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Sample records for adhesive joint development

  1. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  2. Analysis of adhesively bonded composite lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.; Kuruppu, M.; Kelly, D.

    1994-12-31

    A new nonlinear formulation is developed for the governing equations for the shear and peel stresses in adhesively bonded composite double lap joints. The new formulation allows arbitrary nonlinear stress-strain characteristics in both shear and peel behavior. The equations are numerically integrated using a shooting technique and Newton-Raphson method behind a user friendly interface. The failure loads are predicted by utilizing the maximum stress criterion, interlaminar delamination and the energy density failure criteria. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effect of the nonlinear adhesive behavior on the stress distribution and predict the failure load and the associated mode.

  3. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  4. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  5. The analysis of adhesively bonded advanced composite joints using joint finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  6. The Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Advanced Composite Joints Using Joint Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  7. Stress analysis of adhesive bonded stiffener plates and double joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The general problem of adhesive bonded stiffener plates and double joints of dissimilar orthotropic adherends with transverse shear deformations are analyzed. Adhesive layers are assumed to be of an isotropic, elastic and relatively flexible material. It is shown that the stress distributions in the adhesive layers are very much dependent on the bending deformations in adherends. Also, it is found that, in the adhesive layer, maximum transverse normal stress is, in many cases, larger than the longitudinal shear stress and that both occur at the edge of the joint. The general method of solution developed is applied to several practical examples.

  8. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper an adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  9. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1980-01-01

    An adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads, namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  10. Adhesive Bonding Characterization of Composite Joints for Cryogenic Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Schieleit, Gregory F.; Biggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite cryogenic tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future reusable launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW). This weight reduction is possible due to the large reduction in weight that composite materials can provide over current aluminum technology. In addition to composite technology, adhesively bonded joints potentially have several benefits over mechanically fastened joints, such as weight savings and cryogenic fluid containment. Adhesively bonded joints may be used in several areas of these cryogenic tanks, such as in lobe-to-lobe joints (in a multi-lobe concept), skirt-to-tank joint, strut-to-tank joint, and for attaching stringers and ring frames. The bonds, and the tanks themselves, must be able to withstand liquid cryogenic fuel temperatures that they contain. However, the use of adhesively bonded composite joints at liquid oxygen and hydrogen temperatures is largely unknown and must be characterized. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Michoud Operations performed coupon-level tests to determine effects of material selection, cure process parameters, substrate surface preparation, and other factors on the strength of these composite joints at cryogenic temperatures. This led to the selection of a material and process that would be suitable for a cryogenic tank. KEY WORDS: Composites, Adhesive Bonding, Cryogenics

  11. Adhesive-bonded scarf and stepped-lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Continuum mechanics solutions are derived for the static load-carrying capacity of scarf and stepped-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses account for adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch. The scarf joint solutions include a simple algebraic formula which serves as a close lower bound, within a small fraction of a per cent of the true answer for most practical geometries and materials. Digital computer programs were developed and, for the stepped-lap joints, the critical adherend and adhesive stresses are computed for each step. The scarf joint solutions exhibit grossly different behavior from that for double-lap joints for long overlaps inasmuch as that the potential bond shear strength continues to increase with indefinitely long overlaps on the scarf joints. The stepped-lap joint solutions exhibit some characteristics of both the scarf and double-lap joints. The stepped-lap computer program handles arbitrary (different) step lengths and thickness and the solutions obtained have clarified potentially weak design details and the remedies. The program has been used effectively to optimize the joint proportions.

  12. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    The final report consists of 5 published papers in referred journals and a technical letter to the technical monitor. These papers include the following: (1) Comparison of the effects of debonds and voids in adhesive; (2) On the peak shear stresses in adhesive joints with voids; (3) Nondestructive evaluation of adhesively bonded joints by acousto-ultrasonic technique and acoustic emission; (4) Multiaxial fatigue life evaluation of tubular adhesively bonded joints; (5) Theoretical and experimental evaluation of the bond strength under peeling loads. The letter outlines the progress of the research. Also included is preliminary information on the study of nondestructive evaluation of composite materials subjected to localized heat damage. The investigators studied the effects of localized heat on unidirectional fiber glass epoxy composite panels. Specimens of the fiber glass epoxy composites were subjected to 400 C heat for varying lengths of time. The specimens were subjected to nondestructive tests. The specimens were then pulled to their failure and acoustic emission of these specimens were measured. The analysis of the data was continuing as of the writing of the letter, and includes a finite element stress analysis of the problem.

  14. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  15. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dattaguru, B.; Everett, R. A., Jr.; Whitcomb, J. D.; Johnson, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis of cohesive failure in typical joints is presented. Cracked-lap-shear joints were chosen for analysis. Results obtained from linear and nonlinear analysis show that nonlinear effects, due to large rotations, significantly affect the calculated mode 1, crack opening, and mode 2, inplane shear, strain-energy-release rates. The ratio of the mode 1 to mode 2 strain-energy-relase rates (G1/G2) was found to be strongly affected by he adhesive modulus and the adherend thickness. The ratios between 0.2 and 0.8 can be obtained by varying adherend thickness and using either a single or double cracked-lap-shear specimen configuration. Debond growth rate data, together with the analysis, indicate that mode 1 strain-energy-release rate governs debond growth. Results from the present analysis agree well with experimentally measured joint opening displacements.

  16. Ultrasonic Guided Wave Inspection of Adhesive Joints: a Parametric Study for a Step-Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthillath, Padma Kumar; Kannajosyula, Haraprasad; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Adhesively bonded joints are used to connect structural members in aircraft. When subject to loads and environmental conditions these joints undergo deterioration. Being load bearing members, it becomes critical to develop reliable and non-destructive methods for inspecting these adhesive joints. Ultrasonic guided waves, with their mode and frequency tuning possibilities, form an attractive tool for such inspections. Guided wave behavior as observed through dispersion phenomena is dependent on the waveguide dimensions. Since actual structural joints in aircraft involve adherends of different thicknesses and materials, and joints of varied overlap lengths, a robust inspection methodology needs to be tunable for all conditions. A parametric study showing the effect that some key joint parameters, that is the thickness of the adhesive, overlap length, and material parameters, have on the ultrasonic guided wave behavior is presented in this paper. In addition, the influence of defects like cohesive weakness, delamination and kissing bonds and their location on guided wave propagation is investigated. The transmission of ultrasonic guided wave energy is used as a guideline to select optimal conditions for joint inspection.

  17. Evaluation of polyaryl adhesives in elastomer-stainless steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Carciello, N.; Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1992-10-01

    Polyaryl thermoplastic adhesives (polyetheretherketone, PEEK, polyphenylene sulfide PPS, polyphenylethersulfone, PES) were evaluated for ability to bond elastomer to metal for use in geothermal environments. Strength of elastomer-to-metal joints adhesives blends (such as in drill pipe or casing protectors) were determined using peel tests. Parameters involved in making the joints were temperature, time and atmosphere, in addition to type of adhesive. Physical chemical analyses have aided endeavors to determine the cause of adhesion failure in the joint: differential thermal analyses, thermal gravimetric analyses, infrared spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Tests showed that joints made of adhesive blends which contained greater than 50% PES survived simulated geothermal conditions (200C, water vapor pressure 200 psi) for weeks without significant decrease in peel strength. Chemical components of the adhesive appear to be highly stable under the conditions required to make the joints and in subsequent exposure to the simulated geothermal environment.

  18. The effect of bending on the stresses in adhesive joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of stress distribution in adhesive joints where two orthotropic plates are bonded through a flexible adhesive layer is analyzed. It is shown that the effect of bending of the adherends on the stresses in the adhesive layer is very significant. The transverse shear deformations of the adherends appear to have little influence on the adhesive layer stresses. The maximum transverse normal stress in the adhesive is shown to be larger than the maximum longitudinal shear stress. The method of solution is applied to several examples of specific joint geometries and material combinations, and is proven to be applicable to other related problems.

  19. Time-temperature effect in adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    The viscoelastic analysis of an adhesively bonded lap joint was reconsidered. The adherends are approximated by essentially Reissner plates and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. The hereditary integrals are used to model the adhesive. A linear integral differential equations system for the shear and the tensile stress in the adhesive is applied. The equations have constant coefficients and are solved by using Laplace transforms. It is shown that if the temperature variation in time can be approximated by a piecewise constant function, then the method of Laplace transforms can be used to solve the problem. A numerical example is given for a single lap joint under various loading conditions.

  20. Ultrasonic inspection of adhesive joints of composite pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeidaa, Priscila Duarte; Alcoforado Rebello, João Marcos; Pereira, Gabriela Ribeiro; Soares, Sérgio Damasceno; Fernandez, Roman

    2014-02-01

    Composite pipelines are an attractive solution when traditional materials are not suitable for this purpose, which happens frequently at aggressive environments and also where the structural weight is a limiting factor. This work studies the application of the ultrasonic technique at the detection of defects as lack of adhesive and lack of adhesion, commonly found in adhesive joints of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) pipelines applied at onshore and offshore facilities. Computational simulations were conducted in CIVA 11software (beta version) in order to obtain the best possible configuration for the inspections, applying the pulse-echo technique. Experimental results were compared to these simulations and several transducers were tested. An inspection methodology and reference blocks were developed for the calibration of the inspections. Some samples were selected for cutting in order to compare the ultrasonic results and the real condition of the joints. Results show that smaller frequencies are suitable for the inspection of this material and focused probes present more accurate results.

  1. Automation Tools for Finite Element Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article presents two new automation creation tools that obtain stresses and strains (Shear and peel) in adhesively bonded joints. For a given adhesively bonded joint Finite Element model, in which the adhesive is characterised using springs, these automation tools read the corresponding input and output files, use the spring forces and deformations to obtain the adhesive stresses and strains, sort the stresses and strains in descending order, and generate plot files for 3D visualisation of the stress and strain fields. Grids (nodes) and elements can be numbered in any order that is convenient for the user. Using the automation tools, trade-off studies, which are needed for design of adhesively bonded joints, can be performed very quickly.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations on adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negru, R.; Marsavina, L.; Hluscu, M.

    2016-04-01

    Two types of adhesively bonded joints were experimental and numerical investigated. Firstly, the adhesives were characterized through a set of tests and the main elastic and mechanical properties were obtained. After that, the stress distributions at interface and middle of adhesive layer were determined using a linear elastic FEA. The numerical data were fitted by a power law in order to determine the critical values of intensity of stress singularity.

  3. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  4. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  5. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  6. Elastic-plastic analysis of crack in ductile adhesive joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Toru; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Akira; Munakata, Tsuyoshi

    1995-11-01

    The fracture of a crack in adhesive is important to the structural integrity of adhesive structures and composite materials. Though the fracture toughness of a material should be constant according to fracture mechanics, it is said that the fracture toughness of a crack in an adhesive joint depends on the bond thickness. In the present study, the elastic-plastic stress analyses of a crack in a thin adhesive layer are performed by the combination of the boundary element method and the finite element method. The effect of adhesive thickness on the J-integral, the Q`-factor which is a modified version of the Q-factor, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) are investigated. It is found from the analyses that the CTOD begins to decrease at very thin bond thickness, the Q`-factor being almost constant. The decrease of the fracture toughness at very thin adhesive layer is expected by the present analysis.

  7. A Diagram for Evaluating Delamination of GFRP/Stainless-steel Adhesive Joints by Using Stress Singularity Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Masaaki

    Static tests on double-lap and T-type adhesive joints were performed. We developed a device that applies contact pressure to glass-fiber reinforced plastics/stainless-steel double-lap adhesive joints. The device contains a bolt with which a strain gauge is bonded for controlling contact pressure. Using this device, we investigated the effect of contact pressure on the delamination strength of double-lap adhesive joints. We applied tensile shear loading to double-lap adhesive joints under contact pressure to their adhesive interfaces. We found that the delamination strength of the double-lap adhesive joints increased with increasing contact pressure. On the contrary, when we applied compressive shear stress to them, the delamination strength stayed constant. Therefore the delamination strength of double-lap adhesive joints is dominated by normal stress when contact pressure under tensile shear loading is applied. On the other hand, it was dominated by shear stress when contact pressure under compressive shear loading was applied. Then stress singularity parameters for double-lap and T-type adhesive joints were performed by the FEM. Stress distributions near the bonding edge could be expressed by the stress singularity parameters. Finally, a delamination evaluation diagram using stress singularity parameters was developed. This diagram enables us to evaluate the delamination strength of adhesive joints.

  8. A comprehensive assessment of adhesively bonded joints between sandwich composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, Khaled Omar

    Assessment of adhesively bonded joints between sandwich composite beams are presented in this thesis in three parts, each is concerned with a distinct aspect of the joint behaviour. In physical order, these include the deformations of the entire joint assembly, the state of stress in the joint overlap region, and the strain energy release at the crack-tip at the end of the overlap. Analytical models developed in this thesis, however, are not limited in their application to adhesive joint between sandwich beams. In each part of this thesis, the integrity of the proposed analytical models are tested against geometrically non-linear finite element models. In this first part of this thesis, an analytical asymptotic model is presented for the analysis of balanced and unbalanced adhesively bonded joints. The model takes advantage of the asymptotic nature of the adhesive stress functions by eliminating exponentially small terms. Analysis of balanced and unbalanced adhesive joints is greatly simplified with negligible loss in accuracy. Accurate closed-form solutions for both adhesive peel and shear stresses are presented, providing an efficient analysis and design tool and a significant contribution to the literature on unbalanced adhesively bonded joints. In the second part, the asymptotic model is extended to the analysis of strain energy release rates in adhesively bonded joints, using the crack closure concept. Closed-form expressions are presented for various joint types. The shear force and adhesive layer effects are included in the analysis, thus improving on currently available works in the literature. In joints with a long crack and a thin adhesive layer, the asymptotic model is shown to be in good agreement with classical beam theory models. In the third part, deformations in adhesively bonded joints between sandwich beams are studied. Adherends are modeled as cylindrically bent plates on elastic foundations and the overlap section is treated as a single

  9. Deformations and strains in adhesive joints by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Wood, J.; John, D.; Lubowinski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Displacement fields in a thick adherend lap joint and a cracked lap shear specimen were measured by high sensitivity moire interferometry. Contour maps of in-plane U and V displacements were obtained across adhesive and adherent surfaces. Loading sequences ranged from modest loads to near-failure loads. Quantitative results are given for displacements and certain strains in the adhesive and along the adhesive/adherend boundary lines. The results show nonlinear displacements and strains as a function of loads or stresses and they show viscoelastic or time-dependent response. Moire interferometry is an excellent method for experimental studies of adhesive joint performance. Subwavelength displacement resolution of a few micro-inches, and spatial resolution corresponding to 1600 fringes/inch (64 fringes/mm), were obtained in these studies. The whole-field contour maps offer insights not available from local measurements made by high sensitivity gages.

  10. A fracture mechanics approach for designing adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if the adhesive debond initiation stress could be predicted for arbitrary joint geometries. The analysis was based upon a threshold total strain-energy-release rate (Gth) concept. Two bonded systems were tested: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with either EC-3445 or FM-300 adhesive. The Gth for each adhesive was determined from cracked-lap-shear (CLS) specimens by initiation tests. Finite-element analyses of various tapered CLS specimen geometries predicted the specimen stress at which the total strain-energy-release rate (GT) equaled Gth at the joint tip. Experiments verified the predictions. The approach described herein predicts the maximum stress at which an adhesive joint can be cycled yet not debond. Furthermore, total strain-energy-release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding and debond initiation in structural adhesives. In addition, debond initiation and growth were found to occur with virtually no peel stress present.

  11. Structural Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Fady

    In recent years, many aerospace organizations have researched and implemented composite materials to achieve better fuel efficiency as well as reduced maintenance cost. In addition to the use of composites, manufacturers are investigating the use of adhesive bonded joints and composite patch bonded repairs to extend the life of their in-service aircraft. Adhesive joints are superior to traditional mechanical fasteners as they reduce stress concentration zones and overall part count. However, the integrity of an adhesive joint is difficult to inspect. Inspection of adhesive joints may be carried out using interrogation technology such as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This thesis focuses on the evaluation of Acoustic-Ultrasonic (AU) SHM technique for the detection of crack and disbond growth. In addition to AU, Capacitance Disbond Detection Technique (CDDT) and the Surface Mountable Crack Detection System (SMCDS) were evaluated for the detection disbonds. Results of the AU system demonstrated that AU technology may be used to detect and quantify crack and disbond growth. It was also found that SMCDS and CDDT both complement each other, as SMCDS identified the location of disbond while CDDT quantify disbond.

  12. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  13. Stresses in adhesively bonded joints - A closed-form solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Aydinoglu, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The general plane strain problem of adhesively bonded structures consisting of two different, orthotropic adherends is considered, under the assumption that adherend thicknesses are constant and small in relation to the lateral dimensions of the bonded region, so that they may be treated as plates. The problem is reduced to a system of differential equations for the adhesive stresses which is solved in closed form, with a single lap joint and a stiffened plate under various loading conditions being considered as examples. It is found that the plate theory used in the analysis not only predicts the correct trend for adhesive stresses but gives surprisingly accurate results, the solution being obtained by assuming linear stress-strain relations for the adhesive.

  14. Mechanical behavior of adhesive joints subjected to cyclic thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Humfeld, G.R.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stresses induced in bimaterial systems due to changing temperature has been the subject of much study since the publication of Timoshenko`s classic paper of 1925. An adhesive bond is one example of a bimaterial system in which thermal stress can play an important role. However, adhesives are viscoelastic in nature, and their mechanical behavior is dictated by the temperature- and time-dependence of their material properties; analytical solutions for elastic materials do not adequately describe their true behavior. The effect of the adhesive`s viscoelasticity on stress in an adhesive bond subjected to changing temperature is therefore of compelling interest and importance for the adhesives industry. The objective of this research is to develop an understanding of the viscoelastic effect in an adhesive bond subjected to cycling temperature, particularly when the temperature range spans a transition temperature of the adhesive. Numerical modeling of a simplified geometry was first undertaken to isolate the influence of viscoelasticity on the stress state from any particular specimen geometry effect. Finite element modeling was then undertaken to examine the mechanical behavior of the adhesive in a layered geometry. Both solution methods predicted development of residual tensile stresses in the adhesive. For the layered geometry this was found to correspond with residual tensile peel stresses, which are thought to be the cause of interfacial debonding.

  15. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  16. Metalized nanotube tips improve through thickness thermal conductivity in adhesive joints.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Sihn, Sangwook; Roy, Ajit K; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2009-03-01

    The through-thickness thermal conductivity in conventional adhesive joints (of approximately 0.3 W/m-K) fails to meet the thermal load transfer requirement in numerous applications to enable lean manufacturing and improve system reliability to thermal load. Carbon nanotubes are known to possess extremely high thermal conductivity along the longitudinal axis. According to molecular dynamics simulations, the value can be as high as 3500 W/m-K at room temperature for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Meanwhile, the transverse thermal conductivity perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the MWCNTs is known to be relatively low, approximately 10-15 W/m-K. Existing studies of mixing the MWCNTs in polymers for adhesive joints only achieved minimal enhancement in the thermal conductivity and failed to satisfy the thermal property requirement for the adhesive joints. In order to properly utilize the superior axial thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs, vertically aligned MWCNTs have been used in this study and incorporated in the adhesive joint configuration. Analytical parametric study was conducted to identify critical parameters that affect the overall thermal conductivity of the joint and to provide guidelines for the process development. The process development involved growing the vertically aligned MWCNTs on silicon wafers. The aligned nanotube array was partially infused with epoxy adhesive. Selective reactive ion etching of the epoxy revealed the nanotube tips. In order to reduce the impedance mismatch and phonon scattering at the interface between the nanotube tips and the adherends, gold was thermally evaporated on the nanotube tips. The measured thermal conductivity of the adhesive joint device incorporating the MWCNTs was 262 W/m-K, which is significantly larger compared to that of less than 1 W/m-K without the MWCNTs. PMID:19435032

  17. Damage state evaluation of adhesive composite joints using chaotic ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasonic chaotic excitations combined with sensor prediction algorithms have shown the ability to identify incipient damage (loss of preload) in a bolted joint. In this study we examine the capability of this damage detection scheme to identify disbonds and poorly cured bonds in a composite-to-composite adhesive joint. The test structure consists of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) plate that has been bonded to a CFRP rectangular tube/spar with several sizes of disbond as well as a poorly cured section. Each excitation signal is imparted to the CFRP plate through a macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch on one side of the adhesive joint and sensed using an equivalent MFC patch on the opposite side of the joint. A novel statistical classification feature is developed from information theory concepts of cross-prediction and interdependence. Temperature dependence of this newly developed feature will also be examined.

  18. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  19. Analysis Method for Inelastic, Adhesively Bonded Joints with Anisotropic Adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Klang, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional analysis method for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives with nonlinear material behavior is presented in the proposed paper. The strain and resulting stress field in a general, bonded joint overlap are determined by using a variable-step, finite-difference solution algorithm to iteratively solve a system of first-order differential equations. Applied loading is given by a system of combined extensional, bending, and shear forces that are applied to the edge of the joint overlap. Adherends are assumed to behave as linear, cylindrically bent plates using classical laminated plate theory that includes the effects of first-order transverse shear deformation. Using the deformation theory of plasticity and a modified von-Mises yield criterion, inelastic material behavior is modeled in the adhesive layer. Results for the proposed method are verified against previous results from the literature and shown to be in excellent agreement. An additional case that highlights the effects of transverse shear deformation between similar adherends is also presented.

  20. Nanotube Reinforcement of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Saltysiak, Bethany

    2002-01-01

    Over the past five years there has been much excitement about the development of nanotubes and nanofibers and the potential that these materials may offer in enhancing electrical and mechanical properties of systems. The purpose of this paper is to present research into improving the mechanical performance of polymers by using nanofibers as a reinforcement to make high performance composite materials. This paper will present theoretical predictions of the composite modulus and then present the actual performance of the composite. Fabrication details will be given along with photos of the microstructure. The matrix material is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and the nanofibers are vapor-grown carbon nanofibers produced by Pyrograph Products, Inc.

  1. Nanotube Reinforcement of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Saltysiak, Bethany

    2003-01-01

    Over the past five years there has been much excitement about the development of nanotubes and nanofibers and the potential that these materials may offer in enhancing electrical and mechanical properties of systems. The purpose of this paper is to present research into improving the mechanical performance of polymers by using nanofibers as a reinforcement to make high performance composite materials. This paper will present theoretical predictions of the composite modulus and then present the actual performance of the composite. Fabrication details will be given along with photos of the microstructure. The matrix material is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and the nanofibers are vapor-grown carbon nanofibers produced by Pyrograph Products, Inc.

  2. Numerical solutions for heat flow in adhesive lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, P. A.; Winfree, William P.

    1992-01-01

    The present formulation for the modeling of heat transfer in thin, adhesively bonded lap joints precludes difficulties associated with large aspect ratio grids required by standard FEM formulations. This quasi-static formulation also reduces the problem dimensionality (by one), thereby minimizing computational requirements. The solutions obtained are found to be in good agreement with both analytical solutions and solutions from standard FEM programs. The approach is noted to yield a more accurate representation of heat-flux changes between layers due to a disbond.

  3. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  4. Torsional Stiffness Verification of an Adhesively Bonded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annicchiarico, A.; Caputo, F.; De Angelis, G.; Frascà, F.; Lamanna, G.

    2010-06-01

    In the present work numerical-experimental analysis for the characterization of a structural adhesive has been performed. The numerical analysis has been carried out through the finite element method by using, for the phases pre / post processing were used commercial programs while for the phase of numerical solution the Abaqus code was used. The experimental analyses were carried out at laboratories of C.R.F. S.C.p.A. by using of a standard quasi static testing machine. Later numerical analysis was performed comparing the torsional stiffness of a vehicle in which the welded connection between the pavilion and the flank has been substituted by bonded one. This comparison has allowed to demonstrate the ability of the bonded joint discussed to provide mechanical performances comparable with those of a welded joint widely used in the automotive industry.

  5. A method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for joint repair applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tissue adhesives are useful means for various medical procedures. Since varying requirements cause that a single adhesive cannot meet all needs, bond strength testing remains one of the key applications used to screen for new products and study the influence of experimental variables. This study was conducted to develop an easy to use method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for tissue engineering applications. Method Tissue grips were designed to facilitate the reproducible production of substrate tissue and adhesive strength measurements in universal testing machines. Porcine femoral condyles were used to generate osteochondral test tissue cylinders (substrates) of different shapes. Viability of substrates was tested using PI/FDA staining. Self-bonding properties were determined to examine reusability of substrates (n = 3). Serial measurements (n = 5) in different operation modes (OM) were performed to analyze the bonding strength of tissue adhesives in bone (OM-1) and cartilage tissue either in isolation (OM-2) or under specific requirements in joint repair such as filling cartilage defects with clinical applied fibrin/PLGA-cell-transplants (OM-3) or tissues (OM-4). The efficiency of the method was determined on the basis of adhesive properties of fibrin glue for different assembly times (30 s, 60 s). Seven randomly generated collagen formulations were analyzed to examine the potential of method to identify new tissue adhesives. Results Viability analysis of test tissue cylinders revealed vital cells (>80%) in cartilage components even 48 h post preparation. Reuse (n = 10) of test substrate did not significantly change adhesive characteristics. Adhesive strength of fibrin varied in different test settings (OM-1: 7.1 kPa, OM-2: 2.6 kPa, OM-3: 32.7 kPa, OM-4: 30.1 kPa) and was increasing with assembly time on average (2.4-fold). The screening of the different collagen formulations revealed a substance with significant higher adhesive

  6. Optimal tubular adhesive-bonded lap joint of the carbon fiber epoxy composite shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki S.; Kim, Won T.; Lee, Dai G.; Jun, Eui J.

    The effects of the adhesive thickness and the adherend surface roughness on the fatigue strength of a tubular adhesive-bonded single lap joint were investigated using fatigue test specimens whose adherends were made of S45C carbon steel. Results of fatigue tests showed that the optimal arithmetic surface roughness of the adherends is about 2 microns and the optimal adhesive thickness is about 0.15 mm. Using these values, the prototype torsional adhesive joints were manufactured for power transmission shafts of an automotive vehicle or a small helicopter, and static tests under torque were performed on a single-lap joint, a single-lap joint with scarf, a double-lap joint, and a double-lap joint with scarf. It was found that the double-lap joint was superior among the joints, in terms of torque capacity and manufacturing cost.

  7. Durability of polyimide adhesives and their bonded joints for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvatareddy, Hari

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and develop an understanding of durability of an adhesive bonded system, for application in a future high speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft structure. The system under study was comprised of Ti-6Al-4V metal adherends and a thermosetting polyimide adhesive, designated as FM-5, supplied by Cytec Engineered Materials, Inc. An approach based on fracture mechanics was employed to assess Ti-6Al-4V/FM-5 bond durability. Initially, wedge tests were utilized to find a durable surface pretreatment for the titanium adherends. Based on an extensive screening study, chromic acid anodization (CAA) was chosen as the standard pretreatment for this research project. Double cantilever beam specimens (DCB) were then made and aged at 150sp°C, 177sp°C, and 204sp°C in three different environments; ambient atmospheric air (14.7 psia), and reduced air pressures of 2 psia (13.8 KPa) and 0.2 psia (1.38 KPa). Joints were aged for up to 18 months (including several intermediate aging times) in the above environments. The strain energy release rate (G) of the adhesive joints was monitored as a function of exposure time in the different environments. A 40% drop in fracture toughness was noted over the 18 month period, with the greatest degradation observed in samples aged at 204sp°C in ambient atmospheric air pressure. The loss in adhesive bond performance with time was attributable to a combination of physical and chemical aging phenomena in the FM-5 resin, and possible degradation of the metal-adhesive interface(s). Several mechanical and material tests, performed on the bonded joints and neat FM-5 resin specimens, confirmed the above statement. It was also noted that physical aging could be "erased" by thermal rejuvenation, partially restoring the toughness of the FM-5 adhesive material. The FM-5 adhesive material displayed good chemical resistance towards organic solvents and other aircraft fluids such as jet fuel and hydraulic fluid. The

  8. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  9. Micromechanical characterization of the interphase zone in adhesive joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Ardebili, Vahid

    The interphase in an epoxy-aluminum adhesive system has been characterized using acoustic microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ion etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and nano-indentation, with particular attention to micromechanical characterization. A systematic search method was proposed for locating an acoustic coupling fluid which had a sufficiently low velocity of sound and attenuation factor for the acoustic microscopy of polymers. A new acoustic microscope system was developed, which operated at a frequency of 250 MHz, and utilized an ultrasonic probe designed specifically for the characteristics of the new couplant. This acoustic microscope system is the first one being able to induce Rayleigh waves on the surface of plastics. A new angular spectrum formulation was introduced for a type-II acoustic microscope probe. No prior assumption, regarding the field on the aperture plane of the transducer, is needed in this new formulation. The angular spectrum model was extended to the case of a type-I probe in the presence of deviations of the lens shape from the ideal sphere as long as it remains axisymmetric. A multiple curve fitting procedure was used to infer the interphase property profiles by simultaneously fitting a large number of calculated V (z) curves to the experimental ones. The interphase was between 2 and 6 mum thick, and corresponded to a region of greater resistance to ion etching and a marked absence of the silica particles used in the epoxy adhesive. The acoustic microscope V(z) scans showed that the interphase had, on average, 20% larger values of tensile and shear moduli than the bulk, and smaller values of the shear attenuation factor and density than the bulk adhesive. Nano-indentation tests, traversing various sections of the interphase from the aluminum to the bulk adhesive, showed that the interphase region had, on average, a reduced elastic modulus (E/(1 - nu2)) that was 13% greater than that of the bulk adhesive. The

  10. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  11. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  12. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Gobbato, Maurizio; Conte, Joel; Kosmatke, John; Oliver, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  13. The effects of inherent flaws on the time and rate dependent failure of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancaktar, E.; Padgilwar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Inherent flaws, as well as the effects of rate and time, are shown by tests on viscoelastic adhesive-bonded single lap joints to be as critical in joint failure as environmental and stress concentration effects, with random inherent flaws and loading rate changes resulting in an up to 40% reduction in joint strength. It is also found that the asymptotic creep stress, below which no delayed failure may occur, may under creep loading be as much as 45% less than maximum adhesive strength. Attention is given to test results for the case of titanium-LARC-3 adhesive single-lap specimens.

  14. Thermo-oxidative and hydrothermal ageing of epoxy-dicyandiamide adhesive in bonded stainless steel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaukler, J. Ch; Fehling, P.; Possart, W.

    2009-09-01

    The ageing behaviour of stainless steel joints bonded with hot-curing adhesives is crucial for their reliability and durability in engineering applications. In industry, accelerated artificial ageing regimes are combined with short-term mechanical tests to simulate the in-service long-term behaviour and to predict the life time of the adhesive joints. With such a focus on mechanical bond strength, chemical changes in the adhesive are widely disregarded. Hence, neither the very causes for the decreasing performance of the joint nor their relevance for application can be revealed. Reasoning this study, lap shear samples of the stainless steel alloy 1.4376 are bonded with an epoxy-dicyandiamide adhesive and aged artificially under moderate thermo-oxidative (60 °C, dried air) or hydrothermal (60 °C, distilled water) condition. After testing (shear stress-strain analysis), chemical modifications of this adhesive due to ageing are detected on the fracture faces by μ-ATR-FTIR-spectroscopy as function of ageing time and position in the adhesive joint. The results attest high thermo-oxidative stability to these adhesive joints. For hydrothermal ageing, permeating water deteriorates the EP network from the edges towards the centre of the joint via hydrolysis of imine groups to ammonia, amine species and carbonyls.

  15. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Anish

    decrease of bond shear strength in single lap shear test samples. Through-transmission ultrasonics (TTU) Acoustography at 3.8 MHz showed promising results on the detectability of bondline defects in adhesively bonded CFRP-Al lap shear test samples. A correlation between Acoustography ultrasonic attenuation and average bond shear strength in CFRP-Al lap shear panels demonstrated that differential attenuation increased with the reduction of the bond shear strength. Similarly, optical DIC tests were conducted to identify and quantify kissing bond defects in CFRP-Al single lap shear joints. DIC results demonstrated changes in the normal strain (epsilonyy) contour map of the contaminated specimens at relatively lower load levels (15% ~ 30% of failure loads). Kissing bond regions were characterized by negative strains, and these were attributed to high compressive bending strains and the localized disbonding taking placed at the bondline interface as a result of the load application. It was also observed that contaminated samples suffered from more compressive strains (epsilonyy) compared to the baseline sample along the loading direction and they suffered from less compressive strains (epsilonxx) compared to the baseline sample perpendicular to the loading direction. This demonstrated the adverse effect of the kissing bond on the adhesive joint integrity. This was a very significant finding for the reason that hybrid ultrasonic DIC is being developed as a faster, more efficient, and more reliable NDE technique for determining bond quality and predicting bond shear strength in adhesively bonded structures.

  16. RSRM Nozzle-to-Case Joint J-leg Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrechtsen, Kevin U.; Eddy, Norman F.; Ewing, Mark E.; McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program, nozzle-to-case joint polysulfide adhesive gas paths have occurred on several flight motors. These gas paths have allowed hot motor gases to reach the wiper O-ring. Even though these motors continue to fly safely with this condition, a desire was to reduce such occurrences. The RSRM currently uses a J-leg joint configuration on case field joints and igniter inner and outer joints. The J-leg joint configuration has been successfully demonstrated on numerous RSRM flight and static test motors, eliminating hot gas intrusion to the critical O-ring seals on these joints. Using the proven technology demonstrated on the case field joints and igniter joints, a nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design was developed for implementation on RSRM flight motors. This configuration provides an interference fit with nozzle fixed housing phenolics at assembly, with a series of pressurization gaps incorporated outboard of the joint mating surface to aid in joint pressurization and to eliminate any circumferential flow in this region. The joint insulation is bonded to the nozzle phenolics using the same pressure sensitive adhesive used in the case field joints and igniter joints. An enhancement to the nozzle-to-case joint J-leg configuration is the implementation of a carbon rope thermal barrier. The thermal barrier is located downstream of the joint bondline and is positioned within the joint in a manner where any hot gas intrusion into the joint passes through the thermal barrier, reducing gas temperatures to a level that would not affect O-rings downstream of the thermal barrier. This paper discusses the processes used in reaching a final nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design, provides structural and thermal results in support of the design, and identifies fabrication techniques and demonstrations used in arriving at the final configuration.

  17. Nondestructive inspection in adhesive-bonded joint CFRP using pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, P. H.; Webb, S. C.; Peters, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Many forms of damages in fiber reinforcement polymer (FRP) composites are difficult to detect because they occurs in subsurface layers of the composites. One challenging need for inspection capabilities is in adhesively bonded joints between composite components, a common location of premature failure in aerospace structures. This paper investigates pulsed phase thermography (PPT) imaging of fatigue damage in these adhesively bonded joints. Simulated defects were created to calibrate parameters for fatigue loading conditions, PPT imaging parameters, and a damage sizing algorithm for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) single lap joints. Afterwards, lap joint specimens were fabricated with varying quality of manufacturing. PPT imaging of the pristine specimens revealed defects such as air bubbles, adhesive thickness variations, and weak bonding surface between the laminate and adhesive. Next, fatigue testing was performed and acquired PPT imaging data identified fatigue induced damage prior to final failure cycles. After failure of each sample, those images were confirmed by visual inspections of failure surface.

  18. Influence of artificially accelerated ageing on the adhesive joint of plasma treated polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehocký, M.; Lapčik, L.; Dlabaja, R.; Rachünek, L.; Stoch, J.

    2004-03-01

    An influence of simulated ageing on the adhesive joint of plasma treated polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) was tested. Plasma surface treatment was performed in the rf-plasma reactor operating at 13,56 MHz. The simulated ageing of prepared specimens for following tensile testing was carried out under conditions given by Volkswagen standard P-VW 1200. Temperature of ageing was regularly oscillating between -40°C and 80°C (relative humidity 80%) for required time. The mechanical tensile properties of adhesive joint were measured according to the standard ISO 527. Surface analysis of treated polymer substrates was characterized by XPS measurement. The observation of surface structure and morphology was obtained using SEM. We used convenient cyanoacrylate adhesive Loctite E 406 for PE and PP joints. Tested adhesive joints were prepared in compliance with the standard ISO 4587.

  19. Models for ultrasonic characterization of environmental degradation of interfaces in adhesive joints

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrentyev, A.I.; Rokhlin, S.I. )

    1994-10-15

    In this paper we discuss two models of environmental degradation of adhesive joints developed from experimental observation of the joint failure mode. It is found that after severe degradation, failure is dominated by the interfacial mode, i.e., by failure at the interface between adhesive and adherend. The fraction of failure in the interfacial mode was found to be related to the joint strength and to be proportional to the frequency shift of a minimum in the spectrum of the reflected ultrasonic signal. One model considers an interface as an interphase in the form of a nonhomogeneous layer composed of two phases: soft'' which is viscoelastic (degraded part of the interphase) and stiff'' corresponding to the nondamaged interphase. Increase of the soft'' phase fraction corresponds to the process of degradation in the interphase. The second model describes degradation in a form of disbonds filled by absorbed water at the interface. The disbonded interface is modeled by transverse spring boundary conditions, with the complex spring stiffness representing the quality of the bond. The influence of different disbond growth scenarios is considered. Advantages and drawbacks of these models are discussed.

  20. Fracture testing and analysis of adhesively bonded joints for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Warren, C.D.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began a cooperative effort with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. This paper concentrates on the details of developing accurate fracture test methods for adhesively bonded joints in the automotive industry. The test methods being developed are highly standardized and automated so that industry suppliers will be able to pass on reliable data to automotive designers in a timely manner. Mode I fracture tests have been developed that are user friendly and automated for easy data acquisition, data analysis, test control and test repeatability. The development of this test is discussed. In addition, materials and manufacturing issues are addressed which are of particular importance when designing adhesive and composite material systems.

  1. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  2. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted for by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.

  3. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted formore » by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.« less

  4. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  5. Nondestructive inspection of CFRP adhesively bonded joints using embedded FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2013-05-01

    One challenging need for inspection capabilities is in adhesively bonded joints between composite components, a common location of premature failure in aerospace structures. In this work we demonstrate that dynamic, full spectral scanning of FBG sensors embedded in the adhesive bond can identify changes in bond quality through the measurement of non-linear dynamics of the joint. Eighteen lap joint specimens were fabricated with varying manufacturing quality. Ten samples also included fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the adhesive bond for real-time inspection during a simulated flight condition of these single-lap joints. Prior to testing, pulse phase thermography imaging of the pristine specimens revealed defects such as air bubbles, adhesive thickness variations, and weak bonding surface between the laminate and adhesive. The lap joint specimens were then subjected to fatigue loading, with regular interrogation of the FBG sensors at selected load cycle intervals. The FBG data was collected during vibration loading of the lap joint to represent an in-flight environment. Changes in the lap joint dynamic response, including the transition to non-linear responses, were measured from both the full-spectral and peak wavelength FBG data. These changes were correlated to initial manufacturing defects and the progression of fatigue-induced damage independently measured with pulse phase imaging and visual inspections of the failure surfaces.

  6. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    SciTech Connect

    Laufenberg, T.L.; River, B.H.; Murmanis, L.L.; Christiansen, A.W.

    1988-08-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross-section finger joint was the subject of a multidisciplinary investigation to assess and advance the technology of adhesive joints in composite wood structures. This investigation, which has wide-spread applicability to all adhesively bonded joints, included (1) analysis of the data collected during fatigue testing, (2) microscopic examination of failed and unfailed surfaces and materials, (3) chemical characterization of the adhesive resin and its cure in the presence of wood and asbestos fibers, (4) testing of the filled adhesive on various adherent systems for its mechanical properties and its performance in prototype finger joints, and (5) analysis of the finger joint's load-carrying capabilities, including the effects of specific design modifications. Four major problem areas were identified which appeared to contribute to the premature fatigue failure. Recommended solutions of these problems would reduce the void content in the veneer-veneer and finger joint bondlines, provide a well-configured finger tip for the joint, improve the adhesive's penetration and bonding to the wood substrate, and provide a cleanly-machined surface. 2 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Tissue Mechanics and Adhesion during Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Shawky, Joseph H.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    During development cells interact mechanically with their microenvironment through cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Many proteins involved in these adhesions serve both mechanical and signaling roles. In this review we will focus on the mechanical roles of these proteins and their complexes in transmitting force or stress from cell to cell or from cell to the extracellular matrix. As forces operate against tissues they establish tissue architecture, extracellular matrix assembly, and pattern cell shapes. As tissues become more established, adhesions play a major role integrating cells with the mechanics of their local environment. Adhesions may serve as both a molecular-specific glue, holding defined populations of cells together, and as a lubricant, allowing tissues to slide past one another. We review the biophysical principles and experimental tools used to study adhesion so that we may aid efforts to understand how adhesions guide these movements and integrate their signaling functions with mechanical function. As we conclude we review efforts to develop predictive models of adhesion that can be used to interpret experiments and guide future efforts to control and direct the process of tissue self-assembly during development. PMID:25512299

  8. Effect of service environments on adhesively bonded joints in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The models employed in the present computational methods for evaluating severe service-environment effects on adhesively bonded joints in composites are based on composite analyses and structural mechanics, encompassing nonlinear environmental degradation. The methods are demonstrated for the case of a butt joint with a single doubler, subjected to the environmental effects as well as static and cyclic loads. The highest joint strength is noted to be required in the case of cyclic loads and hygrothermal service environments; margins of safety for adhesive material stresses decline rapidly in such cases.

  9. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  10. Non-destructive evaluation of metal-to-metal adhesive joints using vibration analysis: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandurangan, Pradeep; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2006-03-01

    Vibration based non-destructive evaluation shows promise for damage detection in metal-to-metal adhesive joints. This research investigates an experimental technique to diagnose damage in single-lap adhesive joints subject to cyclical tensile loading. Vibration analysis reveals that damage can be correlated with changes in identified modal damping ratios. Constant amplitude forcing functions are employed to eliminate amplitude-dependent nonlinearities in the dynamic response profiles. Damping estimates obtained from time-domain analyses correlate well with damage magnitudes. Finite element modal analysis of the lap joints supports the experimental results.

  11. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  12. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  13. Adhesive joint evaluation by ultrasonic interface and lamb waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokhlin, S. I.

    1986-01-01

    Some results on the application of interface and Lamb waves for the study of curing of thin adhesive layers were summarized. In the case of thick substrates (thickness much more than the wave length) the interface waves can be used. In this case the experimental data can be inverted and the shear modulus of the adhesive film may be explicitly found based on the measured interface wave velocity. It is shown that interface waves can be used for the study of curing of structural adhesives as a function of different temperatures and other experimental conditions. The kinetics of curing was studied. In the case of thin substrates the wave phenomena are much more complicated. It is shown that for successful measurements proper selection of experimental conditions is very important. This can be done based on theoretical estimations. For correctly selected experimental conditions the Lamb waves may be a sensitive probe of adhesive bond quality and may be used or cure monitoring.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of Debonds and Voids in Adhesive Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossettos, J. N.; Lin, P.; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid

    1997-01-01

    An analytical model is developed to compare the effects of voids an debonds on the interfacial shear stresses between the adherends and the adhesive in simple lap joints. Since the adhesive material above the debond may undergo some extension (either due to applied load or thermal expansion or both), a modified shear lag model, where the adhesive can take an extensional as well as shear deformation, is used in the analysis. The adherends take on only axial loads and act as membranes. Two coupled nondimensional differential equations are derived, and in general, five parameters govern the stress distribution in the overlap region. As expected, the major differences between the debond and the void occur for the stresses near the edge of the defect itself. Whether the defect is a debond or a void, is hardly discernible by the stresses at the overlap region. If the defect occurs precisely at or very close to either end of the overlap, however, differences of the order of 20 percent in the peak stresses can be obtained.

