Science.gov

Sample records for adhesive potential electrostatic

  1. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  2. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  3. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  4. The Role of the Electrostatic Force in Spore Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunhyea; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic force is investigated as one of the components of the adhesion force between Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores and planar surfaces. The surface potentials of a Bt spore and a mica surface are experimentally obtained using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-scanning surface potential microscopy technique. On the basis of experimental information, the surface charge density of the spores is estimated at 0.03 {micro}C/cm{sup 2} at 20% relative humidity and decreases with increasing humidity. The Coulombic force is introduced for the spore-mica system (both charged, nonconductive surfaces), and an electrostatic image force is introduced to the spore-gold system because gold is electrically conductive. The Coulombic force for spore-mica is repulsive because the components are similarly charged, while the image force for the spore-gold system is attractive. The magnitude of both forces decreases with increasing humidity. The electrostatic forces are added to other force components, e.g., van der Waals and capillary forces, to obtain the adhesion force for each system. The adhesion forces measured by AFM are compared to the estimated values. It is shown that the electrostatic (Coulombic and image) forces play a significant role in the adhesion force between spores and planar surfaces.

  5. Electrostatic adhesion for added functionality of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. The incorporation of electrostatic adhesion into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could provide significant value added functionality. Imparting large potential differences (∼2 kV) across electrodes generates an attractive force, thus providing a means of attachment. This could be used as a reversible latching mechanism or as a means of controllable internal connectivity. Varying the connectivity for discrete elements of a substructure of a given design allows for control of internal load paths and moment of area of the cross section. This could facilitate variable stiffness (both in bending and torsion). Using a combination of existing fabrication techniques, functional electrodes have been integrated within a FRP. Copper polyimide thin film laminate material has been both co-cured with carbon fibre reinforced epoxy and bonded to PVC closed cell foam core material to provide a range of structural configurations with integrated electrodes. The ability of such integrated devices to confer variations in global bending stiffness of basic beam structures is investigated. Through the application of 4 kV across integrated electrostatic adhesive devices, a 112% increase in flexural stiffness has been demonstrated for a composite sandwich structure.

  6. Role of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions in gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Stewart, Katherine M E; Penlidis, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Geckos, which are capable of walking on walls and hanging from ceilings with the help of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical fibrils (setae) on their toe pads, have become the main prototype in the design and fabrication of fibrillar dry adhesives. As the unique fibrillar feature of the toe pads of geckos allows them to develop an intimate contact with the substrate the animal is walking on or clinging to, it is expected that the toe setae exchange significant numbers of electric charges with the contacted substrate via the contact electrification (CE) phenomenon. Even so, the possibility of the occurrence of CE and the contribution of the resulting electrostatic interactions to the dry adhesion of geckos have been overlooked for several decades. In this study, by measuring the magnitude of the electric charges, together with the adhesion forces, that gecko foot pads develop in contact with different materials, we have clarified for the first time that CE does contribute effectively to gecko adhesion. More importantly, we have demonstrated that it is the CE-driven electrostatic interactions which dictate the strength of gecko adhesion, and not the van der Waals or capillary forces which are conventionally considered as the main source of gecko adhesion.

  7. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  8. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone.

  9. Electrostatic potential map modelling with COSY Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Planche, T.; Saminathan, S.

    2016-06-01

    COSY Infinity (Makino and Berz, 2005) is a differential-algebra based simulation code which allows accurate calculation of transfer maps to arbitrary order. COSY's existing internal procedures were modified to allow electrostatic elements to be specified using an array of field potential data from the midplane. Additionally, a new procedure was created allowing electrostatic elements and their fringe fields to be specified by an analytic function. This allows greater flexibility in accurately modelling electrostatic elements and their fringe fields. Applied examples of these new procedures are presented including the modelling of a shunted electrostatic multipole designed with OPERA, a spherical electrostatic bender, and the effects of different shaped apertures in an electrostatic beam line.

  10. The role of electrostatic charge in the adhesion of spherical particles onto planar surfaces in atmospheric systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira Z.; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-06-19

    In this study, the influence of electrostatic charge on the adhesive force between spherical particles and planar surfaces in atmospheric systems was studied using atomic force microscopy. Electrical bias was applied to modify the surface charge, and it was found that application of a stronger positive bias to a particle induces a stronger total adhesive force. The sensitivity of the system to changes in the bias depended on the surface charge density. For larger-size particles, the contribution of the electrostatic force decreased, and the capillary force became the major contributor to the total adhesive force. The influence of water adsorptionmore » on the total adhesive force and, specifically, on the contribution of the electrostatic force depended on the hydrophobicity of interacting surfaces. For a hydrophilic surface, water adsorption either attenuated the surface charge or screened the effect of surface potential. An excessive amount of adsorbed water provided a path to surface charge leakage, which might cancel out the electrostatic force, leading to a reduction in the adhesive force. Theoretically calculated forces were comparable with measured adhesive forces except for mica which has a highly localized surface potential. The results of this study provide information on the behavior of charged colloidal particles in atmospheric systems.« less

  11. The role of electrostatic charge in the adhesion of spherical particles onto planar surfaces in atmospheric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira Z.; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-06-19

    In this study, the influence of electrostatic charge on the adhesive force between spherical particles and planar surfaces in atmospheric systems was studied using atomic force microscopy. Electrical bias was applied to modify the surface charge, and it was found that application of a stronger positive bias to a particle induces a stronger total adhesive force. The sensitivity of the system to changes in the bias depended on the surface charge density. For larger-size particles, the contribution of the electrostatic force decreased, and the capillary force became the major contributor to the total adhesive force. The influence of water adsorption on the total adhesive force and, specifically, on the contribution of the electrostatic force depended on the hydrophobicity of interacting surfaces. For a hydrophilic surface, water adsorption either attenuated the surface charge or screened the effect of surface potential. An excessive amount of adsorbed water provided a path to surface charge leakage, which might cancel out the electrostatic force, leading to a reduction in the adhesive force. Theoretically calculated forces were comparable with measured adhesive forces except for mica which has a highly localized surface potential. The results of this study provide information on the behavior of charged colloidal particles in atmospheric systems.

  12. Microgravity Experiments to Evaluate Electrostatic Forces in Controlling Cohesion and Adhesion of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Weislogel, M.; Jacobson, T.

    1999-01-01

    , are pervasive and probably affect, at some level, everything from astrophysical-scale granular systems such as interstellar nebulae, protoplanetary dust and debris disks, planetary-scale systems such as debris palls from meteorite impact, volcanic eruptions, and aeolian dust storms, all the way to industrial-scale systems in mining, powder and grain processing, pharmaceuticals, and smoke-stack technologies. NASA must concern itself with the electrostatic behavior of dust and sand on Mars because of its potentially critical importance to human exploration. The motion and adhesion of martian surface materials will affect the design and performance of spacesuits, habitats, processing plants, solar panels, and any externally exposed equipment such as surface rovers or communication and weather stations. Additionally, the adhesion of dust and sand could greatly enhance contact with the potentially toxic components of the martian soil.

  13. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-07-05

    Reaction rates of environmental processes occurring at hydrated mineral surfaces are primarily controlled by the electrostatic potential that develops at the interface. This potential depends on the structure of exposed crystal faces, as well as the pH and the type of ions and their interactions with these faces. Despite its importance, experimental methods for determining fundamental electrostatic properties of specific crystal faces such as the point of zero charge are few. Here we show that this information may be obtained from simple, cyclic potentiometric titration using a well characterized single-crystal electrode exposing the face of interest. The method exploits the presence of a hysteresis loop in the titration measurements that allows extraction of key electrostatic descriptors using the Maxwell construction. The approach is demonstrated for hematite (α-Fe2O3) (001), and a thermodynamic proof is provided for the resulting estimate of its point of zero charge. Insight gained from this method will aid in predicting the fate of migrating contaminants, mineral growth/dissolution processes, mineral-microbiological interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories.

  14. Modeling and analysis of electrostatic adhesion force for climbing robot on dielectric wall materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiu-Bing; Qin, Lan; Zhang, Wan-Xiong; Xie, Li; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, electrostatic adhesion technology on the wall climbing robots has attracted many researchers interest for its outstanding characteristics. In this paper, a theoretical analytical model is derived from the electrostatic adhesion field between the dielectric wall and a coplanar array of parallel strip electrodes called inter-digital electrodes (IDE). Due to the polarization on the different dielectric being complicated, the field is divided into four layers in order to obtain corresponding boundaries. Besides, the roughness of the wall surface, alternately polarities applied voltages and different dielectric parameter with different layer, all of which are also taken into account in the model since they have a significant influence on the electrostatic adhesion field. Based on this model, the electrostatic adhesion force (EAF) is calculated utilizing the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) formulation. As we all known, EAF is vital to the climbing robot design. Specially, it is possible for us to optimize the load to weight ratio in next step. Through comparing the finite element method (FEM) simulation with theoretical computation, the simulation and calculated data show that our proposed scheme can achieve desired results. Moreover, experiments of electrostatic adhesion performance for the adhesive on some different dielectric materials are also implemented.

  15. Universal method for computation of electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, D

    2005-05-15

    A computational approach to determine electrostatic interaction and gravitational potentials by performing direct numerical integration is presented. The potential is expanded using finite-element functions of arbitrary order. The method does not involve any solutions of systems of linear equations. The potential is instead obtained as a sum of differential contributions. Thus, no boundary conditions for the potential are needed. It is computationally efficient and well suited for parallel computers, since the innermost loops constitute matrix multiplications and the outer ones can be used as parallel indices. Without using prescreening or other computational tricks to speed up the calculation, the algorithm scales as N4/3 where N denotes the grid size.

  16. Electrostatic potential of point charges inside dielectric oblate spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shaozhong

    2009-01-01

    As a sequel to a previous paper on electrostatic potential of point charges inside dielectric prolate spheroids [J. Electrostatics 66 (2008) 549-560], this note further presents the exact solution to the electrostatic problem of finding the electric potential of point charges inside a dielectric oblate spheroid that is embedded in a dissimilar dielectric medium. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the convergence of the proposed series solutions. PMID:20160934

  17. Electrostatic potentials of proteins in water: a structured continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Andreas; Blossey, Ralf; Rjasanow, Sergej; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lenhof, Hans-Peter

    2007-01-15

    Electrostatic interactions play a crucial role in many biomolecular processes, including molecular recognition and binding. Biomolecular electrostatics is modulated to a large extent by the water surrounding the molecules. Here, we present a novel approach to the computation of electrostatic potentials which allows the inclusion of water structure into the classical theory of continuum electrostatics. Based on our recent purely differential formulation of nonlocal electrostatics [Hildebrandt, et al. (2004) Phys. Rev. Lett., 93, 108104] we have developed a new algorithm for its efficient numerical solution. The key component of this algorithm is a boundary element solver, having the same computational complexity as established boundary element methods for local continuum electrostatics. This allows, for the first time, the computation of electrostatic potentials and interactions of large biomolecular systems immersed in water including effects of the solvent's structure in a continuum description. We illustrate the applicability of our approach with two examples, the enzymes trypsin and acetylcholinesterase. The approach is applicable to all problems requiring precise prediction of electrostatic interactions in water, such as protein-ligand and protein-protein docking, folding and chromatin regulation. Initial results indicate that this approach may shed new light on biomolecular electrostatics and on aspects of molecular recognition that classical local electrostatics cannot reveal. PMID:17237112

  18. Electric fields and electrostatic potentials in the high latitude ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Saint Maurice, J.-P.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Recent interpretive studies of electric field-driven ionospheric plasma convection data from the AE-C satellite are described, where the instruments employed include an ion drift meter and an ion-retarding potential analyzer. Electrostatic potential curves are derived from ion drift velocity measurements for high-latitude segments of the satellite's orbit. The potential curves are shown to be useful in determining the character of the global electrostatic potential pattern, with emphasis on the separation of convective cells. Results are given for six orbits, with attention to the mid-day auroral region.

  19. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ida; Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

  20. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  1. Deriving static atomic multipoles from the electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christian; Bereau, Tristan; Spinn, Alexander; Liedl, Klaus R; Gedeck, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-12-23

    The description of molecular systems using multipolar electrostatics calls for automated methods to fit the necessary parameters. In this paper, we describe an open-source software package that allows fitting atomic multipoles (MTPs) from the ab initio electrostatic potential by adequate atom typing and judicious assignment of the local axis system. By enabling the simultaneous fit of several molecules and/or conformations, the package addresses issues of parameter transferability and lack of sampling for buried atoms. We illustrate the method by studying a series of small alcohol molecules, as well as various conformations of protonated butylamine.

  2. Microgravity Experiments to Evaluate Electrostatic Forces in Controlling Cohesion and Adhesion of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Weislogel, M.; Jacobson, T.

    1999-01-01

    The bulk behavior of dispersed, fluidized, or undispersed stationary granular systems cannot be fully understood in terms of adhesive/cohesive properties without understanding the role of electrostatic forces acting at the level of the grains themselves. When grains adhere to a surface, or come in contact with one another in a stationary bulk mass, it is difficult to measure the forces acting on the grains, and the forces themselves that induced the cohesion and adhesion are changed. Even if a single grain were to be scrutinized in the laboratory, it might be difficult, perhaps impossible, to define the distribution and character of surface charging and the three-dimensional relationship that charges (electrons, holes) have to one another. The hypothesis that we propose to test in microgravity (for dielectric materials) is that adhesion and cohesion of granular matter are mediated primarily by dipole forces that do not require the presence of a net charge; in fact, nominally electrically neutral materials should express adhesive and cohesive behavior when the neutrality results from a balance of positive and negative charge carriers. Moreover, the use of net charge alone as a measure of the electrical nature of grain-to-grain relationships within a granular mass may be misleading. We believe that the dipole forces arise from the presence of randomly-distributed positive and negative fixed charge carriers on grains that give rise to a resultant dipole moment. These dipole forces have long-range attraction. Random charges are created whenever there is triboelectrical activity of a granular mass, that is, whenever the grains experience contact/separation sequences or friction.

  3. Pulse voltage determination for electrostatic micro manipulation considering surface conductivity and adhesion of glass particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Ryo; Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Takahashi, Kunio; Saito, Shigeki

    2015-05-01

    A model with surface conductivity and adhesional force is proposed to investigate the mechanism for electrostatic micro manipulation of a dielectric object using a single probe. The manipulation system consists of three elements: a conductive probe as a manipulator, a conductive plate as a substrate, and a dielectric particle as the target object for manipulation. The particle can be successfully picked up/placed if a rectangular pulse voltage is applied between the probe and the plate. The reliability of the picking up/placing operation is improved by applying a pulse voltage that is determined by a theoretical model considering surface conductivity and adhesion. To verify the theoretical prediction, manipulation experiment is conducted using soda-lime glass particles with radii of 20 μm and 40 μm.

  4. Crystal structures of an ICAM-5 ectodomain fragment show electrostatic-based homophilic adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Recacha, Rosario; Jiménez, David; Tian, Li; Barredo, Román; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) is a member of the ICAM subfamily that is exclusively expressed in the telencephalon region of the brain. The crystal structure of the four most N-terminal glycosylated domains (D1–D4) of ICAM-5 was determined in three different space groups and the D1–D5 fragment was modelled. The structures showed a curved molecule with two pronounced interdomain bends between D2 and D3 and between D3 and D4, as well as some interdomain flexibility. In contrast to ICAM-1, ICAM-5 has patches of positive and negative electrostatic charge at D1–D2 and at D3–D5, respectively. ICAM-5 can mediate homotypic interactions. In the crystals, several charge-based intermolecular interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal moieties of the ICAM-5 molecules were observed, which defined an interacting surface in the D1–D4 fragment. One of the crystal lattices has a molecular assembly that could represent the homophilic ICAM-5 cell adhesion complex in neurons. PMID:25004970

  5. Crystal structures of an ICAM-5 ectodomain fragment show electrostatic-based homophilic adhesions.

    PubMed

    Recacha, Rosario; Jiménez, David; Tian, Li; Barredo, Román; Gahmberg, Carl G; Casasnovas, José M

    2014-07-01

    Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) is a member of the ICAM subfamily that is exclusively expressed in the telencephalon region of the brain. The crystal structure of the four most N-terminal glycosylated domains (D1-D4) of ICAM-5 was determined in three different space groups and the D1-D5 fragment was modelled. The structures showed a curved molecule with two pronounced interdomain bends between D2 and D3 and between D3 and D4, as well as some interdomain flexibility. In contrast to ICAM-1, ICAM-5 has patches of positive and negative electrostatic charge at D1-D2 and at D3-D5, respectively. ICAM-5 can mediate homotypic interactions. In the crystals, several charge-based intermolecular interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal moieties of the ICAM-5 molecules were observed, which defined an interacting surface in the D1-D4 fragment. One of the crystal lattices has a molecular assembly that could represent the homophilic ICAM-5 cell adhesion complex in neurons. PMID:25004970

  6. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics restrained electrostatic potential fitting.

    PubMed

    Burger, Steven K; Schofield, Jeremy; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-12-01

    We present a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to evaluate the partial charges of amino acid residues for use in MM potentials based on their protein environment. For each residue of interest, the nearby residues are included in the QM system while the rest of the protein is treated at the MM level of theory. After a short structural optimization, the partial charges of the central residue are fit to the electrostatic potential using the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. The resulting charges and electrostatic potential account for the individual environment of the residue, although they lack the transferable nature of library partial charges. To evaluate the quality of the QM/MM RESP charges, thermodynamic integration is used to measure the pKa shift of the aspartic acid residues in three different proteins, turkey egg lysozyme, beta-cryptogein, and Thioredoxin. Compared to the AMBER ff99SB library values, the QM/MM RESP charges show better agreement between the calculated and experimental pK(a) values for almost all of the residues considered.

  7. Electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion's structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb's law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle's Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  8. Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-04

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion’s structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb’s law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle’s Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  9. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region, using the adiabatic auroral arc model. With certain simplifying assumptions, new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g., cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters are found. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. Various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) are given which can be studied with existing data sets.

  10. Multilevel Summation of Electrostatic Potentials Using Graphics Processing Units*

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, David J.; Stone, John E.; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Physical and engineering practicalities involved in microprocessor design have resulted in flat performance growth for traditional single-core microprocessors. The urgent need for continuing increases in the performance of scientific applications requires the use of many-core processors and accelerators such as graphics processing units (GPUs). This paper discusses GPU acceleration of the multilevel summation method for computing electrostatic potentials and forces for a system of charged atoms, which is a problem of paramount importance in biomolecular modeling applications. We present and test a new GPU algorithm for the long-range part of the potentials that computes a cutoff pair potential between lattice points, essentially convolving a fixed 3-D lattice of “weights” over all sub-cubes of a much larger lattice. The implementation exploits the different memory subsystems provided on the GPU to stream optimally sized data sets through the multiprocessors. We demonstrate for the full multilevel summation calculation speedups of up to 26 using a single GPU and 46 using multiple GPUs, enabling the computation of a high-resolution map of the electrostatic potential for a system of 1.5 million atoms in under 12 seconds. PMID:20161132

  11. The theory of Langmuir probes in strong electrostatic potential structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The operation of collecting and emitting Langmuir probes and double probes within time-stationary strong electrostatic potential structures is analyzed. The cross sections of spherical and cylindrical probes to charged particles within the structures are presented and used to obtain the current-voltage characteristics of idealized probes. The acquisition of plasma parameters from these characteristics is outlined, and the operation of idealized floating double-probe systems is analyzed. Probe surface effects are added to the idealized theory, and some surface effects pertinent to spacecraft probes are quantified. Magnetic field effects on idealized probes are examined, and the time required for floating probes to change their potentials by collecting charge and by emitting photoelectrons is discussed. Calculations on the space-charge effects of probe-perturbed beams and on the space-charge limiting of electron emission are given in an appendix.

  12. Electrostatic Potentials and Fields in the Vicinity of Engineered Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Schaldach, C; Bourcier, W; Paul, P; Wilson, W

    2004-03-15

    We have developed a method of calculation of the electrostatic potentials and fields in the vicinity of geometrically complex engineered nanostructures comprised of varying materials in electrolytes of arbitrary pH and ionic strength. The method involves direct summation of charged Debye-Hueckel spheres comprising the nanostructural surfaces and, by including charge redistribution on the surface of conducting materials held at constant potential, is applicable to mixed boundary conditions. The method is validated by comparison to analytical solutions for an infinite plane (Gouy-Chapman), an infinite cylinder (Bessel functions) and an infinite plane which contains a hole and which is held at constant potential. Excellent agreement between the potentials obtained by our numerical method and the closed form solutions is found for these conditions. The method is applied to the calculation of the electric field enhancement in the vicinity of a nanomembrane whose pore wall is held at constant charge and whose membrane surfaces are held at constant potential. The electric field is found to be enhanced by the charge buildup in the rim of the hole of the nanomembrane, which redistribution results from the potential being held constant in the conducting region. Ion concentrations are also calculated; positive ion rejection is found to be enhanced by this charge buildup in the region of the rim when a constant positive potential is applied.

  13. Electrostatic potentials and electrostatic interaction energies of rat cytochrome b5 and a simulated anion-exchange adsorbent surface.

    PubMed Central

    Roush, D J; Gill, D S; Willson, R C

    1994-01-01

    Electrostatic potentials were determined for the soluble tryptic core of rat cytochrome b5 (using a structure derived from homology modeling) and a simulated anion-exchange surface through application of the linearized finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation with the simulation code UHBD. Objectives of this work included determination of the contributions of the various charged groups on the protein surface to electrostatic interactions with a simulated anion-exchange surface as a function of orientation, separation distance, and ionic strength, as well as examining the potential existence of a preferred contact orientation. Electrostatic interaction free energies for the complex of the model protein and the simulated surface were computed using the electrostatics section of UHBD employing a 110(3) grid. An initial coarse grid spacing of 2.0 A was required to obtain correct boundary conditions. The boundary conditions of the coarse grid were used in subsequent focusing steps until the electrostatic interaction free energies were relatively independent of grid spacing (at approximately 0.5 A). Explicit error analyses were performed to determine the effects of grid spacing and other model assumptions on the electrostatic interaction free energies. The computational results reveal the presence of a preferred interaction orientation; the interaction energy between these two entities, of opposite net charge, is repulsive over a range of orientations. The electrostatic interaction free energies appear to be the summation of multiple fractional interactions between the protein and the anion-exchange surface. The simulation results are compared with those of ion-exchange adsorption experiments with site-directed mutants of the recombinant protein. Comparisons of the results from the computational and experimental studies should lead to a better understanding of electrostatic interactions of proteins and charged surfaces. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8061185

  14. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region using the adiabatic auroral arc model. This model has crucial nonlinearities (connected, for example. with aurorally produced ionization) which have hampered analysis; earlier work has either been linear, which I will show is a poor approximation or, if nonlinear, either numerical or too specialized to study parametric dependencies. With certain simplifying assumptions I find new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g.. cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. This paper gives various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) which can be studied with existing data sets.

  15. Scattering and confinement dynamics of Dirac particles in external electrostatic and Lorentz scalar potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Haritha; P, Durganandini

    2015-06-01

    We study the scattering and confinement of Dirac particles in external electrostatic and Lorentz scalar potentials. We use a numerical finite difference time -domain method to solve the equation and obtain the particle dynamics. We find qualitatively different dynamical behavior for electrostatic and Lorentz scalar potentials. Electrostatic potentials lead to Klein tunneling and do not exhibit confinement, while Lorentz scalar potentials inhibit Klein tunneling and exhibit confinement.

  16. Influence of surface potential on the adhesive force of radioactive gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2013-09-24

    Radioactive particles may acquire surface potential through self-charging, and thus can behave differently from natural aerosols in atmospheric systems with respect to aggregation, deposition, resuspension, and transport to areas surrounding a radioactive source. This work focuses on the adhesive force between radioactive particles and metallic surfaces, which relates to the deposition and resuspension of particles on surrounding surfaces. Scanning surface potential microscopy was employed to measure the surface potential of radioactive gold foil. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the adhesive force for gold that acquired surface charge either by irradiation or by application of an equivalent electrical bias. Overall, the adhesive force increases with increasing surface potential or relative humidity. However, a behavior that does not follow the general trend was observed for the irradiated gold at a high decay rate. A comparison between experimental measurements and calculated values revealed that the surface potential promotes adhesion. The contribution of the electrostatic force at high levels of relative humidity was lower than the one found using theoretical calculations due to the effects caused by enhanced adsorption rate of water molecules under a high surface charge density. The results of this study can be used to provide a better understanding of the behavior of radioactive particles in atmospheric systems.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of electrostatic potential along lipid bilayer with gramicidin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Megumi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Hidemi

    2013-02-01

    The structure and electrostatic potential profile of the DMPC lipid bilayers with a gramicidin A (GA) were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation reproduced the effect of GA on the membrane structure; the area per lipid decreases and membrane thickness increases, and the observed membrane structures correspond to the experimental data. The polar headgroup of lipid was found to orient toward the membrane normal as the lipid approaches the GA. The observed electrostatic potential map showed that the electrostatic potential around the region of GA gate was lower than the others at the same level of the membrane normal and the values of electrostatic potential in the pore region of GA were negative. These results indicate that a cation in the aqueous region of membrane can be electrostatically led to the GA entrance and penetrate the GA channel following the gradient of ion concentration.

  18. Combined depletion and electrostatic forces in polymer-induced membrane adhesion: A theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raudino, Antonio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Karttunen, Mikko

    2012-02-01

    We develop a semi-quantitative analytical theory to describe adhesion between two identical planar charged surfaces embedded in a polymer-containing electrolyte solution. Polymer chains are uncharged and differ from the solvent by their lower dielectric permittivity. The solution mimics physiological fluids: It contains 0.1 M of monovalent ions and a small number of divalent cations that form tight bonds with the headgroups of charged lipids. The components have heterogeneous spatial distributions. The model was derived self-consistently by combining: (a) a Poisson-Boltzmann like equation for the charge densities, (b) a continuum mean-field theory for the polymer profile, (c) a solvation energy forcing the ions toward the polymer-poor regions, and (d) surface interactions of polymers and electrolytes. We validated the theory via extensive coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The results confirm our analytical model and reveal interesting details not detected by the theory. At high surface charges, polymer chains are mainly excluded from the gap region, while the concentration of ions increases. The model shows a strong coupling between osmotic forces, surface potential and salting-out effects of the slightly polar polymer chains. It highlights some of the key differences in the behaviour of monomeric and polymeric mixed solvents and their responses to Coulomb interactions. Our main findings are: (a) the onset of long-ranged ion-induced polymer depletion force that increases with surface charge density and (b) a polymer-modified repulsive Coulomb force that increases with surface charge density. Overall, the system exhibits homeostatic behaviour, resulting in robustness against variations in the amount of charges. Applications and extensions of the model are briefly discussed.

  19. Adhesion of dry and wet electrostatic capture silk of uloborid spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Vollrath, Fritz

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the impressive adhesive qualities of uloborid spider orb-web capture when dry, which are lost when the nano-filament threads are wetted. A force sensor with a 50 nN-1 mN detection sensitively allowed us to measure quantitatively the stress-strain characteristics of native silk threads in both the original dry state and after wetting by controlled application of water mist with droplet sizes ranging between 3 and 5 μm and densities ranging between 104 and 105 per mm3. Stress forces of between 1 and 5 μN/μm2 in the native, dry multifilament thread puffs were reduced to between 0.1 and 0.5 μN/μm2 in the wetted collapsed state, with strain displacements reducing from between 2 and 5 mm in the dry to 0.10-0.12 mm in the wetted states. We conclude that wetting cribellate threads reduce their van der Waals adhesion with implications on the thread's adhesive strength under tension. This should be considered when discussing the evolutionary transitions of capture silks from the ancestral dry-state nano-filaments of the cribellate spider taxa to the wet-state glue-droplets of the ecribellate taxa.

  20. Adhesion of dry and wet electrostatic capture silk of uloborid spider.

    PubMed

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Vollrath, Fritz

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the impressive adhesive qualities of uloborid spider orb-web capture when dry, which are lost when the nano-filament threads are wetted. A force sensor with a 50 nN-1 mN detection sensitively allowed us to measure quantitatively the stress-strain characteristics of native silk threads in both the original dry state and after wetting by controlled application of water mist with droplet sizes ranging between 3 and 5 μm and densities ranging between 10(4) and 10(5) per mm(3). Stress forces of between 1 and 5 μN/μm(2) in the native, dry multifilament thread puffs were reduced to between 0.1 and 0.5 μN/μm(2) in the wetted collapsed state, with strain displacements reducing from between 2 and 5 mm in the dry to 0.10-0.12 mm in the wetted states. We conclude that wetting cribellate threads reduce their van der Waals adhesion with implications on the thread's adhesive strength under tension. This should be considered when discussing the evolutionary transitions of capture silks from the ancestral dry-state nano-filaments of the cribellate spider taxa to the wet-state glue-droplets of the ecribellate taxa.

  1. Valley filtering using electrostatic potentials in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, Andrey; Sena, S. H. R.; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-07-01

    Propagation of an electron wave packet through a quantum point contact (QPC) defined by electrostatic gates in bilayer graphene is investigated. The gates provide a bias between the layers, in order to produce an energy gap. If the gates on both sides of the contact produce the same bias, steps in the electron transmission probability are observed, as in the usual QPC. However, if the bias is inverted on one of the sides of the QPC, only electrons belonging to one of the Dirac valleys are allowed to pass, which provides a very efficient valley filtering.

  2. Topological properties of the electrostatic potential in weak and moderate N...H hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Mata, Ignasi; Molins, Elies; Alkorta, Ibon; Espinosa, Enrique

    2007-07-19

    The topological analyses of the electrostatic potential phi(r) and the electron density distribution rho(r) have been performed for a set of 20 neutral complexes with weak and moderate N...H bonds. In all cases, a zero flux surface of the electrostatic potential containing a saddle point analogous to the bond critical point of the electron density distribution is observed. These surfaces define an equivalent of the atomic basin of rho(r) for the electrostatic potential, which exhibits zero net charge and can be regarded as an electrostatically isolated region if its volume is finite. The phi(r) and rho(r) zero flux surfaces divide the hydrogen-bonding region in three parts, being the central one related to the electrostatic interaction between donor and acceptor. This central region exhibits a relative size of approximately 13-14% of the N...H distance dNH, it belongs to the outermost shell of the nitrogen and is mainly associated with its lone pair. Topological properties of both rho(r) and phi(r), as well as the electron kinetic (G) and potential (V) energy densities, show similar dependences with dNH at both bond critical points (phi-BCP and rho-BCP). Phenomenological proportionalities between the rho(r) curvatures and G and V are also found at the electrostatic potential critical point. The curvatures of the electrostatic potential, which are interpreted in terms of the electrostatic forces in the bonding region, present the same exponential dependency as the electron density distribution, to which they are related by Poisson's equation.

