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Sample records for adhesive metal transfer

  1. Adhesion and transfer of PTFE to metals studied by auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum has been studied using Auger emission spectroscopy. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate.

  2. Adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluorethylene to metals studied by Auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum were studied. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron-induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals, such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate.

  3. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  4. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  5. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  6. Fundamental considerations in adhesion, friction and wear for ceramic-metal contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental studies of friction, wear and adhesion of ceramics in contact with metals are evaluated. It is shown that friction and adhesion are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. The surface energy, friction, adhesion and hardness of a metal are related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. Generally, the greater the sheer modulus, the less metal transfer there is to the ceramic.

  7. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  8. Transfer of adhesive tape between calender rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Kauzlarich, J. J.

    2004-03-01

    In the calendering process a tape or sheet of deformable material passes through the nip between hard cylindrical rollers. Usually the rolls are driven at the same peripheral speed, but small differences in speed, often referred to as 'creep', can occur if one of the rolls is externally driven and the other is driven by the friction in the contact. In these circumstances it has been observed that a tape that enters the nip adhering to the driven (slower) surface may transfer at exit to the driving (faster) surface but not the other way round. The mechanics of this transfer process is examined theoretically and experimentally in this paper for the case of double sided adhesive tape. It is argued that on emerging from the nip the tape will separate from the surface at which the shear strain in the adhesive is greater and that for transfer to occur the contact load must be sufficient to cause plastic extension of the tape.

  9. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  10. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  11. Adhesion of metals to a clean iron surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of adhesion experiments conducted with various metals contacting a clean iron surface. The metals included gold, silver, nickel, platinum, lead, tantalum, aluminum, and cobalt. Some of the metals were examined with oxygen present on their surface as well as in the clean state. The results indicate that, with the various metals contacting iron, the cohesively weaker will adhere and transfer to the cohesively stronger. The chemical activity of the metal also influenced the adhesive forces measured. With oxygen present on the metal surface, the adhesive forces measured could be correlated with the binding energy of the metal to oxygen.

  12. Adhesive Electroless Metallization of Fluoropolymeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargo, Terrence G.; Gardella, Joseph A., Jr.; Calvert, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Mu-San

    1993-12-01

    A process for producing patterned metal deposits on fluoropolymeric substrates is described. A metal ion-chelating organosilane is chemisorbed by self-assembly onto a fluoropolymer surface after radio-frequency glow discharge plasma surface hydroxylation. Positional modulation of the surface hydrophobicity is illustrated by wetting. The silane covalently binds an aqueous palladium catalyst and subsequent electroless deposition yields homogeneous or patterned metal deposits that exhibit excellent adhesion to the fluoropolymer.

  13. Transfer of molybdenum disulfide to various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, G. C.; Pepper, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with molybdenum disulfide single crystals in contact with sputter cleaned surfaces of copper, nickel, gold, and 304 stainless steel. Transfer of the molybdenum disulfide to the metals was monitored with Auger electron spectroscopy. Results of the investigation indicate molybdenum disulfide transfers to all clean metal surfaces after a single pass over the metal surface with film thickness observed to increase with repeated passes over the same surfaces. Large particle transfer occurs when the orientation of the crystallites is other than basal. This is frequently accompanied by abrasion of the metal. Adhesion of molybdenum disulfide films occurred readily to copper and nickel, less readily to 304 stainless steel, and even less effectively to the gold, which indicates a chemical effect.

  14. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  15. The metal to metal interface and its effect on adhesion and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper considers the interface between two bulk metals and the effect of this interface on adhesive bonding, resistance to tangential displacements, friction and the interfacial transport from one surface to another. Using Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and low energy electron diffraction techniques, the influence of surface orientation, lattice registry, crystal lattice structure and defects, metal surface chemistry and alloying on the characteristics of the interface was studied for noble, platinum, transition, and Group 4B metals. With dissimilar metals in contact, epitaxial transfer of the cohesively weaker to the cohesively stronger metal has been observed. Surface chemical activity of the noble and platinum metals is shown to affect interfacial behavior as does a valence bonding in the transition metals, and the degree of metallic nature in the Group 4B elements. Alloying elements, e.g., Si and Fe, can alter interfacial behavior by segregation to the surface of metals or by altering bulk properties such as crystal transformation kinetics.

  16. Avalanche in Adhesion at Metal Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations have shown that as two metal surfaces approach each other, the surface layers can avalanche together when the rigid interfacial spacing falls below a critical distance. This is accompanied by a discontinuous decrease in the adhesive energy. Here we present an examination of this phenomenon for the body centered cubic (BCC) metals Fe and W using the Equivalent Crystal Theory. In order to identify the circumstances under which avalanche might be inhibited, the effect of loss of registry between the two surfaces is investigated in detail. The avalanche is inhibited when the two surfaces are sufficiently far out of registry and when only a few layers near the surface are allowed to relax. As the relaxing slabs get thicker a sharp avalanche reappears. However, as the loss of registry increases the energy released in the avalanche decreases.

  17. Soft grippers using micro-fibrillar adhesives for transfer printing.

    PubMed

    Song, Sukho; Sitti, Metin

    2014-07-23

    The adhesive characteristics of fibrillar adhesives on a soft deformable membrane are reported. A soft gripper with an inflatable membrane covered by elastomer mushroom-shaped microfibers have a superior conformation to non-planar 3D part geometries, enabling the transfer printing of various parts serially or in parallel.

  18. Universal binding energy relations in metallic adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rose, Smith, and Ferrante have discovered scaling relations which map the adhesive binding energy calculated by Ferrante and Smith onto a single universal binding energy curve. These binding energies are calculated for all combinations of Al(111), Zn(0001), Mg(0001), and Na(110) in contact. The scaling involves normalizing the energy by the maximum binding energy and normalizing distances by a suitable combination of Thomas-Fermi screening lengths. Rose et al. have also found that the calculated cohesive energies of K, Ba, Cu, Mo, and Sm scale by similar simple relations, suggesting the universal relation may be more general than for the simple free electron metals for which it was derived. In addition, the scaling length was defined more generally in order to relate it to measurable physical properties. Further this universality can be extended to chemisorption. A simple and yet quite accurate prediction of a zero temperature equation of state (volume as a function of pressure for metals and alloys) is presented. Thermal expansion coefficients and melting temperatures are predicted by simple, analytic expressions, and results compare favorably with experiment for a broad range of metals.

  19. Improved primer for bonding polyurethane adhesives to metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constanza, L. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primer ensures effective bonding integrity of polyurethane adhesives on metal surfaces at temperatures ranging from minus 423 degrees to plus 120 degrees F. It provides greater metal surface protection and bond strengths over this temperature range than could be attained with other adhesive systems.

  20. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Allred, R.E.; Wilson, K.V. Jr.

    1992-02-18

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  1. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Allred, Ronald E.; Wilson, Jr., Kennard V.

    1992-01-01

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  2. Adhesion of Staphylococcus to orthopaedic metals, an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, E; McKenna, J; Mulhall, K J; Marks, P; McCormack, D

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a new model of biofilm study in rabbits. The primary focus of this study was to assess biofilm adhesion to orthopaedic metals in their first 48 h in a femoral intramedullary implantation model. Two previous inoculation methods i.e. that of pre- and direct inoculation were studied with two bacterial isolates namely Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis, on titanium and stainless steel metallic implants. A method of sonication and log dilution/plating was used to assess biofilm bacteria adhering to implants. Silver coated metals were then compared with their respective control metals in the new model. The direct inoculation model gave larger and more reproducible biofilm adhesion to implanted metals. Staphylococcus epidermidis shows lower adhesion ability to metals, and biofilms adhere in greater numbers to stainless steel over titanium. Silver coated metals show no statistical difference over control metals when exposed to orthopaedic biofilms.

  3. Metal-Filled Adhesives Amenable To X-Ray Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermansen, Ralph D.; Sutherland, Thomas H.; Predmore, Roamer

    1994-01-01

    Adhesive joints between metal parts made amenable to nondestructive radiographic inspection by incorporating radiopaque fillers that increase x-ray contrasts of joints. Adhesives can be epoxies, urethanes, acrylics, phenolics, or silicones, with appropriate curing agents and with such modifiers as polysulfides, polyamides, or butadiene rubbers.

  4. The atomic nature of polymer-metal interactions in adhesion, friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Adhesion experiments with polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyimide contacting tungsten indicate that the polymers bond chemically to the clean metal surface. Polymer chain fragments which transfer to the surface of tungsten in field ion microscopy adhesion studies are highly oriented. Auger emission spectroscopy of PTFE transfer films to various metal surfaces indicates that the PTFE is bonded to the metal surface via the carbon atom. With PTFE in sliding contact with different orientations of aluminum, metal orientation is found to influence surfaces in sliding. The lowest friction and least amount of surface damage is detected on the highest atomic density (111) plane. The friction process itself can initiate polymer film formation from simple organic molecules.

  5. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  6. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  7. Adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with transition metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with various transition metals and the nature of metal transfer to diamond. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with diamond in sliding contact with the metals yttrium, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium and rhodium. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.05 to 0.3 N, at a sliding velocity of 0.003 m per minute, in a vacuum of 10 to the -8th Pa, at room temperature, and on the (111) plane of diamond with sliding in the 110 line type direction. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction for diamond in contact with various metals is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of diamond in sliding.

  8. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, D.H.; Pedraza, A.J.; DeSilva, M.J.; Kumar, R.A.

    1997-12-30

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials are disclosed. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon. 7 figs.

  9. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; Pedraza, Anthony J.; DeSilva, Melvin J.; Kumar, Rajagopalan A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon.

  10. Theoretical adhesion strength of diamond coating with metallic interlayers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haibo; Qi, Yue; Li, Xiaodong

    2009-03-01

    Metallic interlayers are often needed to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings to substrates and to promote diamond nucleation and growth. The interfaces between diamond coatings and metallic interlayer materials with different carbide formation enthalpies, Cu, Al, and Ti, are studied using density functional theory. The ideal interface strength or the work of separation is found to decrease with the carbide formation enthalpy. Analysis to the electronic structure shows that covalent metal-carbon bonds form at the interface, and the perturbation from the interface weakens nearby metal phase. Comparing the work of separation at the interface with the fracture energy of the metal, a fracture is likely to initiate in the metal phase near the interface, therefore a tough metal with a large surface energy is needed to achieve a higher overall toughness. In addition, when the surface energy is larger than the interface energy, a wetted diamond/metal interface is formed during diamond nucleation, which also contributes to good adhesion. The interface energy, which is an energy barrier to diamond nucleation, is found to decrease with the carbide formation enthalpy. These results indicate strong carbide formability and a large surface energy of the interlayer enhance the adhesion and the fracture resistance of the interface, and also conduce to the diamond nucleation on the interlayer.

  11. The metal to metal interface and its effect on adhesion and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the interface, adhesion and friction properties of noble metals, platinum metals, Group IV (B) metals and transition metals were considered. The surface chemical activity of the noble and platinum metals is shown to effect metal to metal interfaces as does a valance bonding in the transition metals. With the Group IV (B) metals the degree of metallic nature of the elements is shown to effect interfacial behavior. The effect of surface segregation of alloy constituents such as silicon in iron and its influence on the metal to metal interface is discussed. In addition the effect of alloy constituents on changes in bulk properties such as transformations in tin are shown to effect interfacial adhesion and friction behavior.

  12. Adhesive force mapping of friction-transferred PTFE film surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Mashiko, S.

    The adhesive force of a friction-transferred polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film was mapped by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) system driven by custom software. The friction-transferred PTFE film, which was made by sliding a PTFE polymer rod on a heated glass, consisted of many PTFE ridges running parallel to the sliding direction on the glass surface. The adhesive force on the sample was derived from force curve measurement. A triangular wave amplified with a custom high-voltage amplifier was fed into the Z piezo of the AFM head through an AFM controller unit to obtain force curves while the AFM cantilever scanned a single line of the sample. The force curves both of the PTFE ridges and of the bare glass surface could be obtained by scanning the region perpendicular to the sliding direction. The deflection signal of the cantilever was sampled and stored in a computer through an AD converter. The adhesive force on the PTFE region was about half that on the glass surface. This difference was explained by the difference in capillary force of the surface water.

  13. Heat Transfer in Adhesively Bonded Honeycomb Core Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship has been used as a standard in aerospace industry to predict the effective thermal conductivity of honeycomb core panels. Recent measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of an adhesively bonded titanium honeycomb core panel using three different techniques, two steady-state and one transient radiant step heating method, at four laboratories varied significantly from each other and from the Swann and Pittman predictions. Average differences between the measurements and the predictions varied between 17 and 61% in the temperature range of 300 to 500 K. In order to determine the correct values of the effective thermal conductivity and determine which set of the measurements or predictions were most accurate, the combined radiation and conduction heat transfer in the honeycomb core panel was modeled using a finite volume numerical formulation. The transient radiant step heating measurements provided the best agreement with the numerical results. It was found that a modification of the Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship which incorporated the facesheets and adhesive layers in the thermal model provided satisfactory results. Finally, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the influence of adhesive thickness and thermal conductivity on the overall heat transfer through the panel.

  14. Adhesion of metals to spin-coated fluorocarbon polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Kil; Chang, Chin-An; Schrott, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion between metals and fluorocarbon polymer films has been studied for Cu, Cr, Ti, Al, and Au on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) films. Polymer films were applied on the Cr/SiO2 /Si substrate by spinning the aqueous dispersions of the polymer resin particles, followed by thermal curing. Strips of different metals were deposited on the polymers, and adhesion was measured at 90° peel test. The peel strengths were invariably higher for the metals on FEP than those of the corresponding metals on PTFE. Among the metals, Ti showed the highest peel strength for both polymers, followed by Cr and Al, with Cu and Au being the lowest. The peel strengths of Ti, Cr, and Cu on FEP are 85, 45, and 12 g/mm, respectively, and the corresponding ones on PTFE are 23, 5, and 2 g/mm, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis shows that the metal-polymer bonding involves the metal-carbon interactions. The strongest interaction is observed for Ti with the polymers, forming Ti carbidelike bonds. Cr also shows strong interaction with the two polymers, but to a lesser degree compared with Ti. Only a weak bonding is shown for Cu. The difference in peel strengths among the metals shows a correlation with the difference in electronegativities between the metals and carbon. Little contribution to the observed peel strengths is seen from the surface morphological analysis of the untreated polymers.

  15. The atomic nature of polymer-metal interactions in adhesion, friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of the solid polymers PTFE and polyimide in contact with various metals were studied using field ion microscopy, Auger emission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that the polymers will transfer to a clean tungsten surface on simple tough contact, forming a chemical bond. With PTFE, it is hypothesized that the bonding is of the carbon to the metal surface, while with the polyimide, both oxygen and carbon bonding to the tungsten surface are possible. In sliding contact, the friction process itself can initiate polymer film formation. The formation of such films has been suggested as a form of extreme pressure lubrication.

  16. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals.

  17. Adhesive bonding of noble metal alloys with a triazine dithiol derivative primer and an adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Taira, Y; Atsuta, M

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of a metal adhesive system bonded to noble metal alloys. Disc specimens were cast from type IV gold (type IV, Casting Gold M. C., metal-ceramic gold (Au-Pt-Pd, Degudent Universal, metal-ceramic palladium (Pd-Ga-Co, PTM 88 silver-indium (Ag-In-Zn, Salivan Hard and silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu, S12) alloys and pure silver (pure Ag). The specimens were air-abraded with 50 micron alumina, conditioned with a thiol-based primer designed for noble alloys (V-Primer), and then bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond Opaque Ivory). Shear bond strengths were determined after repeated thermocycling (4-60 degrees C, 1 min each, 100 000 cycles). The average bond strengths in MPa (n=8) were 30.9 for the type IV alloy, 29.0 for the Ag-Pd-Cu alloy, 28.0 for the Au-Pt-Pd alloy, 26.3 for the pure Ag, 26.0 for the Pd-Ga-Co alloy and 9.3 for the Ag-In-Zn alloy. The Ag-In-Zn alloy exhibited significantly lower bond strength than the other alloys, whereas the bond strengths of the other four alloys and pure Ag were comparable (P<0.05). It is concluded that the combined use of the thiol derivative primer and the adhesive resin is effective for bonding the noble metal alloys examined, with the exception of the Ag-In-Zn alloy.

  18. Adhesion and progressive delamination of polymer/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dauskardt, R.H.; Kook, S.Y.; Kirtikar, A.; Ohashi, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    Bonding of metals using polymers has significantly increased in a wide range of modern applications including aerospace structures, microelectronic packages and bio-prosthetic components. The reliability of these structures are profoundly influenced by the interfacial fracture resistance (adhesion) and resistance to progressive debonding of the resulting polymer/metal interfaces. In this study the authors examine such interfacial fracture properties of representative metal/polymer interfaces commonly found in microelectronic and biomedical applications. Specifically, interface fracture mechanics techniques are described to characterize adhesion and progressive debonding behavior under cyclic fatigue loading. Cyclic fatigue debond-growth rates were measured from {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} to 10{sup {minus}6} m/cycle and found to display a power-law dependence on the applied strain energy release rate range, {Delta}G. Fracture toughness test results show that the interfaces typically exhibit resistance-curve behavior, with a plateau interface fracture resistance, G{sub ss}, strongly dependent on the interface morphology and the thickness of the polymer layer. Micromechanisms controlling interfacial adhesion and progressive debonding are discussed in terms of the prevailing deformation mechanisms and related to interface structure and morphology.

  19. Bonding of adhesive resin luting agents to metal and amalgam.

    PubMed

    Osman, Saad A; McCabe, John F; Walls, Angus W G

    2008-12-01

    The shear bond strength of three adhesives, Panavia 21, Superbond, All Bond C&B Cement, and a dual cure resin (Variolink), to Ni-Cr-Be (Rexillium III), Midigold (Type III gold) and Amalgam (Sybraloy) were determined. Fifteen samples were prepared using 800 grit abrasive papers for Ni-Cr and Midi-Gold, and 100 grit papers for amalgam. Ni-Cr-Be and Midi-Gold samples were sandblasted for 30 s and steam cleaned for 10 s. The adhesives were bonded to the samples using gelatine capsules and were matured for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C. The samples were debonded in shear using an Instron at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analysed using ANOVA and a Tukey test. The bond strength of Superbond to both metal alloys was significantly higher (P<0.05) than any of the materials tested, with the exception Panavia 21 to gold. The bond strength of All Bond C&B cement had shown to be not significant difference from those of Panavia 21 and Variolink, when bonded to Rexillium and Midi-Gold, respectively. The bond strength of All Bond C&B Cement to amalgam was significantly greater (P<0.05) than those of the other materials tested. The shear bond strength to gold showed lower bonding for all adhesives when compared with Rexillium (P<.001). The ranking of bond strength to both alloys was as follows: Superbond>Panavia 21>All Bond C&B>Variolink. The nature of substrate to be used for bonding and the adhesive material itself are important factors in bonding which can be achieved between cast metals and prepared teeth with amalgam filling. Superbond should be successful as an adhesive for the attachment of all substrates tested, with the possible exception of amalgam, for which All Bond C&B Cement gives the best result.

  20. Effect of the combination of dithiooctanoate monomers and acidic adhesive monomers on adhesion to precious metals, precious metal alloys and non-precious metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Kojima, Katsunori; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the combination of a dithiooctanoate monomer and an acidic adhesive monomer on adhesion to precious metals, precious and non-precious metal alloys. From a selection of four dithiooctanoate monomers and six acidic adhesive monomers, 14 experimental primers containing a combination of 5.0 wt% of a dithiooctanoate monomer and 1.0 wt% of an acidic adhesive monomer in acetone were prepared. Tensile bond strengths (TBSs) of MMA-PMMA/TBBO resin to nine kinds of precious metals, precious metal alloys, and non-precious metal alloys after 2,000 thermal cycles were measured. Results showed that there were no significant differences in TBS among the primers to all the precious and non-precious metal adherends tested (p>0.05). Highest TBS values (46.5-55.8 MPa) for bonding to Au alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, Co-Cr alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy were achieved with the primer which contained 5.0 wt% 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT) and 1.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA). Therefore, 5.0 wt% 10-MDDT and 1.0 wt% 6-MHPA was determined as the optimal combination for bonding to precious metals, precious and non-precious metal alloys.

  1. Adhesion Upon Solidification and Detachment in the Melt Spinning of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, Anthony L.; Steen, Paul H.

    2014-12-01

    In planar-flow melt spinning, liquid metal is rapidly solidified, against a heat-sink wheel, into thin ribbons which adhere to the substrate wheel. In the absence of a blade to mechanically scrape the ribbon off the wheel, it may wrap fully around and re-enter the solidification region, called `catastrophic' adhesion. Otherwise, detachment occurs part way around the wheel, called `natural' detachment. Natural detachment occurs through a release of thermo-elastic stress after sufficient cooling of the ribbon, according to prior studies. This note extends prior work by invoking a crack propagation view of natural detachment which, when combined with a simple model of the thermo-elastic stress build-up and ribbon cooling, yields an adhesion/detachment criterion characterized by an interfacial adhesion/fracture energy . For aluminum-silicon alloys frozen against a copper substrate, we report 60 N/m. The criterion can be used to predict detachment once a heat-transfer coefficient is known. We obtain this parameter from natural detachment experiments and then use it to predict catastrophic adhesion in a semi-empirical way. Our note puts a quantitative foundation underneath prior qualitative discussions in the literature. Alternatively, it demonstrates how the interfacial strength of adhesion, a property only of the pair of adhering materials, might be measured based on sticking distance experiments.

  2. Ultimate Control of Rate-Dependent Adhesion for Reversible Transfer Process via a Thin Elastomeric Layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan; Yoon, Min-Ah; Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Seop

    2017-03-30

    Adhesion between a stamp with an elastomeric layer and various devices or substrates is crucial to successfully fabricate flexible electronics using a transfer process. Although various transfer processes using stamps with different adhesion strengths have been suggested, the controllable range of adhesion is still limited to a narrow range. To precisely transfer devices onto selected substrates, however, the difference in adhesion between the picking and placing processes should be large enough to achieve a high yield. Herein, we report a simple way to extend the controllable adhesion range of stamps, which can be achieved by adjusting the thickness of the elastomeric layer and the separation velocity. The adhesion strength increased with decreasing layer thickness on the stamp due to a magnification of the confinement and rate-dependent effects on the adhesion. This enabled the controllable range of the adhesion strength for a 15 μm-thick elastomeric layer to be extended up to 12 times that of the bulk under the same separation conditions. The strategy of designing stamps using simple adhesion tests is also introduced, and the reversible transfer of thin Si chips was successfully demonstrated. Tuning and optimizing the adhesion strength of a stamp according to the design process suggested here can be applied to various materials for the selective transfer and replacement of individual devices.

  3. Improved adhesion of Cu on pre-etched polytetrafluoroethylene by PECVD deposited thin metallic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, C.; Suhr, H.

    1988-10-01

    The adhesion of copper to PTFE has been studied with regard to the influence of a pretreatment in discharges of reactive gases, such as O2 and CF4/O2, and a subsequent deposition of thin metallic interlayers of Pd, Pt, Au, and Cu by PECVD methods. Adhesion forces could be enhanced by about the factor of 10 compared with merely pretreated surfaces up to 5 N/mm, which, as scanning electron micrographs prove, corresponds to the tensile strength of the bulk material. SIMS spectra of the back surface of a peeled copper stripe show the typical signals of PTFE. The thermal stability of the layers was established by dipping the samples into a tin bath of 540 K. The enhanced adhesion is not only due to the changes in surface morphology by etching. It can be attributed to chemical effects, i. e. chemical bonds between substrate atoms and the interlayer, and physical effects, caused by implantation of metal ions into the upper surface layers accompanied by a probable electron transfer from PTFE to metal.

  4. Enhancement of Thermal Conductance at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces Using Subnanometer Metal Adhesion Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Minyoung; Freedman, Justin P.; Liang, Hongliang Joe; Chow, Cheng-Ming; Sokalski, Vincent M.; Bain, James A.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the use of subnanometer adhesion layers significantly enhances the thermal interface conductance at metal-dielectric interfaces. A metal-dielectric interface between Au and sapphire (Al2O3) is considered using Cu (low optical loss) and Cr (high optical loss) as adhesion layers. To enable high throughput measurements, each adhesion layer is deposited as a wedge such that a continuous range of thicknesses could be sampled. Our measurements of thermal interface conductance at the metal-Al2O3 interface made using frequency-domain thermoreflectance show that a 1-nm-thick adhesion layer of Cu or Cr is sufficient to enhance the thermal interface conductance by more than a factor of 2 or 4, respectively, relative to the pure Au/Al2O3 interface. The enhancement agrees with the diffuse-mismatch-model-based predictions of accumulated thermal conductance versus adhesion-layer thickness assuming that it contributes phonons with wavelengths less than its thickness, while those with longer wavelengths transmit directly from the Au.

  5. Laser-Induced Transfer of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Koch, Jürgen; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-10-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metallic micro- and nanostructures based on femtosecond laser-induced transfer of metallic nanodroplets is developed. The size of the transferred droplets depends on the volume of laser-molten metal and can be varied by changing the laser beam focus on the sample surface and the metal film thickness. Controllable fabrication of high quality spherical gold micro- and nanoparticles with sizes between 170 nm and 1500 nm is realized. Fabrication of miscellaneous structures consisting of gold particles as elementary building blocks is demonstrated.

  6. Do adhesive systems leave resin coats on the surfaces of the metal matrix bands? An adhesive remnant characterization.

    PubMed

    Arhun, Neslihan; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Reestablishing proximal contacts with composite resins may prove challenging since the applied adhesives may lead to resin coating that produces additional thickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface of metal matrix bands after application of adhesive systems and blowing or wiping off the adhesive before polymerization. Seventeen groups of matrix bands were prepared. The remnant particles were characterized by energy dispersive spectrum and scanning electron microscopy. Total etch and two-step self-etch adhesives did not leave any resin residues by wiping and blowing off. All-in-one adhesive revealed resin residues despite wiping off. Prime and Bond NT did not leave any remnant with compomer. Clinicians must be made aware of the consequences of possible adhesive remnants on matrix bands that may lead to a defective definitive restoration. The adhesive resin used for Class II restorations may leave resin coats on metal matrix bands after polymerization, resulting in additional thickness on the metal matrix bands and poor quality of the proximal surface of the definitive restoration when the adhesive system is incorporated in the restoration.

  7. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  8. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  9. Metallic adhesion layer induced plasmon damping and molecular linker as a nondamping alternative.

    PubMed

    Habteyes, Terefe G; Dhuey, Scott; Wood, Erin; Gargas, Daniel; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P James; Alivisatos, A Paul; Leone, Stephen R

    2012-06-26

    Drastic chemical interface plasmon damping is induced by the ultrathin (∼2 nm) titanium (Ti) adhesion layer; alternatively, molecular adhesion is implemented for lithographic fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures without significant distortion of the plasmonic characteristics. As determined from the homogeneous linewidth of the resonance scattering spectrum of individual gold nanorods, an ultrathin Ti layer reduces the plasmon dephasing time significantly, and it reduces the plasmon scattering amplitude drastically. The increased damping rate and decreased plasmon amplitude are due to the dissipative dielectric function of Ti and the chemical interface plasmon damping where the conduction electrons are transferred across the metal-metal interface. In addition, a pronounced red shift due to the Ti adhesion layer, more than predicted using electromagnetic simulation, suggests the prevalence of interfacial reactions. By extending the experiment to conductively coupled ring-rod nanostructures, it is shown that a sharp Fano-like resonance feature is smeared out due to the Ti layer. Alternatively, vapor deposition of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane on gently cleaned and activated lithographic patterns functionalizes the glass surface sufficiently to link the gold nanostructures to the surface by sulfur-gold chemical bonds without observable plasmon damping effects.

  10. Direct measurement of adhesion energy of monolayer graphene as-grown on copper and its application to renewable transfer process.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Taeshik; Shin, Woo Cheol; Kim, Taek Yong; Mun, Jeong Hun; Kim, Taek-Soo; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-03-14

    Direct measurement of the adhesion energy of monolayer graphene as-grown on metal substrates is important to better understand its bonding mechanism and control the mechanical release of the graphene from the substrates, but it has not been reported yet. We report the adhesion energy of large-area monolayer graphene synthesized on copper measured by double cantilever beam fracture mechanics testing. The adhesion energy of 0.72 ± 0.07 J m(-2) was found. Knowing the directly measured value, we further demonstrate the etching-free renewable transfer process of monolayer graphene that utilizes the repetition of the mechanical delamination followed by the regrowth of monolayer graphene on a copper substrate.

  11. On the relation between surface roughness of metallic substrates and adhesion of human primary bone cells.

    PubMed

    Anselme, K; Bigerelle, M

    2014-01-01

    Surface characteristics of materials, whether their topography, chemistry, or surface energy, play an essential part in osteoblast adhesion on biomaterials. Thus, the quality of cell adhesion will influence the cell's capacity to proliferate and differentiate in contact with a biomaterial. We have developed for more than ten years numerous studies on the influence of topography and chemistry of metallic substrates on the response of primary human bone cells. The originality of our approach is that contrary to most of other authors, we quantified the adhesion of primary human bone cells on metallic substrates with perfectly characterized surface topography after some hours but also over 21 days. Moreover, we have developed original statistical approaches for characterizing the relation between surface roughness and cell-adhesion parameters. In this article, we will illustrate different studies we did these last ten years concerning the development of a new adhesion parameter, the adhesion power; the correlation between short-term adhesion, long-term adhesion, and proliferation; the influence of roughness organization on cell adhesion and the development of the order parameter; our modeling approach of cell adhesion on surface topography; the relative influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell adhesion and contact angle; the relation between surface features dimensions and cell adhesion. Further, some considerations will be given on the methods for scanning surface topography for cell-adhesion studies. Finally, perspectives will be given to elucidate these intracellular mechanotransduction mechanisms induced by the deformation of cells on model sinusoidal peaks-or-valleys surfaces.

  12. Bistable regulation of integrin adhesiveness by a bipolar metal ion cluster.

    PubMed

    Chen, JianFeng; Salas, Azucena; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-12-01

    Integrin alpha(4)beta(7) mediates rolling adhesion in Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) + Mg(2+), and firm adhesion in Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), mimicking the two key steps in leukocyte accumulation in inflamed vasculature. We mutated an interlinked linear array of three divalent cation-binding sites present in integrin beta-subunit I-like domains. The middle, metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) is required for both rolling and firm adhesion. One polar site, that adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS), is required for rolling because its mutation results in firm adhesion. The other polar site, the ligand-induced metal binding site (LIMBS), is required for firm adhesion because its mutation results in rolling. The LIMBS mediates the positive regulatory effects of low Ca(2+) concentrations, whereas the ADMIDAS mediates the negative regulatory effects of higher Ca(2+) concentrations, which are competed by Mn(2+). The bipolar sites thus stabilize two alternative phases of adhesion.

  13. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  14. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  15. Evenly transferred single-layered graphene membrane assisted by strong substrate adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Kim, Hoijoon; Seol, Daehee; Park, Taejin; Leem, Mirine; Ha, Hyunwoo; An, Hyesung; You Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Park, Seongjun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-04-01

    We explored the transfer of a single-layered graphene membrane assisted by substrate adhesion. A relatively larger adhesion force was measured on the SiO2 substrate compared with its van der Waals contribution, which is expected to result from the additional contribution of the chemical bonding force. Density functional theory calculations verified that the strong adhesion force was indeed accompanied by chemical bonding. The transfer of single-layered graphene and subsequent deposition of the dielectric layer were best performed on the SiO2 substrate exhibiting a larger adhesion force. This study suggests the selection and/or modification of the underlying substrate for proper transfer of graphene as well as other 2D materials similar to graphene.

  16. Evenly transferred single-layered graphene membrane assisted by strong substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Kim, Hoijoon; Seol, Daehee; Park, Taejin; Leem, Mirine; Ha, Hyunwoo; An, Hyesung; You Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Park, Seongjun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-04-07

    We explored the transfer of a single-layered graphene membrane assisted by substrate adhesion. A relatively larger adhesion force was measured on the SiO2 substrate compared with its van der Waals contribution, which is expected to result from the additional contribution of the chemical bonding force. Density functional theory calculations verified that the strong adhesion force was indeed accompanied by chemical bonding. The transfer of single-layered graphene and subsequent deposition of the dielectric layer were best performed on the SiO2 substrate exhibiting a larger adhesion force. This study suggests the selection and/or modification of the underlying substrate for proper transfer of graphene as well as other 2D materials similar to graphene.

  17. Friction and solid-solid adhesion on complex metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Jean-Marie; Belin-Ferré, Esther

    2014-01-01

    The discovery in 1987 of stable quasicrystals in the Al–Cu–Fe system was soon exploited to patent specific coatings that showed reduced friction in ambient air against hard antagonists. Henceforth, it was possible to develop a number of applications, potential or commercially exploited to date, that will be alluded to in this topical review. A deeper understanding of the characteristics of complex metallic alloys (CMAs) may explain why material made of metals like Al, Cu and Fe offers reduced friction; low solid–solid adhesion came later. It is linked to the surface energy being significantly lower on those materials, in which translational symmetry has become a weak property, that is determined by the depth of the pseudo-gap at the Fermi energy. As a result, friction is anisotropic in CMAs that builds up according to the translation symmetry along one direction, but is aperiodic along the other two directions. A review is given in this article of the most salient data found along these lines during the past two decades or so. PMID:27877675

  18. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    SciTech Connect

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Jin Cho, Byung E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr; Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr

    2013-12-09

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  19. Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface.

  20. Degradation mechanisms and stability forecasting and adhesion contacts of metal films with binary dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarova, S.; Nemirovsky, Y.; Simanovskis, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors present their conception of degradation and stability on the adhesion contacts of metal films with binary nonmetallic crystals. There are numerous works devoted to the atomic scale determination of adhesion forces and development of adhesion interaction laws. But in the real life the kinetic processes, taking place on the adhesion contact, can lead to such dramatic changes in adhesion strength values that the initial adhesion characteristics do not worth much for practice. Sometimes, adhesion contact with a metal which supposed to be highly adhesive failes in a short period of aging time. What the authors have learned from their studies of the contact processes is that in many cases the aging could not be separately addressed to the individual properties of film metal or to those of the substrate material. It depends mainly on the relationships between the parameters of interacting pair. The question is: what parameters should be taken into account to explain degradation phenomena and to predict them? The purpose of the present work is to show how the relative chemical activity of film metal and substrate cation affects the contact degradation in a vacuum and in different environmental conditions.

  1. Pattern transfer printing by kinetic control of adhesion to an elastomeric stamp

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2011-05-17

    The present invention provides methods, systems and system components for transferring, assembling and integrating features and arrays of features having selected nanosized and/or microsized physical dimensions, shapes and spatial orientations. Methods of the present invention utilize principles of `soft adhesion` to guide the transfer, assembly and/or integration of features, such as printable semiconductor elements or other components of electronic devices. Methods of the present invention are useful for transferring features from a donor substrate to the transfer surface of an elastomeric transfer device and, optionally, from the transfer surface of an elastomeric transfer device to the receiving surface of a receiving substrate. The present methods and systems provide highly efficient, registered transfer of features and arrays of features, such as printable semiconductor element, in a concerted manner that maintains the relative spatial orientations of transferred features.

  2. Determination of isoelectric points of metals and metallic alloys by adhesion of latex particles.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Grégory; Cerović, Ljiljana; Milonjić, Slobodan; Fédoroff, Michel; Finne, Jörgen; Jaubertie, Anne

    2009-09-15

    A set-up and a method were developed to determine the isoelectric point of metals and metallic alloys samples (stainless steels, inconel, zircaloy, aluminum and dural) by measuring the adhesion rate of negative latex particles. The concentration of polystyrene spheres with surface carboxylate groups (initially 0.5-1 mg L(-1)) in contact with metallic samples was measured as a function of pH and time by turbidimetry. The simulation of measurements by a model predicting the sticking coefficient based on DLVO theory was used for the determination of the isoelectric point from experimental results. It was found that the isoelectric points of aluminum (8.7) and dural (9.1), treated by boiling water, are close to those of hydrated aluminum oxides powders. For stainless steels, inconel and zircaloy, the values of isoelectric points were found to be between 2.4 and 3.0, far below the isoelectric points measured for metallic oxides constituting the alloy surface layer. This difference was explained by two different charging mechanisms: (1) deprotonation of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the metal oxide in suspension or as a thick layer, (2) adsorption of hydroxide ions on a metal surface covered by a thin oxide layer, as observed on hydrophobic surfaces.

  3. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  4. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MODIFIED EPOXIDE RESIN ADHESIVES FOR METALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    composed of Epon 1001 resin, Plyophen 5023, and dicyandiamide as the curing agent. Al dust was used as the reinforcing filler. The adhesive was cured at...to the development of the following formula (parts by weight): 33 Epon 1001 + 67 Polyophen 5023 + 100 Al dust + 6 dicyandiamide . Higher Epon 1001...or curing without dicyandiamide reduced adhesive shear strength, especially at room temperature.

  5. Direct metal transfer printing on flexible substrate for fabricating optics functional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Feng; Shi, Zhenwu; Chen, Linsen; Peng, Changsi

    2015-11-01

    New functional materials and devices based on metal patterns can be widely used in many new and expanding industries,such as flat panel displays, alternative energy,sensors and so on. In this paper, we introduce a new transfer printing method for fabricating metal optics functional devices. This method can directly transfer a metal pattern from a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)supported UV or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern to another PET substrate. Purely taking advantage of the anaerobic UV curing adhesive (a-UV) on PET substrate, metal film can be easily peeled off from micro/nano-structured surface. As a result, metal film on the protrusion can be selectively transferred onto the target substrate, to make it the metal functional surface. But which on the bottom can not be transferred. This method provides low cost fabrication of metal thin film devices by avoiding high cost lithography process. Compared with conventional approach, this method can get more smooth rough edges and has wider tolerance range for the original master mold. Future developments and potential applications of this metal transfer method will be addressed.

  6. ADHESION AND DE-ADHESION MECHANISMS AT POLYMER/METAL INTERFACES: Mechanistic Understanding Based on In Situ Studies of Buried Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmeier, G.; Stratmann, M.

    2005-08-01

    The review highlights the state-of-the-art research regarding the application of modern in situ spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques to improve the understanding of the interaction of organic molecules with metal surfaces. We also consider the chemical and electrochemical processes that lead to a de-adhesion of polymers from metal surfaces. Spectroscopic techniques such as surface-enhanced infrared or Raman spectroscopy provide molecular understanding of organic molecules and water at buried metal surfaces. This information is complementary to adhesion studies by means of atomic force microscopy and de-adhesion studies of polymer layers from metals by means of a scanning Kelvin probe. Adhesion and de-adhesion mechanisms are discussed, especially those involving humid and corrosive environments, which are the predominant and most important for metal/polymer composites in engineering applications.

  7. Improvement of metal and tissue adhesion on surface-modified parylene C.

    PubMed

    Wahjudi, Paulin N; Oh, Jin H; Salman, Salam O; Seabold, Jason A; Rodger, Damien C; Tai, Yu-Chong; Thompson, Mark E

    2009-04-01

    A general method for chemical surface functionalization of parylene C [PC, (para-CH2-C6H3Cl-CH2-)n] films is reported. Friedel-Crafts acylation is used to activate the surface of the PC film, and the resulting carbonyl groups are then used to form a range of different organic functional groups to the surface of the parylene film, including alcohol, imine, thiol, phthalimide, amine, and maleimide. The presence of these functional groups on the parylene surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Static water drop contact angle measurements were also used to demonstrate the changes in hydrophilicity of the PC film surface, consistent with each of the surface modifications. Enhanced metal (gold) adhesion was achieved by anchoring a thiol group onto the acylated surface of PC film. Acylation of parylene with 2-chloropropionyl chloride gave a surface bound chloropropionyl group. Grafting of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (pNIPAM) onto the chloropropionyl substituted PC film via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was carried out. The grafted pNIPAM on the parylene surface leads to temperature-dependent cellular tissue adhesion on the PC film.

  8. Microtransfer printing of metal ink patterns onto plastic substrates utilizing an adhesion-controlled polymeric donor layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sub; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Min-Kyu; Bae, Jeong Min; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for transfer-printed electrode patterns onto flexible/plastic substrates, specifically intended for metal ink that requires a high sintering temperature. Typically, metal-ink-based electrodes cannot be picked up for microtransfer printing because the adhesion between the electrodes and the donor substrate greatly increases after the sintering process due to the binding materials. We introduced a polymeric donor layer between the printed electrodes and the donor substrate and effectively reduced the adhesion between the Ag pattern and the polymeric donor layer by controlling the interfacial contact area. After completing a wet-etching process for the polymeric donor layer, we obtained Ag patterns supported on the fine polymeric anchor structures; the Ag patterns could be picked up onto the stamp surface even after the sintering process by utilizing the viscoelastic properties of the elastomeric stamp with a pick-up velocity control. The proposed method enables highly conductive metal-ink-based electrode patterns to be applied on thermally weak plastic substrates via an all-solution process. Metal electrodes transferred onto a film showed superior electrical and mechanical stability under the bending stress test required for use in printed flexible electronics.

  9. Superhydrophobic Zr-based metallic glass surface with high adhesive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Xia, Ting; Heng, Liping; Liu, Lin

    2013-06-01

    Micro/nano hierarchical structures were constructed on Zr35Ti30Be26.75Cu8.25 metallic glass surface by silicon moulding and subsequently chemical etching. The as-formed surface exhibited both superhydrophobicity and high adhesive force towards water. The superhydrophobicity is rationalized based on the modified Cassie-Baxter model [A. B. D. Cassie and S. Baxter, Trans. Faraday Soc. 40, 546 (1944)]. The origin of the robust adhesion is described in terms of intermolecular capillary forces. The present results not only provide a method to fabricate superhydrophobic metallic glasses surface but also explore an important industrial application as dry adhesives and transport of liquid microdroplets.

  10. Optimally Functionalized Adhesion for Contact Transfer Printing of Plasmonic Nanostructures on Flexible Substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Lee, Jun-Young; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2017-02-01

    This paper demonstrates a facile method to achieve high yield and uniform fabrication for the transfer printing of nanoplasmonic structures on a flexible substrate by providing novel understanding on adhesion layers. The mercapto alkyl carboxylic acids and the alkyl dithiols are used as functionalized adhesion layers and further optimized by controlling the terminal group as well as the length and composition of the functionalization on flat and nanostructured gold surfaces. Our approach of optimized adhesion has been successfully implemented to the transfer printing of functionalized gold nanostructure arrays, thus producing much higher yield of 97.6% and uniform fabrication of nanostructures on a flexible substrate and enabling applications such as flexible nanoplasmonic devices and biosensing platforms.

  11. Metallized Gelled Propellant Heat Transfer Tests Analyzed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1997-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lbf thrust engine composed of a modular injector, an igniter, a chamber, and a nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt % loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each channel used water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples; flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations.

  12. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO2 and ZrO2 coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical-chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO2>ZrO2) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO2, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion.

  13. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society. PMID:24699375

  14. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  15. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-04

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  16. Effect of adhesion transfer on the surface pattern regularity in nanostructuring burnishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Viktor P.; Tarasov, Sergey Yu.; Nikonov, Anton Yu.; Filippov, Andrey V.; Voropaev, Vladimir V.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.

    2016-11-01

    In the paper the influence of friction-induced adhesion of metal to the tool on the formation of surface topography under nanostructuring burnishing was studied. A comprehensive approach, including both experimental (optical microscopy and profilometry) and theoretical (computer-aided simulation) methods was used. The results showed a direct connection between values of adhesion strength of materials in contact with the workpiece surface pattern quality caused by the tool movement. Results of the experimental and theoretical study are in good agreement and allow us to identify the reason of regular profile forming during surface burnishing.

  17. Adhesion and anti-adhesion of viscous fluids on solid surfaces--a study of ink transfer mechanism in waterless offset printing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Mao, Yu; Murray, Gerard; Tian, Junfei

    2008-02-15

    The transfer of a liquid under dynamic conditions onto a solid surface relies on wetting/adhesion under transient external forces. We found the phenomena associated with forced wetting and dewetting could not be explained by thermodynamic approaches which are based on surface energy and work of adhesion. This is because these approaches do not take account of the dynamic nature of the forced wetting and dewetting. This study uses ink transfer in waterless offset printing as an example to present a new understanding of adhesion and anti-adhesion of a liquid to a solid surface under dynamic conditions. We focus on the adhesion strength, instead of work of adhesion, at the ink-plate interface and experimentally quantified ink adhesion forces on the image and non-image areas of the printing plate. Based on adhesion force measurements we proposed that the formation of a weak boundary layer and/or the softening the non-image area due to solvent swelling are likely to be the mechanisms that causes ink refusal on the non-image area. AFM images are presented to show changes of the non-image surface before and after contacting with ink.

  18. Platinum metallization for MEMS application. Focus on coating adhesion for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Vittorio; Biazi, Leonardo; Marchiori, Roberto; Lago, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The adherence of Platinum thin film on Si/SiO2 wafer was studies using Chromium, Titanium or Alumina (Cr, Ti, Al2O3) as interlayer. The adhesion of Pt is a fundamental property in different areas, for example in MEMS devices, which operate at high temperature conditions, as well as in biomedical applications, where the problem of adhesion of a Pt film to the substrate is known as a major challenge in several industrial applications health and in biomedical devices, such as for example in the stents. We investigated the properties of Chromium, Titanium, and Alumina (Cr, Ti, and Al2O3) used as adhesion layers of Platinum (Pt) electrode. Thin films of Chromium, Titanium and Alumina were deposited on Silicon/Silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2) wafer by electron beam. We introduced Al2O3 as a new adhesion layer to test the behavior of the Pt film at higher temperature using a ceramic adhesion thin film. Electric behaviors were measured for different annealing temperatures to know the performance for Cr/Pt, Ti/Pt, and Al2O3/Pt metallic film in the gas sensor application. All these metal layers showed a good adhesion onto Si/SiO2 and also good Au wire bondability at room temperature, but for higher temperature than 400 °C the thin Cr/Pt and Ti/Pt films showed poor adhesion due to the atomic inter-diffusion between Platinum and the metal adhesion layers. The proposed Al2O3/Pt ceramic-metal layers confirmed a better adherence for the higher temperatures tested.

  19. Adhesive bonding of super-elastic titanium-nickel alloy castings with a phosphate metal conditioner and an acrylic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koike, M; Yoneyama, T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bonding characteristics of super-elastic titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) alloy castings. Disk specimens were cast from a Ti-Ni alloy (Ti-50.85Ni mol%) using an arc centrifugal casting machine. High-purity titanium and nickel specimens were also prepared as experimental references. The specimens were air-abraded with alumina, and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C & B). A metal conditioner containing a phosphate monomer (Cesead II Opaque Primer) was also used for priming the specimens. Post-thermocycling average bond strengths (MPa) of the primed groups were 41.5 for Ti-Ni, 30.4 for Ti and 19.5 for Ni, whereas those of the unprimed groups were 21.6 for Ti, 19.3 for Ti-Ni and 9.3 for Ni. Application of the phosphate conditioner elevated the bond strengths of all alloy/metals (P < 0.05). X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed that nickel was attached to the debonded resin surface of the resin-to-nickel bonded specimen, indicating that corrosion of high-purity nickel occurred at the resin-nickel interface. Durable bonding to super-elastic Ti-Ni alloy castings can be achieved with a combination of a phosphate metal conditioner and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

  20. Method of adhesion between an oxide layer and a metal layer

    DOEpatents

    Jennison, Dwight R.; Bogicevic, Alexander; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2004-09-14

    A method of controlling the wetting characteristics and increasing the adhesion between a metal and an oxide layer. By introducing a negatively-charged species to the surface of an oxide layer, layer-by-layer growth of metal deposited onto the oxide surface is promoted, increasing the adhesion strength of the metal-oxide interface. The negatively-charged species can either be deposited onto the oxide surface or a compound can be deposited that dissociates on, or reacts with, the surface to form the negatively-charged species. The deposited metal adatoms can thereby bond laterally to the negatively-charged species as well as vertically to the oxide surface as well as react with the negatively charged species, be oxidized, and incorporated on or into the surface of the oxide.