  15. Statistical Investigation of the Effect of Process Parameters on the Shear Strength of Metal Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, Goribidanur Rangappa; Krishna, Munishamaih; Narasimhamurthy, Hebbale Narayanrao; Keshavamurthy, Yalanabhalli Channegowda

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the work was to optimize sheet metal joining parameters such as adhesive material, adhesive thickness, adhesive overlap length and surface roughness for single lap joint of aluminium sheet shear strength using robust design. An orthogonal array, main effect plot, signal-to-noise ratio and analysis of variance were employed to investigate the shear strength of the joints. The statistical result shows vinyl ester is best candidate among other two polymers viz. epoxy and polyester due to its low viscosity value compared to other two polymers. The experiment results shows that the adhesive thickness 0.6 mm, overlap length 50 mm and surface roughness 2.12 µm for obtained maximum shear strength of Al sheet joints. The ANOVA result shows one of the most significant factors is overlap length which affect joint strength in addition to adhesive thickness, adhesive material, and surface roughness. A confirmation test was carried out as the optimal combination of parameters will not match with the any of the experiments in the orthogonal array.

  16. A self-diagnostic adhesive for monitoring bonded joints in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yitao; Li, Yu-hung; Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Bondline integrity is still one of the most critical concerns in the design of aircraft structures up to date. Due to the lack of confidence on the integrity of the bondline both during fabrication and service, the industry standards and regulations still require assembling the composite using conventional fasteners. Furthermore, current state-of-the-art non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are incapable of offering mature solutions on the issue of bondline integrity monitoring. Therefore, the objective of this work is the development of an intelligent adhesive film with integrated micro-sensors for monitoring the integrity of the bondline interface. The proposed method makes use of an electromechanical-impedance (EMI) based method, which is a rapidly evolving approach within the SHM family. Furthermore, an innovative screen-printing technique to fabricate piezoelectric ceramic sensors with minimal thickness has been developed at Stanford. The approach presented in this study is based on the use of (i) micro screen-printed piezoelectric sensors integrated into adhesive leaving a minimal footprint on the material, (ii) numerical and analytical modeling of the EMI spectrum of the adhesive bondline, (iii) novel diagnostic algorithms for monitoring the bondline integrity based on advanced signal processing techniques, and (iv) the experimental assessment via prototype adhesively bonded structures in static (varying loads) and dynamic (fatigue) environments. The proposed method will provide a huge confidence on the use of bonded joints for aerospace structures and lead to a paradigm change in their design by enabling enormous weight savings while maximizing the economic and performance efficiency.

  17. Advances in the analysis and design of adhesive-bonded joints in composite aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several aspects of adhesive-bonded joint analysis and design are presented from the reference of size of structure or load intensity. This integrates the individual characterizations of double-lap, single-lap, stepped-lap, tapered-lap and scarf joints. The paper includes an overview of bonded joint selection from the standpoints of design, fabrication, and processing, each bearing in mind the influence of such considerations on the strength of the joint. A case study is presented of the optimization of a specific relatively thick titanium-to-graphite epoxy stepped-lap joint, using the digital computer analysis program A4EG. The factors accounted for are adhesive plasticity, adherend stiffness imbalance, adherend thermal mismatch, and change of material properties within the range of temperature environment and with load direction. The strength increases obtainable by refining the initial design are demonstrated.

  18. Damage analysis in composite materials and design of adhesive joints for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    design of adhesive joints for composite structures . A new approach was explored for joining of thick, woven E-glass/vinyl ester composite laminated plates to steel or composite plates, with applications in naval ship structures. Adhesive was applied along through-the-thickness contoured interfaces, employing tongue-and-groove geometry. Both experimental and finite element modeling results were presented. They showed that adhesively bonded tongue-and-groove joints between steel and composite plates loaded in monotonically increasing longitudinal tension are stronger than conventional strap joints even in relatively thin plates. In particular, a single 0.25 in. wide and 8 or 12 in. long steel tongue, bonded by the Dexter-Hysol 9339 adhesive to a groove in a 0.5 in. thick laminated plate, can support a 20,000 lbs tension force. This force was expected to increase in proportion to plate thickness. Simple design rules indicate that the adhesive bond can be made stronger than that of the tongues, so that failure was transferred from the adhesive to the adherends. High joint efficiency can be achieved for any thickness of the joined plates.

  19. Adhesive-bonded double-lap joints. [analytical solutions for static load carrying capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Explicit analytical solutions are derived for the static load carrying capacity of double-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses extend the elastic solution Volkersen and cover adhesive plasticity, adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch between the adherends. Both elastic-plastic and bi-elastic adhesive representations lead to the explicit result that the influence of the adhesive on the maximum potential bond strength is defined uniquely by the strain energy in shear per unit area of bond. Failures induced by peel stresses at the ends of the joint are examined. This failure mode is particularly important for composite adherends. The explicit solutions are sufficiently simple to be used for design purposes

  20. Efficient inhibition of the formation of joint adhesions by ERK2 small interfering RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fengfeng; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi; Zeng, Bingfang; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 is considered to be crucial. Based on these theories, we examined the effects of a lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERK2 on the suppression of joint adhesion formation in vivo. The effects were assessed in vivo from different aspects including the adhesion score, histology and joint contracture angle. We found that the adhesions in the ERK2 siRNA group became soft and weak, and were easily stretched. Accordingly, the flexion contracture angles in the ERK2 siRNA group were also reduced (P < 0.05 compared with the control group). The animals appeared healthy, with no signs of impaired wound healing. In conclusion, local delivery of a lentivirus-mediated siRNA targeting ERK2 can ameliorate joint adhesion formation effectively and safely.

  1. Dynamic measurement of inside strain distributions in adhesively bonded joints by embedded fiber Bragg grating sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Ning, Xiaoguang; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-05-01

    Long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the length of about 100 mm was embedded onto the surface of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) substrate and two CFRP adherends were joined by adhesive to form an adhesive bonded single-lap joint. The joint was subjected to 0.5 Hz cyclic tensile load and longitudinal strain distributions along FBG were measured at 5 Hz by the fiber-optic distributed sensing system based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). We could successfully monitor the strain distributions accurately with high spatial resolution of around 1 mm.

  2. Stresses in adhesively bonded joints: A closed form solution. [plate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Aydinoglu, M. N.

    1980-01-01

    The plane strain of adhesively bonded structures which consist of two different orthotropic adherents is considered. Assuming that the thicknesses of the adherends are constant and are small in relation to the lateral dimensions of the bonded region, the adherends are treated as plates. The transverse shear effects in the adherends and the in-plane normal strain in the adhesive are taken into account. The problem is reduced to a system of differential equations for the adhesive stresses which is solved in closed form. A single lap joint and a stiffened plate under various loading conditions are considered as examples. To verify the basic trend of the solutions obtained from the plate theory a sample problem is solved by using the finite element method and by treating the adherends and the adhesive as elastic continua. The plate theory not only predicts the correct trend for the adhesive stresses but also gives rather surprisingly accurate results.

  3. High-temperature Adhesive Development and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hale, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    High-temperature adhesive systems are evaluated for short and long-term stability at temperatures ranging from 232C to 427C. The resins selected for characterization include: NASA Langley developed polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ), and commercially available polyimides (PI). The primary method of bond testing is single lap shear. The PPQ candidates are evaluated on 6A1-4V titanium adherends with chromic acid anodize and phosphate fluoride etch surface preparations. The remaining adhesives are evaluated on 15-5 PH stainless steel with a sulfuric acid anodize surface preparation. Preliminary data indicate that the PPQ adhesives tested have stability to 3000 hours at 450F with chromic acid anodize surface preparation. Additional studies are continuing to attempt to improve the PPQ's high-performance by formulating adhesive films with a boron filler and utilizing the phosphate fluoride surface preparation on titanium. Evaluation of the polyimide candidates on stainless-steel adherends indicates that the FM-35 (American Cyanamid), PMR-15 (U.S. Polymeric/Ferro), TRW partially fluorinated polyimide and NR 150B2S6X (DuPont) adhesives show sufficient promise to justify additional testing.

  4. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  5. Identification of the dynamic characteristics of a viscoelastic, nonlinear adhesive joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraghi, T.; Nobari, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear mechanical characteristics of an adhesive (Sikaflex-252) are identified over frequency range, using eigenvalues of nonlinear system and inverse eigen-sensitivity method and experimental data. Sikaflex-252 is selected as an adhesive which is mainly used as a joining medium (joint) in structural applications. In order to simulate the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive, the frequency dependent Young's modulus and damping coefficient are assumed in identification process leading to the updating process being repeated for different ranges of frequencies to identify stiffness and damping properties of the adhesive. Using the optimum equivalent linear frequency response function (OELF) concept, in order to realize the nonlinear nature of the adhesive, modal tests are performed under two different random excitation levels which illustrate the stiffness softening characteristic of adhesive which can have serious implications regarding dynamic stability of structures. Furthermore, based on the identified characteristics, the paper examines the possibility of tuning of the Standard Linear Solid model (SLS), in representing the adhesive viscoelastic behaviour. Results of this attempt proved that the S.L.S. model with tuned parameters significantly improves the fidelity of finite element (FE) model to experimental results.

  6. How to develop globular proteins into adhesives.

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, M C; Rutten, A A; Frens, G

    2000-05-26

    To make globular proteins suitable for application in adhesives, the specific bonds and interactions which shape their structure have to broken. Only then, a layer of relatively large, flexible and interwoven polymer chains, which are firmly attached to the solid surface by adsorption, can be created. Such a network layer is essential to save the adhesive bond under an applied force, because it can distribute the concentration of stresses generated at the interface into the bulk. Unfolding and swelling of a protein can be achieved by changing the solvent quality. For the globular whey protein beta-lactoglobulin, the optimal conditions for unfolding and swelling is found with 98% formic acid as a solvent. In formic acid, beta-lactoglobulin looses its amphoteric character (it is protonated, probably for approximately 20%). In addition, formic acid is less polar than water and thus a better solvent for the apolar parts of the protein. The swelling and unfolding behaviour of beta-lactoglobulin is studied by viscosity and CD-spectroscopy measurements. For the interpretation of the results we apply the Kuhn formalism that the conformation of a protein can be described in terms of a statistical chain which consists of segments of an average persistence length P. The statistical segment length P, which varies with the experimental conditions, is directly related to the adsorption energy required for a strong adhesion between coil and surface. It determines the depletion energy kT P(-2) m(-2) which must be overcome by specific attraction between side groups of the protein chain and the surface. For beta-lactoglobulin in 98% formic acid, we find a P value of approximately 2.2 nm, pointing at a relatively flexible chain. The minimum net adsorption energy kT P(-2) is then approximately 1 mJ m(-2), a relatively small value to be exceeded. Preliminary results of destructive adhesion tests on beech wood lap-shear joints reveal promising tensile strengths of approximately 2

  7. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  8. Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2003-11-29

    An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

  9. A two-dimensional stress analysis of a butt adhesive joint containing circular holes and rigid fillers in an adhesive subjected to a tensile load

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Toshiyuki; Nakano, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Yuichi

    1995-11-01

    This study deals with a stress analysis of a butt adhesive joint which contains circular holes and rigid fillers in the adhesive and is subjected to a tensile load. In the analysis, the adherends are assumed to be rigid and the adhesive is replaced with a finite strip having holes and rigid fillers in it and the stress distribution in the joint is analyzed using a two-dimensional theory of elasticity. The effects of size and locations of rigid fillers and circular holes on the stress distributions at the interface and around the fillers and holes are clarified by numerical calculations. For verification, photoelastic experiments are performed using an epoxide resin plate modeled as an adhesive in the joint. The analytical results are in fairly good agreement with the experimental ones. In addition, the stress singularity at the edge of the interface is discussed.

  10. Adhesive defect detection in composite adhesive joints using phased array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are widely used in aircraft structures due to their high specific stiffness and strength. The laminated nature of composite structures makes them subject to disbond and delamination. These types of defects will compromise the integrity of the structure and therefore need to be monitored. To monitor aircraft structures, light weight transducers capable of large area coverage are beneficial. Ultrasonic guided waves are able to travel long distance and are sensitive to localized defects. The multi-modal characteristic of propagating guided waves requires optimal mode selection and excitation. Phased array transducers provide good versatility for optimal mode excitation since they can excite different guided wave modes preferentially. Phased array transducers designed for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications are employed in this work to study the interaction between adhesive defects and guided wave modes. Amplitude ratios and wave packet composition are utilized as defect indicators that are uniquely available due to the phased array transducers.

  11. Recent developments in polyimide and bismaleimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Politi, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Research on high temperature resin systems has intensified. In the Aerospace Industry, the motivation for this increased activity has been to replace heat resistant alloys of aluminum, stainless steel and titanium by lighter weight glass and carbon fiber reinforced composites. Applications for these structures include: (1) engine nacelles involving long time exposure (thousands of hours) to temperatures in the 150 to 300 C range, (2) supersonic military aircraft involving moderately long exposure (hundreds of hours) to temperatures of 150 to 200 C, and (3) missile applications involving only brief exposure (seconds or minutes) to temperatures up to 500 C and above. Because of fatigue considerations, whenever possible, it is preferable to bond rather than mechanically fasten composite structures. For this reason, the increased usage of high temperature resin matrix systems for composites has necessitated the devlopment of compatible and equally heat stable adhesive systems. The performance of high temperature epoxy, epoxy phenolic and condensation polyimide adhesives is reviewed. This is followed by a discussion of three recently developed types of adhesives: (1) condensation reaction polyimides having improved processing characteristics; (2) addition reaction polyimides; and (3) bismaleimides.

  12. Mode 1 delamination growth in adhesively bonded joints under static and fatigue loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S. C.; Jeelani, S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to characterize the pure mode 1 delamination growth in metal to metal adhesively bonded joints under static and fatigue loading conditions, using FM 73 adhesive. Double cantilever beam specimens (DCB) were used for pure mode 1 tests. Aluminum 2024-T3 adherends were bonded with FM 73 adhesive. Delamination was introduced during fabrication by inserting a Teflon film between the two adherends. The mode 1 strain energy release rate G sub I sub c was obtained directly from static DCB tests conducted in accordance with the ASTM designation D1876-12. Constant amplitude fatigue tests on DCB specimens were conducted to determine the relationship between delamination growth rate da/dN and strain energy release rate G sub I sub c for a pure mode 1 delamination growth. It is found that the debond propagation rate in adhesive joints using FM 73 is more sensitive to errors in design load than is typical crack growth rate in metallic structures.

  13. Non-classical adhesive-bonded joints in practical aerospace construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions are derived for adhesive-bonded joints of non-classical geometries. Particular attention is given to bonded doublers and to selective reinforcement by unidirectional composites. Non-dimensionalized charts are presented for the efficiency limit imposed on the skin as the result of the eccentricity in the load path through the doubler. It is desirable to employ a relativly large doubler to minimize the effective eccentricity in the load path. The transfer stresses associated with selective reinforcement of metal structures by advanced composites are analyzed. Reinforcement of bolt holes in composites by bonded metal doublers is covered quantitatively. Also included is the adhesive joint analysis for shear flow in a multi-cell torque box, in which the bond on one angle becomes more critical sooner than those on the others, thereby restricting the strength to less than the total of each maximum strength when acting alone. Adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness and thermal imbalances are included. A simple analysis/design technique of solution in terms of upper and lower bounds on an all-plastic adhesive analysis is introduced.

  14. The Effect of Composite Patches on the Failure of Adhesively-Bonded Joints Under Bending Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Salih

    2013-12-01

    In this study, it was aimed to compare mechanical behavior of double-strap joints with aluminum (AA2024-T3) or 16-ply laminate of carbon/epoxy composite (T300/934) patches of different orientation angles at their overlap area subjected to bending moment. For this purpose, AA2024-T3 aluminum was used as adherend, while the adhesive was a two-part paste (DP 460). Six different types of joint samples were subjected to bending moment. The effect of patch material on failure load and stress distribution was examined experimentally and numerically. In the numerical analysis, the composite patches were assumed to behave linearly elastic, while adherend and adhesive layers were assumed to be nonlinear. It was found that the data obtained from 3-D finite element analysis were coherent with experimental results. Meanwhile, experiments showed that fiber orientation angles of the patches markedly affected the failure load of joints, failure mode and stress distributions appeared in adhesive and composite.

  15. Evaluating quality of adhesive joints in glass-fiber plastic piping by using active thermal NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, M.; Marinho, C. A.; Nesteruk, D. A.; Rebello, J. M.; Soares, S. D.; Vavilov, V. P.

    2013-05-01

    GRP-type composites (Glass-fibre Reinforced Plastics) have been continuously employed in the oil industry in recent years, often on platforms, especially in pipes for water or oil under moderate temperatures. In this case, the pipes are usually connected through adhesive joints and, consequently, the detection of defects in these joints, as areas without adhesive or adhesive failure (disbonding), gains great importance. One-sided inspection on the joint surface (front side) is a challenging task because the material thickness easily exceeds 10 mm that is far beyond the limits of the capacity of thermography applied to GRP inspection, as confirmed by the experience. Detection limits have been evaluated both theoretically and experimentally as a function of outer wall thickness and defect lateral size. The 3D modeling was accomplished by using the ThermoCalc-6L software. The experimental unit consisted of a FLIR SC640 and NEC TH- 9100 IR imagers and some home-made heaters with the power from 1,5 to 30 kW. The results obtained by applying pulsed heating have demonstrated that the inspection efficiency is strongly dependent on the outer wall thickness with a value of about 8 mm being a detection limit.

  16. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  17. Propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in lap-shear adhesive joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Marzani, Alessandro

    2004-07-01

    This paper deals with the propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in adhesively-bonded lap-shear joints. The topic is relevant to ultrasonic bond inspection in aerospace components. Specifically, the propagation of the lowest-order, antisymmetric a0 mode through the joint is examined. This mode can be easily generated and detected in the field due to the predominant out-of-plane displacements at the surface of the test piece. An important aspect is the mode conversion at the boundaries between the single-plate adherends and the multilayer overlap. The a0 strength of transmission is studied for three different bond states in aluminum joints, namely a fully cured adhesive bond, a poorly cured adhesive bond, and a slip bond. Theoretical predictions based on the Global Matrix Method indicate that the dispersive behavior of the guided waves in the multilayer overlap is highly dependent on bond state. Experimental tests of the joints are conducted by a hybrid, broadband laser/air-coupled ultrasonic setup in a through-transmission configuration. This system does not require any wet coupling and it can be moved flexibly across the test piece. The Gabor Wavelet transform is employed to extract energy transmission coefficients in the 100 kHz - 1.4 MHz range for the three different bond states examined. The cross-sectional mode shapes of the guided waves are shown to have a substantial role in the energy transfer through the joint. A rationale for the selection of the a0 excitation frequencies highly sensitive to bond state will be given.

  18. Experimental determination of the effects of moisture on composite-to-composite adhesive joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R. J.; Schulte, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The primary mode of moisture ingress into bonded composite joints is determined using a nuclear probe for deuterium (NPD) to measure the localized D2O content along the length of the adhesive (FM-300 and EA-9601) and through the thickness of bonded composite speciments. Calculated diffusivities and NPD measured equilibrium moisture contents are used to predict the moisture profiles along the length of the adhesives as a function of exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity. These results are compared with the observed moisture profiles to evaluate the extent of enhanced edge diffusion. The FM-300 adhesive exhibits good agreement between measured and predicted profiles at 49 C, 70% and 90% RH, and 77 C, 70% RH. At 77 C, 90% RH, the measured moisture content near the adhesive edge is substantially larger than the predicted level. The EA-9601 adhesive also shows good agreement at 49 C, 70% and 90% RH, but at 77 C, the concentration of D20 near the edges is enhanced at each humidity level. The effect of moisture content on the bond shear strength at room temperature and at elevated temperature is evaluated.

  19. Loading Analysis of Composite Wind Turbine Blade for Fatigue Life Prediction of Adhesively Bonded Root Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi-Majd, Davood; Azimzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays wind energy is widely used as a non-polluting cost-effective renewable energy resource. During the lifetime of a composite wind turbine which is about 20 years, the rotor blades are subjected to different cyclic loads such as aerodynamics, centrifugal and gravitational forces. These loading conditions, cause to fatigue failure of the blade at the adhesively bonded root joint, where the highest bending moments will occur and consequently, is the most critical zone of the blade. So it is important to estimate the fatigue life of the root joint. The cohesive zone model is one of the best methods for prediction of initiation and propagation of debonding at the root joint. The advantage of this method is the possibility of modeling the debonding without any requirement to the remeshing. However in order to use this approach, it is necessary to analyze the cyclic loading condition at the root joint. For this purpose after implementing a cohesive interface element in the Ansys finite element software, one blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine with 46 m rotor diameter was modelled in full scale. Then after applying loads on the blade under different condition of the blade in a full rotation, the critical condition of the blade is obtained based on the delamination index and also the load ratio on the root joint in fatigue cycles is calculated. These data are the inputs for fatigue damage growth analysis of the root joint by using CZM approach that will be investigated in future work.

  20. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development. PMID:25448695

  1. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  2. Strength analysis and design of adhesive joints between circular elements made of metal and reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekh, B. L.; Marchuk, M. V.; Kogut, I. S.

    1992-06-01

    The stress-strain state of an adhesive joint between cylindrical components made of a metal (steel) and a cross-reinforced filament-wound composite (glass/polymer or basalt/polymer) was investigated under static axial loading using newly proposed experimental techniques and a refined mathematical model. Analytical expressions are obtained for contact stresses in the adhesive joint. The maximum permissible load and the ultimate shear strength of the joint are determined. The experimental results are found to be in satisfactory agreement with model predictions.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints by Acousto-Ultrasonic Technique and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    Reliable applications of adhesively bonded joints require an effective nondestructive evaluation technique for their bond strength prediction. To properly evaluate factors affecting bond strength, effects of defects such as voids and disbonds on stress distribution in the overlap region must be understood. At the same time, in order to use acousto-ultrasonic (AU) technique to evaluate bond quality, the effect of these defects on dynamic response of single lap joints must be clear. The stress distribution in a single lap joint with and without defects (void or disbond) is analyzed. A bar-Theta parameter which contains adherend and adhesive thickness and properties is introduced. It is shown for bonded joints with bar-Theta greater than 10, that a symmetric void or disbond in the middle of overlap up to the 70 percent of overlap length has negligible effect on bond strength. In contrast frequency response analyses by a finite element technique showed that the dynamic response is affected significantly by the presence of voids or disbonds. These results have direct implication in the interpretations of AU results. Through transmission attenuation and a number of AU parameters for various specimens with and without defects are evaluated. It is found that although void and disbond have similar effects on bond strength (stress distribution), they have completely different effects on wave propagation characteristics. For steel-adhesive-steel specimens with voids, the attenuation changes are related to the bond strength. However, the attenuation changes for specimens with disbond are fairly constant over a disbond range. In order to incorporate the location of defects in AU parameters, a weighting function is introduced. Using an immersion system with focused transducers, a number of AU parameters are evaluated. It is found that by incorporating weighting functions in these parameters better sensitivities (AU parameters vs. bond strength) are achieved. Acoustic emission

  4. Systems, Apparatuses, and Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, III, Stanley S. (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  5. The use of embedded sensors for the monitoring of adhesive joints in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Scott T.; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2005-05-01

    A copolymer incorporating polyaniline was used as a sensing medium in the construction of a resistance based humidity sensor. Aniline monomer was polymerised in the presence of poly (butyl acrylate / vinyl acetate) and a copolymer containing polyaniline emeraldine salt was obtained. The sensing medium was then developed by redissolving 1-2 w/w% of the resulting polymer residue in dichloromethane to produce a processable polymer blend solution. Some of this polymer residue was also de-doped in a solution of ammonia, and then washed with distilled water until the waste water had a neutral pH. This residue was then redissolved at 1-2 w/w% in dichloromethane to produce a second processable polymer blend this time containing polyaniline emeraldine base. The final sensor design utilised 125μm polyester insulated platinum wire as conducting electrodes that were dip coated in the emeraldine salt copolymer solution and allowed to dry in a desiccator. The sensor was then dip-coated in a protective barrier layer of the emeraldine base copolymer to prevent over-oxidation and/or de-protonation of the emeraldine salt sensing medium under this coating. The sensors had an overall final thickness of less than 150μm and showed high sensitivity to humidity, low resistance, and good reversibility without hysteresis. Sensors were monitored for 2-probe resistance changes when in contact with water. Calibration curves for each sensor were produced to convert the resistance reading to mass uptake of water. Individual sensors were embedded within Aluminium 5083 / Araldite 2015 adhesive joints to monitor mass uptake of water when exposed to marine environments. Correlations between mass uptake of water and joint strength were made. There are various advantages of such a sensor design. Polymer based thin film humidity sensors have the advantage that the high processability of the material allows for simple fabrication of a range of geometries including smaller sensor designs. The ease of

  6. A study of the effects of water concentration on the stability of interfaces in adhesive joints

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.S.; Kinloch, A.J.; Gardhan, L.M.; Bowditch, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of water concentration on steel-epoxide joints was assessed. The 90{degrees} peel test method has been used to obtain fracture energy, G{sub c} values for adhered joints which have been previously conditioned in a range of relative humidities. Firstly, a loss of peel strength has been seen with increased water content of the adhesive. Further, a critical water concentration marking the transition from slight to pronounced loss of joint strength has been observed. Secondly, a theory for G{sub c} has been used to account for elastic and plastic deformation in the peel arm. However, the theory has not been able to fully account for changes in peel arm thickness but has for changes in the peel angle. Thirdly, apparent interfacial failure has been observed under visual inspection. Auger and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be employed to (i) identify the locus of joint failure and (ii) the site and mechanisms of environmental attack by water.

  7. 78 FR 14620 - Joint Development: Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... published guidance on the eligibility of joint development activities for FTA funding. 72 FR 5788 (Feb. 7... review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... Federal Transit Administration Joint Development: Proposed Circular AGENCY: Federal Transit...

  8. Synovial Joints: from Development to Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as interzone, and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cells niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformation as well as joint degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects, and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and to develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism. PMID:25431159

  9. Assessment of bond defects in adhesive joints before and after the treatment with laser generated shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Hellmers, Sandra; Huke, Philipp; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2014-03-01

    The verification of kissing bond defects with conventional nondestructive testing techniques is generally unsuccessful because kissing bonds behave very similar to an intact adhesive. Therefore, one has to apply a suitable method such as loading the adhesive joint using laser-generated shock waves in order to make this kind of defect detectable. The present work describes the results of experimental studies on nondestructive inspection of bond flaws in bonded joints of metal materials. While it is not the purpose of this work to evaluate or characterize shock waves, we demonstrate that kissing bond flaws can be made visible nondestructively using laser generated shock waves.

  10. Innovative use of adhesive interface characteristics to nondestructively quantify the strength of bonded joints.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2010-05-01

    Advances in structural adhesives have permitted engineers to contemplate the use of bonded joints in areas that have long been dominated by mechanical fasteners and welds. Although strength, modulus, and toughness have been improved in modern adhesives, the typical concerns with using these polymers still exist. These include concerns over long-term durability and an inability to quantify bond strength (i.e., identify weak bonds) in adhesive joints. Bond deterioration in aging structures and bond strength in original construction are now critical issues that require more than simple flaw detection. Whether the structure involves metallic or composite materials, it is necessary to extend inspections beyond the detection of disbond flaws to include an assessment of the strength of the bond. Use of advanced nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods to measure the mechanical properties of a bonded joint and associated correlations with post-inspection failure tests have provided some clues regarding the key parameters involved in assessing bond strength. Recent advances in ultrasonic- and thermographic-based inspection methods have shown promise for measuring such properties. Specialized noise reduction and signal enhancement schemes have allowed thermographic interrogations to image the subtle differences between bond lines of various strengths. Similarly, specialized ultrasonic (UT) inspection techniques, including laser UT, guided waves, UT spectroscopy, and resonance methods, can be coupled with unique signal analysis algorithms to accurately characterize the properties of weak interfacial bonds. The generation of sufficient energy input levels to derive bond strength variations, the production of sufficient technique sensitivity to measure such minor response variations, and the difficulty in manufacturing repeatable weak bond specimens are all issues that exacerbate these investigations. The key to evaluating the bond strength lies in the ability to exploit the

  11. Mixed-mode cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composite joints. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental-analytical investigation to characterize the cyclic failure mechanism of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint is conducted. The cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens of graphite/epoxy adherend bonded with EC-3445 adhesive are tested under combined mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, fatigue failure occurs in the form of cyclic debonding. The cyclic debond growth rates are measured. The finite element analysis is employed to compute the mode 1, mode 2, and total strain energy release rates (i.e., GI, GII, and GT). A wide range of mixed-mode loading, i.e., GI/GII ranging from 0.03 to 0.38, is obtained. The total strain energy release rate, G sub T, appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding in the tested composite bonded system.

  12. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of metal adhesively bonded joints using cellular polypropylene transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Amos, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Adhesively bonded aluminum components have been widely used in the aerospace industry for weight-efficient and damage-tolerant structures. Automated squirter jet immersion ultrasonic testing is a common inspection technique to assure the bond integrity of large, contoured assemblies. However, squirter jet inspection presents several limitations in scanning speed, related to water splash noise over protruding stiffeners and splash interference crosstalk in multi-channel inspection systems. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing has been evaluated as an alternative, possibly offering the benefits of increased throughput by enabling higher speeds, and eliminating the contamination concerns and maintenance issues of water couplant systems. Adhesive joints of multi-layer aluminum plates with artificial disbonds were inspected with novel air-coupled ultrasonic probes based on cellular polypropylene. Disbonds of various sizes were engineered in several multi-layer configurations and at various depths. Results were compared with squirter jet immersion and conventional piezoelectric transducer designs in terms of scan contrast, resolution and inspection time.

  13. Feasibility study for the development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of a new approach for the development of stable, easily handled, room temperature (293 K - 311 K) curing adhesives was studied and demonstrated. The work concentrated on a family of unsaturated amide/ester resins. Twelve candidate resins were synthesized and tested for completeness of cure at room temperature, adhesion to aluminum and titanium, shear strength, moisture resistance and heat stability. The three most promising candidate resins were selected and recommended for further development.

  14. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  15. The development of ultrasonic techniques for nondestructive evaluation of adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Gilbert B., II

    Demands for improvements in aerospace and automotive energy-efficiency, performance, corrosion resistance, body stiffness and style have increased the use of adhesive bonds to help meet those demands by providing joining technology that accommodates a wider variety of materials and design options. However, the history of adhesive bond performance clearly indicates the need for a robust method of assuring the existence of the required consistent level of adhesive bond integrity in every bonded region. This investigation seeks to meet that need by the development of new, complementary ultrasonic techniques for the evaluation of these bonds, and thus provide improvements over previous methods by extending the range of resolution, speed and applications. The development of a 20 MHz pulse-echo method for nondestructive evaluation of adhesive bonds will accomplish the assessment of bond joints with adhesive as thin as 0.1 mm. This new method advances the state of the art by providing a high-resolution, phase-sensitive procedure that identifies the bond state at each interface of the adhesive with the substrate(s), by the acquisition and analysis of acoustic echoes reflected from interfaces between layers with large acoustic impedance mismatch. Because interface echo amplitudes are marginal when the acoustic impedance of the substrate is close to that of the adhesive, a 25 kHz Lamb wave technique was developed to be employed in such cases, albeit with reduced resolution. Modeling the ultrasonic echoes and Lamb-wave signals was accomplished using mathematical expressions developed from the physics of acoustic transmission, attenuation and reflection in layered media. The models were validated by experimental results from a variety of bond joint materials, geometries and conditions, thereby confirming the validity of the methodology used for extracting interpretations from the phase-sensitive indications, as well as identifying the range and limits of applications. Results

  16. Endothelial cell–cell adhesion during zebrafish vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Yap, Alpha S; Hogan, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate vasculature is an essential organ network with major roles in health and disease. The establishment of balanced cell–cell adhesion in the endothelium is crucial for the functionality of the vascular system. Furthermore, the correct patterning and integration of vascular endothelial cell–cell adhesion drives the morphogenesis of new vessels, and is thought to couple physical forces with signaling outcomes during development. Here, we review insights into this process that have come from studies in zebrafish. First, we describe mutants in which endothelial adhesion is perturbed, second we describe recent progress using in vivo cell biological approaches that allow the visualization of endothelial cell–cell junctions. These studies underline the profound potential of this model system to dissect in great detail the function of both known and novel regulators of endothelial cell–cell adhesion. PMID:24621476

  17. Thermal conductance of copper-cyanoacrylate adhesive YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ joints between 5 and 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, N.; Chaussy, J.; Mazuer, J.; Odin, J.

    We have measured the thermal conductance per unit area of joints made of cyanoacrylate adhesive between a copper block and various YBa 2Cu 2O 7-δ samples. Below 70 K, the thermal resistance is mainly due to the interfaces between materials. A rough estimate of the bulk thermal conductivity in the high temperature range leads to the value of 0.3 W m -1 K -1, i.e. of the same order of magnitude as for other adhesives commonly used in low temperature experimental physics.

  18. Cell adhesion molecules involved in intrathymic T cell development.

    PubMed

    Patel, D D; Haynes, B F

    1993-08-01

    During stem cell migration to the thymus, intrathymic maturation of T cells, and emigration of mature T cells out of the thymus, intercellular interactions of developing T cells with a myriad of cell types are required for normal T cell development. Intercellular interactions of T cell precursors with endothelial cells, thymic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, thymic macrophages and dendritic cells are all mediated by adhesion molecules on immature T cells binding to ligands on thymic microenvironment cells. While many receptor-ligand interactions that are important in intrathymic T cell development are known, the adhesion molecules that are important for migration of T cell precursors to the thymus and for emigration of mature thymocytes from the thymus are poorly understood. An emerging concept is that select adhesion molecules at discrete stages of T cell maturation participate in and regulate the complex processes of T cell development. PMID:7693023

  19. Traumatic dislocation of the incudostapedial joint repaired with fibrin tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Vasilios

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of traumatic dislocation of the incudostapedial joint (ISJ) and a simple method for controlled application of the glue using commercial fibrin tissue adhesive. A 26-year-old female presented to our ENT clinic for hearing impairment to her left ear 2 months after a head trauma due to a motorcycle accident. The audiogram revealed a 40- to 50-dB HL conductive hearing loss with a notch configuration in bone conduction curve on the left ear. Computed tomography of the left temporal bone revealed a longitudinal fracture line. An exploratory tympanotomy was performed under general anesthesia. The ISJ was found dislocated while the incus was trapped by the edges of the bony lateral attic wall fracture. A small bony edge that impeded incus movement was removed and a small amount of the glue was precisely applied to the lenticular process of the incus with an angled incision knife. The long process of the incus was firmly pressed over the stapes for 30 seconds with a 90° hook and 60 seconds after the application of the glue the ISJ was repaired. One year after our patient achieved full airbone gap (ABG) closure (ABG, ≤10 dB HL), while she demonstrated overclosure in frequencies 2 and 4 kHz. Fibrin tissue glue allowed safe, rapid, and accurate repair of the ISJ and resulted in an anatomically normal articulation as the mass and shape of the ossicles was preserved. Moreover, our patient achieved full ABG closure. PMID:21344438

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROPHOBIC SUBSTANCE TO MITIGATE PAVEMENT ICE ADHESION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The specific problem to which this report is addressed is the development of a hydrophobic substance to mitigate the adhesion of ice to pavement as an alternative to deicing chemicals. The factors involved in evaluating this concept are the following: Economics; safety; environme...

  1. Spherical Joint Piston and Connecting Rod Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy, the NASA Lewis Research Center manages a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Technology (HDET) research program. The overall program objectives are to reduce fuel consumption through increased engine efficiency, reduce engine exhaust emissions, and provide options for the use of alternative fuels. The program is administered with a balance of research contracts, university research grants, and focused in-house research. The Cummins Engine Company participates in the HDET program under a cost-sharing research contract. Cummins is researching and developing in-cylinder component technologies for heavy-duty diesel engines. An objective of the Cummins research is to develop technologies for a low-emissions, 55-percent thermal efficiency (LE-55) engine. The best current-production engines in this class achieve about 46-percent thermal efficiency. Federal emissions regulations are driving this technology. Regulations for heavy duty diesel engines were tightened in 1994, more demanding emissions regulations are scheduled for 1998, and another step is planned for 2002. The LE-55 engine emissions goal is set at half of the 1998 regulation level and is consistent with plans for 2002 emissions regulations. LE-55 engine design requirements to meet the efficiency target dictate a need to operate at higher peak cylinder pressures. A key technology being developed and evaluated under the Cummins Engine Company LE-55 engine concept is the spherical joint piston and connecting rod. Unlike conventional piston and connecting rod arrangements which are joined by a pin forming a hinged joint, the spherical joint piston and connecting rod use a ball-and-socket joint. The ball-and-socket arrangement enables the piston to have an axisymmetric design allowing rotation within the cylinder. The potential benefits of piston symmetry and rotation are reduced scuffing, improved piston ring sealing, improved lubrication, mechanical and thermal

  2. Atypical molecular profile for joint development in the avian costal joint.

    PubMed

    Winslow, B B; Burke, A C

    2010-10-01

    Development of synovial joints involves generation of cartilaginous anlagen, formation of interzones between cartilage anlagen, and cavitation of interzones to produce fluid filled cavities. Interzone development is not fully understood, but interzones are thought to develop from skeletogenic cells that are inhibited from further chondrogenic development by a cascade of gene expression including Wnt and Bmp family members. We examined the development of the rarely studied avian costal joint to better understand mechanisms of joint development. The costal joint is found within ribs, is morphologically similar to the metatarsophalangeal joint, and undergoes cavitation in a similar manner. In contrast to other interzones, Wnt14/9a, Gdf5, Chordin, Barx1, and Bapx1 are absent from the costal joint interzone, consistent with the absence of active β-catenin and phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8. However Autotaxin and Noggin are expressed. The molecular profile of the costal joint suggests there are alternative mechanisms of interzone development. PMID:20730871

  3. Postoperative Adhesion Development Following Cesarean and Open Intra-Abdominal Gynecological Operations

    PubMed Central

    Awonuga, Awoniyi O.; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of adhesion development, the impact of physiological changes associated with pregnancy on markers of adhesion development, and the clinical implications of adhesion development following cesarean delivery (CD). Although peritoneal adhesions develop after the overwhelming majority of intra-abdominal and pelvic surgery, there is evidence in the literature that suggests that patients having CD may develop adhesions less frequently. However, adhesions continue to be a concern after CD, and are likely significant, albeit on average less than after gynecological operations, but with potential to cause significant delay in the delivery of the baby with serious, lifelong consequences. Appreciation of the pathophysiology of adhesion development described herein should allow a more informed approach to the rapidly evolving field of intra-abdominal adhesions and should serve as a reference for an evidence-based approach to consideration for the prevention and treatment of adhesions. PMID:21775773

  4. Improvement of the T-peel Strength of Polypropylene Adhesion Joints by Surface Photografting Pre-Treatment with Methyl Methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balart, R.; Sánchez-Nácher, L.; Balart, J.; Fombuena, V.; España, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    Although polypropylene is one of the most used polymers at industrial level due to good balanced properties, it presents some restrictions in applications that require good adhesion properties as well as coating and painting. These restrictions are related to its non polar nature which leads to low wetting properties. So that, in most cases, it is necessary a previous surface pre-treatment in order to improve adhesion properties. These surface treatments could be physical or chemical. Among the wide variety of physical processes, plasma technologies are useful from both technical and environmental points of view. If we take into account economic considerations, chemical processes are interesting due to low cost equipment and procedures. In particular, we have used photografting of methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer on polypropylene substrates with UV radiation and initiators. This process is useful to promote chemical modification of polypropylene surface by grafting MMA monomers into polypropylene polymer chains. Due to polarity of some groups in MMA monomers, it is possible to increase surface wettability thus promoting a remarkable increase in adhesion properties of polypropylene. In this work, changes in wettability of polypropylene surfaces in terms of the exposure time to UV radiation in presence of MMA monomers and initiators has been investigated. Furthermore, chemical changes have been characterized by FTIR analysis and mechanical performance of adhesion joints has been evaluated by T-peel tests.

  5. Development of hydrocolloid Bi-layer dressing with bio-adhesive and non-adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Iqbal H; Islam, Jahid M M; Kabir, Wasifa; Rahman, Ataur; Mizan, Maria; Rahman, M Fizur; Amin, Jakia; Khan, Mubarak A

    2016-12-01

    Bio-active bi-layer thin film having both bio-adhesive and non-adhesive end composed of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and gelatin/chitosan/polyethylene glycol (PEG) blend was developed for biomedical applications especially as an alternative of advanced tissue scaffold. The developed composite film was subjected to mechanical, thermal and physico-chemical characterization such as tensile strength (TS) and elongation at break (Eb), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluid drainage capacity and biocompatibility. Suitable packaging was also selected and stability study and aging test of the composite film were performed after packing. The incorporation of chitosan and PEG into gelatin showed improved mechanical properties of both TS and Eb, which suggested the occurrence of interaction among gelatin, chitosan and PEG molecules in the composite film. The presence of crosslinking as an interaction of above three polymers was also confirmed by FTIR study. Results from the DSC study suggested increased thermal stability after crosslinking. On the other hand, water uptake studies suggested excellent fluid drainage capability and hydro-stability of the composite film. The proposed dressing also showed excellent biocompatibility. Based on the studies related to the performance with confirmed identity, we concluded that our developed bi-layer film is very potential as an ideal wound dressing material. PMID:27612753

  6. Development of processing diagrams for polymeric die attach adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Jen-Chou

    With a processing diagram, one can reduce the effort required to customize curing process conditions for polymeric die attach adhesives. Polymeric die attach adhesives are often cured per the manufacturer's recommendations during initial screening evaluations. In most cases, the recommended cure schedules have to be modified so as to fit differences in process equipment. Unfortunately, the modified cure schedule is usually determined by a trial-and-error method. An aim of our experiments is to understand the curing process of a wide range of polymeric die attach adhesives (conventional, fast, and snap cure adhesives) and to construct a processing diagram, i.e., "Bondability Diagram", so as to define the processing window. Such diagrams should be helpful in determining both the time and cure temperature required to produce high quality bonds. The bondability diagram can be constructed based on fundamental understandings of the phenomena involved in the curing process using a wide variety of tools. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is utilized to study the cure kinetics and the extent of reaction. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) is used to determine gelation times and melt viscosity under a shear mode. A modified Rheovibron is employed to perform cure characterizations under a tensile mode so that cure stresses could be determined. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) is used to evaluate the outgassing phenomena. Optical Microscopy (OM) is used to detect voids. Results indicate that the cure behaviors of conventional, fast, and snap cure adhesives are different in several respects. The combination of DSC, DMA, TGA, OM, and lap shear test leads to a frame work of developing the bondability diagram concept. The bondability diagram concept provides a foundation for an understanding of the recommended cure schedule and allows one to design their own cure schedule.

  7. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  8. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  9. Measurement of longitudinal strain and estimation of peel stress in adhesive-bonded single-lap joint of CFRP adherend using embedded FBG sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, X.; Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Uzawa, K.; Wada, D.