  3. The effect of surface conductivity and adhesivity on the electrostatic manipulation condition for dielectric microparticles using a single probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Ryo; Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Takahashi, Kunio; Saito, Shigeki

    2016-05-01

    By clarifying the effect of surface conductivity and adhesivity on the electrostatic manipulation condition, a dielectric particle made of any material can be manipulated with surface conductivity. The manipulation system consists of three elements: a conductive probe as a manipulator, a conductive plate as a substrate, and a dielectric particle as the target object for manipulation. The particle can be successfully picked up/placed if a rectangular pulse voltage is applied between the probe and the plate. Four kinds of particle materials are used in the experiment: silica, soda-lime glass, polymethyl methacrylate coated by conductive polymer, and polystyrene coated by surfactant. The radius of each particle is 15 μm. A first-order resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit model is adopted to describe the effect of surface conductivity and adhesivity on the manipulation condition. The manipulation system is modeled as a series circuit consisting of a resistor and a capacitor by considering the surface conductivity. A detachment voltage is defined as the capacitance voltage to detach the particle adhered to the plate or probe. Parameters of the RC model, surface resistance, surface capacitance and detachment voltage are identified by a simulation and measurements. To verify the RC model, the particle’s behavior is observed by a high-speed camera, and the electrical current is measured by an electrometer. A manipulation experiment is demonstrated to show the effectiveness of the model. The particle reaction is observed for each duration and magnitude of the pulse voltage for the manipulation. The optimum pulse voltage for successful manipulation is determined by the parameters of the RC model as the standard. This knowledge is expected to expand the possibility of micro-fabrication technology.

  4. Electronic Energy Band and Transport Properties in Monolayer Graphene with Periodically Modulated Magnetic Vector Potential and Electrostatic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the electronic energy band and transport features of graphene superlattice with periodically modulated magnetic vector potential and electrostatic potential. It is found that both parallel magnetic vector potential and electrostatic potential can decisively shift Dirac point in a different way, which may be an efficient way to achieve electron or hole filter. We also find that applying modulated parallel and anti-parallel magnetic vector potential to the electrons can efficiently change electronic states between pass and stop states, which can be useful in designing electron or hole switches and lead to large magneto-resistance.

  5. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  6. On stochastic heating of electrons by intense laser radiation in the presence of electrostatic potential well

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-10-15

    A simple model developed by Paradkar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 060703 (2012)] for the study of synergistic effects of electrostatic potential well and laser radiation is extended for the case where electric field of the well is accelerating electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. It was found that in these cases, the rate of stochastic heating of energetic electrons remains virtually the same as in Paradkar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 060703 (2012)], where electric field in electrostatic potential was slowing down electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. However, the heating of electrons with relatively low energy can be sensitive to the orientation of the electrostatic potential well with respect to the direction of the laser radiation propagation.

  7. Space and Time Evolution of the Electrostatic Potential During the Activation of a Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Melaccio, Federico; Calimet, Nicolas; Schapiro, Igor; Valentini, Alessio; Cecchini, Marco; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Animal and microbial retinal proteins employ the Schiff base of retinal as their chromophore. Here, the possible consequences of the charge translocation associated with the light-induced dynamics of the chromophore of a visual opsin are investigated along a representative semiclassical trajectory. We show that the evolution of the electrostatic potential projected by the chromophore onto the surrounding protein displays intense but topographically localized sudden variations in proximity of the decay region. pKa calculations carried out on selected snapshots used as probes, indicate that the only residue which may be sensitive to the electrostatic potential shift is Glu181. Accordingly, our results suggest that the frail Tyr191/268-Glu181-Wat2-Ser186 hydrogen bond network may be perturbed by the transient variations of the electrostatic potential.

  8. Space and Time Evolution of the Electrostatic Potential During the Activation of a Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Melaccio, Federico; Calimet, Nicolas; Schapiro, Igor; Valentini, Alessio; Cecchini, Marco; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Animal and microbial retinal proteins employ the Schiff base of retinal as their chromophore. Here, the possible consequences of the charge translocation associated with the light-induced dynamics of the chromophore of a visual opsin are investigated along a representative semiclassical trajectory. We show that the evolution of the electrostatic potential projected by the chromophore onto the surrounding protein displays intense but topographically localized sudden variations in proximity of the decay region. pKa calculations carried out on selected snapshots used as probes, indicate that the only residue which may be sensitive to the electrostatic potential shift is Glu181. Accordingly, our results suggest that the frail Tyr191/268-Glu181-Wat2-Ser186 hydrogen bond network may be perturbed by the transient variations of the electrostatic potential. PMID:27322155

  9. Confusing Aspects in the Calculation of the Electrostatic Potential of an Infinite Line of Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we discuss the trick of eliminating infinite potential of reference arguing that it corresponds to a constant of integration, in the problem of determining the electrostatic potential of an infinite line of charge with uniform density, and show how the problem must be tackled properly. The usual procedure is confusing for most…

  10. Split-illumination electron holography for improved evaluation of electrostatic potential associated with electrophotography

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki Aizawa, Shinji; Soon Park, Hyun; Sato, Kuniaki; Akase, Zentaro; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Kawase, Hiromitsu

    2014-03-31

    Precise evaluation of the electrostatic potential distributions of and around samples with multiple charges using electron holography has long been a problem due to unknown perturbation of the reference wave. Here, we report the first practical application of split-illumination electron holography (SIEH) to tackle this problem. This method enables the use of a non-perturbed reference wave distant from the sample. SIEH revealed the electrostatic potential distributions at interfaces of the charged particles used for development in electrophotography and should lead to dramatic improvements in electrophotography.

  11. The structure, stability, H-bonding pattern, and electrostatic potential of adenine tetrads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2001-03-01

    Two conformations of the adenine tetrad were investigated at the HF and B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory. Both conformations are predicted to be stable only in the nonplanar form. They adopt the bowl type structure. Since the planar form offers better geometry for stacking with the adjacent G-tetrad, both planar forms are expected to be important in the formation of the tetraplexes. Based on electrostatic potential map the positive electrostatic potential in the central area of both conformations is expected to reinforce the stacking between the A-tetrads and the G-tetrads in the tetraplexes.

  12. Stochastic heating of electrons by intense laser radiation in the presence of electrostatic potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    Previous model used for the study of synergistic effects of electrostatic potential well and laser radiation where electric field in electrostatic potential was slowing down electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation, is extended for the opposite case, where electric field of the well is accelerating electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. It was found that in both cases the rate of stochastic heating of energetic electrons remains virtually the same. This work was supported by the USDOE Grant DE-NA0001858 at UCSD and Grant 14.Y26.31.008 of the MES of the Russian Federation at MEPhI.

  13. Partial Atomic Charges and Screened Charge Models of the Electrostatic Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-06-12

    We propose a new screened charge method for calculating partial atomic charges in molecules by electrostatic potential (ESP) fitting. The model, called full density screening (FDS), is used to approximate the screening effect of full charge densities of atoms in molecules. The results are compared to the conventional ESP fitting method based on point charges and to our previously proposed outer density screening (ODS) method, in which the parameters are reoptimized for the present purpose. In ODS, the charge density of an atom is represented by the sum of a point charge and a smeared negative charge distributed in a Slater-type orbital (STO). In FDS, the charge density of an atom is taken to be the sum of the charge density of the neutral atom and a partial atomic charge (of either sign) distributed in an STO. The ζ values of the STOs used in these two models are optimized in the present study to best reproduce the electrostatic potentials. The quality of the fit to the electrostatics is improved in the screened charge methods, especially for the regions that are within one van der Waals radius of the centers of atoms. It is also found that the charges derived by fitting electrostatic potentials with screened charges are less sensitive to the positions of the fitting points than are those derived with conventional electrostatic fitting. Moreover, we found that the electrostatic-potential-fitted (ESP) charges from the screened charge methods are similar to those from the point-charge method except for molecules containing the methyl group, where we have explored the use of restraints on nonpolar H atoms. We recommend the FDS model if the only goal is ESP fitting to obtain partial atomic charges or a fit to the ESP field. However, the ODS model is more accurate for electronic embedding in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) modeling and is more accurate than point-charge models for ESP fitting, and it is recommended for applications

  14. Student Reasoning about Electrostatic and Gravitational Potential Energy: An Exploratory Study with Interdisciplinary Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into student reasoning about potential energy in the context of introductory electrostatics. Similar incorrect reasoning patterns emerged both in written questions administered after relevant instruction and in one-on-one interviews. These reasoning patterns are also prevalent in responses to questions posed…

  15. Explicit solution for the electrostatic potential of the conducting double sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemert, André

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we report about explicit analytical solutions for the electrostatic potential of two conducting overlapping spheres which do not require a numerical evaluation of the computationally expensive conical functions. The obtained expressions are therefore suited for direct applications and useable for the verification of numerical solutions which are dependent on the numerical inversion of the Mehler-Fock transform.

  16. Textbook Treatments of Electrostatic Potential Maps in General and Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinze, Scott R.; Williamson, Vickie M.; Deslongchamps, Ghislain; Shultz, Mary Jane; Williamson, Kenneth C.; Rapp, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic potential maps (EPMs) allow for representation of key molecular-level information in a relatively simple and inexpensive format. As these visualizations become more prevalent in instruction, it is important to determine how students are exposed to them and supported in their use. A systematic review of current general and organic…

  17. Mapping electrostatic potentials from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Foster, J. C.; Banks, P. M.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques for mapping observed ionospheric-potential distributions into the magnetosphere are discussed and illustrated using published Millstone Hill and Chatanika incoherent-scatter-radar data. It is shown that the mapping of a given field line to the equator is subject to strong diurnal and seasonal variations (attributed to the combination of internal and tail-current magnetic-field sources at auroral latitudes and the diurnal variation of solar declination in dipole coordinates) and longitude-dependent differences in ionospheric geometry. A mapping based on the tilt-dependent model of Olson and Pfitzer (1977) and using an empirical ionospheric-potential distribution derived from Chatanika plasma-drift measurements produces a relativity uniform magnetospheric electric field in the tail region. The field at 12 earth radii (Re) is found to be between 1 and 2 kV/Re; at the dawn-dusk meridian beyond the plasmasphere it is as high as 5 kV/Re. The plasmasphere is shown to have a dusk bulge in its equipotential structure and to be almost symmetric about the dawn-dusk meridian.

  18. Mapping electrostatic potentials from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Foster, J. C.; Banks, P. M.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1983-11-01

    Techniques for mapping observed ionospheric-potential distributions into the magnetosphere are discussed and illustrated using published Millstone Hill and Chatanika incoherent-scatter-radar data. It is shown that the mapping of a given field line to the equator is subject to strong diurnal and seasonal variations (attributed to the combination of internal and tail-current magnetic-field sources at auroral latitudes and the diurnal variation of solar declination in dipole coordinates) and longitude-dependent differences in ionospheric geometry. A mapping based on the tilt-dependent model of Olson and Pfitzer (1977) and using an empirical ionospheric-potential distribution derived from Chatanika plasma-drift measurements produces a relativity uniform magnetospheric electric field in the tail region. The field at 12 earth radii (Re) is found to be between 1 and 2 kV/Re; at the dawn-dusk meridian beyond the plasmasphere it is as high as 5 kV/Re. The plasmasphere is shown to have a dusk bulge in its equipotential structure and to be almost symmetric about the dawn-dusk meridian.

  19. Determination of electrostatic potentials at biological interfaces using electron-electron double resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Y K; Hubbell, W L

    1992-01-01

    A new general method for the determination of electrostatic potentials at biological surfaces is presented. The approach is based on measurement of the collision frequency of a charged nitroxide in solution with a nitroxide fixed to the surface at the point of interest. The collision frequency is determined with 14N:15N double label electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR). As a test, the method is shown to give values for phospholipid bilayer surface potentials consistent with the Gouy-Chapman theory, a simple model shown by many independent tests to accurately describe charged, planar surfaces. In addition, the method is applied to determine the electrostatic potential near the surface of DNA. The results indicate that the potential is significantly smaller than that predicted from Poisson-Boltzmann analysis, but is in qualitative agreement with that predicted by Manning's theory of counter ion condensation. The method is readily extended to measurement of surface potentials of proteins. PMID:1319760

  20. Visualizing the Positive-Negative Interface of Molecular Electrostatic Potentials as an Educational Tool for Assigning Chemical Polarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonborn, Konrad; Host, Gunnar; Palmerius, Karljohan

    2010-01-01

    To help in interpreting the polarity of a molecule, charge separation can be visualized by mapping the electrostatic potential at the van der Waals surface using a color gradient or by indicating positive and negative regions of the electrostatic potential using different colored isosurfaces. Although these visualizations capture the molecular…

  1. Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic potential at crystal/electrolyte interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Preocanin, Tajana; Kallay, Nikola; Piasecki, Wojciech

    2010-10-01

    In this feature article we discuss recent advances and challenges in measuring, analyzing and interpreting the electrostatic potential development at crystal/electrolyte interfaces. We highlight progress toward fundamental understanding of historically difficult aspects, including point of zero potential estimation for single faces of single crystals, the non-equilibrium pH titration hysteresis loop, and the origin of nonlinearities in the titration response. It has been already reported that the electrostatic potential is strongly affected by many second order type phenomena such as: surface heterogeneity, (sub)surface transformations, charge transfer reactions, and additional potential jumps at crystal face edges and/or Schottky barriers. Single-crystal electrode potentials seem particularly sensitive to these phenomena, which makes interpretation of experimental observations complicated. We hope that recent theory developments in our research group including an analytical model of titration hysteresis, a perturbative surface potential expansion, and a new surface complexation model that incorporates charge transfer processes will help experimental data analysis, and provide unique insights into the electrostatic response of nonpolarizable single-crystal electrodes.

  2. Stigmatellin Probes the Electrostatic Potential in the QB Site of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Gerencsér, László; Boros, Bogáta; Derrien, Valerie; Hanson, Deborah K.; Wraight, Colin A.; Sebban, Pierre; Maróti, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic potential in the secondary quinone (QB) binding site of the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides determines the rate and free energy change (driving force) of electron transfer to QB. It is controlled by the ionization states of residues in a strongly interacting cluster around the QB site. Reduction of the QB induces change of the ionization states of residues and binding of protons from the bulk. Stigmatellin, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial and photosynthetic respiratory chain, has been proven to be a unique voltage probe of the QB binding pocket. It binds to the QB site with high affinity, and the pK value of its phenolic group monitors the local electrostatic potential with high sensitivity. Investigations with different types of detergent as a model system of isolated RC revealed that the pK of stigmatellin was controlled overwhelmingly by electrostatic and slightly by hydrophobic interactions. Measurements showed a high pK value (>11) of stigmatellin in the QB pocket of the dark-state wild-type RC, indicating substantial negative potential. When the local electrostatics of the QB site was modulated by a single mutation, L213Asp→Ala, or double mutations, L213Asp-L212Glu→Ala-Ala (AA), the pK of stigmatellin dropped to 7.5 and 7.4, respectively, which corresponds to a >210 mV increase in the electrostatic potential relative to the wild-type RC. This significant pK drop (ΔpK > 3.5) decreased dramatically to (ΔpK > 0.75) in the RC of the compensatory mutant (AA+M44Asn→AA+M44Asp). Our results indicate that the L213Asp is the most important actor in the control of the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the dark-state wild-type RC, in good accordance with conclusions of former studies using theoretical calculations or light-induced charge recombination assay. PMID:25606686

  3. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  4. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions. PMID:26277163

  5. Novel in situ normal streaming potential device for characterizing electrostatic properties of confluent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandrangi, P.; Jreij, P.; Rajapaksa, T. E.; Bansal, N.; Lo, D. D.; Rodgers, V. G. J.

    2012-07-01

    The characteristics of transport across confluent cell monolayers may often be attributed to its electrostatic properties. While tangential streaming potential is often used to quantify these electrostatic properties, this method is not effective for transport normal to the apical cell surface where the charge properties along the basolateral sides may be important (i.e., confluent cells with leaky tight junctions). In addition, even when cells have a uniform charge distribution, the shear stress generated by the conventional tangential flow device may dislodge cells from their confluent state. Here we introduce a novel streaming potential measurement device to characterize the normal electrostatic properties of confluent cells. The streaming potential device encompasses a 24 mm cell-seeded Transwell® with two AgCl electrodes on either side of the cell-seeded Transwell. Phosphate buffered saline is pressurized transversal to the Transwell and the resultant pressure gradient induces a potential difference. Confluent monolayers of HEK and EA926 cells are used as examples. The corresponding zeta potential of the cell-membrane configuration is calculated using the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation and the zeta potential of the confluent cell layer is deconvolved from the overall measurements. For these test models, the zeta potential is consistent with that determined using a commercial dispersed-cell device. This novel streaming potential device provides a simple, easy, and cost-effective methodology to determine the normal zeta potential of confluent cells cultured on Transwell systems while keeping the cells intact. Furthermore, its versatility allows periodic measurements of properties of the same cell culture during transient studies.

  6. A simple derivation for amplitude and time period of charged particles in an electrostatic bathtub potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathap Reddy, K.

    2016-11-01

    An ‘electrostatic bathtub potential’ is defined and analytical expressions for the time period and amplitude of charged particles in this potential are obtained and compared with simulations. These kinds of potentials are encountered in linear electrostatic ion traps, where the potential along the axis appears like a bathtub. Ion traps are used in basic physics research and mass spectrometry to store ions; these stored ions make oscillatory motion within the confined volume of the trap. Usually these traps are designed and studied using ion optical software, but in this work the bathtub potential is reproduced by making two simple modifications to the harmonic oscillator potential. The addition of a linear ‘k 1|x|’ potential makes the simple harmonic potential curve steeper with a sharper turn at the origin, while the introduction of a finite-length zero potential region at the centre reproduces the flat region of the bathtub curve. This whole exercise of modelling a practical experimental situation in terms of a well-known simple physics problem may generate interest among readers.

  7. Radial electrostatic flux inferred from core measurements of potential and density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.; Schoch, P. M.; Crowley, T. P.; Connor, K. A.; Ouroua, A.

    2001-04-01

    Broadband potential fluctuations and electrostatic fluctuation induced particle flux have been measured in the core of a medium size tokamak plasma for the first time. Density fluctuations and wave numbers were simultaneously measured. Measurements indicate that radial electrostatic fluctuation induced particle flux in the core region, at the normalized radii of 0.17<{rho}<0.38, due to modes with wave numbers less than 4 cm{sup -1} is small in magnitude, is likely directed inward, and cannot account for particle flux predicted by the continuity equation and particle source codes. Estimates of electrostatic energy flux are also significantly less than values predicted via power balance analysis. Asymmetries in coherent density and potential fluctuation levels on closed flux surfaces are evident. Relative fluctuation levels {tilde n}/n and {tilde {phi}} tend to increase with radius, and the fluctuations are Boltzmann-like in the region 0.17{<=}{rho}{<=}0.38. The direction of mode propagation is in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. Corresponding phase velocities, v{sub ph}{approx}3.5x10{sup 5} cm/s, are similar to drift wave velocities.

  8. Gay-Berne and electrostatic multipole based coarse-grain potential in implicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Johnny; Zhen, Xia; Shen, Hujun; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2011-10-01

    A general, transferable coarse-grain (CG) framework based on the Gay-Berne potential and electrostatic point multipole expansion is presented for polypeptide simulations. The solvent effect is described by the Generalized Kirkwood theory. The CG model is calibrated using the results of all-atom simulations of model compounds in solution. Instead of matching the overall effective forces produced by atomic models, the fundamental intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, repulsion-dispersion, and solvation are represented explicitly at a CG level. We demonstrate that the CG alanine dipeptide model is able to reproduce quantitatively the conformational energy of all-atom force fields in both gas and solution phases, including the electrostatic and solvation components. Replica exchange molecular dynamics and microsecond dynamic simulations of polyalanine of 5 and 12 residues reveal that the CG polyalanines fold into "alpha helix" and "beta sheet" structures. The 5-residue polyalanine displays a substantial increase in the "beta strand" fraction relative to the 12-residue polyalanine. The detailed conformational distribution is compared with those reported from recent all-atom simulations and experiments. The results suggest that the new coarse-graining approach presented in this study has the potential to offer both accuracy and efficiency for biomolecular modeling.

  9. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-01

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities.

  10. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-14

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities.

  11. Electrostatic-Force-Assisted Dispensing Printing to Construct High-Aspect-Ratio of 0.79 Electrodes on a Textured Surface with Improved Adhesion and Contact Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Yoo, Sung-Soo; Song, Hee-Eun; Tak, Hyowon; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-11-01

    As a novel route to construct fine and abnormally high-aspect-ratio electrodes with excellent adhesion and reduced contact resistivity on a textured surface, an electrostatic-force-assisted dispensing printing technique is reported and compared with conventional dispensing and electrohydrodynamic jet printing techniques. The electrostatic force applied between a silver paste and the textured surface of a crystalline silicon solar cell wafer significantly improves the physical adhesion of the electrodes, whereas those fabricated using a conventional dispensing printing technique peel off with a silver paste containing 2 wt% of a fluorosurfactant. Moreover, the contact resistivity and dimensionless deviation of total resistance are significantly reduced from 2.19 ± 1.53 mΩ·cm2 to 0.98 ± 0.92 mΩ·cm2 and from 0.10 to 0.03, respectively. By utilizing electrodes with an abnormally high-aspect-ratio of 0.79 (the measured thickness and width are 30.4 μm and 38.3 μm, respectively), the cell efficiency is 17.2% on a polycrystalline silicon solar cell with an emitter sheet resistance of 60 Ω/sq. This cell efficiency is considerably higher than previously reported values obtained using a conventional electrohydrodynamic jet printing technique, by +0.48-3.5%p.

  12. Electrostatic-Force-Assisted Dispensing Printing to Construct High-Aspect-Ratio of 0.79 Electrodes on a Textured Surface with Improved Adhesion and Contact Resistivity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Yoo, Sung-Soo; Song, Hee-eun; Tak, Hyowon; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-01-01

    As a novel route to construct fine and abnormally high-aspect-ratio electrodes with excellent adhesion and reduced contact resistivity on a textured surface, an electrostatic-force-assisted dispensing printing technique is reported and compared with conventional dispensing and electrohydrodynamic jet printing techniques. The electrostatic force applied between a silver paste and the textured surface of a crystalline silicon solar cell wafer significantly improves the physical adhesion of the electrodes, whereas those fabricated using a conventional dispensing printing technique peel off with a silver paste containing 2 wt% of a fluorosurfactant. Moreover, the contact resistivity and dimensionless deviation of total resistance are significantly reduced from 2.19 ± 1.53 mΩ·cm2 to 0.98 ± 0.92 mΩ·cm2 and from 0.10 to 0.03, respectively. By utilizing electrodes with an abnormally high-aspect-ratio of 0.79 (the measured thickness and width are 30.4 μm and 38.3 μm, respectively), the cell efficiency is 17.2% on a polycrystalline silicon solar cell with an emitter sheet resistance of 60 Ω/sq. This cell efficiency is considerably higher than previously reported values obtained using a conventional electrohydrodynamic jet printing technique, by +0.48–3.5%p. PMID:26576857

  13. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  14. Intriguing Electrostatic Potential of CO: Negative Bond-ends and Positive Bond-cylindrical-surface

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hahn; Doan, Van Dung; Cho, Woo Jong; Valero, Rosendo; Aliakbar Tehrani, Zahra; Madridejos, Jenica Marie L.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-01-01

    The strong electronegativity of O dictates that the ground state of singlet CO has positively charged C and negatively charged O, in agreement with ab initio charge analysis, but in disagreement with the dipole direction. Though this unusual phenomenon has been fairly studied, the study of electrostatic potential (EP) for noncovalent interactions of CO is essential for better understanding. Here we illustrate that both C and O atom-ends show negative EP (where the C end gives more negative EP), favoring positively charged species, whereas the cylindrical surface of the CO bond shows positive EP, favoring negatively charged ones. This is demonstrated from the interactions of CO with Na+, Cl–, H2O, CO and benzene. It can be explained by the quadrupole driven electrostatic nature of CO (like N2) with very weak dipole moment. The EP is properly described by the tripole model taking into account the electrostatic multipole moments, which has a large negative charge at a certain distance protruded from C, a large positive charge on C, and a small negative charge on O. We also discuss the EP of the first excited triplet CO. PMID:26542890

  15. Soluble cell adhesion molecules in hypertriglyceridemia and potential significance on monocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; El-Masri, B; Kimball, K T; Pownall, H; Reilly, C F; Osmundsen, K; Smith, C W; Ballantyne, C M

    1998-05-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis by increasing expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Although the cellular expression of CAMs is difficult to assess clinically, soluble forms of CAMs (sCAMs) are present in the circulation and may serve as markers for CAMs. In this study, we examined the association between sCAMs and other risk factors occurring with hypertriglyceridemia, the effect of triglyceride reduction on sCAM levels, and the role of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in monocyte adhesion in vitro. Compared with normal control subjects (n=20), patients with hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL (n=39) had significantly increased levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) (316+/-28.8 versus 225+/-16.6 ng/mL), sVCAM-1 (743+/-52.2 versus 522+/-43.6 ng/mL), and soluble E-selectin (83+/-5.9 versus 49+/-3.6 ng/mL). ANCOVA showed that the higher sCAM levels in patients occurred independently of diabetes mellitus and other risk factors. In 27 patients who received purified n-3 fatty acid (Omacor) 4 g/d for > or =7 months, triglyceride level was reduced by 47+/-4.6%, sICAM-1 level was reduced by 9+/-3.4% (P=.02), and soluble E-selectin level was reduced by 16+/-3.2% (P<.0001), with the greatest reduction in diabetic patients. These results support previous in vitro data showing that disorders in triglyceride and HDL metabolism influence CAM expression and treatment with fish oils may alter vascular cell activation. In a parallel-plate flow chamber, recombinant sVCAM-1 at the concentration seen in patients significantly inhibited adhesion of monocytes to interleukin-1-stimulated cultured endothelial cells under conditions of flow by 27.5+/-7.2%. Thus, elevated sCAMs may negatively regulate monocyte adhesion.

  16. The role of the exchange in the embedding electrostatic potential for the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2009-11-01

    We have examined the role of the exchange in describing the electrostatic potential in the fragment molecular orbital method and showed that it should be included in the total Fock matrix to obtain an accurate one-electron spectrum; however, adding it to the Fock matrices of individual fragments and pairs leads to very large errors. For the error analysis we have used the virial theorem; numerical tests have been performed for solvated phenol at the Hartree-Fock level with the 6-31G( *) and 6-311G( * *) basis sets.

  17. The role of the exchange in the embedding electrostatic potential for the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2009-11-01

    We have examined the role of the exchange in describing the electrostatic potential in the fragment molecular orbital method and showed that it should be included in the total Fock matrix to obtain an accurate one-electron spectrum; however, adding it to the Fock matrices of individual fragments and pairs leads to very large errors. For the error analysis we have used the virial theorem; numerical tests have been performed for solvated phenol at the Hartree-Fock level with the 6-31G( *) and 6-311G( * *) basis sets. PMID:19894991

  18. Ab initio molecular electrostatic potential of hexanuclear Cu, Ag, and Au clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada-Amarillas, Alvaro

    DFT calculations of electrostatic potential (ESP) are carried out under the PBE/SDD theory level. Planar initial structures are given as input to perform DFT optimization with the aim of obtaining ground state structures. ESP is thus calculated and results show the existence of both, nucleophilic and electrophilic sites. In each case, the latter are located over the cluster planes while the former are observed in cluster vertices. Binding energy is provided, as well as structural parameters of ground state structures. CONACyT-México is acknowledged for funding Project No. 180424.

  19. Electrostatic potential topography for exploring electronic reorganizations in 1,3 dipolar cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Balanarayan, P; Kavathekar, Ritwik; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2007-04-12

    Topographical analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) along a reaction path is employed for bringing out sequential electronic reorganizations for 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ethyne to fulminic acid as well as diazomethane. A simple and consistent set of rules for portraying electronic mechanisms of chemical reactions using the MESP topography is applied for this purpose. The MESP topography at each point on the concerted reaction path is associated with a classical electronic structure yielding a clear picture of the electronic reorganization along the reaction path.

  20. Intrinsic Electrostatic Potential in the BK Channel Pore: Role in Determining Single Channel Conductance and Block

    PubMed Central

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Gonzalez, Wendy; Torres, Yolima P.; Brauchi, Sebastian; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D.; Latorre, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    The internal vestibule of large-conductance Ca2+ voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels contains a ring of eight negative charges not present in K+ channels of lower conductance (Glu386 and Glu389 in hSlo) that modulates channel conductance through an electrostatic mechanism (Brelidze, T.I., X. Niu, and K.L. Magleby. 2003. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 100:9017–9022). In BK channels there are also two acidic amino acid residues in an extracellular loop (Asp326 and Glu329 in hSlo). To determine the electrostatic influence of these charges on channel conductance, we expressed wild-type BK channels and mutants E386N/E389N, D326N, E329Q, and D326N/E329Q channels on Xenopus laevis oocytes, and measured the expressed currents under patch clamp. Contribution of E329 to the conductance is negligible and single channel conductance of D326N/E329Q channels measured at 0 mV in symmetrical 110 mM K+ was 18% lower than the control. Current–voltage curves displayed weak outward rectification for D326N and the double mutant. The conductance differences between the mutants and wild-type BK were caused by an electrostatic effect since they were enhanced at low K+ (30 mM) and vanished at high K+ (1 M K+). We determine the electrostatic potential change, Δφ, caused by the charge neutralization using TEA+ block for the extracellular charges and Ba2+ for intracellular charges. We measured 13 ± 2 mV for Δφ at the TEA+ site when turning off the extracellular charges, and 17 ± 2 mV for the Δφ at the Ba2+ site when the intracellular charges were turned off. To understand the electrostatic effect of charge neutralizations, we determined Δφ using a BK channel molecular model embedded in a lipid bilayer and solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The model explains the experimental results adequately and, in particular, gives an economical explanation to the differential effect on the conductance of the neutralization of charges D326 and E329. PMID:18227273

  1. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3)P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  2. Biobriefcase electrostatic aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Perry M.; Christian, Allen T.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Willis, Ladona; Masquelier, Donald A.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2009-03-17

    A system for sampling air and collecting particles entrained in the air comprising a receiving surface, a liquid input that directs liquid to the receiving surface and produces a liquid surface, an air input that directs the air so that the air with particles entrained in the air impact the liquid surface, and an electrostatic contact connected to the liquid that imparts an electric charge to the liquid. The particles potentially including bioagents become captured in the liquid by the air with particles entrained in the air impacting the liquid surface. Collection efficiency is improved by the electrostatic contact electrically charging the liquid. The effects of impaction and adhesion due to electrically charging the liquid allows a unique combination in a particle capture medium that has a low fluid consumption rate while maintaining high efficiency.

