structure was found to be in local equilibrium on the basis of the assessed Si-Ta-Cu phase diagram at 700 °C, and therefore no further reactions were expected. The role of oxygen was also found to be important in the reactions and it seems to have a strong effect on the thermal stability of the barrier layer.

  6. Mechanical failure modes of chronically implanted planar silicon-based neural probes for laminar recording.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Y; Catt, Kasey; Li, Xia; Gugel, Zhannetta V; Olafsson, Valur T; Vazquez, Alberto L; Cui, X Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating intracortical electrode arrays that record brain activity longitudinally are powerful tools for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. However, regardless of the technology used, signals recorded by these electrodes degrade over time. The failure mechanisms of these electrodes are understood to be a complex combination of the biological reactive tissue response and material failure of the device over time. While mechanical mismatch between the brain tissue and implanted neural electrodes have been studied as a source of chronic inflammation and performance degradation, the electrode failure caused by mechanical mismatch between different material properties and different structural components within a device have remained poorly characterized. Using Finite Element Model (FEM) we simulate the mechanical strain on a planar silicon electrode. The results presented here demonstrate that mechanical mismatch between iridium and silicon leads to concentrated strain along the border of the two materials. This strain is further focused on small protrusions such as the electrical traces in planar silicon electrodes. These findings are confirmed with chronic in vivo data (133-189 days) in mice by correlating a combination of single-unit electrophysiology, evoked multi-unit recordings, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy from traces and electrode sites with our modeling data. Several modes of mechanical failure of chronically implanted planar silicon electrodes are found that result in degradation and/or loss of recording. These findings highlight the importance of strains and material properties of various subcomponents within an electrode array.

  7. Mechanical failure modes of chronically implanted planar silicon-based neural probes for laminar recording

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Catt, Kasey; Li, Xia; Gugel, Zhannetta V.; Olafsson, Valur T.; Vazquez, Alberto L.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating intracortical electrode arrays that record brain activity longitudinally are powerful tools for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. However, regardless of the technology used, signals recorded by these electrodes degrade over time. The failure mechanisms of these electrodes are understood to be a complex combination of the biological reactive tissue response and material failure of the device over time. While mechanical mismatch between the brain tissue and implanted neural electrodes have been studied as a source of chronic inflammation and performance degradation, the electrode failure caused by mechanical mismatch between different material properties and different structural components within a device have remained poorly characterized. Using Finite Element Model (FEM) we simulate the mechanical strain on a planar silicon electrode. The results presented here demonstrate that mechanical mismatch between iridium and silicon leads to concentrated strain along the border of the two materials. This strain is further focused on small protrusions such as the electrical traces in planar silicon electrodes. These findings are confirmed with chronic in vivo data (133–189 days) in mice by correlating a combination of single-unit electrophysiology, evoked multi-unit recordings, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy from traces and electrode sites with our modeling data. Several modes of mechanical failure of chronically implanted planar silicon electrodes are found that result in degradation and/or loss of recording. These findings highlight the importance of strains and material properties of various subcomponents within an electrode array. PMID:25453935

  8. Effect of current reversal on the failure mechanism of Al-Cu-Si narrow interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.U.; Kang, S.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr. |

    1996-02-01

    The work reported here concerns the effect of a brief exposure to a reversed current on the electromigration failure of narrow Al-Cu thin-film conducting lines. While the precise mechanism by which Cu retards electromigration in Al-Cu alloys is not fully understood, the consistent observation that electromigration failure is preceded by the sweeping of Cu from the failure site can be used to improve electromigration resistance by stabilizing the distribution of Cu. One way of doing this is to expose the Al-Cu line to a reverse current for some period of time. The present work shows that this method is particularly effective in thin lines with `quasi-bamboo` microstructures. It has the effect of building a reservoir of Cu at the upstream ends of the polygranular segments that are the preferred failure sites, and significantly increases both the mean time of failure, and the time to first failure of a distribution of lines. It can be inferred from these results that Al-Cu lines that conduct alternating current should be exceptionally resistant to electromigration failure. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Modeling the Progressive Failure of Jointed Rock Slope Using Fracture Mechanics and the Strength Reduction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui; Fan, Wenchen

    2015-03-01

    The fracturing process during the progressive failure of a jointed rock slope is numerically investigated by using fracture mechanics and the strength reduction method (SRM). A displacement discontinuity method containing frictional elements is developed for the calculation of the stress intensity factor (SIF). The failure initiation of the jointed rock slope is analyzed by evaluating the SIF. A new joint model is proposed by combining solid elements with interface elements in the commercial software FLAC3D. These represent the discontinuous planes in a rock mass on which sliding or separation can occur. The progressive failure process is simulated by reducing the shear strength of the rock mass, which includes the process of stress concentration, crack initiation, crack propagation, slip weakening, and coalescence of failure surfaces. The factor of safety (FS) and location of the critical failure surface are determined by the SRM. The influence of the joint inclination is investigated using the FS and the SIF. Laboratory experiments on specimens containing an inclined flaw under compression-shear stress are also conducted to investigate the effect of the angle between the shear direction and the flaw inclination, which provides an experimental explanation for the shear behavior of jointed rock. The results show that the joint inclination dominates the failure behavior of jointed rock slope, and two failure patterns have been classified.

  10. Failure mechanisms and structural optimization of shredder hammer for metal scraps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianyan; Hu, Zhili; Tao, Yijun; Qin, Xunpeng; Hua, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Recycling retired cars can relieve the environmental pollution and resource waste efficiently. However, a few publications can be found on the failure mechanisms and optimization method of recycling equipment, shredders. Thus, the failure mechanisms and structural optimization of shredder hammers for retired cars are studied aiming improving shredding efficiency and reducing cost. Failure types of shredder hammer are studied theoretically, and it is found that wear failure and fatigue failure are the two main failure types of shredder hammer. The shredding process of metal scraps is analyzed by finite element method, and it can be divided into four stages based on the stress states: initial stage, collision stage, grinding stage and separation stage. It is proved that the shredding efficiency can be improved by increasing cutouts on the hammer head. Finally, it is determined that the hammer with two cutouts is the optimal structure for metal scraps, which can improve the shredding efficiency by 20% and lengthen the hammer life by 15%. This study provides scientific basis for the industry application and theoretical foundation for further research.

  11. Li-ion Battery Separators, Mechanical Integrity and Failure Mechanisms Leading to Soft and Hard Internal Shorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Sahraei, Elham; Wang, Kai

    2016-09-01

    Separator integrity is an important factor in preventing internal short circuit in lithium-ion batteries. Local penetration tests (nail or conical punch) often produce presumably sporadic results, where in exactly similar cell and test set-ups one cell goes to thermal runaway while the other shows minimal reactions. We conducted an experimental study of the separators under mechanical loading, and discovered two distinct deformation and failure mechanisms, which could explain the difference in short circuit characteristics of otherwise similar tests. Additionally, by investigation of failure modes, we provided a hypothesis about the process of formation of local “soft short circuits” in cells with undetectable failure. Finally, we proposed a criterion for predicting onset of soft short from experimental data.

  12. Li-ion Battery Separators, Mechanical Integrity and Failure Mechanisms Leading to Soft and Hard Internal Shorts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Sahraei, Elham; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Separator integrity is an important factor in preventing internal short circuit in lithium-ion batteries. Local penetration tests (nail or conical punch) often produce presumably sporadic results, where in exactly similar cell and test set-ups one cell goes to thermal runaway while the other shows minimal reactions. We conducted an experimental study of the separators under mechanical loading, and discovered two distinct deformation and failure mechanisms, which could explain the difference in short circuit characteristics of otherwise similar tests. Additionally, by investigation of failure modes, we provided a hypothesis about the process of formation of local “soft short circuits” in cells with undetectable failure. Finally, we proposed a criterion for predicting onset of soft short from experimental data. PMID:27581185

  13. Failure and runout of giant landslides on Hawaiian volcanoes; cases of enigmatic mechanics?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Landslide failure and runout are distinct mechanical processes. Whereas failure is a quasi-static phenomenon that generally can be quantified by means of conventional limit-equilibrium or elastostatic stress analyses, runout is a dynamic phenomenon that can be quantified only if momentum transport and energy dissipation in moving landslides are understood. The balance of forces that governs landslide failure is highly sensitive to only a few factors: the slope morphology, pore-pressure distribution, friction coefficient, and a lateral pressure coefficient. None of these factors produces scale-dependent effects. Consequently, although runout dynamics of giant landslides are poorly understood and are possibly scale-dependent, failure mechanisms are generally less vexing. Giant landslides that have occurred on Hawaiian volcanoes pose an exception to this generalization; both their failure and runout appear to be mechanically enigmatic. Failure is difficult to explain because the volcano slopes are typically inclined less than ten degrees, and simple ground-water flow analyses show that the pore-pressure distributions necessary to trigger failure of these low-angle slopes are unlikely to arise in high-permeability volcanic rocks. Similarly, limit-equilibrium analyses show that dike injection at prospective headscarps provides insufficient pressure to push the landslides downslope. Large earthquakes or the presence of extraordinarily weak rocks might facilitate failure, but these hypotheses remain untested. On the basis of GLORIA data reported by Moore et al. (JGR, 94, 1989, p. 17465), some giant Hawaiian landslides appear to have descent-to-runout (H/L) ratios smaller than 0.1, which indicate remarkably efficient post-failure movement. Runout paths are entirely submarine. However, most of the mechanisms proposed to account for efficient runout of giant landslides (e.g., air-layer lubrication, acoustic fluidization, mechanical fluidization, pore-fluid vaporization

  14. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Adherend surfaces and fractography were studied using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. In addition, Auger Electron Spectroscopy with depth profiling capability was used. It is shown that contamination of adhesion systems plays an important role not only in determining initial bond strengths but also in the durability of adhesive bonds. It is concluded that the analytical techniques used to characterize and monitor such contamination.

  15. Mechanism for adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR56-mediated RhoA activation induced by collagen III stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E; Lencer, Wayne I; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family.

  16. Effects of elastase on the mechanical and failure properties of engineered elastin-rich matrices.

    PubMed

    Black, Lauren D; Brewer, Kelly K; Morris, Shirley M; Schreiber, Barbara M; Toselli, Paul; Nugent, Matthew A; Suki, Bela; Stone, Phillip J

    2005-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema and vessel wall aneurysms are diseases characterized by elastolytic damage to elastin fibers that leads to mechanical failure. To model this, neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured, accumulating an extracellular matrix rich in elastin, and mechanical measurements were made before and during enzymatic digestion of elastin. Specifically, the cells in the cultures were killed with sodium azide, the cultures were lifted from the flask, cut into small strips, and fixed to a computer-controlled lever arm and a force transducer. The strips were subjected to a broadband displacement signal to study the dynamic mechanical properties of the samples. Also, quasi-static stress-strain curves were measured. The dynamic data were fit to a linear viscoelastic model to estimate the tissues' loss (G) and storage (H) modulus coefficients, which were evaluated before and during 30 min of elastase treatment, at which point a failure test was performed. G and H decreased significantly to 30% of their baseline values after 30 min. The failure stress of control samples was approximately 15 times higher than that of the digested samples. Understanding the structure-function relationship of elastin networks and the effects of elastolytic injury on their mechanical properties can lead to the elucidation of the mechanism of elastin fiber failure and evaluation of possible treatments to enhance repair in diseases involving elastolytic injury.

  17. The Therapeutic Outcomes of Mechanical Ventilation in Hematological Malignancy Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Marumo, Atsushi; Omori, Ikuko; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Yui, Shunsuke; Fukunaga, Keiko; Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Okabe, Masahiro; Wakita, Satoshi; Tamai, Hayato; Okamoto, Muneo; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Takeda, Shinhiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective In hematological malignancy patients, the complication of acute respiratory failure often reaches a degree of severity that necessitates mechanical ventilation. The objective of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic outcomes of mechanical ventilation in hematological malignancy patients with respiratory failure and to analyze the factors that are associated with successful treatment in order to identify the issues that should be addressed in the future. Methods The present study was a retrospective analysis of 71 hematological malignancy patients with non-cardiogenic acute respiratory failure who were treated with mechanical ventilation at Nippon Medical School Hospital between 2003 and 2014. Results Twenty-six patients (36.6%) were treated with mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) was applied in 29 cases (40.8%). The rate of successful mechanical ventilation treatment with NPPV alone was 13.8%. The rate of endotracheal extubation was 17.7%. A univariate analysis revealed that the following factors were associated with the successful extubation of patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation: respiratory management in an ICU (p=0.012); remission of the hematological disease (p=0.011); female gender (p=0.048); low levels of accompanying non-respiratory organ failure (p=0.041); and the non-use of extracorporeal circulation (p=0.005). A subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that respiratory management in an ICU was the only variable associated with successful extubation (p=0.030). Conclusion The outcomes of hematological malignancy patients who receive mechanical ventilation treatment for respiratory failure are very poor. Respiratory management in an ICU environment may be useful in improving the therapeutic outcomes of such patients.

  18. A power-cycling-induced failure mechanism in IGBT multichip modules

    SciTech Connect

    Malberti, P.; Ciappa, M.; Cattomio, R.

    1995-12-31

    Catastrophic burn-out occurring during power-cycling of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) multichip modules have been observed to arise as a secondary failure mechanism caused by the lifting of the emitter aluminum bonding wires. In effect, the successive lift-off of the aluminum wires results in a current crowding through few IGBT cells with consequent triggering of the internal parasitic thyristor-structure. Basing on failure analysis data, this paper presents a simple qualitative model for the time dependent lift-off of aluminum bondwires in IGBT modules occurring during either field operation, or accelerated tests. This power-cycling induced failure mechanism is described in terms of the reconstruction of the aluminum interconnection as consequence of plastic deformation. Some practical conclusions are finally drawn for power cycle testing and for optimal thermal design.

  19. Degradation and corresponding failure mechanism for GaN-based LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jiajia; Zhao, Lixia; Cao, Haicheng; Sun, Xuejiao; Sun, Baojuan; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2016-05-01

    The degradation behaviors of high power GaN-based vertical blue LEDs on Si substrates were measured using in-situ accelerated life test. The results show that the dominant failure mechanism would be different during the operation. Besides that, the corresponding associated failure mechanisms were investigated systematically by using different analysis technologies, such as Scan Electron Microscopy, Reflectivity spectroscopy, Transient Thermal Analysis, Raman Spectra, etc. It is shown that initially, the failure modes were mainly originated from the semiconductor die and interconnect, while afterwards, the following serious deterioration of the radiant fluxes was attributed to the package. The interface material and quality, such as die attach and frame, play an important role in determining the thermal performance and reliability. In addition, the heating effect during the operation will also release the compressive strain in the chip. These findings will help to improve the reliability of GaN-based LEDs, especially for the LEDs with vertical structure.

  20. The microstructural mechanism of electromigration failure in narrow interconnects of Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Choongun

    1993-04-01

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of electromigration failure in Al-2Cu-1Si thin-film conducting lines on Si. Samples were patterned from 0.5 μm thick vapor-deposited films with various mean grain sizes (G), and had lines widths (W) of 1.3, 2, 4 and 6 μm. The lines were aged at various conditions to change the Cu-precipitate distribution and were tested to failure at T = 225°C and j = 2.5 x 106 A/cm2. Some samples were tested over a range of substrate temperatures, current densities and current reversal times. Aging produces an initially dense distribution of metastable θ' (Al2Cu; coherent) in the grain interiors, with stable θ (Al2Cu; incoherent) at the grain boundaries. The intragranular θ' is gradually absorbed into the grain boundary precipitates. In the wide lines the mean time to failure increases slowly and monotonically with pre-aging time and current reversal time. The failure mode is the formation and coalescence of voids that form on grain boundaries with an apparent activation energy of 0.65 eV. In the narrow lines, the lines failed by a transgranular-slit mechanism with an activation energy near 0.93 eV. The distribution of the polygranular segments and the kinetics of failure varies with the linewidths. Failure occurs after Cu has been swept from the grains that fail. Pre-aging the line to create a more stable distribution of Cu significantly increases the time to failure. When the density of intragranular θ-phase precipitates is maximized, the transgranular-slit failure mechanism is suppressed, and the bamboo grain fails by diffuse thinning to rupture. The results from the current reversal test indicate that the time to sweep Cu in the polygranular segments is longer for longer polygranular segments. Thus the time to first failure in an array of lines is much longer than predicted by a log-normal fit to the distribution of failure times.

  1. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions.

  2. Some Aspects of the Failure Mechanisms in BaTiO3-Based Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, David Donhang; Sampson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to gain insight into possible failure mechanisms in BaTiO3-based ceramic capacitors that may be associated with the reliability degradation that accompanies a reduction in dielectric thickness, as reported by Intel Corporation in 2010. The volumetric efficiency (microF/cm3) of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) has been shown to not increase limitlessly due to the grain size effect on the dielectric constant of ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 material. The reliability of an MLCC has been discussed with respect to its structure. The MLCCs with higher numbers of dielectric layers will pose more challenges for the reliability of dielectric material, which is the case for most base-metal-electrode (BME) capacitors. A number of MLCCs manufactured using both precious-metal-electrode (PME) and BME technology, with 25 V rating and various chip sizes and capacitances, were tested at accelerated stress levels. Most of these MLCCs had a failure behavior with two mixed failure modes: the well-known rapid dielectric wearout, and so-called 'early failures." The two failure modes can be distinguished when the testing data were presented and normalized at use-level using a 2-parameter Weibull plot. The early failures had a slope parameter of Beta >1, indicating that the early failures are not infant mortalities. Early failures are triggered due to external electrical overstress and become dominant as dielectric layer thickness decreases, accompanied by a dramatic reduction in reliability. This indicates that early failures are the main cause of the reliability degradation in MLCCs as dielectric layer thickness decreases. All of the early failures are characterized by an avalanche-like breakdown leakage current. The failures have been attributed to the extrinsic minor construction defects introduced during fabrication of the capacitors. A reliability model including dielectric thickness and extrinsic defect feature size is proposed in this

  3. Mechanical and failure properties of extracellular matrix sheets as a function of structural protein composition.

    PubMed

    Black, Lauren D; Allen, Philip G; Morris, Shirley M; Stone, Phillip J; Suki, Béla

    2008-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how alterations in protein composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) affect its functional properties. To achieve this, we investigated the changes in the mechanical and failure properties of ECM sheets generated by neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cells engineered to contain varying amounts of collagen and elastin. Samples underwent static and dynamic mechanical measurements before, during, and after 30 min of elastase digestion followed by a failure test. Microscopic imaging was used to measure thickness at two strain levels to estimate the true stress and moduli in the ECM sheets. We found that adding collagen to the ECM increased the stiffness. However, further increasing collagen content altered matrix organization with a subsequent decrease in the failure strain. We also introduced collagen-related percolation in a nonlinear elastic network model to interpret these results. Additionally, linear elastic moduli correlated with failure stress which may allow the in vivo estimation of the stress tolerance of ECM. We conclude that, in engineered replacement tissues, there is a tradeoff between improved mechanical properties and decreased extensibility, which can impact their effectiveness and how well they match the mechanical properties of native tissue.