    2012-04-01

    In this research, longitudinal strain and peel stress in adhesive-bonded single-lap joint of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) were measured and estimated by embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Two unidirectional CFRP substrates were bonded by epoxy to form a single-lap configuration. The distributed strain measurement system is used. It is based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), which can provide measurement at an arbitrary position along FBG sensors with the high spatial resolution. The longitudinal strain was measured based on Bragg grating effect and the peel stress was estimated based on birefringence effect. Special manufacturing procedure was developed to ensure the embedded location of FBG sensor. A portion of the FBG sensor was embedded into one of CFRP adherends along fiber direction and another portion was kept free for temperature compensation. Photomicrograph of cross-section of specimen was taken to verify the sensor was embedded into proper location after adherend curing. The residual strain was monitored during specimen curing and adhesive joint bonding process. Tensile tests were carried out and longitudinal strain and peel stress of the bondline are measured and estimated by the embedded FBG sensor. A two-dimensional geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was performed by ANSYS to evaluate the measurement precision.

  10. Expression of adhesion molecules on synovial fluid and peripheral blood monocytes in patients with inflammatory joint disease and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koller, M; Aringer, M; Kiener, H; Erlacher, L; Machold, K; Eberl, G; Studnicka-Benke, A; Graninger, W; Smolen, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the presence of adhesion molecules on monocytes/macrophages (Mϕ) from peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory joint diseases (rheumatoid (RA) and reactive arthritis (ReA)) in order to improve our understanding of the possible mechanisms underlying the inflammatory process.
METHODS—Whole blood and SF cells were stained with monoclonal antibodies against CD11a (LFA-1), CD15 s (sialyl-Lewis X), CD44, CD54, VLA-4, and HLA-DR counterstained with anti-CD14 antibodies as a Mϕ marker for dual fluorescence analysis by flowcytometry. 
RESULTS—On PB-Mϕ, CD15s was markedly increased in both RA as well as ReA compared with OA. Furthermore, in the PB LFA-1, CD44, and HLA-DR showed a higher surface density on Mϕ in ReA than in OA. Comparison between SF and PB showed significantly higher CD44 and CD54 expression on SF-Mϕ. These molecules play an important part in lymphocyte-Mϕ interaction.
CONCLUSION—In PB from patients with inflammatory joint diseases, Mϕ are activated, allowing recruitment into the synovial compartment. These disorders, in contrast with OA seem to be "systemic" in nature. Within the SF, different adhesion molecules are expressed on CD14+ Mϕ as compared with PB.

 PMID:10531076

  11. Development of Bonded Joint Technology for a Rigidizable-Inflatable Deployable Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2006-01-01

    Microwave and Synthetic Aperture Radar antenna systems have been developed as instrument systems using truss structures as their primary support and deployment mechanism for over a decade. NASA Langley Research Center has been investigating fabrication, modular assembly, and deployment methods of lightweight rigidizable/inflatable linear truss structures during that time for large spacecraft systems. The primary goal of the research at Langley Research Center is to advance these existing state-of-the-art joining and deployment concepts to achieve prototype system performance in a relevant space environment. During 2005, the development, fabrication, and testing of a 6.7 meter multi-bay, deployable linear truss was conducted at Langley Research Center to demonstrate functional and precision metrics of a rigidizable/inflatable truss structure. The present paper is intended to summarize aspects of bonded joint technology developed for the 6.7 meter deployable linear truss structure while providing a brief overview of the entire truss fabrication, assembly, and deployment methodology. A description of the basic joint design, surface preparation investigations, and experimental joint testing of component joint test articles will be described. Specifically, the performance of two room temperature adhesives were investigated to obtain qualitative data related to tube folding testing and quantitative data related to tensile shear strength testing. It was determined from the testing that a polyurethane-based adhesive best met the rigidizable/inflatable truss project requirements.

  12. An Investigation of the Tensile Strength of a Composite-To-Metal Adhesive Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.; Karatzas, Vassilios A.

    2011-04-01

    The present study examines the feasibility of a simple concept composite-to-metal butt joint through the performance of both numerical and experimental studies. The composite part is made of glass/epoxy unidirectional layers made with the vacuum bag method. The geometry of the joint is typical for marine applications and corresponds to a low stiffness ratio. Two major parameters are investigated, namely the overlap length and the surface preparation of the steel adherent. Manufacturing of specimens and the procedure of the tensile tests are described in detail, giving hints for obtaining a better quality joint. Axial elongation and strains at various places of the joint were monitored and also numerically calculated. The tests revealed that the joint is quite effective, irrespectively of the steel surface preparation method. The failure loads are comparable and in some cases superior to other corresponding values found in the literature. The numerical models proved to adequately predict the structural response of the joint up to the loading where debonding starts.

  13. Development and test of the ITER SC conductor joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gung, C. Y.; Jayakumar, R.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Michael, P.; Minervini, J.; Randall, A.

    1998-08-05

    Joints for the ITER superconducting Central Solenoid should perform in rapidly varying magnetic field with low losses and low DC resistance. This paper describes the design of the ITER joint and presents its assembly process. Two joints were built and tested at the PTF facility at MIT. Test results are presented; losses in transverse and parallel field and the DC performance are discussed. The developed joint demonstrates sufficient margin for baseline ITRR operating scenarios.

  14. Development and test of the ITER conductor joints

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N., LLNL

    1998-05-14

    Joints for the ITER superconducting Central Solenoid should perform in rapidly varying magnetic field with low losses and low DC resistance. This paper describes the design of the ITER joint and presents its assembly process. Two joints were built and tested at the PTF facility at MIT. Test results are presented, losses in transverse and parallel field and the DC performance are discussed. The developed joint demonstrates sufficient margin for baseline ITER operating scenarios.

  15. Development of a qualification standard for adhesives used in hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licari, J. J.; Weigand, B. L.; Soykin, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Improved qualification standards and test procedures for adhesives used in microelectronic packaging are developed. The test methods in specification for the Selection and Use of Organic Adhesives in Hybrid Microcircuits are reevaluated versus industry and government requirements. Four electrically insulative and four electrically conductive adhesives used in the assembly of hybrid microcircuits are selected to evaluate the proposed revised test methods. An estimate of the cost to perform qualification testing of an adhesive to the requirements of the revised specification is also prepared.

  16. Develop, demonstrate, and verify large area composite structural bonding with polyimide adhesives. [adhesively bonding graphite-polyimide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhombal, B. D.; Wykes, D. H.; Hong, K. C.; Stenersen, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The technology required to produce graphite-polyimide structural components with operational capability at 598 K (600 F) is considered. A series of polyimide adhesives was screened for mechanical and physical properties and processibility in fabricating large midplane bonded panels and honeycomb sandwich panels in an effort to fabricate a structural test component of the space shuttle aft body flap. From 41 formulations, LaRC-13, FM34B-18, and a modified LaRC-13 adhesive were selected for further evaluation. The LaRC-13 adhesive was rated as the best of the three adhesives in terms of availability, cost, processibility, properties, and ability to produce void fee large area (12" x 12") midplane bonds. Surface treatments and primers for the adhesives were evaluated and processes were developed for the fabrication of honeycomb sandwich panels of very good quality which was evidenced by rupture in the honeycomb core rather than in the facesheet bands on flatwise tensile strength testing. The fabrication of the adhesively bonded honeycomb sandwich cover panels, ribs, and leading edge covers of Celion graphite/LARC-160 polyimide laminates is described.

  17. Rapid Development of Wet Adhesion between Carboxymethylcellulose Modified Cellulose Surfaces Laminated with Polyvinylamine Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Pelton, Robert; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-09-14

    The surface of regenerated cellulose membranes was modified by irreversible adsorption of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Pairs of wet CMC-modified membranes were laminated with polyvinylamine (PVAm) at room temperature, and the delamination force for wet membranes was measured for both dried and never-dried laminates. The wet adhesion was studied as a function of PVAm molecular weight, amine content, and deposition pH of the polyelectrolyte. Surprisingly the PVAm-CMC system gave substantial wet adhesion that exceeded that of TEMPO-oxidized membranes with PVAm for both dried and never-dried laminates. The greatest wet adhesion was achieved for fully hydrolyzed high molecular weight PVAm. Bulk carboxymethylation of cellulose membranes gave inferior wet adhesion combined with PVAm as compared to CMC adsorption which indicates that a CMC layer of the order of 10 nm was necessary. There are no obvious covalent cross-linking reactions between CMC and PVAm at room temperature, and on the basis of our results, we are instead attributing the wet adhesion to complex formation between the PVAm and the irreversibly adsorbed CMC at the cellulose surface. We propose that interdigitation of PVAm chains into the CMC layer is responsible for the high wet adhesion values. PMID:27552256

  18. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  19. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaoguang; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Kanai, Makoto; Ohsawa, Isamu; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test.

  20. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Thermal Degradation in Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Mal, Ajit K.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in lap joints is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds in lap joints is a prerequisite to the design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures. Furthermore, the lap joint may be subject to high-temperature environments in service. Early detection of the degree of thermal degradation in adhesive bonds is required under these circumstances. A variety of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques can be used to determine the thickness and the elastic moduli of adhesively bonded joints. In this paper we apply a previously developed technique based on the leaky Lamb wave (LLW) experiment to investigate the possibility of characterizing the thermal degradation of adhesive bonds in lap joints. The degradation of the adhesive bonds is determined through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  1. Adhesively-Bonded Structural Composite Joint Utilizing Shoulder-Centered Sleeves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukowski, Florian P., Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite joint includes a first member having a groove therein, a second member adjacent to the first member, and a connector member disposed between the second member and the first member. The connector member is received in the groove so as to bias a load path between the first member and the second member from a peripheral portion to a central portion of the connector member.

  2. New method of determination of spot welding-adhesive joint fatigue life using full field strain evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, T.; Kneć, M.

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted since more than two hundred years ago. Despite this long period, as fatigue phenomena are very complex, assessment of fatigue response of standard materials or composites still requires a long time. Quite precise way to estimate fatigue parameters is to test at least 30 standardized specimens for the analysed material and further statistical post processing is required. In case of structural elements analysis like hybrid joints (Figure 1), the situation is much more complex as more factors influence the fatigue load capacity due to much more complicated structure of the joint in comparison to standard materials specimen, i.e. occurrence of: welded hot spots or rivets, adhesive layers, local notches creating the stress concentrations, etc. In order to shorten testing time some rapid methods are known: Locati's method [1] - step by step load increments up to failure, Prot's method [2] - constant increase of the load amplitude up to failure; Lehr's method [2] - seeking for the point during regular fatigue loading when an increase of temperature or strains become non-linear. The present article proposes new method of the fatigue response assessment - combination of the Locati's and Lehr's method.

  3. Use of Hydration Inhibitors to Improve Bond Durability of Aluminum Adhesive Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Ahearn, J. S.; Matienzo, L. J.; Venables, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the mechanisms by which nitrilotris methylene phosphonic acid (NTMP) and related compounds are adsorbed onto oxidized aluminum surfaces to inhibit hydration and increase the durability of adhesive bonds formed with inhibitor-treated panels. P - O - Al bonds are identified as the basis of adsorption, and it is found that water initially adsorbed onto the etched aluminum surfaces is displaced by the NTMP. The hydration of the NTMP-treated surfaces occurs in three stages, namely the reverisble physisorption of water, the slow dissolution of NTMP followed by rapid hydration of the freshly exposed Al2O3 to AlOOH and further hydration of the surface to Al(OH)3. Five properties of an ideal inhibitor are identified.

  4. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most

  5. [Experimental research of the influences on the development of the hip joints with excavated acetabula].

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Chen, X; Tang, C

    1996-12-01

    There are still arguments about the operation excavated acetabula treatments for the congenital dislocation of the hip. To inquire into the influences on the development of the hip joints with excavated acetabula size, we divided 60 two-month-old chickens into three groups which were given incised dislocation and then reduction partly excavated the cartilages of the acetabula and excavated them totally to the left hips respectively. Contrasting observation of all the experimental chickens was taken on the right ones of their own. The second group achieved a fair function of the joint movement. Limited and slight adhesion was not affecting the development of the joints seriously. The third group had, on the contrary, poor functions because of the comprehensive adhesion in the acetabula. The surfaces of the acetabula were replaced by fabric tissue. The remaining or regenerating cartilage cells vary obviously under the light scope and the electronic scope. The heads of the femurs had changed similarly. It is suggested that in dealing with the congenital dislocation of the hip, excavating the acetabola cartilage is not advisable. Partly excavating is permitted when a limited bony process existing in the bottom of the acetabula. PMID:9590781

  6. Children's Developing Commitments to Joint Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamann, Katharina; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated young children's commitment to a joint goal by assessing whether peers in collaborative activities continue to collaborate until all received their rewards. Forty-eight 2.5- and 3.5-year-old children worked on an apparatus dyadically. One child got access to her reward early. For the partner to benefit as well, this child…

  7. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  8. On the potential for fibronectin/phosphorylcholine coatings on PTFE substrates to jointly modulate endothelial cell adhesion and hemocompatibility properties

    PubMed Central

    Montaño-Machado, Vanessa; Chevallier, Pascale; Mantovani, Diego; Pauthe, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomolecules as coatings on biomaterials is recognized to constitute a promising approach to modulate the biological response of the host. In this work, we propose a coating composed by 2 biomolecules susceptible to provide complementary properties for cardiovascular applications: fibronectin (FN) to enhance endothelialization, and phosphorylcholine (PRC) for its non thrombogenic properties. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was selected as model substrate mainly because it is largely used in cardiovascular applications. Two approaches were investigated: 1) a sequential adsorption of the 2 biomolecules and 2) an adsorption of the protein followed by the grafting of phosphorylcholine via chemical activation. All coatings were characterized by immunofluorescence staining, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy analyses. Assays with endothelial cells showed improvement on cell adhesion, spreading and metabolic activity on FN-PRC coatings compared with the uncoated PTFE. Platelets adhesion and activation were both reduced on the coated surfaces when compared with uncoated PTFE. Moreover, clotting time tests exhibited better hemocompatibility properties of the surfaces after a sequential adsorption of FN and PRC. In conclusion, FN-PRC coating improves cell adhesion and non-thrombogenic properties, thus revealing a certain potential for the development of this combined deposition strategy in cardiovascular applications. PMID:25785369

  9. Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Irick, David Kim; Kenney, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

  10. Development of a torsion balance for adhesion measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Chikayoshi; Masuo, Ryuichi

    1988-01-01

    A new torsion balance for study of adhesion in ceramics is discussed. A torsion wire and a linear variable differential transformer are used to monitor load and to measure pull-off force (adhesion force). The investigation suggests that this torsion balance is valuable in studying the interfacial properties of ceramics in controlled environments such as in ultrahigh vacuum. The pull-off forces measured in dry, moist, and saturated nitrogen atmosphere demonstrate that the adhesion of silicon nitride contacts remains low at humidities below 80 percent but rises rapidly above that. The adhesion at saturation is 10 times or more greater than that below 80 percent relative humidity. The adhesion in a saturated atmosphere arises primarily from the surface tension effects of a thin film of water adsorbed on the surface. The surface tension of the water film was 58 x 10 to the minus 5 to 65 x 10 to the minus 5 power. The accepted value for water is 72.7 x 10 to the minus 5 power N/cm. Adhesion characteristics of silicon nitride in contact with metals, like the friction characteristics of silicon carbide to metal contacts, can be related to the relative chemical activity of metals in ultrahigh vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the adhesion.

  11. The Development of Action Planning in a Joint Action Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus.…

  12. Temperamental and Joint Attentional Predictors of Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Brenda J.; Dixon, Wallace E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Individual differences in child temperament have been associated with individual differences in language development. Similarly, relationships have been reported between early nonverbal social communication (joint attention) and both temperament and language. The present study examined whether individual differences in joint attention might…

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADHESIVE CANDLE FILTER SAFEGUARD DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; Ann K. Henderson; Jan W. Nowok; Michael L. Swanson

    2002-01-01

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal conversion. Two main types of systems employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles. In both systems, suspended particulates must be cleaned from the gas stream before it enters the turbine so as to prevent fouling and erosion of the turbine blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in use in several facilities. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the particulates on the surface. The three main configurations of the barrier filters are candle, cross-flow, and tube filters. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer on the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle and individual elements can fail, allowing particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Preventing all failure of individual ceramic filter elements is not possible at the present state of development of the technology. Therefore, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the particulates streaming through occasional broken filters from reaching the turbine. However, the SGD must allow for the free passage of gas when it is not activated. Upon breaking of a filter, the SGD must either mechanically close or quickly plug with filter dust to prevent additional dust from reaching the turbine. Production of a dependable rapidly closing autonomous mechanical

  14. Development and characterization of a novel hydrogel adhesive for soft tissue applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lindsey Kennedy

    With laparoscopic and robotic surgical techniques advancing, the need for an injectable surgical adhesive is growing. To be effective, surgical adhesives for internal organs require bulk strength and compliance to avoid rips and tears, and adhesive strength to avoid leakage at the application site, while not hindering the natural healing process. Although a number of tissue adhesives and sealants approved by the FDA for surgical use are currently available, attaining a useful balance in all of these qualities has proven difficult, particularly when considering applications involving highly expandable tissue, such as bladder and lung. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a hydrogel-based tissue adhesive that provides proper mechanical properties to eliminate the need for sutures in various soft tissue applications. Tetronic (BASF), a 4-arm poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PPO-PEO) block copolymer, has been selected as the base material for the adhesive hydrogel system. Solutions of Tetronic T1107 can support reverse thermal gelation at physiological temperatures, which can be combined with covalent crosslinking to achieve a "tandem gelation" process making it ideal for use as a tissue adhesive. The objective of this doctoral thesis research is to improve the performance of the hydrogel based tissue adhesive developed previously by Cho and co-workers by applying a multi-functionalization of Tetronic. Specifically, this research aimed to improve bonding strength of Tetronic tissue adhesive using bi-functional modification, incorporate hemostatic function to the bi-functional Tetronic hydrogel, and evaluate the safety of bi-functional Tetronic tissue adhesive both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, we have developed a fast-curing, mechanically strong hemostatic tissue adhesive that can control blood loss in wet conditions during wound treatment applications (bladder, liver and muscle). Specifically, the bi-functional Tetronic adhesive (TAS) with a

  15. Heterogeneity of cell adhesion molecules in the developing nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Cell-surface molecules, especially glycoproteins, are believed to mediate interactions between developing neurons and their environment. These interactions include pathfinding by growing processes, recognition of appropriate targets, and formation of synaptic structures. In order to identify neuronal cell-surface molecules, monoclonal antibodies (Mab's) were prepared against synaptic fractions from adult rat brain. From this group three monoclonal antibodies, designated 3C5.59, 3G5.34, and 3G6.41, that react with cell-surface antigens of embryonic neurons were selected for further study. In immunofluoresence experiments each of these antibodies strongly reacted with the processes of cultured granule cell neurons, the major class of small cerebellar neurons, cultured from developing rat cerebellum. Mab's 3C5.59 and 3G5.34 reacted only with neurons in the cerebellar cultures. Mab 3G6.41, however, also reacted with cultured brain astrocytes. On frozen sections Mab's 3G5.34 and 3G6.41 also strongly stained the molecular layer, the site of active granule cell axon growth, in the developing cerebellum. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) were used to compare the two glycoproteins recognized by Mab 3G6.41 with N-CAM. Band 1, another large neuronal cell-surface glycoprotein was originally identified in mouse N18 neuroblastoma cells. In this study /sup 125/I-labeled N18-derived band 1 was tested for binding to 9 plant lectins and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin coupled to agarose beads. Band 1 solubilized from brain also specifically bound to LCA-agarose, indicating that mannose containing sugar moieties are present on band 1 from brain.

  16. Development of design and analysis methodology for composite bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Peter; Sawicki, Adam

    1991-05-01

    This paper summarizes work performed to develop composite joint design methodology for use on rotorcraft primary structure, determine joint characteristics which affect joint bearing and bypass strength, and develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of such characteristics in structural joints. Experimental results have shown that bearing-bypass interaction allowables cannot be defined using a single continuous function due to variance of failure modes for different bearing-bypass ratios. Hole wear effects can be significant at moderate stress levels and should be considered in the development of bearing allowables. A computer program has been developed and has successfully predicted bearing-bypass interaction effects for the (0/+/-45/90) family of laminates using filled hole and unnotched test data.

  17. Development of the Butt Joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-08-23

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) requires compact and reliable joints for its Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC). The baseline design is a diffusion bonded butt joint. In such a joint the mating cables are compacted to a very low void fraction in a copper sleeve and then heat treated. After the heat treatment the ends are cut, polished and aligned against each other and then diffusion bonded under high compression in a vacuum chamber at 750 C. The jacket is then welded on the conductor to complete the joint, which remarkably does not require more room than a regular conductor. This joint design is based on a proven concept developed for the ITER CS Model Coil that was successfully tested in the previous R&D phase.

  18. Antibacterial effect of dental adhesive containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate on the development of Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05). In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives. PMID:25046750

  19. Antibacterial Effect of Dental Adhesive Containing Dimethylaminododecyl Methacrylate on the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Weir, Michael D.; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05). In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives. PMID:25046750

  20. Cell-cell signaling and adhesion in phagocytosis and early development of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Bracco, E; Pergolizzi, B; Peracino, B; Ponte, E; Balbo, A; Mai, A; Ceccarelli, A; Bozzaro, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell-cell signaling and adhesion regulate transition from the unicellular to the multicellular stage of development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Essential gene networks involved in these processes have been identified and their interplay dissected. Heterotrimeric G protein-linked signal transduction plays a key role in regulating expression of genes mediating chemotaxis or cell adhesion, as well as coordinating actin-based cell motility during phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Two classes of cell adhesion molecules, one cadherin-like and the second belonging to the IgG superfamily, contribute to the strength of adhesion in Dictyostelium aggregates. The developmental role of genes involved in motility and adhesion, and their degree of redundancy, have been re-assessed by using novel developmental assay conditions which are closer to development in nature. PMID:11061438

  1. 24 CFR 570.411 - Joint Community Development Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... under 24 CFR part 570—Community Development Block Grants, subpart C—Eligible Activities. These... in accordance with 24 CFR part 58 must be carried out by the State or unit of general local... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Joint Community Development...

  2. 24 CFR 570.411 - Joint Community Development Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under 24 CFR part 570—Community Development Block Grants, subpart C—Eligible Activities. These... in accordance with 24 CFR part 58 must be carried out by the State or unit of general local... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint Community Development...

  3. 24 CFR 570.411 - Joint Community Development Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... under 24 CFR part 570—Community Development Block Grants, subpart C—Eligible Activities. These... in accordance with 24 CFR part 58 must be carried out by the State or unit of general local... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint Community Development...

  4. 24 CFR 570.411 - Joint Community Development Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... under 24 CFR part 570—Community Development Block Grants, subpart C—Eligible Activities. These... in accordance with 24 CFR part 58 must be carried out by the State or unit of general local... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Joint Community Development...

  5. 24 CFR 570.411 - Joint Community Development Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... under 24 CFR part 570—Community Development Block Grants, subpart C—Eligible Activities. These... in accordance with 24 CFR part 58 must be carried out by the State or unit of general local... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint Community Development...

  6. FLRT Structure: Balancing Repulsion and Cell Adhesion in Cortical and Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; del Toro, Daniel; Nagel, Daniel; Cop, Florian; Härtl, Ricarda; Ruff, Tobias; Seyit-Bremer, Gönül; Harlos, Karl; Border, Ellen Clare; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are broadly expressed proteins with the unique property of acting as homophilic cell adhesion molecules and as heterophilic repulsive ligands of Unc5/Netrin receptors. How these functions direct cell behavior and the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. Here we use X-ray crystallography to reveal the distinct structural bases for FLRT-mediated cell adhesion and repulsion in neurons. We apply this knowledge to elucidate FLRT functions during cortical development. We show that FLRTs regulate both the radial migration of pyramidal neurons, as well as their tangential spread. Mechanistically, radial migration is controlled by repulsive FLRT2-Unc5D interactions, while spatial organization in the tangential axis involves adhesive FLRT-FLRT interactions. Further, we show that the fundamental mechanisms of FLRT adhesion and repulsion are conserved between neurons and vascular endothelial cells. Our results reveal FLRTs as powerful guidance factors with structurally encoded repulsive and adhesive surfaces. PMID:25374360

  7. Etiology of osteoarthritis: genetics and synovial joint development.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Linda J

    2012-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has a considerable hereditary component and is considered to be a polygenic disease. Data derived from genetic analyses and genome-wide screening of individuals with this disease have revealed a surprising trend: genes associated with OA tend to be related to the process of synovial joint development. Mutations in these genes might directly cause OA. In addition, they could also determine the age at which OA becomes apparent, the joint sites involved, the severity of the disease and how rapidly it progresses. In this Review, I propose that genetic mutations associated with OA can be placed on a continuum. Early-onset OA is caused by mutations in matrix molecules often associated with chondrodysplasias, whereas less destructive structural abnormalities or mutations confer increased susceptibility to injury or malalignment that can result in middle-age onset. Finally, mutations in molecules that regulate subtle aspects of joint development and structure lead to late-onset OA. In this Review, I discuss the genetics of OA in general, but focus on the potential effect of genetic mutations associated with OA on joint structure, the role of joint structure in the development of OA--using hip abnormalities as a model--and how understanding the etiology of the disease could influence treatment. PMID:22231237

  8. Development and characterization of amorphous acrylate networks for use as switchable adhesives inspired from shapememory behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhera, Nishant

    Several types of insects and animals such as spiders and geckos are inherently able to climb along vertical walls and ceilings. This remarkable switchable adhesive behavior has been attributed to the fibrillar structures on their feet, with size ranging from few nanometers to a few micrometers depending on the species. Several studies have attempted to create synthetic micro-patterned surfaces trying to imitate this adhesive behavior seen in nature. The experimental procedures are scattered, with sole purpose of trying to increase adhesion, thereby making direct comparison between studies very difficult. There is a lack of fundamental understanding on adhesion of patterned surfaces. The influence of critical parameters like material modulus, glass transition temperature, viscoelastic effects, temperature and water absorption on adhesion is not fully explored and characterized. These parameters are expected to have a decisive influence on adhesion behavior of the polymer. Previous studies have utilized conventional "off-the-shelf" materials like epoxy, polyurethanes etc. It is however, impossible to change the material modulus, glass transition temperature etc. of these polymer systems without changing the base constituents itself, thereby explaining the gaps in the current research landscape. The purpose of this study was to use acrylate shape-memory polymers (SMPs) for their ability to be tailored to specific mechanical properties by control of polymer chemistry, without changing the base constituents. Polymer networks with tailorable glass transition, material modulus, water absorption etc. were developed and adhesion studies were performed to investigate the influence of temperature, viscoelastic effects, material modulus on the adhesion behavior of flat acrylate polymer surfaces. The knowledge base gained from these studies was utilized to better understand the fundamental mechanisms associated with adhesion behavior of patterned acrylate surfaces. Thermally

  9. α-Tocopheryl Succinate as a Scaffold to Develop Potent Inhibitors of Breast Cancer Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dasheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Weng, Shu-Chuan; Huang, Po-Hsien; Hsieh, Hao-Yu; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2009-01-01

    This study is aimed at the pharmacological exploitation of α-tocopheryl succinate (1) to develop potent anti-adhesion agents. Considering the structural cooperativity between the phytyl chain and the carboxylic terminus in determining the anti-adhesion activity, our structural optimization led to compound 5 ([2-(4,8-dimethyl-non-1-enyl)-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-chroman-6-yloxy]-acetic acid), which exhibited an-order-of-magnitude higher potency than 1 in blocking the adhesion of 4T1 metastatic breast cancer cells to extracellular matrix proteins (IC50, 0.6 μM versus 10 μM). Evidence indicates that the ability of compound 5 to block cell adhesion and migration was attributable to its effect on disrupting focal adhesion and actin cytoskeletal integrity by facilitating the degradation of focal adhesion kinase. Interactions between tumor cells and the ECM in the tumor microenvironment have been increasingly recognized as critical modulators of the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Consequently, the ability of compound 5 to block such interactions provides a unique pharmacological tool to shed light onto mechanisms that govern cell adhesion and tumor metastasis. PMID:19708661

  10. A Study of the Effect of Adhesive and Matrix Stiffnesses on the Axial, Normal, and Shear Stress Distributions of a Boron-epoxy Reinforced Composite Joint. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a symmetrical, eight-step, titanium-boron-epoxy joint are discussed. A study of the effect of adhesive and matrix stiffnesses on the axial, normal, and shear stress distributions was made using the finite element method. The NASA Structural Analysis Program (NASTRAN) was used for the analysis. The elastic modulus of the adhesive was varied from 345 MPa to 3100 MPa with the nominal value of 1030 MPa as a standard. The nominal values were used to analyze the stability of the joint. The elastic moduli were varied to determine their effect on the stresses in the joint.

  11. The development of action planning in a joint action context.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus. Their task was to hand the experimenter a tool with which she could activate 1 of 2 different effects on the apparatus. The elicitation of each effect required participants to grasp and insert the tool in a particular orientation. We assessed whether participants planned their grasping and reaching action in such a way that it enabled the partner to efficiently handle the tool, that is, anticipating the final end state of the joint activity. We found that 3-year-old children did not adjust their behavior to accommodate the other's action and that they did not increase their performance over multiple trials. Five- and 7-year-old children initially showed a tendency to plan their action in an egocentric manner (i.e., showed a form of egocentrism), but improved their joint action performance over time. Adult participants demonstrated joint action planning from the beginning. Interestingly, 3- and 5-year-old children were able to plan their grasp efficiently when acting alone on the apparatus. Yet, having first-hand experience with the task before acting with a partner did not facilitate performance in the joint action task for younger children. Overall, the study informs current approaches on the psychological basis and ontogenetic origins of joint action in childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337512

  12. PLASMA POLYMER FILMS AS ADHESION PROMOTING PRIMERS FOR ALUMINUM. PART II: STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF LAP JOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films (~800 A in thickness) were deposited onto 6111-T4 aluminum substrates in radio frequency and microwave powered reactors and used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Processing variables such as substrate pre-treatment,...

  13. The Development of Educational Facilities through Joint Use Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This paper was prepared as an outgrowth of a Getty Center symposium sponsored by New Schools Better Neighborhoods (NSBN) and its partner organizations in May 1999. The subject of joint use, generically meaning the development of K-12 education facilities in combination with other facilities such as parks or libraries, was broached at the Getty…

  14. Development of a Simple Repair Method Using Structural Bonding Tape to Stop Water Leakage from Joints of Small-Scale Concrete Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takehisa; Nakaya, Tetsuo; Ishigami, Akio; Kato, Tomotake

    The study of small-scale concrete canals which had been repaired using simple methods under direct management by farmers or facility managers revealed that the main cause of deterioration of these canals was water leakage caused by failures of joints between sections of the concrete. And the study also revealed that the usual repair methods were insufficiently durable and simple. To solve these problems, a simple repair method was developed in which the canal joints are covered with structural bonding tape and sealant to prevent water leakage. This method satisfied the performance requirements (leak prevention, adhesion, and allowing expansion and contraction of the joint). Moreover, the developed method made farmers possible to repair canal joints in a short time, and no defects in the repaired joints appeared for at least 2 years.

  15. Tbx1 regulates oral epithelial adhesion and palatal development

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Richardson, James A.; Srivastava, Deepak; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate, the most frequent congenital craniofacial birth defect, is a multifactorial condition induced by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In addition to complete cleft palate, a large number of human cases involve soft palate cleft and submucosal cleft palate. However, the etiology of these forms of cleft palate has not been well understood. T-box transcriptional factor (Tbx) family of transcriptional factors has distinct roles in a wide range of embryonic differentiation or response pathways. Here, we show that genetic disruption of Tbx1, a major candidate gene for the human congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome), led to abnormal epithelial adhesion between the palate and mandible in mouse, resulting in various forms of cleft palate similar to human conditions. We found that hyperproliferative epithelium failed to undergo complete differentiation in Tbx1-null mice (Tbx1−/−). Inactivation of Tbx1 specifically in the keratinocyte lineage (Tbx1KCKO) resulted in an incomplete cleft palate confined to the anterior region of the palate. Interestingly, Tbx1 overexpression resulted in decreased cell growth and promoted cell-cycle arrest in MCF7 epithelial cells. These findings suggest that Tbx1 regulates the balance between proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes and is essential for palatal fusion and oral mucosal differentiation. The impaired adhesion separation of the oral epithelium together with compromised palatal mesenchymal growth is an underlying cause for various forms of cleft palate phenotypes in Tbx1−/− mice. Our present study reveals new pathogenesis of incomplete and submucous cleft palate during mammalian palatogenesis. PMID:22371266

  16. Recent developments in polyimide adhesives at NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Adhesive development is directed towards elevated temperature applications (200-300 C). Because of thermal stability considerations, the most attractive adhesives for this temperature range are linear and addition polyimides. The linear polymide adhesive research encompassed basic structure-property relationships, solvent studies and formulations to meet various requirements. The most recent research in linear polyimide systems was in the development of thermoplastic systems in an effort to eliminate the undesirable evolution of water classically associated with the cure going through an amide-acid intermediate step in the cure process. Addition polyimide adhesive research was undertaken in order to avoid water evolution during cure. Basic structure-property relationships for these materials led to an adhesive which was used extensively for high temperature adhesive needs. Since addition systems are of a highly crosslinked nature, they are not as resistant to impact as their linear counterparts. In order to overcome this problem, research was done in the area of elastomer-toughening these polymers.

  17. The design and development of a finger joint simulator.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Artificial finger joints lack the long-term clinical success seen with hip and knee prostheses. In part, this can be explained by the challenges of rheumatoid arthritis, a progressive disease which attacks surrounding tissues as well as the joint itself. Therefore, the natural finger joints' biomechanics are adversely affected, and consequently, this imbalance due to subluxing forces further challenges any prosthesis. Many different designs of finger prosthesis have been offered over a period of greater than 50 years. Most of these designs have failed, and it is likely that many of these failures could have been identified had the prostheses been appropriately tested prior to implantation into patients. While finger joint simulators have been designed, arguably only those from a single centre have been able to reproduce clinical-type failures of the finger prostheses tested in them. This article describes the design and development of a finger simulator at Durham University, UK. It explains and justifies the engineering decisions made and thus the evolution of the finger simulator. In vitro results and their linkage to clinical-type failures are outlined to help to show the effectiveness of the simulator. Failures of finger implants in vivo continue to occur, and the need for appropriate in vitro testing of finger prostheses remains strong. PMID:26833697

  18. Development of restraint material and tucked fabric joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmullen, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate and select a suitable restraint material for the exterior of space suits pressurized to 4.0 PSID for normal operations, and to develop and improve tucked fabric joints for motions associated with the human shoulder, elbow, knee, waist, hip, ankle, and wrist. The many attributes of the end items are summarized to include structural integrity, simplicity, low maintenance, lightweight, high durability, low elongation, full range mobility, long life, and resistance to degradation in the operational environment.

  19. The joint DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Repa, J.V. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The joint Department of Defense (DoD)/Department of Energy (DOE) Munitions Technology Development Program is a cooperative, jointly funded effort of research and development to improve nonnuclear munitions technology across all service mission areas. This program is enabled under a Memorandum of Understanding, approved in 1985 between the DoD and the DOE, that tasks the nuclear weapons laboratories of the DOE to solve problems in conventional defense. The selection of the technical areas to be investigated is based on their importance to the military services, the needs that are common to the conventional and nuclear weapons programs, the expertise of the performing organization, and the perceived benefit to the overall national defense efforts. The research benefits both DoD and DOE programs; therefore, funding, planning, and monitoring are joint activities. Technology Coordination Groups (TCGs), organized by topical areas, serve as technology liaisons between the DoD and DOE for the exchange of information. The members of the TCGs are technical experts who meet semiannually in an informal workshop format to coordinate multiagency requirements, establish project plans, monitor technical activity, and develop classification guidance. A technical advisory committee of senior DoD and DOE managers administers the program and provides guidance on policy and strategy. The abstracts in this volume were collected from the technical progress report for fiscal year 1993. The annual report is organized by major technology areas. Telephone and fax numbers for the principal contacts are provided with each abstract.

  20. A Longitudinal Analysis of Joint Attention and Language Development in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tek, Saime

    2010-01-01

    Joint attention (JA), which occurs when two individuals focus on the same object or event, plays a critical role in social and language development. Two major kinds of joint attention have been observed: response to joint attention (RJA), in which children follow the attentional focus of their social partners, and initiation of joint attention…

  1. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  2. Failure stress criterion for adhesively bonded joint at different strain rates by using dynamic Arcan test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Ludovic; Bourel, Benjamin; Lauro, Franck; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Carrere, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the failure criterion evolution of assembly bonded with a strain rate dependent adhesive. A new modified ARCAN device is then designed to obtain the average stress at failure under different loading angles and for strain up to 350 s-1. Tests are performed on a hydraulic jack machine and a Digital Image Correlation measurement is used to control the opening and the sliding displacements of the two substrates.

  3. Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) Developed for Repairing Shuttle Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced in-space repair technologies for reinforced carbon/carbon composite (RCC) thermal protection system (TPS) structures are critically needed for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) efforts. These technologies are also critical for the repair and refurbishment of thermal protection system structures of future Crew Exploration Vehicles of space exploration programs. The Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) material developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated capabilities for repair of small cracks and damage in RCC leading-edge material. The concept consists of preparing an adhesive paste of desired ceramic in a polymer/phenolic resin matrix with appropriate additives, such as surfactants, and then applying the paste into the damaged or cracked area of the RCC composite components with caulking guns. The adhesive paste cures at 100 to 120 C and transforms into a high-temperature ceramic during simulated vehicle reentry testing conditions.

  4. Escherichia coli adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility on biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Gomes, L C; Silva, L N; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to test materials typically used in the construction of medical devices regarding their influence in the initial adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility of Escherichia coli biofilms. Adhesion and biofilm development was monitored in 12-well microtiter plates containing coupons of different biomedical materials--silicone (SIL), stainless steel (SS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)--and glass (GLA) as control. The susceptibility of biofilms to ciprofloxacin and ampicillin was assessed, and the antibiotic effect in cell morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface hydrophobicity of the bacterial strain and materials was also evaluated from contact angle measurements. Surface hydrophobicity was related with initial E. coli adhesion and subsequent biofilm development. Hydrophobic materials, such as SIL, SS, and PVC, showed higher bacterial colonization than the hydrophilic GLA. Silicone was the surface with the greatest number of adhered cells and the biofilms formed on this material were also less susceptible to both antibiotics. It was found that different antibiotics induced different levels of elongation on E. coli sessile cells. Results revealed that, by affecting the initial adhesion, the surface properties of a given material can modulate biofilm buildup and interfere with the outcome of antimicrobial therapy. These findings raise the possibility of fine-tuning surface properties as a strategy to reach higher therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25044887

  5. Development of in situ gelling and bio adhesive 5-Fluorouracil enema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil's concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  6. Development of a multifunctional adhesive system for prevention of root caries and secondary caries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A. S.; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jason; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel adhesive for prevention of tooth root caries and secondary caries by possessing a combination of protein-repellent, antibacterial, and remineralization capabilities for the first time; and (2) investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) on dentine bond strength, protein-repellent properties, and dental plaque microcosm biofilm response. Methods MPC, DMAHDM and NACP were added into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose primer and adhesive. Dentine shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive coating thickness, surface texture and dentine-adhesive interfacial structure were examined. Protein adsorption onto adhesive resin surface was determined by the micro bicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used to investigate biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production. Results The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP did not adversely affect dentine shear bond strength (p > 0.1). The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP produced a coating on root dentine with a thickness of approximately 70 μm and completely sealed all the dentinal tubules. The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP had 95% reduction in protein adsorption, compared to SBMP control (p < 0.05). The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP was strongly antibacterial, with biofilm CFU being four orders of magnitude lower than that of SBMP control. Significance The novel multifunctional adhesive with strong protein-repellent, antibacterial and remineralization properties is promising to coat tooth roots to prevent root caries and secondary caries. The combined use of MPC, DMAHDM and NACP may have wide applicability to bonding agents, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit caries. PMID:26187532

  7. New piston telemetry applied to spherical joint piston development

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczynski, P.D.; Varo, R.G.; Archuleta, S.A.; Galarno, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    A new telemetry system has been developed for temperature or strain measurements on a spherical joint piston. The system includes a piston mounted signal multiplexer and transmitter. A patented, piston mounted power generator operates in conjunction with a modified cylinder liner. The telemetry system is robust, having high inertia load capability and high environmental temperature operating capability. The telemetry system was installed and operated on an engine motoring test rig. Temperature signals were transmitted at engine speeds from 400 rpm to 2,100 rpm. Over 100 hours of high engine speed testing with oil sump temperatures up to 122 C were completed.

  8. Investigation of the design and static behavior of cylindrical tubular composite adhesive joints utilizing the finite element method and stress-based failure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Michael D.

    2011-12-01

    The stress and strength behavior of cylindrical tubular adhesive joints composed of dissimilar materials was explored. This was accomplished with the finite element method (FEM) and stress-based failure theories. Also, it was shown how a design of experiments (DOE) based method can be used to objectively organize the process of optimizing joint strength by using stress-based failure criteria. The finite element program used in this work was written in-house from scratch to implement the FEM for the purpose of solving both axisymmetric and three-dimensional linear elastic governing equations of static equilibrium. The formulation of the three-dimensional model is presented, and the required operations to arrive to the axisymmetric model are also presented. The axisymmetric model is two dimensional, capable of using four and eight node quadrilateral elements. However, only four node elements are used because a mesh of eight node elements requires more memory and increased mesh refinement. The three-dimensional model is capable of using eight and twenty node brick elements, but only eight node brick elements are used for the same reason. Both of the axisymmetric and three-dimensional models calculate the nodal displacements, strains, stress values for each material, and strength values for each material. The external static loads can be individually applied, or coupled together. The outputs seem to be most useful for interpretation when plotted through-the-thickness (TTT) and along-the-length (ATL) of the joint or tube. Outputs are valid only for materials that behave linearly elastic up to (or near) failure, and the stress-based failure criteria are used to define that limit. A small laboratory-sized joint was modeled to look at the theoretical stress and strength distributions plotted along-the-length of the joint at different radial locations. These stress and strength distributions can be correlated to the type of load being applied because of unique or prominent

  9. Auto-Adhesion Potential of Extraocular Aqp0 during Teleost Development.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2016-01-01

    AQP0 water channels are the most abundant proteins expressed in the mammalian lens fiber membranes where they are essential for lens development and transparency. Unlike other aquaporin paralogs, mammalian AQP0 has a low intrinsic water permeability, but can form cell-to-cell junctions between the lens fibers. It is not known whether the adhesive properties of AQP0 is a derived feature found only in mammals, or exists as a conserved ancestral trait in non-mammalian vertebrates. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, expresses four Aqp0 paralogs in the developing lens, but also expresses significant levels of aqp0 mRNAs and proteins in the epithelia of the pronephros, presumptive enterocytes, gill filament and epidermis. Quantitative PCR reveals that aqp0 mRNA titres increase by three orders of magnitude between the onset of somitogenesis and pigmentation of the eye. Using in situ hybridization and specific antisera, we show that at least two of the channels (Aqp0a1, -0b1 and/or -0b2) are localized in the extraocular basolateral and apical membranes, while Aqp0a2 is lens-specific. Heterologous expression of the Aqp0 paralogs in adhesion-deficient mouse fibolast L-cells reveals that, as for human AQP0, each intact salmon channel retains cell-to-cell adhesive properties. The strongest Aqp0 interactions are auto-adhesion, suggesting that homo-octamers likely form the intercellular junctions of the developing lens and epithelial tissues. The present data are thus the first to show the adhesion potential of Aqp0 channels in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and further uncover a novel extraocular role of the channels during vertebrate development. PMID:27153052

  10. Auto-Adhesion Potential of Extraocular Aqp0 during Teleost Development

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2016-01-01

    AQP0 water channels are the most abundant proteins expressed in the mammalian lens fiber membranes where they are essential for lens development and transparency. Unlike other aquaporin paralogs, mammalian AQP0 has a low intrinsic water permeability, but can form cell-to-cell junctions between the lens fibers. It is not known whether the adhesive properties of AQP0 is a derived feature found only in mammals, or exists as a conserved ancestral trait in non-mammalian vertebrates. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, expresses four Aqp0 paralogs in the developing lens, but also expresses significant levels of aqp0 mRNAs and proteins in the epithelia of the pronephros, presumptive enterocytes, gill filament and epidermis. Quantitative PCR reveals that aqp0 mRNA titres increase by three orders of magnitude between the onset of somitogenesis and pigmentation of the eye. Using in situ hybridization and specific antisera, we show that at least two of the channels (Aqp0a1, -0b1 and/or -0b2) are localized in the extraocular basolateral and apical membranes, while Aqp0a2 is lens-specific. Heterologous expression of the Aqp0 paralogs in adhesion-deficient mouse fibolast L-cells reveals that, as for human AQP0, each intact salmon channel retains cell-to-cell adhesive properties. The strongest Aqp0 interactions are auto-adhesion, suggesting that homo-octamers likely form the intercellular junctions of the developing lens and epithelial tissues. The present data are thus the first to show the adhesion potential of Aqp0 channels in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and further uncover a novel extraocular role of the channels during vertebrate development. PMID:27153052

  11. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  12. Adhesion mechanisms of bituminous crack sealant to aggregate and laboratory test development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajialiakbari Fini, Elham

    fundamental property that can be used to predict adhesion. The stable interface debonding process makes this test attractive. This test also may be used to estimate the optimum annealing time, and to quantify other interface characteristics, such as the moisture susceptibility of a bond. In addition, the elastic modulus of the sealant and its residual stresses can be determined analytically. While the direct adhesion test is proposed as part of newly-developed performance-based guidelines for the selection of hot-poured crack sealant, the blister test may be used to estimate the optimum annealing time, in addition to IFE determination.