  3. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  4. Ion tracking in an electrostatic potential distribution. Ph.D. Thesis; [photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion tracking system utilizing a single detector was designed to resolve two dimensional potential distributions in a vacuum. The ion detector consisted of a continuous dynode electron multiplier tube mounted behind a series of aperture plates. The detector was located on a track below a wedge shaped structure used to produce the desired potential distribution. A 150 volt electron beam aimed at selected regions, ionized the residual gas in the chamber. The ions were ejected from their source points by electrostatic forces causing them to drift downward toward the detector. Measurements of particle energy, detector position, and entry angle of the incoming particle flux were used to initialize a computer trajectory-tracing program. The program assumes a known theoretically calculated potential distribution near the wedge for computation of particle trajectories, providing a basis for evaluating the data. Special attention was given to characterization of the ion detector.

  5. Orbits of magnetized charged particles in parabolic and inverse electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Analytic solutions are presented for the orbit of a charged particle in the combination of a uniform axial magnetic field and parabolic electrostatic potential. These trajectories are shown to correspond to the sum of two individually rotating vectors with one vector rotating at a constant fast frequency and the other rotating in the same sense but with a constant slow frequency. These solutions are related to Penning trap orbits and to stochastic orbits. If the lengths of the two rotating vectors are identical, the particle has zero canonical angular momentum in which case the particle orbit will traverse the origin. If the potential has an inverse dependence on distance from the source of the potential, the particle can impact the source. Axis-encircling orbits are where the length of the vector associated with the fast frequency is longer than the vector associated with the slow frequency. Non-axis-encircling orbits are the other way around.

  6. Hyperbolic divergence cleaning, the electrostatic limit, and potential boundary conditions for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Munz, C.-D.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-08-01

    In a numerical solution of the Maxwell-Vlasov system, the consistency with the charge conservation and divergence conditions has to be kept solving the hyperbolic evolution equations of the Maxwell system, since the vector identity ∇ ṡ (∇ × u →) = 0 and/or the charge conservation of moving particles may be not satisfied completely due to discretization errors. One possible method to force the consistency is the hyperbolic divergence cleaning. This hyperbolic constraint formulation of Maxwell's equations has been proposed previously, coupling the divergence conditions to the hyperbolic evolution equations, which can then be treated with the same numerical method. We pick up this method again and show that electrostatic limit may be obtained by accentuating the divergence cleaning sub-system and converging to steady state. Hence, the electrostatic case can be treated by the electrodynamic code with reduced computational effort. In addition, potential boundary conditions as often given in practical applications can be coupled in a similar way to get appropriate boundary conditions for the field equations. Numerical results are shown for an electric dipole, a parallel-plate capacitor, and a Langmuir wave. The use of potential boundary conditions is demonstrated in an Einzel lens simulation.

  7. Determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of silicon using convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoichiro; Tsuda, Kenji; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    A structure-analysis method using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) developed by Tsuda et al. [Tsuda & Tanaka (1999), Acta Cryst. A55, 939-954; Tsuda, Ogata, Takagi, Hashimoto & Tanaka (2002), Acta Cryst. A58, 514-525] has been applied to the determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of crystalline silicon. CBED patterns recorded at nine different incidences are simultaneously used to improve the accuracy of the refinement. The Debye-Waller factor and low-order structure factors of silicon have been successfully refined only using CBED data. The electrostatic potential and electron-density distribution have been reconstructed from the refined parameters. The latter clearly shows the bonding electrons between the nearest neighbor atoms. The obtained results are compared with the results of other CBED and recent X-ray diffraction experiments. The influence of the number of refined low-order structure factors on the electron density is discussed. The effect of the reduction of experimental data points on the accuracy of the refined parameters is also examined.

  8. Effects of electron exchange-correlation potential on electrostatic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A. Hassan, Sunia

    2014-05-28

    Using macroscopic quantum hydrodynamic formulation, we study the dispersion properties of electrostatic electron plasma oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes. The electrons and ions are considered uniformly distributed over the cylindrical surface of a nanotube thus forming a two-component (electron-ion) quantum plasma system. Electron degeneracy via Fermi-Dirac statistics as well as electron exchange and correlation effects is taken into account. It is found that the quantum (Bohm) potential arising due to fermionic nature of electrons and exchange-correlations effects has significant impact on the wave. The frequency of wave is influenced by variation in azimuthal index and radius of the nanotube. The results are analyzed numerically for typical systems for relatively longer wavelength waves and possible consequences are discussed. The results can be important in general understanding of the role of exchange-correlation potential in quantum hydrodynamic treatment of charge-carriers in nanotubes.

  9. Real-space formulation of the electrostatic potential and total energy of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pask, J E; Sterne, P A

    2004-05-12

    We develop expressions for the electrostatic potential and total energy of crystalline solids which are amenable to direct evaluation in real space. Unlike conventional reciprocal space formulations, no Fourier transforms or reciprocal lattice summations are required, and the formulation is well suited for large-scale, parallel computations. The need for reciprocal space expressions is eliminated by replacing long-range potentials by equivalent localized charge distributions and incorporating long-range interactions into boundary conditions on the unit cell. In so doing, a simplification of the conventional reciprocal space formalism is obtained. The equivalence of the real- and reciprocal space formalisms is demonstrated by direct comparison in self-consistent density-functional calculations.

  10. Gyrokinetic determination of the electrostatic potential of rotating magnetic islands in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Siccinio, M.; Poli, E.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.

    2011-12-15

    The electrostatic potential related to a magnetic island structure with imposed width and rotation frequency is studied by means of gyrokinetic simulations, which allow its self-consistent determination via the Poisson equation. An adiabatic response of the trapped ions at the island separatrix leads to a significant smoothing of the potential with respect to analytic calculations based on a complete flattening of the pressure profile inside the island. As a consequence, the magnitude of the polarization current is drastically reduced. When the island size is comparable to the ion banana width, the adiabatic response covers the whole island region, leading to a reduced density flattening for islands rotating in the electron diamagnetic direction. This confirms previous results based on drift-kinetic simulations.

  11. Design of [2]rotaxane through image threshold segmentation of electrostatic potential image.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingying; Chen, Qiufeng; Ma, Jing

    2016-09-15

    An electrostatic potential (ESP)-based image segmentation method has been used to estimate the ability of proton donation and acceptance involved in ring-rod recognition. The relative binding strength of [2]rotaxane has also been further estimated from the difference of the characteristic image-segmentation derived ESP between proton donor and proton acceptor. The size and electrostatic compatibility criteria are introduced to guide the design of interlocked [2]rotaxane. A library of 75 thermodynamically stable [2]rotaxane candidates has been generated, including 16 experimentally known systems. The theoretical results for 16 experimentally known [2]rotaxanes are in good agreement with both the experimental association constants and density functional theory-calculated binding energies. Our ESP-based image segmentation model is also applicable to the tristable [2]rotaxane molecular shuttle as well as [1]rotaxane with self-inclusion function, indicating this simple method is generic in the field of constructing other supramolecular architectures formed with donor/acceptor molecular recognition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27439676

  12. Atomic charges derived from electrostatic potentials for molecular and periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Stern, Abraham C; Space, Brian; Johnson, J Karl

    2010-09-23

    We present a method for fitting atomic charges to the electrostatic potential (ESP) of periodic and nonperiodic systems. This method is similar to the method of Campa et al. [ J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2009, 5, 2866]. We compare the Wolf and Ewald long-range electrostatic summation methods in calculating the ESP for periodic systems. We find that the Wolf summation is computationally more efficient than the Ewald summation by about a factor of 5 with comparable accuracy. Our analysis shows that the choice of grid mesh size influences the fitted atomic charges, especially for systems with buried (highly coordinated) atoms. We find that a maximum grid spacing of 0.2−0.3 A is required to obtain reliable atomic charges. The effect of the exclusion radius for point selection is assessed; we find that the common choice of using the van der Waals (vdW) radius as the exclusion radius for each atom may result in large deviations between the ESP generated from the ab initio calculations and that computed from the fitted charges, especially for points closest to the exclusion radii. We find that a larger value of exclusion radius than commonly used, 1.3 times the vdW radius, provides more reliable results. We find that a penalty function approach for fitting charges for buried atoms, with the target charge taken from Bader charge analysis, gives physically reasonable results.

  13. Physical model of granule adhesion to the belt-electrodes of a tribo-aero-electrostatic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Dascalescu, Lucian; Miloudi, Mohamed; Bilici, Mihai; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of tribo-aero-electrostatic separation technologies, which consist in the selective sorting of mixed granular insulating materials in a fluidized bed affected by an electric field orthogonally oriented to the direction of the fluidization air. The aim of the present paper is to put the theoretical bases for the optimization of this process, i. e. maximize the total mass of the granules collected at the two electrodes that generate the electric field. The various forces that drive a granule of given mass and electric charge through the electric field and make it stick to an electrode are expressed as functions of the several input variables and parameters of the process, such as the applied high-voltage or the surface roughness, the size and the position of the electrodes. The concepts of "critical electrostatic field" and "virtual climbing distance" are introduced. The prediction of the theoretical model are confirmed by the results of three sets of experiments, carried out on samples of a granular mixture consisting of 50% Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) and 50% High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS), originating from the recycling of waste electric and electronic equipment. Higher separation efficiency was obtained when the electric field in the active zone was intensified by the use of an additional electrode connected to the ground and when the collecting electrodes were covered by a thin insulating layer.

  14. Potential of the adhesion of bacteria isolated from drinking water to materials.

    PubMed

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Oliveira, Rosário; Vieira, Maria João

    2007-04-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria (11 genera, 14 species, 25 putative strains) were isolated from drinking water, identified either biochemically or by partial 16s rDNA gene sequencing and their adherence characteristics were determined by two methods: i. thermodynamic prediction of adhesion potential by measuring hydrophobicity (contact angle measurements) and ii. by measuring adherence to eight different substrata (ASI 304 and 316 stainless steel, copper, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone and glass). All the test organisms were hydrophilic and inter-species variation in hydrophobicity occurred only for Comamonas acidovorans. Stainless steel 304 (SS 304), copper, polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and silicone thermodynamically favoured adhesion for the majority of test strains (>18/25), whilst adhesion was generally less thermodynamically favorable for stainless steel 316 (SS 316), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass. The predictability of thermodynamic adhesion test methods was validated by comparison with 24-well microtiter plate assays using nine reference strains and three adhesion surfaces (SS 316, PVC and PE). Results for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkolderia cepacia and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia sp. 2 were congruent between both methods whilst they differed for the other bacteria to at least one material. Only A. calcoaceticus had strongly adherent properties to the three tested surfaces. Strain variation in adhesion ability was detected only for Sphingomonas capsulata. Analysis of adhesion demonstrated that in addition to physicochemical surface properties of bacterium and substratum, biological factors are involved in early adhesion processes, suggesting that reliance on thermodynamic approaches alone may not accurately predict adhesion capacity. PMID:17440920

  15. Visualization of the electrostatic potential distribution in both polar ionospheres using multiple satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairston, Marc R.; Heelis, Roderick A.; Rich, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    During the time from December 1991 through March 1992, there were four operational DMSP satellites in polar orbit. All four satellites carried the Special Sensor-Ions, Electrons, Scintillation (SSIES) plasma package which included an ion drift meter. Data from the drift meter, combined with the magnetic field data, allowed the calculation of the electrostatic potential in the ionosphere along the satellite's path. Simultaneous polar coverage by four satellites was unprecedented, providing researchers with almost continuous monitoring of the potential distribution in both hemispheres for the four month period. Combining the magnitude and location of the potential data from each of the four satellites in order to examine the varying potential distribution pattern in both hemispheres presented a major challenge in data visualization. The problem was solved by developing a three-dimensional presentation of the data where the potentials are color coded and represented by the vertical dimension. This paper presents examples from a computer animation of several days of data demonstrating evolution of the size and shape of the potential distribution, along with how these changes correspond to variations in other geophysical parameters, such as the IMF orientation and the K(sub p) index.

  16. Visualization of the electrostatic potential distribution in both polar ionospheres using multiple satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hairston, M.R.; Heelis, R.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    During the time from December 1991 through March 1992, there were four operational DMSP satellites in polar orbit. All four satellites carried the Special Sensor-Ions, Electrons, Scintillation (SSIES) plasma package which included an ion drift meter. Data from the drift meter, combined with the magnetic field data, allowed the calculation of the electrostatic potential in the ionosphere along the satellite`s path. Simultaneous polar coverage by four satellites was unprecedented, providing researchers with almost continuous monitoring of the potential distribution in both hemispheres for the four month period. Combining the magnitude and location of the potential data from each of the four satellites in order to examine the varying potential distribution pattern in both hemispheres presented a major challenge in data visualization. The problem was solved by developing a three-dimensional presentation of the data where the potentials are color coded and represented by the vertical dimension. This paper presents examples from a computer animation of several days of data demonstrating evolution of the size and shape of the potential distribution, along with how these changes correspond to variations in other geophysical parameters, such as the IMF orientation and the K{sub p} index.

  17. Evaluation of an electrostatic dust removal system with potential application in next-step fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-05-15

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass, and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm{sup 3} volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 s. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  18. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 cu mm volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales 1 s).

  19. Molecular electrostatic potential for exploring π-conjugation: a density-functional investigation.

    PubMed

    Pingale, Subhash S

    2011-09-01

    Molecular electrostatic potentials (MESP) of the most common building blocks of organic π-conjugated systems, viz. ethylene, acetylene, benzene, furan, pyrrole, thiophene and phenylvinylene, are examined at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level. The topography of MESP is employed for mapping the strength of electronic conjugation between these building blocks. When electron-rich molecular regions are connected to each other, the MESP value of the corresponding conjugation critical point (CCP) is able to provide a quantitative measure of the strength of the conjugation. The systems with stronger conjugation are generally seen to possess a larger negative value of CCP and a smaller difference (ΔV(CM-CCP)) between the MESP values of respective conjugated minimum (CM) and the CCP, in agreement with the experimental as well as other theoretical results. The present MESP topography-based approach thus offers a measure of the quantitative strength of π-conjugation in molecules.

  20. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, F. Q.L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-01-20

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  1. Redox potential of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein quantum-chemical and electrostatic study.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Zueva, Ekaterina M; Masliy, Alexei N; Krishtalik, Lev I

    2010-03-01

    Quantum-chemical study of structures, energies, and effective partial charge distribution for several models of the Rieske protein redox center is performed in terms of the B3LYP density functional method in combination with the broken symmetry approach using three different atomic basis sets. The structure of the redox complex optimized in vacuum differs markedly from that inside the protein. This means that the protein matrix imposes some stress on the active site resulting in distortion of its structure. The redox potentials calculated for the real active site structure are in a substantially better agreement with the experiment than those calculated for the idealized structure. This shows an important role of the active site distortion in tuning its redox potential. The reference absolute electrode potential of the standard hydrogen electrode is used that accounts for the correction caused by the water surface potential. Electrostatic calculations are performed in the framework of the polarizable solute model. Two dielectric permittivities of the protein are employed: the optical permittivity for calculation of the intraprotein electric field, and the static permittivity for calculation of the dielectric response energy. Only this approach results in a reasonable agreement of the calculated and experimental redox potentials.

  2. Expanding the applicability of electrostatic potentials to the realm of transition states.

    PubMed

    Bhasi, Priya; Nhlabatsi, Zanele P; Sitha, Sanyasi

    2016-05-14

    Central to any reaction mechanism study, and sometimes a challenging job, is tracing a transition state in a reaction path. For the first time, electrostatic potentials (ESP) of the reactants were used as guiding tactics to predict whether there is a possibility of any transition state in a reaction surface. The main motive behind this strategy is to see whether the directionality nature of the transition state has something to do with the anisotropic natures of the ESP with their embedded directionalities. Strategically, some atmospherically important, but simple, reactions have been chosen for this study, which heretofore were believed to be barrierless. By carefully analysing the ESP maps of the reactants, regions of possible interactions were located. Using the bilinear interpolation of the 2D grids of the ESP surfaces, search co-ordinates were fine-tuned for a local gradient based approach for the search of a transition state. Out of the three reactions studied in this work, we were able to successfully locate transition states, for the first time, in two cases and the third one still proved to be barrierless. This gives a clear indication that though ESP maps can qualitatively predict the possibility of a transition state; it is not always true that there should definitely be a transition state, as some of the reaction surfaces may genuinely be barrierless. But, nevertheless this strategy definitely has credential to be tested for many more reactions, either new or already established, and may be applied to create the initial search co-ordinates for any well-established transition state search method. Moreover, we have observed that the analysis of the ESP maps of the reactants were very much useful in explaining the nature of interactions existing in those observed transition states and we hope the same can also be extended to any transition state in an electrostatically driven reaction potential energy surface. PMID:27108668

  3. Systematic Improvement of Potential-Derived Atomic Multipoles and Redundancy of the Electrostatic Parameter Space.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Sofie; Jensen, Frank

    2014-12-01

    We assess the accuracy of force field (FF) electrostatics at several levels of approximation from the standard model using fixed partial charges to conformational specific multipole fits including up to quadrupole moments. Potential-derived point charges and multipoles are calculated using least-squares methods for a total of ∼1000 different conformations of the 20 natural amino acids. Opposed to standard charge fitting schemes the procedure presented in the current work employs fitting points placed on a single isodensity surface, since the electrostatic potential (ESP) on such a surface determines the ESP at all points outside this surface. We find that the effect of multipoles beyond partial atomic charges is of the same magnitude as the effect due to neglecting conformational dependency (i.e., polarizability), suggesting that the two effects should be included at the same level in FF development. The redundancy at both the partial charge and multipole levels of approximation is quantified. We present an algorithm which stepwise reduces or increases the dimensionality of the charge or multipole parameter space and provides an upper limit of the ESP error that can be obtained at a given truncation level. Thereby, we can identify a reduced set of multipole moments corresponding to ∼40% of the total number of multipoles. This subset of parameters provides a significant improvement in the representation of the ESP compared to the simple point charge model and close to the accuracy obtained using the complete multipole parameter space. The selection of the ∼40% most important multipole sites is highly transferable among different conformations, and we find that quadrupoles are of high importance for atoms involved in π-bonding, since the anisotropic electric field generated in such regions requires a large degree of flexibility.

  4. Electronic structure, molecular electrostatic potential and hydrogen bonding in DMSO-X complexes (X = ethanol, methanol and water)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhumal, Nilesh R.

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, we have studied the electronic structure, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and hydrogen bonding in DMSO-ethanol, DMSO-methanol and DMSO-water complexes by employing the MP2 method. Different conformers were simulated on the basis of possible binding sites guided by molecular electrostatic potential topology. The stronger hydrogen bonded interaction lowers the energy of the conformer. Molecular electron density topology and natural bond orbital analysis were used to explain the strength of interactions. Experimental vibrations are also compared with the calculated normal vibrations. Blue shift is predicted for SC vibration in experimental and theoretical spectra as well. Molecular electrostatic potential and topology are used to understand the interaction strength of the conformer.

  5. Immobilization of cells by electrostatic droplet generation: a model system for potential application in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, V; Djonlagic, J; Obradovic, B; Nedovic, V; Bugarski, B

    2006-01-01

    The process of electrostatic extrusion as a method for cell immobilization was investigated that could be used for potential applications in medicine. An attempt was made to assess the effects of cell addition and polymer concentration on the overall entrapment procedure, ie, on each stage of immobilization: polymer-cell suspension rheological characteristics, electrostatic extrusion process, and the process of gelation. The findings should contribute to a better understanding of polymer–cell interactions, which could be crucial in possible medical treatments. Alginate–yeast was used as a model system for carrier-cells. The electrostatic extrusion was considered as a complex two-phase flow system and the effects of cell and alginate concentrations on the resulting microbead size and uniformity were assessed. Under investigated conditions, microbeads 50–600 μm in diameter were produced and the increase in both alginate and cell concentrations resulted in larger microbeads with higher standard deviations in size. We attempted to rationalize the findings by rheological characterization of the cell–alginate suspensions. Rheological characterization revealed non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic behavior of cell-alginate suspensions with higher viscosities at higher alginate concentrations. However, the presence of cells even at high concentrations (5×108 and 1×109 cells/mL) did not significantly affect the rheological properties of Na-alginate solution. Lastly, we investigated the kinetics of alginate gelation with respect to the quantity of Ca2+ ions and cell presence. The gelation kinetics were examined under conditions of limited supply with Ca2+ ions, which can be essential for immobilization of highly sensitive mammalian cells that require minimal exposure to CaCl2 solution. The molar ratio of G units to Ca2+ ions of 3.8:1 provided complete crosslinking, while the increase in alginate concentration resulted in prolonged gelation times but higher strength of the

  6. Double layer adhesive silicone dressing as a potential dermal drug delivery film in scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna; Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Żebrowska, Maria; Mikolaszek, Barbara; Sznitowska, Małgorzata

    2015-03-15

    The present studies focused on the evaluation of design of an adhesive silicone film intended for scar treatment. Developed silicone double layer film was examined in terms of its future relevance to therapy and applicability on the human skin considering properties which included in vitro permeability of water vapor and oxygen. In order to adapt the patches for medical use in the future there were tested such properties as in vitro adhesion and occlusion related to in vivo hydration. From the silicone rubbers double layer silicone film was prepared: a non-adhesive elastomer as a drug carrier (the matrix for active substances - enoxaparin sodium - low molecular weight heparin) and an adhesive elastomer, applied on the surface of the matrix. The novel adhesive silicone film was found to possess optimal properties in comparison to commercially available silicone dressing: adhesion in vivo, adhesion in vitro - 11.79N, occlusion F=85% and water vapor permeability in vitro - WVP=105g/m(2)/24h, hydration of stratum corneum in vivoH=61-89 (RSD=1.6-0.9%), oxygen permeation in vitro - 119-391 cm(3)/m(2)/24 (RSD=0.17%). In vitro release studies indicated sufficient LMWH release rate from silicone matrix. Developed novel adhesive silicone films were considered an effective treatment of scars and keloids and a potential drug carrier able to improve the effectiveness of therapy.

  7. Role of electrostatic potential in the in silico prediction of molecular bioactivation and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ford, Kevin A

    2013-04-01

    Electrostatic potential (ESP) is a useful physicochemical property of a molecule that provides insights into inter- and intramolecular associations, as well as prediction of likely sites of electrophilic and nucleophilic metabolic attack. Knowledge of sites of metabolic attack is of paramount importance in DMPK research since drugs frequently fail in clinical trials due to the formation of bioactivated metabolites which are often difficult to measure experimentally due to their reactive nature and relatively short half-lives. Computational chemistry methods have proven invaluable in recent years as a means to predict and study bioactivated metabolites without the need for chemical syntheses, or testing on experimental animals. Additional molecular properties (heat of formation, heat of solvation and E(LUMO) - E(HOMO)) are discussed in this paper as complementary indicators of the behavior of metabolites in vivo. Five diverse examples are presented (acetaminophen, aniline/phenylamines, imidacloprid, nefazodone and vinyl chloride) which illustrate the utility of this multidimensional approach in predicting bioactivation, and in each case the predicted data agreed with experimental data described in the scientific literature. A further example of the usefulness of calculating ESP, in combination with the molecular properties mentioned above, is provided by an examination of the use of these parameters in providing an explanation for the sites of nucleophilic attack of the nucleic acid cytosine. Exploration of sites of nucleophilic attack of nucleic acids is important as adducts of DNA have the potential to result in mutagenesis. PMID:23323940

  8. Electrostatic Potential-Based Method of Balancing Charge Transfer Across ONIOM QM:QM Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-10-14

    The inability to describe charge redistribution effects between different regions in a large molecule can be a source of error in an ONIOM hybrid calculation. We propose a new and an inexpensive method for describing such charge-transfer effects and for improving reaction energies obtained with the ONIOM method. Our method is based on matching the electrostatic potential (ESP) between the model system and the real system. The ESP difference arising due to charge redistribution is overcome by placing an optimum one electron potential at a defined buffer region. In our current implementation, the link atom nuclear charge is optimized iteratively to produce a model low ESP distribution equal to that in the real low calculation. These optimum charges are relatively small in magnitude and corroborate physical intuition. This new ESP-ONIOM-CT method is independent of any arbitrary definition of charges, is defined on the basis of a physical observable, and is less basis set dependent than previous approaches. The method is easily extended for studying reactions involving multiple link atoms. We present a thorough benchmark of this method on test sets consisting of one- and two-link atom reactions. Using reaction energies of four different test sets each with four different combinations of high:low levels of theory, the accuracy of ESP-ONIOM-CT improved by 40-60% over the ONIOM method.

  9. Identifying Student Use of Ball-and-Stick Images versus Electrostatic Potential Map Images via Eye Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Vickie M.; Hegarty, Mary; Deslongchamps, Ghislain; Williamson, Kenneth C., III

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study examined students' use of ball-and-stick images versus electrostatic potential maps when asked questions about electron density, positive charge, proton attack, and hydroxide attack with six different molecules (two alcohols, two carboxylic acids, and two hydroxycarboxylic acids). Students' viewing of these dual images…

  10. Computational prediction of antibody binding sites on tetracycline antibiotics: electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies on molecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Pankaj; Sukumar, N; Murray, Jane S; Giese, Rossman F; Wood, Troy D

    2009-01-29

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the analysis of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, and their transformed compounds in environmental water samples. The antibodies employed in ELISA showed high relative affinity for tetracycline, epitetracycline, chlortetracycline, and epichlortetracycline as compared to anhydrotetracycline, epianhydrotetracycline, and anhydrochlortetracycline. The specificity and crossreactivity of these antibodies are discussed in relation to the electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies computed on the molecular surfaces of tetracycline antibiotics and their transformed compounds with an objective of identifying common features as well as differences that may be related to the experimentally observed variation in cross-reactivity values. The computations were performed at both the HF/STO-3G and HF/6-31+G* levels using the Gaussian 98 program. The results in this study are based upon molecular electrostatic potentials and local ionization energies computed on isodensity molecular surfaces. The surface electrostatic potentials are characterized in terms of a group of statistically defined quantities, which include the average deviation, the positive, negative, and total variances, positive and negative surface extrema, and a parameter indicating the degree of electrostatic balance.

  11. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  12. Measurement of electrostatic potential variations between 2D materials using low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Barrera, Sergio; Mende, Patrick; Li, Jun; Feenstra, Randall; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili

    Among the many properties that evolve as isolated 2D materials are brought together to form a heterostructure, rearrangement of charges between layers due to unintentional doping results in dipole fields at the interface, which critically affect the electronic properties of the structure. Here we report a method for directly measuring work function differences, and hence electrostatic potential variations, across the surface of 2D materials and heterostructures thereof using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Study of MoSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC with LEEM reveals a large work function difference between the MoSe2 and the graphene, indicating charge transfer between the layers and a subsequent dipole layer. In addition to quantifying dipole effects between transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene, direct imaging of the surface, diffraction information, and the spectroscopic dependence of electron reflectivity will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  13. Electronic coupling calculations with transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles derived from electrostatic potential fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2014-12-07

    A transition charge, dipole, and quadrupole from electrostatic potential (TrESP-CDQ) method for electronic coupling calculations is proposed. The TrESP method is based on the classical description of electronic Coulomb interaction between transition densities for individual molecules. In the original TrESP method, only the transition charge interactions were considered as the electronic coupling. In the present study, the TrESP method is extended to include the contributions from the transition dipoles and quadrupoles as well as the transition charges. Hence, the self-consistent transition density is employed in the ESP fitting procedure. To check the accuracy of the present approach, several test calculations are performed to a helium dimer, a methane dimer, and an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TrESP-CDQ method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the original TrESP method. The calculated results also show that the self-consistent treatment to the transition densities contributes significantly to the accuracy of the electronic coupling calculations. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the contributions to the electronic coupling are also analyzed. This analysis clearly shows a negligible contribution of the transition charge interaction to the electronic coupling. Hence, the distribution of the transition density is found to strongly influence the magnitudes of the transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of excitation-energy transfer.

  14. Different Electrostatic Potentials Define ETGE and DLG Motifs as Hinge and Latch in Oxidative Stress Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kit I.; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Kobayashi, Akira; Shang, Chengwei; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    Nrf2 is the regulator of the oxidative/electrophilic stress response. Its turnover is maintained by Keap1-mediated proteasomal degradation via a two-site substrate recognition mechanism in which two Nrf2-Keap1 binding sites form a hinge and latch. The E3 ligase adaptor Keap1 recognizes Nrf2 through its conserved ETGE and DLG motifs. In this study, we examined how the ETGE and DLG motifs bind to Keap1 in a very similar fashion but with different binding affinities by comparing the crystal complex of a Keap1-DC domain-DLG peptide with that of a Keap1-DC domain-ETGE peptide. We found that these two motifs interact with the same basic surface of either Keap1-DC domain of the Keap1 homodimer. The DLG motif works to correctly position the lysines within the Nrf2 Neh2 domain for efficient ubiquitination. Together with the results from calorimetric and functional studies, we conclude that different electrostatic potentials primarily define the ETGE and DLG motifs as a hinge and latch that senses the oxidative/electrophilic stress. PMID:17785452

  15. Quantification and classification of substituent effects in organic chemistry: a theoretical molecular electrostatic potential study.