  4. Effect of Substrate Surface Finish on the Lubrication and Failure Mechanisms of Molybdenum Disulfide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrates were rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  5. Lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films. 2: Effect of substrate roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes; polished, sanded, and sandblasted as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrate was rough, flat plateaus were created during run-in and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and as deposit sites for wear debris. In moist air the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X-ray diffraction to be alpha iron, MoO3, and possibly FeMoO3. In dry argon the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of MoS2 from the contact region by transverse flow, and the wear debris on the track at failure was alpha iron, residual MoS2, and possibly FeS.

  6. Effect of substrate surface finish on the lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrate was rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run-in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic-colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X-ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha-iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha-iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of a Bi-functional Tetronic Hydrogel Adhesive for Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lindsey; Stone, Roland; Webb, C. Kenneth; Mefford, O. Thompson; Nagatomi, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of tissue adhesives and sealants for surgical use are currently available, attaining a useful balance in high strength, high compliance, and low swelling has proven difficult. Recent studies have demonstrated that a 4-arm poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PPO-PEO) block copolymer, Tetronic, can be chemically modified to form a hydrogel tissue adhesive21–23. Building on the success of these studies, the present study explored bi-functionalization of Tetronic with acrylates for chemical crosslinking of the hydrogel and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) for reaction with tissue amines. The adhesive bond strengths of various uni- and bi-functional Tetronic blends (T1107 ACR: T1107 ACR/NHS) determined by lap shear testing ranged between 8 and 74 kPa, with the 75:25 (T1107 ACR: T1107 ACR/NHS) blend displaying the highest value. These results indicated that addition of NHS led to improvement of tissue bond strength over acrylation alone Furthermore, ex vivo pressure tests using the rat bladder demonstrated that the bi-functional Tetronic adhesive exhibited high compliance and maintained pressures under hundreds of filling and emptying cycles. Together, the results of the present study provided evidence that the bi-functional Tetronic adhesive with a proper blend ratio may be used to achieve an accurate balance in bulk and tissue bond strengths, as well as the compliance and durability for soft tissue such as the bladder. PMID:25111445

  8. Mechanical tuning of mammalian sperm behaviour by hyperactivation, rheology and substrate adhesion: a numerical exploration

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2016-01-01

    The great mammalian sperm race encounters numerous microenvironments to which sperm must adapt and a fundamental sperm response is the change in its waveform owing to both fluid rheology and capacitation, with the latter associated with a hyperactivated beat pattern. Hence, in this modelling study, we examine the effect of different flagellar waveforms for sperm behaviour near adhesive substrates, which are representative of epithelia in female tract sperm reservoirs and the zona pellucida (ZP), which surrounds the mammalian egg. On contact with an adhesive surface, virtual sperm rotate to become nearly tangential with the surface, as generally observed. Hyperactivation also induces many effects: sperm exert greater forces on the substrate and periodically tug way from adhesions under circumstances reflecting binding at sperm reservoirs, but with extensive fluid elasticity, as found in the cumulus surrounding the ZP, sperm instead continually push into the substrate. Furthermore, with weak adhesion, rheological media increase the duration hyperactivated sperm remain in the proximity of a substrate. More generally, such results predict that changes owing to both hyperactivation of the flagellar waveform and the rheology of the surrounding medium provide a means of tuning sperm behaviour near, or attached to, adhesive substrates. PMID:27852807

  9. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites. [composed of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.; Mullin, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental failure mechanisms which result from the interaction of thermal cycling and mechanical loading of carbon-epoxy composites were studied. This work was confined to epoxy resin uniderictionally reinforced with HTS carbon fibers, and consists of first identifying local fiber, matrix and interface failure mechanisms using the model composite specimen containing a small number of fibers so that optical techniques can be used for characterization. After the local fracture process has been established for both mechanical loading and thermal cycling, engineering composite properties and gross fracture modes are then examined to determine how the local events contribute to real composite performance. Flexural strength in high fiber content specimens shows an increase in strength with increased thermal cycling. Similar behavior is noted for 25 v/o material up to 200 cycles; however, there is a drastic reduction after 200 cycles indicating a major loss of integrity probably through the accumulation of local cleavage cracks in the tensile region.

  10. Failure strain and mechanical property data for the Type IIIA waste tank liners

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-06-01

    The SRS Waste Tanks at the Savannah River Site to be employed in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process are undergoing a structural evaluation in order to define their response to a hypothetical deflagration accident. This report provides mechanical property data to support the structural analyses, and characterizes the impact of mechanical property variability and materials degradation on the failure strain of the primary liner.

  11. [Adhesion of corynebacterium diphtheriae: the role of surface structures and formation mechanism].

    PubMed

    Kharseeva, G G; Alieva, A A

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of surface structures including pili (fimbriae) 67-72p surface protein, DIP 1281 surface protein, lipoarabinomannan CdiLAM and their role in the adhesion and colonization of the mucous membrane of the throat by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. A description is offered for the main stages in the adhesion process of diphtheria causative agent and the ability of its adhesins to stimulate the effect of innate and acquired immunity factors. The paper stresses prospectiveness of the development of vaccines forming immunoprotection of the organism against adhesive activity of C. diphtheriae and also preventing their colonization and reproduction. That would facilitate a solution for the problem of diphtheria carrier state, which cannot be solved using the existing means of preventive vaccination.

  12. Failure mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament prostheses: in vitro wear study.

    PubMed

    Poddevin, N; King, M W; Guidoin, R G

    1997-01-01

    Previous retrieval studies analyzing the cause of failure of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prostheses identified a wear mechanism. However, the relative importance of yarn on bone compared to yarn on yarn wear has not been clearly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elucidate which type of wear is the dominant cause of clinical failure. A variety of ACL prosthetic structures were exposed to two in vitro tests: one for yarn on yarn and the other for a novel yarn on bone wear test system. The latter included the use of both smooth (uncut) and rough (cut) bone surfaces to simulate the conditions around the condyle and at the exit of the tibial tunnel, respectively. The damaged textile structures were viewed by SEM. The various fiber fracture morphologies were identified and classified for the two types of wear tests; for the smooth and rough bone surfaces; for the braided, knitted, woven, and twisted textile structures; and for the three types of fibers that were included: polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene. The results confirmed that yarn on bone and yarn on yarn wear phenomena are associated with significantly different failure mechanisms. While the more aggressive rough (or cut) bone causes more rapid and intense fiber damage and faster ACL failure than the smooth (uncut) osseous surface, both abradants cause the same type of abrasive wear phenomenon. Differences in failure mechanisms were identified between the different textile structures and the different fiber types. By interpreting the damaged fiber images from clinically failed and retrieved ACL prostheses, we are now able to confirm that the predominant cause of synthetic ACL failure is yarn on bone abrasion. Improvements in future ACL prosthesis designs will only be possible by eliminating or minimizing the effect of this type of abrasive wear.

  13. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics. [titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Various surface preparations for titanium 6-4 alloy were studied. An anodizing method was investigated, and compared with the results of other chemical treatments, namely, phosphate/fluoride, Pasa-Jell and Turco. The relative durability of the different surface treatments was assessed by monitoring changes in surface chemistry and morphology occasioned by aging at 505 K (450 F). Basic electron spectroscopic data were collected for polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline adhesives and synthetic precursors. Fractographic studies were completed for several combinations of adherend, adhesive, and testing conditions.

  14. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  15. N-acetylgalactosamine glycans function in cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells: A role for truncated O-glycans in metastatic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bapu, Deepashree; Runions, John; Kadhim, Munira; Brooks, Susan Ann

    2016-06-01

    Failure in O-glycan chain extension exposing Tn antigen (GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr) is clinically associated with cancer metastasis. This study provides evidence of a functional role for aberrant GalNAc-glycans in cancer cell capture from blood flow and/or adhesion to endothelium. Adhesion of breast cancer cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers was modelled under sweeping flow. Adhesion of metastatic, GalNAc glycan-rich, MCF7 and ZR 75 1 cells to endothelium increased over timepoints up to 1.5 hour, after which it plateaued. Adhesion was significantly inhibited (p < 0.001) when cell surface GalNAc-glycans were masked, an effect not seen in GalNAc glycan-poor, non-metastatic BT 474 cells. Masking irrelevant galactose- and mannose-glycans had no inhibitory effect. Imaging of cells post-adhesion over a 24 hour time course using confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed that up to 6 hours post-adhesion, motile, rounded cancer cells featuring lamellipodia-like processes crawled on an intact endothelial monolayer. From 6-12 hours post-adhesion, cancer cells became stationary, adopted a smooth, circular flattened morphology, and endothelial cells retracted from around them leaving cleared zones in which the cancer cells proceeded to form colonies through cell division.

  16. Percutaneous mechanical assist for severe cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Ryan; Raval, Amish N

    2015-05-01

    Acute right ventricular failure can lead to severe cardiogenic shock and death. Recovery may be achieved with early supportive measures. In many patients, intravenous fluid and inotropic resuscitation is inadequate to improve cardiac output. In these cases, percutaneous mechanical assist may provide a non-surgical bridge to recovery. Herein, we describe a case series of patients with severe, refractory cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure who received a continuous flow percutaneous ventricular device primarily utilizing the right internal jugular vein for out flow cannula placement.

  17. Investigation of static and cyclic bearing failure mechanisms for GR/EP laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. W.; Tuttle, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Static, cyclic load (fatigue), and residual strength testing of graphite-epoxy (GR/EP) and aluminum pin bearing joints was completed to study bearing failure mechanisms. Parameters investigated included static strength, failure mode, fatigue life, hole growth, joint stiffness, and residual strength. Comparative evaluation of these results show that the MIL-HDBK-5 convention for the definition of bearing strength can be used for GR/EP materials while maintaining the same, or improved, level of structural integrity shown for metal joints.

  18. Failure mechanism analysis of electromigration dominated damage in TiSi2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chen-Xia; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-Zheng; Song, Xue-Feng; Yu, Da-Peng

    2009-06-01

    Electromigration-induced damage has been an important concern in very large scale integrated circuit design for a long time and will be a major road block in the pursuit of nanoelectronics devices and next generation power electronics. In this letter, the failure mechanism analysis on two-terminal TiSi2 nanowire devices was reported. Electromigration dominant mass migration is observed and verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The contribution of thermomigration is discussed based on temperature simulation. This work provides useful reference for future devices and the failure analysis on nanostructures.

  19. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  20. Failure Behavior Simulation for Bolted Composite Joints Based on Damage Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yi; Ishikawa, Takashi

    This paper presents the development of an accumulative damage model based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to simulate the bearing failure and response in the bolted composite joints. The simulation is implemented into a general-purpose FEM code ABAQUS. The main damage mechanisms observed from experimental study are described as accumulated compressive damage that appeared by matrix compression failure and fiber compression-shear failure. The fundamental approach consists of contact problem at the pin/hole interface, progressive damage, large deformation problem and material nonlinear problem. A complex approach based on a nonlinear shear elasticity theory combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach can be also utilized to represent the material nonlinear behavior during loading. The damage accumulation criteria using the hybrid method based on Hashin and Yamada-Sun’s failure criteria are adopted, and the stress redistribution analysis using a degradation model for the damaged ply is performed. The accurate prediction results include progressive damage and strength response of the joints that agrees well with the existing experimental data.

  1. Platelet factor 4 promotes adhesion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and binds IL-8: novel mechanisms for modulation of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Nesmelova, Irina; Mayo, Kevin; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Pitchford, Simon; Slungaard, Arne

    2003-06-15

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule C-X-C chemokine that has weak chemotactic potency but strongly inhibits hematopoiesis through an unknown mechanism. We find that PF4 binds to human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with a median effective concentration of 1 microg/mL but not after exposure to chondroitinase ABC. PF4 enhances adhesion of HPCs to intact stroma. Committed progenitors also adhere avidly to immobilized PF4. This adhesion is time-dependent, requires metabolic activity, causes cytoskeletal rearrangement, and induces cell-cycle inhibition. Using extracellular acidification rate to indicate transmembrane signaling, we find that interleukin-8 (IL-8), but not PF4, activates CD34+ progenitors, and PF4 blocks IL-8-mediated activation. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that PF4 binds IL-8 with high (dissociation constant [Kd] = 42 nM) affinity. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of IL-8 and PF4 in solution confirms this interaction. We conclude that PF4 has the capacity to influence hematopoiesis through mechanisms not mediated by a classical high-affinity, 7-transmembrane domain chemokine receptor. Instead, PF4 may modulate the hematopoietic milieu both directly, by promoting progenitor adhesion and quiescence through interaction with an HPC chondroitin sulfate-containing moiety, and indirectly, by binding to or interfering with signaling caused by other, hematopoietically active chemokines, such as IL-8.

  2. Adding silanes to MMA: the effects on the water absorption, adhesive strength and mechanical properties of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Kanie, T; Fujii, K; Arikawa, H; Inoue, K

    2000-12-01

    The adhesive strength of porcelain artificial teeth and polymethylmethacrylates (PMMAs), which contained silanes with various number of vinyl or ethoxy groups, and the mechanical and physical properties of the PMMAs were measured. Four types of PMMAs with silanes showed high adhesive shear strength and caused fractures in the porcelain. Water absorption of the PMMAs increased with the addition of silane, but that of one type with silane was almost the same as the PMMA only type. The flexural strengths of the PMMAs with silane, except for one type, showed no significant differences compared with that of PMMA (p < 0.05). The Tg levels of all PMMAs with silane fell less than that of PMMA. From these results, it was found that PMMA with silane from three vinyl groups and one ethoxy group showed excellent chemical bonding to porcelain and low water absorption.

  3. Dynamic loading affects the mechanical properties and failure site of porcine spines.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Vanessa R; Callaghan, Jack P; McGill, Stuart M

    1997-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of load rate on the mechanical characteristics of spinal motion segments under compressive loading. DESIGN: An in vitro experiment using a porcine model which ensured a homogeneous population for age, weight, genetic background and physical activity. BACKGROUND: Spinal motion segments comprise of viscoelastic materials, and as a result the rate of loading will modulate mechanical characteristics and fracture patterns of the segments. METHODS: Twenty-six cervical porcine spines were excised immediately post-mortem with all soft tissue intact. Spines were then separated into two specimens each consisting of three vertebral bodies and the two intervening intervertebral discs (C2-C4 and C5-C7) and loaded to failure under five loading rates (100, 1000, 3000, 10 000 and 16 000 N s(-1)). After the specimens failed, they were dissected to determine the mode of failure. RESULTS: Dynamic loading increases the ultimate load compared with quasi-static loading (100 N s(-1)), whereas the magnitude of dynamic loading (1000-16 000 N s(-1)) appears not to have a significant affect. Stiffness behaved in a similar manner. The displacement to failure of specimens decreased as load rate increased, although there was a diminishing effect at high load rates. Furthermore, failure at low load rates occurred exclusively in the endplate, whereas failure of the vertebral body appeared with greater frequency at higher load rates. CONCLUSIONS: The mechanical characteristics and resulting injuries of porcine spinal motion segments were affected as the loading rates changed from quasi-static to dynamic. The modulating factors of the mechanical characteristics of the spine need to be understood if valid models are to be designed which will increase the understanding of spinal function, and are important for choosing better injury prevention and rehabilitation programmes.

  4. Deformation and failure mechanisms of 18650 battery cells under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Juner; Zhang, Xiaowei; Sahraei, Elham; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    An important deformation mode during ground impacts of battery packs made of cylindrical battery cells is axial compression. This type of loading subjects the cell to a complex deformation pattern and failure mechanism. The design of endcaps plays an important role in such deformations. To explore the sequence of deformation and the underlying failure mechanisms, a combined experimental/numerical study was carried out. Tests were conducted on 18650 cells, and the deformation of each component was carefully investigated and documented. There are four different stages in the force-displacement curve, corresponding with deformation of various components in the endcap assembly. A short circuit happens at a displacement of 4 mm. To clarify these observations, a detailed Finite Element model was set up, covering the geometry and the mechanical property of almost all the components of the cell. Using the simulation results, the sequence of the axial compression was revealed, which was subsequently validated by Micro CT scans as well as analytical solutions. Based on the precise analysis of the mechanical behavior, the cause of the short circuit during axial loading was clarified. Two failure mechanisms in the separator at the top section of the cell explain the possible causes of short circuit.

  5. Compression failure mechanisms of single-ply, unidirectional, carbon-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Jong-Bae; Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A single-ply composite compression test was used to study compression failure mechanisms as a function of fiber type, matrix type, and interfacial strength. Composites made with low- and intermediate-modulus fibers (Hercules AS4 and IM7) in either an epoxy (Hercules 3501-6) or a thermoplastic (ULTEM and LARC-TPI) matrix failed by kink banding and out-of-plane slip. The failures proceeded by rapid and catastrophic damage propagation across the specimen width. Composites made with high-modulus fibers (Hercules HMS4/3501-6) had a much lower compression strength. Their failures were characterized by kink banding and longitudinal splitting. The damage propagated slowly across the specimen width. Composites made with fibers treated to give low interfacial strength had low compression strength. These composites typically failed near the specimen ends and had long kink bands.

  6. Tensile Properties and Failure Mechanism of 3D Woven Hollow Integrated Sandwich Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Cai, Deng'an; Zhou, Guangming; Lu, Fangzhou

    2017-01-01

    Tensile properties and failure mechanism of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites are investigated experimentally, theoretically and numerically in this paper. Firstly, the tensile properties are obtained by quasi-static tensile tests on the specimens in two principal directions of the sandwich panels, called warp and weft. The experimental results shows that the tensile performances of the warp are better than that of the weft. By observing the broken specimens, it is found that the touch parts between yarns are the main failure regions under tension. Then, a theoretical method is developed to predict the tensile properties. By comparing with the experimental data, the accuracy of the theoretical method is verified. Simultaneously, a finite element model is established to predict the tensile behavior of the composites. The numerical results agree well with the experimental data. Moreover, the simulated progressive damages show that the contact regions in the warp and weft tension are both the initial failure areas.