  13. Development of flexible joint for 500kV Al-sheathed O. F. cable

    SciTech Connect

    Komaba, T.; Kanai, K. ); Yoshida, S.; Shigetoshi, I.; Amano, K. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on a flexible dimensionaly flush joint for 500kV aluminum-sheathed oil-filled cables capable of being assembled, pulled an installed in a similar manner to cables at site which has been developed. This joint is intended for use at intermediate points on long bridges or tunnels where local assembly and installation of conventional joints would be difficult. In developing the joint various novel and original techniques have been employed, including the flexible flush jointing of segmental conductors, the flexible jointing of paper insulation by a combination of wrapping-back and stepping methods, plus on-site aluminum sheath corrugating and sealing methods.

  14. Adhesive Pili in UTI Pathogenesis and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Caitlin N; Hultgren, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, affecting 150 million people each year worldwide. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens are making it imperative to develop alternative strategies for the treatment and prevention of this common infection. In this Review, we discuss how understanding the: (i) molecular and biophysical basis of host-pathogen interactions; (ii) consequences of the molecular cross-talk at the host pathogen interface in terms of disease progression; and (iii) pathophysiology of UTIs is leading to efforts to translate this knowledge into novel therapeutics to treat and prevent these infections. PMID:26999218

  15. Adhesive Pili in UTI Pathogenesis and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Caitlin N.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, affecting 150 million people each year worldwide. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens are making it imperative to develop alternative strategies for the treatment and prevention of this common infection. In this Review, we discuss how understanding the: (i) molecular and biophysical basis of host-pathogen interactions; (ii) consequences of the molecular cross-talk at the host pathogen interface in terms of disease progression; and (iii) pathophysiology of UTIs is leading to efforts to translate this knowledge into novel therapeutics to treat and prevent these infections. PMID:26999218

  16. Numerical Non-Equilibrium and Smoothing of Solutions in The Difference Method for Plane 2-Dimensional Adhesive Joints / Nierównowaga Numeryczna i Wygładzanie Rozwiazań w Metodzie Różnicowej Dla Dwuwymiarowych Połączeń Klejowych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    The subject of the paper is related to problems with numerical errors in the finite difference method used to solve equations of the theory of elasticity describing 2- dimensional adhesive joints in the plane stress state. Adhesive joints are described in terms of displacements by four elliptic partial differential equations of the second order with static and kinematic boundary conditions. If adhesive joint is constrained as a statically determinate body and is loaded by a self-equilibrated loading, the finite difference solution is sensitive to kinematic boundary conditions. Displacements computed at the constraints are not exactly zero. Thus, the solution features a numerical error as if the adhesive joint was not in equilibrium. Herein this phenomenon is called numerical non-equilibrium. The disturbances in displacements and stress distributions can be decreased or eliminated by a correction of loading acting on the adhesive joint or by smoothing of solutions based on Dirichlet boundary value problem.

  17. Joint United States/Japanese criticality data development program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hachiya, Y.; Koyama, T.; Smolen, G.R.; Whitesides, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    A joint program on the subject of criticality data development has been initiated by the US Department of Energy and the Japan Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. A large number of critical experiments are planned to enhance the data base of mixed plutonium and uranium solution experiments. These data will be used to validate computer codes and cross-section libraries so that nuclear fuel recycling facilities can be designed to operate more safely and economically. The program also encompasses the development of a Subcriticality Measurement System which utilizes the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method. The system will be used to measure the subcriticality states of several experimental arrangements.

  18. Development of Non-Cell Adhesive Vascular Grafts Using Supramolecular Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    van Almen, Geert C; Talacua, Hanna; Ippel, Bastiaan D; Mollet, Björne B; Ramaekers, Mellany; Simonet, Marc; Smits, Anthal I P M; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Kluin, Jolanda; Dankers, Patricia Y W

    2016-03-01

    Cell-free approaches to in situ tissue engineering require materials that are mechanically stable and are able to control cell-adhesive behavior upon implantation. Here, the development of mechanically stable grafts with non-cell adhesive properties via a mix-and-match approach using ureido-pyrimidinone (UPy)-modified supramolecular polymers is reported. Cell adhesion is prevented in vitro through mixing of end-functionalized or chain-extended UPy-polycaprolactone (UPy-PCL or CE-UPy-PCL, respectively) with end-functionalized UPy-poly(ethylene glycol) (UPy-PEG) at a ratio of 90:10. Further characterization reveals intimate mixing behavior of UPy-PCL with UPy-PEG, but poor mechanical properties, whereas CE-UPy-PCL scaffolds are mechanically stable. As a proof-of-concept for the use of non-cell adhesive supramolecular materials in vivo, electrospun vascular scaffolds are applied in an aortic interposition rat model, showing reduced cell infiltration in the presence of only 10% of UPy-PEG. Together, these results provide the first steps toward advanced supramolecular biomaterials for in situ vascular tissue engineering with control over selective cell capturing. PMID:26611660

  19. [Joint morphogenesis and development of permanent articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    During limb skeletogenesis progenitor mesenchymal cells aggregate at specific times and sites to form continuous precartilaginous condensations. With time the condensations undergo chondrogenesis and give rise to cartilaginous anlagen that exhibit incipient synovial joints at each end. A multitude of factors regulates subdivision into discrete skeletal elements and the formation, organization, morphogenesis and structure of the joints. This review summarizes recent advance of joint morphogenesis and actions of key players of joint and articular cartilage formation. In addition, we would like to discuss possible direction to translate basic research findings towards treatment of joint diseases. PMID:21628794

  20. Development of molded, coated fabric joints: Fabric construction criteria for a spacesuit elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a molded, coated fabric elbow joint capable of operating reliably at 8 psi internal pressure for extended periods of flexure is considered. The overall design of the joint includes: (1) selection of heatsettable fiber of sufficient strengths; (2) choosing an optimum fabric construction; (3) a fatigue resistant; flexible coating; and (4) a molding technique. A polyester yarn of type 56 Dacron and a urethane coating system were selected. The relationships between yarn and weave parameters which lead to an optimum fabric construction for the 8 psi elbow joint are defined.

  1. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  2. Development and application of biomimetic electrospun nanofibers in total joint replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei

    Failure of osseointegration (direct anchorage of an implant by bone formation at the bone-implant surface) and implant infection (such as that caused by Staphylococcus aureus, S. aureus) are the two main causes of implant failure and loosening. There is a critical need for orthopedic implants that promote rapid osseointegration and prevent bacterial colonization, particularly when placed in bone compromised by disease or physiology of the patients. A better understanding of the key factors that influence cell fate decisions at the bone-implant interface is required. Our study is to develop a class of "bone-like" nanofibers (NFs) that promote osseointegration while preventing bacterial colonization and subsequent infections. This research goal is supported by our preliminary data on the preparation of coaxial electrospun NFs composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymers arranged in a core-sheath shape. The PCL/PVA NFs are biocompatible and biodegradable with appropriate fiber diameter, pore size and mechanical strength, leading to enhanced cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast precursor cells. The objective is to develop functionalized "bone-like" PCL/PVA NFs matrix embedded with antibiotics (doxycycline (Doxy), bactericidal and anti-osteoclastic) on prosthesis surface. Through a rat tibia implantation model, the Doxy incorporated coaxial NFs has demonstrated excellent in promoting osseointegration and bacteria inhibitory efficacy. NFs coatings significantly enhanced the bonding between implant and bone remodeling within 8 weeks. The SA-induced osteomyelitis was prevented by the sustained release of Doxy from NFs. The capability of embedding numerous bio-components including proteins, growth factors, drugs, etc. enables NFs an effective solution to overcome the current challenged issue in Total joint replacement. In summary, we proposed PCL/PVA electrospun nanofibers as promising biomaterials that can be applied on

  3. The Orphan Adhesion-GPCR GPR126 Is Required for Embryonic Development in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Waller-Evans, Helen; Prömel, Simone; Langenhan, Tobias; Dixon, John; Zahn, Dirk; Colledge, William H.; Doran, Joanne; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Davies, Ben; Aparicio, Samuel A. J. R.; Grosse, Johannes; Russ, Andreas P.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion-GPCRs provide essential cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in development, and have been implicated in inherited human diseases like Usher Syndrome and bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria. They are the second largest subfamily of seven-transmembrane spanning proteins in vertebrates, but the function of most of these receptors is still not understood. The orphan Adhesion-GPCR GPR126 has recently been shown to play an essential role in the myelination of peripheral nerves in zebrafish. In parallel, whole-genome association studies have implicated variation at the GPR126 locus as a determinant of body height in the human population. The physiological function of GPR126 in mammals is still unknown. We describe a targeted mutation of GPR126 in the mouse, and show that GPR126 is required for embryonic viability and cardiovascular development. PMID:21124978

  4. Early focus development effort, ultrasonic inspection of fixed housing metal-to-adhesive bondline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, John K.; Hoskins, Brad R.; Karner, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique was developed for the fixed housing metal-to-adhesive bondline that will support the Flight 15 time frame and subsequent motors. The technique has the capability to detect a 1.0 inch diameter unbond with a 90 percent probability of detection (POD) at a 95 percent confidence level. The technique and support equipment will perform within the working envelope dictated by a stacked motor configuration.

  5. Emerging Roles of BAI Adhesion-GPCRs in Synapse Development and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Duman, Joseph G; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Tolias, Kimberley F

    2016-01-01

    Synapses mediate communication between neurons and enable the brain to change in response to experience, which is essential for learning and memory. The sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, dendritic spines, undergo rapid remodeling that is important for neural circuit formation and synaptic plasticity. Abnormalities in synapse and spine formation and plasticity are associated with a broad range of brain disorders, including intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and schizophrenia. Thus, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate these neuronal processes is critical for understanding brain function and disease. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI) subfamily of adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) has recently emerged as central regulators of synapse development and plasticity. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of BAIs at synapses, highlighting their regulation, downstream signaling, and physiological functions, while noting the roles of other adhesion-GPCRs at synapses. We will also discuss the relevance of BAIs in various neurological and psychiatric disorders and consider their potential importance as pharmacological targets in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26881134

  6. Emerging Roles of BAI Adhesion-GPCRs in Synapse Development and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Joseph G.; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2016-01-01

    Synapses mediate communication between neurons and enable the brain to change in response to experience, which is essential for learning and memory. The sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, dendritic spines, undergo rapid remodeling that is important for neural circuit formation and synaptic plasticity. Abnormalities in synapse and spine formation and plasticity are associated with a broad range of brain disorders, including intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and schizophrenia. Thus, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate these neuronal processes is critical for understanding brain function and disease. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI) subfamily of adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) has recently emerged as central regulators of synapse development and plasticity. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of BAIs at synapses, highlighting their regulation, downstream signaling, and physiological functions, while noting the roles of other adhesion-GPCRs at synapses. We will also discuss the relevance of BAIs in various neurological and psychiatric disorders and consider their potential importance as pharmacological targets in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26881134

  7. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development. PMID:26757815

  8. Joint Development of a Fourth Generation Single Crystal Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walston, S.; Cetel, A.; MacKay, R.; OHara, K.; Duhl, D.; Dreshfield, R.

    2004-01-01

    A new, fourth generation, single crystal superalloy has been jointly developed by GE Aircraft Engines, Pratt & Whitney, and NASA. The focus of the effort was to develop a turbine airfoil alloy with long-term durability for use in the High Speed Civil Transport. In order to achieve adequate long-time strength improvements at moderate temperatures and retain good microstructural stability, it was necessary to make significant composition changes from 2nd and 3rd generation single crystal superalloys. These included lower chromium levels, higher cobalt and rhenium levels and the inclusion of a new alloying element, ruthenium. It was found that higher Co levels were beneficial to reducing both TCP precipitation and SRZ formation. Ruthenium caused the refractory elements to partition more strongly to the ' phase, which resulted in better overall alloy stability. The final alloy, EPM 102, had significant creep rupture and fatigue improvements over the baseline production alloys and had acceptable microstructural stability. The alloy is currently being engine tested and evaluated for advanced engine applications.

  9. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  10. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40–70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. PMID:26096083

  11. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

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    2010-05-04

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  15. Southeast Asian seas: joint development of hydrocarbons in overlapping claim areas

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, M.J.; Miyoshi, M.

    1986-01-01

    There are ocean areas of overlapping claims in Southeast Asia with significant petroleum potential which appear to be candidates for joint development, a process in which boundary disputes are set aside and the claimants jointly explore and exploit any hydrocarbon resources in such areas. Factors influencing the choice of joint development are delineated and described. The best candidate areas for joint development in Southeast Asia are the areas of overlap between Vietnam and Kampuchea in the eastern Gulf of Thailand and the Timor gap between Indonesia and Australia. The overlap between Vietnam and China in the Gulf of Tonkin and parts of the Dangerous Ground could become candidates for joint development if political relations change. Joint development schemes include agreement on the extent of the area in question, on the contractual system, and on the degree of autonomy and authority of the joint development body. Hypothetical schemes for joint development of some candidate areas are described. Although joint development is neither the optimal nor the permanent solution to unresolved boundaries, it will look increasingly attractive if the need for oil intensifies and precedents mount. 5 figures.

  16. Cryogenic/high temperature structural adhesives. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are described of the work performed to develop a structural adhesive system which possesses useful properties over a 20K (-423 F) to 589 K (600 F) temperature range. Adhesives systems based on polyimide, polyphenylquinoxaline polyquinoxaline, polybenzothiazole and polybenzimidazole polymers first were screened for suitability. Detailed evaluation of two polyimide adhesive sytems, Br34/FM34 and P4/A5F or P4A/A5FA, and one polyphenylquinoxaline adhesive system, PPQ II (IMW), then was performed. Property information was generated over the full temperature range for shear strength, stressed and unstressed thermal aging, thermal shock and coefficient of thermal expansion. Both polyimide adhesive systems were identified as being capable of providing structural adhesive joints for cryogenic/high temperature service.

  17. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

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  1. 76 FR 24974 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

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  2. Genetic Influences on Temporomandibular Joint Development and Growth.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; Jing, Junjun; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small synovial joint at which the mandible articulates with the skull during movements involved in speaking and mastication. However, the secondary cartilage lining its joint surfaces is indicative of a very different developmental history than limb cartilages. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genes that regulate the formation of primary components of the TMJ, as well as genes that regulate postnatal growth of the TMJ. Although the TMJ is regulated by some of the same genes that are important in limb joints, others appear unique to the TMJ or have different actions. Runx2, Sox9, and members of the TGF-β/BMP family are critical drivers of chondrogenesis during condylar cartilage morphogenesis, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is important for formation of the articular disc and cavitation. Osterix (Osx) is a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation during postnatal TMJ growth. PMID:26589922

  3. High current density, cryogenically cooled sliding electrical joint development

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.

    1986-09-01

    In the past two years, conceptual designs for fusion energy research devices have focussed on compact, high magnetic field configurations. The concept of sliding electrical joints in the large magnets allows a number of technical advantages including enhanced mechanical integrity, remote maintainability, and reduced project cost. The rationale for sliding electrical joints is presented. The conceptual configuration for this generation of experimental devices is highlghted by an approx. 20 T toroidal field magnet with a flat top conductor current of approx. 300 kA and a sliding electrical joint with a gross current density of approx. 0.6 kA/cm/sup 2/. A numerical model was used to map the conductor current distribution as a function of time and position in the conductor. A series of electrical joint arrangements were produced against the system code envelope constraints for a specific version of the Ignition Studies Project (ISP) which is designated as 1025.

  4. Amigo Adhesion Protein Regulates Development of Neural Circuits in Zebrafish Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Aho, Vilma; Peltola, Marjaana A.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti; Rauvala, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    The Amigo protein family consists of three transmembrane proteins characterized by six leucine-rich repeat domains and one immunoglobulin-like domain in their extracellular moieties. Previous in vitro studies have suggested a role as homophilic adhesion molecules in brain neurons, but the in vivo functions remain unknown. Here we have cloned all three zebrafish amigos and show that amigo1 is the predominant family member expressed during nervous system development in zebrafish. Knockdown of amigo1 expression using morpholino oligonucleotides impairs the formation of fasciculated tracts in early fiber scaffolds of brain. A similar defect in fiber tract development is caused by mRNA-mediated expression of the Amigo1 ectodomain that inhibits adhesion mediated by the full-length protein. Analysis of differentiated neural circuits reveals defects in the catecholaminergic system. At the behavioral level, the disturbed formation of neural circuitry is reflected in enhanced locomotor activity and in the inability of the larvae to perform normal escape responses. We suggest that Amigo1 is essential for the development of neural circuits of zebrafish, where its mechanism involves homophilic interactions within the developing fiber tracts and regulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel to form functional neural circuitry that controls locomotion. PMID:24904058

  5. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  6. Development of assembly and joint concepts for erectable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.; Bluck, R. M.; Grotbeck, G. H.; Johnson, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    The technology associated with the on-orbit assembly of tetrahedral truss platforms erected of graphite epoxy tapered columns is examined. Associated with the assembly process is the design and fabrication of nine member node joints. Two such joints demonstrating somewhat different technology were designed and fabricated. Two methods of automatic assembly using the node designs were investigated, and the time of assembly of tetrahedral truss structures up to 1 square km in size was estimated. The effect of column and node joint packaging on the Space Shuttle cargo bay is examined. A brief discussion is included of operating cost considerations and the selection of energy sources. Consideration was given to the design assembly machines from 5 m to 20 m. The smaller machines, mounted on the Space Shuttle, are deployable and restowable. They provide a means of demonstrating the capabilities of the concept and of erecting small specialized platforms on relatively short notice.

  7. Development of a Enhanced Thermal Barrier for RSRM Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope is being considered as replacement for the RTV thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in RSRM nozzle joints, Performance requirements include its ability to cool propellant gases filter slag and particulates, and conform to various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Testing has shown its superior heat resistance, even in oxidative and corrosive environments. Testing has also demonstrated excellent performance of this system in sub-scale motors. Cold flow testing, has demonstrated its ability to conform to motor dynamics. Manufacture and assembly testing have demonstrated the ease of gland machining as well as assembly in a full-scale nozzle.

  8. Oocyte adhesiveness and embryonic development of Astyanax bimaculatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pisces: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Weber, André Alberto; Arantes, Fábio Pereira; Sato, Yoshimi; Rizzo, Elizete; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2013-05-01

    This study shows for the first time the presence of a jelly coat on oocytes of neotropical Characiformes fish. This structure could be responsible for the adhesiveness of Astyanax bimaculatus oocytes, a species widely distributed in South America including in the São Francisco River basin in Brazil. Adult specimens of A. bimaculatus were submitted to artificial reproduction in order to analyse the egg morphology and embryonic development. The eggs were fertilised and kept in incubators with a water temperature of 24°C so that embryogenesis could be monitored. Ovulated and unfertilised oocytes were also collected and submitted to routine histological techniques. Astyanax bimaculatus oocytes were found to be spherical, yellowish, and covered by a thin jelly coat with a slightly adhesive surface. The mean oocyte diameter was 1.03 ± 0.03 mm, the perivitelline space was 0.21 ± 0.02 mm and the jelly coat's thickness was 0.04 ± 0.01 mm. Positive periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain and Alcian blue stain pH 2.5 indicated the presence of neutral glycoproteins, and carboxylated acid glycoconjugates on the jelly coat that formed mucosubstances that may be associated with egg adhesiveness. At a water temperature of 24°C, blastopore closure and hatching occurred at 5 h and 17 h after fertilisation, respectively. The results of this study provide essential information for phylogenetic studies and for a better understanding of the reproductive strategy of A. bimaculatus, currently included in the incertae sedis group of the Characidae family due to the lack of monophyly among the families of the group. PMID:22717095

  9. Attachment of the Yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Is Mediated by Adhesives Localized at Sites of Bud Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Buck, James W.; Andrews, John H.

    1999-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides (anamorph, Rhodotorula glutinis) is a common phylloplane epiphyte with biocontrol potential. To understand how R. toruloides adheres to plant surfaces, we obtained nonadherent fungal mutants after chemical mutagenesis with methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester. Sixteen attachment-minus (Att−) mutants were identified by three methods: (i) screening capsule-minus colonies for loss of adhesive ability; (ii) enrichment for mutants unable to attach to polystyrene; and (iii) selection for reduced fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate-concanavalin A (Con A)-stained cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. None of the 16 mutants attached to polystyrene or barley leaves. The lectin Con A eliminated adhesion in all of the wild-type isolates tested. Hapten competition assays indicated that Con A bound to mannose residues on the cell surface. Adhesion of wild-type R. toruloides was transient; nonadhesive cells subsequently became adhesive, with bud development. All Att− mutants and nonattaching wild-type cells lacked polar regions that stained intensely with fluorescein isothiocyanate-Con A and India ink. Lectin, enzyme, and chemical treatments showed that the polar regions consisted of alkali-soluble materials, including mannose residues. Tunicamycin treatment reduced wild-type adhesion, indicating that the mannose residues could be associated with glycoproteins. We concluded that compounds, including mannose residues, that are localized at sites of bud development mediate adhesion of R. toruloides to both polystyrene and barley leaf surfaces. PMID:9925569

  10. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in nervous system development and disease.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, Tobias; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-09-01

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) class have emerged as crucial regulators of nervous system development, with important implications for human health and disease. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding of aGPCR functions during key steps in neural development, including cortical patterning, dendrite and synapse formation, and myelination. We focus on aGPCR modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signalling to control these varied aspects of neural development, and we discuss how impaired aGPCR function leads to neurological disease. We further highlight the emerging hypothesis that aGPCRs can be mechanically activated and the implications of this property in the nervous system. PMID:27466150

  11. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  12. Development of process to control residual stress distribution of butt weld joint of cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Nayama, Michisuke; Sakamoto, Naruo; Akitomo, Norio; Toyoda, Masao

    1995-12-31

    The authors develop new process to control residual stress distribution of butt weld joint of cylinder. This process, which is heating circularly at both side of butt weld joint and letting cool, can reduce tensile residual stress on inner surface near weld joint by operation from only outside of cylinder and its required temperature rise of this process is lower than ordinary PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) process. This paper describes the procedure and conditions of the process named ``both side heating`` by authors. The appropriate range of process conditions to get sufficient effect is confirmed by FEM stress history analysis and experiment in this paper. Experiments show that the inner residual stress near weld is reduced to compression from over yield stress at as weld condition in austenitic stainless steel pipe to pipe joints, pipe to elbow joints and pipe to valve joint after application of the process.

  13. The simulation of stress fibre and focal adhesion development in cells on patterned substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Amit; Deshpande, Vikram S; McMeeking, Robert M; Evans, Anthony G

    2007-01-01

    The remodelling of the cytoskeleton and focal adhesion (FA) distributions for cells on substrates with micro-patterned ligand patches is investigated using a bio-chemo-mechanical model. We investigate the effect of ligand pattern shape on the cytoskeletal arrangements and FA distributions for cells having approximately the same area. The cytoskeleton model accounts for the dynamic rearrangement of the actin/myosin stress fibres. It entails the highly nonlinear interactions between signalling, the kinetics of tension-dependent stress-fibre formation/dissolution and stress-dependent contractility. This model is coupled with another model that governs FA formation and accounts for the mechano-sensitivity of the adhesions from thermodynamic considerations. This coupled modelling scheme is shown to capture a variety of key experimental observations including: (i) the formation of high concentrations of stress fibres and FAs at the periphery of circular and triangular, convex-shaped ligand patterns; (ii) the development of high FA concentrations along the edges of the V-, T-, Y- and U-shaped concave ligand patterns; and (iii) the formation of highly aligned stress fibres along the non-adhered edges of cells on the concave ligand patterns. When appropriately calibrated, the model also accurately predicts the radii of curvature of the non-adhered edges of cells on the concave-shaped ligand patterns. PMID:17939980

  14. β-catenin-mediated adhesion is required for successful preimplantation mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Daniel; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; Lorthongpanich, Chanchao; Balu, Sathish; Solter, Davor; Knowles, Barbara B

    2016-06-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1) is integral to cell adhesion and to the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. The effects of maternal and zygotic CTNNB1 on embryogenesis have each been separately assessed, whereas the effect of its total absence has not. As the 'traditional' conditional Ctnnb1 knockout alleles give rise to truncated CTNNB1 fragments, we designed a new knockout allele incapable of CTNNB1 production. Mouse embryos lacking intact maternal/zygotic CTNNB1 from two knockout strains were examined in detail. Preimplantation embryos are formed, yet abnormalities in their size and shape were found throughout pre- and early postimplantation development. In the absence of the zona pellucida, embryos lacking CTNNB1 undergo fission and these separated blastomeres can become small trophoblastic vesicles, which in turn induce decidual reactions. Comparing the severity of this defective adhesion phenotype in embryos bearing the null allele with those carrying the 'traditional' knockout allele suggests a hypomorphic effect of the truncated CTNNB1 protein fragment, an important observation with possible impact on previous and future studies. PMID:27246714

  15. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  16. Partnerships between Public Schools and Private Developers. A Report of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoudian, Maria

    The California Legislature's Joint Legislative Audit Committee investigated several "joint venture" partnerships between school districts and the private sector to develop school district-owned properties to determine the feasibility of such innovative school construction projects. This report presents findings from seven of these public/private…

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Joint Attention and Language Development in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundy, Peter; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared to age-matched and language-matched controls, 15 autistic children (mean age of 45 months) who were administered the Early Social-Communication Scales displayed deficits in gestural joint attention skills in 2 testing sessions 13 months apart. The measure of gestural nonverbal joint attention predicted language development in subjects.…

  18. Development of a hip joint model for finite volume simulations.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, P; Karač, A; FitzPatrick, D; Ivanković, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper establishes a procedure for numerical analysis of a hip joint using the finite volume method. Patient-specific hip joint geometry is segmented directly from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging datasets and the resulting bone surfaces are processed into a form suitable for volume meshing. A high resolution continuum tetrahedral mesh has been generated, where a sandwich model approach is adopted; the bones are represented as a stiffer cortical shells surrounding more flexible cancellous cores. Cartilage is included as a uniform thickness extruded layer and the effect of layer thickness is investigated. To realistically position the bones, gait analysis has been performed giving the 3D positions of the bones for the full gait cycle. Three phases of the gait cycle are examined using a finite volume based custom structural contact solver implemented in open-source software OpenFOAM. PMID:24141555

  19. Hyperthyroidism is a Risk Factor for Developing Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder: A Nationwide Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Jia-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Wu, Chin-Wen; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk of adhesive capsulitis among hyperthyroidism patients. The data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID 2005) in Taiwan, using 1 million participants and a prospective population-based 7-year cohort study of survival analysis. The ambulatory-care claim records of patients diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes relating to hyperthyroidism between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007, were obtained. The prevalence and the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of adhesive capsulitis among hyperthyroid patients and the control group were estimated. Of 4472 hyperthyroid patients, 162 (671/100 000 person-years) experienced adhesive capsulitis during the 24 122 person-year follow-up period. The crude HR of stroke was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.49), which was larger than that of the control group. The adjusted HR of developing adhesive capsulitis was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.45) for hyperthyroid patients during the 7-year follow-up period, which achieved statistical significance. The results of our large-scale longitudinal population-based study indicated that hyperthyroidism is an independent risk factor of developing adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24567049

  20. Effect of polymer properties and adherend surfaces on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    High temperature polymer surface characteristics associated with joint strength were evaluated. Selected samples represented composite adherends, aluminum filler and fiber glass carrier cloth. Detailed analysis of fractured joint surfaces revealed unique characteristics typical of the specific adhesive formulations and test conditions. A fracture mechanism model was developed for correlating macroscopic shear strength and microstructure of fracture surfaces. Applications were made to unpublished data on polyimides and fluoropolymers.

  1. SALM4 suppresses excitatory synapse development by cis-inhibiting trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lie, Eunkyung; Ko, Ji Seung; Choi, Su-Yeon; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Cho, Yi Sul; Noh, Ran; Kim, Doyoun; Li, Yan; Kang, Hyeyeon; Choi, Tae-Yong; Nam, Jungyong; Mah, Won; Lee, Dongmin; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Hyun; Choi, Se-Young; Um, Ji Won; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Bae, Yong Chul; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate various aspects of synapse development, function and plasticity. These functions mainly involve trans-synaptic interactions and positive regulations, whereas cis-interactions and negative regulation are less understood. Here we report that SALM4, a member of the SALM/Lrfn family of synaptic adhesion molecules, suppresses excitatory synapse development through cis inhibition of SALM3, another SALM family protein with synaptogenic activity. Salm4-mutant (Salm4(-/-)) mice show increased excitatory synapse numbers in the hippocampus. SALM4 cis-interacts with SALM3, inhibits trans-synaptic SALM3 interaction with presynaptic LAR family receptor tyrosine phosphatases and suppresses SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation. Importantly, deletion of Salm3 in Salm4(-/-) mice (Salm3(-/-); Salm4(-/-)) normalizes the increased excitatory synapse number. These results suggest that SALM4 negatively regulates excitatory synapses via cis inhibition of the trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion. PMID:27480238

  2. Characterization of the role of cadherin in regulating cell adhesion during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; McClay, D R

    1997-12-15

    During development, the modulation of cadherin adhesive function is proposed to control various morphogenetic events including epithelial-mesenchymal conversions and tubulogenesis, although the mechanisms responsible for regulating cadherin activity during these events remain unclear. In order to gain insights into the regulation of cadherin function during morphogenesis, we utilized the sea urchin embryo as a model system to study the regulation of cadherin localization during epithelial-mesenchymal conversion and convergent-extension movements. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the cytoplasmic domain of a cloned sea urchin cadherin recognize three major polypeptides of M(r) 320, 140, and 125 kDa and specifically stain adherens junctions, and to a lesser extent, lateral membrane domains in all epithelial tissues of the embryo. Analysis of embryos during gastrulation demonstrates that changes in cadherin localization are observed in cells undergoing an epithelial-mesenchymal conversion. Ingression of primary mesenchyme cells is accompanied by the rapid loss of junctional cadherin staining and the coincident accumulation of cadherin in intracellular organelles. These data are consistent with the idea that the deadhesion of mesenchymal cells from neighboring epithelial cells involves the regulated endocytosis of cell surface cadherin molecules. Conversely, neither cadherin abundance nor localization is altered in cells of the gut which undergo convergent-extension movements during the formation of the archenteron. This observation indicates that these movements do not require the loss of junctional cadherin molecules. Instead, the necessary balance between adhesion and motility may be achieved by regulating the expression of different subtypes of cadherin molecules or modifying interactions between cadherins and catenins, proteins that bind the cytoplasmic domain of cadherin and are necessary for cadherin adhesive function. To address cadherin function at the

  3. Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented durable redundant joint. Both designs involve honeycomb sandwich structures with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined using adhesively bonded doublers.Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage within a structure. For structures that include multiple material systems, such as the joint designs under consideration, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be accounted for drastically increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, intraply matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The bonded joints were modeled using highly parametric, explicitly solved finite element models, with damage modeling implemented via custom user-written subroutines. Each ply was discretely meshed using three-dimensional solid elements. Layers of cohesive elements were included between each ply to account for the possibility of delaminations and were used to model the adhesive layers forming the joint. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and the predicted failure mechanism(s).

  4. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusables surface insulation, addendum 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1973-01-01

    The task consisted of conducting mechanical and thermal tests to establish design allowables data on a new room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone adhesive, X3-6004. Low modulus, coupled with relatively low density and good low-temperature properties of this adhesive, places it in contention as a candidate for attaching reusable surface insulation on the space shuttle. Data obtained show that the modulus values of X3-6004 are significantly lower than those of RTV-560 and the other three adhesives characterized at test temperatures from 550 to -175 F. At -175, -200 and -270 F, the modulus of X3-6004 is approximately the same as GE RTV-560 and the other three silicone adhesives. The X3-6004 adhesive exhibits good processing properties. It has a 12 percent lower density than RTV-560. Although lower in overall strength properties as compared to the other adhesives in the program, X3-6004 has adequate adhesion to 2024T81 aluminum to compete as an adhesive for attaching reusable surface insulation. It does exhibit some tendency to revert and soften at temperatures above 350 F when in a confined area.

  5. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to establish design allowables data for the following room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber based adhesives: (1) General Electric's RTV-560; (2) Dow Corning's 93-046; and (3) Martin Marietta's SLA-561. These adhesives are being evaluated for attaching reusable surface insulation to space shuttle structure.

  6. Development of mussel adhesive polypeptide mimics coating for in-situ inducing re-endothelialization of intravascular stent devices.

    PubMed

    Yin, Min; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng; Wang, Jing

    2009-05-01

    In this study, to improve the attachment, growth and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs) and thus accelerate the re-endothelialization of stents, a synthesized mussel adhesive polypeptide mimics containing dihydroxyphenylalanine and L-lysine (MAPDL) was immobilized onto 316L stainless steel (316LSS) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule as spacer arm by using cold plasma-induced grafting technique. To immobilize MAPDL effectively, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) was first coated onto 316LSS. Different molecular weights of PEG and grafting times were tested to obtain the optimal cell bioactivity. XPS and water contact angles measurement indicated the successful immobilization of MAPDL. In vitro cell culture results showed that compared with the control of 316LSS, the attachment, adhesion and growth of cells on the MAPDL-coated EVA surface, in particular with PEG as spacer arm, were significantly enhanced, and a confluent endothelial cells layer was formed after a 2-day culture. A platelet adhesion experiment revealed that the platelet adhesion was also reduced on the MAPDL-coated EVA surface. The in vitro inflammatory assessment showed that the MAPDL coating inhibited the TNF-alpha and IL-1beta release from monocyte cells, indicative of good anti-inflammation property. Therefore, it is concluded that the MAPDL coating developed here appeared to be a promising strategy for rapid re-endothelialization of intravascular stent devices. PMID:19223071

  7. The development of autoclave processable, thermally stable adhesives for titanium alloy and graphite composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The A-type polyimide adhesive resin P11B was modified by use of mixed diamines (thio-dianiline and meta phenylene diamine) which provided the desired autoclave processability. This new resin was termed P11BA. It was shown that copolymeric blends of P11BA and Amoco AI-1137 amide-imide resin provided improved adhesive properties when autoclave processed over the properties obtained previously by press bonding with P11B based copolymeric blended adhesives. Properties of bonded assemblies are presented for long-term aging at both elevated and low temperatures, and also stress-rupture tests at elevated temperature.

  8. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  9. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... May 24, 2012..... Sheraton Suites--Old Science-B. Town Alexandria. Neurobiology-D May 24-25,...

  10. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

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  11. 78 FR 22622 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit..., 2013......... U.S. Access Board. Pulmonary Medicine May 30-31, 2013......... Sheraton Crystal...

  12. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Crowne Plaza DC/Silver Spring. Pulmonary Medicine June 3, 2011 Crowne Plaza DC/Silver Spring....

  13. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Medicine........ November 25, 2013 *VA Central Office. Neurobiology-F November 26, 2013 *VA Central...

  14. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... May 24, 2012........ Sheraton Suites--Old Town Alexandria. Science-B Neurobiology-D May 24-25,...

  15. Stress evolution in a conductive adhesive during curing and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuhai

    2000-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using conductive adhesives, which are composites of polymers and conductive fillers, as replacements for solder in different types of microelectronic assemblies. However, conductive adhesives still suffer from several deficiencies, such as unstable electrical conductivity and inadequate adhesion. The reliability of the conductive adhesive joints is always one of the major considerations during their design and operation, and the curing and thermal stresses generated in polymers and composites during curing, cooling and thermal cycling play a very important role in determining reliability. Because of the mismatch in the mechanical properties between the conductive adhesive and the substrate, appreciable curing and thermal stress is generated during manufacturing, which may be detrimental to the reliability of conductive adhesive joints. In this dissertation, an interactive linear viscoelastic model which considers interaction between the initial gel network and the other networks that form during curing is proposed to simulate stress and volume shrinkage during the thermoset curing process, and an effective method for measuring volume shrinkage during the thermoset cure is developed. A systematic experimental study of the material properties of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix during the curing and cooling processes has been conducted. Based on these experimental data, stresses generated during several spatially homogeneous curing and cooling processes of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix are also calculated. It is found that the conductive adhesive possesses mechanical properties which are substantially different from those of the constituents, and that the conductive adhesive has a relaxation process which is similar to its matrix and generates appreciable curing and thermal stresses during curing and cooling. Finally, a processing procedure designed to provide desired residual stresses is discussed.

  16. Adhesive bonding of medical and implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, S M

    2002-09-01

    Although there are many commercially available medical-grade adhesives, their use for new applications requires detailed investigation. It is also important that as well as the initial joint strength, durability of the bonded components during intended use, including exposure to low and high temperatures, stress, fluids and sterilisation, are investigated. Design of accelerated ageing tests, which can simulate the service environments, is critical in providing realistic durability data. Interpretation of ageing data and lifetime prediction of the joint is essential in assessing the performance of medical devices. Emergence of new types of adhesives as well as further development of precision dispensing and rapid-curing technologies offer many exciting and commercially attractive opportunities for joining medical devices. PMID:12397833

  17. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction as a reason for the development of acetabular retroversion: a new theory.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Acetabular retroversion has been recently implicated as an important factor in the development of femoral acetabular impingement and hip osteoarthritis. The proper function of the hip joint requires that the anatomic features of the acetabulum and femoral head complement one another. In acetabular retroversion, the alignment of the acetabulum is altered where it opens in a posterolaterally instead of anterior direction. Changes in acetabular orientation can occur with alterations in pelvic tilt (anterior/posterior), and pelvic rotation (left/right). An overlooked problem that alters pelvic tilt and rotation, often seen by physical therapists, is sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A unique feature that develops in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD) is asymmetry between the left and right innominate bones that can alter pelvic tilt and rotation. This article puts forth a theory suggesting that acetabular retroversion may be produced by sacroiliac joint dysfunction. PMID:24350878

  18. From Interactions to Conversations: The Development of Joint Engagement during Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Nelson, P. Brooke

    2013-01-01

    This research traces the development of symbol-infused joint engagement during mother-child interactions into the preschool years. Forty-nine children, who had been previously observed as toddlers (Adamson, Bakeman, & Deckner, 2004), were systematically observed during interactions with their mothers at ages 3½, 4½, and 5½ during activities related to the past and future, internal states, and graphic systems. Although the amount of symbol-infused joint engagement reached a ceiling by 3½, its focus continued to became more complex and its form more balanced. Individual differences in children’s symbol-infused joint engagement were stable across four years. These findings highlight both how joint engagement is transformed as conversational skills develop and how it remains rooted in earlier interactions and supported by caregiver’s actions. PMID:24266591

  19. Impact of joint contractures on functioning and social participation in older individuals – development of a standard set (JointConFunctionSet): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Joint contractures are frequent in older individuals in geriatric care settings. Even though they are used as indicator of quality of care, there is neither a common standard to describe functioning and disability in patients nor an established standardized assessment to describe and quantify the impact of joint contractures on patients’ functioning. Thus, the aim of our study is (1) to develop a standard set for the assessment of the impact of joint contractures on functioning and social participation in older individuals and (2) to develop and validate a standardized assessment instrument for describing and quantifying the impact of joint contractures on the individuals’ functioning. Methods The standard set for joint contractures integrate the perspectives of all potentially relevant user groups, from the affected individuals to clinicians and researchers. The development of this set follows the methodology to develop an International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set and involves a formal decision-making and consensus process. Evidence from four preparatory studies will be integrated including qualitative interviews with patients, a systematic review of the literature, a survey with health professionals, and a cross sectional study with patients affected by joint contractures. The assessment instrument will be developed using item-response-theory models. The instrument will be validated. Discussion The standard set for joint contractures will provide a list of aspects of functioning and health most relevant for older individuals in geriatric care settings with joint contractures. This list will describe body functions, body structures, activities and participation and related environmental factors. This standard set will define what aspects of functioning should be assessed in individuals with joint contractures and will be the basis of the new assessment instrument to evaluate the impact of joint contractures on

  20. High-Content Microscopy Analysis of Subcellular Structures: Assay Development and Application to Focal Adhesion Quantification.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Torsten; Schmidt, David; Schwanitz, Georg; Ahmad, Mubashir; Hamann, Jana; Schlosser, Corinne; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Böhm, Konrad J; Tuckermann, Jan; Ploubidou, Aspasia

    2016-01-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) converts raw light microscopy images to quantitative data through the automated extraction, multiparametric analysis, and classification of the relevant information content. Combined with automated high-throughput image acquisition, HCA applied to the screening of chemicals or RNAi-reagents is termed high-content screening (HCS). Its power in quantifying cell phenotypes makes HCA applicable also to routine microscopy. However, developing effective HCA and bioinformatic analysis pipelines for acquisition of biologically meaningful data in HCS is challenging. Here, the step-by-step development of an HCA assay protocol and an HCS bioinformatics analysis pipeline are described. The protocol's power is demonstrated by application to focal adhesion (FA) detection, quantitative analysis of multiple FA features, and functional annotation of signaling pathways regulating FA size, using primary data of a published RNAi screen. The assay and the underlying strategy are aimed at researchers performing microscopy-based quantitative analysis of subcellular features, on a small scale or in large HCS experiments. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367288

  1. Development of Screenable Wax Coatings and Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design new formulations and production processes for water-based adhesives and wax coatings that can be easily screened from recycling operations.