  1. Determination of Interfacial Adhesion Strength between Oxide Scale and Substrate for Metallic SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-01-21

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in SOFC operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  2. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

  3. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expressing vancomycin resistance early after adhesion to a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Sakimura, Toshiyuki; Kajiyama, Shiro; Adachi, Shinji; Chiba, Ko; Yonekura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masato; Koseki, Hironobu; Miyamoto, Takashi; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Osaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We investigated biofilm formation and time of vancomycin (VCM) resistance expression after adhesion to a metal surface in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis with a VCM MIC of 1 μg/mL was used. The bacteria were made to adhere to a stainless steel washer and treated with VCM at different times and concentrations. VCM was administered 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after adhesion. The amount of biofilm formed was evaluated based on the biofilm coverage rates (BCRs) before and after VCM administration, bacterial viability in biofilm was visually observed using the fluorescence staining method, and the viable bacterial count in biofilm was measured. The VCM concentration required to decrease BCR significantly compared with that of VCM-untreated bacteria was 4 μg/mL, even in the 0 hr group. In the 4 and 8 hr groups, VCM could not inhibit biofilm growth even at 1,024 μg/mL. In the 8 hr group, viable bacteria remained in biofilm at a count of 10(4) CFU even at a high VCM concentration (1,024 μg/mL). It was suggested that biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expresses resistance to VCM early after adhesion to a metal surface. Resistance increased over time after adhesion as the biofilm formed, and strong resistance was expressed 4-8 hours after adhesion.

  4. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  5. Adhesion studies of GaAs-based ohmic contact and bond pad metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Seigal, P.K.; Briggs, R.D.; Rieger, D.J.; Baca, A.G.; Howard, A.J.

    1996-03-01

    Adhesion strength and surface morphology of commonly used n- and p-type ohmic contacts and pad metallization schemes for GaAs were investigated. GeNiAu, GePdAu, BeAu, and TiPtAu (being studied as potential ohmic contacts for internal optoelectronic devices) had quantitiative measurements made using wire bond pull testing to determine adhesion. Bond pad metals deposited as evaporated TiAu, TiPtAu, and 2-5 micron thick electroplated Au deposited on both semi-insulating GaAs and on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/GaAs were evaluated independently from the ohmic contact metals. In all samples was observed a strong correlation between surface treatment, surface morphology, wire bondability, and bond strength. Very high bond strengths (pull test average values above 6.5 grams force with 25 micron dia Au wire) wereobtained for n-type, p-type, and bond pad metals. Average values of 8.0 gram force were achieved with two-step GeAu/NiAu/TiPtAu metallization, while one-step deposition yielded poorer values. Adhesion was also monitored after aging at 250 C in air for four different times up to 60 hr by wire bond pull testing, with little degradation occurring.

  6. Qualitative link between work of adhesion and thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Monachon, Christian Weber, Ludger; Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-03-28

    We report Time-Domain ThermoReflectance experiments measuring the Thermal Boundary Conductance (TBC) of interfaces between diamond and metal surfaces, based on samples consisting of [111]-oriented diamond substrates with hydrogen or with sp{sup 2} carbon surface terminations created using plasma treatments. In a concurrent theoretical study, we calculate the work of adhesion between Ni, Cu, and diamond interfaces with (111) surface orientation, with or without hydrogen termination of the diamond surface, using first-principles electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We find a positive correlation between the calculated work of adhesion and the measured conductance of these interfaces, suggesting that DFT could be used as a screening tool to identify metal/dielectric systems with high TBC. We also explain the negative effect of hydrogen on the thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces.

  7. A theoretical model of reversible adhesion in shape memory surface relief structures and its application in transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yeguang; Zhang, Yihui; Feng, Xue; Kim, Seok; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-01

    Transfer printing is an important and versatile tool for deterministic assembly and integration of micro/nanomaterials on unusual substrates, with promising applications in fabrication of stretchable and flexible electronics. The shape memory polymers (SMP) with triangular surface relief structures are introduced to achieve large, reversible adhesion, thereby with potential applications in temperature-controlled transfer printing. An analytic model is established, and it identifies two mechanisms to increase the adhesion: (1) transition of contact mode from the triangular to trapezoidal configurations, and (2) explicit enhancement in the contact area. The surface relief structures are optimized to achieve reversible adhesion and transfer printing. The theoretical model and results presented can be exploited as design guidelines for future applications of SMP in reversible adhesion and stretchable electronics.

  8. Plasma polymerized primer for rubber-to-metal bonding: Adhesion measurement and interphase characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.M.; Boerio, F.J.; Kim, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    Adhesion of rubber to steel is of considerable practical importance in many areas of technology. However, direct adhesion of natural rubber to most metals is very poor. As a result, metals are frequently plated with brass, to which rubber adheres very strongly, or else the metals are coated with proprietary primers and adhesives in order to obtain adhesion of rubber. Plasma processing has been attracting attention in many areas due to some of its unique features. During the process, the synthesis and deposition of plasma polymers can be accomplished at the same time, making plasma processing a very efficient method for polymer coating. Plasma processing also allows flexible combinations of reactor parameters which would provide a great deal of process control and versatility. Moreover, in plasma processing, there are no solvents involved and there are no solvent-disposal problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe results the authors have obtained in developing plasma polymerized primer films to enhance rubber-to-steel bonding. Preliminary durability test results are reported. Results obtained using a model rubber system to simulate reactions in the rubber/primer {open_quotes}interphase{close_quotes} are also described.

  9. Elastic-plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; De Angeli, M.; Bykov, I.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Brochard, F.; Ripamonti, D.; den Harder, N.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-08-01

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust.

  10. Assessing acute platelet adhesion on opaque metallic and polymeric biomaterials with fiber optic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schaub, R D; Kameneva, M V; Borovetz, H S; Wagner, W R

    2000-03-15

    The degree of platelet adhesion and subsequent thrombus formation is an important measure of biocompatibility for cardiovascular biomaterials. Traditional methods of quantifying platelet adhesion often are limited by the need for direct optical access, limited spatial resolution, or the lack of temporal resolution. We have developed a new imaging system that utilizes fiber optics and fluorescence microscopy for the quantification of platelet adhesion. This fiber optic remote microscope is capable of imaging individual fluorescently labeled platelets in whole blood on opaque surfaces. Using this method, platelet adhesion was quantified on a series of metallic [low-temperature isotropic carbon (LTIC); titanium alloy (Ti); diamond-like carbon (DLC); oxidized titanium alloy (TiO); and polycrystalline diamond (PCD)] and polymeric [woven Dacron (WD)] collagen-impregnated Dacron (HEM), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), and denucleated ePTFE (dePTFE)] biomaterials designed for use in cardiovascular applications. These materials were perfused with heparinized whole human blood in an in vitro parallel plate flow chamber. Platelet adhesion after 5 min of perfusion ranged from 3.7 +/- 1.0 (dePTFE) to 16.8 +/- 1.5 (WD) platelets/1000 micrometer. The temporal information revealed by these studies provides a comparative measure of the acute thrombogenicity of these materials as well as some insight into their long-term hemocompatibilities. Also studied here were the effects of wall shear rate and axial position on platelet adhesion. A predicted increase in platelet adhesion with increased wall shear rate and a trend toward a decrease in platelet adhesion with increased axial distance was observed with the fiber optic microscope. Future applications for this imaging technique may include the long-term evaluation of thrombosis in blood-contacting devices in vitro and, in animal models, in vivo.

  11. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  12. Fine tuning of graphene-metal adhesion by surface alloying.

    PubMed

    Alfè, D; Pozzo, M; Miniussi, E; Günther, S; Lacovig, P; Lizzit, S; Larciprete, R; Santos Burgos, B; Menteş, T O; Locatelli, A; Baraldi, A

    2013-01-01

    We show that bimetallic surface alloying provides a viable route for governing the interaction between graphene and metal through the selective choice of the elemental composition of the surface alloy. This concept is illustrated by an experimental and theoretical characterization of the properties of graphene on a model PtRu surface alloy on Ru(0001), with a concentration of Pt atoms in the first layer between 0 and 50%. The progressive increase of the Pt content determines the gradual detachment of graphene from the substrate, which results from the modification of the carbon orbital hybridization promoted by Pt. Alloying is also found to affect the morphology of graphene, which is strongly corrugated on bare Ru, but becomes flat at a Pt coverage of 50%. The method here proposed can be readily extended to several supports, thus opening the way to the conformal growth of graphene on metals and to a full tunability of the graphene-substrate interaction.

  13. Preventing Oxide Adhesion of Liquid Metal Alloys to Enable Actuation in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Ishan; Johnson, Alexander; Ayers, Hudson; Dickey, Michael

    This work explores the wetting behavior of an oxide-coated liquid metal, eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (`EGaIn'), which remains a liquid at room temperature. Liquid metals uniquely combine fluidity with metallic properties. Combined, these properties enable soft, stretchable, and shape reconfigurable electronics with `softer than skin' interfaces. Ga forms spontaneously a thin surface oxide that alters its wetting behavior and makes it difficult to move across surfaces without leaving residue behind. We examine the effects of surface roughness (i.e., Cassie-Baxter state) and lubrication to minimize adhesion of Ga oxide to surfaces. Lubricated surfaces create a `slip-layer' of liquid between the metal and surface that also inhibits wetting. This slip layer allows the metal to move reversibly through microchannels by preventing adhesion of the oxide. The metal may be pumped or moved by using low voltages or pneumatic actuation. Optical microscopy confirms the importance of the slip-layer, which enables non-stick motion of the metal through capillaries. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterizes the electrohydrodynanic motion of EGaIn in capillary systems.

  14. Adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of clean metal-ceramic couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    When a clean metal is brought into contact with a clean, harder ceramic in ultrahigh vacuum, strong bonds form between the two materials. The interfacial bond strength between the metal and ceramic surfaces in sliding contact is generally greater than the cohesive bond strength in the metal. Thus, fracture of the cohesive bonds in the metal results when shearing occurs. These strong interfacial bonds and the shearing fracture in the metal are the main causes of the observed wear behavior and the transfer of the metal to the ceramic. In the literature, the surface energy (bond energy) per unit area of the metal is shown to be related to the degree of interfacial bond strength per unit area. Because the two materials of a metal-ceramic couple have markedly different ductilities, contact can cause considerable plastic deformation of the softer metal. It is the ductility of the metal, then, that determines the real area of contact. In general, the less ductile the metal, the smaller the real area of contact. The coefficient of friction for clean surfaces of metal-ceramic couples correlates with the metals total surface energy in the real area of contact gamma A (which is the product of the surface energy per unit area of the metal gamma and the real area of contact (A)). The coefficient of friction increases as gamma A increases. Furthermore, gamma A is associated with the wear and transfer of the metal at the metal-ceramic interface: the higher the value of gamma A, the greater the wear and transfer of the metal.

  15. Polymer surface treatment for improvement of metal-polymer adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neagu, E.; Neagu, R.

    1993-03-01

    The interaction between a low-pressure gas plasma and organic materials has mechanical (surface cleaning and dry micro-etching) and electrostatic (cross-linking and surface activation) effects. Corrosion of a fluorinated ethylenepropylene (FEP) sample was studied for different conditions. The corrosion rate of FEP depends on the gas and on the gas pressure and has the highest value for oxygen. The modifications of the sample surface were studied by contact-angle measurements for water and formamide and by the thermally stimulated discharge current method. The optimum parameters for a continuum vacuum metallization process of FEP are presented.

  16. Diatomic molecules and metallic adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption - A single binding-energy relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Potential-energy relations involving a few parameters in simple analytic forms have been found to represent well the energetics of a wide variety of diatomic molecules. However, such two-atom potential functions are not appropriate for metals. It is well known that, in the case of metals, there exist strong volume-dependent forces which can never be expressed as pairwise interactions. The present investigation has the objective to show that, in spite of the observation concerning metals, a single binding-energy relation can be found which accurately describes diatomic molecules as well as adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption on metals. This universality reveals a commonality between the molecular and metallic bond.

  17. Interfacial charge transfer absorption: Application to metal molecule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutz, Carol; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Sutin, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Optically induced charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and a metal electrode was predicted by Hush to lead to new electronic absorption features, but has been only rarely observed experimentally. Interfacial charge transfer absorption (IFCTA) provides information concerning the barriers to charge transfer between molecules and the metal/semiconductor and the magnitude of the electronic coupling and could thus provide a powerful tool for understanding interfacial charge-transfer kinetics. Here, we utilize a previously published model [C. Creutz, B.S. Brunschwig, N. Sutin, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 10251] to predict IFCTA spectra of metal-molecule assemblies and compare the literature observations to these predictions. We conclude that, in general, the electronic coupling between molecular adsorbates and the metal levels is so small that IFCTA is not detectable. However, few experiments designed to detect IFCTA have been done. We suggest approaches to optimizing the conditions for observing the process.

  18. Electron transfer at thermally heterogeneous molecule-metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Galen T.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    The rate of electron transfer between a molecular species and a metal, each at a different local temperature, is examined theoretically through the implementation of a bithermal (characterized by two temperatures) Marcus formalism. Expressions for the rate constant and the electronic contribution to a heat transfer mechanism which is induced by the temperature gradient between a molecule and metal are constructed. The system of coupled dynamical equations describing the electronic and thermal currents are derived and examined over diverse ranges of reaction geometries and temperature gradients. It is shown that electron transfer across the molecule-metal interface is associated with heat transfer and that the electron exchange between metal and molecule makes a distinct contribution to the interfacial heat conduction even when the net electronic current vanishes.

  19. Transfer of heavy metals through terrestrial food webs: a review.

    PubMed

    Gall, Jillian E; Boyd, Robert S; Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals are released into the environment by both anthropogenic and natural sources. Highly reactive and often toxic at low concentrations, they may enter soils and groundwater, bioaccumulate in food webs, and adversely affect biota. Heavy metals also may remain in the environment for years, posing long-term risks to life well after point sources of heavy metal pollution have been removed. In this review, we compile studies of the community-level effects of heavy metal pollution, including heavy metal transfer from soils to plants, microbes, invertebrates, and to both small and large mammals (including humans). Many factors contribute to heavy metal accumulation in animals including behavior, physiology, and diet. Biotic effects of heavy metals are often quite different for essential and non-essential heavy metals, and vary depending on the specific metal involved. They also differ for adapted organisms, including metallophyte plants and heavy metal-tolerant insects, which occur in naturally high-metal habitats (such as serpentine soils) and have adaptations that allow them to tolerate exposure to relatively high concentrations of some heavy metals. Some metallophyte plants are hyperaccumulators of certain heavy metals and new technologies using them to clean metal-contaminated soil (phytoextraction) may offer economically attractive solutions to some metal pollution challenges. These new technologies provide incentive to catalog and protect the unique biodiversity of habitats that have naturally high levels of heavy metals.

  20. Octopus-Inspired Smart Adhesive Pads for Transfer Printing of Semiconducting Nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hochan; Um, Doo-Seung; Lee, Youngsu; Lim, Seongdong; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2016-09-01

    By mimicking muscle actuation to control cavity-pressure-induced adhesion of octopus suckers, smart adhesive pads are developed in which the thermoresponsive actuation of a hydrogel layer on elastomeric microcavity pads enables excellent switchable adhesion in response to a thermal stimulus (maximum adhesive strength: 94 kPa, adhesion switching ratio: ≈293 for temperature change between 22 and 61 °C).

  1. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  2. Early focus development effort, ultrasonic inspection of fixed housing metal-to-adhesive bondline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, John K.; Hoskins, Brad R.; Karner, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique was developed for the fixed housing metal-to-adhesive bondline that will support the Flight 15 time frame and subsequent motors. The technique has the capability to detect a 1.0 inch diameter unbond with a 90 percent probability of detection (POD) at a 95 percent confidence level. The technique and support equipment will perform within the working envelope dictated by a stacked motor configuration.

  3. Heat Transfer from Finned Metal Cylinders in an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold, E; Pinkel, Benjamin

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made to supply design information for the construction of metal fins for the cooling of heated cylindrical surfaces by an air stream. A method is given for determining fin dimensions for a maximum heat transfer with the expenditure of a given amount of material for a variety of conditions of air flow and metals.

  4. The role of substrate point defects in adhesion of metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarova, S.

    1996-12-31

    As known, nucleation and epitaxial growth of metal films are affected by point defects of substrate surface, F-centers in particular, but their effect on adhesion of thin films has not yet been thoroughly studied. Despite the fact that the point defects are usually taken into account when the adhesion activation by various irradiation treatments is discussed, their role has not been properly revealed. This is due to the difficulties of the accurate control of the type and the density of the point defects in subsurface region as well as to the fact that the radiation treatment of surfaces can produce some changes in the chemical composition and stoichiometry of the surface, in addition to the creation of the point defects. For the purpose of the study of the effect of point defects on the adhesion of thin films, the author approached the problem in a principally different way: the author created point defects in the bulk of the crystals, controlled the type and the bulk density of the defects and then cleaved the crystals in vacuum - in a stream of metal vapors. The fresh, free from contaminants contact of metal film with the crystal surface enriched with point defects was created in this way.

  5. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R.

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  6. Metallic transfer between metals in sliding contact examined by auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1972-01-01

    Metallic transfer between polycrystalline metals in sliding contact was examined. Hemispherical riders of iron, nickel, and cobalt were slid on tungsten, tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum disks in ultrahigh vacuum. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the elemental composition of the disk surfaces. Iron, nickel, and cobalt transferred to tungsten, whereas only cobalt transferred to tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum. The results of this investigation are discussed in terms of the cohesive energy and strain hardening characteristics of the specimen materials.

  7. Heat transfer performance of metal fiber sintered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, T.; Takazawa, H.; Mizuki, M.

    1983-03-01

    Boiling heat transfer performance on stainless steel metal fiber sintered surfaces is experimentally investigated with Freon 11 (R11) as the working fluid. The boiling heat transfer coefficient for the optimum surface structure gives a tenfold improvement over a smooth surface. The nondimensional specific parameter including all design parameters is introduced to explain the trend of the performance of various kinds of metal fiber sintered surfaces. Moreover, the metal fiber sintered surface clad with titanium film is suggested to be appropriate to an evaporator for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system.

  8. Metalized nanotube tips improve through thickness thermal conductivity in adhesive joints.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Sihn, Sangwook; Roy, Ajit K; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2009-03-01

    The through-thickness thermal conductivity in conventional adhesive joints (of approximately 0.3 W/m-K) fails to meet the thermal load transfer requirement in numerous applications to enable lean manufacturing and improve system reliability to thermal load. Carbon nanotubes are known to possess extremely high thermal conductivity along the longitudinal axis. According to molecular dynamics simulations, the value can be as high as 3500 W/m-K at room temperature for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Meanwhile, the transverse thermal conductivity perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the MWCNTs is known to be relatively low, approximately 10-15 W/m-K. Existing studies of mixing the MWCNTs in polymers for adhesive joints only achieved minimal enhancement in the thermal conductivity and failed to satisfy the thermal property requirement for the adhesive joints. In order to properly utilize the superior axial thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs, vertically aligned MWCNTs have been used in this study and incorporated in the adhesive joint configuration. Analytical parametric study was conducted to identify critical parameters that affect the overall thermal conductivity of the joint and to provide guidelines for the process development. The process development involved growing the vertically aligned MWCNTs on silicon wafers. The aligned nanotube array was partially infused with epoxy adhesive. Selective reactive ion etching of the epoxy revealed the nanotube tips. In order to reduce the impedance mismatch and phonon scattering at the interface between the nanotube tips and the adherends, gold was thermally evaporated on the nanotube tips. The measured thermal conductivity of the adhesive joint device incorporating the MWCNTs was 262 W/m-K, which is significantly larger compared to that of less than 1 W/m-K without the MWCNTs.

  9. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  10. Microtopography of metal surfaces influence fibroblast growth by modifying cell shape, cytoskeleton, and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Meredith, David O; Eschbach, Lukas; Riehle, Mathis O; Curtis, Adam S G; Richards, Robert G

    2007-11-01

    Stainless Steel (SS), titanium (cpTi), and Ti-6Al-7Nb (TAN) are frequently used metals in fracture fixation, which contact not only bone, but also soft tissue. In previous soft tissue cytocompatibility studies, TAN was demonstrated to inhibit cell growth in its "standard" micro-roughened state. To elucidate a possible mechanism for this inhibition, cell area, shape, adhesion, and cytoskeletal integrity was studied. Only minor changes in spreading were observed for cells on electropolished SS, cpTi, and TAN. Cells on "standard" cpTi were similarly spread in comparison with electropolished cpTi and TAN, although the topography influenced the cell periphery and also resulted in lower numbers and shorter length of focal adhesions. On "standard" microrough TAN, cell spreading was significantly lower than all other surfaces, and cell morphology differed by being more elongated. In addition, focal adhesion numbers and mean length were significantly lower on standard TAN than on all other surfaces, with 80% of the measured adhesions below a 2-microm threshold. Focal adhesion site location and maturation and microtubule integrity were compromised by the presence of protruding beta-phase microspikes found solely on the surface of standard TAN. This led us to propose that the impairment of focal adhesion numbers, maturation (length), and cell spreading to a possibly sufficient threshold observed on standard TAN blocks cell cycle progress and eventually cell growth on the surface. We believe, as demonstrated with standard cpTi and TAN, that a difference in surface morphology is influential for controlling cell behavior on implant surfaces.

  11. A computational study of adhesion between rubber and metal sulfides at rubber-brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chian Ye; Hirvi, Janne T.; Suvanto, Mika; Bazhenov, Andrey S.; Ajoviita, Tommi; Markkula, Katriina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2015-05-01

    Computational study at level of density functional theory has been carried out in order to investigate the adhesion between rubber and brass plated steel cord, which has high importance in tire manufacturing. Adsorption of natural rubber based adsorbate models has been studied on zinc sulfide, ZnS(1 1 0), and copper sulfide, Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1), surfaces as the corresponding phases are formed in adhesive interlayer during rubber vulcanization. Saturated hydrocarbons exhibited weak interactions, whereas unsaturated hydrocarbons and sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with the metal atoms of sulfide surfaces more strongly. Sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with ZnS(1 1 0) surface stronger than unsaturated hydrocarbons, whereras both Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1) surfaces showed opposite adsorption preference as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed stronger than sulfur-containing adsorbates. The different interaction strength order can play role in rubber-brass adhesion with different relative sulfide concentrations. Moreover, Cu2S(1 1 1) surface exhibits higher adsorption energies than CuS(0 0 1) surface, possibly indicating dominant role of Cu2S in the adhesion between rubber and brass.

  12. Increased endothelial cell adhesion on plasma modified nanostructured polymeric and metallic surfaces for vascular stent applications.

    PubMed

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Reising, Alexander B; Miller, Tiffany; Storey, Dan; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-06-15

    Techniques to regenerate the vasculature have risen considerably over the last few decades due to the increased clinical diagnosis of artery narrowing and blood vessel blockage. Although initially re-establishing blood flow, current small diameter vascular regenerative materials often eventually cause thrombosis and restenosis due to a lack of initial endothelial cell coverage on such materials. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate commonly used vascular materials (specifically, polyethylene terephthalate, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane, nylon, commercially pure titanium, and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V)) modified using an ionic plasma deposition (IPD) process and a nitrogen ion implantation plasma deposition (NIIPD) process. Such surface modifications have been previously shown to create nanostructured surface features which mimic the natural nanostructured surface features of blood vessels. The modified and unmodified surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and surface energy measurements. Furthermore, in vitro endothelial cell adhesion tests (a key first step for vascular material endothelialization) demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on many modified (with IPD and NIIPD + IPD) compared to unmodified samples. In general, endothelial cell adhesion increased with nanoroughness and surface energy but demonstrated a decreased endothelial cell adhesion trend after an optimal coating surface energy value was reached. Thus, results from this study provided materials and a versatile surface modification process that can potentially increase endothelialization faster than current unmodified (conventional) polymer and metallic vascular materials.

  13. Effects of metal primers on bonding of adhesive resin cement to noble alloys for porcelain fusing.

    PubMed

    Okuya, Nobuhiro; Minami, Hiroyuki; Kurashige, Hisanori; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of metal primers on the bonding of adhesive resin to four pure metals (Au, Pd, Ag, Cu) and two noble alloys for porcelain fusing (high-gold and high-palladium content alloys). Bonding surface was polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and primed with one of the three metal primers (V-Primer, Metaltite, and M.L. Primer). Bonded specimens were fabricated by applying adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B) on the primed surface. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C for 2,000 cycles). The highest SBS values to each pure metal after thermocycling were 33.5 MPa for Au by M.L. Primer, 35.0 MPa for Ag by V-Primer, and 34.4 MPa for Cu by Metaltite. SBS to high-gold content alloy after thermocycling was 33.3 MPa by M.L. Primer. None of the primers was effective for pure Pd and high-palladium content alloy after thermocycling.

  14. Sub-15-nm patterning of asymmetric metal electrodes and devices by adhesion lithography

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, David J.; Semple, James; Krishnan Jagadamma, Lethy; Amassian, Aram; McLachlan, Martyn A.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; deMello, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Coplanar electrodes formed from asymmetric metals separated on the nanometre length scale are essential elements of nanoscale photonic and electronic devices. Existing fabrication methods typically involve electron-beam lithography—a technique that enables high fidelity patterning but suffers from significant limitations in terms of low throughput, poor scalability to large areas and restrictive choice of substrate and electrode materials. Here, we describe a versatile method for the rapid fabrication of asymmetric nanogap electrodes that exploits the ability of selected self-assembled monolayers to attach conformally to a prepatterned metal layer and thereby weaken adhesion to a subsequently deposited metal film. The method may be carried out under ambient conditions using simple equipment and a minimum of processing steps, enabling the rapid fabrication of nanogap electrodes and optoelectronic devices with aspect ratios in excess of 100,000. PMID:24861953

  15. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin-Guo; Kam, Fong-Yu; Chua, Lay-Lay

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300 nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup −1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10 V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  16. Charge-Transfer Interactions between Transition Metal Hexafluorides and Xenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    HEXAFLUORIDES AND XENON’. by J. D./Webb M E. R./Bernstein\\ Prepared for Publication in the Journal of the American Chemical Society DTIE Department of...Metal Hexafluorides ar. Xenon" " 6. PERFORMIKG ORG REPk)RT NUMODE . CONTRACT OR GNANT NUMBLR(e) J. D. Webb and E. R. Bernstein N00014-75-C-1179 9...neceoswy and Idenifil by block numbet) charge transfer electron affinities Transitio Metal Hexafluorides Xencn electronegativities 4,AGSTRACT Coninue an

  17. Enhanced adhesion of films to semiconductors or metals by high energy bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, Thomas A. (Inventor); Qiu, Yuanxun (Inventor); Mendenhall, Marcus H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Films (12) of a metal such as gold or other non-insulator materials are firmly bonded to other non-insulators such as semiconductor substrates (10), suitably silicon or gallium arsenide by irradiating the interface with high energy ions. The process results in improved adhesion without excessive doping and provides a low resistance contact to the semiconductor. Thick layers can be bonded by depositing or doping the interfacial surfaces with fissionable elements or alpha emitters. The process can be utilized to apply very small, low resistance electrodes (78) to light-emitting solid state laser diodes (60) to form a laser device 70.

  18. Trends in Adhesion Energies of Metal Nanoparticles on Oxide Surfaces: Understanding Support Effects in Catalysis and Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Hemmingson, Stephanie L; Campbell, Charles T

    2017-02-28

    Nanoparticles on surfaces are ubiquitous in nanotechnologies, especially in catalysis, where metal nanoparticles anchored to oxide supports are widely used to produce and use fuels and chemicals, and in pollution abatement. We show that for hemispherical metal particles of the same diameter, D, the chemical potentials of the metal atoms in the particles (μM) differ between two supports by approximately -2(Eadh,A - Eadh,B)Vm/D, where Ead,i is the adhesion energy between the metal and support i, and Vm is the molar volume of the bulk metal. This is consistent with calorimetric measurements of metal vapor adsorption energies onto clean oxide surfaces where the metal grows as 3D particles, which proved that μM increases with decreasing particle size below 6 nm and, for a given size, decreases with Eadh. Since catalytic activity and sintering rates correlate with metal chemical potential, it is thus crucial to understand what properties of catalyst materials control metal/oxide adhesion energies. Trends in how Eadh varies with the metal and the support oxide are presented. For a given oxide, Eadh increases linearly from metal to metal with increasing heat of formation of the most stable oxide of the metal (per mole metal), or metal oxophilicity, suggesting that metal-oxygen bonds dominate interfacial bonding. For the two different stoichiometric oxide surfaces that have been studied on multiple metals (MgO(100) and CeO2(111), the slopes of these lines are the same, but their offset is large (∼2 J/m(2)). Adhesion energies increase as MgO(100) ≈ TiO2(110) < α-Al2O3(0001) < CeO2(111) ≈ Fe3O4(111).

  19. An exploration of plastic deformation dependence of cell viability and adhesion in metallic implant materials.

    PubMed

    Uzer, B; Toker, S M; Cingoz, A; Bagci-Onder, T; Gerstein, G; Maier, H J; Canadinc, D

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between cell viability and adhesion behavior, and micro-deformation mechanisms was investigated on austenitic 316L stainless steel samples, which were subjected to different amounts of plastic strains (5%, 15%, 25%, 35% and 60%) to promote a variety in the slip and twin activities in the microstructure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) revealed that cells most favored the samples with the largest plastic deformation, such that they spread more and formed significant filopodial extensions. Specifically, brain tumor cells seeded on the 35% deformed samples exhibited the best adhesion performance, where a significant slip activity was prevalent, accompanied by considerable slip-twin interactions. Furthermore, maximum viability was exhibited by the cells seeded on the 60% deformed samples, which were particularly designed in a specific geometry that could endure greater strain values. Overall, the current findings open a new venue for the production of metallic implants with enhanced biocompatibility, such that the adhesion and viability of the cells surrounding an implant can be optimized by tailoring the surface relief of the material, which is dictated by the micro-deformation mechanism activities facilitated by plastic deformation imposed by machining.

  20. Molecular orbital (SCF-Xα-SW) theory of metal-metal charge transfer processes in minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Electronic transitions between the Fe-Fe bonding and Fe-Fe antibonding orbitals results in the optically-induced intervalence charge transfer bands observed in the electronic spectra of mixed valence minerals. Such transitions are predicted to be polarized along the metal-metal bond direction, in agreement with experimental observations.

  1. Rapid transfer of hierarchical microstructures onto biomimetic polymer surfaces with gradually tunable water adhesion from slippery to sticky superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, An-Fu; Huang, Han-Xiong

    2016-02-01

    Biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces are generally limited to extremely high or quite low water droplet adhesion. The present work proposes flexible template replication methods for bio-inspired polypropylene (PP) surfaces with microtopographies and gradually tunable water droplet adhesion in one step using microinjection compression molding (μ-ICM). A dual-level microstructure appears on PP surfaces prepared using a flexible template. The microstructures obtained under low and high mold temperatures exhibit low-aspect-ratio (AR) micropillars with semi-spherical top and high-AR ones with conical top, resulting in the surfaces with high-adhesive hydrophobicity and low-adhesive superhydrophobicity, respectively. Further, silica nanoparticles (SNPs) coated on templates are transferred to viscous state-dominated melt during its filling in μ-ICM, and firmly adhered to the skin of the replicas, forming hierarchical microstructures on PP surfaces. The hydrophilic and hydrophobic SNPs on high-AR micropillared surfaces help achieve extremely high (petal effect) and extremely low (lotus effect) adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces, respectively. The hybrid SNPs on low-AR micropillars change the Wenzel state-dominated surface to Cassie-Baxter state-dominated surface and preserves medium adhesion with superhydrophobicity. The proposed methods for fast and mass replication of superhydrophobic surfaces with the dual-level or hierarchical microtopography can be excellent candidates for the development of microfluidics, sensors, and labs on chip.

  2. Molecular orbital studies in oxidation: Sulfate formation and metal-metal oxide adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical mechanisms for sulfate formation from sodium chloride and sulfur trioxide, which is a product of jet fuel combustion was determined. Molten sodium sulfate leads to hot corrosion of the protective oxide layers on turbine blades. How yttrium dopants in nidkel-aluminum alloys used in turbine blades reduce the spalling rate of protective alumina films and enhance their adhesion was also determined. Two other fulfate mechanisms were deduced and structure of carbon monoxide on a clean chronium and clean platinum-titanium alloys surfaces was determined. All studies were by use of the atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital (ASED-MO) theory. Seven studies were completed. Their titles and abstracts are given.

  3. Fractal Analysis of Metal Transfer in Mig/mag Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A. P.; Vasconcelos, H. H. M.; Gonçalves, L. L.; de Miranda, H. C.

    2009-03-01

    We apply techniques of fractal analysis in order to classify metal-transfer mode in MIG/MAG (metal inert/active gas) welding, which are among the most commonly employed arc-fusion processes for industrial applications. We work with voltage and current time series obtained during welding, and evaluate statistical fluctuations present in those series by Hurst, detrended-fluctuation, and detrended-cross-correlation analyses, for each of three different metal-transfer modes: short-circuiting, globular, and spray. For a given total timespan of each series, curves of fluctuation as a funtion of the time-window size are processed by using pattern-classification techniques, such as principal-component analysis and Karhunen-Loève expansions. We obtain near 100% success rate for the classification, with timespans as small as 100 miliseconds, with a processing time of the same order. This suggests that our set of tools can be incorporated into an industrial welding apparatus in order to guarantee automatic correction of a process requiring a single metal-transfer mode.

  4. Adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene to tungsten studied by field ion microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical contacts between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and tungsten field ion tips were made in situ in the field ion microscope. Both load and force of adhesion were measured for varying contact times and for clean and contaminated tungsten tips. Strong adhesion between the PTFE and clean tungsten was observed at contact times greater than 2.5 min (forces of adhesion were greater than three times the load). For times less than 2.5 min, the force of adhesion was immeasurably small. The increase in adhesion with contact time after 2.5 min can be attributed to the increase in true contact area by creep of PTFE. No adhesion was measurable at long contact times with contaminated tungsten tips. Neon field ion micrographs taken after the contacts show many linear and branched arrays which appear to represent PTFE that remains adhered to the surface even at the high electric fields required for imaging.

  5. Charge Transfer and Catalysis at the Metal Support Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Lawrence Robert

    2012-07-31

    Kinetic, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of model Pt–support systems are used to demonstrate the relationship between charge transfer and catalytic activity and selectivity. The results show that charge flow controls the activity and selectivity of supported metal catalysts. This dissertation builds on extensive existing knowledge of metal–support interactions in heterogeneous catalysis. The results show the prominent role of charge transfer at catalytic interfaces to determine catalytic activity and selectivity. Further, this research demonstrates the possibility of selectively driving catalytic chemistry by controlling charge flow and presents solid-state devices and doped supports as novel methods for obtaining electronic control over catalytic reaction kinetics.

  6. Optimization of a transferred arc reactor for metal nanoparticle synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stein, Matthias; Kruis, Frank Einar

    The demand for metal nanoparticles is increasing strongly. Transferred arc synthesis is a promising process in this respect, as it shows high production rates, good quality particles and the ability of up-scaling. The influence of several process parameters on the performance of the process in terms of production rate and particle size is investigated. These parameters are the electrode design and adjustment, the gas flow rate and power input. A novel feeding mechanism allows process operation over an extended time period. It is shown that the process is capable of producing pure metal nanoparticles with variable primary particle sizes and comparatively high production rates. Optimal process conditions for a single transferred arc electrode pair are found, which allow further scale-up by numbering up.

  7. Optimization of a transferred arc reactor for metal nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Matthias; Kruis, Frank Einar

    2016-09-01

    The demand for metal nanoparticles is increasing strongly. Transferred arc synthesis is a promising process in this respect, as it shows high production rates, good quality particles and the ability of up-scaling. The influence of several process parameters on the performance of the process in terms of production rate and particle size is investigated. These parameters are the electrode design and adjustment, the gas flow rate and power input. A novel feeding mechanism allows process operation over an extended time period. It is shown that the process is capable of producing pure metal nanoparticles with variable primary particle sizes and comparatively high production rates. Optimal process conditions for a single transferred arc electrode pair are found, which allow further scale-up by numbering up.

  8. Use of high L.E.T. radiation to improve adhesion of metals to polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    MgK alpha X-rays (1254 eV) and 2 keV electrons irradiate the surface of polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE). The damage is confined to a few tenths of a micron below the surface, and the doses exceed 10 to the eight power rad. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of the irradiated surfaces and mass spectroscopy of the gaseous products of irradiation indicate that the damaged layer is crosslinked or branched PTFE. After either type of irradiation, the surface has enhanced affinity for metals and a lower contact angle with hexadecane. Tape pull tests show that evaporated Ni and Au films adhere better to the irradiated surface. XPS shows the Ni interacts chemically with PTFE forming NiF2 and possibly NiC. However, the gold adhesion and contact angle results indicate that the interaction is, at least in part, chemically nonspecific. Decreased contact angles on FEP Teflon crystallized against gold were attributed to either the presence of a polar oxygen layer or increased physical forces due to greater density. In the case of irradiated PTFE, no oxygen on the surface was observed. The crosslinked structure might, however, have a greater density, thus accounting for the observed increase in adhesion and wettability.

  9. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Fernanda de Souza; de Macêdo, Érika de Oliveira Dias; Santos, Karoline da Silva; Schwarzbach, Marília; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Mundstock, Karina Santos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM). Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM) to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM). The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface. PMID:28125142

  10. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  11. Review of experimental investigations of liquid-metal heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubarsky, Bernard; Kaufman, Samuel J

    1956-01-01

    Experimental data of various investigators of liquid-metal heat-transfer characteristics were reevaluated using as consistent assumptions and methods as possible and then compared with each other and with theoretical results. The reevaluated data for both local fully developed and average Nusselt numbers in the turbulent flow region were found still to have considerable spread, with the bulk of the data being lower than predicted by existing analysis. An equation based on empirical grounds which represents most of the fully developed heat-transfer data is nu = 0.625 pe(0.4) where nu represents the Nusselt number and pe the Peclet number. The theoretical prediction of the heat transfer in the entrance region was found to give lower values, in most cases, than those found in the experimental work.

  12. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  13. Adhesion at the interfaces between BCC metals and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V. V. Kulkova, S. E.

    2012-02-15

    Ab initio calculations of the atomic and electronic structures of Me(111)/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) interfaces (Me = V, Cr, Nb, Mo, Ta, W) in the framework of density functional theory are reported. The energies of separation of metal films from oxide surfaces have been calculated. The structural and electronic factors responsible for the strong adhesion of bcc metal films on the oxygen termination of the surface of aluminum oxide have been analyzed.

  14. Metallization and charge-transfer gap closure of transition-metal iodides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. Li-Chung

    1993-05-01

    It is shown with resistivity and near-IR absorption measurements that NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2}, and FeI{sub 2} metallize under pressure by closure of the charge-transfer energy gap at pressures of 17, 10, and 23 GPa, respectively, which is close to the antiferromagnetic-diamagnetic transition in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}. Thus, the magnetic transitions probably are caused by the metallization; in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}, the insulator-metal transitions are first order. Moessbauer and XRD data were also collected. Figs, 46 refs.

  15. Effect of Various Material Properties on the Adhesive Stage of Fretting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Various properties of metals and alloys were studied with respect to their effect on the initial stage of the fretting process, namely adhesion. Crystallographic orientation, crystal structure, interfacial binding energies of dissimiliar metal, segregation of alloy constituents and the nature and structure of surface films were found to influence adhesion. High atomic density, low surface energy grain orientations exhibited lower adhesion than other orientations. Knowledge of interfacial surface binding energies assists in predicting adhesive transfer and wear. Selective surface segregation of alloy constituents accomplishes both a reduction in adhesion and improved surface oxidation characteristics. Equivalent surface coverages of various adsorbed species indicate that some are markedly more effective in inhibiting adhesion than others.

  16. Evaluation of adhesives for adhering carbon/epoxy composites to various metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, R.B.; Osterndorf, J.F.; Ambrosio, A.M.; Pettenger, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    The strength properties of composite matrix resins and adhesive are dependent on time, temperature, environment, and stress factors. All of these conditions combine to influence the properties of adhesives and composites in ways that are not yet fully known or quantifiable. Therefore, it is important to know the service conditions that structural adhesive bonded composite joints will encounter prior to fielding. This paper details an evaluation of five epoxy adhesives used to adhere a carbon/epoxy composite to 7075-T6 aluminum, 4340 steel and aluminum coated steel. Test results indicate that certain paste adhesives are capable of better lap-shear and peel performance than film adhesives, especially at elevated temperatures.

  17. Highly adhesive metal plating on Zylon ® fiber via iodine pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatema, Ummul Khair; Gotoh, Yasuo

    2011-11-01

    Highly adhesive metal plating was performed on poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) fiber named Zylon® via iodine pretreatment followed by electroless plating. First, iodine components were selectively doped into the inner part of the fiber near the surface through iodine vapor exposure. The doped iodine was converted to palladium iodide particles by treating with palladium chloride solution. After the reduction of the iodide to metal palladium particles, electroless copper plating was conducted on the fiber. A uniform copper layer was deposited on the fiber surface and exhibited high durability in durability tests such as ultrasonic exposure, tape peeling-off, and corrosion in NaCl solution. This durability was attributed to the palladium particles formed at the fiber surface that served as an anchor for the plated layer as well as an electroless plating catalyst. The plated fibers also possessed electrical conductivity. Although the tensile strength of the Zylon® fiber decreased from 5.8 to 4.9 GPa after undergoing the pretreatment and plating processes, the light shielding effect improved the light resistance of the plated fibers in terms of tensile properties. After 18 days of xenon lamp exposure, the plated fibers retained 74% of its initial strength, whereas that of untreated fibers decreased to 43%.

  18. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  19. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  20. Tunable charge transfer properties in metal-phthalocyanine heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siles, P. F.; Hahn, T.; Salvan, G.; Knupfer, M.; Zhu, F.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-04-01

    Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of different organic materials to create organic heterostructures which combine the electrical capabilities of each material. This opens the possibility to precisely engineer and tune new electrical properties. In particular, similar transition metal phthalocyanines demonstrate hybridization and charge transfer properties which could lead to interesting physical phenomena. Although, when considering device dimensions, a better understanding and control of the tuning of the transport properties still remain in the focus of research. Here, by employing conductive atomic force microscopy techniques, we provide an insight about the nanoscale electrical properties and transport mechanisms of MnPc and fluorinated phthalocyanines such as F16CuPc and F16CoPc. We report a transition from typical diode-like transport mechanisms for pure MnPc thin films to space-charge-limited current transport regime (SCLC) for Pc-based heterostructures. The controlled addition of fluorinated phthalocyanine also provides highly uniform and symmetric-polarized transport characteristics with conductance enhancements up to two orders of magnitude depending on the polarization. We present a method to spatially map the mobility of the MnPc/F16CuPc structures with a nanoscale resolution and provide theoretical calculations to support our experimental findings. This well-controlled nanoscale tuning of the electrical properties for metal transition phthalocyanine junctions stands as key step for future phthalocyanine-based electronic devices, where the low dimension charge transfer, mediated by transition metal atoms could be intrinsically linked to a transfer of magnetic moment or spin.Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of

  1. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  2. Tunable charge transfer properties in metal-phthalocyanine heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Siles, P F; Hahn, T; Salvan, G; Knupfer, M; Zhu, F; Zahn, D R T; Schmidt, O G

    2016-04-28

    Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of different organic materials to create organic heterostructures which combine the electrical capabilities of each material. This opens the possibility to precisely engineer and tune new electrical properties. In particular, similar transition metal phthalocyanines demonstrate hybridization and charge transfer properties which could lead to interesting physical phenomena. Although, when considering device dimensions, a better understanding and control of the tuning of the transport properties still remain in the focus of research. Here, by employing conductive atomic force microscopy techniques, we provide an insight about the nanoscale electrical properties and transport mechanisms of MnPc and fluorinated phthalocyanines such as F16CuPc and F16CoPc. We report a transition from typical diode-like transport mechanisms for pure MnPc thin films to space-charge-limited current transport regime (SCLC) for Pc-based heterostructures. The controlled addition of fluorinated phthalocyanine also provides highly uniform and symmetric-polarized transport characteristics with conductance enhancements up to two orders of magnitude depending on the polarization. We present a method to spatially map the mobility of the MnPc/F16CuPc structures with a nanoscale resolution and provide theoretical calculations to support our experimental findings. This well-controlled nanoscale tuning of the electrical properties for metal transition phthalocyanine junctions stands as key step for future phthalocyanine-based electronic devices, where the low dimension charge transfer, mediated by transition metal atoms could be intrinsically linked to a transfer of magnetic moment or spin.

  3. Metal-free transfer hydrogenation of olefins via dehydrocoupling catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Manuel; Caputo, Christopher B.; Dobrovetsky, Roman; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    A major advance in main-group chemistry in recent years has been the emergence of the reactivity of main-group species that mimics that of transition metal complexes. In this report, the Lewis acidic phosphonium salt [(C6F5)3PF][B(C6F5)4] 1 is shown to catalyze the dehydrocoupling of silanes with amines, thiols, phenols, and carboxylic acids to form the Si-E bond (E = N, S, O) with the liberation of H2 (21 examples). This catalysis, when performed in the presence of a series of olefins, yields the concurrent formation of the products of dehydrocoupling and transfer hydrogenation of the olefin (30 examples). This reactivity provides a strategy for metal-free catalysis of olefin hydrogenations. The mechanisms for both catalytic reactions are proposed and supported by experiment and density functional theory calculations. PMID:25002489

  4. Design of nanocoatings by in situ phosphatizing reagent catalyzed polysilsesquioxane for corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion on metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Kimberly B.

    When a metal reacts with oxygen and water, a redox reaction happens, which will cause corrosion. Current surface pretreatment for inhibiting corrosion on metal alloys is a phosphate conversion bath. The phosphate conversion bath will generate a phosphate-chromate layer to adhere strongly to a metal substrate. However, it is toxic and unfriendly to the environment. Our group proposed an innovative coating that contains a phosphate component (ISPR-In-situ Phosphatizing Reagent) within a protective coating. The ISPR coating will form a bound phosphate layer on the metal surface acting as the corrosion barrier and enhancing adhesion into the metal surface; moreover, it is low in cost and non-toxic. Within this dissertation, there are four projects that investigate design of ISPR nanocoatings for the use of corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion. Surface modification and adjusting concentrations of materials with the different formulations are explored. The first project focuses on the adhesion enhancement of a coating created by modifying the surface of an aluminum panel. Secondly, the next project will discuss and present the use of three rare earth element formulations as a replacement for phosphate conversion coatings on magnesium alloy, AZ61. The third project is the design of a nanocoating by using heat dissipating materials to fill in small vacant spaces in the ISPR network coating on various metal alloys. The last project, studies the strategic selection of incorporating metal components into ISPR network by the reduction potential values on several different alloys. Many methods of analysis are used; SEM, TEM, ASTM B117, ASTM D1308, ASTM D3359, EIS, and thickness probe. It was found that the addition of ISPR in the nanocoatings dramatically improves the vitality of metal alloys and these results will be presented during this dissertation.