  7. Incidence and causes of non-invasive mechanical ventilation failure after initial success

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, M.; Cilione, C.; Tampieri, A.; Fracchia, C.; Marchioni, A.; Nava, S.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The rate of failure of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with acute respiratory insufficiency ranges from 5% to 40%. Most of the studies report an incidence of "late failure" (after >48 hours of NIMV) of about 10-20%. The recognition of this subset of patients is critical because prolonged application of NIMV may unduly delay the time of intubation.
METHODS—In this multicentre study the primary aims were to assess the rate of "late NIMV failure" and possible associated predictive factors; secondary aims of the study were evaluation of the best ventilatory strategy in this subset of patients and their outcomes in and out of hospital. The study was performed in two respiratory intensive care units (ICUs) on patients with COPD admitted with an episode of hypercapnic respiratory failure (mean (SD) pH 7.23(0.07), PaCO2 85.3 (15.8) mm Hg).
RESULTS—One hundred and thirty seven patients initially responded to NIMV in terms of objective (arterial blood gas tensions) and subjective improvement. After 8.4 (2.8) days of NIMV 31 patients (23%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 18 to 33) experienced a new episode of acute respiratory failure while still ventilated. The occurrence of "late NIMV failure" was significantly associated with functional limitations (ADL scale) before admission to the respiratory ICU, the presence of medical complications (particularly hyperglycaemia), and a lower pH on admission. Depending on their willingness or not to be intubated, the patients received invasive ventilation (n=19) or "more aggressive" (more hours/day) NIMV (n=12). Eleven (92%) of those in this latter subgroup died while in the respiratory ICU compared with 10 (53%) of the patients receiving invasive ventilation. The overall 90 day mortality was 21% and, after discharge from hospital, was similar in the "late NIMV failure" group and in patients who did not experience a second episode of acute

  8. The mechanism of electromigration failure of narrow Al-2Cu-1Si thin-film interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Morris, J.W. Jr. )

    1993-05-15

    This work is principally concerned with the microstructure of electromigration failure in narrow Al-2Cu-1Si conducting lines on Si. Samples were patterned from 0.5-[mu]m-thick vapor-deposited films with mean grain size of 2.4 [mu]m, and had linewidths of 1.3 [mu]m ([ital W]/[ital G][approx]0.5), 2 [mu]m ([ital W]/[ital G][approx]0.8), and 6 [mu]m ([ital W]/[ital G][approx]2.5). The lines were tested to failure at [ital T]=226 [degree]C and [ital j]=2.5[times]10[sup 6] A/cm[sup 2]. Other samples were tested over a range of substrate temperatures and current densities to test the effect of these variables, and 1.3 [mu]m lines were tested after preaging at 226 [degree]C for various times to change the Cu-precipitate distribution prior to testing. Three failure modes were observed: The 6 [mu]m specimens failed by separation along grain boundaries with an apparent activation energy of 0.65 eV; the 1.3 [mu]m specimens that were preaged for 24 h failed after very long times by gradual thinning to rupture; all other narrow lines failed by the transgranular-slit mechanism with an activation energy near 0.93 eV. Microstructural studies suggest that the transgranular-slit failure mechanism is due to the accumulation of a supersaturation of vacancies in the bamboo grains that terminate polygranular segments in the line. Failure occurs after Cu has been swept from the grain that fails. Failure happens first at the end of the longest polygranular segment of the line, at a time that decreases exponentially with the polygranular segment length. Preaging the line to create a more stable distribution of Cu lengthens the time required to sweep Cu from the longest polygranular segment, and significantly increases the time to failure. In the optimal case the transgranular-slit failure mechanism is suppressed, and the bamboo grain fails by diffuse thinning to rupture.

  9. Direct Insulation-to-Conduction Transformation of Adhesive Catecholamine for Simultaneous Increases of Electrical Conductivity and Mechanical Strength of CNT Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Chou, Jeffrey B; Lee, Kyueui; Lee, Dongju; Hong, Soon Hyung; Zhao, Rong; Lee, Haeshin; Kim, Sang-gook

    2015-06-03

    Increase in conductivity and mechanical properties of a carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber inspired by mussel-adhesion chemistry is described. Infiltration of polydopamine into an as-drawn CNT fiber followed by pyrolysis results in a direct insulation-to-conduction transformation of poly(dopamine) into pyrolyzed-poly(dopamine) (py-PDA), retaining the intrinsic adhesive function of catecholamine. The py-PDA enhances both the electrical conductivity and the mechanical strength of the CNT fibers.

  10. Analysis of seismic disaster failure mechanism and dam-break simulation of high arch dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingkui; Zhang, Liaojun

    2014-06-01

    Based on a Chinese national high arch dam located in a meizoseismal region, a nonlinear numerical analysis model of the damage and failure process of a dam-foundation system is established by employing a 3-D deformable distinct element code (3DEC) and its re-development functions. The proposed analysis model considers the dam-foundation-reservoir coupling effect, influence of nonlinear contact in the opening and closing of the dam seam surface and abutment rock joints during strong earthquakes, and radiation damping of far field energy dissipation according to the actual workability state of an arch dam. A safety assessment method and safety evaluation criteria is developed to better understand the arch dam system disaster process from local damage to ultimate failure. The dynamic characteristics, disaster mechanism, limit bearing capacity and the entire failure process of a high arch dam under a strong earthquake are then analyzed. Further, the seismic safety of the arch dam is evaluated according to the proposed evaluation criteria and safety assessment method. As a result, some useful conclusions are obtained for some aspects of the disaster mechanism and failure process of an arch dam. The analysis method and conclusions may be useful in engineering practice.

  11. Retrogressive Failures in Sand Deposits of the Mississippi River. Report 1. Field Investigations, Laboratory Studies and Analysis of the Hypothesized Failure Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    mechanism and placement of the next threaded rod. Cone tip resistance and sleeve friction were plotted on a strip chart recorder during pushing. The cone...pressure in the riser was isolated from the regulator by closure of a valve between the two. The strip chart recorder plotting the transducer readings...failure than against strip or two-dimensional failure (Prof. Donald Taylor took exception to this statement in a later meeting of consultants). The

  12. Kinetic Mechanism and Rate-Limiting Steps of Focal Adhesion Kinase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, Jessica L.; Briand, Jacques; Chen, Stephanie; Lehr, Ruth; McDevitt, Patrick; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela; Concha, Nestor; Oza, Khyati; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Yan, Kang; Villa, James P.; Meek, Thomas D.; Thrall, Sara H.

    2010-12-07

    Steady-state kinetic analysis of focal adhesion kinase-1 (FAK1) was performed using radiometric measurement of phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide substrate (Ac-RRRRRRSETDDYAEIID-NH{sub 2}, FAK-tide) which corresponds to the sequence of an autophosphorylation site in FAK1. Initial velocity studies were consistent with a sequential kinetic mechanism, for which apparent kinetic values k{sub cat} (0.052 {+-} 0.001 s{sup -1}), K{sub MgATP} (1.2 {+-} 0.1 {micro}M), K{sub iMgATP} (1.3 {+-} 0.2 {micro}M), K{sub FAK-tide} (5.6 {+-} 0.4 {micro}M), and K{sub iFAK-tide} (6.1 {+-} 1.1 {micro}M) were obtained. Product and dead-end inhibition data indicated that enzymatic phosphorylation of FAK-tide by FAK1 was best described by a random bi bi kinetic mechanism, for which both E-MgADP-FAK-tide and E-MgATP-P-FAK-tide dead-end complexes form. FAK1 catalyzed the {beta}{gamma}-bridge:{beta}-nonbridge positional oxygen exchange of [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP in the presence of 1 mM [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP and 1.5 mM FAK-tide with a progressive time course which was commensurate with catalysis, resulting in a rate of exchange to catalysis of k{sub x}/k{sub cat} = 0.14 {+-} 0.01. These results indicate that phosphoryl transfer is reversible and that a slow kinetic step follows formation of the E-MgADP-P-FAK-tide complex. Further kinetic studies performed in the presence of the microscopic viscosogen sucrose revealed that solvent viscosity had no effect on k{sub cat}/K{sub FAK-tide}, while k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub MgATP} were both decreased linearly at increasing solvent viscosity. Crystallographic characterization of inactive versus AMP-PNP-liganded structures of FAK1 showed that a large conformational motion of the activation loop upon ATP binding may be an essential step during catalysis and would explain the viscosity effect observed on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for MgATP but not on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for FAK-tide. From the positional isotope exchange, viscosity, and

  13. The Mechanics of Left Ventricular Contraction in Acute Experimental Cardiac Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Ross, John; Covell, James W.; Sonnenblick, Edmund H.

    1967-01-01

    The effects of acute cardiac failure induced by pentobarbital or pronethalol on the basic mechanical properties of the intact left ventricle were examined in the dog, and the influence on auxotonic and isovolumic contractions of the increase in end-diastolic volume that usually accompanies cardiac failure was assessed. The right heart bypass preparation was employed, and isovolumic beats were induced by sudden balloon occlusion of the aortic root. The ventricular pressure-volume curve was determined directly, and the mechanical responses of the myocardial fibers and contractile elements were calculated. When end-diastolic pressure was held constant, failure reduced the extent of circumferential fiber shortening, and the tension-velocity relation calculated during isovolumic beats was always shifted, with reductions in both maximal velocity (average decrease 30%) and maximal developed tension (average 23%); in addition, during failure achievement of maximal contractile element velocity and maximal tension was delayed, whereas the total duration of contraction was always prolonged. Acetylstrophanthidin tended to reverse all of these changes. When end-diastolic volume was augmented during failure at a constant stroke volume, the extent of circumferential fiber shortening was reduced (3.82 cm to 2.02 cm), and during ejection the fiber and contractile element velocities were diminished at wall tensions comparable to control; maximal velocity and velocity at peak tension were also decreased. The tension-velocity relation during isovolumic beats was shifted by failure with consistent reductions in maximal shortening velocity, but changes in maximal tension were small. Maximal instantaneous power was always reduced by failure, and a striking alteration occurred in the relation between work expended in stretching the series elastic component and the external work; the former, “internal work,” increased by an average of 90%, the latter diminished by 11%, and the total

  14. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin-focal adhesion kinase signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer.

  15. The effect of ionic strength on oil adhesion in sandstone – the search for the low salinity mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hilner, E.; Andersson, M. P.; Hassenkam, T.; Matthiesen, J.; Salino, P. A.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Core flood and field tests have demonstrated that decreasing injection water salinity increases oil recovery from sandstone reservoirs. However, the microscopic mechanism behind the effect is still under debate. One hypothesis is that as salinity decreases, expansion of the electrical double layer decreases attraction between organic molecules and pore surfaces. We have developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to explore the relationship between wettability and salinity. We functionalised AFM tips with alkanes and used them to represent tiny nonpolar oil droplets. In repeated measurements, we brought our “oil” close to the surface of sand grains taken from core plugs and we measured the adhesion between the tip and sample. Adhesion was constant in high salinity solutions but below a threshold of 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, adhesion decreased as salinity decreased, rendering the surface less oil wet. The effect was consistent, reproducible and reversible. The threshold for the onset of low salinity response fits remarkably well with observations from core plug experiments and field tests. The results demonstrate that the electric double layer force always contributes at least in part to the low salinity effect, decreasing oil wettability when salinity is low. PMID:25899050

  16. Beta2-chimaerin provides a diacylglycerol-dependent mechanism for regulation of adhesion and chemotaxis of T cells.

    PubMed

    Siliceo, María; García-Bernal, David; Carrasco, Silvia; Díaz-Flores, Ernesto; Coluccio Leskow, Federico; Leskow, Federico C; Teixidó, Joaquín; Kazanietz, Marcelo G; Mérida, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac contributes to regulation of cytoskeletal rearrangement during chemokine-induced lymphocyte adhesion and migration in a multi-step process that is very precisely coordinated. Chimaerins are Rac1-specific GTPase-activating proteins of unknown biological function, which have a canonical diacylglycerol C1-binding domain. Here we demonstrate endogenous expression of beta2-chimaerin in T lymphocytes and study the functional role of this protein in phorbol ester and chemokine (CXCL12)-regulated T-cell responses. We used green fluorescent protein-tagged beta2-chimaerin and phorbol ester stimulation to investigate changes in protein localization in living lymphocytes. Our results demonstrate that active Rac cooperates with C1-dependent phorbol ester binding to induce sustained GFP-beta2-chimaerin localization to the membrane. Subcellular distribution of GFP beta2-chimaerin in living cells showed no major changes following CXCL12 stimulation. Nonetheless Rac1-GTP levels were severely inhibited in GFP-beta2-chimaerin-expressing cells, which displayed reduced CXCL12-induced integrin-dependent adhesion and spreading. This effect was dependent on chimaerin GTPase-activating protein function and required diacylglycerol generation. Whereas beta2-chimaerin overexpression decreased static adhesion, it enhanced CXCL12-dependent migration via receptor-dependent diacylglycerol production. These studies demonstrate that beta2-chimaerin provides a novel, diacylglycerol-dependent mechanism for Rac regulation in T cells and suggest a functional role for this protein in Rac-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling.

  17. Failure Mechanisms and Interphase Chemistry of Gold Films on Ti6Al4V. Part I. Surface Chemistry of Failure Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    removed initially. This improvement of peel strength with exposure to high temperature and humidity has the opposite affect normally obtained with...adhesive bond on treated titanium specimens. Longer exposures to high temperatures and humidity did show degradation of bonding in other specimens...Exposure to high temperatures (dry) showed enhancement of bond strength probably due to diffusion mechanisms. Perhaps in this series we are observing an

  18. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of SEM/EDAX to determine the physical and chemical composition of very small areas was used to study several diverse types of samples representative of NASA-LaRC technology. More systematic investigation was carried out on differences in the results of grit-blasting Ti 6-4 adherends and the presence of extraneous elements, primarily silicon, in some polymer/HT-S fiber composites. Initial results were obtained from a fractured (ILS) short-beam shear specimen, and from Ti 6-4 alloy, before and after a proprietary Boeing anodizing surface preparation for adhesive bonding. Photomicrographs and EDAX spectra were also obtained from new, fractured lap shear strength specimens that employed PPQ and LARC-13 adhesives.

  19. Deformation and failure of single- and multi-phase silicate liquids: seismic precursors and mechanical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Wassermann, Joachim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-04-01

    Along with many others, volcanic unrest is regarded as a catastrophic material failure phenomenon and is often preceded by diverse precursory signals. Although a volcanic system intrinsically behave in a non-linear and stochastic way, these precursors display systematic evolutionary trends to upcoming eruptions. Seismic signals in particular are in general dramatically increasing prior to an eruption and have been extensively reported to show accelerating rates through time, as well as in the laboratory before failure of rock samples. At the lab-scale, acoustic emissions (AE) are high frequency transient stress waves used to track fracture initiation and propagation inside a rock sample. Synthesized glass samples featuring a range of porosities (0 - 30%) and natural rock samples from volcán de Colima, Mexico, have been failed under high temperature uniaxial compression experiments at constant stresses and strain rates. Using the monitored AEs and the generated mechanical work during deformation, we investigated the evolutionary trends of energy patterns associated to different degrees of heterogeneity. We observed that the failure of dense, poorly porous glasses is achieved by exceeding elevated strength and thus requires a significant accumulation of strain, meaning only pervasive small-scale cracking is occurring. More porous glasses as well as volcanic samples need much lower applied stress and deformation to fail, as fractures are nucleating, propagating and coalescing into localized large-scale cracks, taking the advantage of the existence of numerous defects (voids for glasses, voids and crystals for volcanic rocks). These observations demonstrate that the mechanical work generated through cracking is efficiently distributed inside denser and more homogeneous samples, as underlined by the overall lower AE energy released during experiments. In contrast, the quicker and larger AE energy released during the loading of heterogeneous samples shows that the

  20. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of HIV Type 1 Prophylaxis Failure Revealed by Single-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Blair, Lily; Chen, Yalu; Learn, Gerald; Pfafferott, Katja; John, Mina; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Mallal, Simon; Shaw, George M.; Bar, Katharine J.

    2013-01-01

    Trials of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) pre- and postexposure prophylaxis show promise. Here, we describe a novel strategy for deciphering mechanisms of prophylaxis failure that could improve therapeutic outcomes. A healthcare worker began antiretroviral prophylaxis immediately after a high-risk needlestick injury but nonetheless became viremic 11 weeks later. Single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA identified 15 drug susceptible transmitted/founder HIV genomes responsible for productive infection. Sequences emanating from these genomes exhibited extremely low diversity, suggesting virus sequestration as opposed to low-level replication as the cause of breakthrough infection. Identification of transmitted/founder viruses allows for genome-wide assessment of molecular mechanisms of prophylaxis failure. PMID:24023257

  2. Heart Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Jorde, Ulrich P; González-Costello, José

    2017-02-07

    Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis and heart transplant is still the best treatment option. However, the scarcity of donors, long waiting times, and an increasing number of unstable patients have favored the development of mechanical circulatory support. This review summarizes the indications for heart transplant, candidate evaluation, current immunosuppression strategies, the evaluation and treatment of rejection, infectious prophylaxis, and short and long-term outcomes. Regarding mechanical circulatory support, we distinguish between short- and long-term support and the distinct strategies that can be used: bridge to decision, recovery, candidacy, transplant, and destination therapy. We then discuss indications, risk assessment, management of complications, especially with long-term support, and outcomes. Finally, we discuss future challenges and how the widespread use of long-term support for patients with advanced heart failure will only be viable if their complications and costs are reduced.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of HIV type 1 prophylaxis failure revealed by single-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Blair, Lily; Chen, Yalu; Learn, Gerald; Pfafferott, Katja; John, Mina; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Hahn, Beatrice H; Mallal, Simon; Shaw, George M; Bar, Katharine J

    2013-11-15

    Trials of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) pre- and postexposure prophylaxis show promise. Here, we describe a novel strategy for deciphering mechanisms of prophylaxis failure that could improve therapeutic outcomes. A healthcare worker began antiretroviral prophylaxis immediately after a high-risk needlestick injury but nonetheless became viremic 11 weeks later. Single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA identified 15 drug susceptible transmitted/founder HIV genomes responsible for productive infection. Sequences emanating from these genomes exhibited extremely low diversity, suggesting virus sequestration as opposed to low-level replication as the cause of breakthrough infection. Identification of transmitted/founder viruses allows for genome-wide assessment of molecular mechanisms of prophylaxis failure.

  4. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°.

  5. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure (hydrogen embrittlement, protective coatings, composite materials, NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1,600 reference citations related to four problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period 1962-1976, the effort being largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the four problem areas: Hydrogen Embrittlement; Protective Coatings; Composite Materials; and Nondestructive Evaluation. An author index is included.

  6. Research Study to Define the Critical Failure Mechanisms in Notched Composites under Compression Fatigue Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    A0-13 654 MATERIALS SCIENCES CORP SPRING HOUSE PA FGS 11/ " RESEARCH STUDY TO DEFINE THE CRITICAL FAILURE MECHANISMS IN NOT--ETC(U) MAR 81 B W ROSEN... House , PA 19477 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Naval Air Systems Command March, 1981 Washington, DC 20361 13. NUMBER OF PAGES...fatigue of a laminate containing a hole. The emphasis is upon understanding the governing physical phe- nomnena. Accordingly, the experimental tasks

  7. Mechanical properties and platelet adhesion behavior of diamond-like carbon films synthesized by pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Yang, P.; Sun, H.; Wan, G. J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an attractive biomedical material due to its high inertness and excellent mechanical properties. In this study, DLC films were fabricated on Ti6Al4V and Si(1 0 0) substrates at room temperature by pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition. By changing the argon flow from 0 to 13 sccm during deposition, the effects of argon flow on the characteristics of the DLC films were systematically examined to correlate to the blood compatibility. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the films were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analysis, a nano-indenter and pin-on-disk tribometer. The blood compatibility of the films was evaluated using in vitro platelet adhesion investigation, and the quantity and morphology of the adherent platelets was investigated employing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The Raman spectroscopy results showed a decreasing sp 3 fraction (an increasing trend in ID/ IG ratio) with increasing argon flow from 0 to 13 sccm. The sp 3:sp 2 ratio of the films was evaluated from the deconvoluted XPS spectra. We found that the sp 3 fraction decreased as the argon flow was increased from 0 to 13 sccm, which is consistent with the results of the Raman spectra. The mechanical properties results confirmed the decreasing sp 3 content with increasing argon flow. The Raman D-band to G-band intensity ratio increased and the platelet adhesion behavior became better with higher flow. This implies that the blood compatibility of the DLC films is influenced by the sp 3:sp 2 ratio. DLC films deposited on titanium alloys have high wear resistance, low friction and good adhesion.