  2. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  3. Diet-induced elevation of circulating HSP70 may trigger cell adhesion and promote the development of atherosclerosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Zhan, Rui; Yan, Li-Cheng; Gong, Jing-Bo; Zhao, Yun; Ma, Jing; Qian, Ling-Jia

    2016-09-01

    Although accumulating evidence indicates that heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) could be secreted into plasma and its levels have been found to have an ambiguous association with atherosclerosis, our knowledge for the exact role of circulating HSP70 in the development of atherosclerosis is still limited. In the present study, we report an adhesion-promoting effect of exogenous HSP70 and evaluate the potential involvement of elevated circulating HSP70 in the development of atherosclerosis. Time-dependent elevation of plasma HSP70 was found in diet-induced atherosclerotic rats, whose effect was investigated through further in vitro experiments. In rat aortic endothelial cell (RAEC) cultures, exogenous HSP70 incubation neither produced cell injuries by itself nor had protective effects on cell injuries caused by Ox-LDL or homocysteine. However, exogenous HSP70 administration could lead to a higher adhesion rate between rat peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) and RAECs. This adhesion-promoting effect appeared only when PBMCs, rather than RAECs, were pretreated with HSP70 incubation. PBMCs in an HSP70 environment released more IL-6 to supernatant, which subsequently up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1 in RAECs. These results indicate that the diet-induced elevation of circulating HSP70 could trigger cell adhesion with the help of IL-6 as a mediator, which provides a novel possible mechanism for understanding the role of circulating HSP70 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:27435079

  4. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  5. Adhesion, growth and differentiation of osteoblasts on surface-modified materials developed for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Vandrovcová, M; Bačáková, L

    2011-01-01

    This review briefly outlines the history and possibilities of bone reconstruction using various types of artificial materials, which allow interaction with cells only on the surface of the implant or enable ingrowth of cells inside the material. Information is also provided on the most important properties of bone cells taking part in bone tissue development, and on diseases and regeneration. The most common cell types used for testing cell-material interaction in vitro are listed, and the most commonly used approaches to this testing are also mentioned. A considerable part of this review is dedicated to the physical and chemical properties of the material surface, which are decisive for the cell-material interaction, and also to modifications to the surface of the material aimed at integrating it better with the surrounding bone tissue. Special attention is paid to the effects of nanoscale and microscale surface roughness on cell behaviour, to material surface patterning, which allows regionally-selective adhesion and growth of cells, and also to the surface chemistry. In addition, coating the materials with bioactive layers is examined, particularly those created by deposition of fullerenes, hybrid metal-fullerene composites, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystalline diamond films, diamond-like carbon, and nanocomposite hydrocarbon plasma polymer films enriched with metals. PMID:21401307

  6. Development and evaluation of a monolithic drug-in-adhesive patch for valsartan.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naohiro; Taniyama, Kazuhiro; Sawabe, Toshihiro; Manome, Yoichi

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a monolithic drug-in-adhesive (DIA) patch as a transdermal therapeutic system for the administration of valsartan (VAL). To improve the penetration of VAL in the patch, several chemical penetration enhancers were investigated by in vitro hairless mouse and Yucatan micro pig (YMP) skin permeation studies. A combination of isopropyl myristate (IPM)/diisooctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) most strongly enhanced the permeation of VAL. Since the concentration of VAL through the patch in hairless rat (HR) in vivo was correlated with that in HR skin in vitro, VAL that permeated through the skin could effectively pass into the systemic circulation. The plasma concentration-time profile of VAL after the patch was applied in humans was estimated by a convolution technique from the results of the in vitro YMP study, which indicated that the concentration of VAL could be sufficient to produce a pharmacological effect. These results demonstrate that the combination of IPM/AOT may be useful for the development of a practical DIA patch for VAL. PMID:20933069

  7. Toughened moderate-temperature cure exoxy structural adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    LeMay, J.D.; Lyon, R.E.

    1992-03-01

    Low-viscosity liquid precursor adhesives that can be cured at mederate temperatures and deliver high static strength and fracture toughness in bonded joints are of interest in a variety of structural joining applications at Lawrence Livermore. We have developed a toughened, structural epoxy adhesive that cures completely at 75{degrees}C and has a fracture toughness, K{sub Ic}(joint)=1.3 MPa{radical}m, in a 100{mu}m thick bondline. This adhesive is based on diglycidylether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxide resin in combination with an amidoamine hardener, and is toughened with an epoxide-functional liquid rubber. This adhesive was developed to join beryllium oxide components, but has proven to be a good general purpose structural adhesive for a variety of high surface energy substrates including metals, metal oxide ceramics, and glasses. The low surface tension of the liquid adhesive, {gamma}=31 dynes/cm, ensures that it also will wet and bond most low surface energy solids such as plastics and fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  8. Improved wettability and adhesion of polylactic acid/chitosan coating for bio-based multilayer film development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Hunter; Li, Yana; Almenar, Eva

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of methyldiphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) concentration (0, 0.2, 1, 2, and 3%) on the wettability and adhesion of blend solutions of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and chitosan (CS) when coated on PLA film for development of a bio-based multi-layer film suitable for food packaging and other applications. Characterization was carried out by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectrometry (ATR-FTIR), contact angle (θ), mechanical adhesion pull-off testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The θ of the PLA/CS blend shifted to a lower value (41-35°) with increasing MDI concentration showing that the surface tension was modified between the PLA/CS blend solution and PLA film and better wettability was achieved. The increase in MDI also resulted in an increased breaking strength (228-303 kPa) due to the increased H-bonding resulting from the more urethane groups formed within the PLA/CS blend as shown by ATR-FTIR. The improved adhesion was also shown by the increased number of physical entanglements observed by SEM. It can be concluded that MDI can be used to improve wettability and adhesion between PLA/CS coating and PLA film.

  9. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... too far. In children with hypermobility syndrome, those ligaments are loose or weak. This may lead to: Arthritis, which may develop over time Dislocated joints, which is a separation of two bones where they meet at a joint Sprains and strains Children with hypermobile joints also often have flat ...

  10. Design and technical support for development of a molded fabric space suit joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. Howard

    1994-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has under design a new joint or element for use in a space suit. The design concept involves molding a fabric to a geometry developed at Ames. Unusual characteristics of this design include the need to produce a fabric molding draw ratio on the order of thirty percent circumferentially on the surface. Previous work done at NASA on molded fabric joints has shown that standard, NASA qualified polyester fabrics as are currently available in the textile industry for use in suits have a maximum of about fifteen percent draw ratio. NASA has done the fundamental design for a prototype joint and of a mold which would impart the correct shape to the fabric support layer of the joint. NASA also has the capability to test a finished product for suitability and reliability. Responsibilities resting with Georgia Tech in the design effort for this project are textile related, namely fiber selection, fabric design to achieve the properties of the objective design, and determining production means and sources for the fabrics. The project goals are to produce a prototype joint using the NASA design for evaluation of effectiveness by NASA, and to establish the sources and specifications which would allow reliable and repeatable production of the joint.

  11. Joint Attention Behaviours and Vocabulary Development in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zampini, L.; Salvi, A.; D'Odorico, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because of their difficulties in language development, various studies have focussed on the precursors of linguistic skills in children with Down syndrome. However, data on the predictive role of joint attention on language development in this population are inconsistent. The present study aimed to analyse attention behaviours in a…

  12. Design and development testing of the bonded joint between a typical launch vehicle attachment ring and CFRP thrust cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, J. T.; Nayler, G. H. F.; Reynolds, J.

    1986-02-01

    The development of the principal structural joint of a Shuttle payload is described. The joint is subjected to large tension and compression loads due to the spacecraft being cantilevered perpendicular to the direction of flight of the launch vehicle. Finite element modeling was included in the investigation of joint designs. A bonded and bolted double lap shear configuration was chosen. Manufacturing and inspection methods were developed and testing of joint samples was undertaken including static, thermal and fatigue loading. The static test results were used to determine the design allowable strength of the joint.

  13. Morphogen-based simulation model of ray growth and joint patterning during fin development and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle; Paquette, Mathieu; Tweedle, Valerie; Akimenko, Marie-Andrée

    2012-03-01

    The fact that some organisms are able to regenerate organs of the correct shape and size following amputation is particularly fascinating, but the mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) caudal fin has emerged as a model system for the study of bone development and regeneration. The fin comprises 16 to 18 bony rays, each containing multiple joints along its proximodistal axis that give rise to segments. Experimental observations on fin ray growth, regeneration and joint formation have been described, but no unified theory has yet been put forward to explain how growth and joint patterns are controlled. We present a model for the control of fin ray growth during development and regeneration, integrated with a model for joint pattern formation, which is in agreement with published, as well as new, experimental data. We propose that fin ray growth and joint patterning are coordinated through the interaction of three morphogens. When the model is extended to incorporate multiple rays across the fin, it also accounts for how the caudal fin acquires its shape during development, and regains its correct size and shape following amputation. PMID:22318227

  14. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  15. Curcumin inhibits development and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum: Implications for YakA signaling and GST enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Garige, Mamatha; Walters, Eric

    2015-11-13

    The molecular basis for nutraceutical properties of the polyphenol curcumin (Curcuma longa, Turmeric) is complex, affecting multiple factors that regulate cell signaling and homeostasis. Here, we report the effect of curcumin on cellular and developmental mechanisms in the eukaryotic model, Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium proliferation was inhibited in the presence of curcumin, which also suppressed the prestarvation marker, discoidin I, members of the yakA-mediated developmental signaling pathway, and expression of the extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins (DdCAD and csA). This resulted in delayed chemotaxis, adhesion, and development of the organism. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on developmental genes, curcumin induced gstA gene expression, overall GST activity, and generated production of reactive oxygen species. These studies expand our knowledge of developmental and biochemical signaling influenced by curcumin, and lends greater consideration of GST enzyme function in eukaryotic cell signaling, development, and differentiation. PMID:26449461

  16. Development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Hutchins, E. L.; Barr, Ronald E.; Abraham, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. The length, velocity, and moment arm for each of the eight musculotendon actuators were based on skeletal anatomy and position. Musculotendon parameters were determined for each actuator and verified by comparing analytical torque-angle curves with experimental joint torque data. The parameters and skeletal geometry were also utilized in the musculoskeletal model for the analysis of ballistic elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by parameterized optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and movement kinematics. The model was verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing ballistic elbow joint complex movements.

  17. New developments for the investigation of hard X-rays emitted by peeling adhesive tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, D.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Lühmann, B.; Keite-Telgenbüscher, K.; Frahm, R.

    2013-05-01

    We realized an advanced apparatus for the investigation of emitted X-rays produced by peeling adhesive tape rolls under vacuum conditions. Two stepper motors can unwind and rewind a tape roll, and an additional roller with an optical encoder provides measurement and control of the tape speed. This way reproducible and consecutive experiments are feasible without having to change the tape or break the vacuum. The dependence of the X-ray emission on tape speed, gas pressure, type of adhesive tape, and detector angle has been investigated. The resulting spectra are continuous and span an X-ray energy range of typically 2-60 keV with high intensity. Furthermore, the new apparatus allows the in situ metalization of adhesive tape rolls by a gold sputter source. A significantly increased X-ray emission was observed for adhesive tapes with a metal coating. Thin metal foils have been placed between the tape and the detector, different K- and L-absorption edges could be measured. A considerable enhancement of the emission was achieved under the influence of the magnetic field of an NdFeB permanent magnet.

  18. New developments for the investigation of hard X-rays emitted by peeling adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Krämer, D; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Lühmann, B; Keite-Telgenbüscher, K; Frahm, R

    2013-05-01

    We realized an advanced apparatus for the investigation of emitted X-rays produced by peeling adhesive tape rolls under vacuum conditions. Two stepper motors can unwind and rewind a tape roll, and an additional roller with an optical encoder provides measurement and control of the tape speed. This way reproducible and consecutive experiments are feasible without having to change the tape or break the vacuum. The dependence of the X-ray emission on tape speed, gas pressure, type of adhesive tape, and detector angle has been investigated. The resulting spectra are continuous and span an X-ray energy range of typically 2-60 keV with high intensity. Furthermore, the new apparatus allows the in situ metalization of adhesive tape rolls by a gold sputter source. A significantly increased X-ray emission was observed for adhesive tapes with a metal coating. Thin metal foils have been placed between the tape and the detector, different K- and L-absorption edges could be measured. A considerable enhancement of the emission was achieved under the influence of the magnetic field of an NdFeB permanent magnet. PMID:23742586

  19. Structural development of laminar flow control aircraft chordwise wing joint designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.; Jerstad, N. M.; Gallimore, F. H., Jr.; Pollard, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    For laminar flow to be achieved, any protuberances on the surface must be small enough to avoid transition to turbulent flow. However, the surface must have joints between the structural components to allow assembly or replacement of damaged parts, although large continuous surfaces can be utilized to minimize the number the number of joints. Aircraft structural joints usually have many countersunk bolts or rivets on the outer surface. To maintain no mismatch on outer surfaces, it is desirable to attach the components from the inner surface. It is also desirable for the panels to be interchangeable, without the need for shims at the joint, to avoid surface discontinuities that could cause turbulence. Fabricating components while pressing their outer surfaces against an accurate mold helps to ensure surface smoothness and continuity at joints. These items were considered in evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of the joint design concepts. After evaluating six design concepts, two of the leading candidates were fabricated and tested using many small test panels. One joint concept was also built and tested using large panels. The small and large test panel deflections for the leading candidate designs at load factors up to +1.5 g's were well within the step and waviness requirements for avoiding transition.The small panels were designed and tested for compression and tension at -65 F, at ambient conditions, and at 160 F. The small panel results for the three-rib and the sliding-joint concepts indicated that they were both acceptable. The three-rib concept, with tapered splice plates, was considered to be the most practical. A modified three-rib joint that combined the best attributes of previous candidates was designed, developed, and tested. This improved joint met all of the structural strength, surface smoothness, and waviness criteria for laminar flow control (LFC). The design eliminated all disadvantages of the initial three-rib concept except for

  20. Working better together: joint leadership development for doctors and managers

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, there have been tensions between frontline healthcare professionals and managers, with well-known stereotypes of difficult consultants and pen-pushing managers. Many junior doctors have limited management experience and have often never even met a manager prior to taking on a consultant role. Based on a successful programme pioneered by Dr Robert Klaber (Imperial, London) we have set-up an innovative scheme for Birmingham Children's Hospital, pairing junior doctors and managers to learn and work together. Our aim was to cultivate positive attitudes and understanding between the two groups, break down inter-professional barriers, and to provide practical leadership experience and education. We recruited 60 managers and doctors to participate in shadowing, conversation, and quality improvement projects. Thought-provoking online materials, blogs, socials, and popular monthly workshops consisting of patient-focused debate and discussion around key leadership themes, have helped to support learning and cement shared values. Formal evaluation has demonstrated an improvement in how participants perceive their knowledge and ability based on key NHS Leadership Framework competencies. Participant feedback has been extremely positive, and everyone plans to continue to incorporate Paired Learning into their continuing professional development. We are now embedding Paired Learning in the on-going educational programme offered at Birmingham Children's Hospital, whilst looking at extending the scheme to include different professional groups and other trusts across the region and nationally.

  1. Development of the Joint NASA/NCAR General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.-J.; Rood, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Data Assimilation Office at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center is collaborating with NCAR/CGD in an ambitious proposal for the development of a unified climate, numerical weather prediction, and chemistry transport model which is suitable for global data assimilation of the physical and chemical state of the Earth's atmosphere. A prototype model based on the NCAR CCM3 physics and the NASA finite-volume dynamical core has been built. A unique feature of the NASA finite-volume dynamical core is its advanced tracer transport algorithm on the floating Lagrangian control-volume coordinate. The model currently has a highly idealized ozone production/loss chemistry derived from the observed 2D (latitude-height) climatology of the recent decades. Nevertheless, the simulated horizontal wave structure of the total ozone is in good qualitative agreement with the observed (TOMS). Long term climate simulations and NWP experiments have been carried out. Current up to date status and futur! e plan will be discussed in the conference.

  2. Working better together: joint leadership development for doctors and managers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, there have been tensions between frontline healthcare professionals and managers, with well-known stereotypes of difficult consultants and pen-pushing managers. Many junior doctors have limited management experience and have often never even met a manager prior to taking on a consultant role. Based on a successful programme pioneered by Dr Robert Klaber (Imperial, London) we have set-up an innovative scheme for Birmingham Children's Hospital, pairing junior doctors and managers to learn and work together. Our aim was to cultivate positive attitudes and understanding between the two groups, break down inter-professional barriers, and to provide practical leadership experience and education. We recruited 60 managers and doctors to participate in shadowing, conversation, and quality improvement projects. Thought-provoking online materials, blogs, socials, and popular monthly workshops consisting of patient-focused debate and discussion around key leadership themes, have helped to support learning and cement shared values. Formal evaluation has demonstrated an improvement in how participants perceive their knowledge and ability based on key NHS Leadership Framework competencies. Participant feedback has been extremely positive, and everyone plans to continue to incorporate Paired Learning into their continuing professional development. We are now embedding Paired Learning in the on-going educational programme offered at Birmingham Children's Hospital, whilst looking at extending the scheme to include different professional groups and other trusts across the region and nationally. PMID:27493738

  3. SALM4 suppresses excitatory synapse development by cis-inhibiting trans-synaptic SALM3–LAR adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Eunkyung; Ko, Ji Seung; Choi, Su-Yeon; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Cho, Yi Sul; Noh, Ran; Kim, Doyoun; Li, Yan; Kang, Hyeyeon; Choi, Tae-Yong; Nam, Jungyong; Mah, Won; Lee, Dongmin; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Hyun; Choi, Se-Young; Um, Ji Won; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Bae, Yong Chul; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate various aspects of synapse development, function and plasticity. These functions mainly involve trans-synaptic interactions and positive regulations, whereas cis-interactions and negative regulation are less understood. Here we report that SALM4, a member of the SALM/Lrfn family of synaptic adhesion molecules, suppresses excitatory synapse development through cis inhibition of SALM3, another SALM family protein with synaptogenic activity. Salm4-mutant (Salm4−/−) mice show increased excitatory synapse numbers in the hippocampus. SALM4 cis-interacts with SALM3, inhibits trans-synaptic SALM3 interaction with presynaptic LAR family receptor tyrosine phosphatases and suppresses SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation. Importantly, deletion of Salm3 in Salm4−/− mice (Salm3−/−; Salm4−/−) normalizes the increased excitatory synapse number. These results suggest that SALM4 negatively regulates excitatory synapses via cis inhibition of the trans-synaptic SALM3–LAR adhesion. PMID:27480238

  4. Statistic study on developing condition of horizontal columnar joints in Jeongja and Eupchon beach areas, SE Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; Kim, Y.; Geologic Structure; Geohazard Research Group

    2010-12-01

    Unusual patterns of columnar joints are developed in Tertiary volcanic rocks along the Jeongja and Eupchon beach areas, SE Korea. The columnar joints represent various features in shape and orientation, including horizontal and inclined column distribution. The shape and orientation of columnar joints were statistically analyzed to understand the causes of the unusual column patterns. For this purpose, the shape of the column face perpendicular to the column direction and the trend and plunge of the column are analyzed. Most columnar joints in the study areas have five or six column faces, and the column diameter perpendicular to the column direction is in a range of between 30 to 50 cm. Columnar joints generally develop vertically due to cooling from both top and bottom surfaces. However, unusual horizontal and inclined columnar joints are observed in the study areas. Therefore, the horizontal and inclined columnar joints developed in the study areas may suggest abnormal cooling condition. The volcanic rocks in the study areas intruded or extruded in late Miocene (22-16 Ma), which coincides with a period of high sea level in the Miocene. The sea level is almost the same as the present sea level. This may suggest that the unusual columnar joint patterns that have developed in the study areas may have been affected by sea water. Therefore, if the characteristics of these columnar joints are more intensively studied on a morphological, petrological, geochemical, and chronological level, we can better understand the developing mechanism of horizontal columnar joints.

  5. 77 FR 41164 - Joint Subcommittee on Aquaculture Research and Development Strategic Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Agricultural Research Service DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC007 Joint Subcommittee on Aquaculture Research and Development Strategic Plan AGENCIES: Agricultural... request for comments. SUMMARY: NOAA and U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service...

  6. From Interactions to Conversations: The Development of Joint Engagement during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Nelson, P. Brooke

    2014-01-01

    This research traces the development of symbol-infused joint engagement during mother-child interactions into the preschool years. Forty-nine children, who had been previously observed as toddlers (L. B. Adamson, R. Bakeman, & D. F. Deckner), [Adamson, L. B., 2004], were systematically observed during interactions with their mothers at ages…

  7. 15 CFR 295.23 - Dissolution of joint research and development ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dissolution of joint research and development ventures. 295.23 Section 295.23 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST...

  8. 15 CFR 295.23 - Dissolution of joint research and development ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dissolution of joint research and development ventures. 295.23 Section 295.23 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST...

  9. 15 CFR 295.23 - Dissolution of joint research and development ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dissolution of joint research and development ventures. 295.23 Section 295.23 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST...

  10. 15 CFR 295.23 - Dissolution of joint research and development ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dissolution of joint research and development ventures. 295.23 Section 295.23 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST...

  11. 15 CFR 295.23 - Dissolution of joint research and development ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dissolution of joint research and development ventures. 295.23 Section 295.23 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST...

  12. Development of integrated insulation joint for cooling pipe in tokamak reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Abe, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Masashi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro

    1994-08-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor, an electrically insulated part is needed for an in-vessel piping system in order to break an electric circuit loop. When a closed loop is formed in the piping system, large induced electromagnetic forces during a plasma disruption (rapid plasma current quench) could give damages on the piping system. Ceramic brazing joint is a conventional method for the electric circuit break, but an application to the fusion reactor is not feasible due to its brittleness. Here, a stainless steel / ceramics / stainless steel functionally gradient material (FGM) has been proposed and developed as an integrated insulation joint of the piping system. Both sides of the joint can be welded to the main pipes, and expected to be reliable even in the fusion reactor environment. When the FGM joint is manufactured by way of a sintering process, a residual thermal stress is the key issue. Through detailed computations of the residual thermal stress and several trial productions, tubular elements of FGM joints have been successfully manufactured.

  13. Development of High Temperature Dissimilar Joint Technology for Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Bowman, Cheryl L.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA is developing fission surface power (FSP) system technology as a potential option for use on the surface of the moon or Mars. The goal is to design a robust system that takes full advantage of existing materials data bases. One of the key components of the power conversion system is the hot-side Heat Exchanger (HX). One possible design for this heat exchanger requires a joint of the dissimilar metals 316L stainless steel and Inconel 718, which must sustain extended operation at high temperatures. This study compares two joining techniques, brazing and diffusion bonding, in the context of forming the requisite stainless steel to superalloy joint. The microstructures produced by brazing and diffusion bonding, the effect of brazing cycle on the mechanical tensile properties of the alloys, and the strength of several brazed joints will be discussed.

  14. Characterization of bulk stainless steel joints developed through microwave hybrid heating

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Amit; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Das, Shantanu

    2014-05-01

    Processing of metallic materials through microwave heating is a challenging area of research. In the present work, joining of stainless steel-316 to stainless steel-316 in the bulk form has been carried out by placing stainless steel-316 powder at the interface and through targeted heating using microwave hybrid heating. The trials were carried out in a multimode microwave applicator at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and power 900 W. The developed joints were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and measurement of Vicker's microhardness, porosity and tensile strength. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of the developed joint shows the presence of chromium carbide, iron carbide and iron silicide phases that eventually contribute to enhancement of the microhardness of the joint. The scanning electron microscope micrographs confirm classical metallurgical bonding between the substrate and the interface (molten powder) layer; the epitaxial growth rate was observed adjacent to the fusion zone. The average observed Vicker's microhardness in the joint zone on the grain boundary was significantly higher than that inside the grains due to the presence of various hard phases at the grain boundaries. Evaluation of the tensile strength of the joints showed an average ultimate tensile strength of 425.0 MPa with an average elongation of 9.44%. - Highlights: • Joining of stainless steel (SS-316) plates using microwave hybrid heating • Epitaxial growth rate observed adjacent to the fusion zone of welded joint • The ultimate tensile strength of the order of 425.0 MPa with 9.44% elongation.

  15. Development and production of a flame retardant, general purpose, pressure sensitive adhesive tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P. B.; Doggett, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The specification results for the finished tape properties were as follows: (1) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on aluminum from 107 to 143 grams per centimeter (0.6 to 0.8 pounds per inch); (2) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on stainless steel from 71 to 107 grams per centimeter (0.4 to 0.6 pounds per inch); (3) unwind resistance of 536 to 714 grams per centimeter (3 to 4 pounds per inch); (4) tensile strength minimum of 7143 grams per centimeter (40 pounds per inch); (5) elongation from 5 to 10% at break; (6) tear strength, Elmendorf from 200 to 350 grams (0.44 to 0.77 pounds); and (7) tear strength, tongue from 363 to 408 grams (0.8 to 0.9) pounds).

  16. Development of an adhesively bonded beryllium propulsion structure for the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. H.; Layman, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    The design, testing, and fabrication of the support truss structure for the propulsion system of the Mariner 9 spacecraft are described. Support is provided by an 8.9-kg (19.5-lbm) truss assembly consisting of beryllium tubes adhesively bonded to magnesium end fittings. Beryllium was selected for the tubular struts in the truss because of its exceptionally high stiffness-to-weight ratio. Adhesive bonding, rather than riveting, was utilized to join the struts to the end fittings because of the low toughness (high notch sensitivity) of beryllium. Magnesium, used in the end fittings, resulted in a 50% weight saving over aluminum since geometric factors in the fitting design resulted in low stress areas where magnesium's lower density is a benefit.

  17. Supporting the joint warfighter by development, training, and fielding of man-portable UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Kenneth A.; Stratton, Benjamin V.

    2005-05-01

    The Robotic Systems Pool (RSP), sponsored by the Joint Robotics Program (JRP), is an inventory of small robotic systems, payloads, and components intended to expedite the development and integration of technology into effective, supportable, fielded robotic assets. The RSP loans systems to multiple users including the military, first-responders, research organizations, and academia. These users provide feedback in their specific domain, accelerating research and development improvements of robotic systems, which in turn allow the joint warfighter to benefit from such changes more quickly than from traditional acquisition cycles. Over the past year, RSP assets have been used extensively for pre-deployment operator and field training of joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) teams, and for the training of Navy Reservist repair technicians. These Reservists are part of the Robotic Systems Combat Support Platoon (RSCSP), attached to Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego. The RSCSP maintains and repairs RSP assets and provides deployable technical support for users of robotic systems. Currently, a small team from the RSCSP is deployed at Camp Victory repairing and maintaining man-portable unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) used by joint EOD teams in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The focus of this paper is to elaborate on the RSP and RSCSP and their role as invaluable resources for spiral development in the robotics community by gaining first-hand technical feedback from the warfighter and other users.

  18. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  19. Analysis of EDZ Development of Columnar Jointed Rock Mass in the Baihetan Diversion Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xian-Jie; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yang, Cheng-Xiang; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Due to the time dependency of the crack propagation, columnar jointed rock masses exhibit marked time-dependent behaviour. In this study, in situ measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), back-analysis method and numerical simulations are presented to study the time-dependent development of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around underground diversion tunnels in a columnar jointed rock mass. Through in situ measurements of crack propagation and EDZ development, their extent is seen to have increased over time, despite the fact that the advancing face has passed. Similar to creep behaviour, the time-dependent EDZ development curve also consists of three stages: a deceleration stage, a stabilization stage, and an acceleration stage. A corresponding constitutive model of columnar jointed rock mass considering time-dependent behaviour is proposed. The time-dependent degradation coefficient of the roughness coefficient and residual friction angle in the Barton-Bandis strength criterion are taken into account. An intelligent back-analysis method is adopted to obtain the unknown time-dependent degradation coefficients for the proposed constitutive model. The numerical modelling results are in good agreement with the measured EDZ. Not only that, the failure pattern simulated by this time-dependent constitutive model is consistent with that observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and in situ observation, indicating that this model could accurately simulate the failure pattern and time-dependent EDZ development of columnar joints. Moreover, the effects of the support system provided and the in situ stress on the time-dependent coefficients are studied. Finally, the long-term stability analysis of diversion tunnels excavated in columnar jointed rock masses is performed.

  20. Development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R V; Hutchins, E L; Barr, R E; Abraham, L D

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. The length, velocity, and moment arm for each of the eight musculotendon actuators were based on skeletal anatomy and joint position. Musculotendon parameters were determined for each actuator and verified by comparing analytical moment-angle curves with experimental joint torque data. The parameters and skeletal geometry were also utilized in the musculoskeletal model for the analysis of ballistic (rapid-directed) elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by parameterized optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and to determine the effects of forearm and elbow position on the recruitment of individual muscles during a variety of ballistic movements. The model was partially verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing both isometric and ballistic elbow joint complex movements. This verification lends credibility to the time-varying muscle force predictions and the recruitment of muscles that contribute to both elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. PMID:8833072

  1. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  2. Development and laboratory testing of a 138-kV PPP-insulated joint for commercial application

    SciTech Connect

    Walldorf, S.P. ); Chu, H.; Elbadaly, H. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the design, development and laboratory testing of a high voltage PPP (paper polypropylene/paper laminate) insulated joint for commercial application on 138-kV PPP-insulated cable. The design approach taken is conservative and addresses the typical variations in field conditions and in skill and workmanship of the splicing. Joint construction details, including choice of connector, taping structure, and joint mechanical reinforcement, are discussed. The test criteria are described and results are presented.

  3. Development of an Arthroscopic Joint Capsule Injury Model in the Canine Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David; Baker, Andrew R.; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Kim, Myung-Sun; Ricchetti, Eric T.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The natural history of rotator cuff tears can be unfavorable as patients develop fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy that is often associated with a loss of muscle strength and shoulder function. To facilitate study of possible biologic mechanisms involved in early degenerative changes to rotator cuff muscle and tendon tissues, the objective of this study was to develop a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder using arthroscopy. Methods Arthroscopic surgical methods for performing a posterior joint capsulectomy in the canine shoulder were first defined in cadavers. Subsequently, one canine subject underwent bilateral shoulder joint capsulectomy using arthroscopy, arthroscopic surveillance at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, and gross and histologic examination of the joint at 10 weeks. Results The canine subject was weight-bearing within eight hours after index and follow-up surgeries and had no significant soft tissue swelling of the shoulder girdle or gross lameness. Chronic synovitis and macroscopic and microscopic evidence of pathologic changes to the rotator cuff bony insertions, tendons, myotendinous junctions and muscles were observed. Conclusions This study demonstrates feasibility and proof-of-concept for a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder. Future work is needed to define the observed pathologic changes and their role in the progression of rotator cuff disease. Ultimately, better understanding of the biologic mechanisms of early progression of rotator cuff disease may lead to clinical interventions to halt or slow this process and avoid the more advanced and often irreversible conditions of large tendon tears with muscle fatty atrophy. PMID:26808837

  4. Development of biomimetic quadruped walking robot with 2-DOF waist joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Se-Hoon; Lee, Yun-Jung

    2005-12-01

    This paper presented a novel bio-mimetic quadruped walking robot with 2-DOF (Degree Of Freedom) waist joint, which connects the front and the rear parts of the body. The waist-jointed walking robot can guarantee more stable and more animal-like gait than that of a conventional single-rigid-body walking robot. The developed robot, called ELIRO-II (Eating LIzard RObot version 2), can bend its body from side to side by using 1-DOF passive waist joint while the legs is transferred, thereby increasing the stride and speed of the robot. In addition, ELIRO-II has one more active DOF to bend its body up and down, which increases the mobility in irregular terrain such as slope and stairs. We design the mechanical structure of the robot, which is small and light to have high mobility. This research described characteristics of the 2-DOF waists joint and leg mechanism as well as a hardware and software of the controller of ELIRO-II.

  5. Development of the anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit for air breathing PEMFC stack using silicone adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minkook; Lee, Dai Gil

    2016-05-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) exhibit a wide power range, low operating temperature, high energy density and long life time. These advantages favor PEMFC for applications such as vehicle power sources, portable power, and backup power applications. With the push towards the commercialization of PEMFC, especially for portable power applications, the overall balance of plants (BOPs) of the systems should be minimized. To reduce the mass and complexity of the systems, air-breathing PEMFC stack design with open cathode channel configuration is being developed. However, the open cathode channel configuration incurs hydrogen leakage problem. In this study, the bonding strength of a silicon adhesive between the Nafion membrane and the carbon fiber/epoxy composite bipolar plate was measured. Then, an anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit which was bonded with the silicone adhesive was developed to solve the hydrogen leakage problem. The reliability of the anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit was estimated under the internal pressure of hydrogen by the FE analysis. Additionally, the gas sealability of the developed air breathing PEMFC unit cell was experimentally measured. Finally, unit cell performance of the developed anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit was tested and verified under operating conditions without humidity and temperature control.

  6. Study of joint designing on composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazushi, Haruna

    In this paper, strength design techniques of CFRP mechanical joints and adhesively bonded joints were examined. Remarkable stress concentration generates at the mechanical hole edge and the adhesive edge, therefore an unskillful design of joints often causes a reduction in the strength of composite structures. In mechanical joints, a study on predicting the joint strength has been performed, but bearing failure that is most important failure mode for designing joints can not be predicted. So in this paper, the strength prediction method in consideration with bearing failure was examined. On the other hand, the criterion using the intensity of stress singularity was suggested in adhesive joints, but it was clarified in this paper, that this method can not be applied the prediction of the final failure strength. So the critical stress distribution of single-lap adhesive bonded carbon/epoxy joints was examined to obtain the failure criterion of the final failure. Moreover the simulation method for an internal stress generated by cure shrinkage of adhesive was also examined. In the proposed method for mechanical joint, 2-parameter criterion, that is combined the characteristic length with the Yamada-Sun criterion, was applied and the characteristic length for compression was determined from "bearing failure test" that was newly conceived to take bearing failure into consideration. In case of adhesive joints, it was thought that 2-parameter criterion was effective. So the prediction method using 2-parameter criterion was applied to other adhesive joints. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results in both mechanical and adhesive joints. And it was cleared that an internal stress could be simulated by the proposed method. Moreover, in mechanical joints, the most suitable stacking sequence, the reduction technique of interlaminar stress, and the elevation of joint strength by application of high toughness matrix were also shown. Consequently

  7. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  8. Biomimetic-inspired joining of composite with metal structures: A survey of natural joints and application to single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoulas, Evangelos Ioannis; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.

    2014-03-01

    Joining composites with metal parts leads, inevitably, to high stress concentrations because of the material property mismatch. Since joining composite to metal is required in many high performance structures, there is a need to develop a new multifunctional approach to meet this challenge. This paper uses the biomimetics approach to help develop solutions to this problem. Nature has found many ingenious ways of joining dissimilar materials and making robust attachments, alleviating potential stress concentrations. A literature survey of natural joint systems has been carried out, identifying and analysing different natural joint methods from a mechanical perspective. A taxonomy table was developed based on the different methods/functions that nature successfully uses to attach dissimilar tissues (materials). This table is used to understand common themes or approaches used in nature for different joint configurations and functionalities. One of the key characteristics that nature uses to joint dissimilar materials is a transitional zone of stiffness in the insertion site. Several biomimetic-inspired metal-to-composite (steel-to-CFRP), adhesively bonded, Single Lap Joints (SLJs) were numerically investigated using a finite element analysis. The proposed solutions offer a transitional zone of stiffness of one joint part to reduce the material stiffness mismatch at the joint. An optimisation procedure was used to identify the variation in material stiffness which minimises potential failure of the joint. It was found that the proposed biomimetic SLJs reduce the asymmetry of the stress distribution along the adhesive area.

  9. The development of goal-directed reaching in infants: hand trajectory formation and joint torque control.

    PubMed

    Konczak, J; Borutta, M; Topka, H; Dichgans, J

    1995-01-01

    Nine young infants were followed longitudinally from 4 to 15 months of age. We recorded early spontaneous movements and reaching movements to a stationary target. Time-position data of the hand (endpoint), shoulder, and elbow were collected using an optoelectronic measurement system (ELITE). We analyzed the endpoint kinematics and the intersegmental dynamics of the shoulder and elbow joint to investigate how changes in proximal torque control determined the development of hand trajectory formation. Two developmental phases of hand trajectory formation were identified: a first phase of rapid improvements between 16 and 24 weeks of age, the time of reaching onset for all infants. During that time period the number of movement units per reach and movement time decreased dramatically. In a second phase (28-64 weeks), a period of "fine-tuning" of the sensorimotor system, we saw slower, more gradual changes in the endpoint kinematics. The analysis of the underlying intersegmental joint torques revealed the following results: first, the range of muscular and motion-dependent torques (relative to body weight) did not change significantly with age. That is, early reaching was not confined by limitations in producing task-adequate levels of muscular torque. Second, improvements in the endpoint kinematics were not accomplished by minimizing amplitude of muscle and reactive torques. Third, the relative timing of muscular and motion-dependent torque peaks showed a systematic development toward an adult timing profile with increasing age. In conclusion, the development toward invariant characteristics of the hand trajectory is mirrored by concurrent changes in the control of joint forces. The acquisition of stable patterns of intersegmental coordination is not achieved by simply regulating force amplitude, but more so by modulating the correct timing of joint force production and by the system's use of reactive forces. Our findings support the view that development of reaching

  10. First Phase Development of Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator and Its Current Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Se-Jin; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    The first phase of the Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator (KJJVC) development has been completed and installed to correlate the observed data from KVN (Korean VLBI Network) and VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) in October 2009. KJJVC is able to process 16 stations, a maximum of 8 Gbps/station, and 8,192 output channels for VLBI data. The system configuration, the experimental results, and future plans are introduced in this paper.

  11. Osteoprotegerin reduces the development of pain behaviour and joint pathology in a model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Ashraf, Sadaf; Xu, Luting; Burston, James J; Menhinick, Matthew R; Poulter, Caroline L; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased subchondral bone turnover may contribute to pain in osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives To investigate the analgesic potential of a modified version of osteoprotegerin (osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc)) in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) model of OA pain. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats (140–260 g) were treated with either OPG-Fc (3 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) between days 1 and 27 (pre-emptive treatment) or days 21 and 27 (therapeutic treatment) after an intra-articular injection of MIA (1 mg/50 µl) or saline. A separate cohort of rats received the bisphosphonate zoledronate (100 µg/kg, subcutaneously) between days 1 and 25 post-MIA injection. Incapacitance testing and von Frey (1–15 g) hind paw withdrawal thresholds were used to assess pain behaviour. At the end of the study, rats were killed and the knee joints and spinal cord removed for analysis. Immunohistochemical studies using Iba-1 and GFAP quantified levels of activation of spinal microglia and astrocytes, respectively. Joint sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or Safranin-O fast green and scored for matrix proteoglycan and overall joint morphology. The numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts were quantified. N=10 rats/group. Results Pre-emptive treatment with OPG-Fc significantly attenuated the development of MIA-induced changes in weightbearing, but not allodynia. OPG-Fc decreased osteoclast number, inhibited the formation of osteophytes and improved structural pathology within the joint similarly to the decrease seen after pretreatment with the bisphosphonate, zoledronate. Therapeutic treatment with OPG-Fc decreased pain behaviour, but did not improve pathology in rats with established joint damage. Conclusions Our data suggest that early targeting of osteoclasts may reduce pain associated with OA. PMID:23723320

  12. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  13. The adhesion GPCR Gpr56 regulates oligodendrocyte development via interactions with Gα12/13 and RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Sarah D.; Garcia, Cynthia; Piao, Xianhua; Gutmann, David H.; Monk, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    In the vertebrate central nervous system, myelinating oligodendrocytes are postmitotic and derive from proliferative oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The molecular mechanisms that govern oligodendrocyte development are incompletely understood, but recent studies implicate the adhesion class of G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) as important regulators of myelination. Here, we use zebrafish and mouse models to dissect the function of the aGPCR Gpr56 in oligodendrocyte development. We show that gpr56 is expressed during early stages of oligodendrocyte development. Additionally, we observe a significant reduction of mature oligodendrocyte number and of myelinated axons in gpr56 zebrafish mutants. This reduction results from decreased OPC proliferation, rather than increased cell death or altered neural precursor differentiation potential. Finally, we show that these functions are mediated by Gα12/13 proteins and Rho activation. Together, our data establish Gpr56 as a regulator of oligodendrocyte development. PMID:25607772

  14. The Role of Mother-Child Joint Play in the Early Development of Children's Conduct Problems: A Longitudinal Observational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Frances; Ward, Sarah; Burton, Jennifer; Wilson, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    Examined longitudinally the relationship between mother-child spontaneous joint play and development of conduct problems in 60 preschoolers. Found that amount of joint play at age 3 predicted individual improvement in conduct problems at age 4, and this association was independent of initial level of conduct problems and hyperactivity, social…

  15. Transcription Factor SomA Is Required for Adhesion, Development and Virulence of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Jan; Sasse, Christoph; Gerke, Jennifer; Valerius, Oliver; Irmer, Henriette; Frauendorf, Holm; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Straßburger, Maria; Tran, Van Tuan; Herzog, Britta; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Flo8/Som1 controls filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and virulence in the plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Flo8/Som1 includes a characteristic N-terminal LUG/LUH-Flo8-single-stranded DNA binding (LUFS) domain and is activated by the cAMP dependent protein kinase A signaling pathway. Heterologous SomA from Aspergillus fumigatus rescued in yeast flo8 mutant strains several phenotypes including adhesion or flocculation in haploids and pseudohyphal growth in diploids, respectively. A. fumigatus SomA acts similarly to yeast Flo8 on the promoter of FLO11 fused with reporter gene (LacZ) in S. cerevisiae. FLO11 expression in yeast requires an activator complex including Flo8 and Mfg1. Furthermore, SomA physically interacts with PtaB, which is related to yeast Mfg1. Loss of the somA gene in A. fumigatus resulted in a slow growth phenotype and a block in asexual development. Only aerial hyphae without further differentiation could be formed. The deletion phenotype was verified by a conditional expression of somA using the inducible Tet-on system. A adherence assay with the conditional somA expression strain indicated that SomA is required for biofilm formation. A ptaB deletion strain showed a similar phenotype supporting that the SomA/PtaB complex controls A. fumigatus biofilm formation. Transcriptional analysis showed that SomA regulates expression of genes for several transcription factors which control conidiation or adhesion of A. fumigatus. Infection assays with fertilized chicken eggs as well as with mice revealed that SomA is required for pathogenicity. These data corroborate a complex control function of SomA acting as a central factor of the transcriptional network, which connects adhesion, spore formation and virulence in the opportunistic human pathogen A. fumigatus. PMID:26529322

  16. Suppression of the PI3K subunit p85α delays embryoid body development and inhibits cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Susan M R; Forster, Peter; Just, Ursula; Schwanbeck, Ralf

    2011-12-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3Ks) exert a variety of signaling functions in eukaryotes. We suppressed the PI3K regulatory subunit p85α using a small interfering RNA (Pik3r1 siRNA) and examined the effects on embryoid body (EB) development in hanging drop culture. We observed a 150% increase in the volume of the treated EBs within 24 h, compared to the negative controls. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) assays showed that this increase in volume is not due to increased cellular proliferation. Instead, the increase in volume appears to be due to reduced cellular aggregation and adherence. This is further shown by our observation that 40% of treated EBs form twin instead of single EBs, and that they have a significantly reduced ability to adhere to culture dishes when plated. A time course over the first 96 h reveals that the impaired adherence is transient and explained by an initial 12-hour delay in EB development. Quantitative PCR expression analysis suggests that the adhesion molecule integrin-β1 (ITGB1) is transiently downregulated by the p85α suppression. In conclusion we found that suppressing p85α leads to a delay in forming compact EBs, accompanied by a transient inability of the EBs to undergo normal cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. PMID:21780162

  17. Development of drug-in-adhesive patch formulations for transdermal delivery of fluoxetine: In vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunjae; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Ban, Sang-Jun; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Kim, Jung Sun; Yoon, In-Soo; Kim, Dae-DuK

    2015-06-20

    The aim of this study was to develop drug-in adhesive (DIA) patch formulations for the transdermal delivery of fluoxetine (FX). The DIA patch formulations containing FX were prepared and optimized with various pressure sensitive adhesives, drug contents and enhancers. Among the various formulations, DuroTak 87-502B-based patch formulation containing 20% (w/w) FX with no enhancer was selected for in vivo pharmacokinetic study based on in vitro permeation studies using hairless mouse, rat and human cadaver skins. The Cmax of FX after the transdermal administration of the optimized patch formulation in rats was 52.38 ng/ml, and plasma concentration of FX was maintained for 36 h. Moreover, the predicted human Css (55.79 ng/ml) and Cmax (27.35 ng/ml) were in good agreement with the reported plasma levels (15-55 ng/ml) of oral FX in clinical applications. These results suggest that the optimized patch formulation could be further developed for clinical applications, providing the therapeutic plasma level of FX over an extended period. To the best of our knowledge, our results are the first reported in vitro and in vivo data on the preparation and optimization of FX-loaded DIA patch, showing its feasibility as an effective transdermal delivery system for FX. PMID:25863117

  18. A novel chemokine receptor for SDF-1 and I-TAC involved in cell survival, cell adhesion, and tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jennifer M.; Summers, Bretton C.; Wang, Yu; Melikian, Anita; Berahovich, Rob; Miao, Zhenhua; Penfold, Mark E. T.; Sunshine, Mary Jean; Littman, Dan R.; Kuo, Calvin J.; Wei, Kevin; McMaster, Brian E.; Wright, Kim; Howard, Maureen C.; Schall, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The chemokine stromal cell–derived factor (SDF-1; also known as chemokine ligand 12 [CXCL12]) regulates many essential biological processes, including cardiac and neuronal development, stem cell motility, neovascularization, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. It is generally believed that SDF-1 mediates these many disparate processes via a single cell surface receptor known as chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). This paper characterizes an alternate receptor, CXCR7, which binds with high affinity to SDF-1 and to a second chemokine, interferon-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC; also known as CXCL11). Membrane-associated CXCR7 is expressed on many tumor cell lines, on activated endothelial cells, and on fetal liver cells, but on few other cell types. Unlike many other chemokine receptors, ligand activation of CXCR7 does not cause Ca2+ mobilization or cell migration. However, expression of CXCR7 provides cells with a growth and survival advantage and increased adhesion properties. Consistent with a role for CXCR7 in cell survival and adhesion, a specific, high affinity small molecule antagonist to CXCR7 impedes in vivo tumor growth in animal models, validating this new receptor as a target for development of novel cancer therapeutics. PMID:16940167

  19. Development of the meniscus of the knee joint in human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Ikuo; Hatta, Toshihisa; Uchio, Yuji; Otani, Hiroki

    2009-03-01

    Discoid meniscus of the knee joint occurs at a higher incidence in the lateral than in the medial menisci. Although its developmental origin has been suggested, it remains unclear. To verify the developmental etiology, we examined the meniscus of the knee joint in 41 human fetuses (from 14 to 30 weeks of gestation) and 14 adults (from 56 to 91 years of age) comparatively. The articular surfaces of the tibia and meniscus of the left knees in 40 fetuses and 14 adults were photographed and each area was measured by Scion Image (Scion; http://www.scioncorp.com). Morphometric analyses revealed that the proportion of the area of meniscus to that of the plateau was continuously higher in the lateral side than in the medial side. The right knee joints of seven fetuses were histologically observed, and the layered structure of fibers developed earlier in the lateral meniscus than in the medial in fetuses. The observed differential development of lateral and medial sides of the meniscus may be involved in the etiology of discoid meniscus. PMID:19243414

  20. [The development of a finger joint phantom for the optical simulation of early inflammatory rheumatic changes].