  5. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  6. Rules and trends of metal cation driven hydride-transfer mechanisms in metal amidoboranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Young; Lee, Han Myoung; Seo, Jongcheol; Shin, Seung Koo; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-01-01

    Group I and II metal amidoboranes have been identified as one of the promising families of materials for efficient H(2) storage. However, the underlying mechanism of the dehydrogenation of these materials is not well understood. Thus, the mechanisms and kinetics of H(2) release in metal amidoboranes are investigated using high level ab initio calculations and kinetic simulations. The metal plays the role of catalyst for the hydride transfer with formation of a metal hydride intermediate towards the dehydrogenation. In this process, with increasing ionic character of the metal hydride bond in the intermediate, the stability of the intermediate decreases, while the dehydrogenation process involving ionic recombination of the hydridic H with the protic H proceeds with a reduced barrier. Such correlations lead directly to a U-shaped relationship between the activation energy barrier for H(2) elimination and the ionicity of metal hydride bond. Oligomerized intermediates are formed by the chain reaction of the size-driven catalytic effects of metals, competing with the non-oligomerization pathway. The kinetic rates at low temperatures are determined by the maximum barrier height in the pathway (a Lambda-shaped relation), while those at moderately high temperatures are determined by most of multiple-barriers. This requires kinetic simulations. At the operating temperatures of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the metal amidoboranes with lithium and sodium release H(2) along both oligomerization and non-oligomerization paths. The sodium amidoboranes show the most accelerated rates, while others release H(2) at similar rates. In addition, we predict that the novel metal amidoborane-based adducts and mixtures would release H(2) with accelerated rates as well as with enhanced reversibility. This comprehensive study is useful for further developments of active metal-based better hydrogen storage materials.

  7. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  8. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  9. Remote opto-acoustic probing of single-cell adhesion on metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Zouani, Omar F; Gadalla, Atef; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2014-06-01

    The reflection of picosecond ultrasonic pulses from a cell-substrate interface is used to probe cell-biomaterial adhesion with a subcell resolution. We culture monocytes on top of a thin biocompatible Ti metal film, supported by a transparent sapphire substrate. Low-energy femtosecond pump laser pulses are focused at the bottom of the Ti film to a micron spot. The subsequent ultrafast thermal expansion launches a longitudinal acoustic pulse in Ti, with a broad spectrum extending up to 100 GHz. We measure the acoustic echoes reflected from the Ti-cell interface through the transient optical reflectance changes. The time-frequency analysis of the reflected acoustic pulses gives access to a map of the cell acoustic impedance Zc and to a map of the film-cell interfacial stiffness K simultaneously. Variations in Zc across the cell are attributed to rigidity and density fluctuations within the cell, whereas variations in K are related to interfacial intermolecular forces and to the nano-architecture of the transmembrane bonds.

  10. Electron transfer and catalysis with high-valent metal-oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    High-valent metal-oxo complexes are produced by reductive activation of dioxygen via reduction of metal complexes with reductants and dioxygen. Photoinduced electron transfer from substrates to metal complexes with dioxygen also leads to the generation of high-valent metal-oxo complexes that can oxygenate substrates. In such a case metal complexes act as a photocatalyst to oxygenate substrates with dioxygen. High-valent metal-oxo complexes are also produced by proton-coupled electron-transfer oxidation of metal complexes by one-electron oxidants with water, oxygenating substrates to regenerate metal complexes. In such a case metal complexes act as a catalyst for electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates by one-electron oxidants with water that acts as an oxygen source. The one-electron oxidants which can oxidize metal complexes can be replaced by much weaker oxidants by a combination of redox photocatalysts and metal complexes. Thus, photocatalytic oxygenation of substrates proceeds via photoinduced electron transfer from a photocatalyst to reductants followed by proton-coupled electron transfer oxidation of metal complexes with the oxidized photocatalyst to produce high-valent metal-oxo complexes that oxygenate substrates. Thermal and photoinduced electron-transfer catalytic reactions of high-valent metal-oxo complexes for oxygenation of substrates using water or dioxygen as an oxygen source are summarized in this perspective.

  11. Laser Transfer of Metals and Metal Alloys for Digital Microfabrication of 3D Objects.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Sa'ar, Amir; Kotler, Zvi

    2015-09-02

    3D copper logos printed on epoxy glass laminates are demonstrated. The structures are printed using laser transfer of molten metal microdroplets. The example in the image shows letters of 50 µm width, with each letter being taller than the last, from a height of 40 µm ('s') to 190 µm ('l'). The scanning microscopy image is taken at a tilt, and the topographic image was taken using interferometric 3D microscopy, to show the effective control of this technique.

  12. An Interdisciplinary Study of Cathodic Debonding in Elastomer/Metal Adhesive Bonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    both sides and to that of the bulk degraded primer component of the adhesive. Saponification of the adhesive and the leaching of chlorine (forming HCI...exposure to the alkali _ has been verified throughout this research. Saponification and leaching of chlorine are perhaps only two of several...to the steel substrate; saponification of the adhesive under formation of carboxylate ions also occurs. 3) Delamination is in a Weak Boundary Layer of

  13. Adhesive bonding and the use of corrosion resistant primers. [for metal surface preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockridge, R. R.; Thibault, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    The use of an anti-corrosive primer has been shown to be essential to assure survival of a bonded structure in a hostile environment, particularly if a stress is to be applied to the adhesively bonded joint during the environmental exposure. For example, the Lockheed L-1011 TriStar assembly, after exhaustive evaluation tests specifies use of chromate filled inhibitive polysulfide sealants, and use of corrosion inhibiting adhesive primers prior to structural bonding with film adhesive.

  14. The Enhancement of Metallic Silver Monomer Evaporation by the Adhesion of Polar Molecules to Silver Nanocluster Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-21

    POLAR MOLECULES TO SILVER NANOCLUSTER IONS by Clifton Fagerquist, Dilip K. Sensharma, Angel Rubio, Marvin L. Cohen and M. A. EI-Sayed Prepared for...MOLECULES TO SILVER NANOCLUSTER IONS Clifton K. Fagerquist#, Dilip K. Sensharma and Mostafa A. E1-Sayed* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry...CZVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. .:UNO:NG :.UMBERS Tl1E ENANCDEET OF METALLIC SILVER MONOMER EVAPORATION .- 1 9Y THE ADHESION OF POLAR MOLECULES TO SILVER

  15. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  16. Oligomer and mixed-metal compounds potential multielectron transfer catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rillema, D.P.

    1992-03-30

    Projects related to the design and characterization of multimetallic complexes has proceeded forward with a number of achievements. First, photoprocesses in hydrogel matrices lead to the conclusion that cationic metallochromophores could be ion exchanged into a hydrogel matrix ({kappa}-carageenan) and substantial photocurrents could be generated. Second, X-ray structures of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Ru(bpz){sub 3}{sup 2+}, where bpy is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, bpm is 2,2{prime}-bipyrimidine and bpz is 2,2{prime}-bipyrizine, were obtained and revealed similar Ru-N bond distances in each complex even though their {sigma}-donor and {pi}-acceptor character differ markedly. The structure parameters are expected to provide theoreticians with the information needed to probe the electronic character of the molecular systems and provide us with direction in our synthetic strategies. Third, a copper(I) complex was synthesized with a dimeric-ethane-bridged, 1,10-phenanthroline ligand that resulted in isolation of a bimetallic species. The copper(I) complex did luminesce weakly, suggesting that the dimer possesses potential electron transfer capability. Fourth, the photophysical properties of (Re(CO){sub 4}(L-L)){sup +}, where L-L = heterocyclic diimine ligands, and Pt(bph)X{sub 2}, where bph = the dianion of biphenyl and X = CH{sub 3}CN, py or ethylendiamine, displayed luminescence at high energy and underwent excited-state electron transfer. Such high energy emitters provide high driving forces for undergoing excited-state electron transfer. Fifth, both energy and electron transfer were observed in mixed-metal complexes bridged by 1,2-bis(2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-4{prime}-yl) ethane.

  17. On the HSAB based estimate of charge transfer between adsorbates and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of the HSAB based electron charge transfer parameter, Δ N, is analyzed for molecular and atomic adsorbates on metal surfaces by means of explicit DFT calculations. For molecular adsorbates Δ N gives reasonable trends of charge transfer if work function is used for electronegativity of metal surface. For this reason, calculated work functions of low Miller index surfaces for 11 different metals are reported. As for reactive atomic adsorbates, e.g., N, O, and Cl, the charge transfer is proportional to the adatom valence times the electronegativity difference between the metal surface and the adatom, where the electronegativity of metal is represented by a linear combination of atomic Mulliken electronegativity and the work function of metal surface. It is further shown that the adatom-metal bond strength is linearly proportional to the metal-to-adatom charge transfer thus making the Δ N parameter a useful indicator to anticipate the corresponding adsorption energy trends.

  18. Reducing Ice Adhesion on Nonsmooth Metallic Surfaces: Wettability and Topography Effects.

    PubMed

    Ling, Edwin Jee Yang; Uong, Victor; Renault-Crispo, Jean-Sébastien; Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Servio, Phillip

    2016-04-06

    The effects of ice formation and accretion on external surfaces range from being mildly annoying to potentially life-threatening. Ice-shedding materials, which lower the adhesion strength of ice to its surface, have recently received renewed research attention as a means to circumvent the problem of icing. In this work, we investigate how surface wettability and surface topography influence the ice adhesion strength on three different surfaces: (i) superhydrophobic laser-inscribed square pillars on copper, (ii) stainless steel 316 Dutch-weave meshes, and (iii) multiwalled carbon nanotube-covered steel meshes. The finest stainless steel mesh displayed the best performance with a 93% decrease in ice adhesion relative to polished stainless steel, while the superhydrophobic square pillars exhibited an increase in ice adhesion by up to 67% relative to polished copper. Comparisons of dynamic contact angles revealed little correlation between surface wettability and ice adhesion. On the other hand, by considering the ice formation process and the fracture mechanics at the ice-substrate interface, we found that two competing mechanisms governing ice adhesion strength arise on nonplanar surfaces: (i) mechanical interlocking of the ice within the surface features that enhances adhesion, and (ii) formation of microcracks that act as interfacial stress concentrators, which reduce adhesion. Our analysis provides insight toward new approaches for the design of ice-releasing materials through the use of surface topographies that promote interfacial crack propagation.

  19. Friction and transfer behavior of pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with pyrolytic boron nitride in sliding contact with itself and various metals. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor transfer of pyrolytic boron nitride to metals and metals to pyrolytic boron nitride. Results indicate that the friction coefficient for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with metals can be related to the chemical activity of the metals and more particularly to the d valence bond character of the metal. Transfer was found to occur to all metals except silver and gold and the amount of transfer was less in the presence than in the absence of metal oxide. Friction was less for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with a metal in air than in vacuum.

  20. Rate of Heat Transfer from Finned Metal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G Fayette; Rehbock, A

    1930-01-01

    The object was to evaluate the factors which control the rate of heat transfer to a moving current of air from finned metal surfaces similar to those used on aircraft engine cylinders. The object was to establish data which will enable the finning of cooling surfaces to be designed to suit the particular needs of any specific application. Most of the work was done on flat copper specimens 6 inches square, upon which were mounted copper fins with spacings varying from 1/2 inch to 1/12 inch. All fins were 1 inch deep, 6 inches long, and .020 inch thick. The results of the investigation are given in the form of curves included here. In general, it was found that for specimens of this kind, the effectiveness of a given fin does not decrease very rapidly until its distance from adjacent fins has been reduced to 1/9 or 1/10 of an inch. A formula for the heat transfer from a flat surface without fins was developed, and an approximate formula for the finned specimens is suggested.

  1. Plasmonics: Heat transfer between metal nanoparticles and supporting nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Zorić, Igor; Kasemo, Bengt

    2012-09-01

    Due to plasmon-related local field enhancement, metal nanoparticles can be used in conventional surface photochemistry and also in numerous applications, e.g., for optimization of the performance of thin film solar cells and photo-electrochemical cells employed for solar-to-fuel energy conversion. In the experimental model studies related to such cells, metal nanoparticles are located on or embedded into a 40-100 nm thick active photoabsorbing material (e.g., Si or Fe2O3), supported underneath by a ∼1 mm thick glass layer. We present general equations describing heat transport in the layered systems of this type. The equations contain the coefficients of heat transfer between different nanophases. Using the Debye model, we derive an analytical expression for these coefficients. Our calculations show that for the energy flux corresponding to solar light the overheating is practically negligible. In more conventional surface photochemistry, the effect may be more appreciable with increasing the energy flux and support thickness.

  2. Shear bond strength of ceramic and metallic orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer and conventional bonding adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Arash, Valiollah; Naghipour, Fatemeh; Ravadgar, Mehdi; Karkhah, Ahmad; Barati, Mohammad Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adult patients typically require high-quality orthodontic treatment for ceramic brackets, but some clinicians remain concerned about the bond strength of these brackets. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the shear bond strength and de-bonding characteristics of metallic and ceramic brackets bonded with two types of bonding agents. Methods In an experimental study done in 2013 in Babol, Iran, 120 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows: HM group: metallic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SM group: metallic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer; HC group: ceramic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SC group: ceramic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer. Twenty-four hours after thermocycling (1000 cycle, 5 °C–55 °C), the shear bond strength values were measured. The amount of resin remaining on the tooth surface (adhesive remnant index: ARI) was determined under a stereomicroscope. Enamel detachment index was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. To perform statistical analysis, ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey post-hoc tests were applied. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. Results The mean shear bond strength values (MPa ± SD) were group HM=12.59, group SM=11.15, group HC=7.7, and group SC=7.41. Bond strength differences between groups HM and SM (p=0.063) and between HC and SC (p=0.091) were not statistically significant. There were significant differences between HM and HC and between SM and SC groups (p < 0.05). Insignificant differences were found in ARI among all groups. Conclusion Our findings indicated that the metallic brackets had higher bond strengths in comparison with ceramic brackets. In addition, self-etching primer was able to produce fewer bonds compared with the conventional technique. Many samples showed the bracket-adhesive interface failure or failure inside the adhesive. PMID:28243410

  3. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-07

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability.

  4. Improved Charge Transfer by Thin Metal Oxide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan

    The field of electronics has an immense impact on our day to day life. Efficient charge transfer at the semiconductor and electrode interface is one of the most crucial issues for the performance of any electronic device. A lot of effort has been spent to address this issue. A counter intuitive phenomenon of insertion of a thin metal oxide film at the semiconductor and electrode interface has gained momentum recently. In the current thesis, based on results of several experiments, I will propose a prominent mechanism of performance improvement with such insertions. I will also demonstrate the applicability of such metal oxide thin films in many other systems. First, I will introduce the scope of the thesis in detail. I will also introduce the background to understand the electronic structure of organic semiconductors, along with the interface formation at the semiconductor/metal interface. Then, I will discuss the measurement techniques. I will start the discussion on results with the insertion of a thin layer of MoOx (a transition metal oxide) between indium tin oxide (ITO) and two well studied organic semiconductors. I will also demonstrate that the optimum insertion layer thickness is just a few nanometers. I will illustrate the importance of high vacuum during the deposition of such insertion layers. I will also discuss the method to recover work function of air exposed MoOx films. I will further demonstrate that a thin layer of MoOx can be utilized to dope C60 strongly p-type. Then, I will discuss the application of MoO x insertion layer in CdTe based solar cells. I will further show the application of MoOx and organic double-inter-layer in organic devices. At the end, I will discuss an intense oxygen plasma treatment on ITO films and demonstrate a method to achieve high work function ITO films. The mechanism of high work function and application in devices will also be explained in detail. Finally, I will summarize the thesis.

  5. When hole extraction determines charge transfer across metal-organic-metal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govor, L. V.; Reiter, G.; Parisi, J.

    2016-03-01

    We examined the charge transfer in metal-organic-metal structure, where the contact resistance of the extracting interface is larger than the resistance of the organic crystalline material and the resistance of the injecting interface. If direct tunneling (low voltage) and Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling (high voltage) across both interfaces take place, part of the injected holes remains located in the organic crystal because of the blocking action of the extracting interface, but not because of traps within the organic crystalline material (which was negligible). If Fowler-Nordheim tunneling across the injecting interface and direct tunneling across the extracting interface take place for high voltages, the latter leads to the deviation of the total current-voltage characteristic from the power law I∼ Vγ with γ>2 to Ohm's law with γ≃1.0 .

  6. Does Metal Transfer Differ on Retrieved Ceramic and CoCr Femoral Heads?

    PubMed Central

    Fredette, Eliza K.; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Underwood, Richard J.; Chen, Antonia F.; Mont, Michael A.; Lee, Gwo-Chin; Klein, Gregg R.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Metal transfer has been observed on retrieved THA femoral heads for both CoCr and ceramic bearing materials. In vitro wear testing has shown increased wear to polyethylene acetabular liners with the presence of metal transfer. This study sought to investigate the extent of metal transfer on the bearing surface of CoCr and ceramic femoral heads and identify prevalent morphologies. Three bearing couple cohorts: M-PE (n = 50), C-PE (n = 35), and C-C (n = 15), were derived from two previously matched collections (n = 50/group) of CoCr and ceramic femoral heads. From the three cohorts, 75% of the femoral heads showed visual evidence of metal transfer. These femoral heads were analyzed using direct measurement, digital photogrammetry, and white light interferometry. Surface area coverage and curved median surface area were similar among the three cohorts. The most prevalent metal transfer patterns observed were random stripes (n = 21/75), longitudinal stripes (n = 17/75), and random patches (n = 13/75). Metal transfer arc length was shorter in the M-PE cohort. Understanding the morphology of metal transfer may be useful for more realistic recreation of metal transfer in in vitro pin-on-disk and joint simulators studies. PMID:26583097

  7. Does Metal Transfer Differ on Retrieved Ceramic and CoCr Femoral Heads?

    PubMed

    Fredette, Eliza K; MacDonald, Daniel W; Underwood, Richard J; Chen, Antonia F; Mont, Michael A; Lee, Gwo-Chin; Klein, Gregg R; Rimnac, Clare M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Metal transfer has been observed on retrieved THA femoral heads for both CoCr and ceramic bearing materials. In vitro wear testing has shown increased wear to polyethylene acetabular liners with the presence of metal transfer. This study sought to investigate the extent of metal transfer on the bearing surface of CoCr and ceramic femoral heads and identify prevalent morphologies. Three bearing couple cohorts: M-PE (n = 50), C-PE (n = 35), and C-C (n = 15), were derived from two previously matched collections (n = 50/group) of CoCr and ceramic femoral heads. From the three cohorts, 75% of the femoral heads showed visual evidence of metal transfer. These femoral heads were analyzed using direct measurement, digital photogrammetry, and white light interferometry. Surface area coverage and curved median surface area were similar among the three cohorts. The most prevalent metal transfer patterns observed were random stripes (n = 21/75), longitudinal stripes (n = 17/75), and random patches (n = 13/75). Metal transfer arc length was shorter in the M-PE cohort. Understanding the morphology of metal transfer may be useful for more realistic recreation of metal transfer in in vitro pin-on-disk and joint simulators studies.

  8. Embedded optical fibres as strain sensors in polymer matrix fibre composites: The influence of adhesion in strain transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekroth, M.

    1994-06-01

    Optical fibers can serve as strain sensors embedded in load carrying polymer matrix fiber composites. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of chemical bonding between the optical fiber, its protective polyimide coating and the surrounding composite, in strain transfer from the composite to the optical fiber. The degree of adhesion was determined by measuring the force during debonding and pull-out of the optical fiber from the composite. Debonding occurred between the quartz fiber and the coating for both untreated and ammonia modified fibers. The PTFE coated fibers debonded between the coating and the composite. The modified fibers debonded at a lower applied load than the untreated fibers. The strain during tensile loading was measured both with conventional resistance strain gages mounted on the specimen surfaces, and optically with a Mach-Zehnder-interferometer. The optically measured strains, obtained with the untreated fiber and the modified fibers, were all in good agreement with the response from the resistance strain gages. It is concluded that the chemical bonding between the quartz fiber/coating/composite consequently has little or no influence on the strain transfer. Internal stresses (mechanical pressure and friction forces) arising from the laminate fabrication process are sufficient for strain transfer.

  9. Improved simulations of heat transfer in liquid metal flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.

    2011-04-01

    In liquid-metal flows, the predictions of the Nusselt number (heat transfer) by Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models of turbulence that use the assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number can be significantly off. Heat transfer analyses were performed with a number of turbulence models for flows in a triangular rod bundle and in a pipe, and model predictions were compared with experimental data. Emphasis was placed on the low Reynolds (low-Re) number k-{var_epsilon} model that resolves the boundary layer and does not use 'logarithmic wall functions.' The high Reynolds (high-Re) number k-{var_epsilon} model underpredicts the Nusselt number up to 30%, while the low-Re number model overpredicts it up to 34%. For high Peclet number values, the low-Re number model provides better predictions than the high-Re number model. For Peclet numbers higher than 1500, the predictions of the Reynolds stress model (RSM) are in very good agreement with experimental measurements, but for lower Peclet number values its predictions are significantly off. A relationship was developed that expresses the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the molecular viscosity. With this modified turbulent Prandtl number, for the flow in the rod bundle the predictions of the low-Re number model are well within the spread of the experimental measurements. For pipe flow, the model predictions are not as sensitive to the correction of the turbulent Prandtl number as they are in the case of the flow in a bundle. The modified low-Re number model underpredicts the limited experimental data by 4%.

  10. 19 CFR 19.24 - Theoretical transfer without physical shipment of dutiable metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dutiable metal. 19.24 Section 19.24 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... dutiable metal. (a) Transfer may be made from one port of entry to another by a withdrawal for transportation and rewarehouse executed in regular form without physical shipment of the metal, provided...

  11. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  12. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  13. Ab-initio simulations on adhesion and material transfer between contacting Al and TiN surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbauer, Gregor; Wolloch, Michael; Mohn, Peter; Redinger, Josef; Vernes, Andras

    2014-03-01

    Contacts of surfaces at the atomic scale are crucial in many modern applications from analytical techniques like indentation or AFM experiments to technologies such as nano- and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (N-/M-EMS). Furthermore, detailed insights into such contacts are fundamental for a better understanding of tribological processes like wear. A series of simulations is performed within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) to investigate the approaching, contact and subsequent separation of two atomically flat surfaces consisting of different materials. Aluminum (Al) and titanium-nitride (TiN) slabs have been chosen as a model system representing the interaction between a soft and a hard material. The approaching and separation is simulated by moving one slab in discrete steps and allowing for electronic and ionic relaxations after each one. The simulations reveal the influences of different surface orientations ((001), (011), (111)) and alignments of the surfaces with respect to each other on the adhesion, equilibrium distance, charge distribution and material transfer between the surfaces. Material transfer is observed for configurations where the interface is stronger than the softer material.

  14. Trace metals in barnacles: the significance of trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2005-05-01

    Barnacles have very high accumulated trace metal body concentrations that vary with local trace metal bioavailabilities and represent integrated measures of the supply of bioavailable metals. Pioneering work in Chinese waters in Hong Kong highlighted the potential value of barnacles (particularly Balanus amphitrite) as trace metal biomonitors in coastal waters, identifying differences in local trace metal bioavailabilities over space and time. Work in Hong Kong has also shown that although barnacles have very high rates of trace metal uptake from solution, they also have very high trace metal assimilation efficiencies from the diet. High assimilation efficiencies coupled with high ingestion rates ensure that trophic uptake is by far the dominant trace metal uptake route in barnacles, as verified for cadmium and zinc. Kinetic modelling has shown that low efflux rate constants and high uptake rates from the diet combine to bring about accumulated trace metal concentrations in barnacles that are amongst the highest known in marine invertebrates.

  15. Supercritical CO2 assisted electroless plating on polypropylene substrate-effect of injection speed on adhesive force of metal to polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Masahiro; Tsubouchi, Kensuke; Ishihara, Shota; Hikima, Yuta; Tengsuwan, Siwach

    2016-03-01

    The aqueous plating solution cannot be diffused into a plain polypropylene (PP) substrate and consequently Ni-P metal layer cannot be formed by electroless plating on the PP substrate with a satisfied degree of adhesive force unless the hydrophilicity of the substrate surface was increased. A block copolymer PP-b-polyethylene oxide (PP-b-PEO) was used to increase the hydrophilicity of the surface and the adhesive force of the metal layer to the satisfactory level. Our previous study showed the morphology of PP-b-PEO domain near the surface of substrate strongly affected the adhesiveness of the metal layer to the substrate. The degrees of elongation and orientation of the PP-b-PEO domains in PP matrix were the key factors of determining the thickness of the metal-PP composite layer and the resulting adhesive strength. In this study, the effect of injection molding condition on the degrees of elongation and orientation was investigated: PP/PP-b-PEO blend substrates were prepared by injection molding at different injection speed. The higher injection speed increased the degrees of elongation and orientation of copolymer and formed multilayered structure of the copolymer domains. It could produce the electroless plating PP substrate with the higher adhesive strength of the Ni-P metal layer to the PP substrate.

  16. Heat and mass transfer enhancement of nanofluids flow in the presence of metallic/metallic-oxides spherical nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar; Ali, Kashif; Iqbal, M. Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shazad

    2017-01-01

    The numerical study of heat and mass transfer for an incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nanofluid flow containing spherical shaped nanoparticles through a channel with moving porous walls is presented. Further, another endeavour is to study the effect of two types of fluids, namely the metallic nanofluid (Au + water) and metallic-oxides nanofluid (TiO2 + water) are studied. The phenomena of spherical metallic and metallic-oxides nanoparticles have been also mathematically modelled by using the Hamilton-Crosser model. The influence of the governing parameters on the flow, heat and mass transfer aspects of the problem is discussed. The outcome of the investigation may be beneficial to the application of biotechnology and industrial purposes. Numerical solutions for the velocity, heat and mass transfer rate at the boundary are obtained and analysed.

  17. Transient adhesion and conductance phenomena in initial nanoscale mechanical contacts between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2013-11-29

    We report on transient adhesion and conductance phenomena associated with tip wetting in mechanical contacts produced by the indentation of a clean W(111) tip into a Au(111) surface. A combination of atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy was used to carry out indentation and to image residual impressions in ultra-high vacuum. The ∼7 nm radii tips used in these experiments were prepared and characterized by field ion microscopy in the same instrument. The very first indentations of the tungsten tips show larger conductance and pull-off adhesive forces than subsequent indentations. After ∼30 indentations to a depth of ∼1.7 nm, the maximum conductance and adhesion forces reach steady state values approximately 12 ×  and 6 ×  smaller than their initial value. Indentation of W(111) tips into Cu(100) was also performed to investigate the universality of tip wetting phenomena with a different substrate. We propose a model from contact mechanics considerations which quantitatively reproduces the observed decay rate of the conductance and adhesion drops with a 1/e decay constant of 9-14 indentation cycles. The results show that the surface composition of an indenting tip plays an important role in defining the mechanical and electrical properties of indentation contacts.

  18. Mass Transfer of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrode During Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; He, Guo

    2013-03-01

    The mass transfer in shielded metal arc welding of a group of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes according to AWS specification A5.11-A5.11M was investigated by directly measuring their deposited metal compositions. The results indicate that the chromium mass-transfer coefficient is in the range of 86 to 94 pct, iron in the range of 82 to 89 pct, manganese in the range of 60 to 73 pct, niobium in the range of 44 to 56 pct, and silicon in the range of 41 to 47 pct. The metal mass-transfer coefficient from the core wire is markedly higher than that from the coating. The basicity of slag, the metal contents in the flux coating, and the welding current together affect the mass transfer. As the basicity of slag increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of Mn, Fe, and Cr slightly increase, but those of Nb and Si decrease significantly. As the niobium and manganese contents increase in the coating, their mass-transfer coefficients also increase. However, iron is different. The content of iron in the coating in the range of 8 to 20 wt pct results in the optimal effective mass transfer. The lower, or higher, iron content leads to lower mass-transfer coefficient. As the welding current increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of niobium and manganese decrease, but chromium and silicon increase. Iron has the lowest mass-transfer coefficient when welded under the operating current of 100 A.

  19. Mussel-inspired adhesive and transferable free-standing films by self-assembling dexamethasone encapsulated BSA nanoparticles and vancomycin immobilized oxidized alginate.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Wang, Zhen-ming; Lu, Xiong; Dong, Li; Xie, Chao-ming; Wang, Ke-feng; Chen, Xiao-lang; Ding, Yong-hui; Weng, Lu-tao

    2015-02-01

    This study developed an adhesive and transferable free-standing (FS) film with dual function of osteoinductivity and antibacterial activity, which was obtained by sequentially assembling vancomycin immobilized oxidized sodium alginate and dexamethasone encapsulated chitosan coated BSA nanoparticles on a poly-dopamine layer. The FS films enabled the dual release of vancomycin and dexamethasone. The FS films had excellent osteoinductivity and antibacterial activity by cell culture and antibacterial assay. The FS film was detached from substrates and transferred to non-fouling surfaces by a wet transfer method, which demonstrated that the adhesive FS film is potential to modify biopolymers with non-fouling surfaces in mild and biocompatible conditions for biomedical applications.

  20. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures. PMID:27698422

  1. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  2. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed only between Provy (164.44 ± 31.23) and Temp Bond NE (88.48 ± 21.83) after cementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  3. Printing transferable components using microstructured elastomeric surfaces with pressure modulated reversible adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Kim, Seok; Carlson, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    In a method of printing a transferable component, a stamp including an elastomeric post having three-dimensional relief features protruding from a surface thereof is pressed against a component on a donor substrate with a first pressure that is sufficient to mechanically deform the relief features and a region of the post between the relief features to contact the component over a first contact area. The stamp is retracted from the donor substrate such that the component is adhered to the stamp. The stamp including the component adhered thereto is pressed against a receiving substrate with a second pressure that is less than the first pressure to contact the component over a second contact area that is smaller than the first contact area. The stamp is then retracted from the receiving substrate to delaminate the component from the stamp and print the component onto the receiving substrate. Related apparatus and stamps are also discussed.

  4. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  5. The transfer of atmospheric-pressure ionization waves via a metal wire

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping; Wang, Wenchun; Peng, Yifeng; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Wang, Xueyang; Qi, Zhihua

    2016-01-15

    Our study has shown that the atmospheric-pressure He ionization waves (IWs) may be transferred from one dielectric tube (tube 1) to the other one (tube 2) via a floating metal wire. The propagation of IWs along the two tubes is not affected by the diameter of a floating metal wire, however, their propagation is strongly dependent on the length of a floating metal wire. The propagation of one IW along the tube 1 may result in the second IW propagating reversely inside the tube in vicinity of a floating metal wire, which keeps from their further propagation through the tube 1. After they merge together as one conduction channel inside the tube 1, the transferred plasma bullet starts to propagate along the tube 2. The propagation of transferred plasma bullets along the tube 2 is mainly determined by the capacitance and inductance effects, and their velocity and density can be controlled by the length of a floating metal wire.

  6. Decal transfer lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, William Robert

    A new soft-lithographic method for micropatterning polymeric resists, Decal Transfer Lithography (DTL), is described. This technique is based on the adhesive transfer of elastomeric decal patterns via the engineered adhesion and release properties of a compliant poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patterning tool. This procedure is capable of transferring micron to sub-micron-sized features with high fidelity over large substrate areas in both open and closed forms, negative and positive image contrasts. Methods are introduced to promote adhesion of PDMS to noble metals using either of two methods: self-assembling monolayers (SAMs) or silicon dioxide capping layers. A novel UV/Ozone (UVO) mask was developed, which allows the photopatterning of UVO modifications of polymer surfaces. This modification in turn enables the direct photoinitiated patterning of resist patterns transferred by the soft-lithographic DTL method Photodefined-Cohesive Mechanical Failure (P-CMF), which fuses the design rules of the contact based adhesive transfer of PDMS in DTL with those of photolithography. The second, so-called Spartacus method, transfers the design rules of photolithography directly onto PDMS surfaces, enabling a photodefined adhesive transfer of PDMS films onto silicon oxide surfaces. The most significant advance embodied in the DTL method, however, is that is offers useful new capabilities for the design and fabrication of patterns of non-planar surfaces, 3D microfluidic assemblies, and microreactors.

  7. Trace Metals Affect Early Maternal Transfer of Immune Components in the Feral Pigeon.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Haussy, C; Frantz, A

    2016-01-01

    Maternal early transfers of immune components influence eggs' hatching probability and nestlings' survival. They depend on females' own immunity and, because they are costly, on their physiological state. Therefore, trace metals, whether toxic and immunosuppressive (e.g., lead, cadmium, etc.) or necessary and immunostimulant (e.g., zinc, copper, iron, etc.), are likely to affect the amount of immune components transferred into the eggs. It may also vary with plumage eumelanin level, which is known to be linked to immunity, to transfer of antibodies, and to metal detoxification. In feral pigeons (Columba livia) injected with an antigen and experimentally exposed to lead and/or zinc (two highly abundant trace metals in urban areas), we measured specific antibody transfer and concentrations of two antimicrobial proteins (lysozyme and ovotransferrin) in eggs. As expected, lead had negative effects on specific antibody transfer, while zinc positively affected lysozyme egg concentrations. Moreover, eggs from lead-exposed females exhibited higher ovotransferrin concentrations; because it binds metal ions, ovotransferrin may enable egg detoxification and embryo protection. Finally, eggs' lysozyme concentrations increased with plumage darkness of females not exposed to zinc, while the relation was opposite among zinc-exposed females, suggesting that benefits and costs of plumage melanism depend on trace metal environmental levels. Overall, our study underlines the potential ecotoxicological effects of trace metals on maternal transfers of immune components and the role of plumage melanism in modulating these effects.

  8. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  9. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  10. Direct micro/nano metal patterning based on two-step transfer printing of ionic metal nano-ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Won Seok; Lee, Jihye; Park, Inkyu

    2012-07-01

    We present a direct metal patterning method by a two-step transfer printing process of non-particle, ionic metal nano-ink solution. This fabrication method allows a simple direct patterning of various micro/nanoscale metallic structures. Complex structures such as multilayer line arrays, patterns along non-flat topologies, and micro/nanoscale hybrid patterns can be achieved by using this process. Also, the low temperature and pressure process conditions are compatible with the fabrication of electronic structures and devices on flexible substrates such as polyimide film and photographic papers. As an application of this process, we fabricated ZnO nanowire-based flexible UV sensors, where metal electrodes were fabricated by two-step transfer printing. In the case of ZnO nanowire sensors, highly sensitive and fast responding performances to UV illumination and good mechanical robustness against repeated bending conditions could be verified.

  11. Effect of the chemical nature of metal oxide on adhesion to the polyacrylate matrix in filled nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terziyan, T. V.; Safronov, A. P.; Petrov, A. V.; Volodina, N. S.; Beketov, I. V.

    2014-08-01

    The morphology, particle size, and thermochemical properties of the surface of oxides Al2O3, NiO, TiO2, ZnO, and ZrO2 obtained by the wire electroexplosion method were studied. The nanoparticles are spherical, with a mean diameter of 54-86 nm depending on the nature of the oxide. The hydrophilicity of the surface of metal oxide nanopowders was found to change in the series NiO-ZrO2-TiO2-ZnO-Al2O3. Nanocomposites with widely varied compositions were obtained from butyl methacrylate copolymer with 5 wt % methacrylic acid and the oxides under study. The enthalpies of dissolution of the composites in chloroform were determined by Calvet calorimetry. The enthalpies of copolymer mixing with oxides were calculated using the thermochemical cycle. The limiting enthalpies of copolymer adhesion to the oxide surface were calculated from the thermochemical data. The limiting adhesion enthalpy was shown to be negative for all oxides under study; these values decreased in magnitude as the surface hydrophilicity increased. The results were analyzed from the viewpoint of balance between the specific and dispersion interactions at the interface.

  12. A model to calculate the average interaction energy and adhesion force between petroleum asphaltenes and some metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Rodriguez, A; Alvarez-Ramirez, F; Cruz, S A; Lira-Galeana, C

    2006-09-15

    A model is proposed to account for the interaction energy and adhesion force between petroleum asphaltenes and metallic surfaces. It is assumed that the total molecule-surface interaction potential may be constructed through superposition of corresponding interactions with a relevant number of atomic layers forming the substrate and resorting to the Lindhard continuum planar potential (CPP) approximation, which requires only of knowledge of binary molecule-atom interactions. Molecular mechanics (MM) calculations are performed to generate the average binary interaction between the asphaltene molecule and an atom in the substrate, which in turn is represented by a parameterized analytical--physically sound--expression. The resulting CPP yields an analytical expression representing the interaction between the asphaltene molecule and each substrate layer. To validate the method, pilot calculations are performed for a sample asphaltene molecule with a fixed orientation relative to metallic surfaces of iron, aluminum, and chromium. Comparison between corresponding CPP and MM calculations for the asphaltene-plane (A-P) and asphaltene-substrate (A-S) interactions indicate reasonable agreement pointing to the adequacy of the CPP method to represent molecule-surface interactions. Also, the effect of a surrounding (i.e., solvent) medium is addressed with the use of a dielectric constant, epsilon, incorporated in the molecule-atom potential. Finally, a discussion is presented on the applicability of the method to generate an analytical universal expression for asphaltene-metallic wall interactions.

  13. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans.

  14. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  15. Charge-transfer gap closure in transition-metal halides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.L.; Yu, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Insulator-to-metal transition induced by pressure has been studied in three transition metal iodides: NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2} and FeI{sub 2} using optical absorption and resistivity measurements at room temperature. Comparisons between the results obtained by these two techniques suggested that the closure of the charge-transfer gap is the principal mechanism responsible for the insulator-to-metal transition in these materials.

  16. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy.

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  18. Strategies to prepare TiO2 thin films, doped with transition metal ions, that exhibit specific physicochemical properties to support osteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Marshal; Kapoor, Renu; Sistla, Pavana Goury; Pandey, Ravi Ranjan; Kar, Satabisha; Saini, Krishan Kumar; Pande, Gopal

    2014-04-01

    Metal ion doped titanium oxide (TiO2) thin films, as bioactive coatings on metal or other implantable materials, can be used as surfaces for studying the cell biological properties of osteogenic and other cell types. Bulk crystallite phase distribution and surface carbon-oxygen constitution of thin films, play an important role in determining the biological responses of cells that come in their contact. Here we present a strategy to control the polarity of atomic interactions between the dopant metal and TiO2 molecules and obtain surfaces with smaller crystallite phases and optimal surface carbon-oxygen composition to support the maximum proliferation and adhesion of osteoblast cells. Our results suggest that surfaces, in which atomic interactions between the dopant metals and TiO2 were less polar, could support better adhesion, spreading and proliferation of cells.

  19. Temporal variation and regional transfer of heavy metals in the Pearl (Zhujiang) River, China.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Gengchong; Li, Ying; Tong, Yindong; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metals are highly persistent in water and have a particular significance in ecotoxicology. Heavy metals loading from the Pearl River are likely to cause significant impacts on the environment in the South China Sea and the West Pacific. In this study, using monthly monitoring data from a water quality monitoring campaign during 2006-2012, the temporal variation and spatial transfer of six heavy metals (lead (Pb), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg)) in the Pearl River were analyzed, and the heavy metal fluxes into the sea were calculated. During this period, the annual heavy metal loads discharged from the Pearl River into the South China Sea were 5.8 (Hg), 471.7 (Pb), 1524.6 (Cu), 3819.6 (Zn), 43.9 (Cd), and 621.9 (As) tons, respectively. The metal fluxes showed a seasonal variation with the maximum fluxes occurring from June to July. There is a close association between metal fluxes and runoff. The analysis of the heavy metal transfer from the upstream to the downstream revealed that the transfer from the upstream accounted for a major portion of the heavy metals in the Pearl River Delta. Therefore, earlier industry relocation efforts in the Pearl River watershed may have limited effect on the water quality improvement in surrounding areas. It is suggested that watershed-based pollution control measures focusing on wastewater discharge in both upstream and downstream areas should be developed and implemented in the future.

  20. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of metal adhesively bonded joints using cellular polypropylene transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Amos, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Adhesively bonded aluminum components have been widely used in the aerospace industry for weight-efficient and damage-tolerant structures. Automated squirter jet immersion ultrasonic testing is a common inspection technique to assure the bond integrity of large, contoured assemblies. However, squirter jet inspection presents several limitations in scanning speed, related to water splash noise over protruding stiffeners and splash interference crosstalk in multi-channel inspection systems. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing has been evaluated as an alternative, possibly offering the benefits of increased throughput by enabling higher speeds, and eliminating the contamination concerns and maintenance issues of water couplant systems. Adhesive joints of multi-layer aluminum plates with artificial disbonds were inspected with novel air-coupled ultrasonic probes based on cellular polypropylene. Disbonds of various sizes were engineered in several multi-layer configurations and at various depths. Results were compared with squirter jet immersion and conventional piezoelectric transducer designs in terms of scan contrast, resolution and inspection time.

  1. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed N -atom transfer reactions of azides

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer reactions of azides provide efficient ways to construct new carbon–nitrogen and sulfur–nitrogen bonds. These reactions are inherently green: no additive besides catalyst is needed to form the nitrenoid reactive intermediate, and the by-product of the reaction is environmentally benign N2 gas. As such, azides can be useful precursors for transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer to sulfides, olefins and C–H bonds. These methods offer competitive selectivities and comparable substrate scope as alternative processes to generate metal nitrenoids. PMID:20617243

  2. Can geotextiles modify the transfer of heavy metals transported by stormwater in infiltration basins?

    PubMed

    Lassabatère, L; Winiarski, T; Galvez-Cloutier, R

    2005-01-01

    Geotextiles are fibrous materials increasingly employed for the design of infiltration basins. However, their influence on the transfer of contaminants carried by stormwater has not been fully investigated. This study, based on column leaching experiments, aims at showing the effect of geotextiles on the transfer of three heavy metals (Zn, Pb and Cd) in a reactive soil (simulating an infiltration basin at laboratory scale). This effect depends on several factors, such as type of geotextile, hydric conditions (geotextile water content), hydraulic conditions (flow-rates) and the number of geotextiles installed. In all cases, geotextiles influence heavy metal retention by modifying flow and thus regulating contact between these metals and the reactive soil.

  3. A study of the mechanism of metal deposition by the laser-induced forward transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Jette, A. N.; Thompson, P.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique for transferring metal features from a film to a substrate is examined by using the one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation with a moving solid-melt boundary to model the heating, melting, and vaporization of the metal film by the laser. For typical LIFT conditions the calculations show that the back of the film (i.e., the part exposed to the laser) will reach the boiling point before the film melts through, which supports the qualitative picture that the LIFT process involves vapor-driven propulsion of metal from the film onto the target.

  4. Image processing algorithm for automated monitoring of metal transfer in double-electrode GMAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen Zhou; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2007-07-01

    Controlled metal transfer in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) implies controllable weld quality. To understand, analyse and control the metal transfer process, the droplet should be monitored and tracked. To process the metal transfer images in double-electrode GMAW (DE-GMAW), a novel modification of GMAW, a brightness-based algorithm is proposed to locate the droplet and compute the droplet size automatically. Although this algorithm can locate the droplet with adequate accuracy, its accuracy in droplet size computation needs improvements. To this end, the correlation among adjacent images due to the droplet development is taken advantage of to improve the algorithm. Experimental results verified that the improved algorithm can automatically locate the droplets and compute the droplet size with an adequate accuracy.

  5. Polymer metallization: Low energy ion beam surface modification to improve adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, P.; Lambert, P.; Travaly, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The interface formation between copper and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films is studied in situ by Ion Scattering Spectrometry (ISS). Very low metal fluxes (˜ 10 13 atoms/cm 2 s) and hence low deposition rates are obtained by using a Knudsen's effusion cell. This allows to reach very low metal coverages down to the sub-monolayer regime. The results indicate that without surface activation, Cu atoms interact only very weakly with both polymer surfaces. Indeed, the oxygen/carbon ISS intensity ratio remains nearly unaffected by the metal deposition, showing no preferential shadowing effect. Moreover, the ISS polymer signals are still detected after exposure to Cu atom fluences corresponding to several monolayers coverage. Cu diffusion below the polymer surface is evidenced by the presence of an inelastic multiple collision contribution in the ISS spectra. It is observed that 2 keV 3He + ion beam irradiation prior to metallization induces a drastic modification in the interface formation. Ion beam irradiation prevents the metal diffusion into the polymer bulk and leads to an increase of the metal concentration at the surface. In order to explain these results, the surface modifications produced by the ion beam on pristine polymers are studied by ISS and ToF-SIMS. Dehydrogenation and preferential loss of O containing fragments are found. These modifications are associated with the production of radicals leading to the creation of new adsorption sites for the Cu atoms. It is proposed that the reaction between radicals of different macrochains induces a surface crosslinking, that can prevent the diffusion for the deposited metal atoms into the polymer bulk.

  6. Adhesion and enrichment of metals on human hands from contaminated soil at an Arctic urban brownfield.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Steven D; James, K; Zhang, Guiyin; Schafer, Alexis N; Peak, J Derek

    2009-08-15

    Human exposure to contaminated soils drives clean up criteria at many urban brownfields. Current risk assessment guidelines assume that humans ingest some fraction of soil smaller than 4 mm but have no estimates of what fraction of soil is ingested by humans. Here, we evaluated soil adherence to human hands for 13 agricultural soils from Saskatchewan, Canada and 17 different soils from a brownfield located in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. In addition, we estimated average particle size adhering to human hands for residents of a northern urban setting. Further, we estimated how metal concentrations differed between the adhered and bulk (< 4 mm) fraction of soil. The average particle size for adhered agricultural soils was 34 microm, adhered brownfield soils was 105 microm, and particles adhered to human residentswas 36 microm. Metals were significantly enriched in these adhered fractions with an average enrichment [(adhered-bulk)/bulk] in metal concentration of 184% (113% median) for 24 different elements. Enrichment was greater for key toxicological elements of concern such as chromium (140%), copper (140%), nickel (130%), lead (110%), and zinc (130%) and was highest for silver (810%), mercury (630%), selenium (500%), and arsenic (420%). Enrichment were positively correlated with carbonate complexation constants (but not bulk solubility products) and suggests that the dominant mechanism controlling metal enrichment in these samples is a precipitation of carbonate surfaces that subsequently adsorb metals. Our results suggest that metals of toxicological concern are selectively enriched in the fraction of soil that humans incidentally ingest. Investigators should likely process soil samples through a 45 microm sieve before estimating the risk associated with contaminated soils to humans. The chemical mechanisms resulting in metal enrichment likely differ between sites but at our site were linked to surface complexation with carbonates.

  7. Effects of metal burden and food avoidance on the transfer of metals from naturally contaminated prey to a marine predator Nassarius siquijorensis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Yang, Lulu; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2013-05-15

    Nassarid snails are important opportunistic scavengers widely found in marine intertidal shores and trophic transfer is a predominant source of metal accumulation in these species, thus there is a significant need to understand the controls of metal trophic transfer. In the present study, we took advantage of a severely contaminated estuary and collected two prey organisms (oysters Crassostrea angulata and barnacles Fistulobalanus albicostatus) with different contamination histories. These naturally contaminated prey were fed to a marine neogastropod Nassarius siquijorensis for a period of up to 7 weeks. We then investigated the influences of prey type, metal burden, and subcellular distribution in the prey on the metal accumulation, trophic transfer, and potential toxicity on N. siquijorensis. We demonstrated an obvious negative relationship between the trophic transfer and the metal concentration in prey or the metal dosage. N. siquijorensis exhibited food avoidance behavior to the Cu contaminated food, which effectively reduced the metal ingestion and resulted in a decrease of trophic transfer, as well as a potential toxic effect from dietary exposure. On the other hand, our results also implied the metal-specific impact of subcellular metal distribution in prey on the trophic transfer to N. siquijorensis. Our study suggested that metal burden and feeding avoidance should be considered in studying the trophic transfer of metals in marine benthic food chain.