  8. Mechanisms Regulating the Degradation of Dentin Matrices by Endogenous Dentin Proteases and their Role in Dental Adhesion. A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Camila; Pashley, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This systematic review provides an overview of the different mechanisms proposed to regulate the degradation of dentin matrices bye host-derived dentin proteases, particularly as it relates to their role in dental adhesion. Methods Significant developments have taken place over the last few years that have contributed to a better understanding of all the factors affecting the durability of adhesive resin restorations. The complexity of dentin-resin interfaces mandates a thorough understanding of all the mechanical, physical and biochemical aspects that play a role in the formation of hybrid layers. The ionic and hydrophilic nature of current dental adhesives yields permeable, unstable hybrid layers susceptible to water sorption, hydrolytic degradation and resin leaching. The hydrolytic activity of host-derived proteases also contributes to the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds. Preservation of the collagen matrix is critical to the improvement of resin-dentin bond durability. Approaches to regulate collagenolytic activity of dentin proteases have been the subject of extensive research in the last few years. A shift has occurred from the use of proteases inhibitors to the use of collagen cross-linking agents. Data provided by fifty-one studies published in peer-reviewed journals between January 1999 and December 2013 was compiled in this systematic review. Results Appraisal of the data provided by the studies included in the present review yielded a summary of the mechanisms which have already proven to be clinically successful and those which need further investigation before new clinical protocols can be adopted. PMID:25831604

  9. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  10. Increased Dicarbonyl Stress as a Novel Mechanism of Multi-Organ Failure in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    van Bussel, Bas C. T.; van de Poll, Marcel C. G.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Bergmans, Dennis C. J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular pathological pathways leading to multi-organ failure in critical illness are progressively being unravelled. However, attempts to modulate these pathways have not yet improved the clinical outcome. Therefore, new targetable mechanisms should be investigated. We hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress is such a mechanism. Dicarbonyl stress is the accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites (i.e., methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone) that damages intracellular proteins, modifies extracellular matrix proteins, and alters plasma proteins. Increased dicarbonyl stress has been shown to impair the renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous system function, and possibly also the hepatic and respiratory function. In addition to hyperglycaemia, hypoxia and inflammation can cause increased dicarbonyl stress, and these conditions are prevalent in critical illness. Hypoxia and inflammation have been shown to drive the rapid intracellular accumulation of reactive dicarbonyls, i.e., through reduced glyoxalase-1 activity, which is the key enzyme in the dicarbonyl detoxification enzyme system. In critical illness, hypoxia and inflammation, with or without hyperglycaemia, could thus increase dicarbonyl stress in a way that might contribute to multi-organ failure. Thus, we hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress in critical illness, such as sepsis and major trauma, contributes to the development of multi-organ failure. This mechanism has the potential for new therapeutic intervention in critical care. PMID:28178202

  11. Increased Dicarbonyl Stress as a Novel Mechanism of Multi-Organ Failure in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Bas C T; van de Poll, Marcel C G; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Bergmans, Dennis C J J

    2017-02-07

    Molecular pathological pathways leading to multi-organ failure in critical illness are progressively being unravelled. However, attempts to modulate these pathways have not yet improved the clinical outcome. Therefore, new targetable mechanisms should be investigated. We hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress is such a mechanism. Dicarbonyl stress is the accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites (i.e., methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone) that damages intracellular proteins, modifies extracellular matrix proteins, and alters plasma proteins. Increased dicarbonyl stress has been shown to impair the renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous system function, and possibly also the hepatic and respiratory function. In addition to hyperglycaemia, hypoxia and inflammation can cause increased dicarbonyl stress, and these conditions are prevalent in critical illness. Hypoxia and inflammation have been shown to drive the rapid intracellular accumulation of reactive dicarbonyls, i.e., through reduced glyoxalase-1 activity, which is the key enzyme in the dicarbonyl detoxification enzyme system. In critical illness, hypoxia and inflammation, with or without hyperglycaemia, could thus increase dicarbonyl stress in a way that might contribute to multi-organ failure. Thus, we hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress in critical illness, such as sepsis and major trauma, contributes to the development of multi-organ failure. This mechanism has the potential for new therapeutic intervention in critical care.

  12. Damage mechanisms and failure modes of cortical bone under components of physiological loading.

    PubMed

    George, W T; Vashishth, D

    2005-09-01

    Fatigue damage development in cortical bone was investigated in vitro under different mechanical components of physiological loading including tension, compression, and torsion. During each test, stress and strain data were collected continuously to monitor and statistically determine the occurrence of the primary, secondary, and tertiary stages associated with fatigue and/or creep failure of bone. The resultant microdamage and failure modes were identified by histological and fractographic analysis, respectively. The tensile group demonstrated Mode I cracking and the three classic stages of fatigue and creep suggesting a low crack initiation threshold, steady crack propagation and final failure by coalescence of microcracks. In contrast, the compressive group displayed Mode II cracking and a two-stage fatigue behavior with limited creep suggesting a high crack initiation threshold followed by a sudden fracture. The torsion group also displayed a two-stage fatigue profile but demonstrated extensive damage from mixed mode (Modes II and III) microcracking and predominant time-dependent damage. Thus, fatigue behavior of bone was found to be uniquely related to the individual mechanical components of physiological loading and the latter determined the specific damage mechanisms associated with fatigue fracture.

  13. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  14. Clinical factors associated with weaning failure in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Background For patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV), weaning is difficult and mortality is very high. PMV has been defined recently, by consensus, as constituting ≥21 consecutive days of mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥6 hours per day. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical factors predicting weaning failure in patients undergoing PMV in medical intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and laboratory characteristics of 127 patients who received MV for more than 21 days in the medical ICU at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea between January 2005 and December 2014. Patients who underwent surgery or experienced trauma were excluded from this study. Results Among the 127 patients requiring PMV, 41 (32.3%) were successfully weaned from MV. The median age of the weaning failure group was higher than that of the weaning success group (74.0 vs. 70.0 years; P=0.003). The proportion of male patients was 58.5% in the weaning success group and 72.1% in the weaning failure group, respectively. The most common reasons for ICU admission were respiratory causes (66.1%) followed by cardiovascular causes (16.5%) in both groups. ICU mortality and in-hospital mortality rates were 55.1% and 55.9%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, respiratory causes of ICU admission [odds ratio (OR), 3.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29–12.30; P=0.016] and a high sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score on day 21 of MV (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.17–1.85; P=0.001) were significantly associated with weaning failure in patients requiring PMV. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the SOFA score on day 21 of MV for predicting weaning failure was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67–0.87; P=0.000). Conclusions Respiratory causes of ICU admission and a high SOFA score on day 21 of MV could be predictive of weaning failure in patients requiring PMV. PMID:28203417

  15. A molecular-dynamics study of defects and failure mechanisms in strained heteroepitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod E.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2006-03-01

    The formation and growth of pits and pit-like structures through a delamination-driven mechanism have been observed in the analysis of comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations of a laterally strained Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) interfacial system. These phenomena contribute to the ultimate mechanical failure of the simulated samples. Several factors play a key role the nucleation and growth of the pits including temperature and strain rate. Here we present an overview of the dependence of pit nucleation and morphology on both global and local conditions for a representative range of temperatures and applied strain rates.

  16. Failure mechanisms of polycrystalline diamond compact drill bits in geothermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, E.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1981-09-01

    Over the past few years the interest in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits has grown proportionately with their successful use in drilling oil and gas wells in the North Sea and the United States. This keen interest led to a research program at Sandia to develop PDC drill bits suitable for the severe drilling conditions encountered in geothermal fields. Recently, three different PDC drill bits were tested using either air or mud drilling fluids: one in the laboratory with hot air, one in the Geysers field with air, and one in the Geysers field with mud. All three tests were unsuccessful due to failure of the braze joint used to attach the PDC drill blanks to the tungsten carbide studs. A post-mortem failure analysis of the defective cutters identified three major failure mechanisms: peripheral nonbonding caused by braze oxidation during the brazing step, nonbonding between PDC drill blanks and the braze due to contamination prior to brazing, and hot shortness. No evidence was found to suggest that the braze failures in the Geysers field tests were caused by frictional heating. In addition, inspection of the PDC/stud cutter assemblies using ultrasonic techniques was found to be ineffective for detecting the presence of hot shortness in the braze joint.

  17. Photo-crosslinkable cyanoacrylate bioadhesive: shrinkage kinetics, dynamic mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of adhesives containing TMPTMA and POSS nanostructures as crosslinking agents.

    PubMed

    Ghasaban, S; Atai, M; Imani, M; Zandi, M; Shokrgozar, M-A

    2011-11-01

    The study investigates the photo-polymerization shrinkage behavior, dynamic mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of cyanoacrylate bioadhesives containing POSS nanostructures and TMPTMA as crosslinking agents. Adhesives containing 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (2-OCA) and different percentages of POSS nanostructures and TMPTMA as crosslinking agents were prepared. The 1-phenyl-1, 2-propanedione (PPD) was incorporated as photo-initiator into the adhesive in 1.5, 3, and 4 wt %. The shrinkage strain of the specimens was measured using bonded-disk technique. Shrinkage strain, shrinkage strain rate, maximum and time at maximum shrinkage strain rate were measured and compared. Mechanical properties of the adhesives were also studied using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Biocompatibility of the adhesives was examined by MTT method. The results showed that shrinkage strain increased with increasing the initiator concentration up to 3 wt % in POSS-containing and 1.5 wt % in TMPTMA-containing specimens and plateaued out at higher concentrations. By increasing the crosslinking agent, shrinkage strain, and shrinkage strain rate increased and the time at maximum shrinkage strain rate decreased. The study indicates that the incorporation of crosslinking agents into the cyanoacrylate adhesives resulted in improved mechanical properties. Preliminary MTT studies also revealed better biocompatibility profile for the adhesives containing crosslinking agents comparing to the neat specimens.

  18. Investigation into the Formation and Adhesion of Cyclopentane Hydrates on Mechanically Robust Vapor-Deposited Polymeric Coatings.

    PubMed

    Sojoudi, Hossein; Walsh, Matthew R; Gleason, Karen K; McKinley, Gareth H

    2015-06-09

    Blockage of pipelines by formation and accumulation of clathrate hydrates of natural gases (also called gas hydrates) can compromise project safety and economics in oil and gas operations, particularly at high pressures and low temperatures such as those found in subsea or arctic environments. Cyclopentane (CyC5) hydrate has attracted interest as a model system for studying natural gas hydrates, because CyC5, like typical natural gas hydrate formers, is almost fully immiscible in water; and thus CyC5 hydrate formation is governed not only by thermodynamic phase considerations but also kinetic factors such as the hydrocarbon/water interfacial area, as well as mass and heat transfer constraints, as for natural gas hydrates. We present a macroscale investigation of the formation and adhesion strength of CyC5 hydrate deposits on bilayer polymer coatings with a range of wettabilities. The polymeric bilayer coatings are developed using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of a mechanically robust and densely cross-linked polymeric base layer (polydivinylbenzene or pDVB) that is capped with a covalently attached thin hydrate-phobic fluorine-rich top layer (poly(perfluorodecyl acrylate) or pPFDA). The CyC5 hydrates are formed from CyC5-in-water emulsions, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to confirm the thermal dissociation properties of the solid hydrate deposits. We also investigate the adhesion of the CyC5 hydrate deposits on bare and bilayer polymer-coated silicon and steel substrates. Goniometric measurements with drops of CyC5-in-water emulsions on the coated steel substrates exhibit advancing contact angles of 148.3 ± 4.5° and receding contact angles of 142.5 ± 9.8°, indicating the strongly emulsion-repelling nature of the iCVD coatings. The adhesion strength of the CyC5 hydrate deposits is reduced from 220 ± 45 kPa on rough steel substrates to 20 ± 17 kPa on the polymer-coated steel substrates. The measured strength of CyC5 hydrate

  19. The mechanism of adhesion and germination in the carpospores of Porphyra spiralis var. amplifolia (Rhodophyta, Bangiales).

    PubMed

    Ouriques, Luciane Cristina; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita

    2012-02-01

    Spore release is the primary means of dispersion employed by red algae, and it provides insight into the elements linking the stages of their life history. In most red algae, spores are released within a sheath-like envelope of mucilage, which is responsible for their primary attachment. However, few studies have characterized the polysaccharides involved in the adhesion of seaweed spores. Therefore, in this paper, the process of spore germination and adhesion in Porphyra spiralis var. amplifolia is described, as representative of the germination pattern of the Naccaria type. Using FITC-labeled lectins, we discovered high concentrations of α-D-mannose, α-D-glucose and β-D-galactose in the mucilage. The germ tube reacted with RCA-FITC, indicating the presence β-D-galactose, and the rhizoidal cells showed the presence of α-D-mannose, α-D-glucose and β-D-galactose, indicating their importance to substrate adhesion. Using light and transmission electron microscopy, we also conducted an analysis of spore ultrastructure. We found that the differentiation of a vacuole in the spore is one of the most important processes marking the initial stage of germination. Thus, as the degree of vacuolation increases, whole cell contents move towards the germ tube, which undergoes several successive divisions forming the sporophytic phase. Therefore, we can conclude that germination in Porphyra spiralis var. amplifolia is characterized by (1) the fixation of carpospores in the substrate by sugars present in the mucilage and (2) the polarization of cell contents by the processes of vacuolization and germ tube formation.

  20. Reduction of Tendon Adhesions following Administration of Adaprev, a Hypertonic Solution of Mannose-6-Phosphate: Mechanism of Action Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason K. F.; Metcalfe, Anthony D.; Wong, Richard; Bush, Jim; Platt, Chris; Garcon, Arnaud; Goldspink, Nick; McGrouther, Duncan A.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Repaired tendons may be complicated by progressive fibrosis, causing adhesion formation or tendon softening leading to tendon rupture and subsequent reduced range of motion. There are few therapies available which improve the gliding of damaged tendons in the hand. We investigate the role of Mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) in a 600 mM hypertonic solution (Adaprev) on tendon adhesion formation in vivo using a mouse model of severed tendon in conjunction with analysis of collagen synthesis, cellular proliferation and receptors involved in TGF beta signalling. Cytotoxicity was assessed by measuring tissue residency, mechanical strength and cell viability of tendons after treatment with Adaprev. To elicit potential modes of action, in vitro and ex vivo studies were performed investigating phosphorylation of p38, cell migration and proliferation. Adaprev treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the development of adhesions and improved collagen organisation without reducing overall collagen synthesis following tendon injury in vivo. The bioavailability of Adaprev saw a 40% reduction at the site of administration over 45 minutes and tendon fibroblasts tolerated up to 120 minutes of exposure without significant loss of cell viability or tensile strength. These favourable effects were independent of CI-MPR and TGF-β signalling and possibly highlight a novel mechanism of action related to cellular stress demonstrated by phosphorylation of p38. The effect of treatment reduced tendon fibroblast migration and transiently halted tendon fibroblast proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. Our studies demonstrate that the primary mode of action for Adaprev is potentially via a physical, non-chemical, hyperosmotic effect. PMID:25383548

  1. [Home mechanical ventilation: Invasive and noninvasive ventilation therapy for chronic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Huttmann, S E; Storre, J H; Windisch, W

    2015-06-01

    Home mechanical ventilation represents a valuable therapeutic option to improve alveolar ventilation in patients with chronic respiratory failure. For this purpose both invasive ventilation via tracheostomy and noninvasive ventilation via facemasks are available. The primary goal of home mechanical ventilation is a reduction of symptoms, improvement of quality of life and in many cases reduction of mortality. Elective establishment of home mechanical ventilation is typically provided for noninvasive ventilation in respect to clinical symptoms and partial pressure of carbon dioxide depending on the underlying disease. However, invasive mechanical ventilation is increasingly being used to continue ventilatory support in polymorbid patients following unsuccessful weaning. Recommendations and guidelines have been published by the German Respiratory Society (DGP).

  2. Tension Strength, Failure Prediction and Damage Mechanisms in 2D Triaxial Braided Composites with Notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Anglin, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unnotched and notched (open hole) tensile strength and failure mechanisms of two-dimensional (2D) triaxial braided composites were examined. The effect of notch size and notch position were investigated. Damage initiation and propagation in notched and unnotched coupons were also examined. Theory developed to predict the normal stress distribution near an open hole and failure for tape laminated composites was evaluated for its applicability to 2D triaxial braided textile composite materials. Four different fiber architectures were considered; braid angle, yarn and braider size, percentage of longitudinal yarns and braider angle varied. Tape laminates equivalent to textile composites were also constructed for comparison. Unnotched tape equivalents were stronger than braided textiles but exhibited greater notch sensitivity. Notched textiles and tape equivalents have roughly the same strength at large notch sizes. Two common damage mechanisms were found: braider yarn cracking and near notch longitudinal yarn splitting. Cracking was found to initiate in braider yarns in unnotched and notched coupons, and propagate in the direction of the braider yarns until failure. Damage initiation stress decreased with increasing braid angle. No significant differences in prediction of near notch strain between textile and tape equivalents could be detected for small braid angle, but the correlations were weak for textiles with large braid angle. Notch strength could not be predicted using existing anisotropic theory for braided textiles due to their insensitivity to notch.

  3. Failure Mechanism of Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries in Liquid Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dongping; Shao, Yuyan; Lozano, Terence J.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Zhang, Jiguang; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saenz, Natalio T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, lithium anode has re-attracted broad interest because of the necessity of employing lithium metal in the next-generation battery technologies such as lithium sulfur (Li-S) and lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Fast capacity degradation and safety issue associated with rechargeable lithium metal batteries have been reported, although the fundamental understanding on the failure mechanism of lithium metal at high charge rate is still under debate due to the complicated interfacial chemistry between lithium metal and electrolyte. Herein, we demonstrate that, at high current density, the quick growth of porous solid electrolyte interphase towards bulk lithium, instead of towards the separator, dramatically builds up the cell impedance that directly leads to the cell failure. Understanding the lithium metal failure mechanism is very critical to gauge the various approaches used to address the stability and safety issues associated with lithium metal anode. Otherwise, all cells will fail quickly at high rates before the observation of any positive effects that might be brought from adopting the new strategies to protect lithium.

  4. Failure mechanism of shear-wall dominant multi-story buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuksel, S.B.; Kalkan, E.

    2008-01-01

    The recent trend in the building industry of Turkey as well as in many European countries is towards utilizing the tunnel form (shear-wall dominant) construction system for development of multi-story residential units. The tunnel form buildings diverge from other conventional reinforced concrete (RC) buildings due to the lack of beams and columns in their structural integrity. The vertical load-carrying members of these buildings are the structural-walls only, and the floor system is a flat plate. Besides the constructive advantages, tunnel form buildings provide superior seismic performance compared to conventional RC frame and dual systems as observed during the recent devastating earthquakes in Turkey (1999 Mw 7.4 Kocaeli, Mw 7.2 Duzce, and 2004 Mw 6.5 Bingol). With its proven earthquake performance, the tunnel form system is becoming the primary construction technique in many seismically active regions. In this study, a series of nonlinear analyses were conducted using finite element (FE) models to augment our understanding on their failure mechanism under lateral forces. In order to represent the nonlinear behavior adequately, The FE models were verified with the results of experimental studies performed on three dimensional (3D) scaled tunnel form building specimens. The results of this study indicate that the structural walls of tunnel form buildings may exhibit brittle flexural failure under lateral loading, if they are not properly reinforced. The global tension/compression couple triggers this failure mechanism by creating pure axial tension in the outermost shear-walls.