    PubMed

    Prapavat, V; Runge, W; Mans, J; Krause, A; Beuthan, J; Müller, G

    1997-11-01

    In the field of rheumatology, conventional diagnostic methods permit the detection only of advanced stages of the disease, which is at odds with the current clinical demand for the early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Prompted by current needs, we developed a finger joint phantom that enables the optical and geometrical simulation of an early stage of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The results presented here form the experimental basis for an evaluation of new RA diagnostic systems based on near infrared light. The early stage of RA is characterised mainly by a vigorous proliferation of the synovial membrane and clouding of the synovial fluid. Using a double-integrating-sphere technique, the absorption and scattering coefficients (mua, mus') are experimentally determined for healthy and pathologically altered synovial fluid and capsule tissue. Using a variable mixture of Intralipid Indian ink and water as a scattering/absorption medium, the optical properties of skin, synovial fluid or capsule can be selected individually. Since the optical and geometrical properties of bone tissue remain constant in early-stage RA, a solid material is used for its simulation. Using the finger joint phantom described herein, the optical properties of joint regions can be adjusted specifically, enabling an evaluation of their effects on an optical signal--for example, during fluorography--and the investigation of these effects for diagnostically useful information. The experimental foundation for the development of a new optical system for the early diagnosis of RA has now been laid. PMID:9490122

  1. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  2. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  3. The spectroscopic detection of drugs of abuse in fingerprints after development with powders and recovery with adhesive lifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Matthew J.; Went, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The application of powders to fingerprints has long been established as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints. Fingerprints developed in situ at a crime scene routinely undergo lifting with specialist tapes and are then stored in evidence bags to allow secure transit and also to preserve the chain of evidence. In a previous study we have shown that exogenous material within a fingerprint can be detected using Raman spectroscopy following development with powders and lifting with adhesive tapes. Other reports have detailed the use of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints including cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. This study involves the application of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints for fingerprints that had been treated with powders and also subsequently lifted with adhesive tapes. Samples of seized ecstasy, cocaine, ketamine and amphetamine were supplied by East Sussex Police and by the TICTAC unit at St. Georges Hospital Tooting. Contaminated fingerprints were deposited on clean glass slides. The application of aluminium or iron based powders to contaminated fingerprints did not interfere with the Raman spectra obtained for the contaminants. Contaminated fingerprints developed with powders and then lifted with lifting tapes were also examined. The combination of these two techniques did not interfere with the successful analysis. The lifting process was repeated using hinge lifters. As the hinge lifters exhibited strong Raman bands the spectroscopic analysis was more complex and an increase in the number of exposures to the detector allowed for improved clarification. Spectral subtraction was performed to remove peaks due to the hinge lifters using OMNIC software. Raman spectra of developed and lifted fingerprints recorded through evidence bags were obtained and it was found that the detection process was not compromised. Although the application of

  4. The adhesion protein IgSF9b is coupled to neuroligin 2 via S-SCAM to promote inhibitory synapse development.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jooyeon; Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Nam, Jungyong; Choi, Seungwon; Takahashi, Hideto; Krueger, Dilja; Park, Joohyun; Lee, Yeunkum; Bae, Jin Young; Lee, Dongmin; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Bae, Yong Chul; Chang, Sunghoe; Craig, Ann Marie; Kim, Eunjoon

    2013-06-10

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of synapse formation and maintenance. Many known synaptic adhesion molecules localize at excitatory synapses, whereas relatively little is known about inhibitory synaptic adhesion molecules. Here we report that IgSF9b is a novel, brain-specific, homophilic adhesion molecule that is strongly expressed in GABAergic interneurons. IgSF9b was preferentially localized at inhibitory synapses in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical interneurons and was required for the development of inhibitory synapses onto interneurons. IgSF9b formed a subsynaptic domain distinct from the GABAA receptor- and gephyrin-containing domain, as indicated by super-resolution imaging. IgSF9b was linked to neuroligin 2, an inhibitory synaptic adhesion molecule coupled to gephyrin, via the multi-PDZ protein S-SCAM. IgSF9b and neuroligin 2 could reciprocally cluster each other. These results suggest a novel mode of inhibitory synaptic organization in which two subsynaptic domains, one containing IgSF9b for synaptic adhesion and the other containing gephyrin and GABAA receptors for synaptic transmission, are interconnected through S-SCAM and neuroligin 2. PMID:23751499

  5. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erli, Hans J; Marx, Rudolf; Paar, Othmar; Niethard, Fritz U; Weber, Michael; Wirtz, Dieter C

    2003-01-01

    Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties) usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m). This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body. PMID:14561228

  6. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  7. Development of Buccal Adhesive Tablet with Prolonged Antifungal activity: Optimization and ex vivo Deposition Studies

    PubMed Central

    Madgulkar, A.; Kadam, S.; Pokharkar, V.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare buccal adhesive tablets of miconazole nitrate. The simplex centroid experimental design was used to arrive at optimum ratio of carbopol 934P, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M and polyvinylpyrollidone, which will provide desired drug release and mucoadhesion. Swelling index, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release of the prepared tablet was determined. The drug release and bioadhesion was dependent on type and relative amounts of the polymers. The optimized combination was subjected to in vitro antifungal activity, transmucosal permeation, drug deposition in mucosa, residence time and bioadhesion studies. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate any interaction between drug and excipients. Dissolution of miconazole from tablets was sustained for 6 h. based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the prepared slow release buccoadhesive tablets of miconazole would markedly prolong the duration of antifungal activity. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activity of tablet with marketed gel showed that drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration were achieved immediately from both formulations but release from tablet was sustained up to 6 h, while the gel showed initially fast drug release, which did not sustain later. Drug permeation across buccal mucosa was minimum from the tablet as well as marketed gel; the deposition of drug in mucosa was higher in case of tablet. In vitro residence time and bioadhesive strength of tablet was higher than gel. Thus the buccoadhesive tablet of miconazole nitrate may offer better control of antifungal activity as compared to the gel formulation. PMID:20490296

  8. Development of Buccal Adhesive Tablet with Prolonged Antifungal activity: Optimization and ex vivo Deposition Studies.

    PubMed

    Madgulkar, A; Kadam, S; Pokharkar, V

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare buccal adhesive tablets of miconazole nitrate. The simplex centroid experimental design was used to arrive at optimum ratio of carbopol 934P, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M and polyvinylpyrollidone, which will provide desired drug release and mucoadhesion. Swelling index, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release of the prepared tablet was determined. The drug release and bioadhesion was dependent on type and relative amounts of the polymers. The optimized combination was subjected to in vitro antifungal activity, transmucosal permeation, drug deposition in mucosa, residence time and bioadhesion studies. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate any interaction between drug and excipients. Dissolution of miconazole from tablets was sustained for 6 h. based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the prepared slow release buccoadhesive tablets of miconazole would markedly prolong the duration of antifungal activity. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activity of tablet with marketed gel showed that drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration were achieved immediately from both formulations but release from tablet was sustained up to 6 h, while the gel showed initially fast drug release, which did not sustain later. Drug permeation across buccal mucosa was minimum from the tablet as well as marketed gel; the deposition of drug in mucosa was higher in case of tablet. In vitro residence time and bioadhesive strength of tablet was higher than gel. Thus the buccoadhesive tablet of miconazole nitrate may offer better control of antifungal activity as compared to the gel formulation. PMID:20490296

  9. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24575424

  10. Metal-Filled Adhesives Amenable To X-Ray Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermansen, Ralph D.; Sutherland, Thomas H.; Predmore, Roamer

    1994-01-01

    Adhesive joints between metal parts made amenable to nondestructive radiographic inspection by incorporating radiopaque fillers that increase x-ray contrasts of joints. Adhesives can be epoxies, urethanes, acrylics, phenolics, or silicones, with appropriate curing agents and with such modifiers as polysulfides, polyamides, or butadiene rubbers.

  11. Rating Parent-Child Interactions: Joint Engagement, Communication Dynamics, and Shared Topics in Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Nelson, P. Brooke

    2012-01-01

    A battery of 17 rating items were applied to video records of typically-developing toddlers and young children with autism and Down syndrome interacting with their parents during the Communication Play Protocol. This battery provided a reliable and broad view of the joint engagement triad of child, partner, and shared topic. Ratings of the child’s joint engagement correlated very strongly with state coding of joint engagement and replicated the findings that coordinated joint engagement was less likely in children with autism and symbol-infused joint engagement was less likely in children with Down syndrome. Ratings of other child actions, of parent contributions, and of shared topics and communicative dynamics also documented pervasive variations related to diagnosis, language facility, and communicative context. PMID:22466689

  12. Quorum-sensing regulation governs bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and host colonization in Pantoea stewartii subspecies stewartii.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudis, Maria D; Tsaltas, Dimitrios; Minogue, Timothy D; von Bodman, Susanne B

    2006-04-11

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii synthesizes stewartan exo/capsular polysaccharide (EPS) in a cell density-dependent manner governed by the EsaI/EsaR quorum-sensing (QS) system. This study analyzes biofilm development and host colonization of the WT and QS regulatory mutant strains of P. stewartii. First, we show that the cell density-dependent synthesis of stewartan EPS, governed by the EsaI/EsaR QS system, is required for proper bacterial adhesion and development of spatially defined, 3D biofilms. Second, a nonvirulent mutant lacking the esaI gene adheres strongly to surfaces and develops densely packed, less structurally defined biofilms in vitro. This strain appears to be arrested in a low cell density developmental mode. Exposure of this strain to exogenous N-acyl-homoserine lactone counteracts this adhesion phenotype. Third, QS mutants lacking the EsaR repressor attach poorly to surfaces and form amorphous biofilms heavily enmeshed in excess EPS. Fourth, the WT strain disseminates efficiently within the xylem, primarily in a basipetal direction. In contrast, the two QS mutant strains remain largely localized at the site of infection. Fifth, and most significantly, epifluorescence microscopic imaging of infected leaf tissue and excised xylem vessels reveals that the bacteria colonize the xylem with unexpected specificity, particularly toward the annular rings and spiral secondary wall thickenings of protoxylem, as opposed to indiscriminate growth to fill the xylem lumen. These observations are significant to bacterial plant pathogenesis in general and may reveal targets for disease control. PMID:16585516

  13. Ruminant methane reduction through livestock development in Tanzania. Final report for US Department of Energy and US Initiative on Joint Implementation--Activities Implemented Jointly

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, Roderick

    1999-07-01

    This project was designed to help develop the US Initiative on Joint Implementation activities in Eastern Africa. It has been communicated in meetings with representatives from the Ministry of Environment of Tanzania and the consultant group that developed Tanzania's National Climate Change Action Plan, the Centre for Energy, Environment, Science and Technology, that this project fits very well with the developmental and environmental goals of the Government of Tanzania. The goal of the Activities Implemented Jointly ruminant livestock project is to reduce ruminant methane emissions in Eastern Africa. The project plans a sustainable cattle multiplication unit (CMU) at Mabuki Ranch in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania. This CMU will focus on raising genetically improved animals to be purchased by farmers, developmental organizations, and other CMUs in Tanzania. Through the purchase of these animals farmers will raise their income generation potential and reduce ruminant methane emissions.

  14. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  15. Structural tests and development of a laminar flow control wing surface composite chordwise joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program beginning in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplished under NAS1-16235 Laminar-Flow-Control (LFC) Wing Panel Structural Design and Development (WSSD); design, manufacturing, and testing activities. An in-depth preliminary design of the baseline 1993 LFC wing was accomplished. A surface panel using the Lockheed graphite/epoxy integrated LFC wing box structural concept was designed. The concept was shown by analysis to be structurally efficient and cost effective. Critical details of the surface and surface joint was demonstrated by fabricating and testing complex, concept selection specimens. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments, Development of LFC Wind Surface Composite Structures (WSCS), are documented. Tests were conducted on two CV2 panels to verify the static tension and fatigue strength of LFC wing surface chordwise joints.

  16. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  17. Nonlinear analysis of bonded joints with thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, E. A.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear results are presented for adhesive bonded joints. It is shown that adhesive nonlinearities are only significant in the predicted adhesive shear stresses. Adherend nonlinearities and temperature dependent properties are shown to have little effect upon the adhesive stress predictions under mechanical and thermal loadings.

  18. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  19. Ground reaction forces and lower-limb joint kinetics of turning gait in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Philippe C; Stebbins, Julie; Theologis, Tim; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2014-11-28

    Turning is a common locomotor task essential to daily activity; however, very little is known about the forces and moments responsible for the kinematic adaptations occurring relative to straight-line gait in typically developing children. Thus, the aims of this study were to analyse ground reaction forces (GRFs), ground reaction free vertical torque (TZ), and the lower-limb joint kinetics of 90° outside (step) and inside (spin) limb turns. Step, spin, and straight walking trials from fifty-four typically developing children were analysed. All children were fit with the Plug-in Gait and Oxford Foot Model marker sets while walking over force plates embedded in the walkway. Net internal joint moments and power were computed via a standard inverse dynamics approach. All dependent variables were statistically analysed over the entire curves using the mean difference 95% bootstrap confidence band approach. GRFs were directed medially for step turns and laterally for spin turns during the turning phase. Directions were reversed and magnitudes decreased during the approach phase. Step turns showed reduced ankle power generation, while spin turns showed large TZ. Both strategies required large knee and hip coronal and transverse plane moments during swing. These kinetic differences highlight adaptations required to maintain stability and reorient the body towards the new walking direction during turning. From a clinical perspective, turning gait may better reveal weaknesses and motor control deficits than straight walking in pathological populations, such as children with cerebral palsy, and could potentially be implemented in standard gait analysis sessions. PMID:25311452

  20. Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Seals for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Miller, Sharon K. R.; Smith, Ian M.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M

    2008-01-01

    Silicone rubber seals are being considered for a number of interfaces on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Some of these joints include the docking system, hatches, and heat shield-to-back shell interface. A large diameter molded silicone seal is being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) that forms an effective seal between the CEV and International Space Station (ISS) and other future Constellation Program spacecraft. Seals between the heat shield and back shell prevent high temperature reentry gases from leaking into the interface. Silicone rubber seals being considered for these locations have inherent adhesive tendencies that would result in excessive forces required to separate the joints if left unchecked. This paper summarizes adhesion assessments for both as-received and adhesion-mitigated seals for the docking system and the heat shield interface location. Three silicone elastomers were examined: Parker Hannifin S0899-50 and S0383-70 compounds, and Esterline ELA-SA-401 compound. For the docking system application various levels of exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) were evaluated. Moderate AO treatments did not lower the adhesive properties of S0899-50 sufficiently. However, AO pretreatments of approximately 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm did lower the adhesion of S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 to acceptable levels. For the heat shield-to-back shell interface application, a fabric covering was also considered. Molding Nomex fabric into the heat shield pressure seal appreciably reduced seal adhesion for the heat shield-to-back shell interface application.

  1. Proinflammatory Cytokine, Chemokine, and Cellular Adhesion Molecule Expression during the Acute Phase of Experimental Brain Abscess Development

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy; Hickey, William F.

    2000-01-01

    Brain abscess represents the infectious disease sequelae associated with the influx of inflammatory cells and activation of resident parenchymal cells in the central nervous system. However, the immune response leading to the establishment of a brain abscess remains poorly defined. In this study, we have characterized cytokine and chemokine expression in an experimental brain abscess model in the rat during the acute stage of abscess development. RNase protection assay revealed the induction of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α as early as 1 to 6 hours after Staphylococcus aureus exposure. Evaluation of chemokine expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated enhanced levels of the CXC chemokine KC 24 hours after bacterial exposure, which correlated with the appearance of neutrophils in the abscess. In addition, two CC chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were induced within 24 hours after S. aureus exposure and preceded the influx of macrophages and lymphocytes into the brain. Analysis of abscess lesions by in situ hybridization identified CD11b+ cells as the source of IL-1β in response to S. aureus. Both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression were enhanced on microvessels in S. aureus but not sterile bead-implanted tissues at 24 and 48 hours after treatment. These results characterize proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression during the early response to S. aureus in the brain and provide the foundation to assess the functional significance of these mediators in brain abscess pathogenesis. PMID:10934167

  2. Development of brazing process for W-EUROFER joints using Cu-based fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2016-02-01

    A successful joint between W and EUROFER using high temperature brazing technique has been achieved for structural application in future fusion power plants. Cu-based powder alloy mixed with a polymeric binder has been used as filler. Microstructural analysis of the joints revealed that the joint consisted mainly of primary phases and acicular structures in a Cu matrix. Interaction between EUROFER and filler took place at the interface giving rise to several Cu-Ti-Fe rich layers. A loss of hardness at the EUROFER substrate close to the joint due to a diffusion phenomenon during brazing cycle was measured; however, the joints had an adequate shear strength value.

  3. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  4. Effects of Strength Training on Strength Development and Joint Position Sense in Functionally Unstable Ankles

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Carrie L.; Moore, Josef H.; Arnold, Brent L.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of ankle-strengthening exercises on joint position sense and strength development in subjects with functionally unstable ankles. Design and Setting: Subjects were randomly assigned to a training or control group. The training group participated in a 6-week strength-training protocol using rubber tubing 3 times a week throughout the training period. The control group did not participate in the strength-training protocol. Subjects: Twenty healthy college students (10 females, 10 males, age = 20.6 ± 2.23 years; ht = 176.40 ± 7.14 cm; wt = 74.18 ± 10.17 kg) with a history of functional ankle instability volunteered to participate in this study. Measurements: We pretested and posttested dorsiflexor and evertor isometric strength with a handheld dynamometer and collected joint position sense (JPS) data at 20° for inversion and plantar flexion and at 10° for eversion and dorsiflexion. Results: Statistical tests for strength and JPS revealed significant group-by-time interactions for dorsiflexion strength, eversion strength, inversion JPS, and plantar flexion JPS. Simple main-effects testing revealed improvements in training group strength and JPS at posttesting. There were no significant effects for eversion JPS, but the group main effect for dorsiflexion JPS was significant, with the experimental group having better scores than the control group. Conclusions: Ankle-strengthening exercises improved strength, inversion JPS, dorsiflexion JPS, and plantar flexion JPS in subjects with functionally unstable ankles. Imagesp311-a PMID:16558526

  5. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR56 is a cell-autonomous regulator of oligodendrocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Giera, Stefanie; Deng, Yiyu; Luo, Rong; Ackerman, Sarah D.; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R.; Ying, Yanqin; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Makinodan, Manabu; Bialas, Allison R.; Chang, Bernard S.; Stevens, Beth; Corfas, Gabriel; Piao, Xianhua

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in GPR56, a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family, cause a human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of BFPP brains reveals myelination defects in addition to brain malformation. However, the cellular role of GPR56 in oligodendrocyte development remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that loss of Gpr56 leads to hypomyelination of the central nervous system in mice. GPR56 levels are abundant throughout early stages of oligodendrocyte development, but are downregulated in myelinating oligodendrocytes. Gpr56-knockout mice manifest with decreased oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and diminished levels of active RhoA, leading to fewer mature oligodendrocytes and a reduced number of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum and optic nerves. Conditional ablation of Gpr56 in OPCs leads to a reduced number of mature oligodendrocytes as seen in constitutive knockout of Gpr56. Together, our data define GPR56 as a cell-autonomous regulator of oligodendrocyte development. PMID:25607655

  6. Development of a complex parent-metabolite joint population pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Julie; Laffont, Céline M; Mentré, France; Chenel, Marylore; Comets, Emmanuelle

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a joint population pharmacokinetic model for an antipsychotic agent in development (S33138) and its active metabolite (S35424) produced by reversible metabolism. Because such a model leads to identifiability problems and numerical difficulties, the model building was performed using the FOCE-I and the Stochastic Approximation Expectation Maximization (SAEM) estimation algorithms in NONMEM and MONOLIX, respectively. Four different structural models were compared based on Bayesian information criteria. Models were first written as ordinary differential equations systems and then in closed form (CF) to facilitate further analyses. The impact of polymorphisms on genes coding for the CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 enzymes, respectively involved in the parent drug and the metabolite elimination were investigated using permutation Wald test. The parent drug and metabolite plasma concentrations of 101 patients were analyzed on two occasions after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h following daily oral administration. All configurations led to a two compartment model with back-transformation of the metabolite into the parent drug and a first-pass effect. The elimination clearance of the metabolite through other processes than back-transformation was decreased by 35% [9-53%] in CYP2D6 poor metabolizer. Permutation tests were performed to ensure the robustness of the analysis, using SAEM and CF. In conclusion, we developed a complex joint pharmacokinetic model adequately predicting the impact of CYP2D6 polymorphisms on the parent drug and its metabolite concentrations through the back-transformation mechanism. PMID:21618059

  7. Mouse limb skeletal growth and synovial joint development are coordinately enhanced by Kartogenin.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rebekah S; Koyama, Eiki; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Maye, Peter; Rowe, David; Zhu, Shoutian; Schultz, Peter G; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-11-15

    Limb development requires the coordinated growth of several tissues and structures including long bones, joints and tendons, but the underlying mechanisms are not wholly clear. Recently, we identified a small drug-like molecule - we named Kartogenin (KGN) - that greatly stimulates chondrogenesis in marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and enhances cartilage repair in mouse osteoarthritis (OA) models. To determine whether limb developmental processes are regulated by KGN, we tested its activity on committed preskeletal mesenchymal cells from mouse embryo limb buds and whole limb explants. KGN did stimulate cartilage nodule formation and more strikingly, boosted digit cartilaginous anlaga elongation, synovial joint formation and interzone compaction, tendon maturation as monitored by ScxGFP, and interdigit invagination. To identify mechanisms, we carried out gene expression analyses and found that several genes, including those encoding key signaling proteins, were up-regulated by KGN. Amongst highly up-regulated genes were those encoding hedgehog and TGFβ superfamily members, particularly TFGβ1. The former response was verified by increases in Gli1-LacZ activity and Gli1 mRNA expression. Exogenous TGFβ1 stimulated cartilage nodule formation to levels similar to KGN, and KGN and TGFβ1 both greatly enhanced expression of lubricin/Prg4 in articular superficial zone cells. KGN also strongly increased the cellular levels of phospho-Smads that mediate canonical TGFβ and BMP signaling. Thus, limb development is potently and harmoniously stimulated by KGN. The growth effects of KGN appear to result from its ability to boost several key signaling pathways and in particular TGFβ signaling, working in addition to and/or in concert with the filamin A/CBFβ/RUNX1 pathway we identified previously to orchestrate overall limb development. KGN may thus represent a very powerful tool not only for OA therapy, but also limb regeneration and tissue repair strategies. PMID

  8. Mouse limb skeletal growth and synovial joint development are coordinately enhanced by Kartogenin

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Rebekah S.; Koyama, Eiki; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Maye, Peter; Rowe, David; Zhu, Shoutian; Schultz, Peter G.; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Limb development requires the coordinated growth of several tissues and structures including long bones, joints and tendons, but the underlying mechanisms are not wholly clear. Recently, we identified a small drug-like molecule -we named Kartogenin (KGN)- that greatly stimulates chondrogenesis in marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and enhances cartilage repair in mouse osteoarthritis (OA) models. To determine whether limb developmental processes are regulated by KGN, we tested its activity on committed preskeletal mesenchymal cells from mouse embryo limb buds and whole limb explants. KGN did stimulate cartilage nodule formation and more strikingly, boosted digit cartilaginous anlaga elongation, synovial joint formation and interzone compaction, tendon maturation as monitored by ScxGFP, and interdigit invagination. To identify mechanisms, we carried out gene expression analyses and found that several genes, including those encoding key signaling proteins, were up-regulated by KGN. Amongst highly up-regulated genes were those encoding hedgehog and TGFβ superfamily members, particularly TFGβ1. The former response was verified by increases in Gli1-LacZ activity and Gli1 mRNA expression. Exogenous TGFβ1 stimulated cartilage nodule formation to levels similar to KGN, and KGN and TGFβ1 both greatly enhanced expression of lubricin/Prg4 in articular superficial zone cells. KGN also strongly increased the cellular levels of phospho-Smads that mediate canonical TGFβ and BMP signaling. Thus, limb development is potently and harmoniously stimulated by KGN. The growth effects of KGN appear to result from its ability to boost several key signaling pathways and in particular TGFβ signaling, working in addition to and/or in concert with the filamin A/CBFβ/RUNX1 pathway we identified previously to orchestrate overall limb development. KGN may thus represent a very powerful tool not only for OA therapy, but also limb regeneration and tissue repair strategies. PMID

  9. The development of centres of ossification of bones forming elbow joints in young swine.

    PubMed Central

    Visco, D M; Hill, M A; Van Sickle, D C; Kincaid, S A

    1990-01-01

    Epiphyseal centres of ossification in the bones forming the elbow joints of pigs between one day and 15 weeks of age were examined radiographically, macroscopically, mesoscopically and microscopically. Thoracic limbs from 39 pigs were perfused with India ink or silicone rubber injection compound and the bones were dissected free of soft tissues. The humerus, ulna and radius were fixed in formalin or ethyl alcohol and then cleared by the modified Spalteholz technique. Bones were radiographed, examined grossly, and then cut into slabs for mesoscopical evaluation. Foci considered to be calcifying within cartilaginous anlage were selected for microscopical examination. It was concluded that the epiphyseal centre of ossification develops at different times in different sites in the bones forming the elbow joint. Centres of ossification are initiated when foci of chondrocytes adjacent to one side of a cartilage canal undergo hypertrophy and the inter-territorial matrix becomes calcified. Osteogenesis then proceeds in the calcified focus, presumably with osteoprogenitor cells that originate within the cartilage canals. Subsequently, each epiphyseal centre of ossification enlarges by one of two methods. Firstly, the layer of cartilage adjacent to the centre undergoes endochondral ossification, thus allowing for the circumferential growth of the epiphyseal centre of ossification. Secondly, foci of calcification develop adjacent to the ends of cartilage canals near the epiphyseal centre of ossification and eventually the focus of calcification coalesces with the developing epiphyseal centre of ossification, thus establishing a new ossification front. Endochondral ossification continues at the periphery of the mass of bone. Mesoscopical examination is more useful than radiographical evaluation for identifying small foci of calcification which precede epiphyseal centres of ossification. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2081708

  10. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  11. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  12. Effect of Metal Bond-Pad Configurations on the Solder Microstructure Development of Flip-Chip Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. J.; Hsu, Y. C.; Huang, T. S.; Lu, C. T.; Wu, Albert T.; Liu, C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Various microstructural zones were observed in the solidified solder of flip-chip solder joints with three metal bond-pad configurations (Cu/Sn/Cu, Ni/Sn/Cu, and Cu/Sn/Ni). The developed microstructures of the solidified flip-chip solder joints were strongly related to the associated metal bond pad. A hypoeutectic microstructure always developed near the Ni bond pad, and a eutectic or hypereutectic microstructure formed near the Cu pad. The effect of the metal bond pads on the solder microstructure alters the Cu solubility in the molten solder. The Cu content (solubility) in the molten Sn(Cu) solder eventually leads to the development of particular microstructures. In addition to the effect of the associated metal bond pads, the developed microstructure of the flip-chip solder joint depends on the configuration of the metal bond pads. A hypereutectic microstructure formed near the bottom Cu pad, and a eutectic microstructure formed near the top Cu pad. Directional cooling in the flip-chip solder joint during the solidification process causes the effects of the metal bond-pad configuration. Directional cooling causes the Cu content to vary in the liquid Sn(Cu) phase, resulting in the formation of distinct microstructural zones in the developed microstructure of the flip-chip solder joint.

  13. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  14. Early Predictors of Communication Development in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Joint Attention, Imitation, and Toy Play

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Jeffrey; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Dawson, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the unique contributions of joint attention, imitation, and toy play to language ability and rate of development of communication skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sixty preschool-aged children with ASD were assessed using measures of joint attention, imitation, toy play, language, and communication ability. Two skills, initiating protodeclarative joint attention and immediate imitation, were most strongly associated with language ability at age 3–4 years, whereas toy play and deferred imitation were the best predictors of rate of communication development from age 4 to 6.5 years. The implications of these results for understanding the nature and course of language development in autism and for the development of targeted early interventions are discussed. PMID:16845578

  15. Ukrainian Virtual Observatory: Current Status and Perspectives of Development of Joint Archives of Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Protsyuk, Yu. I.; Virun, N. V.; Kashuba, S. G.; Pikhun, A. I.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Mazhaev, A. E.; Kazantseva, L. V.; Shlyapnikov, A. A.; Shulga, A. V.; Zolotukhina, A. V.; Sergeeva, T. P.; Miroshnichenko, A. P.; Andronov, I. L.; Breus, V. V; Virnina, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The current state of the observational data archives of seven observatories of Ukraine which were created from 1898 to 2010 is considered in respect to their suitability for including into the Ukrainian Virtual Observatory (UkrVO) database. In accordance with a current UkrVO conception approved by the Ukrainian Astronomical Association, the database of astro negatives is the main scientific component of the UkrVO. The database will include all the photo plates accumulated in Ukraine and combine them into the Joint Digitized Archive (JDA). This will provide for a user an easy access to textual data and images using web interface and a corresponding search engine. The data archives obtained from CCD and radio observations in Ukraine are also discussed as scientific components of the UkrVO. Some prospects of the JDA development are formulated.

  16. Parental Support for Language Development During Joint Book Reading for Young Children With Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Doll, Emily R.; Stika, Carren J.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Johnson, Karen J.; Ganguly, Dianne Hammes; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.

    2014-01-01

    Parent and child joint book reading (JBR) characteristics and parent facilitative language techniques (FLTs) were investigated in two groups of parents and their young children; children with normal hearing (NH; n = 60) and children with hearing loss (HL; n = 45). Parent–child dyads were videotaped during JBR interactions, and parent and child behaviors were coded for specific JBR behaviors using a scale developed for this study. Children’s oral language skills were assessed using the Preschool Language Scale–4 (PLS-4). Parents of children with HL scored higher on two of the four subscales of JBR: Literacy Strategies and Teacher Techniques. Parents of children with NH utilized higher level FLTs with their children who had higher language skills. Higher level FLTs were positively related to children’s oral language abilities. Implications are discussed for professionals who work with families of very young children with HL. PMID:25309136

  17. Development of a rotary joint fluid coupling for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costulis, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The design and development is described of a rotary joint fluid coupling for Space Station Freedom. The function of this fluid coupling is to transfer a heat rejection fluid between stationary and rotating interfaces with the Space Station thermal bus system. The design of this coupling incorporates a modular type design to allow maximum flexibility, two types of seals (mechanical face seals and shaft lip seals) for redundancy, materials with excellent ammonia compatibility, and coatings that enhance seal wear resistance and increased protection against corrosion. This design was thoroughly tested and met all design requirements. Potential applications of this hardware include uses in gun turrets, coal slurries, farming equipment, and any other applications that require the low leakage transfer of fluids between stationary and rotating interfaces.

  18. Development of a truss joint for robotic assembly of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed study of mechanical fasteners which were designed to facilitate robotic assembly of structures. Design requirements for robotic structural assembly were developed, taking into account structural properties and overall system design, and four candidate fasteners were designed to meet them. These fasteners were built and evaluated in the laboratory, and the Hammer-Head joint was chosen as superior overall. It had a high reliability of fastening under misalignments of 2.54 mm (0.1 in) and 3 deg, the highest end fixity (2.18), the simplest end effector, an integral capture guide, good visual verification, and the lightest weight (782 g, 1.72 lb). The study found that a good design should incorporate chamfers sliding on chamfers, cylinders sliding on chamfers, and hard surface finishes on sliding surfaces. The study also comments on robot flexibility, sag, hysteresis, thermal expansion, and friction which were observed during the testing.

  19. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  20. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  1. Hedgehog inhibits β-catenin activity in synovial joint development and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rockel, Jason S.; Yu, Chunying; Whetstone, Heather; Craft, April M.; Reilly, Katherine; Ma, Henry; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Al-Jazrawe, Mushriq; Keller, Gordon M.; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Both the WNT/β-catenin and hedgehog signaling pathways are important in the regulation of limb development, chondrocyte differentiation, and degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). It is not clear how these signaling pathways interact in interzone cell differentiation and synovial joint morphogenesis. Here, we determined that constitutive activation of hedgehog signaling specifically within interzone cells induces joint morphological changes by selectively inhibiting β-catenin–induced Fgf18 expression. Stabilization of β-catenin or treatment with FGF18 rescued hedgehog-induced phenotypes. Hedgehog signaling induced expression of a dominant negative isoform of TCF7L2 (dnTCF7L2) in interzone progeny, which may account for the selective regulation of β-catenin target genes observed. Knockdown of TCF7L2 isoforms in mouse chondrocytes rescued hedgehog signaling–induced Fgf18 downregulation, while overexpression of the human dnTCF7L2 orthologue (dnTCF4) in human chondrocytes promoted the expression of catabolic enzymes associated with OA. Similarly, expression of dnTCF4 in human chondrocytes positively correlated with the aggrecanase ADAMTS4. Consistent with our developmental findings, activation of β-catenin also attenuated hedgehog-induced or surgically induced articular cartilage degeneration in mouse models of OA. Thus, our results demonstrate that hedgehog inhibits selective β-catenin target gene expression to direct interzone progeny fates and articular cartilage development and disease. Moreover, agents that increase β-catenin activity have the potential to therapeutically attenuate articular cartilage degeneration as part of OA. PMID:27018594

  2. Foundation-industry relationships--a new business model joint-venture philanthropy in therapy development.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The business model for medical therapy development has changed drastically. Large companies that once conducted their own Research and Development (R&D) and funded all the preclinical studies, all phases of clinical development and marketing of the products are increasingly turning to others for more and more of the earlier work in hopes of being able to in-license a de-risked program well downstream, take it through the final phases of clinical development and into the marketplace. This new paradigm has required patient-advocacy foundations, especially in the rare-disease space, to become far more effective in building relationships with all the players along the therapy-development pathway -- academic scientists, government agencies, other foundations with overlapping interests, biotechs, small biopharmaceutical entities and even the larger industry companies. From the perspective of the patient-advocacy community, these increasingly essential public-private partnerships have taken on the nature of what could be called joint-venture philanthropy and involve a broad spectrum of collaborations and financial relationships between foundations and industry partners that are not without concerns about potential conflicts of interest. PMID:24283968

  3. Development of high temperature silicone adhesive formulations for thermal protection system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockridge, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Trade-off studies and screening evaluations were made of commercial polymers and silicone foam sheet stock. A low modulus, low density 0.26 gm/cc modification was developed of the GE-RESD PD-200 system based upon GE RTV-560 silicone polymer. The bond system modification was initially characterized for mechanical and thermal properties, evaluated for application methods, and its capability demonstrated as a strain arrestor bond system.

  4. Roles of Specific Membrane Lipid Domains in EGF Receptor Activation and Cell Adhesion Molecule Stabilization in a Developing Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Nicholas J.; Tolbert, Leslie P.; Oland, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Reciprocal interactions between glial cells and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) cause ORN axons entering the brain to sort, to fasciculate into bundles destined for specific glomeruli, and to form stable protoglomeruli in the developing olfactory system of an experimentally advantageous animal species, the moth Manduca sexta. Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and the cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs) neuroglian and fasciclin II are known to be important players in these processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We report in situ and cell-culture studies that suggest a role for glycosphingolipid-rich membrane subdomains in neuron-glia interactions. Disruption of these subdomains by the use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in loss of EGFR activation, depletion of fasciclin II in ORN axons, and loss of neuroglian stabilization in the membrane. At the cellular level, disruption leads to aberrant ORN axon trajectories, small antennal lobes, abnormal arrays of olfactory glomerul, and loss of normal glial cell migration. Conclusions/Significance We propose that glycosphingolipid-rich membrane subdomains (possible membrane rafts or platforms) are essential for IgCAM-mediated EGFR activation and for anchoring of neuroglian to the cytoskeleton, both required for normal extension and sorting of ORN axons. PMID:19787046

  5. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  6. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  7. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  8. Effects of Professional Development Training on Joint Attention Engagement in Low-Quality Childcare Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, David W.; Rudd, Loretta C.; Saxon, Terrill F.

    2007-01-01

    This study carries forward the exploration of joint attention engagement in children from 18 to 24 months of age enrolled in "low-quality" childcare centers. Childcare providers and children were videotaped to capture social interactions in the classroom including duration and bids for joint attention. One-half of 48 childcare providers were…

  9. Thermoplastic polymeric adhesive for structural bonding applications for orthopaedic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, D.; King, R.; Swarts, D.; Lin, S.; Ramani, K.; Tagle, J.

    1994-12-31

    The orthopaedics industry has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years primarily due to the introduction of high performance, porous coated implants. These devices have eliminated the need for the use of bone cement for in vivo implant fixation, replacing it with the ingrowth of bone into the porous surfaces. The metallurgical bonding processes used for attaching the porous to the implant body introduce some undesirable effect i.e., the reduction of the fatigue strength of the implant due to the ``notches`` created and also due to the high temperature exposure during the sintering operations. This paper describes the development of a thermoplastic polymeric adhesive based structural bonding technique. The high performance polymeric adhesive is fully characterized with respect to its intended application. The design of the porous layer is optimized to achieve a reliable bond to the implant. A thermal heating/cooling process was developed to control the final polymer morphology. Static and fatigue tests were conducted to fully characterize the adhesive bond strength. A ring shear test method was developed to determine the shear strength of the bond interface. Besides the characterization of the adhesive bond, the joints will be analyzed using finite element models. The correlation between the analytical models and the

  10. A review of chemical-approach and ultramorphological studies on the development of fluoride-releasing dental adhesives comprising new pre-reacted glass ionomer (PRG) fillers.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tay, Franklin R; Endo, Takeshi; Pashley, David H

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on fluoride-releasing adhesives and the related studies in this field based on information from original research papers, reviews, and patent literatures. A revolutionary PRG (pre-reacted glass ionomer) filler technology--where fillers were prepared by the acid-base reaction of a fluoroaluminosilicate glass with polyalkenoic acid in water, was newly developed, and a new category as "Giomer" was introduced into the market. On fluoride release capability, SIMS examination revealed in vitro fluoride ion uptake by dentin substrate from the PRG fillers in dental adhesive. On bonding durability, it was found that the improved durability of resin-dentin bonds might be achieved not only via the strengthened dentin due to fluoride ion uptake from the PRG-Ca fillers, but also due to retention of relatively insoluble 4-AETCa formed around remnant apatite crystallites within the hybrid layer in 4-AET-containing self-etching adhesives. On ultramorphological study of the resin-dentin interface, TEM images of the PRG-Ca fillers revealed that the dehydrated hydrogel was barely distinguishable from normal glass fillers, if not for the concurrent presence of remnant, incompletely reacted glass cores. In conclusion, it was expected that uptake of fluoride ions with cariostatic effect from PRG-Ca fillers would endow dentin substrates with the benefit of secondary caries prevention, together with an effective and durable adhesion to dentin. PMID:18717159

  11. GEP-based method to formulate adhesion strength and hardness of Nb PVD coated on Ti-6Al-7Nb aimed at developing mixed oxide nanotubular arrays.