    PubMed

    Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2016-07-27

    Substituent effects in organic chemistry are generally described in terms of experimentally derived Hammett parameters whereas a convenient theoretical tool to study these effects in π-conjugated molecular systems is molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) analysis. The present study shows that the difference between MESP at the nucleus of the para carbon of substituted benzene and a carbon atom in benzene, designated as ΔVC, is very useful to quantify and classify substituent effects. On the basis of positive and negative ΔVC values, a broad classification of around 381 substituents into electron withdrawing and donating categories is made. Each category is again sorted based on the magnitude of ΔVC into subcategories such as very strong, strong, medium, and weak electron donating/withdrawing. Furthermore, the data are used to show the transferability and additivity of substituent effects in π-conjugated organic molecules such as condensed aromatic, olefinic, acetylenic, and heterocyclic systems. The transferability properties hold good for ΔVC in all these molecular systems. The additive properties of substituent effects are strongly reflected on ΔVC and the predictive power of the data to assign the total substituent effects of multi-substituted systems is verified. The ΔVC data and the present classification of substituents are very useful to design π-conjugated organic molecular systems with desired electron rich/poor character. PMID:27412764

  16. Prediction of physicochemical properties of organic molecules using van der Waals surface electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Kyung; Lee, Kyung A; Hyun, Kwan Hoon; Park, Heung Jin; Kwack, In Young; Kim, Chang Kon; Lee, Hai Whang; Lee, Bon-Su

    2004-12-01

    The generalized interaction properties function (GIPF) methodology developed by Politzer and coworkers, which calculated molecular surface electrostatic potential (MSESP) on a density envelope surface, was modified by calculating the MSESP on a much simpler van der Waals (vdW) surface of a molecule. In this work, vdW molecular surfaces were obtained from the fully optimized structures confirmed by frequency calculations at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. Multiple linear regressions for normal boiling point, heats of vaporization, heats of sublimation, heats of fusion, liquid density, and solid density were performed using GIPF variables from vdW model surface. Results from our model are compared with those from Politzer and coworkers. The surface-dependent beta (and gamma) values are dependent on the surface models but the surface-independent alpha and regression coefficients (r) are constant when vdW surface and density surface with 0.001 a.u. contour value are compared. This interesting phenomenon is explained by linear dependencies of GIPF variables.

  17. Characterization of fluorescein-oligonucleotide conjugates and measurement of local electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Sjöback, R; Nygren, J; Kubista, M

    1998-12-01

    The properties of fluorescein are substantially altered upon conjugation to nucleic acids, affecting not only the molar absorptivities and fluorescence quantum yields but also the protolytic equilibrium constant and fluorescence lifetimes. Around neutral pH, the fluorescein moiety is present as both mono- and dianion, and the pKa relating them is increased from 6.43 for free fluorescein to about 6.90 for fluorescein attached to both single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides of at least 12 bases/base pairs. This difference reflects the local electrostatic potential around the nucleic acid, which is calculated to -28 mV. The molar absorptivities and spectral responses of the conjugated fluorescein protolytic species are also determined, from which the concentrations of fluorescein-oligonucleotide conjugates can be calculated by assuming: epsilon 494 = 62000/[1 + 10-(pH-6.90)] + 12000/[1 + 10(pH-6.90)] (M-1 cm-1). The fluorescence quantum yield of the conjugates depends, in a complex way, on temperature, environment and oligonucleotide length, sequence and conformation, and must be determined for each experimental situation.

  18. Identifying DNA-binding proteins using structural motifs and the electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Hugh P; Garcia, Mario A; Jones, Susan; Thornton, Janet M

    2004-01-01

    Robust methods to detect DNA-binding proteins from structures of unknown function are important for structural biology. This paper describes a method for identifying such proteins that (i) have a solvent accessible structural motif necessary for DNA-binding and (ii) a positive electrostatic potential in the region of the binding region. We focus on three structural motifs: helix-turn-helix (HTH), helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and helix-loop-helix (HLH). We find that the combination of these variables detect 78% of proteins with an HTH motif, which is a substantial improvement over previous work based purely on structural templates and is comparable to more complex methods of identifying DNA-binding proteins. Similar true positive fractions are achieved for the HhH and HLH motifs. We see evidence of wide evolutionary diversity for DNA-binding proteins with an HTH motif, and much smaller diversity for those with an HhH or HLH motif. PMID:15356290

  19. Quantification and classification of substituent effects in organic chemistry: a theoretical molecular electrostatic potential study.

    PubMed

    Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2016-07-27

    Substituent effects in organic chemistry are generally described in terms of experimentally derived Hammett parameters whereas a convenient theoretical tool to study these effects in π-conjugated molecular systems is molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) analysis. The present study shows that the difference between MESP at the nucleus of the para carbon of substituted benzene and a carbon atom in benzene, designated as ΔVC, is very useful to quantify and classify substituent effects. On the basis of positive and negative ΔVC values, a broad classification of around 381 substituents into electron withdrawing and donating categories is made. Each category is again sorted based on the magnitude of ΔVC into subcategories such as very strong, strong, medium, and weak electron donating/withdrawing. Furthermore, the data are used to show the transferability and additivity of substituent effects in π-conjugated organic molecules such as condensed aromatic, olefinic, acetylenic, and heterocyclic systems. The transferability properties hold good for ΔVC in all these molecular systems. The additive properties of substituent effects are strongly reflected on ΔVC and the predictive power of the data to assign the total substituent effects of multi-substituted systems is verified. The ΔVC data and the present classification of substituents are very useful to design π-conjugated organic molecular systems with desired electron rich/poor character.

  20. Through-Space Effects of Substituents Dominate Molecular Electrostatic Potentials of Substituted Arenes

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Steven E.; Houk, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Model systems have been studied using density functional theory to assess the contributions of π-resonance and through-space effects on electrostatic potentials of substituted arenes. The results contradict the widespread assumption that changes in molecular ESPs reflect only local changes in the electron density. Substituent effects on the ESP above the molecular plane are commonly attributed to changes in the aryl π-system. We show that ESP changes for a collection of substituted benzenes and more complex aromatic systems can be accounted for mostly by through-space effects, with no change in the aryl π-electron density. Only when π-resonance effects are substantial do they influence changes in the ESP above the aromatic ring to any extent. Examples of substituted arenes studied here are taken from the fields of drug design, host-guest chemistry, and crystal engineering. These findings emphasize the potential pitfalls of assuming ESP changes reflect changes in the local electron density. Since ESP changes are frequently used to rationalize and predict intermolecular interactions, these findings have profound implications for our understanding of substituent effects in countless areas of chemistry and molecular biology. Specifically, in many non-covalent interactions there are significant, often neglected, through-space interactions with the substituents. Finally, the present results explain the perhaps unexpectedly good performance of many molecular mechanics force-fields applied to supramolecular assembly phenomena and π-π interactions in biological systems despite the neglect of the polarization of the aryl π-system by substituents. PMID:20161573

  1. Electrostatically driven spatial patterns at supported lipid membrane junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2005-03-01

    We have recently shown that mobile, membrane-bound proteins sandwiched at simple, cell-free junctions between lipid bilayers can organize themselves into micron-scale spatial patterns. This pattern formation is mechanical in origin, a consequence of the coupling of the lateral mobility of the proteins and inter-membrane adhesion forces. We find that these mechanically driven protein patterns can electrostatically generate patterns of charged membrane lipids. Measuring the magnitude of the electrostatic interaction as a function of lipid composition and ionic strength, and quantitatively analyzing the interplay between thermodynamics and electrostatics via a Poisson-Boltzmann approach, we are able to determine the charge densities and surface potentials of the components of our junctions -- properties that are difficult or impossible to measure by other means. Surprisingly, the electrostatic potential of the proteins is a minor factor in the lipid reorganization; the protein size and its modulation of the junction topography play the dominant role in driving the electrostatic patterns.

  2. Dependence of electrostatic potential distribution of Al2O3/Ge structure on Al2O3 thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xiang, Jinjuan; Wang, Wenwu; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic potential distribution of Al2O3/Ge structure is investigated vs. Al2O3 thickness by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrostatic potential distribution is found to be Al2O3 thickness dependent. This interesting phenomenon is attributed to the appearance of gap states on Al2O3 surface (GSAl2O3) and its higher charge neutrality level (CNL) compared with the CNL of gap states at Al2O3/Ge interface (GSAl2O3/Ge), leading to electron transfer from GSAl2O3 to GSAl2O3/Ge. In the case of thicker Al2O3, fewer electrons transfer from GSAl2O3 to GSAl2O3/Ge, resulting in a larger potential drop across Al2O3 and XPS results.

  3. Effect of surface potential on epithelial cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Yun; Kao, Wei-Lun; You, Yun-Wen; Chu, Yi-Hsuan; Chu, Kuo-Jui; Chen, Peng-Jen; Wu, Chen-Yi; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2016-05-01

    Cell adhesion is the basis of individual cell survival, division and motility. Hence, understanding the effects that the surface properties have on cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology are crucial. In particular, surface charge/potential has been identified as an important factor that affects cell behavior. However, how cells respond to incremental changes in surface potential remains unclear. By using binary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified Au surfaces that are similar in mechanical/chemical properties and provide a series of surface potentials, the effect of surface potential on the behavior of cells can be studied. In this work, the effect of surface potential on epithelial cells, including human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), were examined. The results showed that the adhesion density of epithelial cells increased with increasing surface potential, which is similar to but varied more significantly compared with fibroblasts. The proliferation rate is found to be independent of surface potential in both cell types. Furthermore, epithelial cells show no morphological change with respect to surface potential, whereas the morphology of the fibroblasts clearly changed with the surface potential. These differences between the cell types were rationalized by considering the difference in extracellular matrix composition. Laminin-dominant epithelial cells showed higher adhesion density and less morphological change than did fibronectin-dominant fibroblasts because the more significant adsorption of positively charged laminin on the surface enhanced the adhesion of epithelial cells. In contrast, due to the dominance of negatively charged fibronectin that adsorbed weakly on the surface, fibroblasts had to change their morphology to fit the inhomogeneous fibronectin-adsorbed area.

  4. Quantitative assessment of substituent effects on cation-π interactions using molecular electrostatic potential topography.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Fareed Bhasha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2011-08-25

    A molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography based approach has been proposed to quantify the substituent effects on cation-π interactions in complexes of mono-, di-, tri-, and hexasubstituted benzenes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and NH(4)(+). The MESP minimum (V(min)) on the π-region of C(6)H(5)X showed strong linear dependency to the cation-π interaction energy, E(M(+)). Further, cation-π distance correlated well with V(min)-π distance. The difference between V(min) of C(6)H(5)X and C(6)H(6) (ΔV(min)) is proposed as a good parameter to quantify the substituent effect on cation-π interaction. Compared to benzene, electron-donating groups stabilize the di-, tri-, and hexasubstituted cation-π complexes while electron-withdrawing groups destabilize them. In multiple substituted complexes, E(M(+)) is almost equal (∼95%) to the sum of the individual substituent contributions (E(M(+)) ≈ Σ(ΔE(M(+)))), suggesting that substituent effect on cation-π interactions is largely additive. The ΔV(min) of C(6)H(5)X systems and additivity feature have been used to make predictions on the interaction energies of 80 multiple substituted cation-π complexes with above 97% accuracy. The average mean absolute deviation of the V(min)-predicted interaction energy, E(M(+))(V) from the calculated E(M(+)) is -0.18 kcal/mol for Li(+), -0.09 kcal/mol for Na(+), -0.43 kcal/mol for K(+), and -0.67 kcal/mol for NH(4)(+), which emphasize the predictive power of V(min) as well as the additive feature of the substituent effect.

  5. Electrostatic potential of mean force between two curved surfaces in the presence of counterion connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate effects of counterion connectivity (i.e., association of the counterions into a chain molecule) on the electrostatic potential of mean force (EPMF) between two similarly charged cylinder rods in a primitive model electrolyte solution by solving a classical density functional theory. The main findings include the following: (i) The counterion connectivity helps in inducing a like-charge-attractionlike (LCA-like) phenomenology even in a monovalent counterion solution wherein the LCA-like observation generally does not occur without the counterion connectivity. (ii) For divalent counterion solutions, the counterion connectivity can reinforce or weaken the LCA-like observation depending on the chain length N , and simply increases the equilibrium nearest surface separation of the rods corresponding to the minimum EPMF to nearly three times the counterion site diameter, whether N is large or small. (iii) If N is large enough, the LCA-like strength tends to be negatively correlated with the electrolyte concentration c over the entire range of the rod surface charge magnitude | σ*| considered; whereas if N drops, the correlation tends to become positive with decrease of the | σ*| value, and particularly for modest | σ*| values, the correlation relationship exhibits an extreme value phenomenon. (iv) In the case of a 1:1 electrolyte, the EPMF effects of the diameters of counterion and coion sites are similar in both situations with and without the counterion connectivity. All of these findings can be explained self-consistently by a recently proposed hydrogen-bonding style mechanism reinforced by one additional concept: flexibility of the counterion chain and the factors affecting it, like N and counterion site valence.

  6. Potential derived point charge model study of electrostatic interaction energies in some complexes of water with uracil, thymine, and cytosine.

    PubMed

    Ray, N K; Bolis, G; Shibata, M; Rein, R

    1984-01-01

    Potential derived (PD) point charges and segmental multipole moments are calculated for water, uracil, thymine, and cytosine using STO-3G quality wave functions. The PD point charges are used to estimate the electrostatic interaction energies for a series of complexes of water with these nucleic acid bases. It is shown here that the results obtained using simple PD charge model is very similar to those obtained from more elaborate segmental multipole moment analysis.

  7. Hybrid QTAIM and electrostatic potential-based quantum topology phase diagrams for water clusters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Gadre, Shridhar R; Chenxia, Xiao; Tianlv, Xu; Kirk, Steven Robert; Jenkins, Samantha

    2015-06-21

    The topological diversity of sets of isomers of water clusters (W = H2O)n, 7 ≤ n ≤ 10, is analyzed employing the scalar fields of total electronic charge density ρ(r) and the molecular electrostatic potential (MESP). The features uncovered by the MESP are shown to be complementary to those revealed by the theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis. The MESP is known to exhibit the electron localizations such as lone pairs that are central to water cluster behavior. Therefore, a 'hybrid' QTAIM and MESP quantum topology phase diagram (QTPD) for Wn, 7 ≤ n ≤ 10, is introduced in addition to the QTPD. The 'spanning' QTPD with upper and lower bounds is constructed from the solutions of the Poincaré-Hopf relation involving the non-degenerate critical points. The changing subtle balance between the planar and three dimensional character of the growing water clusters Wn, 4 ≤ n ≤ 10, is revealed. Characterization of the structure of the QTPDs, possible with new tools, demonstrated the migration of the position of the global minimum on the spanning QTPD from the lower bound to upper bound as the Wn, 4 ≤ n ≤ 10, cluster grows in size. Differences in the structure of the QTPD are found between the clusters containing even versus odd monomers for Wn, n = 7-10. The energetic stability of the clusters which possess even number of monomers viz. n = 8, 10 is higher than that of the n = 7, 9 clusters due to relatively higher numbers of hydrogen-bond BCPs in the n = 8, 10 clusters, in agreement with energetic results reported in the literature. A 'hybrid' QTPD is created from a new chemical relation bHB + l ≥ 2n for Wn that relates the number of hydrogen-bond bond critical points (bHB) with the number of oxygen lone pairs exclusively specified by the negative valued MESP (3,+3) critical points (l). The topologies of the subset bHB + l = 2n for Wn, point the way to the discovery of unknown 'missing' lower energy isomers. A discussion of the relative merits and

  8. Protein Recovery from Secondary Paper Sludge and Its Potential Use as Wood Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervaiz, Muhammad

    cross-linking, the synergy of adhesive blends was evaluated through classical rule-of-mixture. The findings of this study warrants further investigation concerning other potential uses of recovered sludge protein, especially as food supplements and economic implications.

  9. A description of electron heating with an electrostatic potential jump in a parallel, collisionless, fire hose shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.

    1988-01-01

    The electron heating required if protons scatter elastically in a parallel, collisionless shock is calculated. Near-elastic proton scattering off large amplitude background magnetic field fluctuations might be expected if the waves responsible for the shock dissipation are generated by the fire hose instability. The effects of an electrostatic potential jump in the shock layer are included by assuming that the energy lost by protons in traversing the potential jump is converted into electron thermal pressure. It is found that the electron temperature increase is a strong function of the potential jump. Comparison is made to the parallel shock plasma simulation of Quest (1987).

  10. Adhesion Potential of Intestinal Microbes Predicted by Physico-Chemical Characterization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Niederberger, Tobias; Fischer, Peter; Rühs, Patrick Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to epithelial surfaces affects retention time in the human gastro-intestinal tract and therefore significantly contributes to interactions between bacteria and their hosts. Bacterial adhesion among other factors is strongly influenced by physico-chemical factors. The accurate quantification of these physico-chemical factors in adhesion is however limited by the available measuring techniques. We evaluated surface charge, interfacial rheology and tensiometry (interfacial tension) as novel approaches to quantify these interactions and evaluated their biological significance via an adhesion assay using intestinal epithelial surface molecules (IESM) for a set of model organisms present in the human gastrointestinal tract. Strain pairs of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 with its sortase knockout mutant Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus GG with Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T were used with Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 as control organism. Intra-species comparison revealed significantly higher abilities for Lb. plantarum WCSF1 and Lb. rhamnosus GG vs. Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T to dynamically increase interfacial elasticity (10−2 vs. 10−3 Pa*m) and reduce interfacial tension (32 vs. 38 mN/m). This further correlated for Lb. plantarum WCSF1 and Lb. rhamnosus GG vs. Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T with the decrease of relative hydrophobicity (80–85% vs. 57–63%), Zeta potential (-2.9 to -4.5 mV vs. -8.0 to -13.8 mV) and higher relative adhesion capacity to IESM (3.0–5.0 vs 1.5–2.2). Highest adhesion to the IESM collagen I and fibronectin was found for Lb. plantarum WCFS1 (5.0) and E. faecalis JH2-2 (4.2) whereas Lb. rhamnosus GG showed highest adhesion to type II mucus (3.8). Significantly reduced adhesion (2 fold) to the tested IESM was observed for Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T corresponding with lower relative hydrophobicity, Zeta potential and abilities to modify interfacial

  11. Computation of methodology-independent ionic solvation free energies from molecular simulations. I. The electrostatic potential in molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastenholz, M. A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2006-03-01

    The computation of ionic solvation free energies from atomistic simulations is a surprisingly difficult problem that has found no satisfactory solution for more than 15years. The reason is that the charging free energies evaluated from such simulations are affected by very large errors. One of these is related to the choice of a specific convention for summing up the contributions of solvent charges to the electrostatic potential in the ionic cavity, namely, on the basis of point charges within entire solvent molecules (M scheme) or on the basis of individual point charges (P scheme). The use of an inappropriate convention may lead to a charge-independent offset in the calculated potential, which depends on the details of the summation scheme, on the quadrupole-moment trace of the solvent molecule, and on the approximate form used to represent electrostatic interactions in the system. However, whether the M or P scheme (if any) represents the appropriate convention is still a matter of on-going debate. The goal of the present article is to settle this long-standing controversy by carefully analyzing (both analytically and numerically) the properties of the electrostatic potential in molecular liquids (and inside cavities within them). Restricting the discussion to real liquids of "spherical" solvent molecules (represented by a classical solvent model with a single van der Waals interaction site), it is concluded that (i) for Coulombic (or straight-cutoff truncated) electrostatic interactions, the M scheme is the appropriate way of calculating the electrostatic potential; (ii) for non-Coulombic interactions deriving from a continuously differentiable function, both M and P schemes generally deliver an incorrect result (for which an analytical correction must be applied); and (iii) finite-temperature effects, including intermolecular orientation correlations and a preferential orientational structure in the neighborhood of a liquid-vacuum interface, must be taken

  12. Electrostatic Charge on Flying Hummingbirds and Its Potential Role in Pollination.

    PubMed

    Badger, Marc; Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; von Rabenau, Lisa; Smiley, Ashley; Dudley, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic phenomena are known to enhance both wind- and insect-mediated pollination, but have not yet been described for nectar-feeding vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that wild Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna) can carry positive charges up to 800 pC while in flight (mean ± s.d.: 66 ± 129 pC). Triboelectric charging obtained by rubbing an isolated hummingbird wing against various plant structures generated charges up to 700 pC. A metal hummingbird model charged to 400 pC induced bending of floral stamens in four plants (Nicotiana, Hemerocallis, Penstemon, and Aloe spp.), and also attracted falling Lycopodium spores at distances of < 2 mm. Electrostatic forces may therefore influence pollen transfer onto nectar-feeding birds.

  13. Electrostatic Charge on Flying Hummingbirds and Its Potential Role in Pollination.

    PubMed

    Badger, Marc; Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; von Rabenau, Lisa; Smiley, Ashley; Dudley, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic phenomena are known to enhance both wind- and insect-mediated pollination, but have not yet been described for nectar-feeding vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that wild Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna) can carry positive charges up to 800 pC while in flight (mean ± s.d.: 66 ± 129 pC). Triboelectric charging obtained by rubbing an isolated hummingbird wing against various plant structures generated charges up to 700 pC. A metal hummingbird model charged to 400 pC induced bending of floral stamens in four plants (Nicotiana, Hemerocallis, Penstemon, and Aloe spp.), and also attracted falling Lycopodium spores at distances of < 2 mm. Electrostatic forces may therefore influence pollen transfer onto nectar-feeding birds. PMID:26421845

  14. Electrostatic potential wells for on-demand drop manipulation in microchannels.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Riëlle; Pit, Arjen M; de Oliveira, Vitor Martins; Duits, Michèl H G; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-03-01

    Precise control and manipulation of individual drops are crucial in many lab-on-a-chip applications. We present a novel hybrid concept for channel-based discrete microfluidics with integrated electrowetting functionality by incorporating co-planar electrodes (separated by a narrow gap) in one of the microchannel walls. By combining the high throughput of channel-based microfluidics with the individual drop control achieved using electrical actuation, we acquire the strengths of both worlds. The tunable strength of the electrostatic forces enables a wide range of drop manipulations, such as on-demand trapping and release, guiding, and sorting of drops in the microchannel. In each of these scenarios, the retaining electrostatic force competes with the hydrodynamic drag force. The conditions for trapping can be predicted using a simple model that balances these forces. PMID:24394887

  15. Electrostatic Charge on Flying Hummingbirds and Its Potential Role in Pollination

    PubMed Central

    von Rabenau, Lisa; Smiley, Ashley; Dudley, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic phenomena are known to enhance both wind- and insect-mediated pollination, but have not yet been described for nectar-feeding vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that wild Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna) can carry positive charges up to 800 pC while in flight (mean ± s.d.: 66 ± 129 pC). Triboelectric charging obtained by rubbing an isolated hummingbird wing against various plant structures generated charges up to 700 pC. A metal hummingbird model charged to 400 pC induced bending of floral stamens in four plants (Nicotiana, Hemerocallis, Penstemon, and Aloe spp.), and also attracted falling Lycopodium spores at distances of < 2 mm. Electrostatic forces may therefore influence pollen transfer onto nectar-feeding birds. PMID:26421845

  16. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  17. Electron holographic tomography for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of electrostatic potential in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D.; Lichte, H.; Pozzi, G.; Prete, P.; Lovergine, N.

    2011-06-01

    Electron holographic tomography (EHT), the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, is a technique, which can be applied to the quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) mapping of electrostatic potential at the nanoscale. Here, we show the results obtained in the EHT investigation of GaAs and GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by Au-catalysed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The unique ability of EHT of disentangling the materials mean inner potential (MIP) from the specimen projected thickness allows reconstruction of the nanowire 3D morphology and inner compositional structure as well as the measurement of the MIP.

  18. Electron holographic tomography for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of electrostatic potential in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, D.; Lichte, H.; Pozzi, G.; Lovergine, N.

    2011-06-27

    Electron holographic tomography (EHT), the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, is a technique, which can be applied to the quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) mapping of electrostatic potential at the nanoscale. Here, we show the results obtained in the EHT investigation of GaAs and GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by Au-catalysed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The unique ability of EHT of disentangling the materials mean inner potential (MIP) from the specimen projected thickness allows reconstruction of the nanowire 3D morphology and inner compositional structure as well as the measurement of the MIP.

  19. Potential-derived point-charge model study of electrostatic interaction energies in some hydrogen-bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Ray, N K; Shibata, M; Bolis, G; Rein, R

    1985-01-01

    Mulliken's atomic changes (MC) and potential derived (PD) point charges obtained from STO-3G wave functions are used to study the electrostatic interaction energies for a series of representative hydrogen-bonded complexes. The results of the above-mentioned models are compared with the more accurate results of segmental multipole moment (SMM) expansion, and it is shown that the PD model is superior to the MC model. The results of PD model are shown to be well correlated with the results of SMM expansion technique. Results of our calculations using 6-31G and 6-31G** PD charges are also reported here. Electrostatic interaction energies obtained using 6-31G** PD charges are compared with the 6-31G** SCF interaction energies available for the nine hydrogen-bonded dimers of ammonia, water, and hydrogen fluoride and a good correlation between the two is shown. The interrelationship between the results of different basis sets are also examined for the PD point-charge model. The electrostatic interaction energies obtained using STO-3G PD model are shown to be well correlated to the results of 6-31G and 6-31G** PD models.

  20. Antimicrobial and anti-adhesive potential of a biosurfactant Rufisan produced by Candida lipolytica UCP 0988.

    PubMed

    Rufino, R D; Luna, J M; Sarubbo, L A; Rodrigues, L R M; Teixeira, J A C; Campos-Takaki, G M

    2011-05-01

    In the last years, researches developed with biosurfactants for application in the medical area have been revealing the promising biological activities of these biomolecules. In this work the antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties of a biosurfactant Rufisan isolated from the yeast Candida lipolytica UCP 0988, growth in a medium supplemented with ground nut refinery residue was determined against several microorganisms. The biosurfactant was able to reduce the water surface tension from 70 to 25.3 mN/m and showed a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.03%. The biosurfactant was isolated after 72 h of fermentation and was tested in concentrations varying from 0.75 to 12 mg/l. The highest antimicrobial activities were observed against Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mutans NS, Streptococcus mutans HG, Streptococcus sanguis 12, Streptococcus oralis J22 at a concentration superior to the biosurfactant critical micelle concentration. Moreover, the biosurfactant showed anti-adhesive activity against most of the microorganisms tested. As far as we know, this is the first compilation of data on antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activities of a biosurfactant obtained from a Candida strain against such a broad group of microorganisms. The results obtained in this work showed that the biosurfactant from C. lipolytica is a potential antimicrobial and/or anti-adhesive agent for several biomedical applications.

  1. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  2. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules by serine proteases: a role in long term potentiation?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K B; Martinez, J; Lynch, G

    1998-11-16

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease endogenous to hippocampal neurons, is shown to recognize a highly conserved sequence in the extracellular domain of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). When added to brain homogenates, tPA generated a CAM fragment similar in size to that produced in hippocampal slices by brief periods of NMDA receptor stimulation. The serine protease inhibitor 4-(2-Aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride blocked the effects of tPA with an approximately 50% suppression at 250 microM. The inhibitor at this concentration had no evident effect on synaptic responses but caused long term potentiation to decay back to baseline over a 1 h period. These results suggest that extracellular breakdown of cell adhesion molecules initiated by NMDA receptors and mediated by serine proteases contributes to the formation of stable potentiation.

  3. Auto-Adhesion Potential of Extraocular Aqp0 during Teleost Development

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2016-01-01

    AQP0 water channels are the most abundant proteins expressed in the mammalian lens fiber membranes where they are essential for lens development and transparency. Unlike other aquaporin paralogs, mammalian AQP0 has a low intrinsic water permeability, but can form cell-to-cell junctions between the lens fibers. It is not known whether the adhesive properties of AQP0 is a derived feature found only in mammals, or exists as a conserved ancestral trait in non-mammalian vertebrates. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, expresses four Aqp0 paralogs in the developing lens, but also expresses significant levels of aqp0 mRNAs and proteins in the epithelia of the pronephros, presumptive enterocytes, gill filament and epidermis. Quantitative PCR reveals that aqp0 mRNA titres increase by three orders of magnitude between the onset of somitogenesis and pigmentation of the eye. Using in situ hybridization and specific antisera, we show that at least two of the channels (Aqp0a1, -0b1 and/or -0b2) are localized in the extraocular basolateral and apical membranes, while Aqp0a2 is lens-specific. Heterologous expression of the Aqp0 paralogs in adhesion-deficient mouse fibolast L-cells reveals that, as for human AQP0, each intact salmon channel retains cell-to-cell adhesive properties. The strongest Aqp0 interactions are auto-adhesion, suggesting that homo-octamers likely form the intercellular junctions of the developing lens and epithelial tissues. The present data are thus the first to show the adhesion potential of Aqp0 channels in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and further uncover a novel extraocular role of the channels during vertebrate development. PMID:27153052

  4. Tissue anti-adhesion potential of ibuprofen-loaded PLLA-PEG diblock copolymer films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Ho; Go, Ae Kyung; Oh, Se Heang; Lee, Ka Eul; Yuk, Soon Hong

    2005-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ibuprofen) on the prevention of postsurgical tissue adhesion. For this, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-PEG diblock copolymers were synthesized by ring opening polymerization of L-lactide and methoxy polyethylene glycol (Mw 5000) of different compositions. The synthesized copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PLLA-PEG copolymer films were prepared by solvent casting. The prepared copolymer films were more flexible and hydrophilic than the control PLLA film, as investigated by the measurements of glass transition temperature, water absorption content, and water contact angle. The drug release behavior from the ibuprofen (10 wt%)-loaded copolymer films was examined by high performance liquid chromatography. It was observed that the drug was released gradually up to about 40% of total loading amount after 20 days, depending on PEG composition; more drug release from the films with higher PEG compositions. In vitro cell adhesions on the copolymer films with/without drug were compared by the culture of NIH/3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts on the surfaces. For in vivo evaluation of tissue anti-adhesion potential, the copolymer films with/without drug were implanted between the cecum and peritoneal wall defects of rats and their tissue adhesion extents were compared. It was observed that the ibuprofen-containing PLLA-PEG films with high PEG composition (particularly PLLA113-PEG113 film with PEG composition, 50 mol%) were very effective in preventing cell or tissue adhesion on the film surfaces, probably owing to the synergistic effects of highly mobile, hydrophilic PEG and anti-inflammatory drug, ibuprofen.