  8. Effect of noble metal adhesive systems on bonding between an indirect composite material and a gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kiyoshi; Tanoue, Naomi; Atsuta, Mitsuru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the bond strength between an indirect composite and a gold alloy was determined for the purpose of evaluating noble metal bonding systems. A single liquid primer designed for conditioning noble metal alloys (Infis Opaque Primer) and tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resins (Super-Bond C & B), with or without the powder component, were assessed. Cast gold alloy disks (Casting Gold type IV) were air-abraded with alumina, followed by six surface preparations, and were then bonded with a light-activated composite material (New Metacolor Infis). Shear testing was performed both before and after thermocycling for evaluation of bond durability. The results showed that three primed groups improved post-thermocycling bond strengths compared to each of the corresponding unprimed groups (P < 0.01). The bond strength was reduced for all six groups by the application of thermocycling (P < 0.01). After thermocycling, the group primed with the Infis Opaque Primer material and bonded with the Super-Bond C & B resin exhibited the greatest bond strength (23.4 MPa). The Infis Opaque Primer and Super-Bond bonding system increased the post-thermocycling bond strength of the control group by a factor of approximately ten. This simple technique is applicable in the fabrication of composite veneered restorations and cone-telescope dentures.

  9. Dynamic Response of Metal-Polymer Bilayers - Viscoelasticity, Adhesion and Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-25

    without a die backing ( Plum 1995). Similar applications have also evolved in forming tubular parts. In these appli- cations, it is the regime of...and cavity fill experiments and model. J Mater Proc Tech 170:350-362 Plum M (1995) "Electromagnetic Forming", Metals Handbook, 14, 9th edition, ASM

  10. Trophic transfer of trace metals: Subcellular compartmentalization in a polychaete and assimilation by a decapod crustacean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical form of accumulated trace metal in prey is important in controlling the bioavailataility of dietary metal to a predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of radiolabelled Ag, Cd and Zn from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians. We used 2 populations of worms with different proportions of accumulated metals in different subcellular fractions as prey, and loaded the worms with radiolabelled metals either from sediment or from solution. Accumulated radiolabelled metals were fractionated into 5 components : metal-rich granules (MRG), cellular debris, organelles, metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP), and other (heat-sensitive) proteins (HSP). Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of the metals by P. varians were measured from the 4 categories of prey (i.e. 2 populations, radiolabelled from sediment or solution). There were significant differences for each metal between the AEs from the different prey categories, confirming that origin of prey and route of uptake of accumulated trace metal will cause intraspecific differences in subsequent metal assimilation. Correlations were sought between AEs and selected fractions or combinations of fractions of metals in the prey-MRG, Trophically Available Metal (TAM = MTLP + HSP + organelles) and total protein (MTLP + HSP). TAM explained 28% of the variance in AEs for Ag, but no consistent relationships emerged between AEs and TAM or total protein when the metals were considered separately. AEs did, however, show significant positive regressions with both TAM and total protein when the 3 metals were considered together, explaining only about 21 % of the variance in each case. A significant negative relationship was observed between MRG and AE for all metals combined. The predator (P. varians) can assimilate dietary metal from a range of the fractions binding metals in the prey (N. diversicolor), with different assimilation efficiencies summated across these

  11. Heat transfer enhancement for thermal energy storage using metal foams embedded within phase change materials (PCMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.Y.; Lu, W.; Tian, Y.

    2010-08-15

    In this paper the experimental investigation on the solid/liquid phase change (melting and solidification) processes have been carried out. Paraffin wax RT58 is used as phase change material (PCM), in which metal foams are embedded to enhance the heat transfer. During the melting process, the test samples are electrically heated on the bottom surface with a constant heat flux. The PCM with metal foams has been heated from the solid state to the pure liquid phase. The temperature differences between the heated wall and PCM have been analysed to examine the effects of heat flux and metal foam structure (pore size and relative density). Compared to the results of the pure PCM sample, the effect of metal foam on solid/liquid phase change heat transfer is very significant, particularly at the solid zone of PCMs. When the PCM starts melting, natural convection can improve the heat transfer performance, thereby reducing the temperature difference between the wall and PCM. The addition of metal foam can increase the overall heat transfer rate by 3-10 times (depending on the metal foam structures and materials) during the melting process (two-phase zone) and the pure liquid zone. The tests for investigating the solidification process under different cooling conditions (e.g. natural convection and forced convection) have been carried out. The results show that the use of metal foams can make the sample solidified much faster than pure PCM samples, evidenced by the solidification time being reduced by more than half. In addition, a two-dimensional numerical analysis has been carried out for heat transfer enhancement in PCMs by using metal foams, and the prediction results agree reasonably well with the experimental data. (author)

  12. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  13. Direct Metal Transfer Between Periplasmic Proteins Identifies a Bacterial Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, I.; Rensing, C.; Blackburn, N.; McEvoy, M.M.

    2009-05-11

    Transition metals require exquisite handling within cells to ensure that cells are not harmed by an excess of free metal species. In Gram-negative bacteria, copper is required in only small amounts in the periplasm, not in the cytoplasm, so a key aspect of protection under excess metal conditions is to export copper from the periplasm. Additional protection could be conferred by a periplasmic chaperone to limit the free metal species prior to export. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that two periplasmic proteins, CusF and CusB, of the Escherichia coli Cu(I)/Ag(I) efflux system undergo a metal-dependent interaction. Through the development of a novel X-ray absorption spectroscopy approach using selenomethionine labeling to distinguish the metal sites of the two proteins, we have demonstrated transfer of Cu(I) occurs between CusF and CusB. The interaction between these proteins is highly specific, as a homologue of CusF with a 51% identical sequence and a similar affinity for metal, did not function in metal transfer. These experiments establish a metallochaperone activity for CusF in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, serving to protect the periplasm from metal-mediated damage.

  14. Direct metal transfer between periplasmic proteins identifies a bacterial copper chaperone.

    PubMed

    Bagai, Ireena; Rensing, Christopher; Blackburn, Ninian J; McEvoy, Megan M

    2008-11-04

    Transition metals require exquisite handling within cells to ensure that cells are not harmed by an excess of free metal species. In gram-negative bacteria, copper is required in only small amounts in the periplasm, not in the cytoplasm, so a key aspect of protection under excess metal conditions is to export copper from the periplasm. Additional protection could be conferred by a periplasmic chaperone to limit the free metal species prior to export. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that two periplasmic proteins, CusF and CusB, of the Escherichia coli Cu(I)/Ag(I) efflux system undergo a metal-dependent interaction. Through the development of a novel X-ray absorption spectroscopy approach using selenomethionine labeling to distinguish the metal sites of the two proteins, we have demonstrated transfer of Cu(I) occurs between CusF and CusB. The interaction between these proteins is highly specific, as a homologue of CusF with a 51% identical sequence and a similar affinity for metal, did not function in metal transfer. These experiments establish a metallochaperone activity for CusF in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria, serving to protect the periplasm from metal-mediated damage.

  15. Research study on materials processing in space experiment number M512. [adhesion-cohesion properties of liquid metals under weightlessness conditions in Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, J. M.; Kossowsky, R.

    1973-01-01

    Adhesion of the melted metals to the adjacent solid metals, and cohesion of the liquid metal to itself appeared to be equally as strong in zero gravity as on earth. Similar cut edge bead periodicity in cut thin plate, and similar periodic chevron patterns in full penetration welds were seen. The most significant practical result is that the design of braze joints for near zero gravity can be very tolerant of dimensional gaps in the joint. This conclusion is based on a comparison of narrow, wide and variable gap widths. Brazing is very practical as a joining or repairing technique for metal structures at zero gravity. The operation of the hardware developed to locate successive small (0.6 cm) diameter cylinders in the focus of the battery powered EB unit, melt the various metal specimens and deploy some liquid metal drops to drift in space, was generally successful. However, the sphericity and surface roughness were far from those of ball bearings.

  16. An experimental and numerical study on the effect of some properties of non-metallic materials on the ice adhesion level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piles Moncholi, Eduardo

    The rise of environmentalism in every sector of industry has led aircraft and engine manufacturing companies to develop new generations of more environmentally friendly engines. Companies are in a constant search for new manufacturing and production techniques in order to improve their products, from the environmental point of view, by gaining efficiency in manufacturing techniques and reduce the fuel consumption and emissions in-flight. Having this scenario in mind, the sponsor of this project is interested in understanding how changing the blade materials, currently titanium alloys, for other lighter materials, such as composites, is going to have an effect on overall gas turbine efficiency. In this Project the influence of the stiffness and coating thickness of those non-metallic materials suitable to be employed as coatings on gas turbine fan blades, from the icing point of view, are studied. The methodology is based on a study of linear elastic fracture mechanics of bi-material junctions and will extrapolate the general problem to the ice-coatings case, by obtaining experimental data from tests carried out in an icing tunnel. It was observed that the coating stiffness has an influence on the adhesion level of ice to less stiff materials, if compared with the adhesion level of ice to metals. We also describe how a 0.5 millimetre thin polymeric coating placed over a metallic substrate is enough to reduce the adhesion level of ice, hiding any effect that the underneath materials might have on the adhesion level..

  17. Transferability and Adhesion of Sol-Gel-Derived Crystalline TiO2 Thin Films to Different Types of Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Amano, Natsumi; Takahashi, Mitsuru; Uchiyama, Hiroaki; Kozuka, Hiromitsu

    2017-01-31

    Anatase thin films were prepared on various plastic substrates by our recently developed sol-gel transfer technique. Polycarbonate (PC), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) were employed as plastic substrates. A Si(100) substrate was first coated with a polyimide (PI)/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) mixture layer, and an alkoxide-derived titania gel film was deposited on it by spin-coating. The resulting titania gel film was heated to 600 °C, during which the PI/PVP layer decomposed and the gel film was converted into a 60 nm thick anatase film. The anatase film was then transferred from the Si(100) substrate to the plastic substrate. This was achieved by heating the plastic/anatase/Si(100) stack in a near-infrared image furnace to 120-350 °C, depending on the type of plastic substrate, under unidirectional pressure. The anatase film cracked during transfer to PE, PP, PEEK, and PVDC substrates but did not crack during transfer to PC, PMMA, and PET substrates. The fraction of the total film area that was successfully transferred was assessed with the aid of image analysis. This fraction tended to be large for plastics with C═O and C-O groups and small for those without these groups. The film/substrate adhesion assessed by cross-cut tape tests also tended to be high for plastics with C═O and C-O groups and low for those without these groups. The adhesion to plastics without C═O or C-O groups could be enhanced and their transfer area fraction increased by oxidizing the native plastic surface by ultraviolet-ozone treatment prior to transfer.

  18. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-08-02

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  19. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-08-05

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  20. Charge and Heat Transfer Mechanism in Directly Coupled CdSe-Metal Nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Anju K.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-10-01

    The charge and heat energy transfer dynamics of directly coupled mixtures of CdSe quantum dots with metal nanoparticles have been studied using thermal lens and photoluminescence (PL) techniques, respectively. The PL of such nanohybrids is found to be quenched dramatically at a particular threshold. Fluorescence decay curves of the Au-CdSe nanohybrids and Ag-CdSe nanohybrids show distinct decay channels with the fastest one associated with transfer of electrons from the CdSe portion to the metal portion. A study on the influence of this charge transfer on the thermal diffusivity with respect to the emission wavelength of quantum dots has been carried out, which could lead to the design of modern photocatalysts and solar cells constructed from nanoscale metal-semiconductor hybrids.

  1. Auger spectroscopy analysis in adhesion, friction and wear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the current use of Auger electron spectroscopy in adhesion, friction, wear and lubrication studies. Conventional Auger spectroscopy is adopted to complement LEED studies of the adhesion of metal single crystals. In addition, Auger cylindrical mirror analysis is applied to the study of changes in surface chemistry during dynamic friction and wear experiments on polycrystalline metals and alloys. Important conclusions are that (1) segregation of alloying elements to the surface of metals can alter adhesion behavior; (2) hydrocarbons are adsorbed readily to clean iron surfaces at 23 C; (3) transfer from one surface to another for dissimilar materials in contact can be followed in sliding or rubbing friction studies; and (4) the friction process can enhance surface activity for metals with hydrocarbons.

  2. Charge transfer between sensing and targeted metal nanoparticles in indirect nanoplasmonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Langhammer, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    In indirect nanoplasmonic sensors, the plasmonic metal nanoparticles are adjacent to the material of interest, and the material-related changes of their optical properties are used to probe that material. If the latter itself represents another metal in the form of nanoparticles, its deposition is accompanied by charge transfer to or from the plasmonic nanoparticles in order to equalize the Fermi levels. We estimate the value of the transferred charge and show on the two examples, nanoparticle sintering and hydride formation, that the charge transfer has negligible influence on the probed processes, because the effect of charge transfer is less important than that of nanoparticle surface energy. This further corroborates the non-invasive nature of nanoplasmonic sensors.

  3. Transfer of Metals in Food Chain: An Example with Copper and Lettuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Klavins, Maris

    2012-12-01

    Present study investigated the possible transfer of metals in the food chain (from soil to edible plants). The experiment was done with lettuce Lactuca sativa grown in different types of soil contaminated with copper (Cu2+) in various concentrations, with or without addition of humic substances. The highest content of copper was detected in lettuce samples grown in soils with lower levels of organic matter, thus indicating the importance of soil organics in metal transfer routes and accumulation rates in plants. It was found that copper accumulation in lettuce grown in contaminated soils can be significantly reduced by the addition of humic substances.

  4. Electron transfer during metal-assisted and stain etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Kurt W.

    2016-01-01

    The etching of silicon in fluoride solutions is limited by the kinetics of charge transfer not thermodynamics. This characteristic is what gives fluoride etching its great versatility in making different types of nanostructures as the result of self-limiting chemistry. This review approaches the kinetics of electron transfer from silicon and metal-coated silicon to a solution phase species from a fundamental point of view in order to establish a better understanding of the mechanisms of nanostructure formation during metal-assisted and stain etching of silicon. Band bending calculations demonstrate that diffusion of holes away from low work function metals such as Ag is not possible. Similarly diffusion of holes outside of the space charge layer is not possible for high work function metals such as Au, Pd and Pt. While direct hole injection may be important for etch track pore formation in the immediate vicinity of the metal, the charge imbalance on or near the metal causes the metal to act like a nanopower supply that polarizes the surrounding Si. This second mechanism is implicated in nonlocal etching of Si during metal-assisted etching.

  5. Metal transfer in vermicomposting of sewage sludge and plant wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.; Klauck, C.; Stonefield, K.I.

    1983-12-01

    Sewage sludge is an urban waste that has a potential nutrient value for recycling into food production. A set of guidelines has been developed that prescribes the quality of sludge suitable for utilization on foodlands. A number of sewage sludges do not meet the criteria and are therefore not acceptable for direct foodland application. One of the options available for such sludges is the production of compost and one of these composting processes involves worms (vermicomposting). This study looks at a pilot vermicomposting operation and follows metal concentrations by batch lot from the sewage sludge to the final commercial product.

  6. Process for bonding elastomers to metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, George E. (Inventor); Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for bonding elastomeric material to a metal part includes coating a heat curable adhesive on the surfaces of the metal part to be bonded. The metal part is placed in a mold, a bottom plate and an upper transfer pot of a transfer molding machine is preheated to a predetermined cure temperature. A predetermined quantity of uncured elastomeric material is loaded into the transfer pot. The mold containing the adhesive coated metal part is clamped to the bottom plate, and almost contemporaneously, the uncured elastomeric material is pressed into the mold while maintaining heat and pressure in the mold for a time sufficient to vulcanize and thereby cure the elastomeric material simultaneously with the adhesive, whereby contacting surfaces of the metal part are strongly bonded to the vulcanized elastomeric material.

  7. Time constants and transfer functions for a homogeneous 900 MWt metallic fueled LMR

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nodal transfer functions are calculated for a 900 MWt U10Zr-fueled sodium cooled reactor. From the transfer functions the time constants, feedback reactivity transfer function coefficients, and power coefficients can be determined. These quantities are calculated for core fuel, upper and lower axial reflector steel, radial blanket fuel, radial reflector steel, and B/sub 4/C rod shaft expansion effect. The quantities are compared to the analogous quantities of a 60 MWt metallic-fueled sodium cooled Experimental Breeder Reactor II configuration. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Contact printing for direct metallic pattern transfer based on pulsed infrared laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Lee, Yung-Chun

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports a novel contact printing method which can transfer patterned metallic films directly from a mold to a substrate, based on applied contact pressure and infrared pulse laser heating. Experiments have been carried out using a 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Chromium (Cr) films of 70 nm thickness with both array-dot patterns and linear grating patterns of typically 500 nm feature sizes are successfully transferred. The transferred Cr patterns can serve as an etching mask for the subsequent etching on the substrate. The potential for applying this method to nano-patterning and nano-fabrication is addressed.

  9. Transplacental transfer of cobalt and chromium in patients with metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, H; Daniel, J; Datta, A K; Blunt, S; McMinn, D J W

    2007-03-01

    Metal-on-metal bearings are being increasingly used in young patients. The potential adverse effects of systemic metal ion elevation are the subject of ongoing investigation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cobalt and chromium ions cross the placenta of pregnant women with a metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and reach the developing fetus. Whole blood levels were estimated using high-resolution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Our findings showed that cobalt and chromium are able to cross the placenta in the study patients with metal-on-metal hip resurfacings and in control subjects without any metal implants. In the study group the mean concentrations of cobalt and chromium in the maternal blood were 1.39 microg/l (0.55 to 2.55) and 1.28 microg/l (0.52 to 2.39), respectively. The mean umbilical cord blood concentrations of cobalt and chromium were comparatively lower, at 0.839 microg/l (0.42 to 1.75) and 0.378 microg/l (0.14 to 1.03), respectively, and this difference was significant with respect to chromium (p < 0.05). In the control group, the mean concentrations of cobalt and chromium in the maternal blood were 0.341 microg/l (0.18 to 0.54) and 0.199 microg/l (0.12 to 0.33), and in the umbilical cord blood they were 0.336 microg/l (0.17 to 0.5) and 0.194 microg/l (0.11 to 0.56), respectively. The differences between the maternal and umbilical cord blood levels in the controls were marginal, and not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The mean cord blood level of cobalt in the study patients was significantly greater than that in the control group (p < 0.01). Although the mean umbilical cord blood chromium level was nearly twice as high in the study patients (0.378 microg/l) as in the controls (0.1934 microg/l), this difference was not statistically significant. (p > 0.05) The transplacental transfer rate was in excess of 95% in the controls for both metals, but only 29% for chromium and 60% for cobalt in study patients

  10. Surface Functionalization of Metal Nanoparticles by Conjugated Metal-Ligand Interfacial Bonds: Impacts on Intraparticle Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Limei; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-03

    first highlighted by ferrocene-functionalized nanoparticles that exhibit nanoparticle-mediated intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) among the particle-bound ferrocenyl moieties, as manifested in electrochemical and spectroscopic measurements. Such intraparticle charge delocalization has also been observed with other functional moieties such as pyrene and anthracene, where the photoluminescence emissions are consistent with those of their dimeric derivatives. Importantly, as such electronic communication occurs via a through-bond pathway, it may be readily manipulated by the valence states of the nanoparticle cores as well as specific binding of selective molecules/ions to the organic capping shells. These fundamental insights may be exploited for diverse applications, ranging from chemical sensing to (nano)electronics and fuel cell electrochemistry. Several examples are included, such as sensitive detection of nitroaromatic derivatives, metal cations, and fluoride anions by fluorophore-functionalized metal nanoparticles, fabrication of nanoparticle-bridged molecular dyads by, for instance, using nanoparticles cofunctionalized with 4-ethynyl-N,N-diphenyl-aniline (electron donor) and 9-vinylanthracene (electron acceptor), and enhanced electrocatalytic activity of acetylene derivatives-functionalized metal/alloy nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction by manipulation of the metal core electron density and hence interactions with reaction intermediates. We conclude this Account with a perspective where inspiration from conventional organometallic chemistry may be exploited for more complicated nanoparticle surface functionalization through the formation of diverse metal-nonmetal bonds. This is a unique platform for ready manipulation of nanoparticle properties and applications.

  11. Metal cooldown, flow instability, and heat transfer in two-phase hydrogen flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Miller, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Studies of the properties of five metals with varying tube-wall thickness, with or without and internal coating of trifluorochloroethylene polymer, show that wall characteristics influence flow stability, affect heat transfer coefficients, and influence the transition point from dry- to wet-wall flow.

  12. Homogeneous catalytic transfer dehydrogenation of alkanes with a group 10 metal center.

    PubMed

    Khaskin, Eugene; Lew, Daniel L; Pal, Shrinwantu; Vedernikov, Andrei N

    2009-11-07

    Unambiguous catalytic homogeneous alkane transfer dehydrogenation was observed with a group 10 metal complex catalyst, LPt(II)(cyclo-C6H10)H, supported by a lipophilic dimethyl-di(4-tert-butyl-2-pyridyl)borate anionic ligand and tert-butylethene as the sacrificial hydrogen acceptor.

  13. Empirical models for liquid metal heat transfer in the entrance region of tubes and rod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Wadim

    2016-10-01

    Experiments focusing on liquid metals heat transfer in pipes and rod bundles with thermally and hydraulically developing flow are reviewed. Empirical heat transfer correlations are developed for engineering applications. In the developing regions the heat transfer is in-stationary. The heat transfer at the entrance is around 100 % higher due to the developing process including the lateral exchange of energy and momentum than for developed flow. Developing flow is not physically considered in the framework of system codes, which are used for thermal-hydraulic analysis of power and process plants with a multitude of components like pipes, tanks, valves and heat exchangers. Therefore, the application to liquid metal flows is limited to developed flow, which is independent of the distance from the flow entrance. The heat transfer enhancement in developing flows is important for the optimization of components like heat exchangers and helps to reduce unnecessary conservatism. In this work, empirical models are developed to account for developing flows in pipes and rod bundles. A literature review is performed to collect available experimental data for developing flow in liquid metal heat transfer. The evaluation shows that the length for pure thermally developing pipe flow is much larger (20-30 hydraulic diameters) than for combined thermally and hydraulically developing flow (10-15 hydraulic diameters). In rod bundles, fully combined developed flow is established after 30-40 hydraulic diameters downstream of the entrance. The derived empirical models for the heat transfer enhancement in the developing regions are implemented into a best estimate system code. The validation of these models by means of post-test analyses of 16 experiments shows that they are very well able to represent the heat transfer in developing regions.

  14. Impact Study of Metal Fasteners in Roofing Assemblies using Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Manan; Gulati, Rupesh; Ravi, Srinivasan; ...

    2016-11-29

    Heat transfer analysis was performed on typical roofing assemblies using HEAT3, a three-dimensional heat transfer analysis software. The difference in heat transferred through the roofing assemblies considered is compared between two cases - without any steel fasteners and with steel fasteners. In the latter case, the metal roofing fasteners were arranged as per Factor Mutual Global (FMG) approvals, in the field, perimeter, and corner zones of the roof. The temperature conditions used for the analysis represented summer and winter conditions for three separate Climate Zones (CZ) namely Climate Zone 2 or CZ2 represented by Orlando, FL; CZ3 represented by Atlanta,more » GA; and CZ6 zone represented by St. Paul, MN. In all the climatic conditions, higher energy transfer was observed with increase in the number of metal fasteners attributed to high thermal conductivity of metals as compared to the insulation and other materials used in the roofing assembly. This difference in heat loss was also quantified in the form of percentage change in the overall or effective insulation of the roofing assembly for better understanding of the practical aspects. Besides, a comparison of 2D heat transfer analysis (using THERM software) and 3D analysis using HEAT3 is also discussed.« less

  15. Impact Study of Metal Fasteners in Roofing Assemblies using Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Manan; Gulati, Rupesh; Ravi, Srinivasan; Bhandari, Mahabir S.

    2016-11-29

    Heat transfer analysis was performed on typical roofing assemblies using HEAT3, a three-dimensional heat transfer analysis software. The difference in heat transferred through the roofing assemblies considered is compared between two cases - without any steel fasteners and with steel fasteners. In the latter case, the metal roofing fasteners were arranged as per Factor Mutual Global (FMG) approvals, in the field, perimeter, and corner zones of the roof. The temperature conditions used for the analysis represented summer and winter conditions for three separate Climate Zones (CZ) namely Climate Zone 2 or CZ2 represented by Orlando, FL; CZ3 represented by Atlanta, GA; and CZ6 zone represented by St. Paul, MN. In all the climatic conditions, higher energy transfer was observed with increase in the number of metal fasteners attributed to high thermal conductivity of metals as compared to the insulation and other materials used in the roofing assembly. This difference in heat loss was also quantified in the form of percentage change in the overall or effective insulation of the roofing assembly for better understanding of the practical aspects. Besides, a comparison of 2D heat transfer analysis (using THERM software) and 3D analysis using HEAT3 is also discussed.

  16. Integer versus Fractional Charge Transfer at Metal(/Insulator)/Organic Interfaces: Cu(/NaCl)/TCNE

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Semilocal and hybrid density functional theory was used to study the charge transfer and the energy-level alignment at a representative interface between an extended metal substrate and an organic adsorbate layer. Upon suppressing electronic coupling between the adsorbate and the substrate by inserting thin, insulating layers of NaCl, the hybrid functional localizes charge. The laterally inhomogeneous charge distribution resulting from this spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry is reflected in observables such as the molecular geometry, the valence and core density of states, and the evolution of the work function with molecular coverage, which we discuss for different growth modes. We found that the amount of charge transfer is determined, to a significant extent, by the ratio of the lateral spacing of the molecules and their distance to the metal. Therefore, charge transfer does not only depend on the electronic structure of the individual components but, just as importantly, on the interface geometry. PMID:25905769

  17. Carrier transfer from InAs quantum dots to ErAs metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Haughn, C. R.; Chen, E. Y.; Zide, J. M. O.; Doty, M. F.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Bissell, L. J.; Eyink, K. G.

    2014-09-08

    Erbium arsenide (ErAs) is a semi-metallic material that self-assembles into nanoparticles when grown in GaAs via molecular beam epitaxy. We use steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence to examine the mechanism of carrier transfer between indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots and ErAs nanoparticles in a GaAs host. We probe the electronic structure of the ErAs metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and the optoelectronic properties of the nanocomposite and show that the carrier transfer rates are independent of pump intensity. This result suggests that the ErAs MNPs have a continuous density of states and effectively act as traps. The absence of a temperature dependence tells us that carrier transfer from the InAs quantum dots to ErAs MNPs is not phonon assisted. We show that the measured photoluminescence decay rates are consistent with a carrier tunneling model.

  18. Determination of heat transfer coefficient for an interaction of sub-cooled gas and metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi Sidek, Mohd; Syahidan Kamarudin, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for a hot metal surface and their surrounding is one of the need be defined parameter in hot forming process. This study has been conducted to determine the HTC for an interaction between sub-cooled gas sprayed on a hot metal surface. Both experiments and finite element have been adopted in this work. Initially, the designated experiment was conducted to obtain temperature history of spray cooling process. Then, an inverse method was adopted to calculate the HTC value before we validate in a finite element simulation model. The result shows that the heat transfer coefficient for interaction of subcooled gas and hot metal surface is 1000 W/m2K.

  19. Transferable Force Field for Metal-Organic Frameworks from First-Principles: BTW-FF.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Jessica K; Tiana, Davide; Walsh, Aron

    2014-10-14

    We present an ab-initio derived force field to describe the structural and mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks (or coordination polymers). The aim is a transferable interatomic potential that can be applied to MOFs regardless of metal or ligand identity. The initial parametrization set includes MOF-5, IRMOF-10, IRMOF-14, UiO-66, UiO-67, and HKUST-1. The force field describes the periodic crystal and considers effective atomic charges based on topological analysis of the Bloch states of the extended materials. Transferable potentials were developed for the four organic ligands comprising the test set and for the associated Cu, Zn, and Zr metal nodes. The predicted materials properties, including bulk moduli and vibrational frequencies, are in agreement with explicit density functional theory calculations. The modal heat capacity and lattice thermal expansion are also predicted.

  20. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  1. Ultra-thin flexible GaAs photovoltaics in vertical forms printed on metal surfaces without interlayer adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juho; Hwang, Jeongwoo; Song, Kwangsun; Kim, Namyun; Shin, Jae Cheol; Lee, Jongho

    2016-06-01

    Wearable flexible electronics often require sustainable power sources that are also mechanically flexible to survive the extreme bending that accompanies their general use. In general, thinner microelectronic devices are under less strain when bent. This paper describes strategies to realize ultra-thin GaAs photovoltaics through the interlayer adhesiveless transfer-printing of vertical-type devices onto metal surfaces. The vertical-type GaAs photovoltaic devices recycle reflected photons by means of bottom electrodes. Systematic studies with four different types of solar microcells indicate that the vertical-type solar microcells, at only a quarter of the thickness of similarly designed lateral-type cells, generate a level of electric power similar to that of thicker cells. The experimental results along with the theoretical analysis conducted here show that the ultra-thin vertical-type solar microcells are durable under extreme bending and thus suitable for use in the manufacturing of wearable flexible electronics.

  2. Metal-free cAMP-dependent protein kinase can catalyze phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    Gerlits, Oksana; Das, Amit; Keshwani, Malik M; Taylor, Susan; Waltman, Mary Jo; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-20

    X-ray structures of several ternary product complexes of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) have been determined with no bound metal ions and with Na(+) or K(+) coordinated at two metal-binding sites. The metal-free PKAc and the enzyme with alkali metals were able to facilitate the phosphoryl transfer reaction. In all studied complexes, the ATP and the substrate peptide (SP20) were modified into the products ADP and the phosphorylated peptide. The products of the phosphotransfer reaction were also found when ATP-γS, a nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue, reacted with SP20 in the PKAc active site containing no metals. Single turnover enzyme kinetics measurements utilizing (32)P-labeled ATP confirmed the phosphotransferase activity of the enzyme in the absence of metal ions and in the presence of alkali metals. In addition, the structure of the apo-PKAc binary complex with SP20 suggests that the sequence of binding events may become ordered in a metal-free environment, with SP20 binding first to prime the enzyme for subsequent ATP binding. Comparison of these structures reveals conformational and hydrogen bonding changes that might be important for the mechanism of catalysis.

  3. Metal-Free cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Can Catalyze Phosphoryl Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray structures of several ternary product complexes of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) have been determined with no bound metal ions and with Na+ or K+ coordinated at two metal-binding sites. The metal-free PKAc and the enzyme with alkali metals were able to facilitate the phosphoryl transfer reaction. In all studied complexes, the ATP and the substrate peptide (SP20) were modified into the products ADP and the phosphorylated peptide. The products of the phosphotransfer reaction were also found when ATP-γS, a nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue, reacted with SP20 in the PKAc active site containing no metals. Single turnover enzyme kinetics measurements utilizing 32P-labeled ATP confirmed the phosphotransferase activity of the enzyme in the absence of metal ions and in the presence of alkali metals. In addition, the structure of the apo-PKAc binary complex with SP20 suggests that the sequence of binding events may become ordered in a metal-free environment, with SP20 binding first to prime the enzyme for subsequent ATP binding. Comparison of these structures reveals conformational and hydrogen bonding changes that might be important for the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:24786636

  4. A theory of adhesion at a bimetallic interface - Overlap effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary calculation of the chemical bonding adhesive interaction between metal surfaces is provided. In this first theory the Hohenberg and Kohn formalism is used to give the bimetallic adhesive binding energy versus separation. The close-packed planes of Al, Mg, and Zn are considered. The effect of simple overlap of the metal-vacuum distributions is determined. The importance of registry between contact surfaces is ascertained. A minimum in the binding energy curve is exhibited for all combinations. The theoretical predictions agree with trends in bond strengths taken from available experimental data. An insight into the mechanisms involved in metallic transfer is given. The relationship between adhesive energies, cohesive energies, and surface energies is discussed.

  5. Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

  6. A luminescent lanthanide coordination polymer based on energy transfer from metal to metal for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui-Hui; Zhang, Li; Rong, Lian-Qing; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2017-03-15

    A bimetal lanthanide coordination polymer nanoparticle (ATP-Ce/Tb-Tris CPNs) with good biocompatibility was synthesized in Tris-HCl buffer using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules as the bridge ligands. The large absorption cross section and suitable emission energy of Ce(3+) matching to the adsorption energy of Tb(3+)((4)fn) results in the efficient energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+), thus the synthesized ATP-Ce/Tb-Tris CPNs exhibit the characteristic green emission of Tb(3+). Such energy transfer from metal to metal in fluorescent lanthanide coordination polymer nanoparticles (Ln-CPNs) has been demonstrated. It is found that the oxidation of Ce(3+) in ATP-Ce/Tb-Tris CNPs to Ce(4+) would interrupt the energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+), leading to fluorescence quenching of Tb(3+). On the basis of this quenching mechanism, ATP-Ce/Tb-Tris CPNs has been successfully used to detect reactive oxygen H2O2 with detection limit as low as 2nM. If glucose oxidase is present in the system, glucose can be determined using the ATP-Ce/Tb-Tris CNPs nanosensor.

  7. The Effect of Roughened Metallic Films on Colloidal Quantum Dot Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Christopher; Ghosh, Somnath; Rich, Brent; Khine, Michelle; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2009-03-01

    We investigate self-organized, roughened metallic surfaces as a platform for enhanced energy transfer between colloidal Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QD). Pre-stressed thermoplastic substrates are sputter coated with gold palladium (AuPd) to create thin films. When heated, due to differing coefficients of thermal expansion of the plastic and metal, the AuPd film buckles to form micro- to nano-meter sized structures. QDs deposited on these self-organized metallic structures exhibit changes in their static and dynamic optical characteristics, which include spectral red-shift and multiple recombination decay rates. These observations can be attributed to a combination of enhanced electronic coupling between close-packed QDs and plasmonic coupling between the QD and metallic structures. We then leverage these properties to fabricate controlled, directional structures using this self-organized method which can be utilized as biochemical sensors.

  8. A Divalent Metal Ion-Dependent N1-Methyl Transfer to G37-tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Reiko; Lahoud, Georges; Christian, Thomas; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the majority of S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyl transferases requires no divalent metal ions. Here we report that methyl transfer from AdoMet to N1 of G37-tRNA, catalyzed by the bacterial TrmD enzyme, is strongly dependent on divalent metal ions and that Mg2+ is the most physiologically relevant. Kinetic isotope analysis, metal rescue, and spectroscopic measurements indicate that Mg2+ is not involved in substrate binding, but in promoting methyl transfer. Based on the pH-activity profile indicating one proton transfer during the TrmD reaction, we propose a catalytic mechanism in which the role of Mg2+ is to help to increase the nucleophilicity of N1 of G37 and stabilize the negative developing charge on O6 during attack on the methyl sulfonium of AdoMet. This work demonstrates how Mg2+ contributes to the catalysis of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer in one of the most crucial post-transcriptional modifications to tRNA. PMID:25219964

  9. Crust formation and its effect on heat transfer in the molten metal pool

    SciTech Connect

    Park, R.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.

    1997-12-01

    Experimental and analytical studies have been performed on crust formation and its effect on heat transfer in a molten metal pool. Two types of tests were performed to investigate the effect of coolant conditions. The experimental results on the relationship between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool were compared with other correlations. The temperature distribution and the heat transfer rate have been evaluated using the FLOW-3D computer program. The present study has shown that the influential parameter in the solidified crust formation process is the bottom surface temperature beneath the molten metal layer in all of the experimental cases due to the developed natural convection flow. An increase of the Rayleigh number leads to an increase of the Nusselt number in the lower molten metal pool. On the contrary, an increase of the Rayleigh number leads to a decrease of the Nusselt number in the upper coolant layer due to the effect of crust as a conducting thermal barrier. The present experimental results on the relationship between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number are more similar to Globe and Dropkin`s correlation than any others. The FLOW-3D results on the temperature profile and on the heat transfer are agreed with the experimental data. 10 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Effects of Two Soft Drinks on Shear Bond Strength and Adhesive Remnant Index of Orthodontic Metal Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Materials and Methods: Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Conclusion: Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25584049

  11. Conjugate heat transfer analysis of an ultrasonic molten metal treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Youli; Bian, Feilong; Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Qian

    2014-09-01

    In piezoceramic ultrasonic devices, the piezoceramic stacks may fail permanently or function improperly if their working temperatures overstep the Curie temperature of the piezoceramic material. While the end of the horn usually serves near the melting point of the molten metal and is enclosed in an airtight chamber, so that it is difficult to experimentally measure the temperature of the transducer and its variation with time, which bring heavy difficulty to the design of the ultrasonic molten metal treatment system. To find a way out, conjugate heat transfer analysis of an ultrasonic molten metal treatment system is performed with coupled fluid and heat transfer finite element method. In modeling of the system, the RNG model and the SIMPLE algorithm are adopted for turbulence and nonlinear coupling between the momentum equation and the energy equation. Forced air cooling as well as natural air cooling is analyzed to compare the difference of temperature evolution. Numerical results show that, after about 350 s of working time, temperatures in the surface of the ceramic stacks in forced air cooling drop about 7 K compared with that in natural cooling. At 240 s, The molten metal surface emits heat radiation with a maximum rate of about 19 036 W/m2, while the heat insulation disc absorbs heat radiation at a maximum rate of about 7922 W/m2, which indicates the effectiveness of heat insulation of the asbestos pad. Transient heat transfer film coefficient and its distribution, which are difficult to be measured experimentally are also obtained through numerical simulation. At 240 s, the heat transfer film coefficient in the surface of the transducer ranges from -17.86 to 20.17 W/(m2 · K). Compared with the trial and error method based on the test, the proposed research provides a more effective way in the design and analysis of the temperature control of the molten metal treatment system.

  12. Oxidation and metal-insertion in molybdenite surfaces: evaluation of charge-transfer mechanisms and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, CV; Becker, U; Shutthanandan, V; Julien, CM

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and geotechnical engineering. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. In addition, understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and metal-insertion will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions onto geomedia. The present work was performed to understand thermal oxidation and metal-insertion processes of molybdenite surfaces. The analysis was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Structural studies using SEM and TEM indicate the local-disordering of the structure as a result of charge-transfer process between the inserted lithium and the molybdenite layer. Selected area electron diffraction measurements indicate the large variations in the diffusivity of lithium confirming that the charge-transfer is different along and perpendicular to the layers in molybdenite. Thermal heating of molybenite surface in air at 400°C induces surface oxidation, which is slow during the first hour of heating and then increases significantly. The SEM results indicate that the crystals formed on the molybdenite surface as a result of thermal oxidation exhibit regular thin-elongated shape. The average size and density of the crystals on the surface is dependent on the time of annealing; smaller size and high density during the first one-hour and significant increase in

  13. Transfer of metallic debris from the metal surface of an acetabular cup to artificial femoral heads by scraping: comparison between alumina and cobalt-chrome heads.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chong Bum; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Song, Won Seok; Kim, Deug Joong; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Kim, Hee Joong

    2008-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the transfer of metal to both ceramic (alumina) and metal (cobalt-chrome) heads that were scraped by a titanium alloy surface under different load conditions. The ceramic and metal heads for total hip arthroplasties were scraped by an acetabular metal shell under various loads using a creep tester. Microstructural changes in the scraped area were visualized with a scanning electron microscope, and chemical element changes were assessed using an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Changes in the roughness of the scraped surface were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface profiling system. Metal transfer to the ceramic and metal heads began to be detectable at a 10 kg load, which could be exerted by one-handed force. The surface roughness values significantly increased with increasing test loads in both heads. When the contact force increased, scratching of the head surface occurred in addition to the transfer of metal. The results documented that metallic debris was transferred from the titanium alloy acetabular shell to both ceramic and metal heads by minor scraping. This study suggests that the greatest possible effort should be made to protect femoral heads, regardless of material, from contact with metallic surfaces during total hip arthroplasty.

  14. Effects of Surface Roughness on Stagnation Heat Transfer of Impinging Liquid Jet on Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungho

    The liquid jet impingement with phase change heat transfer has long been an attractive method of cooling especially in steelmaking process and heat treatment in metals. The current study focuses on making detailed measurements of the stagnation-point heat transfer as a jet impinges on the rough metal surfaces at high temperature nominally up to 900°C. The local heat flux measurements are introduced by a novel experimental technique in which test block assemblies with cartridge heaters and thermocouples are used to measure the heat flux distribution on the surface of hot steel plate as a function of heat flux gauge. The effects of surface roughness on the stagnation-point heat transfer were investigated for well-characterized four rough surfaces with root-mean-square average roughness heights ranging from 40 to 80 µm. The results show that surface protrusions on rough surface can penetrate the thermal sublayer in the stagnation point and thus increase the heat transfer. The heat transfer enhancement mechanism on roughened surface can be investigated by the different boiling regimes.

  15. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment.

  16. Analyzing trophic transfer of metals in stream food webs using nitrogen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Margaret R; Feng, Xiahong; Folt, Carol L; Chamberlain, C Page

    2003-12-30

    This study examines detrimental effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) on stream invertebrate communities and tests for a direct relationship between trophic position and accumulation of three metals (Fe, Cu, Zn) by stream invertebrates in situ. On two dates in each of seven stream sites, we measured food chain length, mean trophic level, taxa richness, and trophic position of stream macroinvertebrates comprising the food webs using stable nitrogen isotope ratios. Metals in tissue of representatives of 35 taxa were measured by ICP-OES. Our results are the first direct comparison of uptake of these metals in stream invertebrate taxa according to trophic position as identified by delta15N. As predicted, metal concentrations were generally greater in water and insects from sites adjacent to mining activity and invertebrate taxa richness was significantly lower. Taxa richness increased with distance away from contaminated headwaters. Despite reductions in diversity at sites nearest AMD, food chain length and mean trophic level did not differ between streams. The relationship between trophic position and metal accumulation differed considerably among metals. Specifically, Fe declined (biodilution) and Zn increased (biomagnification) with trophic level, but trophic position had no effect on Cu levels in these insects. Our results highlight fundamental differences in trophic transfer of specific metals through aquatic food webs and identify ecologically important impacts of AMD on stream invertebrates.

  17. Effect of GLUMA desensitizer on the retention of full metal crowns cemented with Rely X U200 self-adhesive cement

    PubMed Central

    Lawaf, Shirin; Jalalian, Ezatallah; Roshan, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Considering the importance of retention in the success and long-term clinical service of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) as well as the existing controversy regarding the effect of GLUMA desensitizer on the retention of full metal crowns cemented with RelyX U200 self-adhesive cement, this study aimed to assess the effect of GLUMA desensitizer on the retention of full metal crowns cemented using RelyX U200. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this experimental study, 20 sound human premolars were prepared; a 0.5 mm chamfer finish line was prepared above the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly assigned to two groups: a desensitizer group (n = 10, treated with GLUMA desensitizer) and a control (n = 10, no surface treatment). Full metal crowns were fabricated of base metal alloy and had a ring. All crowns were cemented with RelyX U200 and subjected to retention test by using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 and independent t-test. RESULTS The mean tensile bond strength was significantly higher in the GLUMA desensitizer group (230.63 ± 63.8 N) compared to the control group (164.45 ± 39.3 N) (P≤.012). CONCLUSION GLUMA desensitizer increases the tensile bond strength of RelyX U200 self-adhesive cement to dentin. PMID:27826391

  18. Trace metal geochemistry in mangrove sediments and their transfer to mangrove plants (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Marchand, C; Fernandez, J-M; Moreton, B

    2016-08-15

    Because of their physico-chemical inherent properties, mangrove sediments may act as a sink for pollutants coming from catchments. The main objective of this study was to assess the distribution of some trace metals in the tissues of various mangrove plants developing downstream highly weathered ferralsols, taking into account metals partitioning in the sediment. In New Caledonia, mangroves act as a buffer between open-cast mines and the world's largest lagoon. As a result of the erosion of lateritic soils, Ni and Fe concentrations in the sediment were substantially higher than the world average. Whatever the mangrove stand and despite low bioaccumulation and translocations factors, Fe and Ni were also the most abundant metals in the different plant tissues. This low bioaccumulation may be explained by: i) the low availability of metals, which were mainly present in the form of oxides or sulfur minerals, and ii) the root systems acting as barriers towards the transfer of metals to the plant. Conversely, Cu and Zn metals had a greater mobility in the plant, and were characterized by high bioconcentration and translocation factors compared to the other metals. Cu and Zn were also more mobile in the sediment as a result of their association with organic matter. Whatever the metal, a strong decrease of trace metal stock was observed from the landside to the seaside of the mangrove, probably as a result of the increased reactivity of the sediment due to OM enrichment. This reactivity lead to higher dissolution of bearing phases, and thus to the export of dissolved trace metals trough the tidal action. Cu and Zn were the less concerned by the phenomenon probably as a result of higher plant uptake and their restitution to the sediment with litter fall in stands where tidal flushing is limited.

  19. A study of gas sensing behavior of metal-graphene contact with transfer length method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanfu; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Guiming; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The gas sensing behavior of a metal-graphene contact is investigated by transfer length method (TLM). By simultaneously measuring the resistance of all channels in a TLM device, the time evolution of the metal-graphene contact resistance and the graphene sheet resistance are obtained. When the device is exposed to 10 ppm ammonia, the response time of the nickel-graphene contact resistance is only one-third of the pure sheet resistance, and the sensitivity of the contact resistance is about 180% and that of the graphene sheet resistance is 100%. The results of this work indicate that the contact resistance can be an effective gas sensing parameter.

  20. Natural Convection Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid Metal Cooled by Subcooled Water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). The relationship between the Nusselt number (Nu) and the Rayleigh number (Ra) in the liquid metal is determined and compared with the correlations in the literature and experimental results. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with subcooled coolant are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or measured from previous experiments. The current experimental results are utilized to develop new engineering solutions. The new experimental correlations for predicting the natural convection heat transfer are applicable to low Prandtl number (Pr) materials that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used to design BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment in remote sites. Tests are performed with air, water and Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool while the lower surface is heated and the upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The inner dimensions of the test section are 20 cm in length, 11.3 cm in height, and 15 cm in width. Wood's metal has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. Constant temperature and heat flux condition is adopted for the bottom heating. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature of the liquid metal pool, the input power to the bottom surface of the section, and the coolant temperature. (authors)

  1. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  2. Cross sections for charge transfer between mercury ions and other metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vroom, D. A.; Rutherford, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for charge transfer between several ions and metals of interest to the NASA electro propulsion program have been measured. Specifically, the ions considered were Hg(+), Xe(+) and Cs(+) and the metals Mo, Fe, Al, Ti, Ta, and C. Measurements were made in the energy regime from 1 to 5,000 eV. In general, the cross sections for charge transfer were found to be less than 10 to the minus 15 power sq cm for most processes over the total energy range. Exceptions are Hg(+) in collision with Ti and Ta. The results obtained for each reaction are given in both graphical and numerical form in the text. For quick reference, the data at several ion velocities are condensed into one table given in the summary.

  3. Quantum-biological control of energy transfer in hybrid quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Hood, Brady; Patty, Kira

    2016-09-01

    We show theoretically that when a semiconductor quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle system interacts with a laser field, quantum coherence can introduce a new landscape for the dynamics of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET). We predict adsorption of biological molecules to such a hybrid system can trigger dramatic changes in the way energy is transferred, blocking FRET while the distance between the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle (R) and other structural specifications remain unchanged. We study the impact of variation of R on the FRET rate in the presence of quantum coherence and its ultrafast decay, offering a characteristically different dependency than the standard 1/R6. Application of the results for quantum nanosensors is discussed.

  4. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Benel, Cahit; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Goncalves, Manuel; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Ziemann, Paul; Marek, Peter; Hahn, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Summary One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL) and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE) ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu3+, since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The experiments

  5. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Herr, Ulrich; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Benel, Cahit; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Goncalves, Manuel; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Ziemann, Paul; Marek, Peter; Hahn, Horst

    2013-01-01

    One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL) and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE) ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu(3+), since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The experiments are

  6. Laser flash method for measurement of liquid metals heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankus, S. V.; Savchenko, I. V.

    2009-12-01

    New laser flash technique for the measurement of heat transfer coefficients of liquid metals is presented. The thermal diffusivity of the liquid mercury has been studied experimentally over the room temperature range. The thermal conductivity coefficient has been calculated with the use of the reference data on density and heat capacity. Analysis of systematic errors of the measurements has shown that the data error is about 3%. Comparison of the obtained results with data available in publications has proved their reliability.