  5. Cardiac function after acute support with direct mechanical ventricular actuation in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Patrick I; Anstadt, Mark P; Del Rio, Carlos L; Preston, Thomas J; Ueyama, Yukie; Youngblood, Brad L

    2014-01-01

    Direct mechanical ventricular actuation (DMVA) exerts direct cardiac compression/decompression and does not require blood contact. The safety and effects of DMVA support in chronically dysfunctional beating hearts in vivo have not been established. This study evaluated hemodynamics and load-independent systolic/diastolic cardiac function before/after acute support (2 hours) using DMVA in small hearts with induced chronic failure. Chronic heart failure was created in seven small dogs (15 ± 2 kg) via either serial coronary microembolizations or right-ventricular overdrive pacing. Dogs were instrumented to measure cardiac output, hemodynamic pressures, left ventricular volumes for pressure-volume analysis via preload reduction. Temporary cardiac support using a DMVA device was instituted for 2 hours. Hemodynamic and mechanical assessments, including dobutamine dose-responses, were compared both before and after support. Hemodynamic indices were preserved with support. Both left-ventricular systolic and diastolic function were improved postsupport, as the slopes of the preload-recruitable stroke work (+29 ± 7%, p < 0.05) and the end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship (EDPVR: -28 ± 9%, p < 0.05) improved post-DMVA support. Diastolic/systolic myocardial reserve, as assessed by responsiveness to dobutamine challenges, was preserved after DMVA support. Short-term DMVA support can safely and effectively sustain hemodynamics, whereas triggering favorable effects on cardiac function in the setting of chronic heart failure. In particular, DMVA support preserved load-independent diastolic function and reserve.

  6. Mechanism of Collaborative Enhancement of Binding of Paired Antibodies to Distinct Epitopes of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1

    PubMed Central

    Greineder, Colin F.; Villa, Carlos H.; Hood, Elizabeth D.; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Sun, Jing; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Abraham, Valsamma; DeLisser, Horace M.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to extracellular epitopes of human and mouse Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CD31 or PECAM-1) stimulate binding of other mAbs to distinct adjacent PECAM-1 epitopes. This effect, dubbed Collaborative Enhancement of Paired Affinity Ligands, or CEPAL, has been shown to enhance delivery of mAb-targeted drugs and nanoparticles to the vascular endothelium. Here we report new insights into the mechanism underlying this effect, which demonstrates equivalent amplitude in the following models: i) cells expressing a full length PECAM-1 and mutant form of PECAM-1 unable to form homodimers; ii) isolated fractions of cellular membranes; and, iii) immobilized recombinant PECAM-1. These results indicate that CEPAL is mediated not by interference in cellular functions or homophilic PECAM-1 interactions, but rather by conformational changes within the cell adhesion molecule induced by ligand binding. This mechanism, mediated by exposure of partially occult epitopes, is likely to occur in molecules other than PECAM-1 and may represent a generalizable phenomenon with valuable practical applications. PMID:28085903

  7. Lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films. 1: Effect of atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Friction, wear, and wear lives of rubbed molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 films applied to sanded 440C HT steel surfaces were evaluated in moist air, dry air, and dry argon. Optical microscope observations were made as a function of sliding distance to determine the effect of moisture and oxygen on the lubricating and failure mechanisms of MoS2 films. In general, the lubrication process consisted of the formation of a thin, metallic colored, coalesced film of MoS2 that flowed between the surfaces in relative motion. In air, failure was due to the transformation of the metallic colored, coalesced films to a black, powdery material. Water in the air appeared to accelerate the transformation rate. In argon, no transformation of MoS2 was observed with the microscope, but cracking and spalling of the coalesced film occurred and resulted in the gradual depletion of the film.

  8. Failure mechanisms in CoCrMo modular femoral stems for revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Parry, Michael; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive; Wang, Rizhi

    2016-04-28

    In this retrieval study, we reported the failure mechanisms of the CoCrMo-based hip implants. Systematic analyses on the clinically failed modular femoral stems from Revitan™ revision prostheses revealed a multistep fracture process. Multiple microcracks were first developed under the combined action of pitting corrosion and dynamic tensile stress on the lateral side of the CoCrMo connection taper. These microcracks then served as the initiation sites of further corrosion fatigue cracking leading to the final catastrophic failure. This crack initiation process has not been previously reported on retrieved CoCrMo components and our findings provide valuable information on the clinical performance of such implants, as well as the material selection and structural designs of future modular stems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  9. Investigation of failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by EB-PVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, M. R.; Abbas, Musharaf

    2013-06-01

    Failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique owing to formation of micro cracks was investigated. The TBCs were deposited on the Ni-based super alloy IN-100 and the micro cracks were observed within the top ceramic coat of thermally cycled TBCs at 1050°C. It was observed that these cracks propagate in the ceramic coat in the direction normal to interface while no cracks were observed in the bond coat. SEM/EDS studies revealed that some non-uniform oxides were formed on the interface between ceramic top and metallic bond coat just below the cracks. Study proposed that the cracks were initiated due to stress owing to big difference in Pilling-Bed worth ratio of non-uniform oxides as well as thermal stress, which caused the formation of cracks in top ceramic coat leading to failure of TBCs

  10. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  11. The application of fracture mechanics to failure analysis of photovoltaic solar modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Cracking of silicon solar cells and solar module transparent cover panels such as glass or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is a major cause of photovoltaic solar module failure in field service. Silicon and cover materials are brittle, and cracking of these materials is expected to result from the extension of preexisting flaws under stress. Study of the cracking mechanisms is therefore an appropriate area for the application of fracture mechanics principles. In this study, fracture mechanics techniques were employed to identify the mode of crack propagation, to examine the fracture-initiating flaw, to estimate the nature and magnitude of fracture stress in the field, and to predict analytically the service lifetime. Recommendations for corrective actions are also made.

  12. Methods And Systms For Analyzing The Degradation And Failure Of Mechanical Systems

    DOEpatents

    Jarrell, Donald B.; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Peters, Timothy J.

    2005-02-08

    Methods and systems for identifying, understanding, and predicting the degradation and failure of mechanical systems are disclosed. The methods include measuring and quantifying stressors that are responsible for the activation of degradation mechanisms in the machine component of interest. The intensity of the stressor may be correlated with the rate of physical degradation according to some determinable function such that a derivative relationship exists between the machine performance, degradation, and the underlying stressor. The derivative relationship may be used to make diagnostic and prognostic calculations concerning the performance and projected life of the machine. These calculations may be performed in real time to allow the machine operator to quickly adjust the operational parameters of the machinery in order to help minimize or eliminate the effects of the degradation mechanism, thereby prolonging the life of the machine. Various systems implementing the methods are also disclosed.

  13. Tethered agonists: a new mechanism underlying adhesion G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, Torsten; Liebscher, Ines; Luo, Rong; Monk, Kelly R; Piao, Xianhua

    2015-06-01

    The family of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) comprises 33 members in the human genome, which are subdivided into nine subclasses. Many aGPCRs undergo an autoproteolytic process via their GPCR Autoproteolysis-INducing (GAIN) domain during protein maturation to generate an N- and a C-terminal fragments, NTF and CTF, respectively. The NTF and CTF are non-covalently reassociated on the plasma membrane to form a single receptor unit. How aGPCRs are activated upon ligand binding remains one of the leading questions in the field of aGPCR research. Recent work from our labs and others shows that ligand binding can remove the NTF from the plasma membrane-bound CTF, exposing a tethered agonist which potently activates downstream signaling.

  14. Continuum mechanics at the atomic scale: Insights into non-adhesive contacts using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2016-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study non-adhesive contact at the atomic scale. Starting from the case of Hertzian contact, it was found that the reduced Young's modulus E* for shallow indentations scales as a function of, both, the indentation depth and the contact radius. Furthermore, the contact of two representative rough surfaces was investigated: one multi-asperity, Greenwood-Williamson-type (GW-type) rough surface — where asperities were approximated as spherical caps — and a comparable randomly rough one. The results of the MD simulations were in agreement for both representations and showed that the relative projected contact areas Ar p c were linear functions of nominal applied pressures, even after the initiation of plastic deformation. When comparing the MD simulation results with the corresponding continuum GW and Persson models, both continuum models were found to overestimate the values of Ar p c relative to the MD simulation results.

  15. Antiviral adhesion molecular mechanisms for influenza: W. G. Laver's lifetime obsession

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Elspeth F.

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the influenza virus depends firstly on cell adhesion via the sialic-acid-binding viral surface protein, haemagglutinin, and secondly on the successful escape of progeny viruses from the host cell to enable the virus to spread to other cells. To achieve the latter, influenza uses another glycoprotein, the enzyme neuraminidase (NA), to cleave the sialic acid receptors from the surface of the original host cell. This paper traces the development of anti-influenza drugs, from the initial suggestion by MacFarlane Burnet in 1948 that an effective ‘competitive poison’ of the virus' NA might be useful in controlling infection by the virus, through to the determination of the structure of NA by X-ray crystallography and the realization of Burnet's idea with the design of NA inhibitors. A focus is the contribution of the late William Graeme Laver, FRS, to this research. PMID:25533092

  16. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2015-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease. PMID:26858557

  17. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  18. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation. PMID:28127231

  19. Failure mechanisms of nano-silicon anodes upon cycling: an electrode porosity evolution model.

    PubMed

    Radvanyi, Etienne; Porcher, Willy; De Vito, Eric; Montani, Alexandre; Franger, Sylvain; Jouanneau Si Larbi, Séverine

    2014-08-28

    With a specific capacity of 3600 mA h g(-1), silicon is a promising anode active material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, because of the huge volume changes undergone by Si particles upon (de)alloying with lithium, Si electrodes suffer from rapid capacity fading. A deep understanding of the associated failure mechanisms is necessary to improve these electrochemical performances. To reach this goal, we investigate here nano-Si based electrodes by several characterization techniques. Thanks to all these techniques, many aspects, such as the behaviour of the active material or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and the lithiation mechanisms, are studied upon cycling. A clear picture of the failure mechanisms of nano-Si based electrodes is provided. In particular, by combining Hg analyses, SEM observations of electrode cross-sections, and EIS measurements, we follow the evolution of the porosity within the electrode. For the first time, our results clearly show a real dynamic of the pore size distribution: the first cycles lead to the formation of a micrometric porosity which is not present initially. During the following cycles, these large pores are progressively filled up with SEI products which form continuously at the Si particle surface. Thus, from the 50th cycle, Li(+) ion diffusion is dramatically hindered leading to a strongly heterogeneous lithiation of the electrode and a rapid capacity fading.

  20. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  1. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  2. Failure Mechanisms of Air Entrainment in Drop Impact on Lubricated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Min; Hu, Han; Kim, Dong-Ook; Zheng, Zhong; Stone, Howard; Sun, Ying; Drexel University Team; Princeton University Team

    2016-11-01

    Lubricated surfaces have recently been introduced and studied due to their potential benefit in various applications. Combining the techniques of total internal reflection microscopy and reflection interference microscopy, we examine the dynamics of an underlying air film upon drop impact on a lubricated substrate. In contrast to drop impact on solid surfaces where asperities cause random breakup of the entraining air film, we report two air film failure mechanisms on lubricated surfaces. In particular, using thin liquid films of high viscosity, we show that air film rupture shifts from a randomly driven to a controlled event. At low Weber numbers (We) the droplet bounces. At intermediate We, the air film fails at the center as the drop top surface crashes downward owing to impact-induced capillary waves; the resulting liquid-liquid contact time is found to be independent of We. In contrast, at high We, the air film failure occurs much earlier in time at the first inflection point of the air film shape away from the drop center, where the liquid-liquid van der Waals interactions become important. The predictable failure modes of the air film upon drop impact sheds light on droplet deposition in applications such as lubricant-infused self-cleaning surfaces. Support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1401438 to Y.S.

  3. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Commodities are transferred between the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) crew module (CM) and service module (SM) via an external umbilical that is driven apart with spring-loaded struts after the structural connection is severed. The spring struts must operate correctly for the modules to separate safely. There was no vibration testing of strut development units scoped in the MPCV Program Plan; therefore, any design problems discovered as a result of vibration testing would not have been found until the component qualification. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations including identified lessons learned and best practices to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  4. On the failure load and mechanism of polycrystalline graphene by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Wan, Q; Pei, Q X; Quek, S S; Liu, Z S; Zhang, Y W; Shenoy, V B

    2014-12-11

    Nanoindentation has been recently used to measure the mechanical properties of polycrystalline graphene. However, the measured failure loads are found to be scattered widely and vary from lab to lab. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation on polycrystalline graphene at different sites including grain center, grain boundary (GB), GB triple junction, and holes. Depending on the relative position between the indenter tip and defects, significant scattering in failure load is observed. This scattering is found to arise from a combination of the non-uniform stress state, varied and weakened strengths of different defects, and the relative location between the indenter tip and the defects in polycrystalline graphene. Consequently, the failure behavior of polycrystalline graphene by nanoindentation is critically dependent on the indentation site, and is thus distinct from uniaxial tensile loading. Our work highlights the importance of the interaction between the indentation tip and defects, and the need to explicitly consider the defect characteristics at and near the indentation site in polycrystalline graphene during nanoindentation.

  5. The Response and Failure Mechanisms of Circular Metal and Composite Plates Subjected to Underwater Shock Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 17 COSATI CODES I 1...composite materials. This thesis , hopefully, will provide some information pertaining to the dynamic response and failure mechanisms of composite plates or...82170 0 - OL Z > QDO (A o (9 0 ai y 11 u mnE o E E >’ crw~~ ~ a’ &a" & a fulu- Q1 -0 0 t) -(ii* ’. I) ( S m I-(r Cr Yn wm \\f I y0 u m \\ 136 to LO (J Ul

  6. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Alfonso Megido, Joaquín; González Franco, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    When acute heart failure progresses and there is acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, routine therapeutic measures should be accompanied by other measures that help to correct oxygenation of the patient. The final and most drastic step is mechanical ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation has been developed in the last few years as a method that attempts to improve oxygenation without the need for intubation, thus, in theory, reducing morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present article describes the controversies surrounding the results of this technique and discusses its indications. The article also discusses how to start non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary edema from a practical point of view.

  7. User-defined Material Model for Thermo-mechanical Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Previously a user-defined material model for orthotropic bimodulus materials was developed for linear and nonlinear stress analysis of composite structures using either shell or solid finite elements within a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. Extensions of this user-defined material model to thermo-mechanical progressive failure analysis are described, and the required input data are documented. The extensions include providing for temperature-dependent material properties, archival of the elastic strains, and a thermal strain calculation for materials exhibiting a stress-free temperature.

  8. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  9. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  10. Cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of platelet adhesion by nitric oxide donor: A role for α-actinin nitration

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, Sisi; Cardoso, Marcia H. M.; Morganti, Rafael P.; Thomazzi, Sara M.; Lilla, Sergio; Murad, Ferid; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2006-01-01

    The nitric oxide-mediated actions are mostly due to cyclic GMP (cGMP) formation, but cGMP-independent mechanisms, such as tyrosine nitration, have been suggested as potential signaling pathways modulating the NO-induced responses. However, the mechanisms that lead to tyrosine nitration in platelets are poorly studied, and the protein targets of nitration have not been identified in these cells. Therefore, we have used the model of platelet adhesion to fibrinogen-coated plates to investigate the cGMP-independent mechanisms of the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) that leads to inhibition of platelet adhesion. SNP concentration-dependently inhibited platelet adhesion, as observed at 15-min and 60-min adhesion. Additionally, SNP markedly increased the cGMP levels, and the soluble guanylate inhibitor ODQ nearly abolished the SNP-mediated cGMP elevations in all experimental conditions used. Nevertheless, ODQ failed to affect the adhesion inhibition obtained with 1.0 mM SNP at 15 min. On the other hand, superoxide dismutase or peroxynitrite (ONOO−) scavenger epigallocatechin gallate significantly reversed the inhibition of platelet adhesion by SNP (1 mM, 15 min). Western blot analysis in SNP (1 mM, 15 min)-treated platelets showed a single tyrosine-nitrated protein with an apparent mass of ≈105 kDa. Nanospray LC-MS/MS identified the human α-actinin 1 cytoskeletal isoform (P12814) as the protein contained in the nitrated SDS gel band. Thus, tyrosine nitration of α-actinin, through ONOO− formation, may be a key modulatory mechanism to control platelet adhesion. PMID:16492779

  11. The Effect of Defects on Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanisms of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Jonathan; Gonzalez, Joseph; Perriot, Romain; Oleynik, Ivan

    Recent experiments involving nanoindentation of graphene have demonstrated counterintuitive increasing of Young's modulus with increasing concentrations of point defects in graphene. To fully resolve this controversy we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of graphene nanoindentation. The relaible description of interatomic interactions is achieved by using recently developed screened environment-dependent bond order (SED-REBO) potential. The elastic properties of the defective graphene, the breaking strength and the mechanisms of fracture under indenter are investigated as a function of defect concentration and other factors specific to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation experiments.

  12. DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POORLY CONSOLIDATED MEDIA - Borehole Failure Mechanisms in High-Porosity Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bezalel c. Haimson

    2005-06-10

    We investigated failure mechanisms around boreholes and the formation of borehole breakouts in high-porosity sandstone, with particular interest to grain-scale micromechanics of failure leading to the hitherto unrecognized fracture-like borehole breakouts and apparent compaction band formation in poorly consolidated granular materials. We also looked at a variety of drilling-related factors that contribute to the type, size and shape of borehole breakouts. The objective was to assess their effect on the ability to establish correlations between breakout geometry and in situ stress magnitudes, as well as on borehole stability prediction, and hydrocarbon/water extraction in general. We identified two classes of medium to high porosity (12-30%) sandstones, arkosic, consisting of 50-70% quartz and 15 to 50% feldspar, and quartz-rich sandstones, in which quartz grain contents varied from 90 to 100%. In arkose sandstones critical far-field stress magnitudes induced compressive failure around boreholes in the form of V-shaped (dog-eared) breakouts, the result of dilatant intra-and trans-granular microcracking subparallel to both the maximum horizontal far-field stress and to the borehole wall. On the other hand, boreholes in quartz-rich sandstones failed by developing fracture-like breakouts. These are long and very narrow (several grain diameters) tabular failure zones perpendicular to the maximum stress. Evidence provided mainly by SEM observations suggests a failure process initiated by localized grain-bond loosening along the least horizontal far-field stress springline, the packing of these grains into a lower porosity compaction band resembling those discovered in Navajo and Aztec sandstones, and the emptying of the loosened grains by the circulating drilling fluid starting from the borehole wall. Although the immediate several grain layers at the breakout tip often contain some cracked or even crushed grains, the failure mechanism enabled by the formation of the

  13. A microfabricated wedge-shaped adhesive array displaying gecko-like dynamic adhesion, directionality and long lifetime.