  5. Auto-Adhesion Potential of Extraocular Aqp0 during Teleost Development.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2016-01-01

    AQP0 water channels are the most abundant proteins expressed in the mammalian lens fiber membranes where they are essential for lens development and transparency. Unlike other aquaporin paralogs, mammalian AQP0 has a low intrinsic water permeability, but can form cell-to-cell junctions between the lens fibers. It is not known whether the adhesive properties of AQP0 is a derived feature found only in mammals, or exists as a conserved ancestral trait in non-mammalian vertebrates. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, expresses four Aqp0 paralogs in the developing lens, but also expresses significant levels of aqp0 mRNAs and proteins in the epithelia of the pronephros, presumptive enterocytes, gill filament and epidermis. Quantitative PCR reveals that aqp0 mRNA titres increase by three orders of magnitude between the onset of somitogenesis and pigmentation of the eye. Using in situ hybridization and specific antisera, we show that at least two of the channels (Aqp0a1, -0b1 and/or -0b2) are localized in the extraocular basolateral and apical membranes, while Aqp0a2 is lens-specific. Heterologous expression of the Aqp0 paralogs in adhesion-deficient mouse fibolast L-cells reveals that, as for human AQP0, each intact salmon channel retains cell-to-cell adhesive properties. The strongest Aqp0 interactions are auto-adhesion, suggesting that homo-octamers likely form the intercellular junctions of the developing lens and epithelial tissues. The present data are thus the first to show the adhesion potential of Aqp0 channels in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and further uncover a novel extraocular role of the channels during vertebrate development. PMID:27153052

  6. A divide and conquer real-space approach for all-electron molecular electrostatic potentials and interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Losilla, S A; Sundholm, D

    2012-06-01

    A computational scheme to perform accurate numerical calculations of electrostatic potentials and interaction energies for molecular systems has been developed and implemented. Molecular electron and energy densities are divided into overlapping atom-centered atomic contributions and a three-dimensional molecular remainder. The steep nuclear cusps are included in the atom-centered functions making the three-dimensional remainder smooth enough to be accurately represented with a tractable amount of grid points. The one-dimensional radial functions of the atom-centered contributions as well as the three-dimensional remainder are expanded using finite element functions. The electrostatic potential is calculated by integrating the Coulomb potential for each separate density contribution, using our tensorial finite element method for the three-dimensional remainder. We also provide algorithms to compute accurate electron-electron and electron-nuclear interactions numerically using the proposed partitioning. The methods have been tested on all-electron densities of 18 reasonable large molecules containing elements up to Zn. The accuracy of the calculated Coulomb interaction energies is in the range of 10(-3) to 10(-6) E(h) when using an equidistant grid with a step length of 0.05 a(0).

  7. Electrostatic thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Reader, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    The current status of research and development programs on electrostatic thrusters is reviewed. Current programs that utilize mercury electron-bombardment thrusters range from 5- to 30-cm in diameter. Recent progress on the 5-cm thruster has emphasized durability, with accelerator time exceeding 6300 hours and total time on the rest of the thruster exceeding 8300 hours. Recent progress on the 30-cm thruster has been outstanding in dished-grid accelerator systems. Ion beams up to 5 amperes have been obtained for short periods with 1000 volts net accelerating potential difference. The cesium electron-bombardment and cesium contact programs are also described.

  8. An improved fast multipole method for electrostatic potential calculations in a class of coarse-grained molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursina, Mohammad; Anderson, Kurt S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to approximate the long-range electrostatic potential field in the Cartesian coordinates applicable to 3D coarse-grained simulations of biopolymers. In such models, coarse-grained clusters are formed via treating groups of atoms as rigid and/or flexible bodies connected together via kinematic joints. Therefore, multibody dynamic techniques are used to form and solve the equations of motion of such coarse-grained systems. In this article, the approximations for the potential fields due to the interaction between a highly negatively/positively charged pseudo-atom and charged particles, as well as the interaction between clusters of charged particles, are presented. These approximations are expressed in terms of physical and geometrical properties of the bodies such as the entire charge, the location of the center of charge, and the pseudo-inertia tensor about the center of charge of the clusters. Further, a novel substructuring scheme is introduced to implement the presented far-field potential evaluations in a binary tree framework as opposed to the existing quadtree and octree strategies of implementing fast multipole method. Using the presented Lagrangian grids, the electrostatic potential is recursively calculated via sweeping two passes: assembly and disassembly. In the assembly pass, adjacent charged bodies are combined together to form new clusters. Then, the potential field of each cluster due to its interaction with faraway resulting clusters is recursively calculated in the disassembly pass. The method is highly compatible with multibody dynamic schemes to model coarse-grained biopolymers. Since the proposed method takes advantage of constant physical and geometrical properties of rigid clusters, improvement in the overall computational cost is observed comparing to the tradition application of fast multipole method.

  9. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  10. Sweating the small stuff: Glycoproteins in human sweat and their unexplored potential for microbial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robyn A; Gueniche, Audrey; Adam de Beaumais, Ségolène; Breton, Lionel; Dalko-Csiba, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that secretory fluids such as tears, saliva and milk play an important role in protecting the human body from infection via a washing mechanism involving glycan-mediated adhesion of potential pathogens to secretory glycoproteins. Interaction of sweat with bacteria is well established as the cause of sweat-associated malodor. However, the role of sweat glycoproteins in microbial attachment has received little, if any, research interest in the past. In this review, we demonstrate how recent published studies involving high-throughput proteomic analysis have inadvertently, and fortuitously, exposed an abundance of glycoproteins in sweat, many of which have also been identified in other secretory fluids. We bring together research demonstrating microbial adhesion to these secretory glycoproteins in tears, saliva and milk and suggest a similar role of the sweat glycoproteins in mediating microbial attachment to sweat and/or skin. The contribution of glycan-mediated microbial adhesion to sweat glycoproteins, and the associated impact on sweat derived malodor and pathogenic skin infections are unchartered new research areas that we are beginning to explore. PMID:26582610

  11. On a theory of temporal fluctuations in the electrostatic potential structures associated with auroral arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silevitch, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    A possible mechanism is presented for the generation of large-amplitude temporal fluctuations in the structure of the electron energization region associated with auroral arcs. The mechanism is based on the observation that the auroral arc system resembles a laboratory circuit consisting of the series connection of battery, resistance and a forward biased diode containing collisionless plasma in which large-amplitude relaxation oscillations are sometimes observed to be superimposed on the steady-state current. It is shown that in both the laboratory and auroral systems, in which a localized auroral arc dynamo, the ionosphere and the electron energization region are involved, the oscillations are controlled by the times for ions and electrons to traverse the acceleration region, which also characterize the low- and high-frequency structure of the fluctuating waveform. It is demonstrated that a plausible one-dimensional double-layer model of the auroral arc acceleration region exhibits the dynamic negative resistance necessary for the generation of oscillations by the present mechanism. Finally, consideration is given to two kinds of auroral phenomena which might be associated with the mechanism: the 10-Hz quasi-periodic flickering aurora and 10-Hz modulations in the intensity of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves.

  12. Electronic structure, molecular electrostatic potentials, vibrational spectra in substituted calix[n]arenes (n = 4, 5) from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Jayshree K; Pinjari, Rahul V; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2011-09-29

    Electronic structure, molecular electrostatic potential, and vibrational frequencies of para-substituted calix[n]arene CX[n]-R (n = 4, 5; R = H, NH(2), t-Bu, CH(2)Cl, SO(3)H, NO(2)) and their thia analogs (S-CX[n]-R; with R = H and t-Bu) in which sulfur bridges two aromatic rings of CX[n] have been derived from the density functional theory. A rotation around CH(2) groups connecting the phenol rings engenders four, namely, cone, partial cone, 1,2-alternate, and 1,3-alternate CX[n]-R conformers. Of these, the cone conformer comprising of large number of O1-H1···O1' interactions turns out to be of lowest energy. Normal vibration analysis reveal the O1-H1 stretching frequency of unsubstituted CX[n] shifts to higher wavenumber (blue shift) on substitution of electron-withdrawing (NO(2) or SO(3)H) groups, while electron-donating substituents (NH(2), t-Bu) engender a shift of O1-H1 vibration in the opposite direction (red shift). The direction of frequency shifts have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography. Furthermore, calculated (1)H NMR chemical shift (δ(H)) in modified CX[n] hosts follow the order: H1 > H3/H5 > H7(a) > H7(b). The δ(H) values in CX[4] are in consonant with the observed (1)H NMR spectra.

  13. Electrostatic properties of water models evaluated by a long-range potential based solely on the Wolf charge-neutral condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Yasushige

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we evaluate the electrostatic properties of several biologically important waters that have been coupled to general force fields and are used in biological applications, namely SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P-Ewald, and TIP4P/2005, with a recently developed long-range Coulomb potential based solely on the Wolf charge-neutral principle. The potential was shown previously to accurately reproduce several important electrostatic properties of biological systems. Moreover, it enables scalable computation, yielding faster calculations. The present results demonstrate that the calculated electrostatic properties of the water models based on the long-range potential agree well with those calculated by the particle mesh Ewald method.

  14. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  15. Analytical Debye-Huckel model for electrostatic potentials around dissolved DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, K; Keyes, E; Kephart, T W; Edwards, G

    1997-01-01

    We present an analytical, Green-function-based model for the electric potential of DNA in solution, treating the surrounding solvent with the Debye-Huckel approximation. The partial charge of each atom is accounted for by modeling DNA as linear distributions of atoms on concentric cylindrical surfaces. The condensed ions of the solvent are treated with the Debye-Huckel approximation. The resultant leading term of the potential is that of a continuous shielded line charge, and the higher order terms account for the helical structure. Within several angstroms of the surface there is sufficient information in the electric potential to distinguish features and symmetries of DNA. Plots of the potential and equipotential surfaces, dominated by the phosphate charges, reflect the structural differences between the A, B, and Z conformations and, to a smaller extent, the difference between base sequences. As the distances from the helices increase, the magnitudes of the potentials decrease. However, the bases and sugars account for a larger fraction of the double helix potential with increasing distance. We have found that when the solvent is treated with the Debye-Huckel approximation, the potential decays more rapidly in every direction from the surface than it did in the concentric dielectric cylinder approximation. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:9199767

  16. Lunar Prospector observations of the electrostatic potential of the lunar surface and its response to incident currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Lin, R. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.

    2008-09-01

    We present an analysis of Lunar Prospector Electron Reflectometer data from selected time periods using newly developed methods to correct for spacecraft potential and self-consistently utilizing the entire measured electron distribution to remotely sense the lunar surface electrostatic potential with respect to the ambient plasma. These new techniques enable the first quantitative measurements of lunar surface potentials from orbit. Knowledge of the spacecraft potential also allows accurate characterization of the downward-going electron fluxes that contribute to lunar surface charging, allowing us to determine how the lunar surface potential reacts to changing ambient plasma conditions. On the lunar night side, in shadow, we observe lunar surface potentials of ˜-100 V in the terrestrial magnetotail lobes and potentials of ˜-200 V to ˜-1 kV in the plasma sheet. In the lunar wake, we find potentials of ˜-200 V near the edges but smaller potentials in the central wake, where electron temperatures increase and secondary emission may reduce the magnitude of the negative surface potential. During solar energetic particle events, we see nightside lunar surface potentials as large as ˜-4 kV. On the other hand, on the lunar day side, in sunlight, we generally find potentials smaller than our measurement threshold of ˜20 V, except in the plasma sheet, where we still observe negative potentials of several hundred volts at times, even in sunlight. The presence of significant negative charging in sunlight at these times, given the measured incident electron currents, implies either photocurrents from lunar regolith in situ two orders of magnitude lower than those measured in the laboratory or nonmonotonic near-surface potential variation with altitude. The functional dependence of the lunar surface potential on electron temperature in shadow implies somewhat smaller secondary emission yields from lunar regolith in situ than previously measured in the laboratory. These

  17. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between -0.2 and -0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. PMID:26187908

  18. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between -0.2 and -0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications.

  19. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between −0.2 and −0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. PMID:26187908

  20. Evaluation of Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 as a Potential Biomarker in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengxin; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a glycoprotein that mediates tissue-selective lymphocyte adhesion. The prognostic value of VAP-1 has been determined in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes and the predictive value of serum VAP-1 in patients with thyroid cancer. A total of 126 patients with thyroid nodules and 53 healthy controls participated in this study. The patients were further divided into subgroup 1 (69 cases with benign thyroid nodules) and subgroup 2 (57 cases with thyroid cancer). Serum VAP-1 was measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Diagnostic value of presurgical VAP-1 for thyroid cancer was conducted by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Serum levels of VAP-1 were significantly lower in thyroid cancer group than in healthy control and benign thyroid nodule groups. VAP-1 concentrations negatively correlated with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels in thyroid cancer patients (r = −0.81; p < 0.001). The optimum cut-off value of VAP-1 was 456.6 ng/mL with a 77.4% specificity and 66.7% sensitivity for thyroid cancer diagnosis. Serum VAP-1 decreased in thyroid cancer patients and VAP-1 could be a potential useful adjunct biomarker in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. PMID:27446209

  1. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  2. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample. PMID:22397643

  3. Characterisation of a novel light activated adhesive scaffold: Potential for device attachment.

    PubMed

    Ark, Morris; Boughton, Philip; Lauto, Antonio; Tran, Giang T; Chen, Yongjuan; Cosman, Peter H; Dunstan, Colin R

    2016-09-01

    The most common methods for attaching a device to the internal tissues of the human body are via sutures, clips or staples. These attachment techniques require penetration and manipulation of the tissue. Tears and leaks can often be a complication post-attachment, and scarring usually occurs around the attachment sites. To resolve these issues, it is proposed to develop a soft tissue scaffold impregnated with Rose Bengal/Chitosan solution (RBC-scaffold, 0.01% w/v Rose Bengal, 1.7% w/v Medium Molecular Weight Chitosan). This scaffold will initially attach to the tissue via a light activation method. The light activates the dye in the scaffold which causes cross-links to form between the scaffold and tissue, thus adhering them together. This is done without mechanically manipulating the surrounding tissue, thus avoiding the issues associated with current techniques. Eventually, the scaffold will be resorbed and tissue will integrate for long-term attachment. A variety of tests were performed to characterise the RBC-scaffold. Porosity, interconnectivity, and mechanical strength were measured. Light activation was performed with a broad spectrum (380-780nm) 10W LED lamp exposed to various time lengths (2-15min, Fluence range 0.4-3J/cm(2) ). Adhesive strength of the light-activated bond was measured with lap-shear tests performed on porcine stomach tissue. Cell culture viability was also assessed to confirm tissue integration potential. These properties were compared to Variotis™, an aliphatic polyester soft tissue scaffold which has proven to be viable for soft tissue regeneration. The RBC-scaffolds were found to have high porosity (86.46±2.95%) and connectivity, showing rapid fluid movement. The elastic modulus of the RBC-scaffolds (3.55±1.28MPa) was found to be significantly higher than the controls (0.15±0.058MPa, p<0.01) and approached reported values for human gastrointestinal tissue (2.3MPa). The maximum adhesion strength achieved of the RBC-scaffolds was 8

  4. Characterisation of a novel light activated adhesive scaffold: Potential for device attachment.

    PubMed

    Ark, Morris; Boughton, Philip; Lauto, Antonio; Tran, Giang T; Chen, Yongjuan; Cosman, Peter H; Dunstan, Colin R

    2016-09-01

    The most common methods for attaching a device to the internal tissues of the human body are via sutures, clips or staples. These attachment techniques require penetration and manipulation of the tissue. Tears and leaks can often be a complication post-attachment, and scarring usually occurs around the attachment sites. To resolve these issues, it is proposed to develop a soft tissue scaffold impregnated with Rose Bengal/Chitosan solution (RBC-scaffold, 0.01% w/v Rose Bengal, 1.7% w/v Medium Molecular Weight Chitosan). This scaffold will initially attach to the tissue via a light activation method. The light activates the dye in the scaffold which causes cross-links to form between the scaffold and tissue, thus adhering them together. This is done without mechanically manipulating the surrounding tissue, thus avoiding the issues associated with current techniques. Eventually, the scaffold will be resorbed and tissue will integrate for long-term attachment. A variety of tests were performed to characterise the RBC-scaffold. Porosity, interconnectivity, and mechanical strength were measured. Light activation was performed with a broad spectrum (380-780nm) 10W LED lamp exposed to various time lengths (2-15min, Fluence range 0.4-3J/cm(2) ). Adhesive strength of the light-activated bond was measured with lap-shear tests performed on porcine stomach tissue. Cell culture viability was also assessed to confirm tissue integration potential. These properties were compared to Variotis™, an aliphatic polyester soft tissue scaffold which has proven to be viable for soft tissue regeneration. The RBC-scaffolds were found to have high porosity (86.46±2.95%) and connectivity, showing rapid fluid movement. The elastic modulus of the RBC-scaffolds (3.55±1.28MPa) was found to be significantly higher than the controls (0.15±0.058MPa, p<0.01) and approached reported values for human gastrointestinal tissue (2.3MPa). The maximum adhesion strength achieved of the RBC-scaffolds was 8

  5. Electrostatic energy, potential energy, and energy dissipation for a width-variable capacitor system during adiabatic charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Shunji; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Matsuno, Shun-ichi

    2007-02-01

    This paper considers the energy consumed by charging and discharging a width-variable capacitor. The capacitor with plate distance d is coupled with repulsive mechanical potential energy, which is proportional to 1/dn. In this capacitor model, there is a stable point between attractive electrical force and repulsive mechanical force. All energies, including the electrostatic energy, potential energy, and energy dissipation, are proportional not to the ordinary value V2 but to V2/(n-1)+2, where V is the abrupt power supply voltage. We apply N-stepwise adiabatic charging to the width-variable capacitor system. It is shown that the energy consumption after charging and discharging (or recycling) can be 1/N times smaller than that of the conventional abrupt operation. By increasing the step number N, the adiabatic operation can ideally charge and discharge the width-variable capacitor system with absolutely no energy dissipation, although the voltage dependence of energies is quite different from the usual one. Adiabatic charging is very promising for realizing dissipationless operation in the proposed system.

  6. Electrical potential-assisted DNA hybridization. How to mitigate electrostatics for surface DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tymoczko, Jakub; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Gebala, Magdalena

    2014-12-24

    Surface-confined DNA hybridization reactions are sensitive to the number and identity of DNA capture probes and experimental conditions such as the nature and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solution. When the surface probe density is high or the concentration of bulk ions is much lower than the concentration of ions within the DNA layer, hybridization is significantly slowed down or does not proceed at all. However, high-density DNA monolayers are attractive for designing high-sensitivity DNA sensors. Thus, circumventing sluggish DNA hybridization on such interfaces allows a high surface concentration of target DNA and improved signal/noise ratio. We present potential-assisted hybridization as a strategy in which an external voltage is applied to the ssDNA-modified interface during the hybridization process. Results show that a significant enhancement of hybridization can be achieved using this approach.

  7. Electrical potential-assisted DNA hybridization. How to mitigate electrostatics for surface DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tymoczko, Jakub; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Gebala, Magdalena

    2014-12-24

    Surface-confined DNA hybridization reactions are sensitive to the number and identity of DNA capture probes and experimental conditions such as the nature and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solution. When the surface probe density is high or the concentration of bulk ions is much lower than the concentration of ions within the DNA layer, hybridization is significantly slowed down or does not proceed at all. However, high-density DNA monolayers are attractive for designing high-sensitivity DNA sensors. Thus, circumventing sluggish DNA hybridization on such interfaces allows a high surface concentration of target DNA and improved signal/noise ratio. We present potential-assisted hybridization as a strategy in which an external voltage is applied to the ssDNA-modified interface during the hybridization process. Results show that a significant enhancement of hybridization can be achieved using this approach. PMID:25102381

  8. La3+-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine liposomes. Close approach, intermembrane intermediates, and the electrostatic surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J; Alford, D; Cohen, J; Düzgüneş, N

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylserine liposomes (PS LUV) induced by La3+ has been monitored using the 1-aminoapthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid/p-xylenebis(pyridinium bromide) (ANTS/DPX) fluorescence assay for the mixing of aqueous contents. The fusion event is extensive and nonleaky, with up to 95% mixing of contents in the fused liposomes. However, addition of excess EDTA leads to disruption of the fusion products in a way that implies the existence of metastable intermembrane contact sites. The maximal fusion activity occurs between 10 and 100 microM La3+ and fusion can be terminated rapidly, without loss of contents, by the addition of excess La3+, e.g., 1 mM La3+ at pH 7.4. This observation is explained by the very large intrinsic binding constant (approximately 10(5) M-1) of La3+ to the PS headgroup, as measured by microelectrophoresis. Addition of 1 mM La3+ causes charge reversal of the membrane and a large positive surface potential. La3+ binding to PS causes the release of a proton. These data can be explained if La3+ can chelate to PS at two sites, with one of the sites being the primary amino group. This binding model successfully predicts that at pH 4.5 fusion occurs up to 2 mM La3+, due to reduced La3+ binding at low pH. We conclude that the general mechanism of membrane fusion includes three kinetic steps. In addition to (a) aggregation, there is (b) the close approach of the surfaces, or thinning of the hydration layer, and (c) the formation of intermembrane intermediates which determine the extent to which membrane destabilization leads to fusion (mixing of aqueous contents), as opposed to lysis. The lifetime of these intermembrane intermediates appears to depend upon La3+ binding to both PS sites. PMID:3382713

  9. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  10. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-11-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications.

  11. Intestinal lactic acid bacteria from Muscovy duck as potential probiotics that alter adhesion factor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z L; Bai, D P; Xie, L N; Zhang, W N; Huang, X H; Huang, Y F

    2015-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of lactic acid bacteria (LABs) isolated from Muscovy duck as a potential probiotic. Isolates were identified by targeted polymerase chain reaction and assessed in vitro for probiotic characteristics such as autoaggregation; surface-charge; hydrophobicity; tolerance to acidic pH, bile salts and protease; and expression of genes involved in Caco-2 cell adhesion. The LAB isolates exhibited strong resistance to high bile concentration and acidic pH, produced lactic acid, and bacteriostatic (P < 0.05) were identified as bacilli compared with LAB isolates of cocci. Additionally, the LAB isolates showed high sensitivity to penicillin and tetracycline antibiotics, while they were resistant to ofloxacin, Macrodantin, and cotrimoxazole. The level of F-actin mRNA increased in the groups treated with CM3, Salmonella enterica, and CM3 + S. enterica (P < 0.0001, P < 0.05 and P < 0.05 ). The level of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) and E-cadherin (E-cad) mRNA expression was significantly lower in the treatment group (P < 0.05 for both) than in the control. The F-actin, CAM, and E-cad mRNA levels were significantly lower in the S. enterica and CM3 + S. enterica groups (P < 0.01) than in the CM3 group. Among these, RNA levels were higher in the CM3 + S. enterica than S. enterica group. These results indicate that the natural duck gut microflora is an excellent source for probiotic bacteria and can facilitate the establishment of criteria to select probiotic strains for the prevention of diarrhea.

  12. Kirkwood-Buff Integrals for Aqueous Urea Solutions Based upon the Quantum Chemical Electrostatic Potential and Interaction Energies.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shuntaro; Furuta, Tadaomi; Shimizu, Seishi

    2016-08-11

    Cosolvents, such as urea, affect protein folding and binding, and the solubility of solutes. The modeling of cosolvents has been facilitated significantly by the rigorous Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions, which can describe structural thermodynamics over the entire composition range of aqueous cosolvent mixtures based only on the solution density and the KB integrals (KBIs), i.e., the net excess radial distribution functions from the bulk. Using KBIs to describe solution thermodynamics has given rise to a clear guideline that an accurate prediction of KBIs is equivalent to accurate modeling of cosolvents. Taking urea as an example, here we demonstrate that an improvement in the prediction of KBIs comes from an improved reproduction of high-level quantum chemical (QC) electrostatic potential and molecular pairwise interaction energies. This rational approach to the improvement of the KBI prediction stems from a comparison of existing force fields, AMOEBA, and the generalized AMBER force field, as well as the further optimization of the former to enable better agreement with QC interaction energies. Such improvements would pave the way toward a rational and systematic determination of the transferable force field parameters for a number of important small molecule cosolvents. PMID:27434200

  13. Conotoxins as Sensors of Local pH and Electrostatic Potential in the Outer Vestibule of the Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Kwokyin; McIntyre, Deane; French, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the block of voltage-dependent rat skeletal muscle sodium channels by derivatives of μ-conotoxin GIIIA (μCTX) having either histidine, glutamate, or alanine residues substituted for arginine-13. Toxin binding and dissociation were observed as current fluctuations from single, batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels in planar lipid bilayers. R13X derivatives of μCTX only partially block the single-channel current, enabling us to directly monitor properties of both μCTX-bound and -unbound states under different conditions. The fractional residual current through the bound channel changes with pH according to a single-site titration curve for toxin derivatives R13E and R13H, reflecting the effect of changing the charge on residue 13, in the bound state. Experiments with R13A provided a control reflecting the effects of titration of all residues on toxin and channel other than toxin residue 13. The apparent pKs for the titration of residual conductance are shifted 2–3 pH units positive from the nominal pK values for histidine and glutamate, respectively, and from the values for these specific residues, determined in the toxin molecule in free solution by NMR measurements. Toxin affinity also changes dramatically as a function of pH, almost entirely due to changes in the association rate constant, kon. Interpreted electrostatically, our results suggest that, even in the presence of the bound cationic toxin, the channel vestibule strongly favors cation entry with an equivalent local electrostatic potential more negative than −100 mV at the level of the “outer charged ring” formed by channel residues E403, E758, D1241, and D1532. Association rates are apparently limited at a transition state where the pK of toxin residue 13 is closer to the solution value than in the bound state. The action of these unique peptides can thus be used to sense the local environment in the ligand-–receptor complex during individual molecular transitions and defined

  14. Apoptotic Death of Hematopoietic Tumor Cells through Potentiated and Sustained Adhesion to Fibronectin via VLA-4*

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yohei; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Matsunaga, Takuya; Saze, Mizue; Miura, Shogo; Maeda, Mao; Eguchi, Mayu; Tanaka, Rika; Taira, Junichi; Kodama, Hiroaki; Goto, Sumio; Niitsu, Yoshiroh; Terada, Hiroshi; Fukai, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that inactivated β1-integrins are involved in the disordered growth of hematopoietic tumor cells. We recently found that TNIIIA2, a peptide derived from tenascin-C, strongly activates β1-integrins through binding with syndecan-4. We show here that Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma cells can survive and grow in suspension but undergo apoptosis when kept adhering to fibronectin by stimulation with TNIIIA2. Other integrin activators, Mg2+ and TS2/16 (an integrin-activating antibody), were also capable of inducing apoptosis. The inactivation of ERK1/2 and Akt and the subsequent activation of Bad were involved in the apoptosis. The results using other hematopoietic tumor cell lines expressing different levels of fibronectin receptors (VLA-4 and VLA-5) showed that potentiated and sustained adhesion to fibronectin via VLA-4 causally induces apoptosis also in various types of hematopoietic tumor cells in addition to Ramos cells. Because TNIIIA2 requires syndecan-4 as a membrane receptor for activation of β1-integrins, it induced apoptosis preferentially in hematopoietic tumor cells, which expressed both VLA-4 and syndecan-4 as membrane receptors mediating the effects of fibronectin and TNIIIA2, respectively. Therefore, normal peripheral blood cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes, which poorly expressed syndecan-4, were almost insusceptible to TNIIIA2-induced apoptosis. The TNIIIA2-related matricryptic site of TN-C could contribute, once exposed, to preventing prolonged survival of hematopoietic malignant progenitors through potentiated and sustained activation of VLA-4. PMID:20007695

  15. Surface Electrostatic Potential and Water Orientation in the presence of Sodium Octanoate Dilute Monolayers Studied by Means of Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Kalil; de Moura, André F

    2015-10-13

    A series of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the present investigation to assess the spontaneous formation of surfactant monolayers of sodium octanoate at the water-vacuum interface. The surfactant surface coverage increased until a saturation threshold was achieved, after which any further surfactant addition led to the formation of micellar aggregates within the solution. The saturated films were not densely packed, as might be expected for short-chained surfactants, and all films regardless of the surface coverage presented surfactant molecules with the same ordering pattern, namely, with the ionic heads toward the aqueous solution and the tails lying nearly parallel to the interface. The major contributions to the electrostatic surface potential came from the charged heads and the counterion distribution, which nearly canceled out each other. The balance between the oppositely charged ions rendered the electrostatic contributions from water meaningful, amounting to ca. 10% of the contributions arising from the ionic species. And even the aliphatic tails, whose atoms bear relatively small partial atomic charges as compared to the polar molecules and molecular fragments, contributed with ca. 20% of the total electrostatic surface potential of the systems under investigation. Although the aliphatic tails were not so orderly arranged as in a compact film, the C-H bonds assumed a preferential orientation, leading to an increased contribution to the electrostatic properties of the interface. The most prominent feature arising from the partitioning of the electrostatic potential into individual contributions was the long-range ordering of the water molecules. This ordering of the water molecules produced a repulsive dipole-dipole interaction between the two interfaces, which increased with the surface coverage. Only for a water layer wider than 10 nm was true bulk behavior observed, and the repulsive dipole-dipole interaction faded away. PMID

  16. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  17. Electrostatic Explorations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallai, Ditta; Stewart, Gay

    1998-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on electrostatics experiments in the form of an activity guide and worksheet through which students discover the different types of electric charge, Coulomb's Law, induced charge separation, and grounding. (DDR)

  18. A Computational Study of Cytotoxicity of Substituted Amides of Pyrazine- 2-carboxylic acids Using QSAR and DFT Based Molecular Surface Electrostatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Sharieh; Monajjemi, Majid; Rajaeian, Elahe; Haghgu, Mohammad; Salari, Aliakbar; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Pyrazine derivatives are important class of compounds with diverse biological and cytotoxic activities and clinical applications. In this study, B3 p 86 / 6 – 31 + + G * was used to compute and map the molecular surface electrostatic potentials of a group of substituted amides of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acids to identify common features related to their subsequent cytotoxicities. Several statistical properties including potentials extrema (Vs ,min,Vs ,max), the average of positive electrostatic potential on the surface (Vs+), the average of V(r) over the surface (Vs) and the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) and system cytotoxicities were computed. Statistically, the most significant correlation is a five -parameter equation with correlation coefficient, R² values of 0.922 and R²adj = 0.879. The obtained models allowed us to reveal cytotoxic activity of substituted amides of Pyrazine2- carboxcylic acid. PMID:24523754

  19. Effects of electronic coupling and electrostatic potential on charge transport in carbon-based molecular electronic junctions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular junctions consisting of 2–20 nm thick layers of organic oligomers oriented between a conducting carbon substrate and a carbon/gold top contact have proven to be reproducible and reliable, and will soon enter commercial production in audio processing circuits. The covalent, conjugated bond between one or both sp2-hybridized carbon contacts and an aromatic molecular layer is distinct from the more common metal/molecule or silicon/molecule structures in many reported molecular junctions. Theoretical observations based on density functional theory are presented here, which model carbon-based molecular junctions as single molecules and oligomers between fragments of graphene. Electronic coupling between the molecules and the contacts is demonstrated by the formation of hybrid orbitals in the model structure, which have significant electron density on both the graphene and the molecule. The energies of such hybrid orbitals correlate with tunneling barriers determined experimentally, and electronic coupling between the two graphene fragments in the model correlates with experimentally observed attenuation of transport with molecular layer thickness. Electronic coupling is affected significantly by the dihedral angle between the planes of the graphene and the molecular π-systems, but is absent only when the two planes are orthogonal. Coupling also results in partial charge transfer between the graphene contacts and the molecular layer, which results in a shift in electrostatic potential which affects the observed tunneling barrier. Although the degree of partial charge transfer is difficult to calculate accurately, it does provide a basis for the “vacuum level shift” observed in many experiments, including transport and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular layers on conductors. PMID:26925350

  20. Complex coacervates as a foundation for synthetic underwater adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Wang, Ching Shuen; Shao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Complex coacervation was proposed to play a role in the formation of the underwater bioadhesive of the Sandcastle worm (Phragmatopoma californica) based on the polyacidic and polybasic nature of the glue proteins and the balance of opposite charges at physiological pH. Morphological studies of the secretory system suggested the natural process does not involve complex coacervation as commonly defined. The distinction may not be important because electrostatic interactions likely play an important role in formation of the sandcastle glue. Complex coacervation has also been invoked in the formation of adhesive underwater silk fibers of caddisfly larvae and the adhesive plaques of mussels. A process similar to complex coacervation, that is, condensation and dehydration of biopolyelectrolytes through electrostatic associations, seems plausible for the caddisfly silk. This much is clear, the sandcastle glue complex coacervation model provided a valuable blueprint for the synthesis of a biomimetic, waterborne, underwater adhesive with demonstrated potential for repair of wet tissue. PMID:21081223

  1. The molecular electrostatic potential and steric accessibility of poly (dI.dC). Comparison with poly (dG.dC)

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Richard; Pullman, Bernard

    1981-01-01

    The influence of the amino group of guanine on the molecular electrostatic potential and the accessibility to reactive sites of B-DNA is investigated by comparing the two model double helices poly (dI.dC) and poly (dG.dC). The calculations clarify the “disruptive” role of the guanine amino group on nucleic acid-polypeptide interactions. PMID:7335499

  2. Electrostatics in molecular phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náray-Szabó, G.

    1995-04-01

    Molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) and fields (MEF) became very popular in the last two decades since they offer a pictorial modeling of complicated molecular events. In this paper we give an overview on applications. We can discuss chemical reactivity in terms of MEP maps: negative and positive regions are preferred by electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents, respectively. We may define the concept of electrostatic enzyme catalysis. In cases when the ground-state polarity of the active site essentially increases in the transition state the catalytic rate enhancement is due to electrostatic stabilization by the polar protein and solvent environment. Crystal surfaces provide strong MEF, thus enhanced reactivity, in their vicinity. Hydration depends also on the electrostatic behaviour. It is possible to define the average MEF of a molecule that is an appropriate descriptor of hydration ability to be used in quantitative structure-activity relationships. Molecular recognition has also important electrostatic aspects. Complementarity and similarity are determined beside steric aspects by electrostatic and hydrophobic factors, as well. We may define hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions around a molecule in terms of the MEF and apply this representation to the study of host-guest complementarity, as well as crystal packing.