  7. Energy transfer in monodisperse quantum dot solids in the presence of self-organized array of metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.; West, R. G.

    2013-03-01

    We examined the interdot energy transfer between monodisperse quantum dots under different degrees of plasmonic effects (plasmonic field enhancement and Forster energy transfer from quantum dots to metallic nanoparticles). For this we studied emission of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots deposited on substrates containing self-organized arrays of gold nanoislands with radially distributed sizes gradually reduced from the centers of the substrates to their sides. The results suggest how metallic nanoparticles can be used to enhance interdot energy transfer in monodisperse quantum dots and how this process can explain some of the spectral changes seen in the emission of quantum dots when they are close to the metallic nanoparticles.

  8. Altered transfer of heavy metals from soil to Chinese cabbage with film mulching.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-li; Yuan, Jin; Sheng, G Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The influence of film mulching on the migration of metals from soil to cabbage was investigated. Following a 50-day growth in field plots mulched or unmulched, root-zone soils and Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis L.) were sampled for metal analysis. Mulching slightly decreased the soil mobile (acid-extractable) Cd, but increased its transfer from root to the cabbage parts. As an essential element, Cu was readily transferred to the cabbage parts. While mulching decreased the soil mobile Zn, reduced soil pH resulted in its enhanced soil-to-root migration. This, however, did not increase the transfer of Zn within cabbage. Although mulching increased the soil mobile Pb by 200%, an increase in Pb in cabbage leaves but a decrease in stem result presumably from the enhanced foliar uptake of atmospheric Pb. This study suggests that mulching may promote the accumulation of toxic metals such as Cd and Pb in cabbage and therefore increase crop risks to human health.

  9. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  10. Consistent LDA' + DMFT approach to the electronic structure of transition metal oxides: Charge transfer insulators and correlated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, I. A. Pavlov, N. S.; Sadovskii, M. V.

    2013-04-15

    We discuss the recently proposed LDA' + DMFT approach providing a consistent parameter-free treatment of the so-called double counting problem arising within the LDA + DMFT hybrid computational method for realistic strongly correlated materials. In this approach, the local exchange-correlation portion of the electron-electron interaction is excluded from self-consistent LDA calculations for strongly correlated electronic shells, e.g., d-states of transition metal compounds. Then, the corresponding double-counting term in the LDA' + DMFT Hamiltonian is consistently set in the local Hartree (fully localized limit, FLL) form of the Hubbard model interaction term. We present the results of extensive LDA' + DMFT calculations of densities of states, spectral densities, and optical conductivity for most typical representatives of two wide classes of strongly correlated systems in the paramagnetic phase: charge transfer insulators (MnO, CoO, and NiO) and strongly correlated metals (SrVO{sub 3} and Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}). It is shown that for NiO and CoO systems, the LDA' + DMFT approach qualitatively improves the conventional LDA + DMFT results with the FLL type of double counting, where CoO and NiO were obtained to be metals. Our calculations also include transition-metal 4s-states located near the Fermi level, missed in previous LDA + DMFT studies of these monoxides. General agreement with optical and the X-ray experiments is obtained. For strongly correlated metals, the LDA' + DMFT results agree well with the earlier LDA + DMFT calculations and existing experiments. However, in general, LDA' + DMFT results give better quantitative agreement with experimental data for band gap sizes and oxygen-state positions compared to the conventional LDA + DMFT method.

  11. Inhibition of proton-transfer steps in transhydrogenase by transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Simon J; Iwaki, Masayo; Cotton, Nick P J; Rich, Peter R; Jackson, J Baz

    2009-10-01

    Transhydrogenase couples proton translocation across a bacterial or mitochondrial membrane to the redox reaction between NAD(H) and NADP(H). Purified intact transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli was prepared, and its His tag removed. The forward and reverse transhydrogenation reactions catalysed by the enzyme were inhibited by certain metal ions but a "cyclic reaction" was stimulated. Of metal ions tested they were effective in the order Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+)=Cd(2+)>Ni(2+)>Co(2+). The results suggest that the metal ions affect transhydrogenase by binding to a site in the proton-transfer pathway. Attenuated total-reflectance Fourier-transform infrared difference spectroscopy indicated the involvement of His and Asp/Glu residues in the Zn(2+)-binding site(s). A mutant in which betaHis91 in the membrane-spanning domain of transhydrogenase was replaced by Lys had enzyme activities resembling those of wild-type enzyme treated with Zn(2+). Effects of the metal ion on the mutant were much diminished but still evident. Signals in Zn(2+)-induced FTIR difference spectra of the betaHis91Lys mutant were also attributable to changes in His and Asp/Glu residues but were much smaller than those in wild-type spectra. The results support the view that betaHis91 and nearby Asp or Glu residues participate in the proton-transfer pathway of transhydrogenase.

  12. Oscillatory Noncollinear Magnetism Induced by Interfacial Charge Transfer in Superlattices Composed of Metallic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jason D.; Kirby, Brian J.; Kwon, Jihwan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Meyers, D.; Freeland, John W.; Martin, Ivar; Heinonen, Olle G.; Steadman, Paul; Zhou, Hua; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Dean, Mark P. M.; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Zuo, Jian-Min; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-10-01

    Interfaces between correlated complex oxides are promising avenues to realize new forms of magnetism that arise as a result of charge transfer, proximity effects, and locally broken symmetries. We report on the discovery of a noncollinear magnetic structure in superlattices of the ferromagnetic metallic oxide La2 /3Sr1 /3MnO3 (LSMO) and the correlated metal LaNiO3 (LNO). The exchange interaction between LSMO layers is mediated by the intervening LNO, such that the angle between the magnetization of neighboring LSMO layers varies in an oscillatory manner with the thickness of the LNO layer. The magnetic field, temperature, and spacer thickness dependence of the noncollinear structure are inconsistent with the bilinear and biquadratic interactions that are used to model the magnetic structure in conventional metallic multilayers. A model that couples the LSMO layers to a helical spin state within the LNO fits the observed behavior. We propose that the spin-helix results from the interaction between a spatially varying spin susceptibility within the LNO and interfacial charge transfer that creates localized Ni2 + states. Our work suggests a new approach to engineering noncollinear spin textures in metallic oxide heterostructures.

  13. Increased liposome-mediated gene transfer into haematopoietic cells grown in adhesion to stromal or fibroblast cell line monolayers.

    PubMed

    Marit, G; Cao, Y; Froussard, P; Ripoche, J; Dupouy, M; Elandaloussi, A; Lacombe, F; Mahon, F X; Keller, H; Pla, M; Reiffers, J; Theze, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigated transfection rates of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or haematopoietic cell lines (TF-1, KG1a and K562) using the LacZ gene as a reporter and cationic liposomes. The transfection efficiency of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or TF-1, KG1a and K562 grown in suspension is very low (average percentage of 0.013 for HPC and 0.03 for cell lines). Adhesion of HPC or cell lines to plates by immunological or physical methods significantly enhances transfection efficiency; however, the percentage of transfected cells still remained low. We found that adhesion of TF-1, KG1a and K562 HC to MS-5 stroma cells or NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells increased transfection efficiency. Under these conditions transfection is achieved in 11.2-25% (mean 18.30%) for the cell lines and 13.6% (range 8.2-24.2%) for CD34+ HPC. These results indicate that liposome-mediated transfection of HC is significantly increased when cells are grown in adherence to stroma or fibroblast monolayers.

  14. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  15. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  16. Heat transfer and microstructure during the early stages of metal solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muojekwu, C. A.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1995-04-01

    Transient heat transfer in the early stages of solidification of an alloy on a water-cooled chill and the consequent evolution of microstructure, quantified in terms of secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), have been studied. Based on dip tests of the chill, instrumented with thermocouples, into Al-Si alloys, the influence of process variables such as mold surface roughness, mold material, metal superheat, alloy composition, and lubricant on heat transfer and cast structure has been determined. The heat flux between the solidifying metal and substrate, computed from measurements of transient temperature in the chill by the inverse heat-transfer technique, ranged from low values of 0.3 to 0.4 MW/m2 to peak values of 0.95 to 2.0 MW/m2. A onedimensional, implicit, finite-difference model was applied to compute heat-transfer coefficients, which ranged from 0.45 to 4.0 kW/m2 °C, and local cooling rates of 10 °C/s to 100 °C/s near the chill surface, as well as growth of the solidifying shell. Near the chill surface, the SDAS varied from 12 to 22 ( µm while at 20 mm from the chill, values of up to 80 /smm were measured. Although the SDAS depended on the cooling rate and local solidification time, it was also found to be a direct function of the heat-transfer coefficient at distances very near to the casting/chill interface. A three-stage empirical heat-flux model based on the thermophysical properties of the mold and casting has been proposed for the simulation of the mold/casting boundary condition during solidification. The applicability of the various models proposed in the literature relating the SDAS to heat-transfer parameters has been evaluated and the extension of these models to continuous casting processes pursued.

  17. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature

  18. Airborne foliar transfer of PM bound heavy metals in Cassia siamea: A less common route of heavy metal accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Triratnesh; Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Szulejko, Jan E; Prasad, Satgur

    2016-12-15

    In order to investigate possible foliar transfer of toxic heavy metals, concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Fe were measured in samples of: Cassia siamea leaves (a common tree) Cassia siamea foliar dust, nearby road dust, and soil (Cassia siamea tree roots) at six different sites in/around the Bilaspur industrial area and a control site on the university campus. Bilaspur is located in a subtropical central Indian region. The enrichment factor (EF) values of Pb and Cd, when derived using the crustal and measured soil Fe data as reference, indicated significant anthropogenic contributions to Pb and Cd regional pollution. Based on correlation analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, it was evident that Pb and Cd in foliar part of Cassia siamea were largely from airborne sources. The SEM studies of leaf confirmed that leaf morphology (epidermis, trichome, and stomata) of Cassia siamea helped accumulate the toxic metals from deposited particulate matter (PM). There is a line of evidence that the leaf of Cassia siamea was able to entrap PM in respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) range (i.e., both in fine and coarse fractions). The overall results of this study suggest that Cassia siamea can be a potential plant species to control the pollution of PM and PM-bound metals (Pb and Cd) in affected areas.

  19. First-principles calculations of the twin boundary energies and adhesion energies of interfaces for cubic face-centered transition-metal nitrides and carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tengfei; Liu, Tianmo; Wei, Hongmei; Hussain, Shahid; Wang, Jinxing; Zeng, Wen; Peng, Xianghe; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-11-01

    The twin boundary energies of TiN, ZrN, HfN, TiC, ZrC, HfC, VC, NbC and TaC and the adhesion energies of twin interfaces and interfaces of TiN/ZrN, VC/TiC and TiN/TiC were calculated using first-principles methods. A new route in the preparation of mechanically superhard films has been proposed by introducing twin into the multilayer of transition-metal nitrides and carbides.

  20. REVERSIBLE METAL-TO-METAL METHYL TRANSFER IN n5-CYCLOPENTADIENYL(TRIPHENYLPHOSPHINE)DIMETHYLCOBALT(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryndza, Henry E.; Evitt, Eric R.; Bergman, Robert G.

    1980-05-01

    Labeling techniques have been used to demonstrate that {eta}{sup 5} cyclopentadienyl(triphenylphosphine)dimethylcobalt(III) (1) undergoes intermolecular cobalt-to-cobalt methyl group exchange. The reaction follows second order kinetics; rate constants for methyl exchange between complexes 1 and its methylcyclopentadienyl analog 4 show decreasing magnitude with increasing bulk of cyclopentadienyl substituents. Studies of the reaction with excess triphenylphosphine and complexes labeled with the non-dissociating trimethylphosphine ligand indicate the reaction requires dissociation of phosphine from one of the two partners in the exchange before scrambling can take place. Further studies with other complexes (e.g., Cp{sub 2}Zr(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) suggest that alkyl exchange between two transition metal centers may be a more general reaction than has heretofore been suspected.

  1. Therapeutic angiogenesis by a myoblast layer harvested by tissue transfer printing from cell-adhesive, thermosensitive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wan; Jun, Indong; Lee, Tae-Jin; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Young Jun; Jang, Hyeon-Ki; Kang, Seokyung; Park, Ki Dong; Cho, Seung-Woo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Shin, Heungsoo

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by the altered structure and function of arteries caused by accumulated plaque. There have been many studies on treating this disease by the direct injection of various types of therapeutic cells, however, the low cell engraftment efficiency and diffusion of the transplanted cells have been major problems. In this study, we developed an approach (transfer printing) to deliver monolayer of cells to the hindlimb ischemic tissue using thermosensitive hydrogels, and investigated its efficacy in long term retention upon transplantation and therapeutic angiogenesis. We first investigated the in vitro maintenance of robust cell-cell contacts and stable expression of the ECM proteins in myoblast layer following transfer printing process. In order to confirm the therapeutic effect of the myoblasts in vivo, we cultured a monolayer of C2C12 myoblasts on thermosensitive hydrogels, which was then transferred to the hindlimb ischemia tissue of athymic mice directly from the hydrogel by conformal contact. The transferred myoblast layer was retained for a longer period of time than an intramuscularly injected cell suspension. In addition, the morphology of the mice and laser Doppler perfusion (28 days after treatment) supported that the myoblast layer enhanced the therapeutic effects on the ischemic tissue. In summary, the transplantation of the C2C12 myoblast layer using a tissue transfer printing method could represent a new approach for the treatment of PAD by therapeutic angiogenesis.

  2. Friction, wear, and transfer of carbon and graphite to copper, chromium, and aluminum metal surfaces in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with amorphous and fully graphitized carbons sliding on copper and on films of chromium and aluminum on copper. Auger emission spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor carbon transfer to the metal surfaces. Friction and wear were also measured. Metal surfaces were examined both in the clean state and with normal oxides present. Results indicate that different metals have an important effect on friction, wear, and transfer characteristics. With amorphous carbon, the least chemically active metal gave the highest wear and amount of carbon transfer. Both forms of carbon gave lower friction and wear and lower transfer rates when in contact with clean, as opposed to oxide-covered, chromium surfaces. With copper, the reverse was true; cleaning was detrimental.

  3. A study of heat transfer in the surface layer of metal during the impingement of a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldin, A. V.; Platonov, N. I.

    2008-03-01

    We propose a model of heat transfer that takes place when a sheet of metal heated to a high temperature is cooled by a jet. The model takes into account transition and film boiling of liquid, as well as convective and radiant heat transfer in air medium. Examples are given illustrating how the temperature field of a movable metal sheet cooled by a system of jets is calculated.

  4. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V; Moetazedi, Herad; Kong, Casey; Sawyer, Eric J; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; O'Connor, Timothy F; Printz, Adam D; Lipomi, Darren J

    2015-01-30

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules.

  5. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V.; Moetazedi, Herad; Kong, Casey; Sawyer, Eric J.; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; O'Connor, Timothy F.; Printz, Adam D.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules.

  6. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Material properties are considered as they relate to adhesion, friction, and wear of single crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys that are likely to be involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. Metal removal from adhesion between sliding surfaces in contact and metal removal as a result of the silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting into it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows are discussed. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface are also covered. The adhesion, friction, and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the adhesion and friction, and the greater the metal transfer to silicon carbide. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and abrasive wear properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear (metal removal) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. They decrease as the solute to solvent atomic radius ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity, and with an increase of solute content. The surface fracture of silicon carbide is due to cleavages of 0001, 10(-1)0, and/or 11(-2)0 planes.

  7. Transfer of metals in soil-grass ecosystems under long-term N, P, K fertilization in Hesse, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2015-04-01

    With this study focuses on the influence of long-term (14 years) fertilization on metal transition from soil to plants is presented. Accumulation of metals in plants due to long-term fertilization and predicting the bioavailability and transfer of metals in the soil-plant system is of great importance with regard to human health as plants represent the first compartment of the terrestrial food chain. Soil and plant (Lolio-Cynosuretum) samples were taken from a 14 years long-term fertilization field experiment which was carried out in Hesse, Germany. Correlation coefficients, transfer factors, and regression analysis was performed for Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn to quantify the relative difference in bioavailability of metals to plants or to identify the capacity of plants to accumulate a given metal. Correlation coefficients between metals in soils and in plants show significant relationships (p<0.01) for selected metals. Metal bioavailability from soil to plant based on transfer factor (TF) was observed to decrease in the order Cd>Cu>Zn>Mn>Pb. Results of stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that Corg, CEC and bioavailable metal content are the most important predictors for plant metal uptake.

  8. Transferring metallic nano-island on hydrogen passivated silicon surface for nano-electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, J.; Troadec, C.; Joachim, C.

    2009-11-01

    In a planar configuration, precise positioning of ultra-flat metallic nano-islands on semiconductor surface opens a way to construct nanostructures for atomic scale interconnects. Regular triangular Au nano-islands have been grown on atomically flat MoS2 substrates and manipulated by STM to form nanometer gap metal-pads connector for single molecule electronics study. The direct assembly of regular shaped metal nano-islands on H-Si(100) is not achievable. Here we present how to transfer Au triangle nano-islands from MoS2 onto H-Si(100) in a clean manner. In this experiment, clean MoS2 substrates are patterned as array of MoS2 pillars with height of 8 μm. The Au triangle nano-islands are grown on top of the pillars. Successful printing transfer of these Au nano-islands from the MoS2 pillars to the H-Si(100) is demonstrated.

  9. Effect of self-etching primer/adhesive and conventional bonding on the shear bond strength in metallic and ceramic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Hydari, Mahboubeh; Shahrbaf, Shirin; Mirzakouchaki-Boroujeni, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Bracket debonding from the tooth surface is a common problem in fixed orthodontics. The aims of the present study were to assess the bond strength and failure sites in two ways of bonding technique, with metallic and ceramic brackets. Material and Methods: One hundred premolars were assigned to 4 groups of 25 each: Group A, metallic brackets/ conventional procedure; Group B, metallic brackets/Transbond XT; Group C, ceramic brackets/conventional procedure; and Group D, ceramic brackets/Transbond XT. Transbond XT composite paste was used for bracket bonding and cured by conventional light-cure device. Specimens were subjected to thermocycling. One week after bonding shearing force was applied to the bracket-tooth interface. Bonding failure site optically examined using a stereomicroscope under 10 × magnifications and scoring was done using the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Data were subjected to analysis of One-way variance, Tukey post hoc, Chi-square and Spearman’s tests. Results: Mean bond strength (in MPa) were: group A=9.2, group B=8.5, group C=6.2 and group D=5.7. Bond strength differences between groups A and B, and between C and D were not significant, (p<0.0005). Insignificant difference found in ARI in all groups. Conclusion: The bond strengths of metallic brackets were significantly higher than ceramic ones and the selfetching primer produce fewer bonds than the conventional method (clinically acceptable). A positive correlation found between changes in shearing bond strength and ARI. Key words: Acid etching, adhesive remnant index, orthodontic brackets, self-etching primer, shearing bond strength. PMID:21743430

  10. Analysis of fully developed turbulent heat transfer at low Peclet numbers in smooth tubes with application to liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G

    1952-01-01

    An analysis was made of heat transfer at low Peclet numbers for fluids flowing turbulently in smooth tubes. Previous analyses for flow of gases and liquid metals at low Peclet numbers gave higher heat-transfer coefficients than were indicated experimentally. When the mixing-length theory was modified in order to account for the heat transferred by conduction to a turbulent particle as it moves transversely, the predicted results were brought into agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  12. Energy transfer from PO excited states to alkali metal atoms in the phosphorus chemiluminescence flame

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahsan U.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorus chemiluminescence under ambient conditions of a phosphorus oxidation flame is found to offer an efficient electronic energy transferring system to alkali metal atoms. The lowest resonance lines, 2P3 / 2,½→2S½, of potassium and sodium are excited by energy transfer when an argon stream at 80°C carrying potassium or sodium atoms intersects a phosphorus vapor stream, either at the flame or in the postflame region. The lowest electronically excited metastable 4IIi state of PO or the (PO[unk]PO)* excimer is considered to be the probable energy donor. The (PO[unk]PO)* excimer results from the interaction of the 4IIi state of one PO molecule with the ground 2IIr state of another. Metastability of the donor state is strongly indicated by the observation of intense sensitized alkali atom fluorescence in the postflame region. PMID:16592925

  13. Short-Range Charge Transfer Between Oxide Based Superconductor-Ferromagnetic Metal Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Te-Yu; Kourkoutis, L. F.; Chakhalian, J.; Muller, D.; Freeland, J. W.

    2014-03-01

    Unlike the conventional superconductor (S) and ferromagnetic metal (F) interface, the understanding of the proximity effect between oxide-based S and F is still unclear. One particular question relates to the charge transfer length scale between S and F layers, which resulted from the lack of an appropriate experimental tool. In this talk, we show that by combining the cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (XSTM/S) along with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), the charge transfer length scale at the interfaces between YBa Cu O -δ(YBCO) and La3Ca3MnO (LCMO) was revealed to have upper limit of 1 nm.

  14. Direct transfer of metallic photonic structures onto end facets of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Feifei; Lin, Yuanhai

    2016-07-01

    We present a flexible approach to transfer metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) onto end facets of optical fibers. The MPCs were initially fabricated on a glass substrate with a spacer layer of indium tin oxide (ITO), which was used as a buffer layer in the transferring process. The fiber ends were firstly welded on the top surface of the MPCs by a drop of polymer solution after the solvent evaporated. The ITO layer was then etched by hydrochloric acid (HCl), so that the MPCs got off the substrate and were transferred to the fiber ends. Alternatively, the MPCs may be also etched off the substrate first by immersing the sample in HCl. The ultra-thin MPC sheet consisting of gold nanolines interlaced with photoresist gratings was then transferred to cap the fiber ends. In the later approach, we can choose which side of the MPCs to be used as the contact with the fiber facet. Such methods enabled convenient nanostructuring on optical fiber tips and achieving miniaturized MPC devices with compact integration, extending significantly applications of MPCs. In particular, the fabrications presented in this manuscript enrich the lab-on-fiber engineering techniques and the resultant devices have potential applications in remote sensing and detection systems.

  15. Formation of charge-transfer-complex in organic:metal oxides systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. P.; Kang, Y.; Liu, T. L.; Jin, Z. H.; Jiang, N.; Lu, Z. H.

    2013-04-01

    It is found that composite systems consisting of 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) form an IR absorption band around 847 nm. It is also found that the vibrational modes of the CBP, as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, are quenched upon the formation of charge-transfer-complex (CTC) between CBP and MoO3. By examining several sets of organic:metal oxides systems, we discovered that the IR absorption band of the CTCs follow two distinct mechanisms depending on the nature and location of the HOMOs in the organic molecules.

  16. Liquid Metal Bond for Improved Heat Transfer in LWR Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Olander

    2005-08-24

    A liquid metal (LM) consisting of 1/3 weight fraction each of Pb, Sn, and Bi has been proposed as the bonding substance in the pellet-cladding gap in place of He. The LM bond eliminates the large AT over the pre-closure gap which is characteristic of helium-bonded fuel elements. Because the LM does not wet either UO2 or Zircaloy, simply loading fuel pellets into a cladding tube containing LM at atmospheric pressure leaves unfilled regions (voids) in the bond. The HEATING 7.3 heat transfer code indicates that these void spaces lead to local fuel hot spots.

  17. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce3+ upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce(3+), while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  18. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  19. Surface modification of nanodiamond through metal free atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Shi, Kexin; Heng, Chunning; Mao, Liucheng; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-12-01

    Surface modification of nanodiamond (ND) with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [poly(MPC)] has been achieved by using metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The ATRP initiator was first immobilized on the surface of ND through direct esterification reaction between hydroxyl group of ND and 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The initiator could be employed to obtain ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites through SI-ATRP using an organic catalyst. The final functional materials were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis in detailed. All of these characterization results demonstrated that ND-poly(MPC) have been successfully obtained via metal free photo-initiated SI-ATRP. The ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites shown enhanced dispersibility in various solvents as well as excellent biocompatibility. As compared with traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP is rather simple and effective. More importantly, this preparation method avoided the negative influence of metal catalysts. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a promising strategy for fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with great potential for different applications especially in biomedical fields.

  20. Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate with ppm Level of Organic Photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhicheng; Gu, Yu; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2016-10-28

    It is well known that the recently developed photoinduced metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been considered as a promising methodology to completely eliminate transition metal residue in polymers. However, a serious problem needs to be improved, namely, large amount of organic photocatalysts should be used to keep the controllability over molecular weights and molecular weight distributions. In this work, a novel photocatalyst 1,2,3,5-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,6-dicyanobenzene (4CzIPN) with strong excited state reduction potential is successfully used to mediate a metal-free ATRP of methyl methacrylate just with parts per million (ppm) level usage under irradiation of blue light emitting diode at room temperature, using ethyl α-bromophenyl-acetate as a typical initiator with high initiator efficiency. The polymerization kinetic study, multiple controlled "on-off" light switching cycle regulation, and chain extension experiment confirm the "living"/controlled features of this promising photoinduced metal-free ATRP system with good molecular weight control in the presence of ppm level photocatalyst 4CzIPN.

  1. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  2. Study of metal transfer in CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding using argon-helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    The metal transfer in CO2 Laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding by using argon-helium mixtures was investigated and the effect of the laser on the mental transfer is discussed. A 650 nm laser, in conjunction with the shadow graph technique, is used to observe the metal transfer process. In order to analyze the heat input to the droplet and the droplet internal current line distribution. An optical emission spectroscopy system was employed to estimate default parameter and optimized plasma temperature, electron number densities distribution. The results indicate that the CO2 plasma plume have a significant impact to the electrode melting, droplet formation, detachment, impingement onto the workpiece and weld morphology. Since the current distribution direction flow changes to the keyhole, to obtain a metal transfer mode of one droplet per pulse, the welding parameters should be adjusted to a higher pulse time (TP) and a lower voltage.

  3. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-07-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously.In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation

  4. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  5. Heat transfer and fluid flow analysis of self-healing in metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Lucci, J.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores imparting self-healing characteristics to metal matrices similar to what are observed in biological systems and are being developed for polymeric materials. To impart self-healing properties to metal matrices, a liquid healing method was investigated; the met hod consists of a container filled with low melting alloy acting as a healing agent, embedded into a high melting metal matrix. When the matrix is cracked; self-healing is achieved by melting the healing agent allowing the liquid metal to flow into the crack. Upon cooling, solidification of the healing agent occurs and seals the crack. The objective of this research is to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer to impart self-healing property to metal matrices. In this study, a dimensionless healing factor, which may help predict the possibility of healing is proposed. The healing factor is defined as the ratio of the viscous forces and the contact area of liquid metal and solid which prevent flow, and volume expansion, density, and velocity of the liquid metal, gravity, crack size and orientation which promote flow. The factor incorporates the parameters that control self-healing mechanism. It was observed that for lower values of the healing factor, the liquid flows, and for higher values of healing factor, the liquid remains in the container and healing does not occur. To validate and identify the critical range of the healing factor, experiments and simulations were performed for selected combinations of healing agents and metal matrices. The simulations were performed for three-dimensional models and a commercial software 3D Ansys-Fluent was used. Three experimental methods of synthesis of self-healing composites were used. The first method consisted of creating a hole in the matrices, and liquid healing agent was poured into the hole. The second method consisted of micro tubes containing the healing agent, and the third method consisted of incorporating micro balloons containing

  6. Heat transfer and fluid flow analysis of self-healing in metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Lucci, J.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores imparting self-healing characteristics to metal matrices similar to what are observed in biological systems and are being developed for polymeric materials. To impart self-healing properties to metal matrices, a liquid healing method was investigated; the met hod consists of a container filled with low melting alloy acting as a healing agent, embedded into a high melting metal matrix. When the matrix is cracked; self-healing is achieved by melting the healing agent allowing the liquid metal to flow into the crack. Upon cooling, solidification of the healing agent occurs and seals the crack. The objective of this research is to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer to impart self-healing property to metal matrices. In this study, a dimensionless healing factor, which may help predict the possibility of healing is proposed. The healing factor is defined as the ratio of the viscous forces and the contact area of liquid metal and solid which prevent flow, and volume expansion, density, and velocity of the liquid metal, gravity, crack size and orientation which promote flow. The factor incorporates the parameters that control self-healing mechanism. It was observed that for lower values of the healing factor, the liquid flows, and for higher values of healing factor, the liquid remains in the container and healing does not occur. To validate and identify the critical range of the healing factor, experiments and simulations were performed for selected combinations of healing agents and metal matrices. The simulations were performed for three-dimensional models and a commercial software 3D Ansys-Fluent was used. Three experimental methods of synthesis of self-healing composites were used. The first method consisted of creating a hole in the matrices, and liquid healing agent was poured into the hole. The second method consisted of micro tubes containing the healing agent, and the third method consisted of incorporating micro balloons containing

  7. Method for the production of strongly adhesive films on titanium and titanium alloys with a metallization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the spray-application of a strongly adhesive, thick antifriction layer on titanium and titanium alloys is proposed. The titanium/titanium alloy component to be coated is first subjected to cleaning in a pickling bath with reducing additives and sand-blasting, then coated with an intermediate layer of nickel, after which the final layer is applied. The formation of TiNi at the interface ensures strong bonding of the antifriction layer.

  8. Numerical simulation heat transfer by natural convection in liquid metal with a sinusoidal temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Abdelkrim; Elmir, Mohamed; Bouanini, Mohamed; Belkacem, Abdellah; Draoui, Belkacem

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the numerical simulation of heat transfer by natural convection in a rectangular enclosure, filled with a liquid metal (low Prandtl number) partially heated from below with a sinusoidal temperature. The value of the study lies in its involvement in the crystal growth for the manufacture of semiconductors and electronics cooling. Indeed, the occurrence of convection during crystal growth can lead to in homogeneities that lead to striations and defects that affect the quality of the crystals obtained by the Bridgman techniques or Chochrawlski. Temperature of the oscillations, due to the instabilities of the convective flow in the liquid metal, also induces non-uniform cooling in the solidification front. Convection is then studied in order to reduce it. A modelling of the problem in two dimensions was conducted using Comsol computer code that is based on the finite element method, by varying the configuration of the control parameters, namely, the Rayleigh number, the nature of fluid (Prandtl number) and amplitude of temperature on heat transfer rate (Nusselt number) on convective structures that appear.

  9. Area of contact and thermal transport across transfer-printed metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, M; Singh, PK; Sinha, S

    2013-01-14

    Recent experiments suggest that the interfacial thermal conductance of transfer printed metal-dielectric interfaces is similar to 45MW/m(2) K at 300 K, approaching that of interfaces formed using physical vapor deposition. We investigate this anomalous result using a combination of theoretical deformation mechanics and nanoscale thermal transport. Our analysis shows that plastic deformation and capillary forces lead to significantly large fractional areal coverage of similar to 0.25. The conductance predicted from theory is on the same order of magnitude (similar to 18MW/m(2) K) as the experimental data and partially explains the temperature trend. There remains a quantitative discrepancy between data and theory that is not explained through deformation of the asperities alone. We suggest that capillary bridges formed in the small asperities contribute significantly to heat conduction. A preliminary analysis shows this to be plausible based on available data. This work shows that metallic interconnects formed using transfer printing are not at a disadvantage compared to ones formed using vapor deposition, in terms of heat flow characteristics. (C) 2013 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4773532

  10. Metal-free photochemical silylations and transfer hydrogenations of benzenoid hydrocarbons and graphene

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Li, Hu; Bergman, Joakim; Lundstedt, Anna; Jorner, Kjell; Ayub, Rabia; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Jahn, Burkhard O.; Denisova, Aleksandra; Zietz, Burkhard; Lindh, Roland; Sanyal, Biplab; Grennberg, Helena; Leifer, Klaus; Ottosson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The first hydrogenation step of benzene, which is endergonic in the electronic ground state (S0), becomes exergonic in the first triplet state (T1). This is in line with Baird's rule, which tells that benzene is antiaromatic and destabilized in its T1 state and also in its first singlet excited state (S1), opposite to S0, where it is aromatic and remarkably unreactive. Here we utilized this feature to show that benzene and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to various extents undergo metal-free photochemical (hydro)silylations and transfer-hydrogenations at mild conditions, with the highest yield for naphthalene (photosilylation: 21%). Quantum chemical computations reveal that T1-state benzene is excellent at H-atom abstraction, while cyclooctatetraene, aromatic in the T1 and S1 states according to Baird's rule, is unreactive. Remarkably, also CVD-graphene on SiO2 is efficiently transfer-photohydrogenated using formic acid/water mixtures together with white light or solar irradiation under metal-free conditions. PMID:27708336

  11. Determination of the Heat Transfer Coefficient at the Metal-Mold Interface During Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, Santiago; Martorano, Marcelo A.; Heringer, Romulo; Boccalini, Mário

    2015-05-01

    The heat transfer coefficient at the metal-mold interface ( h MM) has been determined for the first time during the centrifugal casting of a Fe-C alloy tube using the inverse solution method. To apply this method, a centrifugal casting experiment was carried out to measure cooling curves within the tube wall under a mold rotation speed of 900 rpm, imposing a centrifugal force 106 times as large as the gravity force (106 G). As part of the solution method, a comprehensive heat transfer model of the centrifugal casting was also developed and coupled to an optimization algorithm. Finally, the evolution of h MM with time that gives the minimum squared error between measured and calculated cooling curves was obtained. The determined h MM is approximately 870 W m-2 K-1 immediately after melt pouring, decreasing to about 50 W m-2 K-1 when the average temperature of the tube is ~973 K (700 °C), after the end of solidification. Despite the existence of a centrifugal force that could enhance the metal-mold contact, these values are lower than those generally reported for static molds with or without an insulating coating at the mold inner surface. The implemented model shows that the heat loss by radiation is dominant over that by convection at the tube inner surface, causing the formation of a solidification front that meets another front coming from the outer surface of the tube.

  12. Metal-free photochemical silylations and transfer hydrogenations of benzenoid hydrocarbons and graphene.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Li, Hu; Bergman, Joakim; Lundstedt, Anna; Jorner, Kjell; Ayub, Rabia; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Jahn, Burkhard O; Denisova, Aleksandra; Zietz, Burkhard; Lindh, Roland; Sanyal, Biplab; Grennberg, Helena; Leifer, Klaus; Ottosson, Henrik

    2016-10-06

    The first hydrogenation step of benzene, which is endergonic in the electronic ground state (S0), becomes exergonic in the first triplet state (T1). This is in line with Baird's rule, which tells that benzene is antiaromatic and destabilized in its T1 state and also in its first singlet excited state (S1), opposite to S0, where it is aromatic and remarkably unreactive. Here we utilized this feature to show that benzene and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to various extents undergo metal-free photochemical (hydro)silylations and transfer-hydrogenations at mild conditions, with the highest yield for naphthalene (photosilylation: 21%). Quantum chemical computations reveal that T1-state benzene is excellent at H-atom abstraction, while cyclooctatetraene, aromatic in the T1 and S1 states according to Baird's rule, is unreactive. Remarkably, also CVD-graphene on SiO2 is efficiently transfer-photohydrogenated using formic acid/water mixtures together with white light or solar irradiation under metal-free conditions.

  13. Metal-free photochemical silylations and transfer hydrogenations of benzenoid hydrocarbons and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Li, Hu; Bergman, Joakim; Lundstedt, Anna; Jorner, Kjell; Ayub, Rabia; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Jahn, Burkhard O.; Denisova, Aleksandra; Zietz, Burkhard; Lindh, Roland; Sanyal, Biplab; Grennberg, Helena; Leifer, Klaus; Ottosson, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    The first hydrogenation step of benzene, which is endergonic in the electronic ground state (S0), becomes exergonic in the first triplet state (T1). This is in line with Baird's rule, which tells that benzene is antiaromatic and destabilized in its T1 state and also in its first singlet excited state (S1), opposite to S0, where it is aromatic and remarkably unreactive. Here we utilized this feature to show that benzene and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to various extents undergo metal-free photochemical (hydro)silylations and transfer-hydrogenations at mild conditions, with the highest yield for naphthalene (photosilylation: 21%). Quantum chemical computations reveal that T1-state benzene is excellent at H-atom abstraction, while cyclooctatetraene, aromatic in the T1 and S1 states according to Baird's rule, is unreactive. Remarkably, also CVD-graphene on SiO2 is efficiently transfer-photohydrogenated using formic acid/water mixtures together with white light or solar irradiation under metal-free conditions.

  14. A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase transfer protocol for the highly efficient extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; Cao, Hongbin; Yang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase-transfer protocol is developed for the extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous solution to a hydrocarbon phase, which calls for first mixing the aqueous metal ion solution with an ethanolic solution of 1-dodecanethiol, and then extracting the coordination compounds formed between noble metal ions and 1-dodecanethiol into a non-polar organic solvent. A number of characterization techniques, including inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis demonstrate that this protocol could be applied to extract a wide variety of noble metal ions from water to dichloromethane with an efficiency of >96%, and has high selectivity for the separation of the noble metal ions from other transition metals. It is therefore an attractive alternative for the extraction of noble metals from water, soil, or waste printed circuit boards.

  15. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Heat Transfer and Combustion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lb/f thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-percentage by weight loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Three different injectors were used during the testing: one for the baseline O(2)/RP-1 tests and two for the gelled and metallized gelled fuel firings. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each chamber used a water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples and flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations. The rocket engine Cstar efficiency for the RP-1 fuel was in the 65-69 percent range, while the gelled 0 percent by weight RP-1 and the 5-percent by weight RP-1 exhibited a Cstar efficiency range of 60 to 62% and 65 to 67%, respectively. The 55-percent by weight RP-1 fuel delivered a 42-47% Cstar efficiency. Comparisons of the heat flux and temperature profiles of the RP-1 and the metallized gelled RP-1/A1 fuels show that the peak nozzle heat fluxes with the metallized gelled O2/RP-1/A1 propellants are substantially higher than the baseline O2/RP-1: up to double the flux for the 55 percent by weight RP-1/A1 over the RP-1 fuel. Analyses showed that the heat transfer to the wall was significantly different for the RP-1/A1 at 55-percent by weight versus the RP-1 fuel. Also, a gellant and an aluminum combustion delay was inferred in the 0 percent and 5-percent by weight RP-1/A1 cases from the decrease in heat flux in the first part of the chamber. A large decrease in heat flux in the last half of the chamber was caused by fuel deposition in the chamber and nozzle. The engine combustion occurred well downstream of the injector face

  16. Catalytic and charge transfer properties of transition metal dichalcogenides arising from electrochemical pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Chia, Xinyi; Ambrosi, Adriano; Sofer, Zdenek; Luxa, Jan; Pumera, Martin

    2015-05-26

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been the center of attention in the scientific community due to their properties that can be tapped on for applications in electrochemistry and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysis. We report on the effect of electrochemical treatment of exfoliated MoS2, WS2, MoSe2 and WSe2 nanosheets toward the goal of activating the electrochemical and HER catalytic properties of the TMDs. In particular, electrochemical activation of the heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) abilities of MoS2, MoSe2 and WSe2 is achieved via reductive treatments at identified reductive potentials based on their respective inherent electrochemistry. Comparing all TMDs, the charge transfer activation is most accentuated in MoSe2 and can be concluded that Mo metal and Se chalcogen type are more susceptible to electrochemical activation than W metal and S chalcogen type. With regards to the HER, we show that while MoS2 displayed enhanced performance when subjected to electrochemical reduction, WS2 fared worse upon oxidation. On the other hand, the HER performance of MoSe2 and WSe2 is independent of electrochemical redox treatment. We can conclude therefore that for the HER, S-containing TMDs are more responsive to redox treatment than compounds with the Se chalcogen. Our findings are beneficial toward understanding the electrochemistry of TMDs and the extent to which activation by electrochemical means is effective. In turn, when such knowledge is administered aptly, it will be promising for electrochemical uses.

  17. Adhesion and friction behavior of group 4 elements germanium, silicon, tin, and lead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Adhesion and friction studies were conducted with thin films of the group IV elements silicon, germanium, tin, and lead ion plated on the nickel (011) substrate. The mating surface was gold (111). Contacts were made for the elements in the clean state and with oxygen present. Adhesion and friction experiments were conducted at very light loads of 1 to 10 g. Sliding was at a speed of 0.7 mm/min. Friction results indicate that the more covalently bonded elements silicon and germanium exhibit lower adhesion and friction than the more metallic bonded tin and lead. The adhesion of gold to germanium was observed, and recrystallization of the transferred gold occurred. Plastic flow of germanium was seen with sliding. Oxygen reduced, but did not eliminate, the adhesion observed with germanium and silicon.

  18. Real-space electron transfer in III-nitride metal-oxide-semiconductor-heterojunction structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygi, S.; Koudymov, A.; Adivarahan, V.; Yang, J.; Simin, G.; Khan, M. Asif; Deng, J.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M. S.

    2005-07-01

    The real-space transfer effect in a SiO2/AlGaN /GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure (MOSH) from the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas at the heterointerface to the oxide-semiconductor interface has been demonstrated and explained. The effect occurs at high positive gate bias and manifests itself as an additional step in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristic. The real-space transfer effect limits the achievable maximum 2D electron gas density in the device channel. We show that in MOSH structures the maximum electron gas density exceeds up to two times that at the equilibrium (zero bias) condition. Correspondingly, a significant increase in the maximum channel current (up to two times compared to conventional Schottky-gate structures) can be achieved. The real-space charge transfer effect in MOSH structures also opens up a way to design novel devices such as variable capacitors, multistate switches, memory cells, etc.

  19. Free Energy and Temperature Dependence of Electron Transfer at the Metal-Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidsey, Christopher E. D.

    1991-02-01

    The rate constant of the electron-transfer reaction between a gold electrode and an electroactive ferrocene group has been measured at a structurally well-defined metal-electrolyte interface at temperatures from 1^circ to 47^circC and reaction free energies from -1.0 to +0.8 electron volts (eV). The ferrocene group was positioned a fixed distance from the gold surface by the self-assembly of a mixed thiol monolayer of (eta^5C_5H_5)Fe(eta^5C_5H_4)CO_2(CH_2)16SH and CH_3(CH_2)15SH. Rate constants from 1 per second (s-1) to 2 x 10^4 s-1 in 1 molar HClO_4 are reasonably fit with a reorganization energy of 0.85 eV and a prefactor for electron tunneling of 7 x 10^4 s-1 eV-1. Such self-assembled monolayers can be used to systematically probe the dependence of electron-transfer rates on distance, medium, and spacer structure, and to provide an empirical basis for the construction of interfacial devices such as sensors and traosducers that utilize macroscopically directional electron-transfer reactions.

  20. Laser-induced forward transfer for improving fine-line metallization in photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Aniorte, M. I.; Mouhamadou, B.; Alloncle, A. P.; Sarnet, T.; Delaporte, P.

    2016-06-01

    Grand challenges to create new front metallization techniques in photovoltaic focus considerable attention on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) approach. This alternative method aims to overcome the limitations of the well-established and mature screen-printing (SP) technique. Such limitations are for instance restrictions in the grid pattern design, high-temperature steps, and limited aspect ratio of the line contact (Poulain et al. in Appl Surf Sci 257:5241-5244, 2011). Although different new front contact metallization concepts have been studied, most of them require a second print step to increase the volume of the contact (Gao et al. in Proceedings of 25th EU PVSEC conference, 2010; Beaucarne and Schubert in Energy Proc 67:2-12, 2015; Lossen and Matusovsky in Energy Proc 67:156-162, 2015; Green in Phys E 14:65-70, 2002; Lennon et al. in Prog Photovolt Res Appl V21:1454-1468, 2012). As a result, it is desirable to find innovative metallization techniques to improve the cell efficiency without significantly increasing the cost. Although many challenges remain before to obtain high-quality, robust, and high-performance LIFT contact formation, it required a fully theoretical and experimental assessment. This paper presents the results of a study of the LIFT technique in picosecond regime and thick silver pastes to create high-quality conductive lines for photovoltaic applications.

  1. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  2. Construction of a subunit-fusion nitrile hydratase and discovery of an innovative metal ion transfer pattern

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongmei; Zhou, Li; Cui, Youtian; Kobayashi, Michihiko; Zhou, Zhemin

    2016-01-01

    Metallochaperones are metal-binding proteins designed to deliver the appropriate metal to a target protein. The metal is usually transferred between different proteins. In this study, we discovered that metal was transferred between the same subunit of a mutant nitrile hydratase (NHase). Various “activator proteins” mediate the trafficking of metal ions into NHases. We constructed fusion NHases by fusing the β- and α-subunits and/or the “activator proteins” of the NHase from Pseudomonas putida. The fusion NHases exhibited higher thermostability and tolerance to high concentrations of the product amide. The mechanism of the cobalt incorporation changed from a self-subunit swapping pattern to an apoprotein-specific molecular chaperone pattern in vivo and a metallochaperone pattern in vitro. Notably, the cobalt transfer occurred between the same α-subunit in the metallochaperone pattern. These results not only demonstrated the superiority of fusion-type NHases, but also revealed an innovative metal ion transfer pattern in metalloprotein biosynthesis. PMID:26755342

  3. Heavy metal pollution status and ecological risks of sediments under the influence of water transfers in Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Qian, Jin; Hou, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The effects of water transfer projects on water channels and the receiving water involved need to be understood. In this research, the compositions and particle size distributions of surface sediment and the Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn contents and distributions in the sediment along a water transfer route from the Wangyu River to Taihu Lake, China, were studied. The correlative relationship between the grain size trend and heavy metal content distribution suggested that heavy metals in Wangyu River sediment have affected the heavy metal contents of Taihu Lake sediment through silt and clay migrating in the transferred water. Enrichment factors and potential ecological risk values were calculated. Low levels of potential ecological risks are posed at 20 sampling sites in Taihu Lake, but higher-to-serious risks (potential ecological risk values >275) are posed at all Wangyu River sites. Toxicity of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Zn, and Ni) in the Wangyu River sediments is more serious than those in the Taihu Lake, but is similar to the entrance of Gonghu Bay. Multivariate statistical analyses (Pearson correlation, cluster, and factor analyses) suggested heavy metals in the study area have many sources, and the relationships between particle migration and heavy metal contents indicated transferring water are likely to lead to adverse ecological risks being posed in Taihu Lake.

  4. Characteristics of heavy metal transfer and their influencing factors in different soil-crop systems of the industrialization region, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyan; Yuan, Xuyin; Li, Tianyuan; Hu, Sun; Ji, Junfeng; Wang, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Soil heavy metals and their bioaccumulation in agricultural products have attracted widespread concerns, yet the transfer and accumulation characteristics of heavy metals in different soil-crop systems was rarely investigated. Soil and crop samples were collected from the typical agricultural areas in the Yangtze River Delta region, China. The concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and Hg in the soils, roots and grains of rice (Oryza Sativa L.), wheat (Triticum L.) and canola (Brassica napus L.) were determined in this study. Transfer ability of heavy metals in soil-rice system was stronger than those in soil-wheat and soil-canola systems. The wheat showed a strong capacity to transfer Zn, Cu and Cd from root to the grain while canola presented a restricting effect to the intake of Cu and Cd. Soil pH and total organic matter were major factors influencing metal transfer from soil to rice, whereas soil Al2O3 contents presented a negative effect on heavy metal mobility in wheat and canola cultivation systems. The concentration of Zn and Cd in crop grains could well predicted according to the stepwise multiple linear regression models, which could help to quantitatively evaluate the ecologic risk of heavy metal accumulation in crops in the study area.

  5. Molecular orbital (SCF-Xα-SW) theory of metal-metal charge transfer processes in minerals - II. Application to Fe2+ --> Ti4+ charge transfer transitions in oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1987-01-01

    A molecular orbital description, based on Xα-Scattered wave calculations on a (FeTiO10)14− cluster, is given for Fe2+ → Ti4+ charge transfer transitions in minerals. The calculated energy for the lowest Fe2+ → Ti4+ metal-metal charge transfer transition is 18040 cm−1 in reasonable agreement with energies observed in the optical spectra of Fe-Ti oxides and silicates. As in the case of Fe2+ → Fe3+ charge transfer in mixed-valence iron oxides and silicates, Fe2+ → Ti4+ charge transfer is associated with Fe-Ti bonding across shared polyhedral edges. Such bonding results from the overlap of the Fe(t 2g ) and Ti(t 2g ) 3d orbitals.