    PubMed

    Rafieerad, A R; Bushroa, A R; Nasiri-Tabrizi, B; Fallahpour, A; Vadivelu, J; Musa, S N; Kaboli, S H A

    2016-08-01

    PVD process as a thin film coating method is highly applicable for both metallic and ceramic materials, which is faced with the necessity of choosing the correct parameters to achieve optimal results. In the present study, a GEP-based model for the first time was proposed as a safe and accurate method to predict the adhesion strength and hardness of the Nb PVD coated aimed at growing the mixed oxide nanotubular arrays on Ti67. Here, the training and testing analysis were executed for both adhesion strength and hardness. The optimum parameter combination for the scratch adhesion strength and micro hardness was determined by the maximum mean S/N ratio, which was 350W, 20 sccm, and a DC bias of 90V. Results showed that the values calculated in the training and testing in GEP model were very close to the actual experiments designed by Taguchi. The as-sputtered Nb coating with highest adhesion strength and microhardness was electrochemically anodized at 20V for 4h. From the FESEM images and EDS results of the annealed sample, a thick layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the sample surface after soaking in SBF for 10 days, which can be connected to the development of a highly ordered nanotube arrays. This novel approach provides an outline for the future design of nanostructured coatings for a wide range of applications. PMID:26874249

  12. The Effect of Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor on the Development of Adhesion Formation in Laparotomized Rats: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Basbug, Murat; Bulbuller, Nurullah; Camci, Cemalettin; Ayten, Refik; Aygen, Erhan; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Arikanoglu, Zulfu; Akbulut, Sami

    2011-01-01

    Aims. This study determined the effects of a single dose of bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic recombinant monoclonal antibody that specifically targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), on adhesion formation in the rat cecal abrasion model. Methodology. Thirty female Wistar albino rats (200–224 g) were divided into three groups. All rats underwent laparotomy at which time cecal wall abrasion and abdominal wall injuries were induced. Group I (control) underwent only the abrasion procedure; Groups II and III received saline or bevacizumab intraperitoneally, respectively, following the abrasion. The rats were killed on postoperative day 7, and the severity of adhesions was evaluated, together with histopathological fibrosis parameters and immunohistochemical staining to identify the VEGF receptor. Results. The mean adhesion severity score in Groups I–III was 2.5 ± 0.52, 2.4 ± 0.69, and 0.7 ± 0.82, respectively; the score in Group III was significantly lower than that in Groups I (P < 0.001) and II (P < 0.001). In the histopathological evaluation, the mean fibrosis score in Group III was significantly lower that the scores in Groups I (P < 0.001) and II (P < 0.001). VEGF staining of the adhesion areas in Group III was significantly lower than that in Groups I (P < 0.001) and II (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Bevacizumab decreases adhesion formation following laparotomy in rats by blocking VEGF receptor occupancy. PMID:21760775

  13. Decorin Binding Proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi Promote Arthritis Development and Joint Specific Post-Treatment DNA Persistence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Jemiina; Jaatinen, Annukka; Söderström, Mirva; Viljanen, Matti K.; Hytönen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Decorin binding proteins A and B (DbpA and B) of Borrelia burgdorferi are of critical importance for the virulence of the spirochete. The objective of the present study was to further clarify the contribution of DbpA and B to development of arthritis and persistence of B. burgdorferi after antibiotic treatment in a murine model of Lyme borreliosis. With that goal, mice were infected with B. burgdorferi strains expressing either DbpA or DbpB, or both DbpA and B, or with a strain lacking the adhesins. Arthritis development was monitored up to 15 weeks after infection, and bacterial persistence was studied after ceftriaxone and immunosuppressive treatments. Mice infected with the B. burgdorferi strain expressing both DbpA and B developed an early and prominent joint swelling. In contrast, while strains that expressed DbpA or B alone, or the strain that was DbpA and B deficient, were able to colonize mouse joints, they caused only negligible joint manifestations. Ceftriaxone treatment at two or six weeks of infection totally abolished joint swelling, and all ceftriaxone treated mice were B. burgdorferi culture negative. Antibiotic treated mice, which were immunosuppressed by anti-TNF-alpha, remained culture negative. Importantly, among ceftriaxone treated mice, B. burgdorferi DNA was detected by PCR uniformly in joint samples of mice infected with DbpA and B expressing bacteria, while this was not observed in mice infected with the DbpA and B deficient strain. In conclusion, these results show that both DbpA and B adhesins are crucial for early and prominent arthritis development in mice. Also, post-treatment borrelial DNA persistence appears to be dependent on the expression of DbpA and B on B. burgdorferi surface. Results of the immunosuppression studies suggest that the persisting material in the joints of antibiotic treated mice is DNA or DNA containing remnants rather than live bacteria. PMID:25816291

  14. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  15. Operational space weather product development and validation at the joint SMC-AFRL Rapid Prototyping Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) and Detachment 11, Space &Missile Systems Center (SMC, Det 11/CIT) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, and implement graphical products for the Air Force's space weather operations center. These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. Jointly-developed products that have been, or will soon be added to real-time operations include: 1) the Operational Space Environment Network Display (OpSEND) suit - a set of four products that address HF communication, UHF satellite communication scintillation, radar auroral clutter, and GP S single- frequency errors; 2) a solar radio background and burst effects (SoRBE) product suite; and C) a meteor effects (ME) product suite. The RPC is also involved in a rather substantial "V&V" effort to produce multiple operational product verifications and validations, with an added end goal of a generalized validation software package. The presentation will provide a general overview of the RPC and each of the products mentioned above, to include background science, operational history, inputs, outputs, dissemination, and customer uses for each.

  16. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  17. Baseline sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and male sex predict the development of radiographic sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Akar, Servet; Isik, Sibel; Birlik, Bilge; Solmaz, Dilek; Sari, Ismail; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the baseline sacroiliac joint (SIJ) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the development of radiographic sacroiliitis and tested their prognostic significance in cases of ankylosing spondylitis. Patients who had undergone an SIJ MRI at the rheumatology department were identified. Individuals for whom pelvic X-rays were available after at least 1 year of MRI were included in the analysis. All radiographs and MRI examinations were scored by two independent readers. Medical records of the patients were reviewed to obtain potentially relevant demographic and clinical data. We identified 1,069 SIJ MRIs, and 328 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Reliability analysis revealed moderate to good inter- and intra-observer agreement. On presentation data, 14 cases were excluded because they had unequivocal radiographic sacroiliitis at baseline. After a mean of 34.8 months of follow-up, 24 patients developed radiographic sacroiliitis. The presence of active sacroiliitis (odds ratio (OR) 15.1) and structural lesions on MRI (OR 8.3), male sex (OR 4.7), fulfillment of Calin's inflammatory back pain criteria (P = 0.001), and total MRI activity score (P < 0.001) were found to be related to the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. By regression modeling, the presence of both active inflammatory and structural damage lesions on MRI and male sex were found to be predictive factors for the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. Our present results suggest that the occurrence of both active inflammatory and structural lesions in SIJs revealed by MRI is a significant risk factor for radiographic sacroiliitis, especially in male patients with early inflammatory back pain. PMID:23765093

  18. Analysis and design of advanced composite bounded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Advances in the analysis of adhesive-bonded joints are presented with particular emphasis on advanced composite structures. The joints analyzed are of double-lap, single-lap, scarf, stepped-lap and tapered-lap configurations. Tensile, compressive, and in-plane shear loads are covered. In addition to the usual geometric variables, the theory accounts for the strength increases attributable to adhesive plasticity (in terms of the elastic-plastic adhesive model) and the joint strength reductions imposed by imbalances between the adherends. The solutions are largely closed-form analytical results, employing iterative solutions on a digital computer for the more complicated joint configurations. In assessing the joint efficiency, three potential failure modes are considered. These are adherend failure outside the joint, adhesive failure in shear, and adherend interlaminar tension failure (or adhesive failure in peel). Each mode is governed by a distinct mathematical analysis and each prevails throughout different ranges of geometric sizes and proportions.

  19. Joint Attention in Parent-Child Dyads Involving Children with Selective Mutism: A Comparison between Anxious and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, Matilda E.; Tasker, Susan L.; Cunningham, Charles E.; McHolm, Angela E.; Edison, Shannon; St. Pierre, Jeff; Boyle, Michael H.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2011-01-01

    Although joint attention processes are known to play an important role in adaptive social behavior in typical development, we know little about these processes in clinical child populations. We compared early school age children with selective mutism (SM; n = 19) versus mixed anxiety (MA; n = 18) and community controls (CC; n = 26) on joint…

  20. 77 FR 38088 - Development of the Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement; Request of the U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ....S. market, protecting the intellectual property rights of U.S. rights holders, and protecting the... BUDGET Development of the Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement; Request of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator for Public Comments AGENCY: Office of the U.S....

  1. Rating Parent-Child Interactions: Joint Engagement, Communication Dynamics, and Shared Topics in Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Nelson, P. Brooke

    2012-01-01

    A battery of 17 rating items were applied to video records of typically-developing toddlers and young children with autism and Down syndrome interacting with their parents during the Communication Play Protocol. This battery provided a reliable and broad view of the joint engagement triad of child, partner, and shared topic. Ratings of the child's…

  2. Microfluidic adhesion induced by subsurface microstructures.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2007-10-12

    Natural adhesives in the feet of different arthropods and vertebrates show strong adhesion as well as excellent reusability. Whereas the hierarchical structures on the surface are known to have a substantial effect on adhesion, the role of subsurface structures such as the network of microchannels has not been studied. Inspired by these bioadhesives, we generated elastomeric layers with embedded air- or oil-filled microchannels. These adhesives showed remarkable enhancement of adhesion ( approximately 30 times), which results from the crack-arresting properties of the microchannels, together with the surface stresses caused by the capillary force. The importance of the thickness of the adhesive layer, channel diameter, interchannel spacing, and vertical position within the adhesive has been examined for developing an optimal design of this microfluidic adhesive. PMID:17932295

  3. Adhesion and Interfacial Fracture: From Organic Light Emitting Devices and Photovoltaic Cells to Solar Lanterns for Developing Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Tiffany Michelle

    From that “ah-ha!” moment when a new technology is first conceived until the time that it reaches the hands of consumers, products undergo numerous iterations of research, development, testing, and redesign in order to create an end-product that is relevant, desirable, functional, and affordable. One crucial step, particularly for electronic devices, is a rigorous testing stage to ensure that a product will be able to withstand regular wear-and-tear. An understanding of how, when, and under what conditions a technology will fail is important in improving device performance and creating high quality products that consumers trust. Understanding that success is inherently tied to failure, this thesis focuses on studies of mechanical failure related to two types of electronic devices: solar cells and light emitting devices. By considering the interfaces that are relevant to the next generation of solar cells and light emitting devices that are built using organic conducting polymers, an atomic force microscopy test is introduced to characterize and rank the relative interfacial adhesion between layers at the nano-scale. These results have implications for material selection that can enhance device processing and performance. This method is then linked to fracture mechanics techniques that determine critical loading forces that induce separation and, hence, mechanical failure between layers of these devices. These results demonstrate the effect of nano-scale interactions on macro-scale behavior, and are particularly valuable in product testing as flexible electronics gain interest. Finally, a case study is conducted in Rural Kenya that measures the impact of commercially-available LED lanterns that are charged by solar panels on a community that is disconnected from the power grid. By demonstrating the value of these lanterns for the community, the role of device reliability and lifetime is examined in underscoring the critical need for proper device testing before

  4. The early development of joint attention in infants with autistic disorder using home video observations and parental interview.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Sally M; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2008-05-01

    The aim in the current study was to investigate the early development of joint attention, eye contact and affect during the first 2 years of life, by using retrospective parental interviews and analyses of home videos of infants who were later diagnosed with Autistic Disorder (AD). The 36 children with AD and the 27 matched control children were all aged between 3 and 5 years at recruitment. Reported anomalies in gaze and affect emerged in the children with AD as early as the first 6 months of life, generally becoming more severe just prior to the second birthday. Video data confirmed these anomalies from as early as the first year. Joint attention impairments were found throughout the second year of life. The results suggest that early dyadic behaviours-eye contact and affect-may play a role in the joint attention impairment in AD. PMID:17917803

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOLOGICAL SIMULATION MONITOR FOR JOINT MUNICIPAL/INDUSTRIAL TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of existent monitoring hardware for the ultimate purpose of detecting the industrial wastewater source causing chronic or acute inefficiency in the performance of a joint biological treatment facility. The approach represents the first phase of the ultimate purpose; th...

  6. Development of an Underactuated 2-DOF Wrist Joint using McKibben PAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S. P.; Jain, S.; Ramasubramanian, S. N.; Johnson, B. V.; Dwivedy, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, model of an underactuated 2-DOF wrist joint with pneumatically actuated muscles is proposed. For the joint, McKibben-type artificial muscles are used in parallel configuration for the actuation. For each Degree of Freedom (DOF) one agonist-antagonist pair arrangement is usually used with a pulley mechanism. A mathematical model of wrist joint is derived using conventional forward kinematic analysis. The static model relating pressure in the muscle with the orientation of the wrist joint is obtained by combining the experimental data and mathematical model. Regulation of pressure can be achieved by pulse width modulation control of on/off solenoid valves. A set of free vibration experiments are done for the dynamic identification of the muscle characteristics.

  7. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  8. Skeletal development of hallucal tarsometatarsal joint curvature and angulation in extant apes and modern humans.

    PubMed

    Gill, Corey M; Bredella, Miriam A; DeSilva, Jeremy M

    2015-11-01

    The medial cuneiform, namely the curvature and angulation of its distal facet with metatarsal 1, is crucial as a stabilizer in bipedal locomotion and an axis upon which the great toe medially deviates during arboreal locomotion in extant apes. Previous work has shown that facet curvature and angulation in adult dry-bone specimens can distinguish African apes from Homo, and can even distinguish among species of Gorilla. This study provides the first ontogenetic assessment of medial cuneiform curvature and angulation in juvenile (n = 68) and adult specimens (n = 102) using computed tomography in humans and extant ape specimens, including Pongo. Our data find that modern human juveniles initially have a convex and slightly medially oriented osseous surface of the developing medial cuneiform distal facet that flattens and becomes more distally oriented with age. The same pattern (though of a different magnitude) occurs developmentally in the chimpanzee medial cuneiform, but not in Gorilla or Pongo, whose medial cuneiform facet angulation remains unchanged ontogenetically. These data suggest that the medial cuneiform ossifies in a distinguishable pattern between Pongo, Gorilla, Pan, and Homo, which may in part be due to subtle differences in the loading environment at the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint-a finding that has important implications for interpreting fossil medial cuneiforms. PMID:26319411

  9. The bHLH-PAS Transcription Factor Dysfusion Regulates Tarsal Joint Formation in Response to Notch Activity during Drosophila Leg Development

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Sergio; Estella, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A characteristic of all arthropods is the presence of flexible structures called joints that connect all leg segments. Drosophila legs include two types of joints: the proximal or “true” joints that are motile due to the presence of muscle attachment and the distal joints that lack musculature. These joints are not only morphologically, functionally and evolutionarily different, but also the morphogenetic program that forms them is distinct. Development of both proximal and distal joints requires Notch activity; however, it is still unknown how this pathway can control the development of such homologous although distinct structures. Here we show that the bHLH-PAS transcription factor encoded by the gene dysfusion (dys), is expressed and absolutely required for tarsal joint development while it is dispensable for proximal joints. In the presumptive tarsal joints, Dys regulates the expression of the pro-apoptotic genes reaper and head involution defective and the expression of the RhoGTPases modulators, RhoGEf2 and RhoGap71E, thus directing key morphogenetic events required for tarsal joint development. When ectopically expressed, dys is able to induce some aspects of the morphogenetic program necessary for distal joint development such as fold formation and programmed cell death. This novel Dys function depends on its obligated partner Tango to activate the transcription of target genes. We also identified a dedicated dys cis-regulatory module that regulates dys expression in the tarsal presumptive leg joints through direct Su(H) binding. All these data place dys as a key player downstream of Notch, directing distal versus proximal joint morphogenesis. PMID:25329825

  10. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  11. Development and Applications of a Self-Contained, Non-Invasive EVA Joint Angle and Muscle Fatigue Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranniger, C. U.; Sorenson, E. A.; Akin, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Maryland Space Systems Laboratory, as a participant in NASA's INSTEP program, is developing a non-invasive, self-contained sensor system which can provide quantitative measurements of joint angles and muscle fatigue in the hand and forearm. The goal of this project is to develop a system with which hand/forearm motion and fatigue metrics can be determined in various terrestrial and zero-G work environments. A preliminary study of the prototype sensor systems and data reduction techniques for the fatigue measurement system are presented. The sensor systems evaluated include fiberoptics, used to measure joint angle, surface electrodes, which measure the electrical signals created in muscle as it contracts; microphones, which measure the noise made by contracting muscle; and accelerometers, which measure the lateral muscle acceleration during contraction. The prototype sensor systems were used to monitor joint motion of the metacarpophalangeal joint and muscle fatigue in flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi ulnaris in subjects performing gripping tasks. Subjects were asked to sustain a 60-second constant-contraction (isometric) exercise and subsequently to perform a repetitive handgripping task to failure. Comparison of the electrical and mechanical signals of the muscles during the different tasks will be used to evaluate the applicability of muscle signal measurement techniques developed for isometric contraction tasks to fatigue prediction in quasi-dynamic exercises. Potential data reduction schemes are presented.

  12. Development of the weldbond process for joining titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, D.

    1972-01-01

    High quality resistance spot welds were produced by welding through epoxy adhesive on titanium alloys. Weldbond joints were consistently stronger than those of either mechanical fasteners, structural adhesive bonds, or mechanical fasteners with adhesive at the joint interface. Weldbond joints and/or spot weld joints showed superior strength at all temperature ranges as compared to other joints tested.

  13. JOINT-INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP A HOLLOW SPHERE DUAL-GRADIENT DRILLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    William C. Maurer; Colin Ruan; Greg Deskins

    2003-05-01

    Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI) formed a joint-industry partnership to fund the development of a hollow sphere dual-gradient drilling (DGD) system. Phase I consisted of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and distributing information and data regarding a new DGD system for use by the oil and gas industry. Near the end of Phase I, DOE provided funding to the project that was used to conduct a series of critical follow-on tests investigating sphere separation in weighted waterbase and oilbase muds. Drilling costs in deep water are high because seawater pressure on the ocean floor creates a situation where many strings of casing are required due to the relatively close spacing between fracture and pore pressure curves. Approximately $100 million have been spent during the past five years on DGD systems that place pumps on the seafloor to reduce these drilling problems by reducing the annulus fluid pressure at the bottom of the riser. BP estimates that a DGD system can save $9 million per well in the Thunderhorse Field and Conoco estimates it can save $5 to $15 million per well in its deepwater operations. Unfortunately, previous DGD development projects have been unsuccessful due to the high costs ($20 to $50 million) and reliability problems with seafloor pump systems. MTI has been developing a simple DGD system concept that would pump hollow glass spheres into the bottom of the riser to reduce density of the mud in the riser. This eliminates the requirement for seafloor pumps and replaces them with low cost mud pumps, shale shakers, and other oilfield equipment that can be operated on the rig by conventional crews. A $1.8 million Phase I joint-industry project funded by five service companies and three operators showed that hollow spheres could be pumped well, but difficulties were encountered in separating the spheres from a polymer mud supplied by Halliburton due to the high viscosity of this mud at the low shear rates encountered on oilfield shale shaker screens. As a

  14. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  15. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  16. Optical Materials, Adhesive and Encapsulant, III-V, and Optical Characterization Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-216

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2012-11-01

    SolFocus is currently developing solar technology for utility scale application using Winston collector based concentrating photovoltaics (CPV). Part of that technology development includes small mirror dishes and front surface reflectors, and bonding the separate parts to the assembly. Mirror panels must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. The reflective surfaces must demonstrate long term durability and maintain high reflectivity. Some bonded surfaces must maintain adhesion and transparency under high concentrations and high temperatures. Others will experience moderate temperatures and do not require transparency. NREL researchers have developed methods and tools that address these related areas.

  17. Advances in light curing adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Andy

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new family of light curing adhesives containing a new reactive additive previously not used in optical grade light curing adhesives are obtained with the addition of functionalized cellulositics. Outgassing as low as 10-6 grams/gram has been observed based on headspace sampling. Other additives have lowered the shrinkage rates of positioning adhesives from near 1 percent to less than 0.1 percent with fractional, percentage movements over thermal range of -40 degrees C to +200 degrees C.

  18. Jointing around magmatic dikes as a precursor to the development of volcanic plugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Meredith; Pollard, David D.; Johnson, Kendra; Culha, Cansu

    2015-10-01

    Basaltic volcanic eruptions typically initiate as fissures fed by dikes. In some cases, eruptions become localized through discrete vents, until the flow is sustained through a single vent underlain by a volcanic plug, at which point, the eruption is capable of delivering much greater volumes of magma to the surface. Existing theories to explain flow localization focus on the relationship between non-uniform dike thickness and variations in magma flow rates. Here, we propose a mechanism for conduit widening that precedes flow localization, and we present geologic evidence from an Oligocene-aged dike-plug system at Ship Rock, New Mexico. We use techniques of structure from motion to map 621 joints in the sedimentary rock adjacent to the intrusions and find that these joints are part of a systematic set oriented perpendicular to the dikes and localized to within a meter of the dike contacts. This joint set, along with a set of dike-parallel joints and the bedding planes, divides the strata into rectangular blocks that subsequently are entrained in the flowing magma to widen the dikes. Using field and lab data and a stress analysis, we show that the dike-perpendicular joints are intimately associated with the emplacement of magma and thermal pressurization of pore fluids in the host rock. This fracturing process is a precursor to entrainment of the host rock and sustained flow through discrete vents.

  19. Ultrasonic guided wave propagation across waveguide transitions applied to bonded joint inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthillath, Padmakumar

    Adhesively bonded joints are increasingly used in safety critical applications such as load bearing elements in aerospace structures. The quality of surface preparation is crucial to the strength of an adhesive joint and also the adhesives are susceptible to environmental conditions and undergo degradation. The possibility of the presence of defects and interfacial weakness make nondestructive inspection techniques a valuable tool to evaluate the structural reliability of the adhesive joints. Two problems related to the inspection of aircraft adhesive joints---the adhesive repair patches and adhesive skin-stringer joints are nondestructively evaluated using ultrasonic guided waves in this thesis. The former is a life extending patch bonded at defect locations on aircraft while the latter is a structural stiffener found in skin and wings in aircraft. Ultrasonic guided waves are thickness resonances that propagate under stress-free boundary conditions in plate-like structures called as waveguides. The guided waves display frequency dispersion or velocity variation with frequencies that are depicted using dispersion curves. Based on the nature of the cross-sectional displacement distribution at each point on the dispersion curves, the guided waves are categorized into modes. Selection of modes for sensitivity to interfacial weakness in a waveguide, and understanding the mode conversion at geometric discontinuities or transitions in waveguides is a major challenge to the inspection using guided waves. The objective of this thesis is to enhance the understanding of guided wave interaction with waveguide transitions and interfacial defects in bonded assemblies in order to develop a field implementable solution for nondestructive inspection. At the beginning, the problem of inspecting aircraft adhesive repair patches applied to epoxy bonded aluminum---titanium joint is presented. Weakness at the aluminum-epoxy interface and bulk defects in epoxy, simulated on repair patch

  20. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  1. Maximum voluntary joint torque as a function of joint angle and angular velocity: model development and application to the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dennis E; Madigan, Michael L; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of human strength can be important during analyses of physical activities. Such measurements have often taken the form of the maximum voluntary torque at a single joint angle and angular velocity. However, the available strength varies substantially with joint position and velocity. When examining dynamic activities, strength measurements should account for these variations. A model is presented of maximum voluntary joint torque as a function of joint angle and angular velocity. The model is based on well-known physiological relationships between muscle force and length and between muscle force and velocity and was tested by fitting it to maximum voluntary joint torque data from six different exertions in the lower limb. Isometric, concentric and eccentric maximum voluntary contractions were collected during hip extension, hip flexion, knee extension, knee flexion, ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion. Model parameters are reported for each of these exertion directions by gender and age group. This model provides an efficient method by which strength variations with joint angle and angular velocity may be incorporated into comparisons between joint torques calculated by inverse dynamics and the maximum available joint torques. PMID:17485097

  2. Development and applications of a software tool for diarthrodial joint analysis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Sandra; Lopomo, Nicola; Greggio, Samuele; Ferretti, Emil; Visani, Andrea

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new software environment for advanced analysis of diarthrodial joints. The new tool provides a number of elaboration functions to investigate the joint kinematics, bone anatomy, and ligament and tendon properties. In particular, the shapes and the contact points of the articulating surfaces can be displayed and analysed through 2D user-defined sections and fittings (lines or conics). Ligament behaviour can be evaluated during joint movement, through the computation of elongations, orientations, and fiber strain. Motion trajectories can be also analysed through the calculation of helical axes, instantaneous rotations, and displacements in specific user-chosen coordinate reference frames. The software has an user-friendly graphical interface to display four-dimensional data (time-space data) obtained from medical images, navigation systems, spatial linkages or digitalizers, and can also generate printable reports and multiple graphs as well as ASCII files that can be imported to spreadsheet programs such as Microsoft Excel. PMID:16777259

  3. [Development of a testing device for knee joint kinematics parameters of patients with strokes].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiulin; Ji, Xuefei; Xu, Xijiao; Zhao, Hongyao

    2013-04-01

    This article is aimed to present a design of a testing device for knee joint kinematics parameters of patients with strokes. We used Auto CAD to design the knee joint sensor device, and applied multifunction data acquisition card to collect sensor data. Then we transferred the data to the computer to quantitatively detect and analyze the joint angle, angular velocity and other parameters. The software system used Visual C+ + MFC frame and shared database Access, and used ADO technology to realize the collection between the software system and patient information system. After a preliminary test of 20 healthy subjects, the result showed that intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was more than 0.8, indicating a good reliability of the instrument. PMID:23858756

  4. Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds from Guided Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, A. K.; Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in the fracture and failure of composites and other bonded materials is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of these adhesion joints is a prerequisite to reliable design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures.

  5. Residual Structure of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm following Complete Disinfection Favors Secondary Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Re-Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Shoji; Wakamatsu, Rika; Sakaue, Yuuki; Narisawa, Naoki; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Ohshima, Hayato; Terao, Yutaka; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion. PMID:25635770

  6. Studies on acrylated epoxydised triglyceride resin-co-butyl methacrylate towards the development of biodegradable pressure sensitive adhesives.

    PubMed

    David, S Begila; Sathiyalekshmi, K; Gnana Raj, G Allen

    2009-12-01

    The potential chemical utility of Soya bean oil for the preparation of novel biodegradable polymeric pressure sensitive adhesive has been investigated. Epoxy resin was prepared through in situ epoxidation of Soya bean oil under controlled reaction conditions. Acrylated epoxidised triglyceride resin (AET resin) and copolymer of AET resin with butyl methacrylate were prepared and evaluated. Higher the concentration of butyl methacrylate higher is the degree of copolymerization of AET resin with butyl methacrylate. An optimum concentration of AET resin with butyl methacrylate (100 : 0.40) yields favourable shear holding time and peel strength to qualify as pressure sensitive adhesive. The candidate PSA formulation is biodegradable with antimicrobial activity against gram positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. PMID:18584126

  7. Note: Development of a compact electromagnetic hydraulic pump for a microrobot joint driving system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Naijian; Wang, Sun'an; Zhang, Jinhua

    2010-04-01

    This note describes a compact electromagnetic hydraulic pump (EMHP) designed primarily to build a microdriving system for a robot joint actuator. A characteristic mathematical model integrating electricity, magnetism, and hydraulics is constructed to represent the working process of the EMHP. Tests show that a volumetric flow rate of up to 430 cm(3)/min and load pressure of up to 2.5 MPa can be achieved. The prototype pump can supply stable pressure of 0-2.4 MPa and acceleration of 1.2 MPa/s for the robot joint actuator. PMID:20441378

  8. Possible involvement of CD10 in the development of endometriosis due to its inhibitory effects on CD44-dependent cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akira; Kotani, Tomomi; Goto, Maki; Kobayashi, Hiroharu; Takikawa, Sachiko; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Tomoko; Kondo, Mika; Bayasula; Nagatomo, Yoshinari; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    A reduced response to progesterone in the eutopic endometrium with endometriosis and in endometriotic tissues is considered to be the underlying factor for endometriosis. CD10 is known to be expressed by endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells and may be induced by progestins, although the function of CD10 is not fully revealed in endometrial or endometriotic tissues. In the current study, the expression of CD10 was significantly increased by treatment of the cells with progesterone, 17β-estradiol, and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in the endometrial stromal cells. On the other hand, the expression of CD10 following treatment with progesterone, 17β-estradiol, and dibutyryl cAMP was not significantly increased in endometriotic stromal cells. The adhesion assay for endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells to hyaluronan using 5- or 6-(N-succinimidyloxycarbonyl)-fluorescein 3', 6'-diacetate-labeled cells demonstrated that the CD44-dependent adhesion of stromal cells was inhibited by CD10. As far as the induction of CD10 is concerned, the effect of progesterone was different between endometrial stromal cells and endometriotic stromal cells. CD10 might be involved in the development of endometriosis due to its influence on CD44-dependent cell adhesion. PMID:23653392

  9. Zeb1 Regulates E-cadherin and Epcam (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule) Expression to Control Cell Behavior in Early Zebrafish Development*

    PubMed Central

    Vannier, Corinne; Mock, Kerstin; Brabletz, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The ZEB1 transcription factor is best known as an inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) in cancer metastasis, acting through transcriptional repression of CDH1 (encoding E-cadherin) and the EMT-suppressing microRNA-200s (miR-200s). Here we analyze roles of the ZEB1 zebrafish orthologs, Zeb1a and Zeb1b, and of miR-200s in control of cell adhesion and morphogenesis during gastrulation and segmentation stages. Loss and gain of function analyses revealed that Zeb1 represses cdh1 expression to fine-tune adhesiveness of migrating deep blastodermal cells. Furthermore, Zeb1 acts as a repressor of epcam in the deep cells of the blastoderm and may contribute to control of epithelial integrity of enveloping layer cells, the outermost cells of the blastoderm. We found a similar ZEB1-dependent repression of EPCAM expression in human pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines, mediated through direct binding of ZEB1 to the EPCAM promoter. Thus, Zeb1 proteins employ several evolutionary conserved mechanisms to regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and cancer. PMID:23667256

  10. Improved high-temperature gimbal joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winemiller, J. R.; Yee, S. T.; Neal, B. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of bellows gimbal joint for reduction of thermal stress effects are discussed. Reactions of designed joint to changes in temperature are described. Illustrations of conventional gimbal joint and improved gimbal joint are provided.

  11. New developments in osteoarthritis. Sex differences in magnetic resonance imaging-based biomarkers and in those of joint metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in the prevalence, incidence, and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) have long been known. Some differences in the evaluation of this issue across studies may be related to differences in study design, sampling, study size, study populations, targeted joint sites, and definitions of OA. This report highlights recent studies of sex differences in individual joint components imaged by magnetic resonance imaging and in systemic biomarkers of joint metabolism. Particularly important are those studies that examine this issue in young unaffected adults and children before the development of disease. Despite some variation across studies, women appear for the most part to have a thinner and more reduced volume of cartilage in the knee than men, and this may occur from early childhood. It is not clear whether women have a more accelerated rate of cartilage volume loss than men. Few data exist on sex differences in systemic biomarkers of joint metabolism. In these studies, it is critically important to characterize the total body burden of OA and the presence of comorbid conditions likely to influence a given biomarker. Lastly, future research should dovetail studies of sex differences in imaging and biochemical biomarkers with genetics to maximize insight into the mechanisms behind observed sex differences. PMID:20701741

  12. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  14. Deliberate Play and Preparation Jointly Benefit Motor and Cognitive Development: Mediated and Moderated Effects.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Caterina; Masci, Ilaria; Marchetti, Rosalba; Vazou, Spyridoula; Sääkslahti, Arja; Tomporowski, Phillip D

    2016-01-01

    In light of the interrelation between motor and cognitive development and the predictive value of the former for the latter, the secular decline observed in motor coordination ability as early as preschool urges identification of interventions that may jointly impact motor and cognitive efficiency. The aim of this study was twofold. It (1) explored the outcomes of enriched physical education (PE), centered on deliberate play and cognitively challenging variability of practice, on motor coordination and cognitive processing; (2) examined whether motor coordination outcomes mediate intervention effects on children's cognition, while controlling for moderation by lifestyle factors as outdoor play habits and weight status. Four hundred and sixty children aged 5-10 years participated in a 6-month group randomized intervention in PE, with or without playful coordinative and cognitive enrichment. The weight status and spontaneous outdoor play habits of children (parental report of outdoor play) were evaluated at baseline. Before and after the intervention, motor developmental level (Movement Assessment Battery for Children) was evaluated in all children, who were then assessed either with a test of working memory (Random Number Generation task), or with a test of attention (from the Cognitive Assessment System). Children assigned to the 'enriched' intervention showed more pronounced improvements in all motor coordination assessments (manual dexterity, ball skills, static/dynamic balance). The beneficial effect on ball skills was amplified by the level of spontaneous outdoor play and weight status. Among indices of executive function and attention, only that of inhibition showed a differential effect of intervention type. Moderated mediation showed that the better outcome of the enriched PE on ball skills mediated the better inhibition outcome, but only when the enrichment intervention was paralleled by a medium-to-high level of outdoor play. Results suggest that

  15. Deliberate Play and Preparation Jointly Benefit Motor and Cognitive Development: Mediated and Moderated Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Caterina; Masci, Ilaria; Marchetti, Rosalba; Vazou, Spyridoula; Sääkslahti, Arja; Tomporowski, Phillip D.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the interrelation between motor and cognitive development and the predictive value of the former for the latter, the secular decline observed in motor coordination ability as early as preschool urges identification of interventions that may jointly impact motor and cognitive efficiency. The aim of this study was twofold. It (1) explored the outcomes of enriched physical education (PE), centered on deliberate play and cognitively challenging variability of practice, on motor coordination and cognitive processing; (2) examined whether motor coordination outcomes mediate intervention effects on children’s cognition, while controlling for moderation by lifestyle factors as outdoor play habits and weight status. Four hundred and sixty children aged 5–10 years participated in a 6-month group randomized intervention in PE, with or without playful coordinative and cognitive enrichment. The weight status and spontaneous outdoor play habits of children (parental report of outdoor play) were evaluated at baseline. Before and after the intervention, motor developmental level (Movement Assessment Battery for Children) was evaluated in all children, who were then assessed either with a test of working memory (Random Number Generation task), or with a test of attention (from the Cognitive Assessment System). Children assigned to the ‘enriched’ intervention showed more pronounced improvements in all motor coordination assessments (manual dexterity, ball skills, static/dynamic balance). The beneficial effect on ball skills was amplified by the level of spontaneous outdoor play and weight status. Among indices of executive function and attention, only that of inhibition showed a differential effect of intervention type. Moderated mediation showed that the better outcome of the enriched PE on ball skills mediated the better inhibition outcome, but only when the enrichment intervention was paralleled by a medium-to-high level of outdoor play. Results suggest that

  16. Development and Implementation of Joint Programs in Laser Ranging and Other Space Geodetic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.; Carter, David (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This progress report discusses the status and progress made in joint international programs including: 1) WEGENER; 2) Arabian Peninsula program; 3) Asia-Pacific Space Geodynamics (APSG) program; 4) the Fourteenth International Workshop on Laser Ranging; 5) the International Laser Ranging Service; and 6) current support for the NASA network.

  17. Learning to Look for Language: Development of Joint Attention in Young Deaf Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Amy M.; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2014-01-01

    Joint attention between hearing children and their caregivers is typically achieved when the adult provides spoken, auditory linguistic input that relates to the child's current visual focus of attention. Deaf children interacting through sign language must learn to continually switch visual attention between people and objects in order to…

  18. Parental Support for Language Development during Joint Book Reading for Young Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Doll, Emily R.; Stika, Carren J.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Johnson, Karen J.; Ganguly, Dianne Hammes; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.

    2014-01-01

    Parent and child joint book reading (JBR) characteristics and parent facilitative language techniques (FLTs) were investigated in two groups of parents and their young children; children with normal hearing (NH; "n" = 60) and children with hearing loss (HL; "n" = 45). Parent-child dyads were videotaped during JBR interactions,…

  19. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  20. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  1. Adhesive capsulitis of the hip: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Colin G; Raynor, Brett; Lowe, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the hip (ACH) is a rare clinical entity. Similar to adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, ACH is characterized by a painful decrease in active and passive range of motion as synovial inflammation in the acute stages of the disease progresses to capsular fibrosis in the chronic stages. Once other diagnoses have been ruled out, management of ACH is tailored to reduce inflammation in the acute stages with NSAIDs, intra-articular steroid injections, and targeted physical therapy while biomechanical dysfunction in the spine, hip, sacroiliac joint, or lower limb joints is addressed. In chronic stages of the disease, intervention should focus on decreasing the progression of fibrotic changes and regaining range of motion through aggressive physical therapy. Interventions described for chronic ACH include manipulation under anesthesia; pressure dilatation; and open or arthroscopic synovectomy, lysis of adhesions, and capsular release. Surgical intervention should be considered only after failure of a minimum 3-month course of nonsurgical treatment. PMID:24292931

  2. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1997-01-01

    Qualitative measurements of adhesion or binding forces can be accomplished, for example, by using the reflection coefficient of an ultrasound or by using thermal waves (Light and Kwun, 1989, Achenbach and Parikh, 1991, and Bostrom and wickham, 1991). However, a quantitative determination of binding forces is rather difficult. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasound passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such non-linearity can be effectively used to characterize the bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect (Adler and Nagy, 1991; Achenbach and Parikh, 1991; Parikh and Achenbach, 1992; and Hirose and Kitahara, 1992; Anastasi and Roberts, 1992). Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear interface binding force, a quantitative method was presented by Pangraz and Arnold (1994). Recently, Tang, Cheng and Achenbach (1997) made a comparison between the experimental and simulated results based on this theoretical model. A water immersion mode-converted shear wave through-transmission setup was used by Berndt and Green (1997) to analyze the nonlinear acoustic behavior of the adhesive bond. In this project, the nonlinear responses of an adhesive joint was investigated through transmission tests of ultrasonic wave and analyzed by the finite element simulations. The higher order harmonics were obtained in the tests. It is found that the amplitude of higher harmonics increases as the aging increases, especially the 3dorder harmonics. Results from the numerical simulation show that the material nonlinearity does indeed generate higher order harmonics. In particular, the elastic-perfect plastic behavior generates significant 3rd and 5th order harmonics.

  3. Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded section beams under torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tomioka, Noboru; Kakiage, Masashi; Niisawa, Junetsu; Kitagawa, Hideo

    1995-11-01

    Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded box beams was investigated. From results of the fatigue tests, it was seen that the fatigue strength of bonded beams was higher than that of spot welded beams. Fatigue strength of bonded beams was independent of plate thickness and partition. The flexural rigidity of the box beams in the plane of partition can increase without decrease of torsional rigidity and torsional fatigue strength, if the partition is jointed by adhesive bonding instead of spot welding. Since the fatigue strength and rigidity of adhesive bonded joints can be higher than the spot welded joints in the weight saving structures, it is expected that the structural adhesive joints will be employed more in the automobile body structure. For assuring the introduction of this joint more into the automobile body structures, it is necessary that the fatigue tests on the model members of the actual members used in the automobile body structure are conducted, in addition to those of the simple joints such as tension shear and T-type tension, and the property of the fatigue strength on the adhesive bonded members is known. But, the authors now have little data on fatigue tests of the adhesive bonded members. In the present research to be reported, the fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams under torsion, which are typical members in automobile body structure, were carried out and the effects of the presence of longitudinal partition and plate thickness on fatigue strength were investigated. Comparing the results of fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams with those on spot welded box beams, the property of fatigue strength on these adhesive bonded box beams was cleared.

  4. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  5. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  6. Sacroiliac joint imaging.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint has several unique anatomical features that make it one of the more challenging joints to image. The joint is difficult to profile well on radiographic views, and therefore the radiographic findings of sacroiliitis are often equivocal. Computed tomography images can usually show the findings of sacroiliitis and osteoarthritis earlier than radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging performed with proper sequences is excellent for diagnosing even very early sacroiliitis and for following treatment response. The SI joint is often involved in patients with osteoarthritis or one of the inflammatory spondyloarthritides, most notably ankylosing spondylitis. Ankylosing spondylitis often presents with sacroiliitis, which appears as erosions, sclerosis, and joint space narrowing, eventually leading to ankylosis. Several disorders can cause sacroiliitis-like changes of the joint, including hyperparathyroidism and repetitive shear-stress injuries in athletes. The joint can become painful during pregnancy as it widens and develops increased motion, and some postpartum women develop iliac sclerosis adjacent to the joint termed osteitis condensans ilii. Another cause of SI joint pain is a disorder called sacroiliac joint dysfunction, which typically has few abnormal imaging findings. Patients with SI joint dysfunction, as well as sacroiliitis, often get relief from image-guided SI joint therapeutic injections. PMID:18382946

  7. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  8. Pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Tan; Pfister

    1999-02-01

    Adhesives are a critical component in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) devices. In addition to the usual requirements of functional adhesive properties, adhesives for TDD applications must have good biocompatibility with the skin, chemical compatibility with the drug, various components of the formulation, and provide consistent, effective delivery of the drug. This review discusses the three most commonly used adhesives (polyisobutylenes, polyacrylates and silicones) in TDD devices, and provides an update on recently introduced TDD products and recent developments of new adhesives. PMID:10234208

  9. New approach to telemetry development will significantly increase productivity of Joint Test Assembly (JTA) teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, K. T.

    1987-10-01

    We design telemetry systems which instrument weapons in the Joint DoD/DOE flight test program. These telemetry systems gather data which can be used to determine if a weapon system functioned as intended. A reusable telemetry electronics system to support new programs for the next decade and to replace old telemetry systems which can no longer be produced is being designed. This multisystem Joint Test Assembly, named JTAX, is being designed to be modular, flexible, and testable. The requirements for each program can be met by choosing the necessary circuitry from a list of off-the-shelf, flexible electronics modules. Present day electronics miniaturization will allow these modules to consist of a few integrated circuits. System-specific circuits can be added to the architecture via well-defined interfaces. Off-the-shelf and system-specific circuitry are connected on printed circuit boards which are designed to meet the unique mechanical constraints for each system.

  10. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  11. Observing the development of the temporomandibular joint in embryonic and post-natal mice using various staining methods

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint that is essential for the movement and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ develops from two mesenchymal condensations, and is composed of the glenoid fossa that originates from the otic capsule by intramembranous ossification, the mandibular condyle of the temporal bone and a fibrocartilagenous articular disc derived from a secondary cartilaginous joint by endochondral ossification. However, the development of the TMJ remains unclear. In the present study, the formation and development of the mouse TMJ was investigated between embryonic day 13.5 and post-natal day 180 in order to elucidate the morphological and molecular alterations that occur during this period. TMJ formation appeared to proceed in three stages: Initiation or blastema stage; growth and cavitation stage; and the maturation or completion stage. In order to investigate the activity of certain transcription factors on TMJ formation and development, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM), sex determining region Y-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2, Indian hedgehog homolog, Osterix, collagen I, collagen II, aggrecan, total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in the TMJ using in situ and/or immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the transcription factors, ECM and MMP serve critical functions in the formation and development of the mouse TMJ. In summary, the development of the mouse TMJ was investigated, and the molecular regulation of mouse TMJ formation was partially characterized. The results of the present study may aid the systematic understanding of the physiological processes underlying TMJ formation and development in mice. PMID:26893634

  12. Experimental Investigation of Composite Pressure Vessel Performance and Joint Stiffness for Pyramid and Inverted Pyramid Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joseph M.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the suitability in the application of classical laminate theory analysis tools for filament wound pressure vessels with adhesive laminated joints in particular: pressure vessel wall performance, joint stiffness and failure prediction. Two 18-inch diameter 12-ply filament wound pressure vessels were fabricated. One vessel was fabricated with a 24-ply pyramid laminated adhesive double strap butt joint. The second vessel was fabricated with the same number of plies in an inverted pyramid joint. Results from hydrostatic tests are presented. Experimental results were used as input to the computer programs GENLAM and Laminate, and the output compared to test. By using the axial stress resultant, the classical laminate theory results show a correlation within 1% to the experimental results in predicting the pressure vessel wall pressure performance. The prediction of joint stiffness for the two adhesive joints in the axial direction is within 1% of the experimental results. The calculated hoop direction joint stress resultant is 25% less than the measured resultant for both joint configurations. A correction factor is derived and used in the joint analysis. The correction factor is derived from the hoop stress resultant from the tank wall performance investigation. The vessel with the pyramid joint is determined to have failed in the joint area at a hydrostatic pressure 33% value below predicted failure. The vessel with the inverted pyramid joint failed in the wall acreage at a hydrostatic pressure within 10% of the actual failure pressure.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Ti Deformation for the Development of a Titanium and Stainless Steel Transition Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A. B.; Kapoor, R.; Thota, M. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2016-05-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to model the joining of titanium grade 2 (Ti) to AISI 321 stainless steel (SS) transition joint of lap configuration with grooves at the interface on SS side. The hot forming of Ti for filling the grooves without defects was simulated. FEA involving large plastic flow with sticking friction condition was initially validated using compression test on cylindrical specimen at 900 °C. The barreled shape and a no-deformation zone in the sample predicted by FEA matched with those of the compression experiments. For the joining process, FEA computed the distribution of strain and hydrostatic stress in Ti and the minimum ram load required for a defect-free joint. The hot forming parameters for Ti to fill the grooves without defects and any geometrical distortion of the die were found to be 0.001 s-1 at 900 °C. Using these conditions a defect-free Ti-SS joint was experimentally produced.