  3. Antibacterial and Cell-adhesive Polypeptide and Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogel as a Potential Scaffold for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Song, Airong; Rane, Aboli A.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    The ideal wound healing scaffold should provide the appropriate physical and mechanical properties to prevent secondary infection, as well as an excellent physiological environment to facilitate cell adhesion, proliferation and/or differentiation. Therefore, we developed a synthetic cell-adhesive polypeptide hydrogel with inherent antibacterial activity. A series of polypeptides, poly(Lys)x(Ala)y (x+y=100) with varied hydrophobicity via metal-free ring-opening polymerization of NCA-Lys(Boc) and NCA-Ala monomers (NCA = N-carboxylic anhydride) mediated by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) were synthesized. These polypeptides were cross-linked with 6-arm PEG-amide succinimidyl glutarate (ASG) (Mw = 10K) to form hydrogels with a gelation time of five minutes and a storage modulus (G') of 1400–3000 Pa as characterized by rheometry. The hydrogel formed by cross-linking of poly(Lys)60(Ala)40 (5 wt%) and 6-arm PEG-ASG (16 wt%) (Gel-III) exhibited cell adhesion and cell proliferation activities superior to other polypeptide hydrogels. In addition, Gel-III displays significant antibacterial activity against E. coli JM109 and S. aureus ATCC25923. Thus, we have developed a novel, cell-adhesive hydrogel with inherent antibacterial activity as a potential scaffold for cutaneous wound healing. PMID:22023748

  4. A Simple Apparatus for Electrostatic Force Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus that demonstrates that electrostatic forces can be large and also gives some idea of dependence of electrostatic forces between charged parallel discs on potential differences and separation. (CS)

  5. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  6. Electrostatics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2011-04-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and "switchable" nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  7. On the potential for fibronectin/phosphorylcholine coatings on PTFE substrates to jointly modulate endothelial cell adhesion and hemocompatibility properties

    PubMed Central

    Montaño-Machado, Vanessa; Chevallier, Pascale; Mantovani, Diego; Pauthe, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomolecules as coatings on biomaterials is recognized to constitute a promising approach to modulate the biological response of the host. In this work, we propose a coating composed by 2 biomolecules susceptible to provide complementary properties for cardiovascular applications: fibronectin (FN) to enhance endothelialization, and phosphorylcholine (PRC) for its non thrombogenic properties. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was selected as model substrate mainly because it is largely used in cardiovascular applications. Two approaches were investigated: 1) a sequential adsorption of the 2 biomolecules and 2) an adsorption of the protein followed by the grafting of phosphorylcholine via chemical activation. All coatings were characterized by immunofluorescence staining, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy analyses. Assays with endothelial cells showed improvement on cell adhesion, spreading and metabolic activity on FN-PRC coatings compared with the uncoated PTFE. Platelets adhesion and activation were both reduced on the coated surfaces when compared with uncoated PTFE. Moreover, clotting time tests exhibited better hemocompatibility properties of the surfaces after a sequential adsorption of FN and PRC. In conclusion, FN-PRC coating improves cell adhesion and non-thrombogenic properties, thus revealing a certain potential for the development of this combined deposition strategy in cardiovascular applications. PMID:25785369

  8. Adhesion of perfume-filled microcapsules to model fabric surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Yanping; Bowen, James; Andrews, James W; Liu, Min; Smets, Johan; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    The retention and adhesion of melamine formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules on a model fabric surface in aqueous solution were investigated using a customised flow chamber technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A cellulose film was employed as a model fabric surface. Modification of the cellulose with chitosan was found to increase the retention and adhesion of microcapsules on the model fabric surface. The AFM force-displacement data reveal that bridging forces resulting from the extension of cellulose chains dominate the adhesion between the microcapsule and the unmodified cellulose film, whereas electrostatic attraction helps the microcapsules adhere to the chitosan-modified cellulose film. The correlation between results obtained using these two complementary techniques suggests that the flow chamber device can be potentially used for rapid screening of the effect of chemical modification on the adhesion of microparticles to surfaces, reducing the time required to achieve an optimal formulation.

  9. Electrostatic potential and Born energy of charged molecules interacting with phospholipid membranes: calculation via 3-D numerical solution of the full Poisson equation.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, J E; Lambrakis, K C

    1991-09-21

    Understanding the physicochemical basis of the interaction of molecules with lipid bilayers is fundamental to membrane biology. In this study, a new, three-dimensional numerical solution of the full Poisson equation including local dielectric variation is developed using finite difference techniques in order to model electrostatic interactions of charged molecules with a non-uniform dielectric. This solution is used to describe the electric field and electrostatic potential profile of a charged molecule interacting with a phospholipid bilayer in a manner consistent with the known composition and structure of the membrane. Furthermore, the Born interaction energy is then calculated by appropriate integration of the electric field over whole space. Numerical computations indicate that the electrostatic potential profile surrounding a charge molecule and its resultant Born interaction energy are a function of molecular position within the membrane and change most significantly within the polar region of the bilayer. The maximum interaction energy is observed when the charge is placed at the center of the hydrophobic core of the membrane and is strongly dependent on the size of the charge and on the thickness of the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer. The numerical results of this continuum model are compared with various analytical approximations for the Born energy including models established for discontinuous slab dielectrics. The calculated energies agree with the well-known Born analytical expression only when the charge is located near the center of a hydrocarbon core of greater than 60 A in thickness. The Born-image model shows excellent agreement with the numerical results only when modified to include an appropriate effective thickness of the low dielectric region. In addition, a newly derived approximation which considers the local mean dielectric provides a simple and continuous solution that also agrees well with the numerical results.

  10. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  11. Electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.

    1982-08-03

    An electrostatic precipitator comprising a plurality of flat plate dust-collecting electrodes, arranged in substantially equally spaced and parallel relationship with one another and each having a discharge electrode, or electrodes, on and along the edge of one side thereof with the discharge electrodes of the adjacent dust-collecting electrodes alternately facing in opposite directions; the edges having the discharge electrodes are arranged in a setback relation by some distance in relation to the nearby edges of the adjacent dust-collecting plates, where no discharge electrodes are provided, so that uniform and nonuniform electric fields may be produced.

  12. The comparative tea staining potential of phenolic, chlorhexidine and anti-adhesive mouthrinses.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Moran, J; Newcombe, R; Warren, P

    1995-12-01

    Staining of teeth and mucous membranes is a well-known side-effect with chlorhexidine mouthrinses in which dietary chromogens play an important rôle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a co-polymer anti-adhesive agent would prevent staining by a low concentration chlorhexidine solution. Additionally, the possibility that an essential oil/phenolic rinse product may cause staining was investigated. The rinses studied were the anti-adhesive alone and combined with 0.02% chlorhexidine and the essential oil/phenolic rinse. These were positioned against a positive control rise, 0.2% chlorhexidine, and a negative control rinse, water. The study was a single blind 5-treatment, randomised Latin square cross-over design, incorporating balance for carry-over effects. 15 volunteers participated and on Day 1 of each study period were rendered stain free by scaling and polishing of the teeth. Oral hygiene was suspended and 8 x per day subjects rinsed under supervision, firstly with the allocated formulation and then with 10 ml of warm black tea. On Day 4, tooth and tongue staining was scored by area and intensity (colour). A washout period of at least 3 1/2 days was permitted between treatment periods when oral hygiene was resumed. Before the study and during washouts, volunteers practised tongue brushing. Tooth and tongue staining was significantly increased with 0.2% chlorhexidine compared to the essential oil/phenolic rinse which in turn was significantly increased compared to the other 3 rinses. The antiadhesive/chlorhexidine rinse produced no more staining than the anti-adhesive or water rise. However, the parallel plaque regrowth study suggests this inhibition of staining resulted from the vitiation of the chlorhexidine activity by the antiadhesive. The methodology would appear a simple and quick way of assessing the propensity of mouthrinses to cause extrinsic staining.

  13. Utilization of the serosal scarification model of postoperative intestinal adhesion formation to investigate potential adhesion-preventing substances in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, E R; Livesey, M A; Barker, I K; Hurtig, M B; Conlon, P D

    1996-01-01

    A rabbit serosal scarification model was utilized to compare the ability of four drugs, previously administered peri-operatively to horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy, to prevent the development of postoperative intestinal adhesions. The substances compared were 32% Dextran 70 (7 mL/kg), 1% sodium carboxymethylcellulose (7 mL/kg), trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (30 mg/kg), and flunixin meglumine (1 mg/kg). The first two were administered intra-abdominally following surgery, while the latter two were administered systemically in the peri-operative period. Fibrous adhesions were evident in all animals in the untreated serosal scarification group. No significant difference in the number of animals with adhesions was found between the untreated control group and any treatment group, nor among the treatment groups. Microscopic examination of adhesions collected at postmortem examination revealed fibers consistent with cotton, surrounded by a giant-cell reaction and ongoing acute inflammation. The source of the fibers was likely the cotton laparotomy sponges used to scarify the intestinal surface, since the pattern in the granuloma and sponge fibers appeared similar under polarized light. Though consistent intestinal adhesion formation was produced in the rabbit, the presence of foreign body granulomas may prevent consideration of this model for future research. The drugs tested were ineffective in preventing the formation of postoperative small intestinal adhesions in this model. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8904667

  14. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-21

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers. PMID:27004887

  15. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-01

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  16. Electrostatic effects of surface acidic amino acid residues on the oxidation-reduction potentials of the flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Swenson, R P

    1995-03-14

    The flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) is a member of a family of small, acidic proteins that contain a single noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. These proteins function as low-potential one-electron transferases in bacteria. A distinguishing feature of these flavoproteins is the dramatic decrease in the midpoint potential of the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple of the FMN upon binding to the apoprotein (-172 mV for FMN free in solution versus -443 mV when bound), a perturbation thought to be essential for physiological function. The structural basis of this phenomenon is not yet thoroughly understood. In this study, the contribution of six acidic residues (Asp62, Asp63, Glu66, Asp95, Glu99, and Asp106) to the perturbation of the redox properties of the cofactor has been investigated. These residues are clustered about the FMN binding site within 13 A of the N(1) atom of the cofactor. Using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, these residues were neutralized in various combinations through the substitution of asparagine for aspartate and glutamine for glutamate. Seventeen mutant flavodoxins were generated in which one to all six acidic residues were systematically neutralized, often in various spatial configurations. There was no obvious correlation between the midpoint potentials for the oxidized/semiquinone couple and general electrostatic environment, although some differences were noted. However, the midpoint potential for the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple for each of the mutants was less negative than that of the wild type. These increases are strongly correlated with the number of acid to amide substitutions, with an average contribution of about 15 mV per substitution. Collectively, the unfavorable electrostatic environment provided by these acidic residues accounts for approximately one-third of the large midpoint potential shift for the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple that typifies the flavodoxin family

  17. Computational chemistry study of 3D-structure-function relationships for enzymes based on Markov models for protein electrostatic, HINT, and van der Waals potentials.

    PubMed

    Concu, Riccardo; Podda, Gianni; Uriarte, Eugenio; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-07-15

    In a significant work, Dobson and Doig (J Mol Biol 2003, 330, 771) illustrated protein prediction as enzymatic or not from spatial structure without resorting to alignments. They used 52 protein features and a nonlinear support vector machine model to classify more than 1000 proteins collected from the PDB with a 77% overall accuracy. The most useful features were: the secondary-structure content, the amino acid frequencies, the number of disulphide bonds, and the largest cleft size. Working on the same dataset used by D&D, in this article we reported a good and simple model, based on the Markov chain models (MCM), to classify protein 3D structures as enzymatic or not, taking into consideration the spatial structure without resorting to alignments. Here we define, for the first time, a general MCM to calculate the electrostatic potential, molecular vibrations, van der Waals (vdw) interactions, and hydrophobic interactions (HINT) and use them in comparative studies of potential fields and/or protein function prediction. The dataset is composed of 1371 proteins divided into 689 enzymes and 682 nonenzymes, all proteins were collected from the PDB. The best model we found was a linear model carried out with the linear discriminant analysis; it was able to classify 74.18% of the proteins using only two electrostatic potentials. In the work described here, we define 3D-HINT potentials (mu(k)) and use them for the first time to derive a classifier for protein enzymes. We analyzed ROC curves, domain of applicability, parametric assumptions, desirability maps, and also tested other nonlinear artificial neural network models which did not improve the linear model. In closing, this MCM allows a fast calculation and comparison of different potentials deriving into accurate protein 3D structure-function relationships, notably simpler than the previous.

  18. Variable stiffness sandwich panels using electrostatic interlocking core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-04-01

    Structural topology has a large impact on the flexural stiffness of a beam structure. Reversible attachment between discrete substructures allows for control of shear stress transfer between structural elements, thus stiffness modulation. Electrostatic adhesion has shown promise for providing a reversible latching mechanism for controllable internal connectivity. Building on previous research, a thin film copper polyimide laminate has been used to incorporate high voltage electrodes to Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) sandwich structures. The level of electrostatic holding force across the electrode interface is key to the achievable level of stiffness modulation. The use of non-flat interlocking core structures can allow for a significant increase in electrode contact area for a given core geometry, thus a greater electrostatic holding force. Interlocking core geometries based on cosine waves can be Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machined from Rohacell IGF 110 Foam core. These Interlocking Core structures could allow for enhanced variable stiffness functionality compared to basic planar electrodes. This novel concept could open up potential new applications for electrostatically induced variable stiffness structures.

  19. Determination of the electrostatic potential distribution in Pt/Fe:SrTiO₃/Nb:SrTiO₃ thin-film structures by electron holography.

    PubMed

    Marchewka, Astrid; Cooper, David; Lenser, Christian; Menzel, Stephan; Du, Hongchu; Dittmann, Regina; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Waser, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We determined the electrostatic potential distribution in pristine Pt/Fe:SrTiO3/Nb:SrTiO3 structures by electron holography experiments, revealing the existence of a depletion layer extending into the Nb-doped bottom electrode. Simulations of potential profiles in metal-insulator-metal structures were conducted assuming different types and distributions of dopants. It is found that the presence of acceptor-type dopant concentrations at the Fe:SrTiO3/Nb:SrTiO3 interface with a donor-doped insulating layer provides a good match to the measured profile. Such acceptor-type interface concentrations may be associated with Sr vacancies on the Nb:SrTiO3 side of the bottom interface.

  20. Spectroscopy (FT-IR, FT-Raman), hydrogen bonding, electrostatic potential and HOMO-LUMO analysis of tioxolone based on DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yaping; Li, Xiaofeng; Han, Ligang; Zhang, Weiying; Liu, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    Tioxolone possess antipsoriatic and antibacterial properties. Therefore, it has been used in treating various skin and scalp disorders for many years. Spectroscopic analysis of tioxolone was presented by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experiments (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis). Molecular geometry and vibrational wavenumbers of tioxolone were investigated by using B3LYP method with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. A complete vibrational spectra was made to analyze the potential energy distributions (PED). In addition, analysis of frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential (ESP) and thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy) was presented with the same basis-set. Furthermore, the nature of molecular association through hydrogen bonding were discussed using atoms in molecules (AIM) and reduced density gradient (RDG) methods.

  1. α6-integrin is required for the adhesion and vasculogenic potential of hemangioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M.; Guerin, Coralie L.; Boscolo, Elisa; Bieche, Ivan; Mulliken, John B.; Bischoff, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common tumor of infancy. Hemangioma stem cells (HemSC) are a mesenchymal subpopulation isolated from IH CD133+ cells. HemSC can differentiate into endothelial and pericyte/smooth muscle cells and form vascular networks when injected in immune-deficient mice. α6-Integrin subunit has been implicated in the tumorgenicity of glioblastoma stem cells and the homing properties of hematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal progenitor cells. Therefore, we investigated the possible function(s) of α6-integrin in HemSC. Methods/Results We documented α6-integrin expression in IH tumor specimens and HemSC by RT-qPCR and flow cytometry. We examined the effect of blocking or silencing α6-integrin on the adhesive and proliferative properties of HemSCin vitro and the vasculogenic and homing properties of HemSCin vivo. Targeting α6-integrin in cultured HemSC inhibited adhesion to laminin but had no effect on proliferation. Vessel-forming ability in Matrigel implants and hepatic homing after intravenous delivery were significantly decreased in α6-integrin siRNA transfected HemSC. Conclusion α6-Integrin is required for HemSC adherence to laminin, vessel formation in vivo and for homing to the liver. Thus, we uncovered an important role for α6 integrin in the vasculogenic properties of HemSC. Our results suggest that α6-integrin expression on HemSC could be a new target for anti-hemangioma therapy. PMID:24022922

  2. Modelling liquid crystal elastomers and potential application as a reversibly switchable adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, James

    2013-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbery materials that composed of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) crosslinked into a network. The rod-like mesogens incorporated into the LCPs are have random orientations in the high temperature isotropic phase, but can adopt the canonical liquid crystalline phases as the temperature is lowered. Smectic liquid crystal elastomers have highly anisotropic mechanical behaviour. This arises in side chain smectic-A systems because the smectic layers behave as if they are embedded in the rubber matrix. The macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these solids is sensitive to the buckling of the layers, so is a multiscale problem. A coarse grained free energy that includes the fine-scale buckling of the layers has been developed, which enables continuum modelling of these systems. In the first part of this talk I present a model of the mechanical behaviour of side chain smectic elastomers. The properties of nematic LCEs, such as their high loss tangent, and mechanical strain hardening, might enable them to be used as reversibly switchable pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). PSAs are typically made from viscoelastic polymers. The quality of their adhesion can be measured by the tack energy, which is the work required to separate two bodies. To obtain a high tack energy a PSA should be capable of a large strain. It should strain soften at low strain to produce crack blunting, and then strain harden at high strain to stiffen the fibrils formed late in the debonding process. I will present a model of the tack energy of weakly crosslinked nematic polymers. To describe the constitutive properties of this system the nematic dumbbell model of Maffettone et al. was used. This constutitive model was then combined with the block model of Yamaguchi et al. describing PSAs. It was found that the parallel orientation of the nematic has a higher tack energy than both the isotropic and the perpendicular director orientation. This work is supported by

  3. In vitro investigation of methylene blue-bearing, electrostatically assembled aptamer-silica nanocomposites as potential photodynamic therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tian-Shyng; Huang, Xin-Chun; Luo, Yun-Ling; Hsu, Hsin-Yun

    2015-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy, that is, excitation of a photosensitizer with light to generate reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen, has emerged as a noninvasive technique for cancer theranostics. However, the clinical use of many photosensitizers is impeded by their hydrophobicity, the nonspecific damage they cause to normal tissues, and their susceptibility to environmental degradation. In this study, we developed a simple electrostatic adsorption strategy to fabricate aptamer-silica nanocomposites by sequentially functionalizing nanocomposites with the cell surface-associated mucin 1 aptamer for tumor targeting and a hydrophilic photosensitizer, methylene blue, for photodynamic therapy applications. We investigated the relationship between the biophysical properties and cellular uptake of such nanocomposites to improve their formulation. Effective generation of singlet oxygen was achieved with a low photosensitizer dosage (0.5 μM) and a short, low-power irradiation (1 min, 10 mW/cm(2)). With the current strategy, the efficiency of photodynamic therapy was determined by the cellular uptake of nanocomposites and the targeting molecules used.

  4. Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces – A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phat L.; Gamboa, Jessica R.; McCracken, Katherine E.; Riley, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring cell adhesion to an underlying biomaterial surface is vital in implant device design and tissue engineering, particularly under circumstances where cells are subjected to potential detachment from overriding fluid flow. Cell-substrate adhesion is a highly regulated process involving the interplay of mechanical properties, surface topographic features, electrostatic charge, and biochemical mechanisms. At the nanoscale level the physical properties of the underlying substrate are of particular importance in cell adhesion. Conventionally, natural, pro-adhesive, and often thrombogenic, protein biomaterials are frequently utilized to facilitate adhesion. In the present study nanofabrication techniques are utilized to enhance the biological functionality of a synthetic polymer surface, polymethymethacrylate, with respect to cell adhesion. Specifically we examine the effect on cell adhesion of combining: 1. optimized surface texturing, 2. electrostatic charge and 3. cell adhesive ligands, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, as an ensemble of nanoparticles trapped in nanowells. Our results reveal that the ensemble strategy leads to enhanced, more than simply additive, endothelial cell adhesion under both static and flow conditions. This strategy may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of blood-contacting surfaces of cardiovascular devices subjected to flow-mediated shear. PMID:23225491

  5. Development of Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    Certain missions require Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panels to establish a favorable environment for the operation of sensitive scientific instruments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ECSA panel that minimizes panel surface potential below 100mV in LEO and GEO charged particle environments, prevents exposure of solar cell voltage and panel insulating surfaces to the ambient environment, and provides an equipotential, grounded structure surrounding the entire panel. An ECSA panel design was developed that uses a Front Side Aperture-Shield (FSA) that covers all inter-cell areas with a single graphite composite laminate, composite edge clips for connecting the FSA to the panel substrate, and built-in tabs that interconnect the FSA to conductive coated coverglasses using a conductive adhesive. Analysis indicated the ability of the design to meet the ECSA requirements. Qualification coupons and a 0.5m x 0.5m prototype panel were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic performance and electrical grounding before and after exposure to acoustic and thermal cycling environments. The results show the feasibility of achieving electrostatic cleanliness with a small penalty in mass, photovoltaic performance and cost, with a design is structurally robust and compatible with a wide range of current solar panel technologies.

  6. Interfacial membrane docking of cytosolic phospholipase A2 C2 domain using electrostatic potential-modulated spin relaxation magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Andy; Nielsen, Robert; Gelb, Michael H.; Robinson, Bruce H.

    1999-01-01

    The C2 domain of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (C2cPLA2) plays an important role in calcium-dependent transfer of the protein from the cytosol to internal cellular membranes as a prelude for arachidonate release from membrane phospholipids. By using a recently developed electron paramagnetic resonance approach together with 13 site-specifically nitroxide spin labeled C2cPLA2s and membrane-permeant and -impermeant spin relaxants, we have determined the orientation of C2cPLA2 with respect to the surface of vesicles of the phospholipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphomethanol. The structure reveals that the two calcium-binding regions on C2cPLA2 that display hydrophobic residues, CBR1 and CBR3, are partially inserted into the core of the membrane. CBR2 that contains predominantly hydrophilic residues is close to the membrane but not inserted. The long axis of the cylindrical C2cPLA2 molecule is tilted with respect to the bilayer normal, which brings a cluster of basic protein residues close to the phospholipid headgroups. Such an orientation places the two bound calcium ions close to the membrane surface. All together, the results provide structural support for previous proposals that binding of C2cPLA2 to the membrane interface is driven in part by insertion of hydrophobic surface loops into the membrane core. The results are contrasted with previous studies of the interfacial binding of the first C2 domain of synaptotagmin I, which has shorter surface loops that display basic residues for electrostatic interaction with the bilayer surface. PMID:10359764

  7. eF-seek: prediction of the functional sites of proteins by searching for similar electrostatic potential and molecular surface shape

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kengo; Murakami, Yoichi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a method to predict ligand-binding sites in a new protein structure by searching for similar binding sites in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The similarities are measured according to the shapes of the molecular surfaces and their electrostatic potentials. A new web server, eF-seek, provides an interface to our search method. It simply requires a coordinate file in the PDB format, and generates a prediction result as a virtual complex structure, with the putative ligands in a PDB format file as the output. In addition, the predicted interacting interface is displayed to facilitate the examination of the virtual complex structure on our own applet viewer with the web browser (URL: http://eF-site.hgc.jp/eF-seek). PMID:17567616

  8. InfiniCharges: A tool for generating partial charges via the simultaneous fit of multiframe electrostatic potential (ESP) and total dipole fluctuations (TDF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, Marco; Gabrieli, Andrea; Demontis, Pierfranco; Suffritti, Giuseppe B.

    2016-03-01

    The InfiniCharges computer program, for generating reliable partial charges for molecular simulations in periodic systems, is here presented. This tool is an efficient implementation of the recently developed DM-REPEAT method, where the stability of the resulting charges, over a large set of fitting regions, is obtained through the simultaneous fit of multiple electrostatic potential (ESP) configurations together with the total dipole fluctuations (TDF). Besides DM-REPEAT, the program can also perform standard REPEAT fit and its multiframe extension (M-REPEAT), with the possibility to restrain the charges to an arbitrary value. Finally, the code is employed to generate partial charges for ZIF-90, a microporous material of the metal organic frameworks (MOFs) family, and an extensive analysis of the results is carried out.

  9. Electrostatic Enhancement of Coagulation in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Cuzzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity experiments suggest that electrostatic forces (overwhelmed by normal Earth gravity) could greatly enhance cohesive strength of preplanetary aggregates. Cohesive forces may be 103 times larger than those for van der Waals adhesion. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Adhesion molecule expression in Graves' thyroid glands; potential relevance of granule membrane protein (GMP-140) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the homing and antigen presentation processes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, A; Mirakian, R; Bottazzo, G F

    1992-01-01

    To assess the potential role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease, we examined the expression of several of these adhesion molecules, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140), in sections of Graves' thyroid glands and control thyroids, using immunohistochemical techniques. Up-regulated expression of GMP-140 was frequently observed on endothelial cells (EC) of post-capilliary venules in all Graves' thyroids examined, compared with an occasional weak staining on EC control glands. Some capillary EC around thyroid follicles (perifollicular EC) were strongly positive for GMP-140 in the Graves' thyroids in contrast to a negative staining on the same structures in the control glands. In addition, there was a correlation between the reactivity and frequency of GMP-140 expression on EC and the severity of mononuclear cell (MNC) infiltration in the Graves' thyroids. The expression of ICAM-1 was up-regulated on perifollicular EC and EC of small venules in some thyroids of both Graves' and control groups. Conversely, no significant expression was observed on any type of EC for both endothelial-leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) and VCAM-1. However, dendritic-like cells, present within lymphocytic infiltrates, were positive for VCAM-1 in most of the Graves' thyroids examined, especially in those with a severe lymphocytic infiltration. Thyrocytes were constantly negative for the expression of all four adhesion molecules investigated. These data suggest that GMP-140, as well as ICAM-1, could play an important role in the initiation of MNC infiltration in Graves' disease. ELAM-1 and VCAM-1 appear not to be relevant for the migration of MNC from the blood vessels into the target gland, although VCAM-1 expression on dendritic-like cells might play an additively tissue-selective role in autoantigen presentation and subsequent elicitation of autoimmune

  11. Effect of finite ion sizes in an electrostatic potential distribution for a charged soft surface in contact with an electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Sourayon; Das, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    We provide a theory to analyze the impact of finite ion sizes (or steric effect) in electrostatic potential distribution for a charged soft surface in contact with an electrolyte solution. The theory is based on a free energy model that appropriately accounts for the contribution of finite ion sizes as well as the structural characteristics of a soft interface, represented by a combination of a rigid surface and a fixed charge layer (FCL), with the FCL being in contact with an electrolyte solution forming an electric double layer (EDL). This FCL contains a particular kind of ion which is impermeable to the electrolyte solution, and this impermeability is quantified in terms of the corresponding Donnan potential of the "membrane" represented by the FCL-electrolyte interface. We find that consideration of the finite ion size increases the magnitude of this Donnan potential, with the extent of increase being dictated by three length scales, namely, the thickness of the FCL, the thickness of the electrolyte EDL, and the thickness of an equivalent EDL within the FCL. Such regulation of the Donnan potential strongly affects the distribution of the permeable electrolyte ions within the FCL, which in turn will have significant implications in several processes involving "soft" biological membranes. PMID:24580227

  12. Electrostatic Return of Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, R.; Gordon, T.

    2003-01-01

    A Model has been developed capable of calculating the electrostatic return of spacecraft-emitted molecules that are ionized and attracted back to the spacecraft by the spacecraft electric potential on its surfaces. The return of ionized contaminant molecules to charged spacecraft surfaces is very important to all altitudes. It is especially important at geosynchronous and interplanetary environments, since it may be the only mechanism by which contaminants can degrade a surface. This model is applicable to all altitudes and spacecraft geometries. In addition to results of the model will be completed to cover a wide range of potential space systems.