  6. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  7. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  8. A biomimetic principle for the chemical modification of metal surfaces: synthesis of tripodal catecholates as analogues of siderophores and mussel adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Franzmann, Elisa; Khalil, Faiza; Weidmann, Christoph; Schröder, Michael; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Smarsly, Bernd M; Maison, Wolfgang

    2011-07-25

    By following a biomimetic design principle, tetravalent scaffolds based on an adamantyl and trisalkylmethyl core structure have been synthesized. These scaffolds have been coupled to three catecholamines, thus resembling the characteristic tripodal recognition motif of many natural metal binders, such as mussel adhesion proteins and siderophores, for example, enterobactin. Besides this tripodal recognition element, our scaffolds provide a fourth position for the conjugation of effector molecules. These effectors can be conjugated through biocompatible conjugation techniques to the scaffold and can be used to tailor the properties of different metal surfaces for a range of applications, for example, in implant engineering. Herein, we describe the synthesis of several tripodal metal binders and their immobilization on TiO(2) surfaces by using a simple dip-coating procedure. Furthermore, we demonstrate the conjugation of our surface binders to the dye eosin Y as an effector molecule by peptide coupling. The resulting surfaces have been analyzed by using ellipsometry, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, and contact-angle measurements to confirm the specific loading on TiO(2) films and nanoparticles with our trivalent surface binders. As a proof of concept, we have demonstrated the functionalization of TiO(2) nanoparticles with the eosin Y dye.

  9. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Engine Calorimeter Heat Transfer Measurements and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1997-01-01

    A set of analyses was conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of metallized gelled liquid propellants in a rocket engine. The analyses used the data from experiments conducted with a small 30- to 40-lbf thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-wt %, 5-wt%, and 55-wt% loadings of aluminum with silicon dioxide gellant, and gaseous oxygen as the oxidizer. Heat transfer was computed based on measurements using calorimeter rocket chamber and nozzle hardware with a total of 31 cooling channels. A gelled fuel coating formed in the 0-, 5- and 55-wt% engines, and the coating was composed of unburned gelled fuel and partially combusted RP-1. The coating caused a large decrease in calorimeter engine heat flux in the last half of the chamber for the 0- and 5-wt% RP-1/Al. This heat flux reduction effect was analyzed by comparing engine runs and the changes in the heat flux during a run as well as from run to run. Heat transfer and time-dependent heat flux analyses and interpretations are provided. The 5- and 55-wt% RP-1/Al fueled engines had the highest chamber heat fluxes, with the 5-wt% fuel having the highest throat flux. This result is counter to the predicted result, where the 55 wt% fuel has the highest combustion and throat temperature, and therefore implies that it would deliver the highest throat heat flux. The 5-wt% RP-1/Al produced the most influence on the engine heat transfer and the heat flux reduction was caused by the formation of a gelled propellant layer in the chamber and nozzle.

  10. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser metal deposition by powder injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqiang

    Laser metal deposition is an additive manufacturing technique which allows quick fabrication of fully-dense metallic components directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. A self-consistent three-dimensional model was developed for the laser metal deposition process by powder injection, which simulates heat transfer, phase changes, and fluid flow in the melt pool. The governing equations for solid, liquid and gas phases in the calculation domain have been formulated using the continuum model. The free surface in the melt pool has been tracked by the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, while the VOF transport equation was solved using the Piecewise Linear Interface Calculation (PLIC) method. Surface tension was modeled by taking the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model combined with a force-balance flow algorithm. Laser-powder interaction was modeled to account for the effects of laser power attenuation and powder temperature rise during the laser metal deposition process. The governing equations were discretized in the physical space using the finite volume method. The advection terms were approximated using the MUSCL flux limiter scheme. The fluid flow and energy equations were solved in a coupled manner. The incompressible flow equations were solved using a two-step projection method, which requires a solution of a Poisson equation for the pressure field. The discretized pressure Poisson equation was solved using the ICCG (Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient) solution technique. The energy equation was solved by an enthalpy-based method. Temperature-dependent thermal-physical material properties were considered in the numerical implementation. The numerical model was validated by comparing simulations with experimental measurements.

  11. Lateral Gene Transfer in a Heavy Metal-Contaminated-Groundwater Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Hemme, Christopher L.; Green, Stefan J.; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Prakash, Om; Pettenato, Angelica; Chakraborty, Romy; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Jordan, I. King; Arkin, Adam P.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Unraveling the drivers controlling the response and adaptation of biological communities to environmental change, especially anthropogenic activities, is a central but poorly understood issue in ecology and evolution. Comparative genomics studies suggest that lateral gene transfer (LGT) is a major force driving microbial genome evolution, but its role in the evolution of microbial communities remains elusive. To delineate the importance of LGT in mediating the response of a groundwater microbial community to heavy metal contamination, representative Rhodanobacter reference genomes were sequenced and compared to shotgun metagenome sequences. 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequence analysis indicated that Rhodanobacter populations were highly abundant in contaminated wells with low pHs and high levels of nitrate and heavy metals but remained rare in the uncontaminated wells. Sequence comparisons revealed that multiple geochemically important genes, including genes encoding Fe2+/Pb2+ permeases, most denitrification enzymes, and cytochrome c553, were native to Rhodanobacter and not subjected to LGT. In contrast, the Rhodanobacter pangenome contained a recombinational hot spot in which numerous metal resistance genes were subjected to LGT and/or duplication. In particular, Co2+/Zn2+/Cd2+ efflux and mercuric resistance operon genes appeared to be highly mobile within Rhodanobacter populations. Evidence of multiple duplications of a mercuric resistance operon common to most Rhodanobacter strains was also observed. Collectively, our analyses indicated the importance of LGT during the evolution of groundwater microbial communities in response to heavy metal contamination, and a conceptual model was developed to display such adaptive evolutionary processes for explaining the extreme dominance of Rhodanobacter populations in the contaminated groundwater microbiome. PMID:27048805

  12. Laser Induced Forward Transfer of High Viscosity Silver Paste for New Metallization Methods in Photovoltaic and Flexible Electronics Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Munoz-Martin, D.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Sánchez-Cortezon, E.; Murillo-Gutierrez, J.

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) has been studied in the past as a promising approach for precise metallization in electronics using metallic inks and pastes. In this work we present large area metallization using LIFT of fully commercial silver-based pastes initially designed for solar cell screen-printing. We discuss the mechanisms for the material transfer both in ns and ps regimes of irradiation of these high viscosity materials, and the potential use of this technique in the photovoltaic industry (both in standard c-Si solar cells and thin film technologies) and flexible electronics devices. In particular we summarize the results of our group in this field, demonstrating that our approach is capable of improving the aspect ratio of the standard metallization patterns achieved with screen-printing technologies in those technological fields and, in addition, of fulfilling the requirements imposed by the mechanical properties of the substrates in flexible electronic applications.

  13. Study on metal microparticle content of the material transferred with Absorbing Film Assisted Laser Induced Forward Transfer when using silver absorbing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Kecskeméti, G.; Bor, Z.

    2006-04-01

    Absorbing Film Assisted Laser Induced Forward Transfer (AFA-LIFT) is a modified LIFT method where a high absorption coefficient thin film coating of a transparent substrate is used to transform the laser energy into kinetic in order to transfer the "target" material spread on it. This method can be used for the transfer of biomaterials and living cells, which could be damaged by direct irradiation of the laser beam. In previous experiments, ˜50-100 nm thick metal films have been used as absorbing layer. The transferred material can also contain metal microparticles originating from the absorbing thin film and acting as non-desired impurities in some cases. The aim of our work was to study how the properties (number, size and covered area) of metal particles transferred during the AFA-LIFT process depend on film thickness and the applied fluence. Silver thin films with different thickness (50-400 nm) were used as absorbing layers and real experimental conditions were modeled by a 100 μm thick water layer. The particles transferred without the use of water layer were also studied. The threshold laser fluence for the complete removal of the absorber from the irradiated area was found to strongly increase with increasing film thickness. The deposited micrometer and submicrometer particles were observed with optical microscope and atomic force microscope. Their size ranged from 100 nm to 20 μm and depended on the laser fluence. The increase in fluence resulted in an increasing number of particles of smaller average size.

  14. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  15. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  16. Specific cooperative effect of a macrocyclic receptor for metal ion transfer into an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroyuki; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Saito, Takumi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Naganawa, Hirochika; Hirayama, Naoki; Umetani, Shigeo; Imura, Hisanori; Shimojo, Kojiro

    2012-11-06

    An intramolecular cooperative extraction system for the removal of strontium cations (Sr(2+)) from water by use of a novel macrocyclic receptor (H(2)βDA18C6) composed of diaza-18-crown-6 and two β-diketone fragments in ionic liquid (IL) is reported, together with X-ray spectroscopic characterization of the resulting extracted complexes in the IL and chloroform phases. The covalent attachment of two β-diketone fragments to a diazacrown ether resulted in a cooperative interaction within the receptor for Sr(2+) transfer, which remarkably enhanced the efficiency of Sr(2+) transfer relative to a mixed β-diketone and diazacrown system. The intramolecular cooperative effect was observed only in the IL extraction system, providing a 500-fold increase in extraction performance for Sr(2+) over chloroform. Slope analysis and potentiometric titration confirmed that identical extraction mechanisms operated in both the IL and chloroform systems. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy revealed that the average distance between Sr(2+) and O atoms in the Sr(2+) complex was shorter in IL than in chloroform. Consequently, Sr(2+) was held by H(2)βDA18C6 more rigidly in IL than in chloroform, representing an important factor dominating the magnitude of the intramolecular cooperative effect of H(2)βDA18C6 for Sr(2+). Furthermore, competitive extraction studies with alkaline earth metal ions revealed that the magnitude of the intramolecular cooperative effect depended on the suitability between metal ion size and the cavity size of H(2)βDA18C6. Sr(2+) was successfully recovered from IL by controlling the pH in the receiving phase, and the extraction performance of H(2)βDA18C6 in IL was maintained after five repeated uses.

  17. Laser-direct process of Cu nano-ink to coat highly conductive and adhesive metallization patterns on plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hyungsuk; Lee, Byoungyoon; Jeong, Sooncheol; Lee, Myeongkyu

    2016-05-01

    We here present a simple, low-cost laser-direct process to fabricate conductive Cu patterns on plastic substrate. A Cu nano-ink was synthesized using Cu formate as a precursor. The Cu ink spin-coated on a polyimide substrate was selectively sintered using a pulsed ultraviolet laser beam. The unexposed regions of the coated ink could be removed by rinsing the whole film in the dispersion agent of the synthesized ink, which revealed a conductive Cu pattern. This allowed sintering and patterning to be simultaneously accomplished, with a minimum line width of ~20 μm available. The fabricated pattern remained strongly adhesive to the substrate and exhibited only a slight increase in resistance even after 1000 bending cycles to a radius of curvature of 4.8 mm.

  18. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    PubMed

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  19. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, J. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  20. Jahn-Teller effects in transition-metal compounds with small charge-transfer energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizokawa, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We have studied Jahn-Teller effects in Cs2Au2Br6, ACu3Co4O12(A=Ca or Y), and IrTe2 in which the ligand p-to-transition-metal d charge-transfer energy is small or negative. The Au+/Au3+ charge disproportionation of Cs2Au2Br6 manifests in Au 4f photoemission spectra. In Cs2Au2Br6 with negative Δ and intermediate U, the charge disproportionation can be described using effective d orbitals constructed from the Au 5d and Br 4p orbitals and is stabilized by the Jahn-Teller distortion of the Au3+ site with low-spin d8 configuration. In ACu3Co4O12, Δs for Cu3+ and Co4+ are negative and Us are very large. The Zhang-Rice picture is valid to describe the electronic state, and the valence change from Cu2+/Co4+ to Cu3+/Co3+ can be viewed as the O 2p hole transfer from Co to Cu or d9 + d6L → d9L + d6. In IrTe2, both Δ and U are small and the Ir 5d and Te 5p electrons are itinerant to form the multi-band Fermi surfaces. The ideas of band Jahn-Teller transition and Peierls transition are useful to describe the structural instabilities.

  1. Energy transfer mechanisms in heavy metal oxide glasses doped with lanthanide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragin, Tomasz; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, glasses based on bismuth, germanium, gallium and sodium oxides have been synthesized in terms of low phonon energy (724 cm-1) and high thermal stability (ΔT = 127°C). Synthesis process have been optimized using low vacuum conditions (approx. 60 mBar) to improve the transmittance in the mid-infrared region and decrease the content of hydroxide groups in the material structure. Glass doped with erbium ions has been pumped with high power diode (λexc = 980 nm) to obtain luminescence in the band of 2.7 μm as a result of Er3+: 4I11/2 -> 4I13/2 radiative transition. For analysis of emission properties and energy transfer mechanisms, glasses co-doped with Er3+/Ho3+, Er3+/Pr3+, Er3+/Nd3+ ions have been synthesized. Obtained results indicated energy transfer phenomenon between lanthanide ions and elements forming the glass matrix. This demonstrates that developed heavy metal oxide glass doped with optimal rare earth elements system is an attractive material for mid-infrared applications.

  2. Improving heat transfer with pool boiling by covering of heating surface with metallic spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, M.; Djuric, M.; Zavargo, Z.; Novakovic, M. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, boiling heat transfer (BHT) is investigated experimentally. Smooth copper walls were covered with single sphere layer and corresponding temperature difference and heat flux were measured. The results were compared with published data for several types of heating surfaces. Comparative analysis shows that surfaces covered with spheres have characteristics as good as the other systems, if not better. There are many ways to enhance boiling heat transfer. One of them is to cover the heating surface with a layer of solid particles, which either remain on the surface during the process or circulate through the boiling liquid, generating a porous two-component, three-phase system. Particles are made of various materials (glass, alumosilicate, corundum, sand, mullite some metals, etc.), which are shaped as spheres mostly, but sometimes are irregular bodies. Many different parameters were proposed to characterize the porous layer. The influence of particles can be expressed by introducing the effective thermal-physical properties of a complex medium. Also, if the working regime can be described as any kind of fluidization, then all quantities developed to be applied to this matter can be used in the case of heat fluidization.

  3. Binary Blue Metal-poor Stars: Evidence for Asymptotic Giant Branch Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W.; Cowan, John J.

    2003-07-01

    We present new abundance analyses of six blue metal-poor (BMP) stars with very low iron abundances ([Fe/H]<-2), based on new high-resolution echelle spectra. Three are spectroscopic binaries, and three have constant radial velocities. The chemical compositions of these two groups are very different, as the binary BMP stars have large enhancements of carbon and neutron-capture elements that are products of s-process nucleosynthesis. One star, CS 29497-030, has an extreme enhancement of lead, [Pb/Fe]=+3.7, the largest abundance in any star yet discovered. It probably also has an oxygen overabundance compared to the other BMP stars of our sample. The binary BMP stars must have attained their status via mass transfer during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolutions of their companion stars, which are now unseen and most likely are compact objects. We have not found any examples of AGB mass transfer among BMP binaries with [Fe/H]>-2.

  4. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  5. Development of analytic models for placental transfer of the heaviest metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Kelman, B.J.

    1987-12-01

    Inferential information concerning placental passage has been obtained from sequential measurements of concentration ratios in the embryo/fetus and in pregnant animals following injection, and experiments in perfused placentas have provided kinetic data. Although wide ranges of values are reported, results generally indicate that most heavy metals do not readily cross the placental barriers or deposit in the conceptus after acute exposures. Concentration measurements in human and in wild and domestic animal populations, which provide data relating to environmental exposures, suggest that relative fetal deposition is greater with chronic than with acute exposures. There are several factors that influence placental transfer and fetoplacental content. These include mass and physicochemical state, route of administration, species-specific changes in placental structure and function relative to stage of gestation at exposure, and stage-related changes in tissue affinities. We will compare the fetoplacental metabolism of the heaviest metallic elements (Z greater than or equal to 82) to illustrate these several concepts, and to examine and compare the models that have been proposed to describe and explain these patterns and to provide a basis for extrapolation to man.

  6. Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer: Coupling between Chromophore Molecules and Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Xie, Tao; Qian, Ruo-Can; Long, Yi-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from a single metallic nanoparticle to the molecules adsorbed on its surface has attracted more and more attentions in recent years. Here, a molecular beacon (MB)-regulated PRET coupling system composed of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and chromophore molecules has been designed to study the influence of PRET effect on the scattering spectra of GNPs. In this system, the chromophore molecules are tagged to the 5'-end of MB, which can form a hairpin structure and modified on the surface of GNPs by its thiol-labeled 3'-end. Therefore, the distance between GNPs and chromophore molecules can be adjusted through the open and close of the MB loop. From the peak shift, the PRET interactions of different GNPs-chromophore molecules coupling pairs have been calculated by discrete dipole approximation and the fitting results match well with the experimental data. Therefore, the proposed system has been successfully applied for the analysis of PRET situation between various metallic nanoparticles and chromophore molecules, and provides a useful tool for the potential application in screening the PRET-based nanoplasmonic sensors.

  7. Radiative transfer modeling for quantifying lunar surface minerals, particle size, and submicroscopic metallic Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Li, Lin

    2011-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to quantify lunar surface minerals (agglutinate, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, ilmenite, and volcanic glass), particle sizes, and the abundance of submicroscopic metallic Fe (SMFe) from the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) data set with Hapke's radiative transfer theory. The mode is implemented for both forward and inverse modeling. We implement Hapke's radiative transfer theory in the inverse mode in which, instead of commonly used look-up tables, Newton's method and least squares are jointly used to solve nonlinear questions. Although the effects of temperature and surface roughness are incorporated into the implementation to improve the model performance for application of lunar spacecraft data, these effects cannot be extensively addressed in the current work because of the use of lab-measured reflectance data. Our forward radiative transfer model results show that the correlation coefficients between modeled and measured spectra are over 0.99. For the inverse model, the distribution of the particle sizes is all within their measured range. The range of modeled SMFe for highland samples is 0.01%-0.5%, and for mare samples it is 0.03%-1%. The linear trend between SMFe and ferromagnetic resonance (Is) for all the LSCC samples is consistent with laboratory measurements. For quantifying lunar mineral abundances, the results show that the R squared for the training samples (Is/FeO ≤ 65) are over 0.65 with plagioclase having highest correlation (0.94) and pyroxene having the lowest correlation (0.68). In future work, the model needs to be improved for handling more mature lunar soil samples.

  8. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    DOE PAGES

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; ...

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate bymore » pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.« less

  9. A study into the role of surface capping on energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Dipankar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-01

    Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and light harvesting devices because metal nanoclusters and semiconductor QDs are promising candidates for photon harvesting. Here, we have designed well defined metal cluster-semiconductor nanostructures using different surface capped negatively charged Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) and positively charged cysteamine capped CdTe quantum dots using electrostatic interactions. The main focus of this article is to address the impact of surface capping agents on the photophysical properties of Au cluster-CdTe QD hybrid nanocomposites. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic studies reveal that photoluminescence quenching, radiative and nonradiative rate, and energy transfer between Au nanoclusters and CdTe QDs have been influenced by the nature of the capping agent. We have calculated the energy transfer related parameters such as the overlap integral, distance between donor and acceptor, Förster distance, efficiency of energy transfer and rate of energy transfer from CdTe QDs to three different Au NCs. Photoluminescence quenching varies from 73% to 43% when changing the capping agents from bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glutathione (GSH). The efficiency of the energy transfer from CdTe QDs to BSA-capped Au NCs is found to be 83%, for Cys-capped Au NCs it was 46% and for GSH-capped Au NCs it was 35%. The efficiency depends on the number of Au clusters attached per QD. This reveals that the nature of capping ligands plays a crucial role in the energy transfer phenomena from CdTe QDs to Au NCs. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic

  10. Electrostatic potentials for metal-oxide surfaces and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitz, F. H.; Mintmire, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    As most technologically important metals will form oxides readily, any complete study of adhesion at real metal surfaces must include the metal-oxide interface. The role of this ubiquitous oxide layer cannot be overlooked, as the adhesive properties of the oxide or oxide-metal system can be expected to differ profoundly from the adhesive properties of a bare metal surface. We report on the development of a computational method for molecular-dynamics simulations, which explicitly includes variable charge transfer between anions and cations. This method is found to be capable of describing the elastic properties, surface energies, and surface relaxation of crystalline metal oxides accurately. We discuss in detail results using this method for α-alumina and several of its low-index faces.

  11. The electron-transfer based interaction between transition metal ions and photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs): a platform for metal ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Liao, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zou, Mingjian; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2013-12-15

    The electron-transfer based quenching effect of commonly encountered transition metal ions on the photoluminescence of grapheme quantum dots (GQDs) was for the first time investigated, and was found to be associated with electron configuration of the individual metal ion. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the metal ion chelator, can competitively interact with metal ions to recover the quenched photoluminescence of GQDs. Basically, metal ions with empty or completely filled d orbits could not quench the photoluminescence of GQDs, but this quenching effect was observed for the metal ions with partly filled d orbits. Based on the quenching-recovering strategy, a simple optical metal sensing platform was established by taking Ni(2+) as an example. Using the nickel ion-specific chelating reagent, dimethylglyoxime (DMG), to replace EDTA, a detection limit of 4.1 μM was obtained in standard solution. This proposed strategy does not need further functionalization of GQDs, facilitating the application for simple, fast and cost-effective screening of metal ions.

  12. A study into the role of surface capping on energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Bain, Dipankar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-28

    Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and light harvesting devices because metal nanoclusters and semiconductor QDs are promising candidates for photon harvesting. Here, we have designed well defined metal cluster-semiconductor nanostructures using different surface capped negatively charged Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) and positively charged cysteamine capped CdTe quantum dots using electrostatic interactions. The main focus of this article is to address the impact of surface capping agents on the photophysical properties of Au cluster-CdTe QD hybrid nanocomposites. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic studies reveal that photoluminescence quenching, radiative and nonradiative rate, and energy transfer between Au nanoclusters and CdTe QDs have been influenced by the nature of the capping agent. We have calculated the energy transfer related parameters such as the overlap integral, distance between donor and acceptor, Förster distance, efficiency of energy transfer and rate of energy transfer from CdTe QDs to three different Au NCs. Photoluminescence quenching varies from 73% to 43% when changing the capping agents from bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glutathione (GSH). The efficiency of the energy transfer from CdTe QDs to BSA-capped Au NCs is found to be 83%, for Cys-capped Au NCs it was 46% and for GSH-capped Au NCs it was 35%. The efficiency depends on the number of Au clusters attached per QD. This reveals that the nature of capping ligands plays a crucial role in the energy transfer phenomena from CdTe QDs to Au NCs. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  13. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  14. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  15. Importance of Mobile Genetic Elements and Conjugal Gene Transfer for Subsurface Microbial Community Adaptation to Biotransformation of Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Soren J.

    2005-06-01

    The overall goal of this project is to investigate the effect of mobile genetic elements and conjugal gene transfer on subsurface microbial community adaptation to mercury and chromium stress and biotransformation. Our studies focus on the interaction between the fate of these metals in the subsurface and the microbial community structure and activity.

  16. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  17. Trophic transfer of trace metals from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the polychaete N. virens and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Diet is an important exposure route for the uptake of trace metals by aquatic invertebrates, with trace metal trophic transfer depending on 2 stages - assimilation and subsequent accumulation by the predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of trace metals from the sediment-dwelling polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor from metal-rich estuarine sediments in southwestern UK to 2 predators - another polychaete N. virens (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe, Ag, As, Mn). N. virens showed net accumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from the prey; accumulation increased with increasing prey concentration, but a coefficient of trophic transfer decreased with increasing prey concentration, probably because a higher proportion of accumulated metal in the prey is bound in less trophically available (insoluble) detoxified forms. The trace metal accumulation patterns of P. varians apparently restricted significant net accumulation of metals from the diet of N. diversicolor to just Cd. There was significant mortality of the decapods fed on the diets of metal-rich worms. Metal-rich invertebrates that have accumulated metals from the rich historical store in the sediments of particular SW England estuaries can potentially pass these metals along food chains, with accumulation and total food chain transfer depending on the metal assimilation efficiencies and accumulation patterns of the animal at each trophic level. This trophic transfer may be significant enough to have ecotoxicological effects. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  18. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  19. Metal/Ceramic Adhesion at the Fe/TiN Interface: Electronic and Magnetic Structure, and Effect of S Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joo-Hyoung; Freeman, A. J.; Olson, G. B.

    2004-03-01

    As part of our ongoing effort in steel research to design a new class of materials with advanced fracture toughness and strength, we performed first-principles calculations on the Fe matrix/TiN fine particle interface with the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method for film geometry(Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, and Freeman, Phys. Rev. B, 24), 864 (1981) within the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA(J. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77), 3865 (1996)), and compared the results with those found previously for Fe/TiC(T. Shishidou,Joo-Hyoung Lee, Yu-Jun Zhao, A. J. Freeman, and G. B. Olson, unpublished). The work of adhesion (3.82 J/m^2 for Fe/TiC, and 3.79 J/m^2 for Fe/TiN) and their calculated force separation laws are very close to each other, but the induced Ti magnetic moment at the interface shows a large difference (-0.02 μ_B for Fe/TiC, and -0.19 μ_B for Fe/TiN). In order to investigate impurity effects, 25% of S atoms were inserted at the interface; results of calculations (now in progress) on the effects of S will be analyzed and discussed.

  20. Characterization of the Nonlinear Viscoelastic and Adhesive Properties of Polyurea and Characterization of Polyurea-Clad Metallic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-14

    explosion of cylindrical shells in order to arrive at the underpinnings of his model. He was guided by experimental results that indicated an...process of stretch-forming sheet metal. Int J Mech Sci 9:609-620. doi: 10.1016/0020-7403(67)90066-5 Mott NF (1947) Fragmentation of shell cases. Proc...surfaces of storage tanks, swimming pools, truck flat-beds, roofs , water and sewer pipes, bridges, boats and other marine struc- tures, and concrete

  1. Assessing effects of metal mining effluent on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction in a trophic-transfer exposure system.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, Carrie J; Dubé, Monique G; Weber, Lynn P; Driedger, Kimberlea L; Janz, David M

    2006-10-15

    Assessment of effects of metal mine effluent (MME) on aquatic organisms in lab-based settings predominantly evaluates contaminant transfer through the water only with little emphasis on food-borne exposure. The effects of MME on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) (FHM) have been reported downstream of metal mine discharges in the Junction Creek system, Sudbury, ON, but to date, no study has investigated the significance of trophic transfer in this system. Our objective was to develop a self-sustaining trophic-transfer bioassay, using Chironomus tentans and FHM, that allowed assessment of the effects of not only water-borne (FHM-only) but also food- and water-borne (trophic-transfer) exposure to MME on FHM reproduction. Reproductive performance of FHM was assessed for 21 days under controlled laboratory conditions to obtain baseline data of various endpoints, including egg production and hatching success. Exposure to 45% (v/v) Copper Cliff mine effluent (CCME) and control treatments for both systems was then conducted for a further 21 days. It was evident that reproductive output in both the water-only and the trophic-transfer system was reduced compared to controls. It was only in the trophic-transfer system that a significant reduction in larval hatching and an increase in deformities occurred after exposure to CCME. This would suggest that contaminated food was a route of exposure causing effects on larval survival.

  2. Heavy metals in intensive greenhouse vegetable production systems along Yellow Sea of China: Levels, transfer and health risk.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyou; Huang, Biao; Tian, Kang; Holm, Peter E; Zhang, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    Recently, greenhouse vegetable production (GVP) has grown rapidly and counts a large proportion of vegetable production in China. In this study, the accumulation, health risk and threshold values of selected heavy metals were evaluated systematically. A total of 120 paired soil and vegetable samples were collected from three typical intensive GVP systems along the Yellow Sea of China. Mean concentrations of Cd, As, Hg, Pb, Cu and Zn in greenhouse soils were 0.21, 7.12, 0.05, 19.81, 24.95 and 94.11 mg kg(-1), respectively. Compared to rootstalk and fruit vegetables, leafy vegetables had relatively high concentrations and transfer factors of heavy metals. The accumulation of heavy metals in soils was affected by soil pH and soil organic matter. The calculated hazard quotients (HQ) of the heavy metals by vegetable consumption decreased in the order of leafy > rootstalk > fruit vegetables with hazard index (HI) values of 0.61, 0.33 and 0.26, respectively. The HI values were all below 1, which indicates that there is a low risk of greenhouse vegetable consumption. Soil threshold values (STVs) of heavy metals in GVP system were established according to the health risk assessment. The relatively lower transfer factors of rootstalk and fruit vegetables and higher STVs suggest that these types of vegetables are more suitable for cultivation in greenhouse soils. This study will provide an useful reference for controlling heavy metals and developing sustainable GVP.

  3. Evolution of heavy metals in municipal solid waste during bio-drying and implications of their subsequent transfer during combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dongqing; Zhang Hua; Wu Changlin; Shao Liming; He Pinjing

    2011-08-15

    Bio-drying has been applied to improve the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to combustion. In the present study, evolution of heavy metals in MSW during bio-drying and subsequent combustion was studied using one aerobic and two combined hydrolytic-aerobic scenarios. Heavy metals were concentrated during bio-drying and transformed between different metal fractions, namely the exchangeable, carbonate-bound, iron- and manganese-oxides-bound, organic-matter-bound and residual fractions. The amounts of heavy metals per kg of bio-dried MSW transferred into combustion flue gas increased with bio-drying time, primarily due to metals enrichment from organics degradation. Because of their volatility, the partitioning ratios of As and Hg in flue gas remained stable so that bio-drying and heavy metal speciation had little effect on their transfer and partitioning during combustion. In contrast, the partitioning ratios of Pb, Zn and Cu tended to increase after bio-drying, which likely enhanced their release potential during combustion.

  4. Metal-metal coupling elements of mixed-valence pentaammineruthenium dimers: The hole-transfer superexchange case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naklicki, M. L.; Evans, C. E. B.; Crutchley, R. J.

    1997-03-01

    The extent of metal-metal coupling in the mixed-valence complexes [Ru(NH 3) 52(μ-L)] 3+], where L is 2,5-dimethyl-(Me 2dicyd 2-), 2,5-dichloro- (Cl 2dicyd 2-), 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro- (Cl 4dicyd 2-) or unsubstituted (dicyd 2-) 1,4-dicyanamidobenzene dianion, was evaluated by comparing theoretical values of metal-metal coupling elements with estimates of the free energy of resonance exchange which were derived from the free energies of comproportionation. Poor agreement was found with the Hush model; however, an excellent correlation was seen with the model of Creutz, Newton and Sutin (CNS). It would appear that the CNS model is remarkably successful in describing the extent of metal-metal coupling for the strongly coupled valence trapped complexes of this study.

  5. Energy transfer ultraviolet photodetector with 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative-metal complexes as acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang-Hong; Li, Wen-Lian; Chen, Zhi; Li, Shi-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Wei, Xiong-Bang

    2015-02-01

    We choose 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative-metal complexes (Beq, Mgq, and Znq) as the acceptors (A) and 4,4',4”-tri-(2-methylphenyl phenylamino) triphenylaine (m-MTDATA) as the donor (D) respectively to study the existing energy transfer process in the organic ultraviolet (UV) photodetector (PD), which has an important influence on the sensitivity of PDs. The energy transfer process from D to A without exciplex formation is discussed, differing from the working mechanism of previous PDs with Gaq [Zisheng Su, Wenlian Li, Bei Chu, Tianle Li, Jianzhuo Zhu, Guang Zhang, Fei Yan, Xiao Li, Yiren Chen and Chun-Sing Lee 2008 Appl. Phys. Lett. 93 103309)] and REq [J. B. Wang, W. L. Li, B. Chu, L. L. Chen, G. Zhang, Z. S. Su, Y. R. Chen, D. F. Yang, J. Z. Zhu, S. H. Wu, F. Yan, H. H. Liu, C. S. Lee 2010 Org. Electron. 11 1301] used as an A material. Under 365-nm UV irradiation with an intensity of 1.2 mW/cm2, the m-MTDATA:Beq blend device with a weight ratio of 1:1 shows a response of 192 mA/W with a detectivity of 6.5× 1011 Jones, which exceeds those of PDs based on Mgq (146 mA/W) and Znq (182 mA/W) due to better energy level alignment between m-MTDATA/Beq and lower radiative decay. More photophysics processes of the PDs involved are discussed in detail. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61371046, 61405026, 61474016, and 61421002) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M552330).

  6. Metals in benthic macrofauna and biogeochemical factors affecting their trophic transfer to wild fish around fish farm cages.

    PubMed

    Kalantzi, I; Papageorgiou, N; Sevastou, K; Black, K D; Pergantis, S A; Karakassis, I

    2014-02-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrates and wild fish aggregating in the vicinity of four Mediterranean fish farms were sampled. Concentrations of metals and other elements were measured in macrofaunal taxa and in fish tissues (muscle, liver, gills, bone, gonad, stomach, intestine, and stomach content). Biological and geochemical characteristics play an important role in metal accumulation in benthic invertebrates, and consequently in metal transfer to higher trophic levels. Macroinvertebrates accumulated lower concentrations of most metals and elements than their respective sediment, except As, P, Na, Zn and Cd. Elemental concentrations of benthic organisms increased with increasing sediment metal content, except Cd, and with % silt, refractory organic matter and chlorophyll-a of sediment due to the influence of sediment geochemistry on metal bioavailability. Tolerant species were found to accumulate higher concentrations of most metals and elements, except for Cd, than equilibrium species. The ecological and morphological characteristics of the benthic invertebrates can affect the bioaccumulation of metals and elements in macrobenthos. Hg and P were found to increase their concentrations from zoobenthos to wild fish aggregating around fish cages feeding on macrofauna.

  7. Superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated by femtosecond laser with tunable water adhesion: from lotus leaf to rose petal.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiangyou; Fan, Peixun; Gong, Dingwei; Jiang, Dafa; Zhang, Hongjun; Li, Lin; Zhong, Minlin

    2015-05-13

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable water adhesion have attracted much interest in fundamental research and practical applications. In this paper, we used a simple method to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable water adhesion. Periodic microstructures with different topographies were fabricated on copper surface via femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. The topography of these microstructures can be controlled by simply changing the scanning speed of the laser beam. After surface chemical modification, these as-prepared surfaces showed superhydrophobicity combined with different adhesion to water. Surfaces with deep microstructures showed self-cleaning properties with extremely low water adhesion, and the water adhesion increased when the surface microstructures became flat. The changes in surface water adhesion are attributed to the transition from Cassie state to Wenzel state. We also demonstrated that these superhydrophobic surfaces with different adhesion can be used for transferring small water droplets without any loss. We demonstrate that our approach provides a novel but simple way to tune the surface adhesion of superhydrophobic metallic surfaces for good potential applications in related areas.

  8. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    PubMed Central

    ALMILHATTI, Hercules Jorge; NEPPELENBROEK, Karin Hermana; VERGANI, Carlos Eduardo; MACHADO, Ana Lúcia; PAVARINA, Ana Cláudia; GIAMPAOLO, Eunice Teresinha

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm) were cast and subjected to polishing (P) or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB) or 250 mm (250SB) Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP), Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP), Targis Link (TL), and one surface modification system Siloc (S), were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7). All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min) until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05), while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05). No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05). Conclusion Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi. PMID:24473727

  9. Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide Complexes in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Chu, Ivan K.

    2008-03-12

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of ternary complexes of CoIII(salen)+, FeIII(salen)+, and MnIII(salen)+ with several angiotensin peptide analogs was studied using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially equipped to perform SID experiments. Time-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) were modeled using an RRKM-based approach developed in our laboratory. The approach utilizes a very flexible analytical expression for the internal energy deposition function that is capable of reproducing both single-collision and multiple-collision activation in the gas phase and excitation by collisions with a surface. The energetics and dynamics of competing dissociation pathways obtained from the modeling provides important insight on the competition between proton transfer, electron transfer, loss of neutral peptide ligand, and other processes that determine gas-phase fragmentation of these model systems. Similar fragmentation behavior was obtained for various CoIII(salen)-peptide systems of different angiotensin analogs. In contrast, dissociation pathways and relative stabilities of the complexes changed dramatically when cobalt was replaced with trivalent iron or manganese. We demonstrate that the electron transfer efficiency is correlated with redox properties of the metalIII(salen) complexes (Co > Fe > Mn), while differences in the types of fragments formed from the complexes reflect differences in the modes of binding between the metal-salen complex and the peptide ligand. RRKM modeling of time- and collision energy-resolved SID data suggests that the competition between proton transfer and electron transfer during dissociation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes is mainly determined by differences in entropy effects while the energetics of these two pathways are very similar.

  10. Etchant-free graphene transfer using facile intercalation of alkanethiol self-assembled molecules at graphene/metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Manabu; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Wang, Shengnan; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel etchant-free transfer method of graphene using the intercalation of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) at the graphene/Cu interfaces. The early stage of intercalation proceeds through graphene grain boundaries or defects within a few seconds at room temperature until stable SAMs are formed after a few hours. The formation of SAMs releases the compressive strain of graphene induced by Cu substrates and make graphene slightly n-doped due to the formation of interface dipoles of the SAMs on metal surfaces. After SAM formation, the graphene is easily delaminated off from the metal substrates and transferred onto insulating substrates. The etchant-free process enables us to decrease the density of charged impurities and the magnitude of potential fluctuation in the transferred graphene, which suppress scattering of carriers. We also demonstrate the removal of alkanethiol SAMs and reuse the substrate. This method will dramatically reduce the cost of graphene transfer, which will benefit industrial applications such as of graphene transparent electrodes.We report a novel etchant-free transfer method of graphene using the intercalation of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) at the graphene/Cu interfaces. The early stage of intercalation proceeds through graphene grain boundaries or defects within a few seconds at room temperature until stable SAMs are formed after a few hours. The formation of SAMs releases the compressive strain of graphene induced by Cu substrates and make graphene slightly n-doped due to the formation of interface dipoles of the SAMs on metal surfaces. After SAM formation, the graphene is easily delaminated off from the metal substrates and transferred onto insulating substrates. The etchant-free process enables us to decrease the density of charged impurities and the magnitude of potential fluctuation in the transferred graphene, which suppress scattering of carriers. We also demonstrate the removal of alkanethiol

  11. Effects of sewage sludge amendment on snail growth and trace metal transfer in the soil-plant-snail food chain.

    PubMed

    Bourioug, Mohamed; Gimbert, Frédéric; Alaoui-Sehmer, Laurence; Benbrahim, Mohammed; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-11-01

    Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations in a soil plant (Lactuca sativa) continuum were measured after sewage sludge amendment. The effects of sewage sludge on growth and trace metal bioaccumulation in snails (Cantareus aspersus) were investigated in a laboratory experiment specifically designed to identify contamination sources (e.g., soil and leaves). Application of sewage sludge increased trace metal concentrations in topsoil. However, except Zn, metal concentrations in lettuce leaves did not reflect those in soil. Lettuce leaves were the main source of Zn, Cu, and Cd in exposed snails. Bioaccumulation of Pb suggested its immediate transfer to snails via the soil. No apparent toxic effects of trace metal accumulation were observed in snails. Moreover, snail growth was significantly stimulated at high rates of sludge application. This hormesis effect may be due to the enhanced nutritional content of lettuce leaves exposed to sewage sludge.

  12. Radiative heat transfer between metallic gratings using Fourier modal method with adaptive spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Riccardo; Noto, Antonio; Guizal, Brahim; Antezza, Mauro

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the radiative heat transfer between two identical metallic one-dimensional lamellar gratings. To this aim we present and exploit a modification to the widely used Fourier modal method, known as adaptive spatial resolution, based on a stretch of the coordinate associated with the periodicity of the grating. We first show that this technique dramatically improves the rate of convergence when calculating the heat flux, allowing us to explore smaller separations. We then present a study of heat flux as a function of the grating height, highlighting a remarkable amplification of the exchanged energy, ascribed to the appearance of spoof-plasmon modes, whose behavior is also spectrally investigated. Differently from previous works, our method allows us to explore a range of grating heights extending over several orders of magnitude. By comparing our results to recent studies we find a consistent quantitative disagreement with some previously obtained results going up to 50%. In some cases, this disagreement is explained in terms of an incorrect connection between the reflection operators of the two gratings.

  13. Testing Reciprocity of Spin Pumping and Spin Transfer Torque in Ferromagnet/Spin-Orbit Metal Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Carl; Emori, Satoru; Nan, Tianxiang; Sun, Nian

    2015-03-01

    Spin pumping from a ferromagnet (FM) to a normal metal (NM) and spin transfer torque (STT) generated in a FM from an injected spin current should be reciprocal processes governed by the spin mixing conductance. The same should be true for the spin Hall effect (SHE) and inverse SHE, which are used to generate and measure spin currents. Past experiments on multilayer thin films involving FM and NM interfaces have measured only spin pumping or spin injection, and have utilized incomplete modeling that results in different effective values for the same parameter such as the spin mixing conductance or spin Hall angle. This gives rise to a large range of values reported in the literature. Here we develop a complete model for spin flow in the FM/NM system including SHE, spin diffusion and spin pumping that allows us to determine the true values of the spin transport parameters. To explore the physcis we use STT-ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) experiments of NM/FM/NM trilayers, and FMR spectroscopy of FM/NM bilayers where we simultaneously measure damping changes due to spin pumping, voltage generated by the inverse SHE, and STT generated by the SHE. These experiments, combined with the complete modeling, allow us to test the reciprocity of spin pumping and STT plus the SHE and its inverse.

  14. Heat transfer enhancement of PCM melting in 2D horizontal elliptical tube using metallic porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourabian, Mahmoud; Farhadi, Mousa; Rabienataj Darzi, Ahmad Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the melting process of ice as a phase-change material (PCM) saturated with a nickel-steel porous matrix inside a horizontal elliptical tube is investigated. Due to the low thermal conductivity of the PCM, it is motivated to augment the heat transfer performance of the system simultaneously by finding an optimum value of the aspect ratio and impregnating a metallic porous matrix into the base PCM. The lattice Boltzmann method with a double distribution function formulated based on the enthalpy method, is applied at the representative elementary volume scale under the local thermal equilibrium assumption between the PCM and porous matrix in the composite. While reducing or increasing the aspect ratio of the circular tubes leads to the expedited melting, the 90° inclination of each elliptical tube in the case of the pure PCM melting does not affect the melting rate. With the reduction in the porosity, the effective thermal conductivity and melting rate in all tubes promoted. Although the natural convection is fully suppressed due to the significant flow blockage in the porous structure, the melting rates are generally increased in all cases.

  15. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  16. Design of a new, multi-purpose, light-curing adhesive comprising a silane coupling agent, acidic adhesive monomers and dithiooctanoate monomers for bonding to varied metal and dental ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tanaka, Hisaki; Fujii, Toshihide; Deguchi, Mikito; Negoro, Noriyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    A newly designed, light-curing adhesive was investigated for its bonding effectiveness to porcelain, alumina, zirconia, Au, Au alloy, Ag alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy. Four experimental adhesives were prepared using varying contents of the following: a silane coupling agent [3-methacryloyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (3-MPTES)], acidic adhesive monomers [6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate(6-MHPA),6-methacryloyloxyhexyl3-phosphonopropionate(6-MHPP)and 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET)], and dithiooctanoate monomers [6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT)]. After all adherend surfaces were sandblasted and applied with an experimental adhesive, shear bond strengths (SBSs) of a light-curing resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) to the adherend materials after 2,000 times of thermal cycling were measured. For the experimental adhesive which contained 3-MPTES (30.0 wt%), 6-MHPA (1.0 wt%), 6-MHPP (1.0 wt%), 4-MET (1.0 wt%), 6-MHDT (0.5 wt%) and 10-MDDT (0.5 wt%), it consistently yielded the highest SBS for all adherend surfaces in the range of 20.8 (4.8)-30.3 (7.9) MPa, with no significant differences among all the adherend materials (p>0.05). Therefore, the newly designed, multi-purpose, light-curing adhesive was able to deliver high SBS to all the adherend materials tested.

  17. Characterization and Adhesion in Cu/Ru/SiO2/Si Multilayer Nano-scale Structure for Cu Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, N.; Venkatesh, S. H.; Singh, D. R. P.; Alford, T. L.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we have characterized the microstructure, resistivity, and dynamic deformation behavior of Cu/Ru/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 samples under scratch loading conditions. Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples showed higher elastic recovery and hardness when compared to the Cu/SiO2 samples. In the case of Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples, Ru acts as a glue layer between the Cu and the SiO2 substrate providing both strength and toughness against dynamic loading. Hence, the critical load for delamination is higher for Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples compared to Cu/SiO2 samples. Our results show that Cu/Ru/SiO2 thin films present significant potential to be used in Cu metallization.

  18. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer through Open-Cell Metal Foam Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mehrdad

    In this thesis analytical and numerical investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer through open cell metal foam heat exchangers are presented. Primarily, different representative unit cell approximations, i.e, tetrakaidecahedron, dodecahedron and cubic are discussed. By applying the thermal resistance analogy, a novel formulation for evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams is proposed. The model improves previous models based on cubic or hexagonal cells. By using computer tomography images of a nickel foam sample a realistic 3D geometry is created and the foam's geometrical properties (i.e., porosity and surface area to volume ratio) and effective thermal conductivity are obtained. By using the experimentally found values of permeability, Forchheimer coefficient and solid-fluid interfacial convection coefficient, mathematical models for fluid flow and heat transfer in metal foams are developed. Two different assumptions: local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE), are used. LTNE yields more accurate results. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of metal foam is made and validated against the experimental data for a square cross sectional nickel foam heat exchanger channel heated from the side walls while cooling air passes through the foam. The simulations are carried out for constant temperature or heat flux and different foam materials with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per inch. The results show that the bonding of the foam to the walls has a considerable impact on the heat transfer rate. Convective heat transfer coefficients in terms of Nusselt number as functions of Reynolds number are also obtained. The design and CFD modeling of metal foam cross flow heat exchangers are also discussed. The results indicate both effectiveness and number of transfer units (NTU) for the metal foam heat exchangers are higher than those of a hollow channel; however, the effectiveness-NTU curves

  19. Effect of additive metals, Sn, Ga, and In in Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys on initial bond strength of 4-META adhesive cement to these alloys.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shin-ichi; Churnjitapirom, Pornkiat; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three additives, Sn, Ga, and In, as well as the main constituents, Pd and Cu, of Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys on the initial bond strength of 4-META adhesive cement to these alloys. The Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys consisted of 20%, 30% or 40% Pd, and 10%, 15% or 20% Cu, 20% Au, and Ag as balance. Besides, additive metals (Sn, Ga, and In) of 2% and 4% were added to these compositions. The addition of three additives, in general, increased the initial bond strength of the cement in comparison to the mother compositions (0% additives), although the degrees of effectiveness of the three additives were different and varied with their contents. Among these additives, a remarkable increase in bond strength was observed with the addition of In. The increase in Cu content, in many cases, resulted in an increase in bond strength at high Pd contents (30% and 40%), but a decrease at low Pd content (20%) in some cases. The positive effects of the three additives and Cu could be due to the formation of a suitable oxide layer for strong bonding with 4-META.

  20. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  1. Enhancement of thermal spin transfer torque by double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a nonmagnetic metal spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Tseng, P.; Yang, Y. Y.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of thermal spin transfer torque in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal spacer is proposed in this study. The results indicate that, given the same temperature difference, thermal spin transfer torque and charge current density for the proposed double barrier magnetic tunnel junction configuration can be approximately twice as much as that of the traditional single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. This enhancement can be attributed to the resonant tunneling mechanism in the double-barrier structure.