    PubMed

    Parness, Aaron; Soto, Daniel; Esparza, Noé; Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar; Cutkosky, Mark

    2009-12-06

    Gecko adhesion has become a paradigmatic example of bio-inspired engineering, yet among the many gecko-like synthetic adhesives (GSAs), truly gecko-like performance remains elusive. Many GSAs have previously demonstrated one or two features of the gecko adhesive. We present a new wedge-shaped GSA that exhibits several gecko-like properties simultaneously: directional features; zero force at detachment; high ratio of detachment force to preload force; non-adhesive default state; and the ability to maintain performance while sliding, even after thousands of cycles. Individual wedges independently detach and reattach during sliding, resulting in high levels of shear and normal adhesion during drag. This behaviour provides a non-catastrophic failure mechanism that is desirable for applications such as climbing robots where sudden contact failure would result in serious falls. The effects of scaling patch sizes up to tens of square centimetres are also presented and discussed. Patches of 1 cm(2) had an adhesive pressure of 5.1 kPa while simultaneously supporting 17.0 kPa of shear. After 30 000 attachment/detachment cycles, a patch retained 67 per cent of its initial adhesion and 76 per cent of its initial shear without cleaning. Square-based wedges of 20 mum and 50 mum are manufactured in a moulding process where moulds are fabricated using a dual-side, dual-angle lithography process on quartz wafers with SU-8 photoresist as the mould material and polydimethylsiloxane as the cast material.

  14. Impact performance characteristics and modeling failure mechanisms of pultruded glass-graphite/epoxy hybrid composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowsika, Murthy V. S. L. N.

    In this study, investigation was performed to comprehend the influence of hybridization on the impact performance in terms of the energy absorption characteristics and delamination fracture toughness of pultruded uni-directional composite materials. In order to evaluate the improvements/changes in the impact performance as a result of hybridization, apart from considering mono-fiber reinforced all-graphite and all-glass composites, several types of sandwich hybrid composites comprising of both graphite as well as glass fibers were included in the investigation. By keeping a constant overall fiber content, the lay-up sequence and the volume fraction of each type of fiber are altered in these pultruded composites to determine the trend in the mechanical behavior as a result of hybridization. The response of pultruded all-graphite, all-glass and glass-graphite hybrid composites is evaluated under two different incident impact energy conditions. A high incident energy (HIE) and a low incident energy (LIE) of impact are chosen to cause either complete fracture or induce delamination, respectively, for assessing the energy absorption characteristics (crashworthiness) and delamination fracture toughness of these composites. Finite element modeling is performed under static as well as dynamic loading conditions to simulate the stress distribution and to predict the energy absorption behavior of composites. Progressive damage due to sequential ply failure was modeled by utilizing the failure strain data obtained from static and HTE impact tests for analyzing the post-initial ply failure characteristics of pultruded composites. Finite element modeling was also performed to simulate delamination crack propagation at various levels through the thickness. The strain energy release rate computed using the virtual crack closure technique was monitored to determine the likelihood of delamination crack propagation with increment in crack growth for the pultruded composites under

  15. Thermo-mechanical Fatigue Failure of Thermal Barrier Coated Superalloy Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Rajivgandhi; Mori, Yuzuru; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Okazaki, Masakazu

    2015-09-01

    Failure behavior of thermal barrier coated (TBC) Ni-based superalloy specimens were studied from the aspect of the effect of bond coat material behavior on low cycle fatigue (LCF) and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) at various temperatures and under various loading conditions. Initially, monotonic tensile tests were carried out on a MCrAlY alloy bond coat material in the temperature range of 298 K to 1273 K (25 °C to 1000 °C). Special attention was paid to understand the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Next, LCF and TMF tests were carried out on the thermal barrier coated Ni-based alloy IN738 specimen. After these tests, the specimens were sectioned to understand their failure mechanisms on the basis of DBTT of the bond coat material. Experimental results demonstrated that the LCF and TMF lives of the TBC specimen were closely related to the DBTT of the bond coat material, and also the TMF lives were different from those of LCF tests. It has also been observed that the crack density in the bond coat in the TBC specimen was significantly dependent on the test conditions. More importantly, not only the number of cracks but also the crack penetration probability into substrate were shown to be sensitive to the DBTT.

  16. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists. PMID:26312104

  17. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality.

  18. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists.

  19. Material heterogeneity in cancellous bone promotes deformation recovery after mechanical failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ashley M.; Matheny, Jonathan B.; Keaveny, Tony M.; Taylor, David; Rimnac, Clare M.; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Many natural structures use a foam core and solid outer shell to achieve high strength and stiffness with relatively small amounts of mass. Biological foams, however, must also resist crack growth. The process of crack propagation within the struts of a foam is not well understood and is complicated by the foam microstructure. We demonstrate that in cancellous bone, the foam-like component of whole bones, damage propagation during cyclic loading is dictated not by local tissue stresses but by heterogeneity of material properties associated with increased ductility of strut surfaces. The increase in surface ductility is unexpected because it is the opposite pattern generated by surface treatments to increase fatigue life in man-made materials, which often result in reduced surface ductility. We show that the more ductile surfaces of cancellous bone are a result of reduced accumulation of advanced glycation end products compared with the strut interior. Damage is therefore likely to accumulate in strut centers making cancellous bone more tolerant of stress concentrations at strut surfaces. Hence, the structure is able to recover more deformation after failure and return to a closer approximation of its original shape. Increased recovery of deformation is a passive mechanism seen in biology for setting a broken bone that allows for a better approximation of initial shape during healing processes and is likely the most important mechanical function. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified biomimetic design strategy in which tissue level material heterogeneity in foams can be used to improve deformation recovery after failure. PMID:26929343

  20. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  1. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation.

  2. Tensile Properties and Failure Mechanism of a New 3D Nonorthogonal Woven Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Sun, Jin; Cai, Deng'an; Zhou, Guangming

    2016-12-01

    Tensile properties and failure mechanism of a newly developed three-dimensional (3D) woven composite material named 3D nonorthogonal woven composite are investigated in this paper. The microstructure of the composite is studied and the tensile properties are obtained by quasi-static tensile tests. The failure mechanism of specimen is discussed based on observation of the fracture surfaces via electron microscope. It is found that the specimens always split along the oblique yarns and produce typical v-shaped fracture surfaces. The representative volume cell (RVC) is established based on the microstructure. A finite element analysis is conducted with periodical boundary conditions. The finite element simulation results agree well with the experimental data. By analyzing deformation and stress distribution under different loading conditions, it is demonstrated that finite element model based on RVC is valid in predicting tensile properties of 3D nonorthogonal woven composites. Stress distribution shows that the oblique yarns and warp yarns oriented along the x direction carry primary load under x tension and that warp yarns bear primary load under y tension.

  3. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  4. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM's have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation. Nomenclature

  5. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as specific spacecraft orientations in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and low beta angle Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  6. Mechanical response and failure of High Performance Propellant (HPP) subject to uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Thompson, D. G.

    2015-05-01

    As part of a program to characterize and understand the mechanical response and failure behavior of the High Performance Propellant (HPP), uniaxial tensile tests were conducted. The mechanical properties of the HPP solid propellant subject to tension are investigated as a function of both the loading (strain) rate and the temperature. The nominal strain rate varies from 10-6 to 10-2 s-1 and the temperature varies from -50 to 50 °C. Digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to obtain the full field deformation measurement over the sample surface, from which both the axial strain and the circumferential strain were determined, and as a result, volume changes during the uniaxial tension were studied. Some of the material parameters, e.g., Young's modulus E, the tensile strength σ max, and uniaxial tensile strain at the maximum tensile stress ɛ max, were found to be extremely sensitive to both the strain rate and the temperature. It was also observed that during the linear portion of the uniaxial tension, the HPP is close to incompressible. But when deformation enters the nonlinear regime, volume change of the sample accelerates and such a significant volume increase during the nonlinear portion of the deformation can be attributed to the formation and extension of damage within the gage section, which lead to the macroscopic tearing failure of the material.

  7. Material heterogeneity in cancellous bone promotes deformation recovery after mechanical failure.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ashley M; Matheny, Jonathan B; Keaveny, Tony M; Taylor, David; Rimnac, Clare M; Hernandez, Christopher J

    2016-03-15

    Many natural structures use a foam core and solid outer shell to achieve high strength and stiffness with relatively small amounts of mass. Biological foams, however, must also resist crack growth. The process of crack propagation within the struts of a foam is not well understood and is complicated by the foam microstructure. We demonstrate that in cancellous bone, the foam-like component of whole bones, damage propagation during cyclic loading is dictated not by local tissue stresses but by heterogeneity of material properties associated with increased ductility of strut surfaces. The increase in surface ductility is unexpected because it is the opposite pattern generated by surface treatments to increase fatigue life in man-made materials, which often result in reduced surface ductility. We show that the more ductile surfaces of cancellous bone are a result of reduced accumulation of advanced glycation end products compared with the strut interior. Damage is therefore likely to accumulate in strut centers making cancellous bone more tolerant of stress concentrations at strut surfaces. Hence, the structure is able to recover more deformation after failure and return to a closer approximation of its original shape. Increased recovery of deformation is a passive mechanism seen in biology for setting a broken bone that allows for a better approximation of initial shape during healing processes and is likely the most important mechanical function. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified biomimetic design strategy in which tissue level material heterogeneity in foams can be used to improve deformation recovery after failure.

  8. Mechanisms and clinical consequences of untreated central sleep apnea in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Khayat, Rami; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Stellbrink, Christoph; Mianulli, Marcus; Abraham, William T

    2015-01-06

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a highly prevalent, though often unrecognized, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Data from HF population studies suggest that it may present in 30% to 50% of HF patients. CSA is recognized as an important contributor to the progression of HF and to HF-related morbidity and mortality. Over the past 2 decades, an expanding body of research has begun to shed light on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CSA. Armed with this growing knowledge base, the sleep, respiratory, and cardiovascular research communities have been working to identify ways to treat CSA in HF with the ultimate goal of improving patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of CSA in HF and review emerging therapies for this disorder.

  9. A procedure for combining acoustically induced and mechanically induced loads (first passage failure design criterion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, D. R.; Henricks, W.

    1983-01-01

    The combined load statistics are developed by taking the acoustically induced load to be a random population, assumed to be stationary. Each element of this ensemble of acoustically induced loads is assumed to have the same power spectral density (PSD), obtained previously from a random response analysis employing the given acoustic field in the STS cargo bay as a stationary random excitation. The mechanically induced load is treated as either (1) a known deterministic transient, or (2) a nonstationary random variable of known first and second statistical moments which vary with time. A method is then shown for determining the probability that the combined load would, at any time, have a value equal to or less than a certain level. Having obtained a statistical representation of how the acoustic and mechanical loads are expected to combine, an analytical approximation for defining design levels for these loads is presented using the First Passage failure criterion.

  10. Mechanism of an indirect effect of aqueous cigarette smoke extract on the adhesion of monocytic cells to endothelial cells in an in vitro assay revealed by transcriptomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Gallitz, Inka; Schlage, Walter K; Steffen, Yvonne; Stolle, Katrin; Lebrun, Stefan; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manual C; Lietz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The adhesion of monocytic cells to the "dysfunctional" endothelium constitutes a critical step in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Cigarette smoke (CS) has been shown to contribute to this process, the complex mechanism of which still needs to be unraveled. We developed an in vitro adhesion assay to investigate the CS-induced adhesion of monocytic MM6 cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) following exposure to an aqueous CS extract (smoke-bubbled phosphate buffered saline: sbPBS), reasoning that in vivo monocytes and endothelial cells are exposed primarily to soluble constituents from inhaled CS absorbed through the lung alveolar wall. MM6 cell adhesion was increased exclusively by the conditioned medium from sbPBS-exposed MM6 cells, not by direct sbPBS exposure of the HUVECs within a range of sbPBS doses. Using a transcriptomics approach followed by confirmation experiments, we identified different exposure effects on both cell types and a key mechanism by which sbPBS promoted the adhesion of MM6 cells to HUVECs. While sbPBS provoked a strong oxidative stress response in both cell types, the expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, responsible for the adhesion of MM6 cells to HUVECs, was induced in the latter through a proinflammatory paracrine effect. We confirmed that this effect was driven mainly by TNFα produced by MM6 cells exposed to sbPBS. In conclusion, we have elucidated an indirect mechanism by which sbPBS increases the adhesion of monocytic cells to endothelial cells in this in vitro assay that was designed for tobacco product risk assessment while mimicking the in vivo exposure conditions as closely as possible.

  11. PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate results in increased PRG4 expression: a potential mechanism for anti-adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Edsfeldt, Sara; Holm, Björn; Mahlapuu, Margit; Reno, Carol; Hart, David A.; Wiig, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the anti-adhesive mechanisms of PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate (HA) by using the rabbit lactoferrin peptide, rabPXL01 in HA, in a rabbit model of healing tendons and tendon sheaths. The mechanism of action for PXL01 in HA is interesting since a recent clinical study of the human lactoferrin peptide PXL01 in HA administered around repaired tendons in the hand showed improved digit mobility. Materials and methods On days 1, 3, and 6 after tendon injury and surgical repair, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to assess mRNA expression levels for genes encoding the mucinous glycoprotein PRG4 (also called lubricin) and a subset of matrix proteins, cytokines, and growth factors involved in flexor tendon repair. RabPXL01 in HA was administered locally around the repaired tendons, and mRNA expression was compared with untreated repaired tendons and tendon sheaths. Results We observed, at all time points, increased expression of PRG4 mRNA in tendons treated with rabPXL01 in HA, but not in tendon sheaths. In addition, treatment with rabPXL01 in HA led to repression of the mRNA levels for the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 in tendon sheaths. Conclusions RabPXL01 in HA increased lubricin mRNA production while diminishing mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators, which in turn reduced the gliding resistance and inhibited the adhesion formation after flexor tendon repair. PMID:27658527

  12. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant–injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide–modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development. PMID:27583680

  13. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-10-01

    Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant-injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development.

  14. Shear lag sutures: Improved suture repair through the use of adhesives.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Stephen W; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Gelberman, Richard H; Birman, Victor; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-09-01

    Suture materials and surgical knot tying techniques have improved dramatically since their first use over five millennia ago. However, the approach remains limited by the ability of the suture to transfer load to tissue at suture anchor points. Here, we predict that adhesive-coated sutures can improve mechanical load transfer beyond the range of performance of existing suture methods, thereby strengthening repairs and decreasing the risk of failure. The mechanical properties of suitable adhesives were identified using a shear lag model. Examination of the design space for an optimal adhesive demonstrated requirements for strong adhesion and low stiffness to maximize the strength of the adhesive-coated suture repair construct. To experimentally assess the model, we evaluated single strands of sutures coated with highly flexible cyanoacrylates (Loctite 4903 and 4902), cyanoacrylate (Loctite QuickTite Instant Adhesive Gel), rubber cement, rubber/gasket adhesive (1300 Scotch-Weld Neoprene High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive), an albumin-glutaraldehyde adhesive (BioGlue), or poly(dopamine). As a clinically relevant proof-of-concept, cyanoacrylate-coated sutures were then used to perform a clinically relevant flexor digitorum tendon repair in cadaver tissue. The repair performed with adhesive-coated suture had significantly higher strength compared to the standard repair without adhesive. Notably, cyanoacrylate provides strong adhesion with high stiffness and brittle behavior, and is therefore not an ideal adhesive for enhancing suture repair. Nevertheless, the improvement in repair properties in a clinically relevant setting, even using a non-ideal adhesive, demonstrates the potential for the proposed approach to improve outcomes for treatments requiring suture fixation. Further study is necessary to develop a strongly adherent, compliant adhesive within the optimal design space described by the model.

  15. Shear lag sutures: Improved suture repair through the use of adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Stephen W.; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Gelberman, Richard H.; Birman, Victor; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.; Genin, Guy M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Suture materials and surgical knot tying techniques have improved dramatically since their first use over five millennia ago. However, the approach remains limited by the ability of the suture to transfer load to tissue at suture anchor points. Here, we predict that adhesive-coated sutures can improve mechanical load transfer beyond the range of performance of existing suture methods, thereby strengthening repairs and decreasing the risk of failure. The mechanical properties of suitable adhesives were identified using a shear lag model. Examination of the design space for an optimal adhesive demonstrated requirements for strong adhesion and low stiffness to maximize the strength of the adhesive-coated suture repair construct. To experimentally assess the model, we evaluated single strands of sutures coated with highly flexible cyanoacrylates (Loctite 4903 and 4902), cyanoacrylate (Loctite QuickTite Instant Adhesive Gel), rubber cement, rubber/gasket adhesive (1300 Scotch-Weld Neoprene High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive), an albumin-glutaraldehyde adhesive (BioGlue), or poly(dopamine). As a clinically relevant proof-of-concept, cyanoacrylate-coated sutures were then used to perform a clinically relevant flexor digitorum tendon repair in cadaver tissue. The repair performed with adhesive-coated suture had significantly higher strength compared to the standard repair without adhesive. Notably, cyanoacrylate provides strong adhesion with high stiffness and brittle behavior, and is therefore not an ideal adhesive for enhancing suture repair. Nevertheless, the improvement in repair properties in a clinically relevant setting, even using a non-ideal adhesive, demonstrates the potential for the proposed approach to improve outcomes for treatments requiring suture fixation. Further study is necessary to develop a strongly adherent, compliant adhesive within the optimal design space described by the model. PMID:26022966

  16. Acoustic Imaging of Microstructure and Evaluation of the Adhesive's Physical, Mechanical and Chemical Properties Changes at Different Cure States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severina, I. A.; Fabre, A. J.; Maeva, E. Yu.

    Epoxy thermoset adhesives transform during cure from liquid state into the highly cross-linked solid. Cure state of the material depends on condition of the reaction (temperature, pressure, time etc.) and resin/hardener ratio. It is known that the cure degree of the adhesive correlates with adhesion strength, which is critical for structural adhesives used in automotive, aerospace and marine industries. In this work, characterization of cure process of the adhesive with acoustic methods is presented. Evolution of the acoustic and elastic properties (attenuation, sound velocity, density, elastic moduli) during cure reaction was monitored in relation to the substantial physical and chemical changes of the material. These macro parameters of the adhesive were compared with the material's microstructure obtained by high-resolution acoustic microscopy technique in frequencies range of 50-400 MHz. Development of the microstructure of the adhesive as it cures at different conditions has been investigated. Appearance and development of the granular structure on the adhesive interface during cure reaction has been demonstrated. Acoustic images were analyzed by mathematical method to quantitatively characterize distribution of the adhesive's components. Statistical analysis of such images provides an accurate quantitative measure of the degree of cure of such samples. Research results presented in this paper can be useful as a basis for non-destructive evaluation of the adhesive materials

  17. How can health literacy influence outcomes in heart failure patients? Mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Cheryl; Sethares, Kristen; Davidson, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Health literacy is discussed in papers from 25 countries where findings suggest that approximately a third up to one half of the people in developed countries have low health literacy. Specifically, health literacy is the mechanism by which individuals obtain and use health information to make health decisions about individual treatments in the home, access care in the community, promote provider-patient interactions, structure self-care, and navigate health care programs both locally and nationally. Further, health literacy is a key determinant of health and a critical dimension for assessing individuals' needs, and, importantly, their capacity for self-care. Poorer health knowledge/status, more medication errors, costs, and higher rates of morbidity, readmissions, emergency room visits, and mortality among patients with health illiteracy have been demonstrated. Individuals at high risk for low health literacy include the elderly, disabled, Blacks, those with a poverty-level income, some or less high school education, either no insurance or Medicare or Medicaid, and those for whom English is a second language. As a consequence, health literacy is a complex, multifaceted, and evolving construct including aspects of social, psychological, cultural and economic circumstances. The purpose of this paper is to describe the mechanisms and consequences of health illiteracy. Specifically, the prevalence, associated demographics, and models of health literacy are described. The mechanism of health illiteracy's influence on outcomes in heart failure is proposed. Tools for health literacy assessment are described and compared. Finally, the health outcomes and general interventions to enhance the health outcomes in heart failure are discussed.