  14. Planning my actions to accommodate yours: joint action development during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; van der Wel, Robrecht P R D; Hunnius, Sabine

    2016-05-01

    The planning and adjusting of one's actions in relation to an action partner is fundamental to smooth joint action. During their first years of life, children gradually become more engaged in joint actions. Here, we investigated whether and at what age children take their partner into account in their action plans to accommodate the other's actions. We focused on children's proactive planning (without prior experience) and flexible adjustment of action plans over time. In a behavioural study, we tested 96 children from four age groups (2½, 3, 3½ and 5 years) in a joint cup-stacking task. Children passed cups to their partner who had only one hand available (alternating over time) to build a tower. Children's response choices were assessed (i.e. passing the cup on the free or occupied side to their partner). The study yielded two major findings. At all ages, children proactively planned their actions in a way that accommodated their partner's actions. However, only by 3½ years did children start to flexibly integrate their partner into their action plans. Even at age 5, children only showed minimal adjustments to their action partner. Candidate processes underlying these developmental changes (e.g. inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, perspective taking) are discussed. PMID:27069048

  15. Preliminary results on the development of vacuum-brazed joints for cyrogenic wind tunnel aerofoil models

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, D.A.; Lawing, P.L.; Sandefur, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Initial trials carried out at the NASA Langley Research Center in the investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel joint construction demonstrated that diffusion-assisted brazed joints could be formed in 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH, AISI-type 347, and Nitronic 40 stainless steels using electrodeposited copper as the bonding agent. Subsequent work has concentrated on 15-5 PH and Nitronic 40 using thin foils of pure copper and Nicrobraz LM, a commercially available nickel-based alloy containing boron and silicon melting point depressants. This paper summarizes the work carried out to understand and evaluate these bonds and their metallurgical characteristics. The results indicate that a high-strength void-free bond can be formed by the vacuum brazing of stainless steels using copper- and nickel-based filler alloys. The Nitronic 40 brazed joints show strengths in excess of the yield strengths of the parent metal. The poor toughness of 15-5 PH stainless steel at cryogenic temperatures tends to disqualify its use in critical areas of low-temperature aerofoil models.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Ti Deformation for the Development of a Titanium and Stainless Steel Transition Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A. B.; Kapoor, R.; Thota, M. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to model the joining of titanium grade 2 (Ti) to AISI 321 stainless steel (SS) transition joint of lap configuration with grooves at the interface on SS side. The hot forming of Ti for filling the grooves without defects was simulated. FEA involving large plastic flow with sticking friction condition was initially validated using compression test on cylindrical specimen at 900 °C. The barreled shape and a no-deformation zone in the sample predicted by FEA matched with those of the compression experiments. For the joining process, FEA computed the distribution of strain and hydrostatic stress in Ti and the minimum ram load required for a defect-free joint. The hot forming parameters for Ti to fill the grooves without defects and any geometrical distortion of the die were found to be 0.001 s-1 at 900 °C. Using these conditions a defect-free Ti-SS joint was experimentally produced.

  17. A review of the development of radical photopolymerization initiators used for designing light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on radical photopolymerization initiators, which are used in the design of light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites, by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literature. The photopolymerization reactivities of acylphosphine oxide (APO) and bisacylphosphine oxide (BAPO) derivatives, and D,L-camphorquinone (CQ)/tertiary amine were investigated, and no significant differences in degree of conversion (DC) were found between BAPO and CQ/amine system (p>0.05). In addition, a novel 7,7-dimethyl-2,3-dioxobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-1-carbonyldiphenyl phosphine oxide (DOHC-DPPO=CQ-APO) was synthesized and its ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) spectral behavior was investigated. CQ-APO possessed two maximum absorption wavelengths (λmax) at 350-500 nm [372 nm (from APO group) and 475 nm (from CQ moiety)], and CQ-APO-containing resins exhibited good photopolymerization reactivity, excellent color tone, relaxed operation time, and high mechanical strength. It was also found that a newly synthesized, water-soluble photoinitiator (APO-Na) improved adhesion to ground dentin. PMID:20859059

  18. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  19. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  20. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  1. Investigation of chitosan-phenolics systems as wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Svetlana; Li, Kaichang

    2003-04-24

    Chitosan-phenolics systems were investigated as wood adhesives. Adhesion between two pieces of wood veneer developed only when all three components-chitosan, a phenolic compound, and laccase-were present. For the adhesive systems containing a phenolic compound with only one phenolic hydroxyl group, adhesive strengths were highly dependent upon the chemical structures of phenolic compounds used in the system and the relative oxidation rates of the phenolic compounds by laccase. The adhesive strengths were also directly related to the viscosity of the adhesive systems. However, for the adhesive systems containing a phenolic compound with two or three phenolic hydroxyl groups adjacent to each other, no correlations among adhesive strengths, relative oxidation rates of the phenolic compounds by laccase, and viscosities were observed. The adhesion mechanisms of these chitosan-phenolics systems were proposed to be similar to those of mussel adhesive proteins. PMID:12697397

  2. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  3. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  4. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  5. Development of a hinge compatible with the kinematics of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Bertomeu, José María Baydal; Lois, Juan Manuel Belda; Guillem, Ricard Barberà; Pozo, Alvaro Page Del; Lacuesta, Javiersanchez; Mollà, Carme Gimeno; Luna, Pedro Vera; Pastor, Jaime Prat

    2007-12-01

    This study aims to present a new concept of a knee hinge based on a crossed four-bar linkage mechanism which has been designed to optimally follow a motion curve representing the knee kinematics in the position at which the knee hinge should be placed. The methodology used to determine the optimal knee hinge is based on the optimization of certain variables of the crossed four-bar mechanism using genetic algorithms in order to follow a certain motion curve, which was determined using a biomechanical model of the knee motion. Two current, commercially available knee hinges have been used to theoretically determine their motion by means of the path performed by their instantaneous helical axis. Comparison between these two different knee hinges, Optimal Knee Hinge and the theoretical motion performed by a human knee reveals that a common monocentric hinge has a maximum misalignment of up to 27.2 mm; a polycentric hinge has a maximum misalignment of 23.9 mm. In contrast, the maximum misalignment produced by the Optimal Knee Hinge is 1.99 mm. The orthotic joint presented significantly improves the kinematical compatibility and the adjustment between orthotic and human joint motion, and should provide several advantages in terms of comfort and safety. Furthermore, the determination of the instantaneous helical axis for a particular user, by means of human movement measurement techniques, will enable the optimal crossed four-bar mechanisms to be determined in a customized and personalized manner. As a consequence, this new concept of orthotic knee joint design may improve the adaptability of lower limb orthoses for the user, and may lead to significant advantages in the field of orthotics for the lower limb. PMID:18050008

  6. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service. [supersonic cruise aircraft research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different Ti-6Al-4V surface treatments were investigated for each of 10 candidate resins. Primers (two for each resin) were studied for appropriate cure and thickness and initial evaluation of bond joints began using various combinations of the adhesive resins and surface treatments. Surface failure areas of bonded titanium coupons were analyzed by electron microscopy and surface chemical analysis techniques. Results of surface characterization and failure analysis are described for lap shear bond joints occurring with adhesive systems consisting of: (1) LARC-13 adhesive, Pasa jell surface treatment; (2) LARC-13 adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; (3) PPQ adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; and (4) PPQ adhesive, 5 volt CAA treatment. The failure analysis concentrated on the 10,000 hr 505K (450 F) exposed specimens which exhibited adhesive failure. Environmental exposure data being generated on the PPQ-10 volt CAA and the LARC-TPI-10 volt CAA adhesive systems is included.

  7. The Challenge of Limiting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Activities implemented Jointly in Developing Countries: A Brazilian Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    La Rovere, E.L.

    1998-11-01

    This paper addresses, from the Brazilian perspective, the main problems with Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly (JI/AIJ) between industrialized (Annex I) and developing (non-Annex I) countries, as defined by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Four possible GHG emissions abatement measures are presented for Brazil: forest protection, reforestation projects for carbon sequestration or charcoal manufacturing, use of ethanol produced from sugar cane as a car fuel, and electrical energy conservation through an increase in end-use efficiencies. These four case studies form the basis of a discussion regarding the validity of developing countries' concerns about JI/AIJ. Recommendations are offered for overcoming the present shortcomings of JI/AIJ in developing countries. The primary conclusion is that Annex I countries' funding of JI/AIJ projects in developing countries in return for GHG emissions credits is not the best means to implement the UNFCCC. However, JI/AIJ projects can be a productive means of preventing global climate change if combined with other measures, including GHG emissions reduction targets for all countries involved in JI/AIJ projects and limits on the percentage of industrialized countries' emissions reductions that can be met through projects in developing countries.

  8. The joint center for energy storage research: A new paradigm for battery research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2015-03-01

    The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) seeks transformational change in transportation and the electricity grid driven by next generation high performance, low cost electricity storage. To pursue this transformative vision JCESR introduces a new paradigm for battery research: integrating discovery science, battery design, research prototyping and manufacturing collaboration in a single highly interactive organization. This new paradigm will accelerate the pace of discovery and innovation and reduce the time from conceptualization to commercialization. JCESR applies its new paradigm exclusively to beyond-lithium-ion batteries, a vast, rich and largely unexplored frontier. This review presents JCESR's motivation, vision, mission, intended outcomes or legacies and first year accomplishments.

  9. The joint center for energy storage research: A new paradigm for battery research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George

    2015-03-30

    The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) seeks transformational change in transportation and the electricity grid driven by next generation high performance, low cost electricity storage. To pursue this transformative vision JCESR introduces a new paradigm for battery research: integrating discovery science, battery design, research prototyping and manufacturing collaboration in a single highly interactive organization. This new paradigm will accelerate the pace of discovery and innovation and reduce the time from conceptualization to commercialization. JCESR applies its new paradigm exclusively to beyond-lithium-ion batteries, a vast, rich and largely unexplored frontier. This review presents JCESR's motivation, vision, mission, intended outcomes or legacies and first year accomplishments.

  10. Experiment K-314: Fetal and neonatal rat bone and joint development following in Utero spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelman, E. E.; Holton, E. M.; Arnaud, C. D.

    1981-01-01

    Infant rat limb specimens from Soviet and U.S. ground-based studies were examined by radiography, macrophotography, histologic sectioning and staining and scanning electron microscopy. A comparison was conducted between vivarium and flight-type diets suggesting that nutritional obesity may adversely affect pregnancy. Data were obtained on maturation of ossification centers, orientation of collagen fibers in bone, tendon and ligaments, joint surface texture and spatial relationships of bones of the hind limb. Computer reconstructions of the knee and hip show promise as a means of investigating the etiology of congenital hip dislocation.

  11. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  12. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and m

  13. Evaluation of adhesives for adhering carbon/epoxy composites to various metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, R.B.; Osterndorf, J.F.; Ambrosio, A.M.; Pettenger, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    The strength properties of composite matrix resins and adhesive are dependent on time, temperature, environment, and stress factors. All of these conditions combine to influence the properties of adhesives and composites in ways that are not yet fully known or quantifiable. Therefore, it is important to know the service conditions that structural adhesive bonded composite joints will encounter prior to fielding. This paper details an evaluation of five epoxy adhesives used to adhere a carbon/epoxy composite to 7075-T6 aluminum, 4340 steel and aluminum coated steel. Test results indicate that certain paste adhesives are capable of better lap-shear and peel performance than film adhesives, especially at elevated temperatures.

  14. [Prevention of intrauterine adhesions after hysteroscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Revaux, A; Ducarme, G; Luton, D

    2008-03-01

    Intrauterine adhesions are the most frequent complications after hysteroscopic surgery in women of reproductive age. The prevalence of intrauterine adhesions after hysteroscopic surgery is correlated to intrauterine pathology (myoma, polyp, or adhesions). Few clinical trials have demonstrated the efficiency of barrier agents developed in order to prevent adhesions after operative hysteroscopy. Adhesion barriers are mechanic agent (intrauterine device), fluid agents (Seprafilm, Hyalobarrier) and postoperative systemic treatment (estroprogestative treatment). In this article, we evaluate the efficiency of these barrier agents for adhesion prevention in hysteroscopic surgery, undertaking a review of clinical trials published. The most frequent published studies evaluate the anatomic efficiency of antiadhesion agents after hysteroscopic surgery in order to evaluate the fertility. Data are still insufficient to evaluate them for clinical use. There is a need for other randomised controlled trials. PMID:18308609

  15. Adhesive bonding of carbon and ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kravetskii, G.A.; Anikin, L.T.; Demin, A.V.; Butyrin, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    On the basis of phenol resins and high-melting powder fillers, adhesives for bonding carbon and ceramic materials have been developed at NIIGRAFIT that allow adhesively bonded parts to be used at temperatures as high as 1500 to 1800{degrees}C, Some properties of those adhesives are covered in. The present paper describes results of recent investigations of the heat- and corrosion-resistance of the NIIGRAFIT`s adhesives. As the subjects of investigations were taken adhesives differing in the powder filler composition. Moreover, one adhesive (SVK) was subjected to a preliminary heat treatment (1200{degrees}C, 1 h, Ar) to fully complete the interaction processes between powder components and a binder coke.

  16. Preface: Joint Discussion JD5 From Meteors and Meteorites to their Parent Bodies: Current Status and Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmerle, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    The Joint Discussion 5 entitled "From Meteors and Meteorites to their Parent Bodies: Current Status and Future Developments" within the IAU GA 2012 was organized with the coordination of the IAU Division III Planetary Systems Sciences and the IAU Commission N. 22 Meteors, Meteorites & Interplanetary Dust, together with the supports by Divisions I Fundamental Astronomy, Division XII Union-Wide Activities, Commission 4 Ephemerides, Commission 6 Astronomical Telegrams, Commission 8 Astrometry, Commission 15 Physical Study of Comets & Minor Planets, and Commission 20 Positions & Motions of Minor Planets, Comets & Satellites.

  17. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  18. Scientific Evidence and Rationale for the Development of Curcumin and Resveratrol as Nutraceutricals for Joint Health

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves; Biesalski, Hans-Konrad; Shakibaei, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) are key cytokines that drive the production of inflammatory mediators and matrix-degrading enzymes in osteoarthritis (OA). These proinflammatory cytokines bind to their respective cell surface receptors and activate inflammatory signaling pathways culminating with the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), a transcription factor that can be triggered by a host of stress-related stimuli including, excessive mechanical stress and ECM degradation products. Once activated, NF-κB regulates the expression of many cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, inflammatory mediators, and several matrix-degrading enzymes. Therefore, proinflammatory cytokines, their cell surface receptors, NF-κB and downstream signaling pathways are therapeutic targets in OA. This paper critically reviews the recent literature and outlines the potential prophylactic properties of plant-derived phytochemicals such as curcumin and resveratrol for targeting NF-κB signaling and inflammation in OA to determine whether these phytochemicals can be used as functional foods. PMID:22605974

  19. Scientific evidence and rationale for the development of curcumin and resveratrol as nutraceutricals for joint health.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves; Biesalski, Hans-Konrad; Shakibaei, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) are key cytokines that drive the production of inflammatory mediators and matrix-degrading enzymes in osteoarthritis (OA). These proinflammatory cytokines bind to their respective cell surface receptors and activate inflammatory signaling pathways culminating with the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), a transcription factor that can be triggered by a host of stress-related stimuli including, excessive mechanical stress and ECM degradation products. Once activated, NF-κB regulates the expression of many cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, inflammatory mediators, and several matrix-degrading enzymes. Therefore, proinflammatory cytokines, their cell surface receptors, NF-κB and downstream signaling pathways are therapeutic targets in OA. This paper critically reviews the recent literature and outlines the potential prophylactic properties of plant-derived phytochemicals such as curcumin and resveratrol for targeting NF-κB signaling and inflammation in OA to determine whether these phytochemicals can be used as functional foods. PMID:22605974

  20. Morphological studies of the toe pads of the rock frog, Staurois parvus (family: Ranidae) and their relevance to the development of new biomimetically inspired reversible adhesives.

    PubMed

    Drotlef, Dirk M; Appel, Esther; Peisker, Henrik; Dening, Kirstin; Del Campo, Aránzazu; Gorb, Stanislav N; Barnes, W Jon P

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of the toe epithelium of the rock frog, Staurois parvus (Family Ranidae), was investigated using a variety of microscopical techniques. The toe pad epithelium is stratified (four to five cell layers), the apical parts of the cells of the outermost layer being separated by fluid-filled channels. The surface of these cells is covered by a dense array of nanopillars, which also cover the surface of subarticular tubercles and unspecialized ventral epithelium of the toes, but not the dorsal epithelium. The apical portions of the outer two layers contain fibrils that originate from the nanopillars and are oriented approximately normal to the surface. This structure is similar to the pad structure of tree frogs of the families Hylidae and Rhacophoridae, indicating evolutionary convergence and a common evolutionary design for reversible attachment in climbing frogs. The main adaptation to the torrent habitat seems to be the straightness of the channels crossing the toe pad, which will assist in drainage of excess water. The presence of nanopillar arrays on all ventral surfaces of the toes resembles that on clingfish suckers and may be a specific adaptation for underwater adhesion and friction. The relevance of these findings to the development of new biomimetically inspired reversible adhesives is discussed. PMID:25657830

  1. Morphological studies of the toe pads of the rock frog, Staurois parvus (family: Ranidae) and their relevance to the development of new biomimetically inspired reversible adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Drotlef, Dirk M.; Appel, Esther; Peisker, Henrik; Dening, Kirstin; del Campo, Aránzazu; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Barnes, W. Jon. P.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the toe epithelium of the rock frog, Staurois parvus (Family Ranidae), was investigated using a variety of microscopical techniques. The toe pad epithelium is stratified (four to five cell layers), the apical parts of the cells of the outermost layer being separated by fluid-filled channels. The surface of these cells is covered by a dense array of nanopillars, which also cover the surface of subarticular tubercles and unspecialized ventral epithelium of the toes, but not the dorsal epithelium. The apical portions of the outer two layers contain fibrils that originate from the nanopillars and are oriented approximately normal to the surface. This structure is similar to the pad structure of tree frogs of the families Hylidae and Rhacophoridae, indicating evolutionary convergence and a common evolutionary design for reversible attachment in climbing frogs. The main adaptation to the torrent habitat seems to be the straightness of the channels crossing the toe pad, which will assist in drainage of excess water. The presence of nanopillar arrays on all ventral surfaces of the toes resembles that on clingfish suckers and may be a specific adaptation for underwater adhesion and friction. The relevance of these findings to the development of new biomimetically inspired reversible adhesives is discussed. PMID:25657830

  2. Improving cell adhesion: development of a biosensor for cell behaviour monitoring by surface grafting of sulfonic groups onto a thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Alves, P; Pinto, S; Ferreira, P; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Bruinink, Arie; de Sousa, Hermínio C; Gil, M H

    2014-08-01

    The surface properties of a material in combination with the mechanical properties are responsible for the material performance in a biological environment as well as the behaviour of the cells which contact with the material. Surface properties such as chemical, physical, biological play an important role in the biomaterials filed. In this work, the surface of a thermoplastic polyurethane film (Elastollan(®)1180A50) was tailored with sulfonic groups by grafting [2-(methacryloxyl)ethyl]-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl)-ammonium hydroxide (SB) after a previous surface activation either by Argon plasma or by ultra-violet irradiation. This surface modification had the purpose of improving cell adhesion in order to develop a biosensor able to monitor cell behaviour. The surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, by atomic force microscopy and by contact angle measurements in order to evaluate the efficiency of the modification. Additionally, blood compatibility studies and cell adhesion tests with human bone marrow cells were performed. These methods allowed the grafting of SB and the results indicate that a higher density of grafting was achieved with previous surface plasma treatment than with UV irradiation. However, for both techniques, the presence of SB functional groups led to a decrease of hydrophobicity and roughness of the surface, together with an improvement of the materials biological performance. PMID:24854674

  3. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  4. Design and development of high-temperature superconducting magnet system with joint-winding for the helical fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, N.; Ito, S.; Terazaki, Y.; Seino, Y.; Hamaguchi, S.; Tamura, H.; Miyazawa, J.; Mito, T.; Hashizume, H.; Sagara, A.

    2015-05-01

    An innovative winding method is developed by connecting high-temperature superconducting (HTS) conductors to enable efficient construction of a magnet system for the helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1. A large-current capacity HTS conductor, referred to as STARS, is being developed by the incorporation of several innovative ideas, such as the simple stacking of state-of-the-art yttrium barium copper oxide tapes embedded in a copper jacket, surrounded by electrical insulation inside a conductor, and an outer stainless-steel jacket cooled by helium gas. A prototype conductor sample was fabricated and reached a current of 100 kA at a bias magnetic field of 5.3 T with the temperature at 20 K. At 4.2 K, the maximum current reached was 120 kA, and a current of 100 kA was successfully sustained for 1 h. A low-resistance bridge-type mechanical lap joint was developed and a joint resistance of 2 nΩ was experimentally confirmed for the conductor sample.

  5. Newly developed anatomical and functional ligament reconstruction for the Lisfranc joint fracture dislocations: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takaaki; Niki, Hisateru; Beppu, Moroe

    2014-09-01

    A 15-year-old male complained of pain in the left foot that occurred when changing direction while running and at presentation, he had difficulty in walking due to pain and swelling. Plain X-ray of the foot revealed a Myerson Type B2 Lisfranc fracture dislocation, and 3-D computed tomography (CT) revealed proximal fractures of the 2nd-4th metatarsals. The Lisfranc ligament was anatomically reconstructed using a graft of the gracilis tendon. During aftercare, partial weight bearing was permitted at 6 weeks postoperatively and full weight bearing at 8 weeks postoperatively. The patient resumed sporting activities 3 months postoperatively. A plain X-ray taken 12 months postoperatively showed favorable joint congruency, and the patient scored 100 points on the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot standard rating system midfoot scale. Our anatomical ligament reconstruction is a useful new method of anatomical reduction and maintenance, and it shortens the duration of aftercare. PMID:25103712

  6. Pre-Operative Status and Quality of Life Following Total Joint Replacement in a Developing Country: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Nina N.; Collins, Jamie E.; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Alcantara Abreu, Luis; Ghazinouri, Roya; Okike, Kanu; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of medical relief organizations have launched programs to perform total joint replacements in the developing world. There is a paucity of data on the clinical outcomes of these procedures. We documented pre- and post-operative pain and functional status in a group of low income Dominicans who underwent total hip or knee replacement performed by an American relief organization. Methods: In March 2009 and 2010, we surveyed patients participating in Operation Walk Boston, a medical relief organization that provides total joint replacements to patients in the Dominican Republic. Questionnaires included the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index scales and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scales for physical activity and mental health. Scores were transformed to a 0 - 100 point scale (100 is best). Results: 81 individuals (mean age 61 years, 60% female) completed the pre-operative questionnaires. Twenty eight of the 35 who completed preoperative forms in 2009 also completed follow up forms in 2010 (follow-up rate 80%). Patients reported poor pre-operative WOMAC function (mean = 33.6, sd = 22.0) and WOMAC pain (mean = 38.4, sd = 22.9) scores preoperatively. Mean post-operative WOMAC pain and function scores were 86.4 (sd = 13.1) and 88.1 (sd = 11.4) respectively. Improvement in pain and function was similar for patients undergoing hip (n=11) and knee (n=17) replacements. Conclusion: Total joint replacement was effective in relieving pain and restoring function in this program. These results are useful for comparison to outcomes in developed countries and for establishing benchmarks for future programs. PMID:21886686

  7. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  8. Nonsteady thermal stress analysis and thermal fatigue strength of metal-CFRP bonded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiang; Shiratori, Masaki; Mori, Takao

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, a finite-element method (FEM) system of nonsteady thermal stress analysis has been developed to analyze the problem of metal-fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) bonded joints. The authors have presented a new algorithm for the system, which can provide an effective thermal stress analysis for metal-carbon-FRP (CFRP) bonded joints. The effectiveness, in terms of the accuracy and central processing unit (CPU) time, has been discussed by analyzing some typical problems. The thermal fatigue strength of Al-CFRP bonded joints has been studied through a series of thermal cyclic fatigue tests. It has been shown that the thermal fatigue strength of the joints can be well described by the maximum equivalent stress at the adhesive layer, which can be calculated by the developed FEM system.

  9. Development of computerized materials, protection, control and accountability systems in the former Soviet republics: a joint effort

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, R.; Ryan, R.H.; Seitz, S.; Landry, R.P.

    1996-07-01

    The laboratory-to-laboratory programs of cooperation between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Institutes of the Russian Federation and the government-to-government programs between the US and Russia have the goal of reducing the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A). As part of these programs, DOE is making available to sites in the former Soviet Republics a new-generation nuclear materials accountability system similar to one developed for DOE sites. This new system, the Core Materials Accountability System (COREMAS), is designed for international use. It is a core system to which facility-specific extensions are expected to be made. This paper describes the joint efforts of US personnel and software development teams at sites in Russia, Kazakhstan, and the Ukraine to develop sophisticated computerized MPC&A systems that are customized for the site-specific needs of each facility.

  10. Development of a technology for laser welding of the 1424 aluminum alloy with a high strength of the welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Cherepanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Results of an experimental study of properties of joints obtained by using different regimes of laser welding of the 1424 alloy (Al-Mg-Li) are reported. The strength and structure of the welded joints are determined. The influence of various types of welded joint straining on its strength is studied. It is demonstrated that the joint strength increases in the case of plastic straining.

  11. Development and validation of a computational model of the knee joint for the evaluation of surgical treatments for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mootanah, R; Imhauser, C W; Reisse, F; Carpanen, D; Walker, R W; Koff, M F; Lenhoff, M W; Rozbruch, S R; Fragomen, A T; Dewan, Z; Kirane, Y M; Cheah, K; Dowell, J K; Hillstrom, H J

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) knee joint computational model was developed and validated to predict knee joint contact forces and pressures for different degrees of malalignment. A 3D computational knee model was created from high-resolution radiological images to emulate passive sagittal rotation (full-extension to 65°-flexion) and weight acceptance. A cadaveric knee mounted on a six-degree-of-freedom robot was subjected to matching boundary and loading conditions. A ligament-tuning process minimised kinematic differences between the robotically loaded cadaver specimen and the finite element (FE) model. The model was validated by measured intra-articular force and pressure measurements. Percent full scale error between FE-predicted and in vitro-measured values in the medial and lateral compartments were 6.67% and 5.94%, respectively, for normalised peak pressure values, and 7.56% and 4.48%, respectively, for normalised force values. The knee model can accurately predict normalised intra-articular pressure and forces for different loading conditions and could be further developed for subject-specific surgical planning. PMID:24786914

  12. JANNAF 28th Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee and 17th Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Mulder, Edwin J. (Editor); Gomez-Knight, Sylvia J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains 37 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers that were presented at the JANNAF 28th Propellant Development & Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) and 17th Safety & Environmental Protection Subcommittee (S&EPS) Joint Meeting, held 26-30 April 1999 at the Town & Country Hotel and the Naval Submarine Base, San Diego, California. Volume II contains 29 unclassified/limited-distribution papers that were presented at the 28th PDCS and 17th S&EPS Joint Meeting. Volume III contains a classified paper that was presented at the 28th PDCS Meeting on 27 April 1999. Topics covered in PDCS sessions include: solid propellant rheology; solid propellant surveillance and aging; propellant process engineering; new solid propellant ingredients and formulation development; reduced toxicity liquid propellants; characterization of hypergolic propellants; and solid propellant chemical analysis methods. Topics covered in S&EPS sessions include: space launch range safety; liquid propellant hazards; vapor detection methods for toxic propellant vapors and other hazardous gases; toxicity of propellants, ingredients, and propellant combustion products; personal protective equipment for toxic liquid propellants; and demilitarization/treatment of energetic material wastes.

  13. Fracturing in upper Cretaceous Selma group Chalky marls, inner coastal plain of Alabama: stratigraphic (facies) control of joint development and regional joint-strike orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, E.; King, D.T. Jr.; Holston, I.

    1988-09-01

    In the inner coastal plain of Alabama, chalky marl is a distinctive sedimentary facies that contains more original biogenic calcareous-nannofossil components than the adjacent marls. The chalky marl is one facies in the cyclically arranged genetic packages that comprise the Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks of the lower part of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group. Analysis of genetic-package stratigraphy shows that the chalky marls were deposited during relative sea level highstands. The chalky marls are selectively cemented by calcium carbonate, thus making a relatively well-indurated brittle rock. The chalky marls, in three sections over 15 m thick, host most of the systematic joints in the Mooreville and Demopolis. As a result, fracture-density mapping clearly delineates the outcrop belts of the thick fracture-prone chalky marls. Joint systems in the marls and chalky marls have two main strike trends (N30/degrees/E to N70/degrees/E and N20/degrees/W to N50/degrees/W) and two secondary strike trends (north to N10/degrees/E and east-west), which are nearly parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to crystalline bedrock structural trends and fracture zones. Thus, bedrock structural trends and fracture patterns appear to have propagated through the overlying Mesozoic rocks, dictating the orientation of joints in the chalky marls.

  14. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  15. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of resin materials to acid-conditioned enamel is a clinically proven technique in preventative, restorative, and orthodontic procedures. Laboratory evaluations of etched-enamel resin bonding have shown excellent bond strengths and the virtual elimination of marginal microleakage. Adhesion to dentin has been more of a challenge. Earlier-generation dentin bonding systems did not yield high bond strengths in the laboratory or prevent marginal microleakage. Newer-generation adhesive systems generally use a dentin conditioner to modify or remove the smear layer and a subsequent application of an adhesive resin bonding agent. Laboratory evaluations of newer systems have shown bond strengths that approach or actually exceed that of etched enamel resin bonding. Bond strengths have improved with the evolution of dentin bonding systems, and microleakage from the cementum/dentin margin has been significantly reduced or prevented with the newer systems. Although laboratory testing of adhesive systems provides a mechanism to screen and compare newly developed systems, clinical trials are essential to document long-term clinical performance. PMID:1470553

  17. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  18. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  19. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  20. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  1. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A−1/4. We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A−1/50. Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm2 of adhesive per hand. PMID:25411404

  2. Implementation of cystic fibrosis services in developing countries: memorandum from a Joint WHO/ICF(M)A meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    A Joint WHO/ICF(M)A meeting defined strategies for the implementation and development of cystic fibrosis (CF) services in countries where CF is thought to be more common than is appreciated by the medical profession or the public and where CF services are either non-existent or in the early stages of development. The following common problems in such countries were identified: underdiagnosis; reduced life expectancy (relative to developed countries) among those diagnosed; a clinical profile that may vary from the "classic" description; poor availability of necessary drugs; and a lack of CF services or basic research on the condition. The following recommendations were made concerning CF: neonatal screening projects should be set up to determine its incidence and identify affected infants; national and regional laboratories should be encouraged to identify the specific mutations responsible for the condition in their populations; centres for diagnosis and treatment should be developed, using a team approach; a national organization, involving families and friends of individuals with CF and other volunteers, should be established; a national registry should be set up; awareness about the condition should be improved and knowledge about it developed among medical professionals, public health authorities, and the general public; and increased collaboration between groups and organizations (including pharmaceutical companies) at the national, regional, and international levels should be developed in order to exchange information about and promote knowledge of CF, and to stimulate the development of CF services in developing countries. PMID:9141744

  3. Broad Autism Phenotype in Typically Developing Children Predicts Performance on an Eye-Tracking Measure of Joint Attention

    PubMed Central

    Serlin, Gayle C.; Siller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We examined visual attention allocation during a set of social videos that are intended to elicit the coordination of attention with another person, compared to a control condition. Deficits in joint attention are a characteristic of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included a diverse sample of 50 typically developing school-aged children between 3 and 9 years of age (M = 6:3, SD = 1:8). Results demonstrated that gaze allocation differed significantly between the experimental and control condition. Further, individual differences in gaze allocation were significantly predicted by a parent-report measure evaluating features of the broad autism phenotype. This study contributes to a research program that aims to develop and validate an endophenotype measure of ASD. PMID:22847297

  4. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins. PMID:18727911

  5. New adhesive withstands temperature extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Seidenberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive, developed for high-temperature components aboard satellites, is useful at both high and low temperatures and exhibits low-vacuum volatility and low shrinkage. System uses polyfunctional epoxy with high aromatic content, low equivalent weight, and more compact polymer than conventional bisphenol A tape.

  6. Nectin-1 spots as a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell lateral dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahito; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Mizoguchi, Akira; Takai, Yoshimi

    2015-08-15

    Mitral cells project lateral dendrites that contact the lateral and primary dendrites of other mitral cells and granule cell dendrites in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. In immunofluorescence microscopy, the immunofluorescence signal for the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 was concentrated on mitral cell lateral dendrites in the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. In electron microscopy, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically localized on the plasma membranes at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, which showed bilateral darkening without dense cytoskeletal undercoats characteristic of puncta adherentia junctions. We named the contacts where the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically accumulated "nectin-1 spots." The nectin-1 spots were 0.21 μm in length on average and the distance between the plasma membranes was 20.8 nm on average. In 3D reconstruction of serial sections, clusters of the nectin-1 spots formed a disc-like structure. In the mitral cell lateral dendrites of nectin-1-knockout mice, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were undetectable and the plasma membrane darkening was electron-microscopically normalized, but the plasma membranes were partly separated from each other. The nectin-1 spots were further identified between mitral cell lateral and primary dendrites and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots constitute a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. PMID:25967681

  7. Development and evaluation of the measurement system for the human shoulder joint based on the 6 DOF kinematic modelling.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Y; Iwanaga, K; Harada, H; Katsuura, T

    2000-01-01

    Although numerical models on the shoulder complex joint are currently available, many are impractical because of the procedural complexity coupled with limited and mere simple simulations. The present study defined the clavicle-scapula system as the "base of the humerus" in determining the position of proximal head of humerus, rendering conclusive innovation of a six degree of freedom (DOF) shoulder complex joint model. Furthermore, a complete measurement system where evaluation by calibrating the actual values via the use of an electromagnetic tracking device (ETD) was developed based on the innovated model. The special calibration method using optimizing calculation to work out the rotational center of humerus was employed and actually tested if the theoretical consideration was practically available. As a result of accuracy check experiments, the measurement error was defined within 2-3 mm, indicating sufficient accuracy in studies for human movement. Our findings strongly advocate that the benefit of this novel measurement system would contribute to studies related to shoulder movements in physiological anthropology. PMID:10979249

  8. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  9. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  10. Towards a Socio-Cultural Framework for the Analysis of Joint Student-Teacher Development over Technology-Based Mathematics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a framework, an extension of Valsiner's "zone theory", for the analysis of joint student-teacher development over a series of technology-based mathematics lessons. The framework is suitable for developing research studies over a moderately long period of time and considers interrelated student-teacher development as…

  11. Tissue adhesives for meniscus tear repair: an overview of current advances and prospects for future clinical solutions.

    PubMed

    Bochyńska, A I; Hannink, G; Grijpma, D W; Buma, P

    2016-05-01

    Menisci are crucial structures in the knee joint as they play important functions in load transfer, maintaining joint stability and in homeostasis of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, ones of the most frequently occurring knee injuries are meniscal tears. Particularly tears in the avascular zone of the meniscus usually do not heal spontaneously and lead to pain, swelling and locking of the knee joint. Eventually, after a (partial) meniscectomy, they will lead to osteoarthritis. Current treatment modalities to repair tears and by that restore the integrity of the native meniscus still carry their drawbacks and a new robust solution is desired. A strong tissue adhesive could provide such a solution and could potentially improve on sutures, which are the current gold standard. Moreover, a glue could serve as a carrier for biological compounds known to enhance tissue healing. Only few tissue adhesives, e.g., Dermabond(®) and fibrin glue, are already successfully used in clinical practice for other applications, but are not considered suitable for gluing meniscus tissue due to their sub-optimal mechanical properties or toxicity. There is a growing interest and research field focusing on the development of novel polymer-based tissue adhesives, but up to now, there is no material specially designed for the repair of meniscal tears. In this review, we discuss the current clinical gold standard treatment of meniscal tears and present an overview of new developments in this field. Moreover, we discuss the properties of different tissue adhesives for their potential use in meniscal tear repair. Finally, we formulate recommendations regarding the design criteria of material properties and adhesive strength for clinically applicable glues for meniscal tears. PMID:26970767

  12. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  13. Probabilistic assessment of failure in adhesively bonded composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    Damage initiation and progressive fracture of adhesively bonded graphite/epoxy composites is investigated under tensile loading. A computer code is utilized for the simulation of composite structural damage and fracture. Structural response is assessed probabilistically during degradation. The effects of design variable uncertainties on structural damage progression are quantified. The Fast Probability Integrator is used to assess the response scatter in the composite structure at damage initiation. Sensitivity of the damage response to design variables is computed. Methods are general purpose in nature and are applicable to all types of laminated composite structures and joints, starting from damage initiation to unstable damage propagation and collapse. Results indicate that composite constituent and adhesive properties have a significant effect on structural durability. Damage initiation/progression does not necessarily begin in the adhesive bond. Design implications with regard to damage tolerance of adhesively bonded joints are examined.

  14. Development and experience of large conductor cable 35-kV joints at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, F.; Findon, E.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) places a high priority on developing its distribution system in the most reliable and cost-effective manner. At higher distribution voltages, such as 34.5-kV, jointing systems which are easily, consistently, and quickly installed by both utility and contracted personnel offer significant economic advantages. With increasing loads and higher load densities at LADWP, the use of 34.5-kV, cross-linked polyethylene (CLP) aluminum, 1000-kcmil cable is becoming more common to meet customer load requirements. Two methods of jointing this large conductor cable were historically used, although each method had limitations. This paper provides an overview of LADWP's distribution system, past jointing techniques, the investigation and evaluation of alternate approaches, and the field experience with the joint selected for use.

  15. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature stable adhesive systems were evaluated for potential Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) vehicle applications. The program was divided into two major phases: Phase I 'Adhesive Screening' evaluated eleven selected polyimide (PI) and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) adhesive resins using eight different titanium (6Al-4V) adherend surface preparations; Phase II 'Adhesive Optimization and Characterization' extensively evaluated two adhesive systems, selected from Phase I studies, for chemical characterization and environmental durability. The adhesive systems which exhibited superior thermal and environmental bond properties were LARC-TPI polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline both developed at NASA Langley. The latter adhesive system did develop bond failures at extended thermal aging due primarily to incompatibility between the surface preparation and the polymer. However, this study did demonstrate that suitable adhesive systems are available for extended supersonic cruise vehicle design applications.

  16. Hot melt joints for carbon fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netze, C.; Michaeli, W.

    The electric conductivity of carbon fibers and EVA thermoplastic adhesives in composite materials are exploited in a method for melting and/or hardening joint bonds. The joining method is based on the simultaneous use of electrical energy and mechanical pressure in joining sections of CFRP materials by means of hot melts. The EVA hot melt is used as a model adhesive to join 1:1 bidirectional CFRP sheets with a 12.5 mm overlap. Heating power is shown to affect the temperature development in the joining areas, and no relationship is noted between heating behavior and joining pressure. The strength of the bonds is comparable to the values yielded by other methods, although the carbon black in the EVA films leads to some microscopic cracks. The joining technique outlined is shown to provide effective structural bonds that could be of use in the fabrication of aircraft and other structures.

  17. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (<50 nm), it is challenging to characterize their material properties for correlation to adhesive performance. We circumvent this problem by estimating the elastic modulus of the silane-based coatings using the buckling instability formed between two materials of a large elastic mismatch. The elastic modulus is found to effectively predict the joint strength of an epoxy/aluminum joint that has been reinforced with silane coupling agents. This buckling

  18. Development of a biomechanical model of the wrist joint for patient-specific model guided surgical therapy planning: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Jörg; Stromps, Jan-Philipp; Fischer, Maximilian; Schick, Fabian; Rath, Björn; Pallua, Norbert; Radermacher, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced musculoskeletal biomechanical model of the wrist joint is presented in this article. The developed computational model features the two forearm bones radius and ulna, the eight wrist bones, the five metacarpal bones, and a soft tissue apparatus. Validation of the model was based on information taken from the literature as well as own experimental passive in vitro motion analysis of eight cadaver specimens. The computational model is based on the multi-body simulation software AnyBody. A comprehensive ligamentous apparatus was implemented allowing the investigation of ligament function. The model can easily patient specific personalized on the basis of image information. The model enables simulation of individual wrist motion and predicts trends correctly in the case of changing kinematics. Therefore, patient-specific multi-body simulation models are potentially valuable tools for surgeons in pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement and orientation. PMID:26994117

  19. Joint development and tectonic stress field evolution in the southeastern Mesozoic Ordos Basin, west part of North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lin; Qiu, Zhen; Wang, Qingchen; Guo, Yusen; Wu, Chaofan; Wu, Zhijie; Xue, Zhenhua

    2016-09-01

    Major joint sets trending E-W (J1), ENE-WSW (J2), NE-SW (J3), N-S (J4), NNW-SSE (J5), NNE-SSW (J6), NW-SE (J7), and WNW-ESE (J8) respectively are recognized in Mesozoic strata within the southeast of Ordos Basin. Among them, the J1, J2 and J3 joint sets are systematic joints, while the other five joint sets (J4, J5, J6, J7, J8) are nonsystematic joints. There are three groups of orthogonal joint systems (i.e. J1 and J4 sets, J2 and J5 sets, and J6 and J8 sets) and two groups of conjugate shear fractures (ENE-WSW and NNE-SSW, ENE-WSW and ESE-WNW) in the study area. Joint spacing analysis indicates that: (1) layer thickness has an effect on the joint spacing, but the correlation of joint spacing and layer thickness is low; (2) joint density of systematic joints is greater than nonsystematic joints, and the joint density of a thin layer is also greater than that of a thick layer; and (3) the joints of Mesozoic strata in the basin are the result of tectonic events affected by multiple stress fields. All these joints in the Mesozoic strata are formed in the two main tectonic events since Late Mesozoic times. One is the westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasia Plate, which formed the approximately E-W-trending compressive stress field in the China continent. The trends of the J1 joint set (E-W) and the bisector of conjugate shear fractures composed of ENE-WSW and ESE-WNW fractures are all parallel to the trend of maximum compressive stress (E-W). The other stress field is related to the collision of the Indian and Eurasian Plates, which formed the NE-SW-trending compressive stress field in the China continent. The trends of the J3 joint set and bisector of conjugate shear fractures composed of ENE-WSW and NNE-SSW fractures are all parallel to the trend of maximum compressive stress (NE-SW). Finally, we conclude that the J1 and J4 sets are formed in the E-W-trending compressive stress field, and the J2, J3, J5, J6, J7 and J8 sets are formed in the NE

  20. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.