  2. Tailoring liquid/solid interfacial energy transfer: fabrication and application of multiscale metallic surfaces with engineered heat transfer and electrolysis properties via femtosecond laser surface processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Troy P.; Wilson, Chris; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Kruse, Corey; Hassebrook, Anton; Somanas, Isra; Ndao, Sidy; Gogos, George; Alexander, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond Laser Surface Processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique for the fabrication of self-organized multiscale surface structures on metals that are critical for advanced control over energy transfer at a liquid/solid interface in applications such as electrolysis. The efficiency of the hydrogen evolution reaction on stainless steel 316 electrodes in a 1 molar potassium hydroxide solution is used to analyze the role of surface geometry to facilitate the phase conversion of the liquid to a gaseous state in the vicinity of the interface. It is found that the efficiency of the electrolysis process is directly related to the separation of micro-scale features on an electrode surface. The enhancement is attributed to the size of the valleys between microstructures controlling the contact between an evolving vapor bubble and the electrode surface. The results suggest an alternative pathway for the tailoring of interfacial energy transfer on structured surfaces separate from traditional benchmarks such as surface area and contact angle.

  3. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  4. Accurate analysis of electron transfer from quantum dots to metal oxides in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Fahimi, Mohammad; Fathi, Davood; Ansari-Rad, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Electron transfer rate from quantum dot (QD) to metal oxide (MO) in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) has an important role in the efficiency. In this work, we analyse the electron transfer rate from CdSe, CdS and CdTe QDs to TiO2, ZnO and SnO2 MOs by extending the related equations with considering various effects, based on the Marcus theory. In this regard, the effects of QD diameter, QD-MO spacing, the crystalline defects, temperature, and the reorganizational energy, on the electron transfer rate are investigated. The results show that, the maximum electron transfer rate is achieved for CdTe QD with the mentioned three MOs. Moreover, in order to direct the designer to reach the appropriate QDs-MOs combinations for obtaining the maximum electron transfer rate, the average electron transfer rate for various combinations is calculated. For the verification of simulation method, a part of work has been compared with the previous experimental and theoretical results, which indicates the correctness of our simulation algorithm.

  5. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  6. Design guidelines for hybrid microcircuits; organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were studied to acquire an adequate information base to generate a guideline document for the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specific areas covered include: (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives; (2) effects of long term aging at 150C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives; (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics; (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive; (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters; (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives; and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  7. Coordination structure and charge transfer in microsolvated transition metal hydroxide clusters [MOH](+)(H2O)1-4.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Brett M; Voss, Jonathan M; Zhou, Jia; Garand, Etienne

    2015-09-21

    Infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of transition metal hydroxide clusters, [MOH](+)(H2O)1-4·D2 with M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, are presented and analyzed with the aid of density functional theory calculations. For the [MnOH](+), [FeOH](+), [CoOH](+) and [ZnOH](+) species, we find that the first coordination shell contains three water molecules and the four ligands are arranged in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. [CuOH](+) can have either two or three water molecules in the first shell arranged in a planar arrangement, while [NiOH](+) has an octahedral ligand geometry with the first shell likely closed with five water molecules. Upon closure of the first coordination shell, characteristic stretch frequencies of hydrogen-bonded OH in the 2500-3500 cm(-1) region are used to pinpoint the location of the water molecule in the second shell. The relative energetics of different binding sites are found to be metal dependent, dictated by the first-shell coordination geometry and the charge transfer between the hydroxide and the metal center. Finally, the frequency of the hydroxide stretch is found to be sensitive to the vibrational Stark shift induced by the charged metal center, as observed previously for the smaller [MOH](+)(H2O) species. Increasing solvation modulates this frequency by reducing the extent of the charge transfer while elongating the M-OH bond.

  8. Charge and Energy Transfer in the Metal-free Indoline Dyes for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Li-ying; Gu, Wen-xiang; Chen, Yue-hui; Ma, Feng-cai

    2006-06-01

    Metal-free indoline dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells were studied by employing quantum chemistry methods. Comparative study of the properties of both ground and excited states of metal-free indoline dyes for dye- sensitized solar cells revealed: (i) as the number of rhodanine rings increases, the energy difference between HOMO and LUMO decreases and there is a red shift in the absorption spectrum with the binding energy increased, and the transition dipole moment decreased; (ii) Based on an analysis of charge differential density, we observed that the charge and energy are transfered from the phenylethenyl to the indoline and rhodanine rings; (iii) The electron-hole coherences are mainly on the indoline and rhodanine rings, and the exciton sizes are 30 and 40 atoms for indoline dyes with one and two rhodanline rings, respectively. These results serve as a good example of computer-aided design in metal-free indoline dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  9. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  10. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  11. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  12. Investigation of Heat Transfer at the Mold/Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Light Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Pehlke; John T. Berry

    2005-12-16

    Accurate modeling of the metal casting process prior to creating a mold design demands reliable knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the mold metal interface as a function of both time and location. The phenomena concerned with the gap forming between the mold and the solidifying metal are complex but need to be understood before any modeling is attempted. The presence of mold coatings further complicates the situation. A commercial casting was chosen and studied in a gravity permanent mold casting process. The metal/mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) was the focus of the research. A simple, direct method has been used to evaluate the IHTC. Both the simulation and experiments have shown that a reasonably good estimate of the heat transfer coefficient could be made in the case studied. It has been found that there is a good agreement between experiments and simulations in the temperature profiles during the solidification process, given that the primary mechanism of heat transfer across the gap in permanent mold casting of light alloys is by conduction across the gap. The procedure utilized to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient can be applied to other casting processes. A recently completed project involving The University of Michigan and Mississippi State University, together with several industrial partners, which was supported by the USDOE through the Cast Metals Coalition, examined a number of cases of thermal contact. In an investigation which gave special consideration to the techniques of measurement, several mold coatings were employed and results presented as a function of time. Realistic conditions of coating thickness and type together with an appropriate combination of mold preheat and metal pouring temperature were strictly maintained throughout the investigation. Temperature sensors, in particular thermocouples, play an important part in validating the predictions of solidification models. Cooling

  13. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  14. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  15. An in situ transmission electron microscope deformation study of the slip transfer mechanisms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Robertson, I.M.; Birnbaum, H.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-09-01

    The slip transfer mechanisms across grain boundaries in 310 stainless steel, high-purity aluminum, and a Ni-S alloy have been studied by using the in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) deformation technique. Several interactions between mobile lattice dislocations and grain boundaries have been observed, including the transfer and generation of dislocations at grain boundaries and the nucleation and propagation of a grain boundary crack. Quantitative condition have been established to correctly predict the slip transfer mechanism.

  16. Manipulating the excitation transfer in Photosystem I using a Fabry-Perot metal resonator with optical subwavelength dimensions.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Alexander; Trost, Anna-Lisa; Skandary, Sepideh; Hussels, Martin; Meixner, Alfred J; Karapetyan, Navasard V; Brecht, Marc

    2014-04-07

    We demonstrate controlled modification of the fluorescence and energy transfer properties of Photosystem I (PSI) - one of the most important light harvesting systems - by using a newly developed approach to produce optical subwavelength microcavities for cryogenic temperature issues. The experiments were carried out on PSI from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis as it shows a broad and structured fluorescence emission. By changing the distance between the cavity forming mirrors, the electromagnetic field mode structure around PSI is varied affecting the emission and energy transfer properties, which allows us to selectively enhance signals of resonant emitters and suppress off-resonant emission. By comparing the experimental data with simulations, we are able to show how excitation transfer within PSI is affected by the microcavity. The ability to control the energy transfer within such efficient energy converters as photosynthetic proteins can establish the opportunity for enhancing the efficiencies of bio-solar applications. The defined control of the resonance conditions by microcavities makes them a preferable tool to study the effects of additional electromagnetic modes on the energy transfer in any coupled multi-chromophore system. The resonator geometry excludes the direct contact of the proteins with any surface. Possible quenching or denaturation of the complexes close to metal surfaces is still an insuperable obstacle for studies with proteins and nanostructures, which can be avoided by resonators.

  17. Rapid and facile ratiometric detection of an anthrax biomarker by regulating energy transfer process in bio-metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihe; Li, Bin; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Liming; Zheng, Youxuan

    2016-11-15

    A ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on luminescent bio-metal-organic framework was prepared by exchanging both Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) cations into anionic bio-MOF-1. Due to a highly efficient energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) (>89%), emission color of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 was orange-red even though Tb(3+) was the dominant content in this Tb/Eu co-doping material. More interestingly, this energy transfer process could be modulated by dipicolinic acid (DPA), an unique biomarker for bacillus spores. With DPA addition, corresponding DPA-to-Tb(3+) energy transfer was gradually enhanced while the energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) was significantly weakened. By regulating the energy transfer process in Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1, visual colorimetric sensing of DPA in porous MOF was realized for the first time. Detection limit of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 for DPA was 34nM, which was much lower than an infectious dosage of Bacillus anthracis spores (60μM) for human being. Besides, Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 showed a remarkable selectivity over other aromatic ligands and amino acids. More importantly, this porous ratiometric sensor worked equally well in human serum. These particularly attractive features of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 made the direct, rapid and naked-eye detection of DPA for practical application possible.

  18. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  19. Polyethylene separator activated by hybrid coating improving Li+ ion transference number and ionic conductivity for Li-metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xufeng; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Haijiao; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhu, Jiefang; Qiu, Zhengfu; Zhao, Yin; Zhang, Meihong; Yuan, Shuai

    2017-02-01

    Low Li+ ion transference number is one fatal defect of the liquid LiPF6 electrolyte for Li-metal anode based batteries. This work aims to improve Li+ ion transference number and ionic conductivity polyethylene (PE) separators. By a simple dip-coating method, the water-borne nanosized molecular sieve with 3D porous structure (ZSM-5) can be coated on PE separators. Especially, the Li+ ion transference number is greatly enhanced from 0.28 to 0.44, which should be attributed to the specific pore structure and channel environment of ZSM-5 as well as the interaction between ZSM-5 and electrolyte. Compared with the pristine PE separator, the ionic conductivity of modified separators is remarkably improved from 0.30 to 0.54 mS cm-1. As results, the C-rate capability and cycling stability are both improved. The Li-metal battery using the ZSM-5-modified PE separator keeps 94.2% capacity after 100 cycles. In contrast, the discharge capacity retention of the battery using pristine PE is only 74.7%.

  20. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  1. Tension assisted metal transfer of graphene for Schottky diodes onto wafer scale substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooho; Lee, Su Chan; Kim, Yongsung; Heo, Jinseong; Lee, Kiyoung; Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Jaekwan; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Chang Seung; Nam, Min Sik; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-02-01

    We developed an effective graphene transfer method for graphene/silicon Schottky diodes on a wafer as large as 6 inches. Graphene grown on a large scale substrate was passivated and sealed with a gold layer, protecting graphene from any possible contaminant and keeping good electrical contact. The Au/graphene was transferred by the tension-assisted transfer process without polymer residues. The gold film itself was used directly as the electrodes of a Schottky diode. We demonstrated wafer-scale integration of graphene/silicon Schottky diode using the proposed transfer process. The transmission electron microscopy analysis and relatively low ideality factor of the diodes indicated fewer defects on the interface than those obtained using the conventional poly(methyl methacrylate)-assisted transfer method. We further demonstrated gas sensors as an application of graphene Schottky diodes.

  2. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  3. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  4. A computational analysis and suitability assessment of cold-gas dynamic spraying of glass-fiber-reinforced poly-amide 6 for use in direct-adhesion polymer metal hybrid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Bell, W. C.; Daqaq, M.; Ma, L.; Seyr, Norbert; Erdmann, Marc; Holzleitner, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA transient non-linear dynamics computational analysis of cold-gas dynamic spraying (CGDS) of glass-fiber-reinforced poly-amide (nylon) 6 has been carried out using Ansys-Autodyn [Century Dynamics Inc., Ansys-Autodyn Version 11.0, User Documentation, Century Dynamics Inc. (a subsidiary of ANSYS Inc.), 2007] in order to assess the suitability of this spraying technology for coating of metal stampings used in polymer metal hybrid (PMH) load-bearing automotive component applications. In addition, the suitability of the CGDS is assessed with respect to a need for metal stamping surface preparation/treatment, the ability to deposit polymeric material without significant material degradation, the ability to selectively overcoat the metal stamping, the resulting magnitude of the polymer-to-metal adhesion strength, durability of the polymer/metal bond with respect to prolonged exposure to high-temperature/high-humidity and mechanical/thermal fatigue service conditions, and compatibility with the automotive body-in-white ( BIW) manufacturing process chain. The analysis revealed that CGDS can be considered as a viable technology for coating of metal stampings used in PMH load-bearing automotive component applications.

  5. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  6. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  7. Effects of ultrasonic agitation on adhesion strength of micro electroforming Ni layer on Cu substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Xu, Zheng; Shao, Ligeng

    2016-03-01

    Micro electroforming is an important technology, which is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in MEMS. The micro metal devices have the problem of poor adhesion strength, which has dramatically influenced the dimensional accuracy of the devices and seriously limited the development of the micro electroforming technology. In order to improve the adhesion strength, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process in this paper. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under ultrasonic and ultrasonic-free conditions. The effects of the ultrasonic agitation on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization and alternating current (a.c.) impedance methods. The real surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry method. The compressive stress and the crystallite size of the electroforming layer were measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The adhesion strength of the electroforming layer was measured by scratch test. The experimental results show that the imposition of the ultrasonic agitation decreases the polarization overpotential and increases the charge transfer process at the electrode-electrolyte interface during the electroforming process. The ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size and the real surface area, and reduces the compressive stress. Then the adhesion strength is improved about 47% by the ultrasonic agitation in average. In addition, mechanisms of the ultrasonic agitation improving the adhesion strength are originally explored in this paper. The mechanisms are that the ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size, which reduces the compressive stress. The lower the compressive stress is, the larger the adhesion strength is. Furthermore, the ultrasonic agitation increases the real surface area, enhances the mechanical interlocking strength and consequently increases the adhesion

  8. Study of the risk of heavy metal transfer to homoeopathic mother tinctures.

    PubMed

    Busch, J; Werner, W; Huwer, A

    2012-04-01

    To assess the risk of heavy metal contamination of homoeopathic mother tinctures, 9 plant species and 1 fungus used in the manufacture of homoeopathic medicaments were investigated. Mother tinctures were prepared according to the manufacturing procedures described in the European Pharmacopoeia. The original herbal drug and the material processed during production were analysed for their cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) content. The plant components were harvested from 2 sites contaminated by different heavy metal exposure pathways and compared with reference material from Deutsche Homöopathie-Union (DHU). It was confirmed that in all cases a significant depletion of all heavy metals studied occurred during manufacture of the mother tincture, regardless of the starting material used. In all cases, most of the heavy metal content was retained in the press cake; low levels only were detected in the mother tincture. None of the mother tinctures of plant origin exceeded the required limits, not even those of plant starting materials originating from highly contaminated sites. Substantial heavy metal concentrations could only be detected in the mother tincture of the fungus Amanita muscaria, calculated from the dry weight of the starting material. According to the results obtained, a risk-based approach to heavy metal assessment is suggested where permanent control is focused on the heavy metals accumulating in organisms such as fungi.

  9. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  10. Fundamental study of transpiration cooling. [pressure drop and heat transfer data from porous metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Dutton, J. L.; Benson, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal pressure drop data and heat transfer data generated on porous 304L stainless steel wire forms, sintered spherical stainless steel powder, and sintered spherical OFHC copper powder are reported and correlated. Pressure drop data was collected over a temperature range from 500 R to 2000 R and heat transfer data collected over a heat flux range from 5 to 15 BTU/in2/sec. It was found that flow data could be correlated independently of transpirant temperature and type (i.e., H2, N2). It was also found that no simple relation between heat transfer coefficient and specimen porosity was obtainable.

  11. Polyimide adhesives for titanium and composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Approach results in synthesis of addition polyimide adhesives with exceptional high temperature capabilities that show excellent potential for bonding titanium metal, polyimide/graphite composites, and combinations of these materials. Adhesives compatible with materials used in high performance aircraft and spacecraft structures also prove highly desirable in many other applications involving similar adherents.

  12. Synthesis of highly fluorescent metal (Ag, Au, Pt, and Cu) nanoclusters by electrostatically induced reversible phase transfer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xun; Luo, Zhentao; Zhang, Qingbo; Zhang, Xinhai; Zheng, Yuangang; Lee, Jim Yang; Xie, Jianping

    2011-11-22

    This paper reports a simple and scalable method for the synthesis of highly fluorescent Ag, Au, Pt, and Cu nanoclusters (NCs) based on a mild etching environment made possible by phase transfer via electrostatic interactions. Using Ag as a model metal, a simple and fast (total synthesis time < 3 h) phase transfer cycle (aqueous → organic (2 h incubation) → aqueous) has been developed to process originally polydisperse, nonfluorescent, and unstable Ag NCs into monodisperse, highly fluorescent, and extremely stable Ag NCs in the same phase (aqueous) and protected by the same thiol ligand. The synthetic protocol was successfully extended to fabricate highly fluorescent Ag NCs protected by custom-designed peptides with desired functionalities (e.g., carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amine). The facile synthetic method developed in this study should largely contribute to the practical applications of this new class of fluorescence probes.

  13. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 4, Plan for technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffee, W.B.; Davis, S.

    1994-04-01

    This project was developed because of growing concern over the decline of the US metal casting industry; it springs from the Public Law 101-425 ``Department of Energy Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Act of 1990.`` The project sought the opinion of two groups in the metal casting industry: the operating users (foundries, other producers), and information purveyors. They were asked what was working, what was not, and what were some promising, innovative programs that are taking place or should be tried. Results and recommendations are given.

  14. A Conceptual Design Study on the Application of Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Technology to the Solar Thermal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Robertson, C. S.; Ehde, C. L.; Divakaruni, S. M.; Stacy, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Alkali metal heat transfer technology was used in the development of conceptual designs for the transport and storage of sensible and latent heat thermal energy in distributed concentrator, solar Stirling power conversion systems at a power level of 15 kWe per unit. Both liquid metal pumped loop and heat pipe thermal transport were considered; system configurations included: (1) an integrated, focal mounted sodium heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with latent heat thermal energy storage; (2) a liquid sodium pumped loop with the latent heat storage, Stirling engine-generator, pump and valves located on the back side of the concentrator; and (3) similar pumped loops serving several concentrators with more centralized power conversion and storage. The focus mounted HPSR was most efficient, lightest and lowest in estimated cost. Design confirmation testing indicated satisfactory performance at all angles of inclination of the primary heat pipes to be used in the solar receiver.

  15. Continuous transfer of liquid metal droplets across a fluid-fluid interface within an integrated microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Gol, Berrak; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J; Kurdzinski, Michael E; Tang, Shi-Yang; Petersen, Phred; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-06-07

    Micro scale liquid metal droplets have been hailed as the potential key building blocks of future micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). However, most of the current liquid metal enabled systems involve millimeter scale droplets, which are manually injected onto the desired locations of the microchip. Despite its simplicity, this method is impractical for patterning large arrays or complex systems based on micro scale droplets. Here, we present a microfluidic chip, which integrates continuous generation of micro scale galinstan droplets in glycerol, and the hydrodynamic transfer of these droplets into sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Observation via high-speed imaging along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis are utilised to comprehend the lateral migration of droplets from the glycerol to NaOH fluid. This platform is simple, can be readily integrated into other microfluidic systems, and creates flexibility by separating the continuous phase for droplet generation from the eventual target carrier fluid within a monolithic chip.

  16. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  17. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  18. Wetting and Interfacial Characteristics of Mg AZ61 Alloy/Galvanized Steel in Cold Metal Transfer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiaoli; Yang, Fan; Cao, Rui; Chen, Jianhong; Guo, Tingbiao

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic sessile drop method was used to study the wetting behavior of galvanized steel by molten Mg AZ61 alloy under cold metal transfer condition. The interfacial microstructures were also analyzed by using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometry. The observed results showed that the wetting behavior was directly determined by the wire feed speed (or the heat input). The Al-Fe intermetallic layer and Zn-rich zone were observed both at the interface and at the close of triple line. The formations of these interfacial characteristics satisfy the thermodynamic characteristic of Mg-Al/Fe and Mg-Zn/Fe systems.

  19. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (<50 nm), it is challenging to characterize their material properties for correlation to adhesive performance. We circumvent this problem by estimating the elastic modulus of the silane-based coatings using the buckling instability formed between two materials of a large elastic mismatch. The elastic modulus is found to effectively predict the joint strength of an epoxy/aluminum joint that has been reinforced with silane coupling agents. This buckling

  20. Bio-inspired transition metal-organic hydride conjugates for catalysis of transfer hydrogenation: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    McSkimming, Alex; Chan, Bun; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Ball, Graham E; Colbran, Stephen B

    2015-02-09

    Taking inspiration from yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH), a benzimidazolium (BI(+) ) organic hydride-acceptor domain has been coupled with a 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) metal-binding domain to afford a novel multifunctional ligand (L(BI+) ) with hydride-carrier capacity (L(BI+) +H(-) ⇌L(BI) H). Complexes of the type [Cp*M(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ]2 (M=Rh, Ir) have been made and fully characterised by cyclic voltammetry, UV/Vis spectroelectrochemistry, and, for the Ir(III) congener, X-ray crystallography. [Cp*Rh(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ]2 catalyses the transfer hydrogenation of imines by formate ion in very goods yield under conditions where the corresponding [Cp*Ir(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ] and [Cp*M(phen)Cl][PF6 ] (M=Rh, Ir) complexes are almost inert as catalysts. Possible alternatives for the catalysis pathway are canvassed, and the free energies of intermediates and transition states determined by DFT calculations. The DFT study supports a mechanism involving formate-driven RhH formation (90 kJ mol(-1) free-energy barrier), transfer of hydride between the Rh and BI(+) centres to generate a tethered benzimidazoline (BIH) hydride donor, binding of imine substrate at Rh, back-transfer of hydride from the BIH organic hydride donor to the Rh-activated imine substrate (89 kJ mol(-1) barrier), and exergonic protonation of the metal-bound amide by formic acid with release of amine product to close the catalytic cycle. Parallels with the mechanism of biological hydride transfer in yADH are discussed.

  1. TRANSITION METAL CATALYSIS IN CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION: ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel and diversified macromolecular structures, which include polymers with designed topologies (top), compostions (middle), and functionalities (bottom), can be prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization processes. These polymers can be synthesized from a large variety of...

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) for Photon Collection and Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Monica C.

    . To address problem (a), we incorporated antenna molecules (i.e. perylene diimides) to expand light collection and then transfer energy to the primary chromophores. To address problem (b), we observed that excitons can achieve up to 2,025 hops in a porphyrin-based metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystal within its 3 ns lifetime. By precisely aligning the chromophores in the MOF, we showed that long-distance exciton transport (i.e. ultra-fast, sequential hopping) was consistent with the well-established Forster theory. To address problems (c) and (d), we introduced MOF components one step at a time to optimize optical path length and crystal-thickness. This allowed us to incorporate MOFs (normally bulk crystals) into a MOF film. The approach exploited both MOF chemistry and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of crystalline MOFs in a highly controlled fashion on functional surfaces. We also incorporated good light-harvesting molecules as struts in MOFs to increase the visible absorption. Designing MOF-based OPVs can provide insight into solar energy conversion. This can potentially lead to much higher efficiencies, based on the simultaneous resolution of the four challenges hindering OPV performance.

  3. Adhesion in a Vacuum Environment and its Implications for Dust Mitigation Techniques on Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkebile, Stephen; Gaier, James R.

    2012-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, the adhesion of dust to critical spacecraft systems was a greater problem than anticipated and resulted in functional degradation of thermal control surfaces, spacesuit seals, and other spacecraft components. Notably, Earth-based simulation efforts did not predict the magnitude and effects of dust adhesion in the lunar environment. Forty years later, we understand that the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment, coupled with micrometeorite impacts and constant ion and photon bombardment from the sun result in atomically clean and high surface energy dust particles and spacecraft surfaces. However, both the dominant mechanism of adhesion in airless environments and the conditions for high fidelity simulation tests have still to be determined. The experiments presented in here aim to aid in the development of dust mitigation techniques for airless bodies (e.g., lunar surface, asteroids, moons of outer planets). The approach taken consists of (a) quantifying the adhesion between common polymer and metallic spacecraft materials and a synthetic noritic volcanic glass, as a function of surface cleanliness and of triboelectric charge transfer in a UHV environment, and (b) determining parameters for high fidelity tests through investigation of adhesion dependence on vacuum environment and sample treatment. Adhesion force has been measured between pins of spacecraft materials and a plate of synthetic volcanic glass by determining the pull-off force with a torsion balance. Although no significant adhesion is generally observed directly as a result of high surface energies, the adhesion due to induced electrostatic charge is observed to increase with spacecraft material cleanliness, in some cases by over a factor of 10. Furthermore, electrostatically-induced adhesion is found to decrease rapidly above pressures of 10-6 torr. It is concluded that high-fidelity tests should be conducted in high to ultrahigh vacuum and include an ionized surface cleaning

  4. Friction behavior of members of the platinum metals group with gold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The adhesion and friction behavior of the platinum metals group was examined with clean surfaces and surfaces selectively contaminated with oxygen, vinyl chloride (C2H3Cl), and methyl mercaptan (CH3SH). A pin or disk specimen configuration was used with the pin being a single crystal of gold of the (111) orientation and with the platinum metal disks also being single crystals of the (111) or (0001) orientation. Loads applied ranged from 1 to 10 g and a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min was employed. Results indicate adhesion and transfer of gold to all of the platinum metals. Despite this observation friction differences existed among the metals in the group. These differences are related to surface chemical activity. Adsorption of various friction reducing species was selective. With some adsorbates present strong adhesive forces between metals were still observed.

  5. Electrocatalysis of anodic, oxygen-transfer reactions at noble metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, J.E.

    1992-06-09

    Voltammetry at rotated disk and rotated ring-disk electrodes was applied to the study of several aspects of anodic, oxygen-transfer reactions at noble electrodes. Anodic reactions which involve the transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the oxidation products generally exhibit a voltammetric response characterized by severe kinetic limitations. Mechanistic studies were performed at noble electrodes in order to contrive strategies for improving the kinetics of these reactions. Competitive adsorption studies were used to devise an adsorption hierarchy for Au rotated disk electrodes. It was concluded that adsorption was a prerequisite for oxidations involving the transfer of oxygen present on the electrodes surface as adsorbed hydroxyl radicals. The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol was studied at Au, Pt, Pd, glassy carbon, PbO{sub 2}, and Bi-doped PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The ECL intensity was determined to be inversely related to electrochemical activity for the oxidation of luminol. It was concluded that the oxygen-transfer oxidation of luminol to 3-aminophthalate ( n = 4 eq mol{sup {minus}1}) corresponded to the dark reaction, whereas the electron-transfer oxidation of luminol with n = 1 eq mol{sup {minus}1} initiated the chemiluminescent reaction in solution.

  6. Metal-like transport in proteins: A new paradigm for biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2012-02-01

    Electron flow in biologically proteins generally occurs via tunneling or hopping and the possibility of electron delocalization has long been discounted. Here we report metal-like transport in protein nanofilaments, pili, of bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens that challenges this long-standing belief [1]. Pili exhibit conductivities comparable to synthetic organic metallic nanostructures. The temperature, magnetic field and gate-voltage dependence of pili conductivity is akin to that of quasi-1D disordered metals, suggesting a metal-insulator transition. Magnetoresistance (MR) data provide evidence for quantum interference and weak localization at room temperature, as well as a temperature and field-induced crossover from negative to positive MR. Furthermore, pili can be doped with protons. Structural studies suggest the possibility of molecular pi stacking in pili, causing electron delocalization. Reducing the disorder increases the metallic nature of pili. These electronically functional proteins are a new class of electrically conductive biological proteins that can be used to generate future generation of inexpensive and environmentally-sustainable nanomaterials and nanolectronic devices such as transistors and supercapacitors. [1] Malvankar et al. Nature Nanotechnology, 6, 573-579 (2011)

  7. Metal transfer to plants grown on a dredged sediment: use of radioactive isotope 203Hg and titanium.

    PubMed

    Caille, Nathalie; Vauleon, Clotilde; Leyval, Corinne; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2005-04-01

    Improperly disposed of dredged sediments contaminated with metals may induce long-term leaching and an increase of metal concentrations in ground waters and vegetal cover plants. The objective of the study was to quantify the sediment-to-plant transfer of Cu, Pb, Hg and Zn with a particular focus on the pathway of Hg and to determine whether the establishment of vegetal cover modifies the metal availability. A pot experiment with rape (Brassica napus), cabbage (Brassica oleraccea) and red fescue (Festuca rubra) was set up using a sediment first spiked with the radioisotope 203Hg. Zinc concentrations (197-543 mg kg(-1) DM) in leaves were higher than Cu concentration (197-543 mg kg(-1) DM), Pb concentration (2.3-2.6 mg kg(-1) DM) and Hg concentration (0.9-1.7 mg kg(-1) DM). Leaves-to-sediment ratios decreased as follows: Zn > Cu > Hg > Pb. According to Ti measurements, metal contamination by dry deposition was less than 1%. Mercury concentration in plant leaves was higher than European and French thresholds. Foliar absorption of volatile Hg was a major pathway for Hg contamination with a root absorption of Hg higher in rape than in cabbage and red fescue. Growth of each species increased Cu solubility. Zinc solubility was increased only in the presence of rape. The highest increase of Cu solubility was observed for red fescue whereas this species largely decreased Zn solubility. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements suggested that Cu solubilisation could result from organic matter or release of natural plant exudates. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measures suggested that the high Zn solubility in the presence of rape could originate from a generation of acidity in rape rhizosphere and a subsequent dissolution of calcium carbonates. Consequently, emission of volatile Hg from contaminated dredged sediments and also the potential increase of metal solubility by a vegetal cover of grass when used in phytostabilisation must be taken into account by decision

  8. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Transfer-free electrical insulation of epitaxial graphene from its metal substrate.

    PubMed

    Lizzit, Silvano; Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Orlando, Fabrizio; Baraldi, Alessandro; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco; Perkins, Edward; Hofmann, Philip

    2012-09-12

    High-quality, large-area epitaxial graphene can be grown on metal surfaces, but its transport properties cannot be exploited because the electrical conduction is dominated by the substrate. Here we insulate epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001) by a stepwise intercalation of silicon and oxygen, and the eventual formation of a SiO(2) layer between the graphene and the metal. We follow the reaction steps by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and demonstrate the electrical insulation using a nanoscale multipoint probe technique.

  10. Surface Charge Transfer Doping via Transition Metal Oxides for Efficient p-Type Doping of II-VI Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xia, Feifei; Shao, Zhibin; He, Yuanyuan; Wang, Rongbin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Tianhao; Duhm, Steffen; Zhao, Jianwei; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Jie, Jiansheng

    2016-11-22

    Wide band gap II-VI nanostructures are important building blocks for new-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the difficulty of realizing p-type conductivity in these materials via conventional doping methods has severely handicapped the fabrication of p-n homojunctions and complementary circuits, which are the fundamental components for high-performance devices. Herein, by using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated a simple yet efficient way to achieve controlled p-type doping on II-VI nanostructures via surface charge transfer doping (SCTD) using high work function transition metal oxides such as MoO3, WO3, CrO3, and V2O5 as dopants. Our calculations revealed that these oxides were capable of drawing electrons from II-VI nanostructures, leading to accumulation of positive charges (holes injection) in the II-VI nanostructures. As a result, Fermi levels of the II-VI nanostructures were shifted toward the valence band regions after surface modifications, along with the large enhancement of work functions. In situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations verified the significant interfacial charge transfer between II-VI nanostructures and surface dopants. Both theoretical calculations and electrical transfer measurements on the II-VI nanostructure-based field-effect transistors clearly showed the p-type conductivity of the nanostructures after surface modifications. Strikingly, II-VI nanowires could undergo semiconductor-to-metal transition by further increasing the SCTD level. SCTD offers the possibility to create a variety of electronic and optoelectronic devices from the II-VI nanostructures via realization of complementary doping.

  11. Coherence in metal-metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer excited states of a dimetallic complex investigated by ultrafast transient absorption anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung; Mara, Michael W; Wang, Xianghuai; Lockard, Jenny V; Rachford, Aaron A; Castellano, Felix N; Chen, Lin X

    2011-04-28

    Coherence in the metal-metal-to-ligand-charge transfer (MMLCT) excited state of diplatinum molecule [Pt(ppy)(μ-(t)Bu(2)pz)](2) has been investigated through the observed oscillatory features and their corresponding frequencies as well as polarization dependence in the single-wavelength transient absorption (TA) anisotropy signals. Anticorrelated parallel and perpendicular TA signals with respect to the excitation polarization direction were captured, while minimal oscillatory features were observed in the magic angle TA signal. The combined analysis of the experimental results coupled with those previous calculated in the literature maps out a plausible excited state trajectory on the potential energy surface, suggesting that (1) the two energetically close MMLCT excited states due to the symmetry of the molecule may be electronically and coherently coupled with the charge density shifting back and forth between the two phenylpyridine (ppy) ligands, (2) the electronic coupling strength in the (1)MMLCT and (3)MMLCT states may be extracted from the oscillation frequencies of the TA signals to be 160 and 55 cm(-1), respectively, (3) a stepwise intersystem crossing cascades follows (1)MMLCT → (3)MMLCT (T(1b)) → (3)MMLCT (T(1a)), and (4) a possible electronic coherence can be modulated via the Pt-Pt σ-interactions over a picosecond and survive the first step of intersystem crossing. Future experiments are in progress to further investigate the origin of the oscillatory features. These experimental observations may have general implications in design of multimetal center complexes for photoactivated reactions where coherence in the excited states may facilitate directional charge or energy transfer along a certain direction between different parts of a molecule.

  12. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  13. Encaged Chironomus riparius larvae in assessment of trace metal bioavailability and transfer in a landfill leachate collection pond.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Frédéric; Petitjean, Quentin; Al-Ashoor, Ahmed; Cretenet, Céline; Aleya, Lotfi

    2017-01-09

    Household wastes may constitute a vector of environmental contamination when buried, in particular through degradation and production of leachates containing significant trace metal (TM) concentrations that may constitute a serious risk to biota. The objectives of this study were to assess the bioavailability and transfer potential of various TMs present in water and sediments in a reservoir receiving landfill leachates. An active biomonitoring approach was adopted consisting of exposing naive laboratory organisms in cages deployed in the field. Aquatic insects such as Chironomus riparius larvae are good candidates since they represent key organisms in the trophic functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The results show that water, suspended particles, and sediments were significantly contaminated by various TMs (As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn). Their contribution to the transfer of TMs depends, however, on the specific element considered, e.g., Cd in sediments or Pb in both suspended particles and sediments. The internal fate of TMs was investigated according to their fractionation between an insoluble and a cytosolic fraction. This approach revealed different detoxification strategies capable of preventing the induction of deleterious effects at the individual scale. However, the accumulation of several TMs in C. riparius larvae tissues may also represent a significant load potentially transferable to higher trophic levels.

  14. Intramolecular exchange energy transfer in a bridged bimetallic transition metal complex: Calculation of rate constants using emission spectral fitting parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.Y.; Baba, A.I.; Kim, W.Y.; Schmehl, R.H.; Atherton, S.J.

    1996-11-21

    The photophysical behavior of the transition metal complexes [[(bpy){sub 2}Ru]{sub 2}(bphb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4}, [[(tpy)(CN)Ru]{sub 2}(bhpb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} and [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bhpb)Ru(tpy)(CN)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4} (bpy = 2,2`-bipyridine, typ = 2,2`,6`,2{double_prime}-terpyridine, bphb = 1,4-bis(2,2`-bipyrid-4-yl)benzene) was investigated in acetonitrile solution and low-temperature glasses. Luminescence spectra, excitation spectra, and transient absorption decays of the three complexes serve to show that intermolecular electronic energy transfer from the MLCT excited state of the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the MLCT state of the tpy-containing chromophore occurs in the unsymmetric bimetallic complex. Nearly complete energy transfer from the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the tpy-containing chromophore was observed even in 4:1 ethanol: methanol glasses at 20K. A semiclassical exchange energy transfer mechanism was used to treat the available data; the Franck-Condon weighted density of state (FCWD) was obtained using parameters determined from fits of luminescence spectra. Give the FCWD at room temperature and the experimental rate constant, an electronic coupling matrix element of approximately 60 cm{sup -1} was determined for this system. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Conjugate Heat Transfer and Thermal Mechanical Analysis for Liquid Metal Targets for High Power Electron Beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas, Eric Richard

    2016-02-26

    A conjugate heat transfer and thermal structural analysis was completed, with the objective of determining the following: Lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) peak temperature, free convective velocity patterns in the LBE, peak beam window temperature, and thermal stress/deformation in the window.

  16. Lateral gene transfer in a heavy metal-contaminated-groundwater microbial community

    DOE PAGES

    Hemme, Christopher L.; Green, Stefan J.; Rishishwar, Lavanya; ...

    2016-04-05

    Here, unraveling the drivers controlling the response and adaptation of biological communities to environmental change, especially anthropogenic activities, is a central but poorly understood issue in ecology and evolution. Comparative genomics studies suggest that lateral gene transfer (LGT) is a major force driving microbial genome evolution, but its role in the evolution of microbial communities remains elusive.

  17. Ph(i-PrO)SiH2: An Exceptional Reductant for Metal-Catalyzed Hydrogen Atom Transfers.

    PubMed

    Obradors, Carla; Martinez, Ruben M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2016-04-13

    We report the discovery of an outstanding reductant for metal-catalyzed radical hydrofunctionalization reactions. Observations of unexpected silane solvolysis distributions in the HAT-initiated hydrogenation of alkenes reveal that phenylsilane is not the kinetically preferred reductant in many of these transformations. Instead, isopropoxy(phenyl)silane forms under the reaction conditions, suggesting that alcohols function as important silane ligands to promote the formation of metal hydrides. Study of its reactivity showed that isopropoxy(phenyl)silane is an exceptionally efficient stoichiometric reductant, and it is now possible to significantly decrease catalyst loadings, lower reaction temperatures, broaden functional group tolerance, and use diverse, aprotic solvents in iron- and manganese-catalyzed hydrofunctionalizations. As representative examples, we have improved the yields and rates of alkene reduction, hydration, hydroamination, and conjugate addition. Discovery of this broadly applicable, chemoselective, and solvent-versatile reagent should allow an easier interface with existing radical reactions. Finally, isotope-labeling experiments rule out the alternative hypothesis of hydrogen atom transfer from a redox-active β-diketonate ligand in the HAT step. Instead, initial HAT from a metal hydride to directly generate a carbon-centered radical appears to be the most reasonable hypothesis.

  18. Trophic relationships in an Arctic food web and implications for trace metal transfer.

    PubMed

    Dehn, Larissa-A; Follmann, Erich H; Thomas, Dana L; Sheffield, Gay G; Rosa, Cheryl; Duffy, Lawrence K; O'Hara, Todd M

    2006-06-01

    Tissues of subsistence-harvested Arctic mammals were analyzed for silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), and total mercury (THg). Muscle (or total body homogenates of potential fish and invertebrate prey) was analyzed for stable carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N) isotopes to establish trophic interactions within the Arctic food chain. Food web magnification factors (FWMFs) and biomagnification factors for selected predator-prey scenarios (BMFs) were calculated to describe pathways of heavy metals in the Alaskan Arctic. FWMFs in this study indicate that magnification of selected heavy metals in the Arctic food web is not significant. Biomagnification of Cd occurs mainly in kidneys; calculated BMFs are higher for hepatic THg than renal THg for all predator-prey scenarios with the exception of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). In bears, the accumulation of renal THg is approximately 6 times higher than in liver. Magnification of hepatic Ag is minimal for all selected predator-prey scenarios. Though polar bears occupy a higher trophic level than belugas (Delphinapterus leucas), based on delta15N, the metal concentrations are either not statistically different between the two species or lower for bears. Similarly, concentrations of renal and hepatic Cd are significantly lower or not statistically different in polar bears compared to ringed (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), their primary prey. THg, on the other hand, increased significantly from seal to polar bear tissues. Mean delta15N was lowest in muscle of Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and foxes also show the lowest levels of Hg, Cd and Ag in liver and kidney compared to the other species analyzed. These values are in good agreement with a diet dominated by terrestrial prey. Metal deposition in animal tissues is strongly dependent on biological factors such as diet, age, sex, body condition and health, and caution should be taken when interpreting magnification of dynamic and actively regulated trace

  19. Transfer of heavy metals to biota after remediation of contaminated soils with calcareous residues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martínez-Sánchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Belen Martínez, Lucia; Hernández, Carmen; García-Fernandez, Antonio Juan; Bech, Jaime

    2013-04-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the assimilation of heavy metals by three types of horticultural plants (broccoli, lettuce and leek), different parts of which are destined for human and farm animals consumption (leaves, roots, fruits). Five consecutive crops of each vegetable were obtained in greenhouse. In a second stage, experiments were carried out with rabbits fed with such vegetables. The plants were cultivated in four types of soil. The first one was contaminated by heavy metals (S1), the second was a uncontaminated soil (blank soil) (S2), the third was the material obtained by mixing S1 with residues coming from demolition and construction activities (S3); while the fourth was the result of remediating S1 with lime residues coming from quarries (S4). The total metal content (As, Pb, Cd and Zn) of the soil samples, rizosphere, leached water and vegetable samples, were measured, and both the translocation and bioconcentration factors (TF and BCF, respectively) were calculated. In the second stage, the effect caused in rabbits fed with the vegetables was monitorized using both external observation and the analysis of blood, urine, and the levels of metals in muscles, liver and kidney. The statistical analysis of the results obtained showed that there were no significant differences in the heavy metal levels for the vegetables cultivated in S2, S3 and S4. The results for soil sample S1 did not have a normal distribution since the growing of the vegetables were not homogeneous and also strongly dependent on the type of vegetal. As regards the effect caused in rabbits, significant differences were observed for the animals fed with plants cultivated in S1 compared with the others.

  20. Ab-initio study of metal-zirconia interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkova, S.; Bakulin, A.; Hocker, S.; Schmauder, S.

    2012-08-01

    A comparative theoretical study of metal-zirconia interfaces with BCC and FCC metals was performed using pseudopotential approach with LDA and GGA approximation for exchange-correlation functional. It was shown that the high adhesion can be achieved at the O-terminated Me/ZrO2(001) interface with BCC metals that is related to large charge transfer from metal film to substrate and increase of an ionic contribution in the chemical bonding. The structural and electronic factors which are responsible for decrease of adhesion at differently oriented metal-zirconia interfaces are discussed. The influence of CaO, MgO and Y2O3 doping on the work of separation (Wsep) at Me(001)/c-ZrO2(001) is analyzed.

  1. Nano-hydroxyapatite-coated metal-ceramic composite of iron-tricalcium phosphate: Improving the surface wettability, adhesion and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Surmeneva, Maria A; Kleinhans, Claudia; Vacun, Gabriele; Kluger, Petra Juliane; Schönhaar, Veronika; Müller, Michaela; Hein, Sebastian Boris; Wittmar, Alexandra; Ulbricht, Mathias; Prymak, Oleg; Oehr, Christian; Surmenev, Roman A

    2015-11-01

    Thin radio-frequency magnetron sputter deposited nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) films were prepared on the surface of a Fe-tricalcium phosphate (Fe-TCP) bioceramic composite, which was obtained using a conventional powder injection moulding technique. The obtained nano-hydroxyapatite coated Fe-TCP biocomposites (nano-HA-Fe-TCP) were studied with respect to their chemical and phase composition, surface morphology, water contact angle, surface free energy and hysteresis. The deposition process resulted in a homogeneous, single-phase HA coating. The ability of the surface to support adhesion and the proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied using biological short-term tests in vitro. The surface of the uncoated Fe-TCP bioceramic composite showed an initial cell attachment after 24h of seeding, but adhesion, proliferation and growth did not persist during 14 days of culture. However, the HA-Fe-TCP surfaces allowed cell adhesion, and proliferation during 14 days. The deposition of the nano-HA films on the Fe-TCP surface resulted in higher surface energy, improved hydrophilicity and biocompatibility compared with the surface of the uncoated Fe-TCP. Furthermore, it is suggested that an increase in the polar component of the surface energy was responsible for the enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation in the case of the nano-HA-Fe-TCP biocomposites.

  2. Evaluation of Low Hazardous Air Pollutant Thermoset Adhesives for the Application of Rubber-to-Metal Bonding on Army Tank Pads and Road Wheels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    and Chemlok 6254-LH thinned with a 50/50 solvent blend of n-butyl propionate and Varnish Makers and Painters (VM&P) naphtha (low-HAP adhesive...data sheet TGA thermogravimetric analysis THF tetrahydrofuran VM&P Varnish Makers and Painters 38 VOC volatile organic compound wt

  3. Investigation of heat transfer in liquid-metal flows under fusion-reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubnyi, I. I.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.; Sviridov, E. V.; Leshukov, A. Yu.; Aleskovskiy, K. V.; Obukhov, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect discovered in studying a downward liquid-metal flow in vertical pipe and in a channel of rectangular cross section in, respectively, a transverse and a coplanar magnetic field is analyzed. In test blanket modules (TBM), which are prototypes of a blanket for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) and which are intended for experimental investigations at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), liquid metals are assumed to fulfil simultaneously the functions of (i) a tritium breeder, (ii) a coolant, and (iii) neutron moderator and multiplier. This approach to testing experimentally design solutions is motivated by plans to employ, in the majority of the currently developed DEMO blanket projects, liquid metals pumped through pipes and/or rectangular channels in a transvers magnetic field. At the present time, experiments that would directly simulate liquid-metal flows under conditions of ITER TBM and/or DEMO blanket operation (irradiation with thermonuclear neutrons, a cyclic temperature regime, and a magnetic-field strength of about 4 to 10 T) are not implementable for want of equipment that could reproduce simultaneously the aforementioned effects exerted by thermonuclear plasmas. This is the reason why use is made of an iterative approach to experimentally estimating the performance of design solutions for liquid-metal channels via simulating one or simultaneously two of the aforementioned factors. Therefore, the investigations reported in the present article are of considerable topical interest. The respective experiments were performed on the basis of the mercury magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) loop that is included in the structure of the MPEI—JIHT MHD experimental facility. Temperature fields were measured under conditions of two- and one-sided heating, and data on averaged-temperature fields, distributions of the wall temperature, and statistical fluctuation features were obtained. A substantial effect of counter thermo gravitational

  4. Sewage sludge application in a plantation: effects on trace metal transfer in soil-plant-snail continuum.

    PubMed

    Bourioug, Mohamed; Gimbert, Frédéric; Alaoui-Sehmer, Laurence; Benbrahim, Mohammed; Aleya, Lotfi; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr

    2015-01-01

    We studied the potential bioaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by the snail Cantareus aspersus and evaluated the risk of leaching after application of sewage sludge to forest plantation ecosystems. Sewage sludge was applied to the soil surface at two loading rates (0, and 6 tons ha(-1) in dry matter) without incorporation into the soil so as to identify the sources of trace metal contamination in soil and plants and to evaluate effects on snail growth. The results indicated a snail mortality rate of less than 1% during the experiment, while their dry weight decreased significantly (<0.001) in all treatment modalities. Thus, snails showed no acute toxicity symptoms after soil amendment with sewage sludge over the exposure period considered. Additions of sewage sludge led to higher levels of trace metals in forest litter compared to control subplots, but similar trace metal concentrations were observed in sampling plants. Bioaccumulation study demonstrated that Zn had not accumulated in snails compared to Cu which accumulated only after 28 days of exposure to amended subplots. However, Pb and Cd contents in snails increased significantly after 14 and 28 days of exposure in both the control and amended subplots. At the last sampling date, in comparison to controls the Cd increase was higher in snails exposed to amended subplots. Thus, sludge spread therefore appears to be responsible for the observed bioaccumulation for Cu and Cd after 28days of exposure. Concerning Pb accumulation, the results from litter-soil-plant compartments suggest that soil is this metal's best transfer source.