  18. Impact of mechanical- and maintenance-induced failures of main reactor coolant pump seals on plant safety

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M A; Boccio, J L; Mitra, S

    1985-12-01

    This document presents an investigation of the safety impact resulting from mechanical- and maintenance-induced reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal failures in nuclear power plants. A data survey of the pump seal failures for existing nuclear power plants in the US from several available sources was performed. The annual frequency of pump seal failures in a nuclear power plant was estimated based on the concept of hazard rate and dependency evaluation. The conditional probability of various sizes of leak rates given seal failures was then evaluated. The safety impact of RCP seal failures, in terms of contribution to plant core-melt frequency, was also evaluated for three nuclear power plants. For leak rates below the normal makeup capacity and the impact of plant safety were discussed qualitatively, whereas for leak rates beyond the normal make up capacity, formal PRA methodologies were applied. 22 refs., 17 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Failure mechanisms of air entrainment in drop impact on lubricated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pack, M; Hu, H; Kim, D; Zheng, Z; Stone, H A; Sun, Y

    2017-03-22

    Lubricated surfaces have recently been introduced and studied due to their potential benefit in various configurations and applications. Combining the techniques of total internal reflection microscopy and reflection interference microscopy, we examine the dynamics of an underlying air film upon drop impact on a lubricated substrate where the thin liquid film is immiscible to the drop. In contrast to drop impact on solid surfaces where even the smallest asperities cause random breakup of the entraining air film, we report two air film failure mechanisms on lubricated surfaces. In particular, using ≈5 μm thick liquid films of high viscosity, which should make the substrate nearly atomically smooth, we show that air film rupture shifts from asperity-driven to a controlled event. At low Weber numbers (We < 2, We = ρlU0(2)R/σ, U0 the impact velocity, R the drop radius, and ρl the density and σ the surface tension of the droplet) the droplet bounces. At intermediate We (2 < We < 10), the air film fails at the center as the top surface of the drop crashes downward owing to impact-induced capillary waves; the resulting liquid-liquid contact time is found to be independent of We. In contrast, at high We (We > 10), the air film failure occurs much earlier in time at the first inflection point of the air film shape away from the drop center, where the liquid-liquid van der Waals interactions become important. The predictable failure modes of the air film upon drop impact sheds light on droplet deposition in applications such as lubricant-infused self-cleaning surfaces.

  20. Failure analysis of porcupine quills under axial compression reveals their mechanical response during buckling.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fernando G; Troncoso, Omar P; Diaz, John; Arce, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Porcupine quills are natural structures formed by a thin walled conical shell and an inner foam core. Axial compression tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were all used to compare the characteristics and mechanical properties of porcupine quills with and without core. The failure mechanisms that occur during buckling were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and it was found that delamination buckling is mostly responsible for the decrease in the measured buckling stress of the quills with regard to predicted theoretical values. Our analysis also confirmed that the foam core works as an energy dissipater improving the mechanical response of an empty cylindrical shell, retarding the onset of buckling as well as producing a step wise decrease in force after buckling, instead of an instantaneous decrease in force typical for specimens without core. Cell collapse and cell densification in the inner foam core were identified as the key mechanisms that allow for energy absorption during buckling.

  1. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  2. Failure of fluid-saturated granular materials: a unified approach to capture diffuse and localized instability mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalache, Constance; Buscarnera, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Granular materials are susceptible to a wide variety of failure and deformation mechanisms, especially because of their interaction with the pore fluids and the surrounding environment. An adequate modeling of their mechanical response is therefore essential for understanding a number of geological processes, such as the onset of rapid landslides, hillslope denudation and sediment transport, or even the mechanics of fault gauges. Depending on the type of material, the groundwater conditions and the surrounding kinematic constraints, both diffuse and localized mechanisms are possible, and these may occur under either drained or undrained conditions. In the geomechanics literature, failure modes are usually explained and modeled with the tools of continuum mechanics, such as the mathematical theory of plasticity. Due to the complexity of granular material behavior, however, most classical models for frictional strength are unable to capture the variety of instability mechanisms observed for such class of geomaterials (e.g., liquefaction, shear banding, etc.). Sophisticated strain-hardening plasticity models are therefore required for numerical modeling purposes, thus making the evaluation of critical failure conditions less straightforward than in perfect plasticity theories. Here we propose a mathematical strategy that can be adapted to any elastoplastic model and allows the onset of failure in elastoplastic geomaterials to be expressed in a more general manner. More specifically, our theory expresses the failure conditions as a function of local kinematics and solid-fluid interactions. The stability criterion used in this study is based on the so-called stability modulus, a scalar index of failure that was formulated by linking the physical concept controllability to the mathematical notion of plastic admissibility upon an incremental loading path [Buscarnera et al, 2011]. In this contribution, different loading constraints are considered, accounting for the

  3. Cyclic Failure Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems Under Thermal Gradient Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite+BSAS/Si multilayer thermal and environmental barrier coating (TBC-EBC) systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrates were thermally cyclic tested under high thermal gradients using a laser high-heat-flux rig in conjunction with furnace exposure in water-vapor environments. Coating sintering and interface damage were assessed by monitoring the real-time thermal conductivity changes during the laser heat-flux tests and by examining the microstructural changes after exposure. Sintering kinetics of the coating systems were also independently characterized using a dilatometer. It was found that the coating failure involved both the time-temperature dependent sintering and the cycle frequency dependent cyclic fatigue processes. The water vapor environments not only facilitated the initial coating conductivity increases due to enhanced sintering and interface reaction, but also promoted later conductivity reductions due to the accelerated coating cracking and delamination. The failure mechanisms of the coating systems are also discussed based on the cyclic test results and are correlated to the sintering and thermal stress behavior under the thermal gradient test conditions.

  4. Mechanics-based statistics of failure risk of quasibrittle structures and size effect on safety factors.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Zdenĕk P; Pang, Sze-Dai

    2006-06-20

    In mechanical design as well as protection from various natural hazards, one must ensure an extremely low failure probability such as 10(-6). How to achieve that goal is adequately understood only for the limiting cases of brittle or ductile structures. Here we present a theory to do that for the transitional class of quasibrittle structures, having brittle constituents and characterized by nonnegligible size of material inhomogeneities. We show that the probability distribution of strength of the representative volume element of material is governed by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of atomic energies and the stress dependence of activation energy barriers; that it is statistically modeled by a hierarchy of series and parallel couplings; and that it consists of a broad Gaussian core having a grafted far-left power-law tail with zero threshold and amplitude depending on temperature and load duration. With increasing structure size, the Gaussian core shrinks and Weibull tail expands according to the weakest-link model for a finite chain of representative volume elements. The model captures experimentally observed deviations of the strength distribution from Weibull distribution and of the mean strength scaling law from a power law. These deviations can be exploited for verification and calibration. The proposed theory will increase the safety of concrete structures, composite parts of aircraft or ships, microelectronic components, microelectromechanical systems, prosthetic devices, etc. It also will improve protection against hazards such as landslides, avalanches, ice breaks, and rock or soil failures.

  5. Failure mechanics in low-velocity impacts on thin composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Eight-ply quasi-isotropic composite plates of Thornel 300 graphite in Narmco 5208 epoxy resin (T300/5208) were tested to establish the degree of equivalence between low-velocity impact and static testing. Both the deformation and failure mechanics under impact were representable by static indentation tests. Under low-velocity impacts such as tool drops, the dominant deformation mode of the plates was the first, or static, mode. Higher modes are excited on contact, but they decay significantly by the time the first-mode load reaches a maximum. The delamination patterns were observed by X-ray analysis. The areas of maximum delamination patterns were observed by X-ray analysis. The areas of maximum delamination coincided with the areas of highest peel stresses. The extent of delamination was similar for static and impact tests. Fiber failure damage was established by tensile tests on small fiber bundles obtained by deplying test specimens. The onset of fiber damage was in internal plies near the lower surface of the plates. The distribution and amount of fiber damage was similar fo impact and static tests.

  6. Bypass balloon pumping: a newly developed device for mechanical circulatory support in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, M; Asakura, T; Yasuura, K; Ogawa, Y; Okamoto, H; Matsuura, A

    2003-02-01

    Various types of assist devices have been developed for severe heart failures. Among them, intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) has achieved popularity, mainly in the treatment of patients with either severe cardiac infarction or low cardiac output syndrome (LOS) after open-heart surgery. However, IABP has a limitation in that although it acts as a pressure support, it cannot directly support flow volume. In cases of severe pump failure, stronger pump support would be required. However, there is a limit in the clinical use of temporary mechanical support using a pump because of the costs of the expensive equipment. With this in mind, we came up with a new idea in which the motion of a balloon in IABP system is converted into a power source for creating a one-way stream. In order to realize our idea, we made a J-shaped sample model of pulsating chamber incorporating two ball valves. In the hydrodynamic experiment using our new device, flows over 2500 ml/min (Max. 3475 ml/min) were obtained. The percent changes in parameters such as TTI, DPTI and bypass flows obtained by the experiment of left ventricular bypass have demonstrated that our assist system is effective for reducing cardiac work.

  7. Graphene coating for anti-corrosion and the investigation of failure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. X.; Duan, C. Y.; Liu, H. Y.; Chen, Y. F.; Wang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods has been considered as a promising corrosion prevention layer because of its exceptional structure and impermeability. However, the anti-corrosion performance and the failure mechanism are still controversial. In this study, graphene layers with different quality levels, crystallite sizes, and layer numbers were prepared on the surface of Cu by a CVD process. The effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the failure of graphene layers to provide adequate protection were investigated in detail by combining graphene transfer techniques, computation, and anti-corrosion measurements. Our results reveal that corrosion rates decrease marginally upon the increase of graphene layer number, and this rather weak dependence on thickness likely arises from the aligned nature of the GBs in CVD-grown few-layer graphene. This problem can potentially be overcome by layer-by-layer graphene transfer technique, in which corrosion is found to be arrested locally when transferred graphene is present on top of the as-grown graphene. However, this advantage is not reflected in corrosion studies performed on large-scale samples, where cracks or imperfect interfaces could offset the advantages of GB misalignment. With improvements in technology, the layer-by-layer assembly technique could be used to develop an effective anti-corrosion barrier.

  8. Structure of Slitrk2–PTPδ complex reveals mechanisms for splicing-dependent trans-synaptic adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Atsushi; Sato, Yusuke; Goto-Ito, Sakurako; Uemura, Takeshi; Maeda, Asami; Shiroshima, Tomoko; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Fukai, Shuya

    2015-01-01

    Selective binding between pre- and postsynaptic adhesion molecules can induce synaptic differentiation. Here we report the crystal structure of a synaptogenic trans-synaptic adhesion complex between Slit and Trk-like family member 2 (Slitrk2) and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) δ. The structure and site-directed mutational analysis revealed the structural basis of splicing-dependent adhesion between Slitrks and type IIa RPTPs for inducing synaptic differentiation. PMID:25989451

  9. Linking Seismicity at Depth to the Mechanics of a Lava Dome Failure - a Forecasting Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvage, R. O.; Neuberg, J. W.; Murphy, W.

    2014-12-01

    Soufriere Hills volcano (SHV), Montserrat has been in a state of ongoing unrest since 1995. Prior to eruptions, an increase in the number of seismic events has been observed. We use the Material Failure Law (MFL) (Voight, 1988) to investigate how an accelerating number of low frequency seismic events are related to the timing of a large scale dome collapse in June 1997. We show that although the forecasted timing of a dome collapse may coincide with the known timing, the accuracy of the application of the MFL to the data is poor. Using a cross correlation technique we show how characterising seismicity into similar waveform "families'' allows us to focus on a single process at depth and improve the reliability of our forecast. A number of families are investigated to assess their relative importance. We show that despite the timing of a forecasted dome collapse ranging between several hours of the known timing of collapse, each of the families produces a better forecast in terms of fit to the seismic acceleration data than when using all low frequency seismicity. In addition, we investigate the stability of such families between major dome collapses (1997 and 2003), assessing their potential for use in real-time forecasting. Initial application of Grey's Incidence Analysis suggests that a key parameter influencing the potential for a large scale slumping on the dome of SHV is the rate of low frequency seismicity associated with magma movement and dome growth. We undertook numerical modelling of an andesitic dome with a hydrothermally altered layer down to 800m. The geometry of the dome is based on SHV prior to the collapse of 2003. We show that a critical instability is reached once slope angles exceed 25°, corresponding to a summit height of just over 1100m a.s.l.. The geometry of failure is in close agreement with the identified failure plane suggesting that the input mechanical properties are broadly consistent with reality. We are therefore able to compare

  10. Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: roles of protein expression and mechanical factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    In order to achieve selective targeting of affinity-ligand coated nanoparticles to the target tissue, it is essential to understand the key mechanisms that govern their capture by the target cell. Next-generation pharmacokinetic (PK) models that systematically account for proteomic and mechanical factors can accelerate the design, validation and translation of targeted nanocarriers (NCs) in the clinic. Towards this objective, we have developed a computational model to delineate the roles played by target protein expression and mechanical factors of the target cell membrane in determining the avidity of functionalized NCs to live cells. Model results show quantitative agreement with in vivo experiments when specific and non-specific contributions to NC binding are taken into account. The specific contributions are accounted for through extensive simulations of multivalent receptor-ligand interactions, membrane mechanics and entropic factors such as membrane undulations and receptor translation. The computed NC avidity is strongly dependent on ligand density, receptor expression, bending mechanics of the target cell membrane, as well as entropic factors associated with the membrane and the receptor motion. Our computational model can predict the in vivo targeting levels of the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1)-coated NCs targeted to the lung, heart, kidney, liver and spleen of mouse, when the contributions due to endothelial capture are accounted for. The effect of other cells (such as monocytes, etc.) do not improve the model predictions at steady state. We demonstrate the predictive utility of our model by predicting partitioning coefficients of functionalized NCs in mice and human tissues and report the statistical accuracy of our model predictions under different scenarios.

  11. Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: roles of protein expression and mechanical factors

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve selective targeting of affinity–ligand coated nanoparticles to the target tissue, it is essential to understand the key mechanisms that govern their capture by the target cell. Next-generation pharmacokinetic (PK) models that systematically account for proteomic and mechanical factors can accelerate the design, validation and translation of targeted nanocarriers (NCs) in the clinic. Towards this objective, we have developed a computational model to delineate the roles played by target protein expression and mechanical factors of the target cell membrane in determining the avidity of functionalized NCs to live cells. Model results show quantitative agreement with in vivo experiments when specific and non-specific contributions to NC binding are taken into account. The specific contributions are accounted for through extensive simulations of multivalent receptor–ligand interactions, membrane mechanics and entropic factors such as membrane undulations and receptor translation. The computed NC avidity is strongly dependent on ligand density, receptor expression, bending mechanics of the target cell membrane, as well as entropic factors associated with the membrane and the receptor motion. Our computational model can predict the in vivo targeting levels of the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1)-coated NCs targeted to the lung, heart, kidney, liver and spleen of mouse, when the contributions due to endothelial capture are accounted for. The effect of other cells (such as monocytes, etc.) do not improve the model predictions at steady state. We demonstrate the predictive utility of our model by predicting partitioning coefficients of functionalized NCs in mice and human tissues and report the statistical accuracy of our model predictions under different scenarios. PMID:27429783

  12. Investigation of Bonded Jacket Cable Insulation Failure Mechanisms: HELB Environment Results

    SciTech Connect

    L. Duncan

    2002-11-01

    When overaged from thermal or radiation environments, composite insulation composed of a layer of ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) covered with a bonded layer of chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE[Hypalon]) can crack if subjected to steam environments associated with loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The work described in this report evaluated the effects of a lesser accident, a high-energy line break (HELB), on the aged insulating materials. The object of the test was to determine if the same cracking concerns exist for the less severe HELB environment. The work is based on the use of aged specimens that were prepared under the test program described in EPRI report Investigation of Bonded Jacket Cable Insulation Failure Mechanisms (1001002).

  13. The effect of obesity on mechanical failure after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fessy, Michel-Henri

    2015-01-01

    “Increased aseptic tibial failures in patients with a BMI ≥35 and well-aligned total knee arthroplasties” published in The Journal of Arthroplasty on July 2, 2015 draws the conclusion that the risk of revision total knee arthroplasties (TKA) due to aseptic tibial component loosening is two times greater in patients with a BMI ≥35 kg/m2, independent of age or limb alignment. This result confirms that obese patients are at a higher risk of mechanical complications after performing TKA, independently from the risk of infection. This study suggests that the management of obese patients for TKA must be meticulous, careful, and should inspire from great bone deformations in valgus of varus when choosing implants. PMID:26697470

  14. An experimental study of the mechanism of failure of rocks under borehole jack loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van, T. K.; Goodman, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests with an experimental jack and an NX-borehole jack are reported. The following conclusions were made: Under borehole jack loading, a circular opening in a brittle solid fails by tensile fracturing when the bearing plate width is not too small. Two proposed contact stress distributions can explain the mechanism of tensile fracturing. The contact stress distribution factor is a material property which can be determined experimentally. The borehole tensile strength is larger than the rupture flexural strength. Knowing the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stress field, borehole jack test results can be used to determine the borehole tensile strength. Knowing the orientation of the in situ stress field and the flexural strength of the rock substance, the magnitude of the in situ stress components can be calculated. The detection of very small cracks is essential for the accurate determination of the failure loads which are used in the calculation of strengths and stress components.

  15. Acute respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation in pregnant patient: A narrative review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Pradeep Kumar; Biyani, Ghansham; Mohammed, Sadik; Sethi, Priyanka; Bihani, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Physiological changes of pregnancy imposes higher risk of acute respiratory failure (ARF) with even a slight insult and remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although pregnant women have different respiratory physiology and different causes of ARF, guidelines specific to ventilatory settings, goals of oxygenation and weaning process could not be framed due to lack of large-scale randomized controlled trials. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, pregnant women had higher morbidity and mortality compared to nonpregnant women. During this period, alternative strategies of ventilation such as high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, inhalational of nitric oxide, prone positioning, and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation were increasingly used as a desperate measure to rescue pregnant patients with severe hypoxemia who were not improving with conventional mechanical ventilation. This article highlights the causes of ARF and recent advances in invasive, noninvasive and alternative strategies of ventilation used during pregnancy. PMID:28096571

  16. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion.