  13. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  14. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Olga I; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-21

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  15. Molecular structure, spectroscopy (FT-IR, FT-Raman), thermodynamic parameters, molecular electrostatic potential and HOMO-LUMO analysis of 2, 6-dichlorobenzamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yaping; Han, Ligang; Li, Xiaofeng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Zhaojun

    2016-03-01

    2, 6-dichlorobenzamide is the degradation product of 2, 6-dichlorobenzonitrile, which is often used as herbicide and can cause groundwater pollution. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2, 6-dichlorobenzamide at room temperature were recorded and analyzed in the range 4000-400 and 3700-100 cm-1, respectively. In order to obtain the most stable structure, a potential energy surface (PES) scan for internal rotations was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The optimized geometry, structural parameters energies, theoretical IR and Raman spectra for the title compound have been obtained by employing B3LYP exchange-correlation functional with high-quality aug-cc-pVTZ basis-set. Detailed vibrational assignments of vibrational spectra have been made on the basis of the potential energy distributions (PED) analysis. In addition, the HOMO-LUMO gap and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were studied theoretically. Finally, the thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy, enthalpy, and Gibbs free energy) of 2, 6-dichlorobenzamide were obtained in the range of 100-1000 K.

  16. Electrostatic modulation of periodic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas: From antidot lattice to quantum dot lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Shamim, Saquib; Ghosh, Arindam; Siegert, Christoph; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We use a dual gated device structure to introduce a gate-tuneable periodic potential in a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Using only a suitable choice of gate voltages we can controllably alter the potential landscape of the bare 2DEG, inducing either a periodic array of antidots or quantum dots. Antidots are artificial scattering centers, and therefore allow for a study of electron dynamics. In particular, we show that the thermovoltage of an antidot lattice is particularly sensitive to the relative positions of the Fermi level and the antidot potential. A quantum dot lattice, on the other hand, provides the opportunity to study correlated electron physics. We find that its current-voltage characteristics display a voltage threshold, as well as a power law scaling, indicative of collective Coulomb blockade in a disordered background.

  17. Nonlinear response of the surface electrostatic potential formed at metal oxide/electrolyte interfaces. A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of surface potential nonlinearity at metal oxide/electrolyte interfaces is presented. By using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a simple lattice model of an interface, we show a correlation exists between ionic strength as well as surface site densities and the non-Nernstian response of a metal oxide electrode. We propose two approaches to deal with the 0-nonlinearity: one based on perturbative expansion of the Gibbs free energy and another based on assumption of the pH-dependence of surface potential slope. The theoretical anal ysis based on our new potential form gives excellent performance at extreme pH regions, where classical formulae based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation fail. The new formula is general and independent of any underlying assumptions. For this reason, it can be directly applied to experimental surface potential measurements, including those for individual surfaces of single crystals, as we present for data reported by Kallay and Preocanin [Kallay, Preocanin J. Colloid and Interface20 Sci. 318 (2008) 290].

  18. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  19. Search for Effects of an Electrostatic Potential on Clocks in the Frame of Reference of a Charged Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Conradi, Mark S.; Cassenti, Brice

    2005-01-01

    Results of experiments to confirm a theory that links classical electromagnetism with the geometry of spacetime are described. The theory, based on the introduction of a Torsion tensor into Einstein s equations and following the approach of Schroedinger, predicts effects on clocks attached to charged particles, subject to intense electric fields, analogous to the effects on clocks in a gravitational field. We show that in order to interpret this theory, one must re-interpret all clock changes, both gravitational and electromagnetic, as arising from changes in potential energy and not merely potential. The clock is provided naturally by proton spins in hydrogen atoms subject to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance trials. No frequency change of clocks was observed to a resolution of 6310(exp -9). A new "Clock Principle" was postulated to explain the null result. There are two possible implications of the experiments: (a) The Clock Principle is invalid and, in fact, no metric theory incorporating electromagnetism is possible; (b) The Clock Principle is valid and it follows that a negative rest mass cannot exist.

  20. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF, FGF-2) Potentiates Leukocyte Recruitment to Inflammation by Enhancing Endothelial Adhesion Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zittermann, Sandra I.; Issekutz, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF-2) is a potent angiogenic factor and endothelial cell mitogen. Although bFGF levels are increased in chronically inflamed tissue, its role in inflammation is unclear. We investigated the effect of bFGF on acute dermal inflammation and the recruitment of monocytes, T cells, and neutrophils. Leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites was quantified with radiolabeled leukocytes. Intradermal injection of bFGF in rats did not induce leukocyte recruitment or inflammation. However, the recruitment of leukocytes to inflammation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, C5a, or a delayed hypersensitivity reaction was enhanced by bFGF by 55 to 132% (P < 0.05). Either acute or prolonged bFGF treatment of dermal sites had this effect. The potentiating effect of bFGF on leukocyte recruitment was also seen in joints. There was no associated modulation of vascular permeability, blood flow, or angiogenesis in the sites by bFGF. However, the expression of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) for leukocytes, P-selectin, E-selectin, and ICAM-1, was significantly up-regulated in the inflamed tissue by bFGF, as quantified by radiolabeled anti-CAM antibody binding in vivo. Thus, although not directly proinflammatory, bFGF synergistically potentiates inflammatory mediator-induced leukocyte recruitment, at least in part, by enhancing CAM up-regulation on endothelium. PMID:16507899

  1. Electrostatic precipitator manual

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.; Dean, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies performed by various individuals and organizations on the application of electrostatic precipitators to the collection of fly ash produced in the combustion of pulverized fuel are summarized in this manual. The scope of the studies evaluated include full scale precipitators and laboratory investigations. It covers measurement of fly ash resistivity, rapping reentrainment, conditioning agents, fundamental operations of hot-side precipitators. The major chapter headings are: Terminology and General Design Features Associated with Electrostatic Precipitators Used to Collect Fly Ash Particles; Fundamental Principles of Electrostatic Precipitation; Limiting Factors Affecting Precipitator Performance; Use of Electrostatic Precipitators for the Collection of Fly Ash; Analysis of Factors influencing ESP Performance; Emissions from Electrostatic Precipitators; Choosig an Electrostatic Precipitator: Cold-side versus Hot-side; Safety Aspects of Working with Electrostatic Precipitators; Maintenance Procedures; Troubleshooting; An Electrostatic Precipitator Computer Model; Features of a Well-equipped Electrostatic Precipitator.

  2. Particle adhesion in powder coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Wankum, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Williams, S.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Electrostatic powder coating is a widely used industrial painting process. It has three major advantages: (1) it provides high quality durable finish, (2) the process is environmentally friendly and does not require the use of organic solvents, and (3) it is economically competitive. The adhesion of electrostatically deposited polymer paint particles on the grounded conducting substrate depends upon many parameters: (a) particle size and shape distributions, (b) electrostatic charge distributions, (c) electrical resistivity, (d) dielectric strength of the particles, (e) thickness of the powder film, (f) presence and severity of the back corona, and (g) the conductivity and surface properties of the substrate. The authors present a model on the forces of deposition and adhesion of corona charged particles on conducting substrates.

  3. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  4. Inhibition of cell adhesion by anti–P-selectin aptamer: a new potential therapeutic agent for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutsaeva, Diana R.; Parkerson, James B.; Yerigenahally, Shobha D.; Kurz, Jeffrey C.; Schaub, Robert G.; Ikuta, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between circulating sickle red blood cells (RBCs), leukocytes, and endothelial cells are major pathophysiologic events in sickle cell disease (SCD). To develop new therapeutics that efficiently inhibit adhesive interactions, we generated an anti–P-selectin aptamer and examined its effects on cell adhesion using knockout-transgenic SCD model mice. Aptamers, single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind molecular targets with high affinity and specificity, are emerging as new therapeutics for cardiovascular and hematologic disorders. In vitro studies found that the anti–P-selectin aptamer exhibits high specificity to mouse P-selectin but not other selectins. SCD mice were injected with the anti–P-selectin aptamer, and cell adhesion was observed under hypoxia. The anti–P-selectin aptamer inhibited the adhesion of sickle RBCs and leukocytes to endothelial cells by 90% and 80%, respectively. The anti–P-selectin aptamer also increased microvascular flow velocities and reduced the leukocyte rolling flux. SCD mice treated with the anti–P-selectin aptamer demonstrated a reduced mortality rate associated with the experimental procedures compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that anti–P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits the adhesion of both sickle RBCs and leukocytes to endothelial cells in SCD model mice, suggesting a critical role for P-selectin in cell adhesion. Anti–P-selectin aptamer may be useful as a novel therapeutic agent for SCD. PMID:20926770

  5. DAMQT 2.1.0: A new version of the DAMQT package enabled with the topographical analysis of electron density and electrostatic potential in molecules.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Yeole, Sachin D; Gadre, Shridhar R; López, Rafael; Rico, Jaime F; Ramírez, Guillermo; Ema, Ignacio; Zorrilla, David

    2015-12-01

    DAMQT-2.1.0 is a new version of DAMQT package which includes topographical analysis of molecular electron density (MED) and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), such as mapping of critical points (CPs), creating molecular graphs, and atomic basins. Mapping of CPs is assisted with algorithmic determination of Euler characteristic in order to provide a necessary condition for locating all possible CPs. Apart from the mapping of CPs and determination of molecular graphs, the construction of MESP-based atomic basin is a new and exclusive feature introduced in DAMQT-2.1.0. The GUI in DAMQT provides a user-friendly interface to run the code and visualize the final outputs. MPI libraries have been implemented for all the tasks to develop the parallel version of the software. Almost linear scaling of computational time is achieved with the increasing number of processors while performing various aspects of topography. A brief discussion of molecular graph and atomic basin is provided in the current article highlighting their chemical importance. Appropriate example sets have been presented for demonstrating the functions and efficiency of the code.

  6. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  7. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion. PMID:25243062

  8. Expression of metadherin/AEG-1 gene is positively related to orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines of different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Deng, Huan; Yan, Wei; Huang, Huanjun; Deng, Yueling; Li, Yuan; Tian, De'an

    2012-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism through which a primary HCC cell develops into a metastatic phenotype is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between metadherin (MTDH)/astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) expression in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials and such metastatic phenotypes as orientation chemotaxis and adhesion. MTDH/AEG-1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H). Distribution of MTDH/AEG-1 was observed by immunofluorescence staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion and the index of interaction between HCC cell lines and microvascular endothelial cell lines (MVECs, including HUVECs and HPMECs) were measured by chemotaxis assay and adhesion assay, respectively. The results showed that MTDH/AEG-1 protein expression was significantly higher in high metastatic potential cancer cell lines (Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H) than in low metastatic potential cell lines (HepG2, Huh7) (P<0.05). The MTDH/AEG-1 protein was localized in the perinuclear region of HCC cells. Furthermore, the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells to HPMECs were increased as compared with those of HCC cells to HUVECs (P<0.05). The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion were much stronger in Sk-HEP-1 and MHCC-97H cells with MTDH/AEG-1 highly expressed than in HepG2 and Huh7 cells with MTDH/AEG-1 lowly expressed (P<0.05). These results suggested that the expression of MTDH/AEG-1 gene in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials was closely positively related to the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells. It was deduced that MTDH/AEG-1 might play a pivotal role in the lung-specific metastasis of HCC, which may be mediated through orientation chemotaxis and adhesion abilities of HCC cells. MTDH

  9. Nanoscale quantitative measurement of the potential of charged nanostructures by electrostatic and Kelvin probe force microscopy: unraveling electronic processes in complex materials.

    PubMed

    Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo; Samorì, Paolo

    2010-04-20

    In microelectronics and biology, many fundamental processes involve the exchange of charges between small objects, such as nanocrystals in photovoltaic blends or individual proteins in photosynthetic reactions. Because these nanoscale electronic processes strongly depend on the structure of the electroactive assemblies, a detailed understanding of these phenomena requires unraveling the relationship between the structure of the nano-object and its electronic function. Because of the fragility of the structures involved and the dynamic variance of the electric potential of each nanostructure during the charge generation and transport processes, understanding this structure-function relationship represents a great challenge. This Account discusses how our group and others have exploited scanning probe microscopy based approaches beyond imaging, particularly Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), to map the potential of different nanostructures with a spatial and voltage resolution of a few nanometers and millivolts, respectively. We describe in detail how these techniques can provide researchers several types of chemical information. First, KPFM allows researchers to visualize the photogeneration and splitting of several unitary charges between well-defined nano-objects having complementary electron-acceptor and -donor properties. In addition, this method maps charge injection and transport in thin layers of polycrystalline materials. Finally, KPFM can monitor the activity of immobilized chemical components of natural photosynthetic systems. In particular, researchers can use KPFM to measure the electric potential without physical contact between the tip and the nanostructure studied. These measurements exploit long-range electrostatic interactions between the scanning probe and the sample, which scale with the square of the probe-sample distance, d. While allowing minimal perturbation, these long-range interactions limit the resolution attainable in the measurement

  10. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  11. Electrostatic disturbances aboard LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Valerio

    Test mass charging and stray electrostatic fields are a potentially important source of force noise for the LISA Pathfinder mission. During the flight we plan to measure the relevant stray electrostatic fields on the surfaces of both the test mass and the electrode housing and compensate them with DC electrode bias voltages. In addition we monitor the charge and reduce it to near zero by UV illumination. We describe the analysis techniques used during the mission and explain the importance of periodic charging/discharging and of long-term charge measurements to limit the force noise at low frequency, which is particularly relevant for the eLISA mission.

  12. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  13. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-01-14

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States. Since most of these ESPs are collecting flyash generated from medium- and high-sulfur coal, they are not experiencing operational limitations which are common when treating high-resistivity particles and are performing at an efficiency that is as high as could be expected. However, there are indications that the collection efficiency could be improved with flue gas conditioning. Conditioning is commonly used for solving operational problems associated with high-resistivity dusts. The purpose of conditioning for low- and moderate-resistivity applications is to increase the adhesive characteristics of the dust. Flue gas conditioning that increases particle adhesion has the potential to improve collection efficiency because a large percentage of particulate emissions from a well-performing ESP is due to reentrainment. Improved ESP performance should result if particle reentrainment could be reduced by making the particles more adhesive. This could produce a significant reduction in emissions from and ESP from the Following mechanisms: reduced erosion-type reentrainment; reduced rapping emissions; reduced hopper reentrainment; increased agglomeration of fine particles.

  14. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-01

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR and FT-Raman) studies, natural bond orbital analysis and molecular electrostatic potential surface of Isoxanthopterin.

    PubMed

    Prabavathi, N; Nilufer, A; Krishnakumar, V

    2013-10-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of Isoxanthopterin have been recorded in the region 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of Isoxanthopterin were obtained by the density functional theory (DFT) using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were scaled and compared with experimental values. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The UV-visible spectrum was also recorded and compared with the theoretical values. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0), related properties (β, α0 and Δα) and the Mulliken charges of the molecule were also computed using DFT calculations. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that charge in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies (E2) confirms the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. Information about the charge density distribution of the molecule and its chemical reactivity has been obtained by mapping molecular electrostatic potential surface. In addition, the non-linear optical properties were discussed from the dipole moment values and excitation wavelength in the UV-visible region.

  16. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-05-22

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy.

  17. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-05-22

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:25851904

  18. Electronic structure, molecular electrostatic potential and spectral characteristics of pillar[6]arene hosts and their complexes with n-octyltriethylammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Peerannawar, Swarada R; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2012-06-28

    Electronic structure, charge distribution and (1)H NMR in pillar[6]arene (P6) conformers, their diisobutoxy derivatives and their host-guest complexes have been investigated by employing the density functional theory. It has been shown that a P6 conformer obtained by flipping of alternate hydroquinone units turns out to be of lowest energy, owing to the hydrogen bonded network at both rims of the host. As opposed to this, a conformer void of hydrogen bonding interactions has largely been destabilized. The O-HO interactions are analyzed using molecular electrostatic potential topography as a tool. Modification of a P6 host by substituting a diisobutoxy group at reactive phenols (DIBP6) renders rigid pillar-shape architecture to the host in which electron-rich regions are localized within the cavity and near portals. Complexation of n-octyltriethylammonium ions (n-OTEA) with P6 and DIBP6 reveals qualitatively different binding patterns. It has been shown that the conformer in which n-OTEA penetrates from the lower rim of the host and partially encapsulates within the P6 cavity turns out to be 1.4 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the complex showing complete guest encapsulation. Host-guest binding patterns, viz. encapsulation or portal interactions, can be distinguished from (1)H NMR chemical shifts. The shielding of ethyl and n-octyl chain protons in an n-OTEA⊂DIBP6 complex points to encapsulation of the guest which has been rationalized from natural bond orbital analyses. These inferences are in consonance with (1)H NMR experiments. PMID:22596047

  19. Modeling Biophysical and Biological Properties From the Characteristics of the Molecular Electron Density, Electron Localization and Delocalization Matrices, and the Electrostatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Matta*, Chérif F

    2014-01-01

    The electron density and the electrostatic potential are fundamentally related to the molecular hamiltonian, and hence are the ultimate source of all properties in the ground- and excited-states. The advantages of using molecular descriptors derived from these fundamental scalar fields, both accessible from theory and from experiment, in the formulation of quantitative structure-to-activity and structure-to-property relationships, collectively abbreviated as QSAR, are discussed. A few such descriptors encode for a wide variety of properties including, for example, electronic transition energies, pKa's, rates of ester hydrolysis, NMR chemical shifts, DNA dimers binding energies, π-stacking energies, toxicological indices, cytotoxicities, hepatotoxicities, carcinogenicities, partial molar volumes, partition coefficients (log P), hydrogen bond donor capacities, enzyme–substrate complementarities, bioisosterism, and regularities in the genetic code. Electronic fingerprinting from the topological analysis of the electron density is shown to be comparable and possibly superior to Hammett constants and can be used in conjunction with traditional bulk and liposolubility descriptors to accurately predict biological activities. A new class of descriptors obtained from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) localization and delocalization indices and bond properties, cast in matrix format, is shown to quantify transferability and molecular similarity meaningfully. Properties such as “interacting quantum atoms (IQA)” energies which are expressible into an interaction matrix of two body terms (and diagonal one body “self” terms, as IQA energies) can be used in the same manner. The proposed QSAR-type studies based on similarity distances derived from such matrix representatives of molecular structure necessitate extensive investigation before their utility is unequivocally established. © 2014 The Author and the Journal of Computational Chemistry Published

  20. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:25851904

  1. Modeling biophysical and biological properties from the characteristics of the molecular electron density, electron localization and delocalization matrices, and the electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F

    2014-06-15

    The electron density and the electrostatic potential are fundamentally related to the molecular hamiltonian, and hence are the ultimate source of all properties in the ground- and excited-states. The advantages of using molecular descriptors derived from these fundamental scalar fields, both accessible from theory and from experiment, in the formulation of quantitative structure-to-activity and structure-to-property relationships, collectively abbreviated as QSAR, are discussed. A few such descriptors encode for a wide variety of properties including, for example, electronic transition energies, pK(a)'s, rates of ester hydrolysis, NMR chemical shifts, DNA dimers binding energies, π-stacking energies, toxicological indices, cytotoxicities, hepatotoxicities, carcinogenicities, partial molar volumes, partition coefficients (log P), hydrogen bond donor capacities, enzyme-substrate complementarities, bioisosterism, and regularities in the genetic code. Electronic fingerprinting from the topological analysis of the electron density is shown to be comparable and possibly superior to Hammett constants and can be used in conjunction with traditional bulk and liposolubility descriptors to accurately predict biological activities. A new class of descriptors obtained from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) localization and delocalization indices and bond properties, cast in matrix format, is shown to quantify transferability and molecular similarity meaningfully. Properties such as "interacting quantum atoms (IQA)" energies which are expressible into an interaction matrix of two body terms (and diagonal one body "self" terms, as IQA energies) can be used in the same manner. The proposed QSAR-type studies based on similarity distances derived from such matrix representatives of molecular structure necessitate extensive investigation before their utility is unequivocally established.

  2. The effect of split gate dimensions on the electrostatic potential and 0.7 anomaly within one-dimensional quantum wires on a modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Thomas, K. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    We use a multiplexing scheme to measure the conductance properties of 95 split gates of 7 different gate dimensions fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs chip, in a single cool down. The number of devices for which conductance is accurately quantized reduces as the gate length increases. However, even the devices for which conductance is accurately quantized in units of 2e2 / h show no correlation between the length of electrostatic potential barrier in the channel and the gate length, using a saddle point model to estimate the barrier length. Further, the strength of coupling between the gates and the 1D channel does not increase with gate length beyond 0.7 μm. The background electrostatic profile appears as significant as the gate dimension in determining device behavior. We find a clear correlation between the curvature of the electrostatic barrier along the channel and the strength of the ``0.7 anomaly'' which identifies the electrostatic length of the channel as the principal factor governing the conductance of the 0.7 anomaly. Present address: Wisconsin Institute for Quantum Information, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

  3. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  4. Mechanism of inhibition on L929 rat fibroblasts proliferation induced by potential adhesion barrier material poly(p-dioxanone-co-L-phenylalanine) electrospun membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Dong, Jun; Li, Qijie; Xiong, Zuochun; Xiong, Chengdong; Chen, Dongliang

    2014-11-01

    Fibroblast plays an important role in the occurrence of postoperative tissue adhesion; materials that have particular "cell-material" interactions to inhibit proliferation of fibroblast will be excellent potential adhesion barriers. In the current study, we synthesized copolymers of p-dioxanone and L-phenylalanine (PDPA) and evaluated the mechanism of its particular inhibition effect on L929 fibroblast proliferation when used as a culture surface. PDPA electrospun membranes could induce apoptosis of L929 fibroblasts. We hypothesized there were two reasons for the apoptosis induction: one was the ability to facilitate cell adhesion of materials, and the other was production of the degradation product, L-phenylalanine. Ninhydrin colorimetric results revealed that L-phenylalanine was continuously released during the culture process and could induce apoptosis in L929 cells. Relatively poor cell adhesion and constant release of L-phenylalanine made PDPA-1 to be the most efficient polymer for the induction of apoptosis. Analysis of apoptosis-related genes revealed that PDPA-induced apoptosis might be performed in a mitochondrial-dependent pathway. But poly(p-dioxanone)-induced apoptosis might occur in a c-Myc independent pathway that was different from PDPA. PMID:24443347

  5. Application of a collagen-based membrane and chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogel adhesive for the potential repair of severe ocular surface injuries.

    PubMed

    Chae, Jemin J; Mulreany, Daniel G; Guo, Qiongyu; Lu, Qiaozhi; Choi, Joseph S; Strehin, Iossif; Espinoza, Freddy A; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana M; Bower, Kraig S; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential of a chondroitin sulfate-polyethylene glycol (CS-PEG) adhesive and collagen-based membrane (collagen vitrigel, CV) combination as a method to treat penetrating ocular injuries on the battlefield and to improve this method with two technologies: an antibiotic releasing CS-PEG adhesive and a corneal shaped CV. Burst testing using porcine cadaveric eyes, high-performance liquid chromatography, the Kirby-Bauer bacterial inhibition test, and CV implantations on the live and cadaveric rabbit eyes were performed. The ocular burst test showed CS-PEG adhesive could successfully repair 5-mm to 6-mm length wounds in the corneal and corneoscleral regions but would require CS-PEG + CV to treat larger wounds similar to those seen on the battlefield. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography and the Kirby-Bauer bacterial inhibition test presented evidence suggesting the vancomycin incorporated CS-PEG could inhibit Staphylococcus infection for 9 days. Furthermore, the curved CV showed an advantage by matching the corneal contour without any wrinkle formation. Although this pilot study showed a limited range of possible applications, we demonstrated that the combination of CS-PEG adhesive + CV is a promising method and the 2 technologies improve their applicability to the special demands of the battlefield. PMID:24902138

  6. Electrostatic ion thruster optics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, John H.; Kirkman, David A.; Raridon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations have been performed which encompass both a self-consistent ion source extraction plasma sheath and the primary ion optics including sheath and electrode-induced aberrations. Particular attention is given to the effects of beam space charge, accelerator geometry, and properties of the downstream plasma sheath on the position of the electrostatic potential saddle point near the extractor electrode. The electron blocking potential blocking is described as a function of electrode thickness and secondary plasma processes.

  7. Effect of Split Gate Size on the Electrostatic Potential and 0.7 Anomaly within Quantum Wires on a Modulation-Doped GaAs /AlGaAs Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Thomas, K. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2016-04-01

    We study 95 split gates of different size on a single chip using a multiplexing technique. Each split gate defines a one-dimensional channel on a modulation-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure, through which the conductance is quantized. The yield of devices showing good quantization decreases rapidly as the length of the split gates increases. However, for the subset of devices showing good quantization, there is no correlation between the electrostatic length of the one-dimensional channel (estimated using a saddle-point model) and the gate length. The variation in electrostatic length and the one-dimensional subband spacing for devices of the same gate length exceeds the variation in the average values between devices of different lengths. There is a clear correlation between the curvature of the potential barrier in the transport direction and the strength of the "0.7 anomaly": the conductance value of the 0.7 anomaly reduces as the barrier curvature becomes shallower. These results highlight the key role of the electrostatic environment in one-dimensional systems. Even in devices with clean conductance plateaus, random fluctuations in the background potential are crucial in determining the potential landscape in the active device area such that nominally identical gate structures have different characteristics.

  8. Intrinsic electrostatic effects in nanostructured ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Stanek, Chris R; Nerikar, Pankaj V

    2009-01-01

    Using empirical potentials, we have found that electrostatic dipoles can be created at grain boundaries formed from non-polar surfaces of fluorite-structured materials. In particular, the {Sigma}5(310)/[001] symmetric tilt grain boundary reconstructs to break the symmetry in the atomic structure at the boundary, forming the dipole. This dipole results in an abrupt change in electrostatic potential across the boundary. In multilayered ceramics composed of stacks of grain boundaries, the change in electrostatic potential at the boundary results in profound electrostatic effects within the crystalline layers, the nature of which depends on the electrostatic boundary conditions. For open-circuit boundary conditions, layers with either high or low electrostatic potential are formed. By contrast, for short-circuit boundary conditions, electric fields can be created within each layer, the strength of which then depends on the thickness of the layers. These electrostatic effects may have important consequences for the behavior of defects and dopants within these materials and offer the possibility of interesting technological applications.

  9. Electrostatic Levitator Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation system inside Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  10. Electrostatically controlled micromechanical gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkey, Timothy (Inventor); Torti, Richard (Inventor); Johnson, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An integrated electrostatically-controlled micromechanical gyroscope with a rotor encompassed within a rotor cavity and electrostatically spun within the cavity. The gyroscope includes a plurality of axial electrostatic rotor actuators above and below the rotor for controlling the axial and tilt position of the rotor within the cavity, and a plurality of radial electrostatic actuators spaced circumferentially around the rotor for controlling the radial and tilt position of the rotor within the cavity. The position of the rotor within the cavity is then resolved to determine the external forces acting on the rotor.

  11. Natural Green Coating Inhibits Adhesion of Clinically Important Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Danielle S.; Silva, Denise B.; Frasson, Amanda P.; Rzhepishevska, Olena; da Silva, Márcia V.; de L. Pulcini, Elinor; James, Garth; Soares, Gabriel V.; Tasca, Tiana; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Giordani, Raquel B.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Macedo, Alexandre J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite many advances, biomaterial-associated infections continue to be a major clinical problem. In order to minimize bacterial adhesion, material surface modifications are currently being investigated and natural products possess large potential for the design of innovative surface coatings. We report the bioguided phytochemical investigation of Pityrocarpa moniliformis and the characterization of tannins by mass spectrometry. It was demonstrated that B-type linked proanthocyanidins-coated surfaces, here termed Green coatings, reduced Gram-positive bacterial adhesion and supported mammalian cell spreading. The proposed mechanism of bacterial attachment inhibition is based on electrostatic repulsion, high hydrophilicity and the steric hindrance provided by the coating that blocks bacterium-substratum interactions. This work shows the applicability of a prototype Green-coated surface that aims to promote necessary mammalian tissue compatibility, while reducing bacterial colonization. PMID:25655943

  12. Switchable water-adhesive, superhydrophobic palladium-layered silicon nanowires potentiate the angiogenic efficacy of human stem cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Jung Seung; Lee, Kihong; Kim, Dayeong; Yang, Kisuk; Shin, Sera; Mahata, Chandreswar; Jung, Hwae Bong; Lee, Wooyoung; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Taeyoon

    2014-11-01

    A switchable water-adhesive, super-hydrophobic nanowire surface is developed for the formation of functional stem cell spheroids. The sizes of hADSC spheroids are readily controllable on the surface. Our surface increases cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction, which improves viability and paracrine secretion of the spheroids. Accordingly, the hADSC spheroids produced on the surface exhibit significantly enhanced angiogenic efficacy.