  5. Metal-organic charge transfer can produce biradical states and is mediated by conical intersections

    PubMed Central

    Tishchenko, Oksana; Li, Ruifang; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper illustrates key features of charge transfer between calcium atoms and prototype conjugated hydrocarbons (ethylene, benzene, and coronene) as elucidated by electronic structure calculations. One- and two-electron charge transfer is controlled by two sequential conical intersections. The two lowest electronic states that undergo a conical intersection have closed-shell and open-shell dominant configurations correlating with the 4s2 and 4s13d1 states of Ca, respectively. Unlike the neutral-ionic state crossing in, for example, hydrogen halides or alkali halides, the path from separated reactants to the conical intersection region is uphill and the charge-transferred state is a biradical. The lowest-energy adiabatic singlet state shows at least two minima along a single approach path of Ca to the π system: (i) a van der Waals complex with a doubly occupied highest molecular orbital, denoted , and a small negative charge on Ca and (ii) an open-shell singlet (biradical) at intermediate approach (Ca⋯C distance ≈2.5–2.7 Å) with molecular orbital structure ϕ1ϕ2, where ϕ2 is an orbital showing significant charge transfer form Ca to the π-system, leading to a one-electron multicentered bond. A third minimum (iii) at shorter distances along the same path corresponding to a closed-shell state with molecular orbital structure has also been found; however, it does not necessarily represent the ground state at a given Ca⋯C distance in all three systems. The topography of the lowest adiabatic singlet potential energy surface is due to the one- and two-electron bonding patterns in Ca-π complexes. PMID:21037111

  6. Biological Processes Affecting Bioaccumulation, Transfer, and Toxicity of Metal Contaminants in Estuarine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    acclimation……………………………………………………………………….p. 59 Figure 26. Interactive transcriptome revealed……………………………………p. 60 Figure 27. Functional network of... interacting genes……………………………...p. 61 4 Tables: Table 1. Salinity, DOC and metal concentration additions…………………..….p. 13 Table 2. AVS-SEM... ecology , metal biogeochemistry, ecotoxicology, applied genomics) to investigate “fundamental pathways and processes controlling the movement of

  7. Metal Ion Enhanced Charge Transfer in a Terpyridine-bis-Pyrene System

    PubMed Central

    D'Aléo, Anthony; Cecchetto, Elio; De Cola, Luisa; Williams, René M.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis, electrochemical and photophysical properties of a branched molecule 3,5-bis(pyrene-1-yl)-4′-phenyl-2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine are reported. Spectroscopy in different solvents reveals that an optical electron transfer from the pyrene donor to the terpyridyl electron acceptor can occur in polar media, as the system displays both charge transfer (CT) absorption and CT emission. Furthermore, the study of the zinc complex as well as the bis-protonated form shows an enhancement of the electron transfer character of the system, by an increase of the acceptor strength. This is accompanied by a large increase of the non-radiative processes. With sub-nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, the CT state, consisting of the pyrene radical cation and the terpyridine radical anion, has been detected. At room temperature, the study of the nanosecond transient absorption spectra reveals the formation of a low-lying triplet excited state that we attribute to the pyrene moiety through which the CT state decays. At 77K, the absence of the terpyridine triplet emission also suggests the population of a low-lying triplet state of the pyrene unit. PMID:22412328

  8. Transition-metal-catalyzed group transfer reactions for selective C-H bond functionalization of artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yungen; Xiao, Wenbo; Wong, Man-Kin; Che, Chi-Ming

    2007-10-11

    Three types of novel artemisinin derivatives have been synthesized through transition-metal-catalyzed intramolecular carbenoid and nitrenoid C-H bond insertion reactions. With rhodium complexes as catalysts, lactone 11 was synthesized via carbene insertion reaction at the C16 position in 90% yield; oxazolidinone 13 was synthesized via nitrene insertion reaction at the C10 position in 87% yield based on 77% conversion; and sulfamidate 14 was synthesized via nitrene insertion reaction at the C8 position in 87% yield.

  9. Direct probe of Mott-Hubbard to charge-transfer insulator transition and electronic structure evolution in transition-metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olalde-Velasco, P; Jimenez-Mier, J; Denlinger, JD; Hussain, Z; Yang, WL

    2011-07-11

    We report the most direct experimental verification of Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer insulators through x-ray emission spectroscopy in transition-metal (TM) fluorides. The p-d hybridization features in the spectra allow a straightforward energy alignment of the anion-2p and metal-3d valence states, which visually shows the difference between the two types of insulators. Furthermore, in parallel with the theoretical Zaanen-Sawatzky-Allen diagram, a complete experimental systematics of the 3d Coulomb interaction and the 2p-3d charge-transfer energy is reported and could serve as a universal experimental trend for other TM systems including oxides.

  10. Phenyl Benzo[b]phenothiazine as a Visible Light Photoredox Catalyst for Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Dadashi-Silab, Sajjad; Pan, Xiangcheng; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2016-12-23

    This paper reports use of phenyl benzo[b]phenothiazine (Ph-benzoPTZ) as a visible light-induced metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) photoredox catalyst. Well-controlled polymerizations of various methacrylate monomers were conducted under a 392 nm visible light LED using Ph-benzoPTZ to activate different alkyl halides. The use of the photocatalyst enabled temporal control over the growth of polymer chains during intermittent on/off periods. The polymerization was initiated and progressed only under stimulation by light and completely stopped in the absence of light. Block copolymers were synthesized to demonstrate high retention of chain end fidelity in the polymers and livingness of the process.

  11. Temperature dependences of the spin transfer torque and tunneling magneto-resistance in magnetic metallic and tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chun-Yeol; Song, Seung-Ho; Kim, Hyungsuk

    2011-08-01

    We investigate temperature dependences of the spin transfer torque (STT) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic metallic junction (MMJ) and magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ). The temperature dependences of the in-plane and out-of-plane STTs are calculated with the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that the temperature dependences of the in-plane and out-of-plane STTs for MTJ are strikingly deviated from the previous prediction [P. Bruno, Phys. Rev. B 52, 411 (1995)] for the interlayer exchange coupling, while ones for MMJ are well agreed with the prediction. Furthermore, the temperature dependences of the in-plane and out-of-plane STTs are varied with the bias voltage in different ways.

  12. Thermal spin-transfer torque driven by the spin-dependent Seebeck effect in metallic spin-valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gyung-Min; Moon, Chul-Hyun; Min, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Cahill, David G.

    2015-07-01

    The coupling of spin and heat gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices. In particular, spin-transfer torque (STT) driven by thermal transport provides a new way to manipulate local magnetization. We quantify thermal STT in metallic spin-valve structures using an intense and ultrafast heat current created by picosecond pulses of laser light. Our result shows that thermal STT consists of demagnetization-driven and spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE)-driven components; the SDSE-driven STT becomes dominant after 3 ps. The sign and magnitude of the SDSE-driven STT can be controlled by the composition of a ferromagnetic layer and the thickness of a heat sink layer.

  13. Resonant charge transfer process in ion-metal surface collisions: effect of the presence of vacancies on the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A. M. C.; Wolfgang, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Gauyacq, J. P.; Nordlander, P.; Teillet-Billy, D.

    In this paper an investigation of how the presence of a vacancy on a metal surface influences the energy shift and broadening of negative ion states near the surface is presented. Results for H - and F - ions in the vicinity of a surface vacancy defect on an Al(1 1 1) surface are included. The vacancy-induced electron potential is calculated using a density functional method and the Coupled Angular Mode (CAM) method is used to determine the shift and broadening of H - and F - levels. The results show that the vacancy induces a repulsive potential, shifting the negative ion levels up, while narrowing the width. These two effects have opposite influences on the resonant charge transfer process. Their approximate cancellation makes the RCT process in these systems relatively insensitive to vacancies in the surface layer.

  14. A Method for Characterizing the Surface Cleanliness During Adhesion Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-03-01

    It has been shown that the degree of adhesion of metals depends upon the surface cleanliness . This paper presents a method that was used to...characterize the surface cleanliness of nickel during an adhesion experiment. The change in the work function of the surface as the metal was cleaned was used

  15. Heat transfer computed tomography techniques for damage detection in metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nephi R.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Jeffers, Ann E.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of damage in structures at its earliest stages has many economical and safety benefits. Permanent monitoring systems using various forms of sensor networks and analysis methods are often employed to increase the frequency and diagnostic capabilities of inspections. Some of these techniques provide spatial/volumetric information about a given area/volume of a structure. Many of the available spatial sensing techniques can be costly and cannot be permanently deployed (e.g., IR camera thermography). For this reason intricate analysis methods using permanently deployable sensors are being developed (e.g., ultrasonic piezoelectrics, sensing skins). One approach is to leverage the low cost of heaters and temperature sensors to develop an economical, permanently installable method of spatial damage detection using heat transfer. This paper presents a method similar to that of X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, the theories for Xray CT must be adapted to properly represent heat transfer as well as account for the relatively large and immobile sensors spacing used on a structure (i.e., there is a finite number of heaters/sensors permanently installed around the perimeter of the area of interest). The derivation of heat transfer computed tomography is discussed in this paper including two methods for steering the effective heat wave. A high fidelity finite element method (FEM) model is used to verify the analytical derivation of individual steps within the method as well as simulate the complete damage detection technique. Experimental results from both damaged and undamaged aluminum plate specimens are used to validate the FEM model and to justify theoretical assumptions. The simulation results are discussed along with possible improvements and modifications to the technique.

  16. Horizontal Gene Transfer of PIB-Type ATPases among Bacteria Isolated from Radionuclide- and Metal-Contaminated Subsurface Soils

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Robert J.; Wang, Yanling; Raimondo, Melanie A.; Coombs, Jonna M.; Barkay, Tamar; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Aerobic heterotrophs were isolated from subsurface soil samples obtained from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Field Research Center (FRC) located at Oak Ridge, Tenn. The FRC represents a unique, extreme environment consisting of highly acidic soils with cooccurring heavy metals, radionuclides, and high nitrate concentrations. Four hundred isolates obtained from contaminated soil were assayed for heavy metal resistance, and a smaller subset was assayed for tolerance to uranium. The vast majority of the isolates were gram-positive bacteria and belonged to the high-G+C- and low-G+C-content genera Arthrobacter and Bacillus, respectively. Genomic DNA from a randomly chosen subset of 50 Pb-resistant (Pbr) isolates was amplified with PCR primers specific for PIB-type ATPases (i.e., pbrA/cadA/zntA). A total of 10 pbrA/cadA/zntA loci exhibited evidence of acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. A remarkable dissemination of the horizontally acquired PIB-type ATPases was supported by unusual DNA base compositions and phylogenetic incongruence. Numerous Pbr PIB-type ATPase-positive FRC isolates belonging to the genus Arthrobacter tolerated toxic concentrations of soluble U(VI) (UO22+) at pH 4. These unrelated, yet synergistic, physiological traits observed in Arthrobacter isolates residing in the contaminated FRC subsurface may contribute to the survival of the organisms in such an extreme environment. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study to report broad horizontal transfer of PIB-type ATPases in contaminated subsurface soils and is among the first studies to report uranium tolerance of aerobic heterotrophs obtained from the acidic subsurface at the DOE FRC. PMID:16672448

  17. Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LMMHD) technology transfer feasibility study. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phen, R. L.; Hays, L. G.; Alper, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The potential application of liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LMMHD) to central station utility power generation through the period to 1990 is examined. Included are: (1) a description of LMMHD and a review of its development status, (2) LMMHD preliminary design for application to central station utility power generation, (3) evaluation of LMMHD in comparison with conventional and other advanced power generation systems and (4) a technology development plan. One of the major conclusions found is that the most economic and technically feasible application of LMMHD is a topping cycle to a steam plant, taking advantage of high temperatures available but not usable by the steam cycle.

  18. The effect of long-term wastewater irrigation on accumulation and transfer of heavy metals in Cupressus sempervirens leaves and adjacent soils.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Emad; Linderholm, Hans W

    2015-04-15

    Wastewater reuse for agriculture is an important management strategy in areas with limited freshwater resources, yielding potential economic and environmental benefits. Here the effects of long-term irrigation with wastewater on the nutrient contents of green and senesced leaves of Cupressus sempervirens L. were assessed for three planted forests in Egypt. Stoichiometric ratios, transfer factors for nutrients from soil to plant and enrichment factors in contaminated soils were estimated and compared to a ground water irrigated control site. Under wastewater irrigation, C. sempervirens transferred most of the estimated nutrients, particularly heavy metals, from green to senesced leaves. This could be a self-protecting mechanism under continuous wastewater irrigation. The accumulation of four metals (Zn, Mn, Cu and Cd) with transfer factors>1 for wastewater-irrigated trees, indicated the ability for metal accumulation of C. sempervirens. Stoichiometric ratios decreased under wastewater irrigation compared to the control site and global trends, which suggests nutrient disorders in these plants. The values of enrichment factors in the wastewater-irrigated soils showed remarkable availability and distribution of metals. Decreased resorption of metals by senesced leaves of C. sempervirens will add considerable amount of these metals to the soils, which will likely have adverse affects on the desert ecosystem components.

  19. Theory and applications of surface energy transfer for 2-20 nm diameter metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riskowski, Ryan A.

    The development and experimental validation of a mathematical model for nanoparticle-based surface energy transfer (SET) between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent dye labels, has enabled biophysical studies of nucleic acid structure and function previously inaccessible by other methods. The main advantages of SET for optical distance measurements are that it can operate over longer distances than other similar methods, such as Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), thus enabling measurements across biological structures much larger than otherwise possible. This work discusses the fundamental theory for the SET interaction and expansion of SET theory to account for multiple interacting dye labels and demonstrated on DNA and RNA in order to allow 3D triangulation of labeled structures. SET theory has also been expanded to core shell structures which represent a new class of designer SET platforms with dramatically increased spectral windows; allowing for a multitude of dye labels to be used simultaneously over a broad range of wavelengths. Additionally, these designer nanostructures can incorporate the material properties of the core. So that , for example Ni Au, can provide a SET measurement platform coupled with a magnetic moment for sample purification and manipulation. These efforts to develop and establish optical SET methods lays a foundation of a powerful methodology for biophysical characterization, and allows researchers to study biological structures previously too large or complex to be easily studied, such as the unknown tertiary structures of large RNA elements.

  20. Ligand(s)-to-metal charge transfer as a factor controlling the equilibrium constants of late first-row transition metal complexes: revealing the Irving-Williams thermodynamical series.

    PubMed

    Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Varadwaj, Arpita; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2015-01-14

    A unified relationship between the experimental formation constants and the ligand(s)-to-metal charge transfer values of versatile ligand complexes of late transition series first-row bivalent metal ions is uncovered. The latter property not only explicates the Irving-Williams series but also rationalizes quantitatively Pearson's concept of hard and soft acids and bases by correlating the gas-phase to aqueous solution-phase chemistry in a broad sense.

  1. Understanding charge transfer of Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from metal surfaces with high work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Pin-Yang; Xiao, Yun-Qing; Li, Guo-Peng; Liu, Yi-Ran; Jiang, Hao-Yu; Guo, Yan-Ling; Chen, Xi-Meng

    2016-08-01

    For Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from high work function metal surfaces, efficient neutralization is observed, and it cannot be explained by the conventional free electron model. In order to explain these experimental data, we investigate the velocity-dependent neutral fraction with the modified Brako-Newns (BN) model. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data. We find that the parallel velocity effect plays an important role in neutralizing the Li+ and Na+ ions for large angle scattering. The nonmonotonic velocity behavior of neutral fraction is strongly related to the distance-dependent coupling strength between the atomic level and metal states. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11405078 and 11474140), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. lzujbky-2014-169 and lzujbky-2015-244), the Project sponsored by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, the State Education Ministry, and the National Students’ Innovation and Entrepreneurship Training Program (Grant Nos. 201410730069 and 201510730078).

  2. Heavy metal transfers between trophic compartments in different ecosystems in Galicia (Northwest Spain): Essential elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, X.I.; Aboal, J.R.; Fernandez, J.A.; Carballeira, A.

    2008-11-15

    In the present study, we determined the concentrations of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in soil and several trophic compartments at a total of 16 sampling stations. The trophic compartments studied were primary producers, represented by two species of terrestrial mosses (Pseudoescleropodium purum and Hypnum cupressiforme) and oak trees (Quercus robur or Q. pyrenaica); primary consumers, represented by the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) and the yellow necked mouse (A. flavicollis); secondary consumers, represented by the shrew (Sorex granarius); and finally, detritivores, represented by slugs (Arion ater). Thirteen of the sampling stations were located in mature oak woodlands (Quercus sp.); two of the sampling stations were located in the area surrounding a restored lignite mine dump, and the other in an ultrabasic area. The analytical determinations revealed a lack of significant correlations among trophic compartments, possibly caused by effective regulation of metals by organisms and/or spatial variation in availability of metals from soil or food. Furthermore, the only element that showed a clear pattern of biomagnification was Cu; as for the other elements, there was always some divergence from such a pattern. Finally, the patterns of bioaccumulation in contaminated and woodland sampling stations were very similar, although there was enrichment of the concentrations of Cu, Mn, and Zn in the mice viscera, which, except for Mn, were related to higher edaphic concentrations.

  3. Enhanced near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated metal plates: Role of spoof surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, J.; Dyakov, S. A.; Yan, M.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate with the finite-difference time-domain method that radiative heat transfer between two parallel gold plates can be significantly enhanced by engraving periodic grooves with a subwavelength width on the plate surfaces. The enhancement increases with a decrease in the separation distance at near-field regime and it can be further efficiently improved by having a supercell with multiple grooves with different depths. We attribute this near-field enhancement to coupling of thermally excited spoof surface plasmon polaritons, a type of artificial surface wave inherent to structured metal surfaces [J. B. Pendry, L. Martín-Moreno, and F. J. Garcia-Vidal, Science 305, 847 (2004), 10.1126/science.1098999]. The frequency-dependent contribution to the heat transfer, or transmission-factor spectrum, is confirmed by calculating the dispersion relation of guided modes by the two parallel corrugated plates through a finite-element method. Especially, the photonic density of states derived from the dispersion relation is found to have excellent agreement to the transmission-factor spectrum.

  4. Fermi-level pinning, charge transfer, and relaxation of spin-momentum locking at metal contacts to topological insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Spataru, Catalin D.; Léonard, François

    2014-08-13

    Topological insulators are of interest for many applications in electronics and optoelectronics, but harnessing their unique properties requires detailed understanding and control of charge injection at electrical contacts. Here we present large-scale ab initio calculations of the electronic properties of Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, and graphene contacts to Bi2Se3. We show that regardless of the metal, the Fermi level is located in the conduction band, leading to n-type Ohmic contact to the first quintuplet. Furthermore, we find strong charge transfer and band-bending in the first few quintuplets, with no Schottky barrier for charge injection even when the topoplogical insulator ismore » undoped. Our calculations indicate that Au and graphene leave the spin-momentum locking mostly unaltered, but on the other hand, Ni, Pd, and Pt strongly hybridize with Bi2Se3 and relax spin-momentum locking. In conclusion, our results indicate that judicious choice of the contact metal is essential to reveal the unique surface features of topological insulators.« less

  5. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge-transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  6. Manipulating the dipole layer of polar organic molecules on metal surfaces via different charge-transfer channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Kai; Nakayama, Yasuo; Zhuang, Ying-Jie; Wang, Chin-Yung; Pi, Tun-Wen; Ishii, Hisao; Tang, S.-J.

    The key properties of organic films such as energy level alignment (ELA), work functions, and injection barriers are closely linked to this dipole layer. Using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we systemically investigate the coverage-dependent work functions and spectra line shapes of occupied molecular orbital states of a polar molecule, chloroaluminium phthalocyanine (ClAlPc), grown on Ag(111) to show that the orientations of the first ClAlPc layer can be manipulated via the molecule deposition rate and post annealing, causing ELA at organic-metal interface to differ for about 0.3 eV between Cl-up and Cl-down configuration. Moreover, by comparing the experimental results with the calculations based on both gas-phase model and realistic model of ClAlPc on Ag(111) , we evidence that the different orientations of ClAlPc dipole layers lead to different charge-transfer channels between ClAlPc and Ag, a key factor that controls the ELA at organic-metal interface.

  7. Momentum Transfer Studies and Studies of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Metal Colloids and Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W. E.; Burger, A.; Dyer, K.; George, M.; Henderson, D.; Morgan, S.; Mu, R.; Shi, D.; Conner, D; Thompson, E.; Collins, L.; Curry, L.; Mattox, S.; Williams, G.

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 of this work involved design work on a momentum transfer device. The progress on design and testing will be presented. Phase 2 involved the systematic study of the MPD thruster for dual uses. Though it was designed as a thruster for space vehicles, the characteristics of the plasma make it an excellent candidate for industrial applications. This project sought to characterize the system for use in materials processing and characterization. The surface modification on ZnCdTe, CdTe, and ZnTe will be presented. Phase 3 involved metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots. One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantation for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga, and As. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb, and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. The results of some of this work will also be reported.

  8. Preliminary survey report: control technology for manual transfer of chemical powders at Porcelain Metals Corporation, Louisville, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Godbey, F.W.

    1984-08-01

    Health hazard control methods, work processes, and existing control technologies used in the manual transfer of chemical powders were evaluated at Porcelain Metals Corporation, Louisville, Kentucky in May, 1984. The company employed 97 workers involved in the manufacture of porcelain and metal stampings. The major dry ingredients were frit, silica, and clays. Raw materials were received in bags that were opened as needed and dumped directly into a hopper. The material was discharged into a mill, and various amounts were dispensed by scoop into a pan for weighing. The pan contents were then dumped into the hopper, the mill head was attached, and water was added. After milling, the slurry was pumped to a storage tank for later use. General exhaust ventilation was used, and hearing protectors, safety glasses, hard hats, and dust masks were provided. Workers were encouraged to use good work practices, and were given pre-employment physicals and annual hearing tests. Periodic atmospheric dust sampling was performed, and monthly inspections were conducted. The author does not recommend an in depth study of control technologies at this company since no unique control methods are used.

  9. Fermi-level pinning, charge transfer, and relaxation of spin-momentum locking at metal contacts to topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Spataru, Catalin D.; Léonard, François

    2014-08-13

    Topological insulators are of interest for many applications in electronics and optoelectronics, but harnessing their unique properties requires detailed understanding and control of charge injection at electrical contacts. Here we present large-scale ab initio calculations of the electronic properties of Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, and graphene contacts to Bi2Se3. We show that regardless of the metal, the Fermi level is located in the conduction band, leading to n-type Ohmic contact to the first quintuplet. Furthermore, we find strong charge transfer and band-bending in the first few quintuplets, with no Schottky barrier for charge injection even when the topoplogical insulator is undoped. Our calculations indicate that Au and graphene leave the spin-momentum locking mostly unaltered, but on the other hand, Ni, Pd, and Pt strongly hybridize with Bi2Se3 and relax spin-momentum locking. In conclusion, our results indicate that judicious choice of the contact metal is essential to reveal the unique surface features of topological insulators.

  10. Synergizing Noncovalent Bonding Interactions in the Self-Assembly of Organic Charge-Transfer Ferroelectrics and Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dennis

    Contemporary supramolecular chemistry---chemistry beyond the molecule---seeks to leverage noncovalent bonding interactions to generate emergent properties and complexity. These aims extend beyond the solution phase and into the solid state, where crystalline organic materials have attracted much attention for their ability to imitate the physical properties of inorganic crystals. This Thesis outlines my efforts to understand the properties of the solid-state materials that are self-assembled with noncovalent bonding motifs which I have helped to realize. In the first five Chapters, I chronicle the development of the lock-arm supramolecular ordering (LASO) paradigm, which is a general molecular design strategy for amplifying the crystallization of charge transfer complexes that revolves around the synergistic action of hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions. In an effort to expand upon the LASO paradigm, I identify a two-point halogen-bonding motif which appears to operate orthogonally from the hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions. Since some of these single crystalline materials are ferroelectric at room temperature, I discuss the implications of these experimental observations and reconcile them with the centrosymmetric space groups assigned after X-ray crystallographic refinements. I conclude in the final two Chapters by recording my endeavors to control the assembly of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with noncovalent bonding interactions between [2]catenane-bearing struts. First of all, I describe the formation of syndiotactic pi-stacked 2D MOF layers before highlighting a two-component MOF that assembles with a magic number ratio of components that is independent of the molar proportions present in the crystallization medium.

  11. Advanced Fast Curing Adhesives for Adverse Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    set of battle damage repair adhesives include Belzona 2311 elastomer , Belzona 1221 super metal, and Belzona metal plug, which are very fast curing...resin, and dinonylphenol (10). Marine use A-788 Splash Zone epoxy- polyamide mastic from Z Spar, Los Angeles, CA was used for testing (11). The

  12. Ni catalyst wash-coated on metal monolith with enhanced heat-transfer capability for steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jae-Hong; Lee, Kwan-Young; La, Howon; Kim, Hak-Joo; Yang, Jung-Il; Jung, Heon

    A commercial Ni-based catalyst is wash-coated on a monolith made of 50 μm-thick fecralloy plates. Compared with the same volume of coarsely powdered Ni catalysts, the monolith wash-coated Ni catalysts give higher methane conversion in the steam reforming reaction, especially at gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) higher than 28,000 h -1, and with no pressure drop. A higher conversion of the monolith catalyst is obtained, even though it contains a lower amount of active catalyst (3 g versus 17 g for a powdered catalyst), which indicates that the heat-transfer capability of the wash-coated Ni catalyst is significantly enhanced by the use of a metal monolith. The efficacy of the monolith catalyst is tested using a shell-and-tube type heat-exchanger reactor with 912 cm 3 of the monolith catalyst charged on to the tube side and hot combusted gas supplied to the shell side in a counter-current direction to the reactant flow. A methane conversion greater than 94% is obtained at a GHSV of 7300 h -1 and an average temperature of 640 °C. Nickel catalysts should first be reduced to become active for steam reforming. Doping a small amount (0.12 wt.%) of noble metal (Ru or Pt) in the commercial Ni catalyst renders the wash-coated catalyst as active as a pre-reduced Ni catalyst. Thus, noble metal-doped Ni appears useful for steam reforming without any pre-reduction procedure.

  13. Influence of landscape composition and diversity on contaminant flux in terrestrial food webs: a case study of trace metal transfer to European blackbirds Turdus merula.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Clémentine; Coeurdassier, Michaël; Faivre, Bruno; Baurand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Giraudoux, Patrick; van den Brink, Nico W; Scheifler, Renaud

    2012-08-15

    Although understanding the influence of the spatial arrangement of habitats and interacting communities on the processes of pollutant flux and impacts is critical for exposure and risk assessment, to date few studies have been devoted to this emergent topic. We tested the hypothesis that landscape composition and diversity affect the transfer of trace metals to vertebrates. Bioaccumulation of Cd and Pb in blood and feathers of European blackbirds Turdus merula (n=138) was studied over a smelter-impacted area (Northern France). Landscape composition (type and occurrence of the different habitats) and diversity (number of different habitat types and the proportional area distribution among habitat types) were computed around bird capture locations. Diet composition and contamination were assessed. No sex-related differences were detected, while age-related patterns were found: yearlings showed a sharper increase of tissue residues along the pollution gradient than older birds. Factors determining bird exposure acted at nested spatial scale. On a broad scale, environmental contamination mainly influenced metal levels in blackbirds, tissue residues increasing with soil contamination. At a finer grain, landscape composition and soil properties (pH, organic matter, clay) influenced metal transfer, while no influence of landscape diversity was detected. Landscape composition better explained metal transfer than soil properties did. Diet composition varied according to landscape composition, but diet diversity was not influenced by landscape diversity. Surprisingly, metal accumulation in some insect taxa was as high as in earthworms (known as hyper-accumulators). Results strongly suggested that variations in diet composition were the drivers through which landscape composition influenced metal transfer to blackbirds. This study shows that landscape features can affect pollutant transfer in food webs, partly through ecological processes related to spatial and foraging

  14. Transfer of fine sediments and particulate heavy metals in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Ulrike; Reid, Lucas; Fuchs, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    For heavy metals and other particulate contaminants erosion is an important emission pathway into surface waters. Emissions via erosion can strongly vary depending on land use, morphology, erodibility of the soils and the heavy metal content in the topsoil layer of the source areas. A high spatial resolution of input data is thus necessary to identify hotspots of heavy metal emissions via erosion in large river basins. In addition a part of the suspended solid load which is emitted to surface waters from the catchment areas can be deposited in the river system during transportation. The retention of sediments mainly takes place in lakes, reservoirs and river barrages. Former modelling studies in large river basins of Germany revealed, that the observed suspended sediment loads at monitoring stations were strongly overestimated, if retention processes in the river system were neglected. The objective of this study was therefore to test whether the consideration of sedimentation rates in lakes, reservoirs and river barrages can improve the prediction of observed suspended sediment loads in large river basins. We choose the German/Austrian part of the Danube basin until Passau (77 156 km²) for this analysis, as the alpine tributaries in the South of the Danube basin deliver high annual sediment rates (i.e. Inn and Isar) which are not fully recovered at the monitoring stations located further upstream of the Danube due to retention processes. The sediment input was quantified for all tributaries and added up along the flow path of the river system. Due to the large scale, sediment production within the catchments was calculated using the USLE for cultivated land and naturally covered areas and specific erosion rates for alpine areas without vegetation cover. Sediment delivery was estimated using an approach based on the location of the sediment source areas in the catchments and the morphology on the way to the surface waters. The location of the lakes, reservoirs and

  15. Experimental Studies on Flexible Forming of Sheet Metals Assisted by Magnetic Force Transfer Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Fu Jian; Wang, Mo Nan; Xu, Peng; Jin, Cheng Chuang

    2016-08-01

    To improve the thickness uniformity and increase the forming limit of sheets to enhance their overall quality, a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) was injected into the punch cavity to act as the force transfer medium and fulfill the function of flexible pressing during the sheet bulging process. The rheological properties of the MRF were changed under the influence of a magnetic field produced by loading different currents, which allowed variation of stress states and deformation modes in the 0.75-mm-thick 304 stainless steel sheets. With increasing current (up to 3.5 A), the sheet-forming limit increased by 16.13% at most, and the fracture morphology experienced a certain change. Additionally, both the bulge height and the wall thickness distribution had obvious changes with a punch stroke of 10 mm. According to the experimental analysis, the MRF can be used successfully as a pressure-carrying medium in the sheet forming process.

  16. Understanding charge transfer processes on metal oxides: a laser-flash-photolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieland, Fabian; Schneider, Jenny; Lippmann, Thorsten; Bahnemann, Detlef W.

    2016-09-01

    In the focus of this study, mixtures of commercially available TiO2 powders were created and their photocatalytic activity concerning the acetaldehyde degradation in the gas phase was tested. Further, the lifetime of the photogenerated charge carriers was analyzed by Laser-Flash-Photolysis-Spectroscopy. The acetaldehyde degradation experiments of the mixed powders lead to positive and negative deviations from the expected weighted mean. Nevertheless, their photocatalytic activity could be correlated with the lifetime of the charge carriers. A longer charge carrier lifetime at ambient conditions correlated with a lower fractional conversion of acetaldehyde. The advantageous activities of the samples were associated with a charge transfer reaction between larger and smaller particles comparable to the antenna mechanism.1

  17. Energy transfer on demand: photoswitch-directed behavior of metal-porphyrin frameworks.

    PubMed

    Williams, Derek E; Rietman, Joseph A; Maier, Josef M; Tan, Rui; Greytak, Andrew B; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Shustova, Natalia B

    2014-08-27

    In this paper, a photochromic diarylethene-based derivative that is coordinatively immobilized within an extended porphyrin framework is shown to maintain its photoswitchable behavior and to direct the photophysical properties of the host. In particular, emission of a framework composed of bis(5-pyridyl-2-methyl-3-thienyl)cyclopentene (BPMTC) and tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (H4TCPP) ligands anchored by Zn(2+) ions can be altered as a function of incident light. We attribute the observed cyclic fluorescence behavior of the synthesized porphyrin-BPMTC array to activation of energy transfer (ET) pathways through BPMTC photoisomerization. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements show a decrease in average porphyrin emission lifetime upon BPMTC insertion, consistent with an ET-based mechanism. These studies portend the possible utilization of photochromic ligands to direct chromophore behavior in large light-harvesting ensembles.

  18. Vascular gene transfer from metallic stent surfaces using adenoviral vectors tethered through hydrolysable cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Adamo, Richard F; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J; Alferiev, Ivan S

    2014-08-12

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  19. Comparison of three work of adhesion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, J.A.; O`Toole, E.; Zamora, D.; Poon, B.

    1998-02-01

    Practical work of adhesion measurements are being studied for several types of polymer/metal combinations in order to obtain a better understanding of the adhesive failure mechanisms for systems containing encapsulated and bonded components. The primary question is whether studies of model systems can be extended to systems of technological interest. The authors report on their first attempts to obtain the work of adhesion between a PDMS polymer and stainless steel. The work of adhesion measurements were made using three techniques -- contact angle, adhesive fracture energy at low deformation rates and JKR. Previous work by Whitesides` group show a good correlation between JKR and contact angle measurements for PDMS. Their initial work focused on duplicating the PDMS measurements of Chaudury. In addition, in this paper the authors extend the work of adhesion measurement to third technique -- interfacial failure energy. The ability to determine the reversible work of adhesion for practical adhesive joints allows understanding of several issues that control adhesion: surface preparation, nature of the interphase region, and bond durability.

  20. Accumulation of heavy metals in soil and their transfer to leafy vegetables in the region of Dhaka Aricha Highway, Savar, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Aktaruzzaman, M; Fakhruddin, A N M; Chowdhury, M A Z; Fardous, Z; Alam, M K

    2013-04-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals in environmental matrices is a potential risk to living system due to their uptake by plants and subsequent introduction into the food chain. A study was conducted to investigate the heavy metals concentration in soils and leafy vegetables samples along the Dhaka Aricha Road to assess their potential ecological risk. Heavy metals concentration was analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Concentrations ofallthetestedheavy metals except Cd in soil samples were below the permissible level. The mean concentration of Cd was found 3.99 +/- 1.85 mg kg(-1). Concentrations of all the tested heavy metals except Cd and Cr in vegetables samples were lower than recommended level. Mean concentration of Cd and Cr were found 1.00 +/- 0.68 mg kg(-1) and 2.32 +/- 0.84 mg kg(-1), respectively. Based on the Potential Ecological Risk Index, Cd posed very high risk to the local ecosystem due to its higher Risk Factor, > 320 and based on Transfer Factor of Pb and Cd were found higher accumulator among the tested metals. The results of present study revealed that the bioconcentration of heavy metals along the Dhaka Aricha Road posed high risk to the ecosystem. Considering the Transfer Factor of Cd and Pb it can be suggested that plants and leafy vegetables grow in the soil near Dhaka Aricha Road should not be used as food or feed.

  1. Universal aspects of brittle fracture, adhesion, and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1989-01-01

    This universal relation between binding energy and interatomic separation was originally discovered for adhesion at bimetallic interfaces involving the simple metals Al, Zn, Mg, and Na. It is shown here that the same universal relation extends to adhesion at transition-metal interfaces. Adhesive energies have been computed for the low-index interfaces of Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Fe, and W, using the equivalent-crystal theory (ECT) and keeping the atoms in each semiinfinite slab fixed rigidly in their equilibrium positions. These adhesive energy curves can be scaled onto each other and onto the universal adhesion curve. The effect of tip shape on the adhesive forces in the atomic-force microscope (AFM) is studied by computing energies and forces using the ECT. While the details of the energy-distance and force-distance curves are sensitive to tip shape, all of these curves can be scaled onto the universal adhesion curve.

  2. The impact of Cr adhesion layer on CNFET electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chikkadi, Kiran; Muoth, Matthias; Hierold, Christofer; Haluska, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a Cr adhesion layer on the transfer characteristics of Cr/Au-contacted carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is presented in this paper. We show that a very thin Cr layer (≈0.4 nm) already has an impact on the carrier transport in Schottky-barrier-modulated CNFETs. The ratio of the p- and n-branch current is reduced by eight times when the Cr adhesion layer thickness is increased from 0 to 8 nm. We suggest a change in Schottky barrier height at the contact as the determining mechanism for this result. Additionally, superior lifetime of devices is observed even for non-passivated CNFETs with preserved clean SWNT/Cr/Au-contacts using Cr layer thinner than 2 nm. Our experiments show that the role of the adhesion layer in metal/nanotube contacts should be explicitly considered when designing CNTFET-based circuits, developing CNFET fabrication processes, and analyzing the corresponding properties of the electrical contacts.

  3. The impact of Cr adhesion layer on CNFET electrical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chikkadi, Kiran; Muoth, Matthias; Hierold, Christofer; Haluska, Miroslav

    2016-01-08

    The effect of a Cr adhesion layer on the transfer characteristics of Cr/Au-contacted carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is presented in this paper. We show that a very thin Cr layer (≈0.4 nm) already has an impact on the carrier transport in Schottky-barrier-modulated CNFETs. The ratio of the p- and n-branch current is reduced by eight times when the Cr adhesion layer thickness is increased from 0 to 8 nm. We suggest a change in Schottky barrier height at the contact as the determining mechanism for this result. Additionally, superior lifetime of devices is observed even for non-passivated CNFETs with preserved clean SWNT/Cr/Au-contacts using Cr layer thinner than 2 nm. Our experiments show that the role of the adhesion layer in metal/nanotube contacts should be explicitly considered when designing CNTFET-based circuits, developing CNFET fabrication processes, and analyzing the corresponding properties of the electrical contacts.

  4. Light-harvesting metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): efficient strut-to-strut energy transfer in bodipy and porphyrin-based MOFs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K; Hong, Bong Jin; Sarjeant, Amy A; Nguyen, SonBinh T; Hupp, Joseph T

    2011-10-12

    A pillared-paddlewheel type metal-organic framework material featuring bodipy- and porphyrin-based struts, and capable of harvesting light across the entire visible spectrum, has been synthesized. Efficient-essentially quantitative-strut-to-strut energy transfer (antenna behavior) was observed for the well-organized donor-acceptor assembly consituting the ordered MOF structure.

  5. Tracing transfer processes of metal pollutants from soils to surface water using environmental magnetic techniques - results from Paris suburbia (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Christine; Lamy, Isabelle; van Oort, Folkert; Thiesson, Julien; Barsalini, Luca

    2015-04-01

    acidification (forestation, lixiviation by rain water, etc). Such anthropogenic metal phases were found in the suspended particular matter of the Seine river system, but the transfer mechanisms and pathways from the polluted soils to the surface waters are not yet fully understood and lack high resolution quantitative methods. In this work we aime at calibrating the environmental magnetic measurements that are tested as complementary tracer tools in combination with more classical geochemical analyses. We performed a magnetic cartography using susceptibility along a topographic profile from the different types of polluted soils (agricultural soil, forest deposits, waste land, flooding plains, etc) towards the surface waters (sediment traps of suspended particular matter) draining this area. The results were compared with laboratory susceptibility and elementary composition (XRF) analyses on the freeze dried bulk samples to evaluate the field work approach. Detailed magnetic hysteresis analyses were used to obtain additional information on the magneto-mineralogy and grain-size distribution in order to deconvolute the magnetic bulk signal in terms of the different "natural" and "anthropogenic" ferruginous phases present in the samples and therefore allowing a better tracking of the pathways of the metallic pollutants.

  6. Electron delocalization in the S1 and T1 metal-to-ligand charge transfer states of trans-substituted metal quadruply bonded complexes

    PubMed Central

    Alberding, Brian G.; Chisholm, Malcolm H.; Gallucci, Judith C.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Gustafson, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    The singlet S1 and triplet T1 photoexcited states of the compounds containing MM quadruple bonds trans-M2(TiPB)2(O2CC6H4-4-CN)2, where TiPB = 2,4,6-triisopropylbenzoate and M = Mo (I) or M = W (I′), and trans-M2(O2CMe)2((N[i Pr ])2CC ≡ CC6H5)2, where M = Mo (II) and M = W (II′), have been investigated by a variety of spectroscopic techniques including femtosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. The singlet states are shown to be delocalized metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states for I and I′ but localized for II and II′ involving the cyanobenzoate or amidinate ligands, respectively. The triplet states are MoMoδδ* for both I and II but delocalized 3MLCT for I′ and localized 3MLCT for II′. These differences arise from consideration of the relative orbital energies of the M2δ or M2δ* and the ligand π∗ as well as the magnitudes of orbital overlap. PMID:21525414

  7. Vascular Gene Transfer from Metallic Stent Surfaces Using Adenoviral Vectors Tethered through Hydrolysable Cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P.; Adamo, Richard F.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.

    2014-01-01

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  8. Non-classical adhesive-bonded joints in practical aerospace construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions are derived for adhesive-bonded joints of non-classical geometries. Particular attention is given to bonded doublers and to selective reinforcement by unidirectional composites. Non-dimensionalized charts are presented for the efficiency limit imposed on the skin as the result of the eccentricity in the load path through the doubler. It is desirable to employ a relativly large doubler to minimize the effective eccentricity in the load path. The transfer stresses associated with selective reinforcement of metal structures by advanced composites are analyzed. Reinforcement of bolt holes in composites by bonded metal doublers is covered quantitatively. Also included is the adhesive joint analysis for shear flow in a multi-cell torque box, in which the bond on one angle becomes more critical sooner than those on the others, thereby restricting the strength to less than the total of each maximum strength when acting alone. Adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness and thermal imbalances are included. A simple analysis/design technique of solution in terms of upper and lower bounds on an all-plastic adhesive analysis is introduced.

  9. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  10. Tape Transfer Printing of a Liquid Metal Alloy for Stretchable RF Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    In order to make conductors with large cross sections for low impedance radio frequency (RF) electronics, while still retaining high stretchability, liquid-alloy-based microfluidic stretchable electronics offers stretchable electronic systems the unique opportunity to combine various sensors on our bodies or organs with high-quality wireless communication with the external world (devices/systems), without sacrificing enhanced user comfort. This microfluidic approach, based on printed circuit board technology, allows large area processing of large cross section conductors and robust contacts, which can handle a lot of stretching between the embedded rigid active components and the surrounding system. Although it provides such benefits, further development is needed to realize its potential as a high throughput, cost-effective process technology. In this paper, tape transfer printing is proposed to supply a rapid prototyping batch process at low cost, albeit at a low resolution of 150 μm. In particular, isolated patterns can be obtained in a simple one-step process. Finally, a stretchable radio frequency identification (RFID) tag is demonstrated. The measured results show the robustness of the hybrid integrated system when the tag is stretched at 50% for 3000 cycles. PMID:25192310

  11. Transfer of metals to plants and red deer in an old lead mining area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Reglero, M M; Monsalve-González, L; Taggart, M A; Mateo, R

    2008-11-15

    Lead mining in the Sierra Madrona mountains and the valley of Alcudia in Southern Spain began in the 1st millennium B.C., and the area was intermittently exploited up until the end of the 20th century. The degree of contamination by Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, As and Se of soil, water and sediment, and the transfer to 13 species of plants, and then to red deer (Cervus elaphus) have been studied. Mined areas had higher concentrations in stream sediments than control areas. The highest concentrations were observed for Pb (1481 microg g(-1) d.w.) and As (1880 microg g(-1)) in the sediment of a stream flowing beside the spoil dump at Mina de Horcajo. Plants from mining sites contained consistently higher levels of Pb and As, and their concentrations in plants were correlated. The highest concentrations of Pb were in Gramineae (Pb: 97.5, As: 2.4 microg g(-1) d.w.), and the lowest in elmleaf blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius). The highest mean liver concentrations were found in red deer from the mining sites for Pb (0.805 microg g(-1) d. w.), Cd (0.554 microg g(-1)), Se (0.327 microg g(-1)), and As (0.061 microg g(-1)), although these were well below the levels associated with clinical poisoning.

  12. Tape transfer printing of a liquid metal alloy for stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2014-09-03

    In order to make conductors with large cross sections for low impedance radio frequency (RF) electronics, while still retaining high stretchability, liquid-alloy-based microfluidic stretchable electronics offers stretchable electronic systems the unique opportunity to combine various sensors on our bodies or organs with high-quality wireless communication with the external world (devices/systems), without sacrificing enhanced user comfort. This microfluidic approach, based on printed circuit board technology, allows large area processing of large cross section conductors and robust contacts, which can handle a lot of stretching between the embedded rigid active components and the surrounding system. Although it provides such benefits, further development is needed to realize its potential as a high throughput, cost-effective process technology. In this paper, tape transfer printing is proposed to supply a rapid prototyping batch process at low cost, albeit at a low resolution of 150 μm. In particular, isolated patterns can be obtained in a simple one-step process. Finally, a stretchable radio frequency identification (RFID) tag is demonstrated. The measured results show the robustness of the hybrid integrated system when the tag is stretched at 50% for 3000 cycles.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  14. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metasurfaces: A full-wave study based on two-dimensional grooved metal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Dyakov, Sergey A.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Yan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials possess artificial bulk and surface electromagnetic states. Tamed dispersion properties of surface waves allow one to achieve a controllable super-Planckian radiative heat transfer (RHT) process between two closely spaced objects. We numerically demonstrate enhanced RHT between two two-dimensional grooved metal plates by a full-wave scattering approach. The enhancement originates from both transverse-magnetic spoof surface-plasmon polaritons and a series of transverse-electric bonding- and anti-bonding-waveguide modes at surfaces. The RHT spectrum is frequency selective and highly geometrically tailorable. Our simulation also reveals thermally excited nonresonant surface waves in constituent metallic materials may play a prevailing role for RHT at an extremely small separation between two metal plates, rendering metamaterial modes insignificant for the energy-transfer process.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer as adaptive response to heavy metal stress in subsurface microbial communities. Final report for period October 15, 1997 - October 15, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, B. F.

    2001-12-21

    Horizontal gene transfer as adaptive response to heavy metal stress in the presence of heavy metal stress was evaluated in oligotrophic subsurface soil laboratory scale microcosms. Increasing levels of cadmium (10, 100 and 1000 mM) were applied and an E. coli donor was used to deliver the target plasmids, pMOL187 and pMOL222, which contained the czc and ncc operons, and the helper plasmid RP4. Plasmid transfer was evaluated through monitoring of the heavy metal resistance and presence of the genes. The interactive, clearly revealed, effect of biological and chemical external factors on the extent of plasmid-DNA propagation in microbial communities in contaminated soil environments was observed in this study. Additionally, P.putida LBJ 415 carrying a suicide construct was used to evaluate selective elimination of a plasmid donor.

  16. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  17. Ni/Cu/Ag plated contacts: A study of resistivity and contact adhesion for crystalline-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ur Rehman, Atteq; Lee, Sang Hee; Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-07-01

    Ni/Cu/Ag plated contacts were examined as an alternate to Ag screen printed contacts for silicon (Si) solar cell metallization. To realize a reliable contact for industrial applications, the contact resistance and its adhesion to Si substrates were evaluated. Si surface roughness by picosecond (ps) laser ablation of silicon-nitride (SiNx) antireflection coating (ARC) was done in order to prepare the patterns. The sintering process after Ni/Cu/Ag full metallization in the form of the post-annealing process was applied to investigate the contact resistivity and adhesion. A very low contact resistivity of approximately 0.5 mΩcm2 has been achieved with measurements made by the transfer length method (TLM). Thin finger lines of about 26 μm wide and a line resistance of 0.51 Ω/cm have been realized by plating technology. Improved contact adhesion by combining the ps-laser-ablation and post-annealing process has been achieved. We have shown the peel-off strengths >1 N/mm with a higher average adhesion of 1.9 N/mm. Our pull-tab adhesion tests demonstrate excellent strength well above the wafer breakage force. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls--Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    SciTech Connect

    Ould, Choumad; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Gachon, Yves; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-04

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer (''roll coating'', ''pick up'') may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  19. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls—Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ould, Choumad; Gachon, Yves; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-01

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer ("roll coating", "pick up") may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  20. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.