  17. Cognitive Mechanisms in Chronic Tinnitus: Psychological Markers of a Failure to Switch Attention

    PubMed Central

    Trevis, Krysta J.; McLachlan, Neil M.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The cognitive mechanisms underpinning chronic tinnitus (CT; phantom auditory perceptions) are underexplored but may reflect a failure to switch attention away from a tinnitus sound. Here, we investigated a range of components that influence the ability to switch attention, including cognitive control, inhibition, working memory and mood, on the presence and severity of CT. Our participants with tinnitus showed significant impairments in cognitive control and inhibition as well as lower levels of emotional well-being, compared to healthy-hearing participants. Moreover, the subjective cognitive complaints of tinnitus participants correlated with their emotional well-being whereas complaints in healthy participants correlated with objective cognitive functioning. Combined, cognitive control and depressive symptoms correctly classified 67% of participants. These results demonstrate the core role of cognition in CT. They also provide the foundations for a neurocognitive account of the maintenance of tinnitus, involving impaired interactions between the neurocognitive networks underpinning attention-switching and mood. PMID:27605920

  18. Comparative Role of Disc Degeneration and Ligament Failure on Functional Mechanics of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Shaw, Miranda N.; Giambini, Hugo; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spinal kinematics is essential for distinguishing between pathological conditions of spine disorders, which ultimately lead to low back pain. It’s of high importance to understand how changes in mechanical properties affect the response of the lumbar spine, specifically in an effort to differentiate those associated with disc degeneration from ligamentous changes, allowing for more precise treatment strategies. To do this the goals of this study were twofold: 1) develop and validate a finite element (FE) model of the lumbar spine and 2) systematically alter the properties of the intervertebral disc and ligaments to define respective roles in functional mechanics. A three-dimensional non-linear FE model of the lumbar spine (L3-Sacrum) was developed and validated for pure moment bending. Disc degeneration and sequential ligament failure was modeled. Intersegmental range of motion (ROM) and bending stiffness was measured. The prediction of the FE model to moment loading in all three planes of bending showed very good agreement, where global and intersegmental ROM and bending stiffness of the model fell within one standard deviation of the in vitro results. Degeneration decreased ROM for all directions. Stiffness increased for all directions except axial rotation, where it initially increased then decreased for moderate and severe degeneration, respectively. Incremental ligament failure produced increased ROM and decreased stiffness. This effect was much more pronounced for all directions except lateral bending, which is minimally impacted by ligaments. These results indicate that lateral bending may be more apt to detect the subtle changes associated with degeneration, without being masked by associated changes of surrounding stabilizing structures. PMID:26404463

  19. Deglacial temperature patterns in the Arabian Sea and mechanisms for Indian monsoon failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J. E.; Pausata, F. S. R.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Both paleoclimate data and climate model simulations demonstrate that the Indian monsoon system responds to remote coolings in the North Atlantic. The textbook examples are the stadial events associated with the last deglaciation — the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Stadial 1 — when the monsoon weakened dramatically and caused drying throughout the Indian Ocean rim. The mechanism by which the North Atlantic influences the monsoon system is not completely clear: locally cool SSTs, increases in continental albedo, and southward migration of the intertropical convergence zone have all been raised as possibilities. Here we synthesize biomarker and foraminiferal estimates of temperature to study the evolution of the Arabian Sea water column during the deglaciation and test hypotheses of monsoon failure during stadials. Alkenone and Mg/Ca data clearly indicate that the Arabian Sea cools during the YD and H1, although H1 cooling is partly obscured by the overall warming trend associated with orbital forcing and rising greenhouse gases. In contrast, TEX86 data record warmings during the YD and H1. The stark difference between the TEX86 response and the alkenone and foraminiferal data, as well as comparison with climate model simulations, indicates that TEX86 is most likely acting as a subsurface temperature proxy in the Arabian Sea over these timescales. Taken together, the paleoclimate data describe a pattern of surface cooling and subsurface warming in response to North Atlantic cooling. This oceanographic response is in excellent agreement with both timeslice and transient model simulations spanning the last deglaciation, and strongly supports the hypothesis that locally cool SSTs are a requisite for monsoon failure. Furthermore, subsurface warming causes a destratification of the Arabian Sea water column and provides a mechanism for previously observed reductions in productivity during stadial events.

  20. Mechanisms of improvement of respiratory failure in patients with COPD treated with NIV

    PubMed Central

    Nickol, Annabel H; Hart, Nicholas; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Hamnegård, Carl-Hugo; Moxham, John; Simonds, Anita; Polkey, Michael I

    2008-01-01

    Background Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) improves gas-exchange and symptoms in selected chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure. We hypothesized NIV reverses respiratory failure by one or all of increased ventilatory response to carbon-dioxide, reduced respiratory muscle fatigue, or improved pulmonary mechanics. Methods Nineteen stable COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in one second 35% predicted) were studied at baseline (D0), 5–8 days (D5) and 3 months (3M) after starting NIV. Results Ventilator use was 6.2 (3.7) hours per night at D5 and 3.4 (1.6) at 3M (p = 0.12). Mean (SD) daytime arterial carbon-dioxide tension (PaCO2) was reduced from 7.4 (1.2) kPa to 7.0 (1.1) kPa at D5 and 6.5 (1.1) kPa at 3M (p = 0.001). Total lung capacity decreased from 107 (28) % predicted to 103 (28) at D5 and 103 (27) % predicted at 3M (p = 0.035). At D5 there was an increase in the hypercapnic ventilatory response and some volitional measures of inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength, but not isolated diaphragmatic strength whether assessed by volitional or nonvolitional methods. Conclusion These findings suggest decreased gas trapping and increased ventilatory sensitivity to CO2 are the principal mechanism underlying improvements in gas-exchange in patients with COPD following NIV. Changes in some volitional but not nonvolitional muscle strength measures may reflect improved patient effort. PMID:18990974

  1. Failure mechanisms of single-crystal silicon electrodes in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feifei; Song, Zhichao; Ross, Philip N; Somorjai, Gabor A; Ritchie, Robert O; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2016-06-14

    Long-term durability is a major obstacle limiting the widespread use of lithium-ion batteries in heavy-duty applications and others demanding extended lifetime. As one of the root causes of the degradation of battery performance, the electrode failure mechanisms are still unknown. In this paper, we reveal the fundamental fracture mechanisms of single-crystal silicon electrodes over extended lithiation/delithiation cycles, using electrochemical testing, microstructure characterization, fracture mechanics and finite element analysis. Anisotropic lithium invasion causes crack initiation perpendicular to the electrode surface, followed by growth through the electrode thickness. The low fracture energy of the lithiated/unlithiated silicon interface provides a weak microstructural path for crack deflection, accounting for the crack patterns and delamination observed after repeated cycling. On the basis of this physical understanding, we demonstrate how electrolyte additives can heal electrode cracks and provide strategies to enhance the fracture resistance in future lithium-ion batteries from surface chemical, electrochemical and material science perspectives.

  2. Failure mechanisms of single-crystal silicon electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feifei; Song, Zhichao; Ross, Philip N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2016-06-01

    Long-term durability is a major obstacle limiting the widespread use of lithium-ion batteries in heavy-duty applications and others demanding extended lifetime. As one of the root causes of the degradation of battery performance, the electrode failure mechanisms are still unknown. In this paper, we reveal the fundamental fracture mechanisms of single-crystal silicon electrodes over extended lithiation/delithiation cycles, using electrochemical testing, microstructure characterization, fracture mechanics and finite element analysis. Anisotropic lithium invasion causes crack initiation perpendicular to the electrode surface, followed by growth through the electrode thickness. The low fracture energy of the lithiated/unlithiated silicon interface provides a weak microstructural path for crack deflection, accounting for the crack patterns and delamination observed after repeated cycling. On the basis of this physical understanding, we demonstrate how electrolyte additives can heal electrode cracks and provide strategies to enhance the fracture resistance in future lithium-ion batteries from surface chemical, electrochemical and material science perspectives.

  3. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De’An; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-09-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  4. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De'an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-09-13

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  5. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De’an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft. PMID:27618989

  6. Failure mechanisms of single-crystal silicon electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feifei; Song, Zhichao; Ross, Philip N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Long-term durability is a major obstacle limiting the widespread use of lithium-ion batteries in heavy-duty applications and others demanding extended lifetime. As one of the root causes of the degradation of battery performance, the electrode failure mechanisms are still unknown. In this paper, we reveal the fundamental fracture mechanisms of single-crystal silicon electrodes over extended lithiation/delithiation cycles, using electrochemical testing, microstructure characterization, fracture mechanics and finite element analysis. Anisotropic lithium invasion causes crack initiation perpendicular to the electrode surface, followed by growth through the electrode thickness. The low fracture energy of the lithiated/unlithiated silicon interface provides a weak microstructural path for crack deflection, accounting for the crack patterns and delamination observed after repeated cycling. On the basis of this physical understanding, we demonstrate how electrolyte additives can heal electrode cracks and provide strategies to enhance the fracture resistance in future lithium-ion batteries from surface chemical, electrochemical and material science perspectives. PMID:27297565

  7. Mechanical properties and failure behaviors of the interface of hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride sheets

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet has been fabricated recently and verified to possess unusual physical properties. During the growth process, defects such as vacancies are unavoidably present at the interface between graphene and h-BN. In the present work, typical vacancy defects, which were located at the interface between graphene and h-BN, were studied by density functional theory. The interface structure, mechanical and electronic properties, and failure behavior of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet were investigated and compared. The results showed that the formation energy of the defective graphene/h-BN interface basically increased with increasing inflection angles. However, Young’s modulus for all graphene/h-BN systems studied decreased with the increase in inflection angles. The intrinsic strength of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheets was affected not only by the inflection angles, but also by the type of interface connection and the type of defects. The energy band structure of the hybrid interface could be tuned by applying mechanical strain to the systems. These results demonstrated that vacancies introduced significant effects on the mechanical and electronic properties of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet. PMID:27527371

  8. Edema mechanisms in the patient with heart failure and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-10-01

    Volume overload is a common accompanying feature of heart failure. The mechanistic basis for volume overload in heart failure is incompletely worked out. An important component of heart failure treatment remains diuretic therapy. Diuretic dosing remains as much an art as a science with multiple environmental and disease state-related factors influencing the efficiency with which a diuretic works. In heart failure, diuretics should always be given in the lowest possible dose with careful attention to reducing dietary sodium intake.

  9. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  10. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  11. Failure of Polyethelene Insert Locking Mechanism after a Posterior Stabilised Total Knee Arthroplasty- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, AY Gurava; Rajan, D Soundar; Chiranjeevi, T; Karthik, C; Kiran, E Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Disengagement of polyethylene insert used in total knee arthroplasty is a rare but serious complication. Still rarer is disengagement because of failure of tibial insert locking mechanism. We report a previously unpublished complication of polyethylene insert locking mechanism failure in a 10-months-old posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty in a 70-year-old woman with osteoarthritis for whom Attune (Depuy) knee implant was used. Case Presentation: A 70-year-old female underwent (Attune, Depuy) primary bilateral posterior stabilised total knee arthroplasty in a private hospital. The patient did not have any complaints and had had been functioning well post her arthroplasty. After five months of surgery she had a fall and sustained injury over right hip which was treated with Cemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty. Ten months after index surgery, she sustained trivial fall and presented to the same hospital with knee pain and swelling, where the right knee prosthesis was found to be dislocated. An attempted closed reduction under anaesthesia failed, after which she was referred to our centre with an unstable, painful, swollen right knee in a long knee brace. The physical examination at the time of admission showed posterior sag of the tibia, fullness in the postero-lateral corner, quadriceps muscle atrophy without any neurovascular deficit oflower leg. Postero-lateral dislocation was confirmed with radiographs. Surgical error as a possible causative factor was excluded because patient had been functioning well after surgery. Her comorbidities included hypertension and hyponatremia. ESR and CRP were within normal limits. An open reduction surgery was planned. On exposure, polyethylene was found in the postero-lateral corner of the knee. We were not sure that revising the polyethylene alone would suffice as the poly and locking mechanism was of a relatively new design and hence it was decided to proceed with revision of the components. Revision was done

  12. Environmental durability of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, Lawrence Michael

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the environmental durability of adhesively bonded aircraft joints using fracture mechanics. Three aerospace adhesives, two epoxies and one polyimide, were investigated. Adhesive specimens were tested for tensile and toughness behavior. Bonded joint specimens were subject to Mode I, Mode II, and mixed mode fracture and fatigue tests. Prior to testing, selected specimens were exposed for up to 10,000 hours to isothermal and thermally cyclic conditions similar to aircraft service environments. Analysis was accomplished using finite element programs and closed-form solutions. Environmental exposure caused reductions in the failure strain, strength, and toughness, of the adhesive specimens and in the toughness and fatigue threshold of the bonded joint specimens. Specimens exposed to high temperature and humidity prior to testing and those tested at low temperatures indicative of high altitude operations experienced the most significant toughness losses. Results are discussed in terms of their relationship to bonded joint design and should prove valuable to efforts aimed at extending the lives of aging aircraft using bonded repairs as well as to efforts focused on using adhesive bonding for future aerospace structures.

  13. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M M

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining.

  14. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining. PMID:26549926

  15. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining.

  16. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  17. Changes of Respiratory Mechanics in COPD Patients from Stable State to Acute Exacerbations with Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Ceriana, Piero; Vitacca, Michele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Paneroni, Mara; Pisani, Lara; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Symptoms, clinical course, functional and biological data during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EXCOPD) have been investigated, but data on physiological changes of respiratory mechanics during a severe exacerbation with respiratory acidosis requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of respiratory mechanics in COPD patients comparing data observed during EXCOPD with those observed during stable state in the recovery phase. In 18 COPD patients having severe EXCOPD requiring NIMV for global respiratory failure, we measured respiratory mechanics during both EXCOPD (T0) and once the patients achieved a stable state (T1). The diaphragm and inspiratory muscles effort was significantly increased under relapse, as well as the pressure-time product of the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscle (PTPdi and PTPes). The resistive loads to breathe (i.e., PEEPi,dyn, compliance and inspiratory resistances) were also markedly increased, while the maximal pressures generated by the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles, together with forced expired volumes were decreased. All these indices statistically improved but with a great intrasubject variability in stable condition. Moreover, tension-time index (TTdi) significantly improved from the EXCOPD state to the condition of clinical stability (0.156 ± 0.04 at T0 vs. 0.082 ± 0.02 at T1 p < 0.001). During an EXCOPD, the load/capacity of the respiratory pump is impaired, and although the patients exhibit a rapid shallow breathing pattern, this does not necessarily correlate with a TTdi ≥ 0.15. These changes are reverted once they recover from the EXCOPD, despite a large variability between patients.

  18. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  19. Interferometry of AlN-based microcantilevers to determine the material properties and failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, Christophe; Krupa, Katarzyna; Józwik, Michał

    2012-04-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, making a prediction of operational reliability difficult. Here, we investigate environmental effects on properties of piezoelectrically actuated microcantilevers, where AlN is used as actuation material. The environmental effects to be considered include thermal and humid cycling, as well as harsh electrical loading performed under normal conditions. Investigated properties are defined for the static and dynamic behavior of microcantilevers. A Twyman-Green interferometer, operating in both stroboscopic regime and time-average interferometry mode, is used as a metrology tool. The initial deflection and frequency changes of the first resonance mode of the microcantilevers are monitored during accelerated thermal aging tests, humidity tests, as well as harsh electrical loading and fatigue tests. Finally, the resonant fatigue tests accelerated by application of a high voltage are accomplished to evaluate a lifetime of microcantilevers. Monitoring the micromechanical behaviors of devices driven by AlN during the lifetime tests assists monitoring of their long-term stability. FEM calculation is used to identify critical areas of stress concentration in the cantilever structure and to further explain various failure mechanisms.

  20. Mechanisms of decompensation and organ failure in cirrhosis: From peripheral arterial vasodilation to systemic inflammation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Mauro; Moreau, Richard; Angeli, Paolo; Schnabl, Bernd; Arroyo, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral arterial vasodilation hypothesis has been most influential in the field of cirrhosis and its complications. It has given rise to hundreds of pathophysiological studies in experimental and human cirrhosis and is the theoretical basis of life-saving treatments. It is undisputed that splanchnic arterial vasodilation contributes to portal hypertension and is the basis for manifestations such as ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, but the body of research generated by the hypothesis has revealed gaps in the original pathophysiological interpretation of these complications. The expansion of our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating vascular tone, inflammation and the host-microbiota interaction require a broader approach to advanced cirrhosis encompassing the whole spectrum of its manifestations. Indeed, multiorgan dysfunction and failure likely result from a complex interplay where the systemic spread of bacterial products represents the primary event. The consequent activation of the host innate immune response triggers endothelial molecular mechanisms responsible for arterial vasodilation, and also jeopardizes organ integrity with a storm of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Thus, the picture of advanced cirrhosis could be seen as the result of an inflammatory syndrome in contradiction with a simple hemodynamic disturbance.

  1. Numerical modeling of the failure mechanisms in silicon thin film anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Siddharth H.

    2011-12-01

    In recent times, the demand for the storage of electrical energy has grown rapidly for both static applications and the portable electronics enforcing the substantial improvement in battery systems, and Li-ion batteries have been proven to have maximum energy storage density in all rechargeable batteries. However, major breakthroughs are required to consummate the requirement of higher energy density with lower cost to penetrate new markets. Graphite anode having limited capacity has become a bottle neck in the process of developing next generation batteries and can be replaced by higher capacity metals such as Silicon. In the present study we are focusing on the mechanical behavior of the Si-thin film anode under various operating conditions. A numerical model is developed to simulate the intercalation induced stress and the failure mechanism of the complex anode structure. Effect of the various physical phenomena such as diffusion induced stress, plasticity and the crack propagation are investigated to predict better performance parameters for improved design.

  2. Enhanced dielectric standoff and mechanical failure in field-structured composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Tigges, Chris P.; Anderson, Robert A.; Odinek, Judy

    1999-09-01

    We report dielectric breakdown experiments on electric-field-structured composites of high-dielectric-constant BaTiO3 particles in an epoxy resin. These experiments show a significant increase in the dielectric standoff strength perpendicular to the field structuring direction, relative to control samples consisting of randomly dispersed particles. To understand the relation of this observation to microstructure, we apply a simple resistor-short breakdown model to three-dimensional composite structures generated from a dynamical simulation. In this breakdown model the composite material is assumed to conduct primarily through particle contacts, so the simulated structures are mapped onto a resistor network where the center of mass of each particle is a node that is connected to neighboring nodes by resistors of fixed resistance that irreversibly short to perfect conductors when the current reaches a threshold value. This model gives relative breakdown voltages that are in good agreement with experimental results. Finally, we consider a primitive model of the mechanical strength of a field-structured composite material, which is a current-driven, conductor-insulator fuse model. This model leads to a macroscopic fusing behavior and can be related to mechanical failure of the composite.

  3. Enhanced dielectric standoff and mechanical failure in field-structured composites

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Tigges, C.P.; Anderson, R.A.; Odinek, J.

    1999-09-01

    We report dielectric breakdown experiments on electric-field-structured composites of high-dielectric-constant BaTiO{sub 3} particles in an epoxy resin. These experiments show a significant increase in the dielectric standoff strength perpendicular to the field structuring direction, relative to control samples consisting of randomly dispersed particles. To understand the relation of this observation to microstructure, we apply a simple {ital resistor-short breakdown model} to three-dimensional composite structures generated from a dynamical simulation. In this breakdown model the composite material is assumed to conduct primarily through particle contacts, so the simulated structures are mapped onto a resistor network where the center of mass of each particle is a node that is connected to neighboring nodes by resistors of fixed resistance that irreversibly short to perfect conductors when the current reaches a threshold value. This model gives relative breakdown voltages that are in good agreement with experimental results. Finally, we consider a primitive model of the mechanical strength of a field-structured composite material, which is a current-driven, {ital conductor-insulator fuse model}. This model leads to a macroscopic fusing behavior and can be related to mechanical failure of the composite. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for th