  13. High potential of adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces by opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Dallel, Ines; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel; Janel, Sébastien; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-02-01

    Orthodontic and other oral appliances act as reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can easily become resistant to antibiotics and cause systemic infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from healthy patients with orthodontic appliances, to adhere to biotic (HeLa cells) and abiotic surfaces (polystyrene and dental alloy). Adhesive ability to polystyrene was tested by crystal violet staining and quantitative biofilm production on dental alloy surfaces was evaluated by MTT reduction assay. In addition, the presence of icaA and icaD genes was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Qualitative biofilm production revealed that 70.6% of strains were slime producers. The metabolic activity of S. aureus biofilms on dental alloy surfaces was high and did not differ between tested strains. Moreover, all the isolates were adhesive to HeLa cells and 94% of them harbor icaA and icaD genes. Considerable adhesion and internalization capacity to the epithelial HeLa cells and strong biofilm production abilities together, with a high genotypic expression of icaA/icaD genes are an important equipment of S. aureus to colonize orthodontic appliances and eventually to disseminate towards other body areas.

  14. High potential of adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces by opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Dallel, Ines; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel; Janel, Sébastien; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-02-01

    Orthodontic and other oral appliances act as reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can easily become resistant to antibiotics and cause systemic infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from healthy patients with orthodontic appliances, to adhere to biotic (HeLa cells) and abiotic surfaces (polystyrene and dental alloy). Adhesive ability to polystyrene was tested by crystal violet staining and quantitative biofilm production on dental alloy surfaces was evaluated by MTT reduction assay. In addition, the presence of icaA and icaD genes was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Qualitative biofilm production revealed that 70.6% of strains were slime producers. The metabolic activity of S. aureus biofilms on dental alloy surfaces was high and did not differ between tested strains. Moreover, all the isolates were adhesive to HeLa cells and 94% of them harbor icaA and icaD genes. Considerable adhesion and internalization capacity to the epithelial HeLa cells and strong biofilm production abilities together, with a high genotypic expression of icaA/icaD genes are an important equipment of S. aureus to colonize orthodontic appliances and eventually to disseminate towards other body areas. PMID:26620082

  15. Edutainment Science: Electrostatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlers, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Electrostatics should find a special place in all primary school science curricula. It is a great learning area that reinforces the basics that underpin electricity and atomic structure. Furthermore, it has many well documented hands-on activities. Unfortunately, the "traditional" electrostatics equipment such as PVC rods, woollen cloths, rabbit…

  16. Electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1983-05-24

    Method for enhancing the removal of particles from a particleladen gas stream utilizing an electrostatic precipitator, which comprises treating the gas with morpholine or derivatives thereof. Treated particles are found to also have desirable flow characteristics. Particularly effective compositions for the purpose comprise a combination of the morpholine, or derivative thereof, with an electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancer, and in particular an alkanolamine.

  17. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Wong, Yue Him; Tsang, Ling Ming; Chu, Ka Hou; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Chan, Benny K K

    2014-02-01

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles.

  18. Self-etching zinc-doped adhesives improve the potential of caries-affected dentin to be functionally remineralized.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if mechanical cycling influences bioactivity at the resin-carious dentin interface after bonding with Zn-doped self-etching adhesives. Caries-affected dentin surfaces were bonded with: Clearfil SE bond (SEB), and 10 wt. % ZnO nanoparticles or 2 wt. % ZnCl2 were added into the SEB primer or bonding components. Bonded interfaces were stored during 24 h and then tested or submitted to mechanical loading. Microtensile bond strength was assessed. Debonded dentin surfaces were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Remineralization of the bonded interfaces was evaluated through nanohardness (Hi) and Young's modulus (Ei), Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, and Masson's trichrome staining technique. New precipitation of minerals composed of zinc-base salts and multiple Zn-rich phosphate deposits was observed in samples infiltrated with the Zn-doped adhesives. At the hybrid layer, specimens treated with ZnO incorporated in the primer (SEB·P-ZnO), after load cycling, attained the highest Ei and Hi. Load cycling increased Ei at the bottom of the hybrid layer when both, SEB undoped and SEB with ZnCl2 included in the bonding (SEB·Bd-ZnCl2), were used. ZnO incorporated in the primer promoted an increase in height of the phosphate and carbonate peaks, crystallinity, relative mineral concentration, and lower collagen crosslinking. ZnCl2 included in the bonding attained similar results, but relative mineral concentration decreased, associated to higher crosslinking and restricted collagen maturation. In general, a substantial restoration of the mechanical properties of caries-affected dentin substrata occurred when SEB-Zn doped adhesives were used and load cycled was applied, leading to functional and biochemical remineralization.

  19. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  20. Electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities associated with electrostatic shocks: Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2010-03-15

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation with the realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio of 1836 is carried out to investigate the electrostatic collisionless shocks in relatively high-speed (approx3000 km s{sup -1}) plasma flows and also the influence of both electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, which can develop around the shocks, on the shock dynamics. It is shown that the electrostatic ion-ion instability can develop in front of the shocks, where the plasma is under counterstreaming condition, with highly oblique wave vectors as was shown previously. The electrostatic potential generated by the electrostatic ion-ion instability propagating obliquely to the shock surface becomes comparable with the shock potential and finally the shock structure is destroyed. It is also shown that in front of the shock the beam-Weibel instability gradually grows as well, consequently suggesting that the magnetic field generated by the beam-Weibel instability becomes important in long-term evolution of the shock and the Weibel-mediated shock forms long after the electrostatic shock vanished. It is also observed that the secondary electrostatic shock forms in the reflected ions in front of the primary electrostatic shock.

  1. T6BP and NDP52 are myosin VI binding partners with potential roles in cytokine signalling and cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Morriswood, Brooke; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Puri, Claudia; Arden, Susan D.; Roberts, Rhys; Dendrou, Calliope; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2009-01-01

    Summary Myosin VI has been implicated in many cellular processes including endocytosis, secretion, membrane ruffling and cell motility. We carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified TRAF6-binding protein (T6BP) and nuclear dot protein 52 (NDP52) as myosin VI binding partners. Myosin VI interaction with T6BP and NDP52 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo and the binding sites on each protein were accurately mapped. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed that T6BP, NDP52 and myosin VI are present at the trans side of the Golgi complex, and on vesicles in the perinuclear region. Although the SKICH domain in T6BP and NDP52 does not mediate recruitment into membrane ruffles, loss of T6BP and NDP52 in RNAi knockdown cells results in reduced membrane ruffling activity and increased stress fibre and focal adhesion formation. Furthermore, we observed in these knockdown cells an upregulation of constitutive secretion of alkaline phosphatase, implying that both proteins act as negative regulators of secretory traffic at the Golgi complex. T6BP was also found to inhibit NF-κB activation, implicating it in the regulation of TRAF6-mediated cytokine signalling. Thus myosin VI-T6BP interactions may link membrane trafficking pathways with cell adhesion and cytokine-dependent cell signalling. PMID:17635994

  2. Studying Electrostatic Levitator Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kevin Croat of Washington University in St. Louis, MO, examines samples processed in NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC)Electrostatic Levitator Facility. Croat is working with Prof. Kerneth Kelton in investigating undercooling of polytetrahedral phase-forming liquids.

  3. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  4. Graphene Electrostatic Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Onishi, Seita; Zettl, A.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a wideband electrostatic graphene microphone displaying flat frequency response over the entire human audible region as well as into the ultrasonic regime. Using the microphone, low-level ultrasonic bat calls are successfully recorded. The microphone can be paired with a similarly constructed electrostatic graphene loudspeaker to create a wideband ultrasonic radio. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California - Berkeley.

  5. Electrostatic Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Curry, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    Electrically charged helices attract or repel each other. Proposed electrostatic linear actuator made with intertwined dual helices, which holds charge-bearing surfaces. Dual-helix configuration provides relatively large unbroken facing charged surfaces (relatively large electrostatic force) within small volume. Inner helix slides axially in outer helix in response to voltages applied to conductors. Spiral form also makes components more rigid. Actuator conceived to have few moving parts and to be operable after long intervals of inactivity.

  6. Electrostatic discharge test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic discharge properties of materials are quantitatively measured and ranked. Samples (20) are rotated on a turntable (15) beneath selectable, co-available electrostatic chargers (30/40), one being a corona charging element (30) and the other a sample-engaging triboelectric charging element (40). They then pass under a voltage meter (25) to measure the amount of residual charge on the samples (20). After charging is discontinued, measurements are continued to record the charge decay history over time.

  7. Electrostatic Levitator in Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Metal droplet levitated inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  8. Electrostatic Levitator Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) general layout with captions. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  9. Electrostatic Levitator Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    General oayout of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  10. Electrostatic Levitator Electrode Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  11. Electrostatic Dust Control for Planetary Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Farrell, W. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Rilee, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    Detailed study of the physical and chemical nature of the fine particulate portion of the regoliths of these bodies is a key to understanding micrometeorite bombardment and the nature of regolith formation. Thus, missions to sample the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies, including the Moon, asteroids, and Mercury, have been identified as crucial components of solar system exploration over the next decades. We have proposed autonomous reconfigurable robotic manual assistants and lander/rovers for such missions. On the other hand, dust poses problems for mechanisms and exposed surfaces on landers/rovers sent to such bodies. Compromise of seals and loss of sample material, as well as mechanical damage to systems and surfaces, occurred after hours of operation during the Apollo missions. Thus both dust mitigation and dust collection are issues which must be addressed for sampling missions. Dust activity on atmosphereless bodies is ubiquitous and induced by complex interactions of fine particulates, environmentally-dependent fields, and charged particles with vehicle surfaces and mechanisms. Dust particles are both abrasive and adhesive as a result of the melting and crushing from micrometeorite bombardment. Thus, dust dynamics result from the interplay between mechanical and electrostatic forces and are a critical environmental factor with which all rover technologies must deal. We have considered various strategies for dust mitigation. Passive ones include the use of conducting surfaces and O-ring sealing of all mechanisms. Several active mechanisms for not only removing but collecting dust are under consideration. Our inter-disciplinary team is investigating the feasibility of an electrostatically based concept for a dust control. Relatively little work has been done on empirically simulating what happens when another surface is introduced into a non-conducting, dusty regolith. We plan to test our concept by performing empirical simulations of the interaction between

  12. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  13. The role of electrostatics in protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how protein-protein interactions depend on the choice of buffer, salt, ionic strength, and pH is needed to have better control over protein solution behavior. Here, we have characterized the pH and ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions in terms of an interaction parameter kD obtained from dynamic light scattering and the osmotic second virial coefficient B22 measured by static light scattering. A simplified protein-protein interaction model based on a Baxter adhesive potential and an electric double layer force is used to separate out the contributions of longer-ranged electrostatic interactions from short-ranged attractive forces. The ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions for solutions at pH 6.5 and below can be accurately captured using a Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential to describe the double layer forces. In solutions at pH 9, attractive electrostatics occur over the ionic strength range of 5-275 mM. At intermediate pH values (7.25 to 8.5), there is a crossover effect characterized by a nonmonotonic ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions, which can be rationalized by the competing effects of long-ranged repulsive double layer forces at low ionic strength and a shorter ranged electrostatic attraction, which dominates above a critical ionic strength. The change of interactions from repulsive to attractive indicates a concomitant change in the angular dependence of protein-protein interaction from isotropic to anisotropic. In the second part of the paper, we show how the Baxter adhesive potential can be used to predict values of kD from fitting to B22 measurements, thus providing a molecular basis for the linear correlation between the two protein-protein interaction parameters.

  14. Altering the Electrostatic Potential in the Major Groove: Thermodynamic and Structural Characterization of 7-Deaza-2;#8242;-deoxyadenosine:dT Base Pairing in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kowal, Ewa A.; Ganguly, Manjori; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marky, Luis A.; Gold, Barry; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P.

    2012-02-15

    As part of an ongoing effort to explore the effect of major groove electrostatics on the thermodynamic stability and structure of DNA, a 7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine:dT (7-deaza-dA:dT) base pair in the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer (DDD) was studied. The removal of the electronegative N7 atom on dA and the replacement with an electropositive C-H in the major groove was expected to have a significant effect on major groove electrostatics. The structure of the 7-deaza-dA:dT base pair was determined at 1.1 {angstrom} resolution in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. The 7-deaza-dA, which is isosteric for dA, had minimal effect on the base pairing geometry and the conformation of the DDD in the crystalline state. There was no major groove cation association with the 7-deaza-dA heterocycle. In solution, circular dichroism showed a positive Cotton effect centered at 280 nm and a negative Cotton effect centered at 250 nm that were characteristic of a right-handed helix in the B-conformation. However, temperature-dependent NMR studies showed increased exchange between the thymine N3 imino proton of the 7-deaza-dA:dT base pair and water, suggesting reduced stacking interactions and an increased rate of base pair opening. This correlated with the observed thermodynamic destabilization of the 7-deaza-dA modified duplex relative to the DDD. A combination of UV melting and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were conducted to evaluate the relative contributions of enthalpy and entropy in the thermodynamic destabilization of the DDD. The most significant contribution arose from an unfavorable enthalpy term, which probably results from less favorable stacking interactions in the modified duplex, which was accompanied by a significant reduction in the release of water and cations from the 7-deaza-dA modified DNA.

  15. Rbt1 protein domains analysis in Candida albicans brings insights into hyphal surface modifications and Rbt1 potential role during adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Monniot, Céline; Boisramé, Anita; Da Costa, Grégory; Chauvel, Muriel; Sautour, Marc; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle; Dalle, Frédéric; d'Enfert, Christophe; Richard, Mathias L

    2013-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are central to the virulence of Candida albicans. Hwp1, Hwp2 and Rbt1 form a family of hypha-associated cell surface proteins. Hwp1 and Hwp2 have been involved in adhesion and other virulence traits but Rbt1 is still poorly characterized. To assess the role of Rbt1 in the interaction of C. albicans with biotic and abiotic surfaces independently of its morphological state, heterologous expression and promoter swap strategies were applied. The N-terminal domain with features typical of the Flo11 superfamily was found to be essential for adhesiveness to polystyrene through an increase in cell surface hydrophobicity. A 42 amino acid-long domain localized in the central part of the protein was shown to enhance the aggregation function. We demonstrated that a VTTGVVVVT motif within the 42 amino acid domain displayed a high β-aggregation potential and was responsible for cell-to-cell interactions by promoting the aggregation of hyphae. Finally, we showed through constitutive expression that while Rbt1 was directly accessible to antibodies in hyphae, it was not so in yeast. Similar results were obtained for another cell wall protein, namely Iff8, and suggested that modification of the cell wall structure between yeast and hyphae can regulate the extracellular accessibility of cell wall proteins independently of gene regulation.

  16. Prognostic microRNAs modulate the RHO adhesion pathway: A potential therapeutic target in undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Wong, Philip; Hui, Angela; Su, Jie; Yue, Shijun; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Gokgoz, Nalan; Xu, Wei; Bruce, Jeff; Williams, Justin; Catton, Charles; Wunder, Jay S; Andrulis, Irene L; Gladdy, Rebecca; Dickson, Brendan; O'Sullivan, Brian; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-11-17

    A common and aggressive subtype of soft-tissue sarcoma, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) was examined to determine the role of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in modulating distant metastasis. Following histopathologic review, 110 fresh frozen clinically annotated UPS samples were divided into two independent cohorts for Training (42 patients), and Validation (68 patients) analyses. Global miRNA profiling on the Training Set and functional analysis in vitro suggested that miRNA-138 and its downstream RHO-ROCK cell adhesion pathway was a convergent target of miRNAs associated with the development of metastasis. A six-miRNA signature set prognostic of distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was developed from Training Set miRNA expression values. Using the six-miRNA signature, patients were successfully categorized into high- and low-risk groups for DMFS in an independent Validation Set, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.25 (p = 0.048). After adjusting for other known prognostic variables such as age, gender, tumor grade, size, depth, and treatment with radiotherapy, the six-miRNA signature retained prognostic value with a HR of 3.46 (p < 0.001). A prognostic miRNA biomarker for clinical validation was thus identified along with a functional pathway that modulates UPS metastatic phenotype. PMID:25970788

  17. Elaboration of highly hydrophobic polymeric surface--a potential strategy to reduce the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria?

    PubMed

    Poncin-Epaillard, F; Herry, J M; Marmey, P; Legeay, G; Debarnot, D; Bellon-Fontaine, M N

    2013-04-01

    Different polymeric surfaces have been modified in order to reach a high hydrophobic character, indeed the superhydrophobicity property. For this purpose, polypropylene and polystyrene have been treated by RF or μwaves CF4 plasma with different volumes, the results were compared according to the density of injected power. The effect of pretreatment such as mechanical abrasion or plasma activation was also studied. The modified surfaces were shown as hydrophobic, or even superhydrophobic depending of defects density. They were characterized by measurement of wettability and roughness at different scales, i.e. macroscopic, mesoscopic and atomic. It has been shown that a homogeneous surface at the macroscopic scale could be heterogeneous at lower mesoscopic scale. This was associated with the crystallinity of the material. The bioadhesion tests were performed with Gram positive and negative pathogenic strains: Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Hafnia alvei. They have demonstrated an antibacterial efficiency of very hydrophobic and amorphous PS treated for all strains tested and a strain-dependent efficiency with modified PP surface being very heterogeneous at the mesoscopic scale. Thus, these biological results pointed out not only the respective role of the surface chemistry and topography in bacterial adhesion, but also the dependence on the peaks and valley distribution at bacteria dimension scale. PMID:23827554

  18. On the electrostatic properties of homodimeric proteins

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brandon; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of proteins function as homodimers, but it is not always clear why the dimerization is important for functionality since frequently each monomer possesses a distinctive active site. Recent work (PLoS Computational Biology, 9(2), e1002924) indicates that homodimerization may be important for forming an electrostatic funnel in the spermine synthase homodimer which guides changed substrates toward the active centers. This prompted us to investigate the electrostatic properties of a large set of homodimeric proteins and resulted in an observation that in a vast majority of the cases the dimerization indeed results in specific electrostatic features, although not necessarily in an electrostatic funnel. It is demonstrated that the electrostatic dipole moment of the dimer is predominantly perpendicular to the axis connecting the centers of the mass of the monomers. In addition, the surface points with highest potential are located in the proximity of the interfacial plane of the homodimeric complexes. These findings indicate that frequently homodimerization provides specific electrostatic features needed for the function of proteins. PMID:25419028

  19. Electrostatically shaped membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, Larry M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for electrostatically shaping a membrane suitable for use in antennas or the like, comprising an electrically conductive thin membrane where the periphery of said membrane is free to move in at least one direction, a first charge on the electrically conductive thin membrane to electrostatically stiffen the membrane, a second charge which shapes the electrostatically stiffened thin membrane and a restraint for limiting the movement of at least one point of the thin membrane relative to the second charge. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for adaptively controlling the shape of the thin membrane by sensing the shape of the membrane and selectively controlling the first and second charge to achieve a desired performance characteristic of the membrane.

  20. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  1. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  2. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  3. Electrostatic graphene loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Zettl, A.

    2013-06-01

    Graphene has extremely low mass density and high mechanical strength, and key qualities for efficient wide-frequency-response electrostatic audio speaker design. Low mass ensures good high frequency response, while high strength allows for relatively large free-standing diaphragms necessary for effective low frequency response. Here, we report on construction and testing of a miniaturized graphene-based electrostatic audio transducer. The speaker/earphone is straightforward in design and operation and has excellent frequency response across the entire audio frequency range (20 Hz-20 kHz), with performance matching or surpassing commercially available audio earphones.

  4. Electrostatic Levitator Inspected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Larry Savage, Dr. Jan Rogers, Dr. Michael Robinson (All NASA) and Doug Huie (Mevatec) inspect the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  5. Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Graph depicting Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) heating and cooling cycle to achieve undercooling of liquid metals. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity matierials sciences program.

  6. Electrostatic Levitator at Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A 3 mm drop of nickel-zirconium, heated to incandescence, hovers between electrically charged plates inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  7. Electrostatic Levitator Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers and Dr. Michael Robinson operate the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  8. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  9. Molecular-shape selectivity by naphthalimido-modified silica stationary phases: Insight into the substituents effect of naphthalene on shape recognition and π-π interactions via electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuko; Ohyama, Kaname; Onodera, Gen; Kuriyama, Masami; Kishikawa, Naoya; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-12-18

    This report describes the molecular-shape selectivity of four naphthalimido-modified silica (NIM) stationary phases. To investigate the selectivity, several alkylbenzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested using capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with each NIM stationary phase. Results revealed that nitro group-substituted NIM phases had outstanding molecular-shape recognition ability toward PAHs; a strong negative correlation existed between the k' value and L/B ratio that is opposite those observed for C18 phases, in addition, one possessed 10-fold greater molecular-shape recognition ability compared to existing stationary phases. In addition, the position of the nitro group on the naphthalimide moiety modulated the π-stacking interaction due to steric hindrance. Furthermore, structure optimization and electrostatic potential (ESP) surfaces were used to clarify the mechanism of recognition. Based on this high recognition ability, separations of several positional isomers were examined. Results indicated that structure optimization and ESP maps could reveal the effect of functional groups on π-π interactions, which will aid in the design of new NIM stationary phases with shape selectivity, while taking advantage of electrostatic interactions.

  10. Effect of an electrostatic space charge system on airborne dust and subsequent potential transmission of microorganisms to broiler breeder pullets by airborne dust.

    PubMed

    Richardson, L J; Mitchell, B W; Wilson, J L; Hofacre, C L

    2003-01-01

    High levels of dust and microorganisms are known to be associated with animal confinement rearing facilities. Many of the microorganisms are carried by dust particles, thus providing an excellent vector for horizontal disease transmission between birds. Two environmentally controlled rooms containing female broiler breeder pullets (n = 300) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of an electrostatic space charge system (ESCS) in reducing airborne dust and gram-negative bacteria levels over an 8-wk period (starting when the birds were 10 wk old). The ESCS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of reducing airborne microorganism levels by charging airborne dust particles and causing the particles to be attracted to grounded surfaces (i.e., walls, floor, equipment). The use of the ESCS resulted in a 64% mean reduction in gram-negative bacteria. Airborne dust levels were reduced an average of 37% over a 1-wk period in the experimental room compared with the control room on the basis of samples taken every 10 min. The reductions of airborne dust and bacteria in this study are comparable with earlier results obtained with the ESCS in commercial hatching cabinets and experimental caged layer rooms, suggesting the system could also be applied to other types of enclosed animal housing. PMID:12713167

  11. Theoretical insight into the binding energy and detonation performance of ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with β-HMX, FOX-7, and DMF in different molar ratios, as well as electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-Jun; Gao, Li

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes of the ε-, γ-, β-conformation 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-, γ-, β-CL-20) cocrystal explosives with 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane with β-conformation (β-HMX) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in different molar ratios. The oxygen balance, density, detonation velocity, detonation pressure, and surface electrostatic potential were analyzed. The results indicate that the binding energies E b (*) and stabilities are in the order of 1:1 > 2:1 > 3:1 > 5:1 > 8:1 (CL-20:FOX-7/β-HMX/DMF). The values of E b (*) and stabilities of the energetic-nonenergetic CL-20/DMF cocrystals are far larger than those of the energetic-energetic CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, and those of CL-20/β-HMX are the smallest. For CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, the largest E b (*) appears in the cocrystals with the 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 molar ratio, and the stabilities of the cocrystals with the excess ratio of CL-20 are weaker than those in the cocrystals with the excess ratio of FOX-7 or β-HMX. In CL-20/FOX-7, CL-20 prefers adopting the γ-form, and ε-CL-20 is the preference in CL-20/β-HMX, and ε-CL-20 and β-CL-20 can be found in CL-20/DMF. The CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX cocrystals with low molar ratios can meet the requirements of low sensitive high energetic materials. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change upon the cocrystal formation. Graphical Abstract MD method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes in the ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with FOX-7, β-HMX and DMF in different molar ratios. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change in cocrystals. PMID:27168198

  12. Theoretical insight into the binding energy and detonation performance of ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with β-HMX, FOX-7, and DMF in different molar ratios, as well as electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-Jun; Gao, Li

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes of the ε-, γ-, β-conformation 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-, γ-, β-CL-20) cocrystal explosives with 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane with β-conformation (β-HMX) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in different molar ratios. The oxygen balance, density, detonation velocity, detonation pressure, and surface electrostatic potential were analyzed. The results indicate that the binding energies E b (*) and stabilities are in the order of 1:1 > 2:1 > 3:1 > 5:1 > 8:1 (CL-20:FOX-7/β-HMX/DMF). The values of E b (*) and stabilities of the energetic-nonenergetic CL-20/DMF cocrystals are far larger than those of the energetic-energetic CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, and those of CL-20/β-HMX are the smallest. For CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, the largest E b (*) appears in the cocrystals with the 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 molar ratio, and the stabilities of the cocrystals with the excess ratio of CL-20 are weaker than those in the cocrystals with the excess ratio of FOX-7 or β-HMX. In CL-20/FOX-7, CL-20 prefers adopting the γ-form, and ε-CL-20 is the preference in CL-20/β-HMX, and ε-CL-20 and β-CL-20 can be found in CL-20/DMF. The CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX cocrystals with low molar ratios can meet the requirements of low sensitive high energetic materials. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change upon the cocrystal formation. Graphical Abstract MD method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes in the ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with FOX-7, β-HMX and DMF in different molar ratios. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change in cocrystals.

  13. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  14. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Wilson, J. W.; Youngquist, R. C.

    For the success of NASA s new vision for space exploration to Moon Mars and beyond exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is a must solve problem The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions The exploration beyond low Earth orbit LEO to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation Galactic Cosmic Rays GCR and Solar Particle Events SPE and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies The full space radiation environment has been used for the first time to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons Conclusions will be drawn should the electrostatic shielding be successful for the future directions of space radiation protection

  15. An asymmetry in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    This paper outlines a misuse of the electrostatic induction concept. A non-symmetrical behaviour was observed in a charge by the induction of an insulated hollow metallic conductor (the Faraday ice pail experiment). The major consequence of this experiment is a quick demonstration that the Earth must have a net negative charge.

  16. Studying Electrostatic Levitator Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Prof. Kerneth Kelton of Washington University in St. Lous, MO, (L) and Dr. Michael Robinson of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) examine a titanium-iron silicate (TiFeSiO)sample processed in MSFC's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility (background). Kelton is investigating undercooling of polytetrahedral phase-forming liquids.

  17. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  18. Effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Zheng, J; Zheng, L; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-01

    Salivary pellicle is a biofilm that is formed by the selective adsorption of salivary proteins. Almost all the functions of the salivary pellicle (lubricating properties, anti-caries properties, etc.) are closely associated with its adhesion strength to tooth surface. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel, aiming to understand what act as the determinant of the interfacial adhesion. In this study, human tooth enamel samples were immersed in human whole saliva in vitro to obtain a salivary pellicle on the surface of enamel. Immersion treatments lasting up to 1, 3, 10 and 60 min were conducted, respectively. Nano-scratch tests were conducted on the surface of enamel after different adsorption times. The wettability of enamel surface was measured through water contact angle. Results showed that the shear energy between salivary pellicle and enamel surface increased exponentially with the adsorption time. The adhesion force between salivary pellicle and bare enamel surface was more than twice that between salivary pellicle and salivary pellicle. It was found that both the wettability and zeta potential of enamel increased obviously after 1 min saliva-adsorption treatment, and then they almost kept stable as the adsorption time further increased. In summary, the adhesion strength between initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface was much higher than that between initial salivary pellicle and outer salivary pellicle. It seemed that electrostatic interaction contributed to the adhesion between the initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface, but not to the adhesion between the initial and outer salivary pellicle. The results would be helpful to extend the understanding of the adhesion mechanism of salivary pellicle and then to develop new artificial saliva and dental restorative materials.

  19. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  20. Electrostatics in sandstorms and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Thyagu, Nirmal; Paehtz, Thomas; Herrmann, Hans

    2010-11-01

    We present new data demonstrating (1) that electrostatic charging in sandstorms is a necessary outcome in a class of rapid collisional flows, and (2) that electrostatic precursors to slip events - long reported in earthquakes - can be reproduced in the laboratory.

  1. Electrostatics of deformable lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W

    2010-06-16

    It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (approximately 0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation.

  2. A theoretical investigation into the cooperativity effect between the H∙∙∙O and H∙∙∙F⁻ interactions and electrostatic potential upon 1:2 (F⁻:N-(Hydroxymethyl)acetamide) ternary-system formation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qing-Ping; Wang, Yan-Hong; Shi, Wen-Jing; Song, Shu-Qin; Tang, Hai-Fei

    2013-12-01

    The cooperativity effects between the O/N-H∙∙∙F(-) anionic hydrogen-bonding and O/N-H∙∙∙O hydrogen-bonding interactions and electrostatic potentials in the 1:2 (F(-):N-(Hydroxymethyl)acetamide (signed as "ha")) ternary systems are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311++G** levels. A comparison of the cooperativity effect in the "F(-)∙∙∙ha∙∙∙ha" and "FH∙∙∙ha(-)∙∙∙ha" systems is also carried out. The result shows that the increase of the H∙∙∙O interaction energy in the O-H∙∙∙O-H, N-H∙∙∙O-H or N-H∙∙∙O = C link is more notable than that in the O-H∙∙∙O = C contact upon ternary-system formation. The cooperativity effect is found in the complex formed by the O/N-H∙∙∙F(-) and O/N-H∙∙∙O interactions, while the anti-cooperativity effect is present in the system with only the O/N-H∙∙∙F(-) H-bond or the "FH∙∙∙ha(-)∙∙∙ha" complex by the N(-)∙∙∙H-F contact. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis and shift of electron density confirm the existence of cooperativity. The most negative surface electrostatic potential (V(S,min)) correlates well with the interaction energy E' int.(ha∙∙∙F-) and synergetic energy E(syn.), respectively. The relationship between the change of V(S,min) (i.e., ΔV(S,min)) and E(syn.) is also found.

  3. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, B. Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m−2) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule. PMID:26478273

  4. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, B. Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (~50 mJ m-2) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  5. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-10-19

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m(-2)) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  6. Electrostatic phenomena in organic semiconductors: fundamentals and implications for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Gabriele; Muccioli, Luca; Castet, Frédéric; Poelking, Carl; Andrienko, Denis; Soos, Zoltán G; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David

    2016-11-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of electrostatic phenomena in ordered and disordered organic semiconductors, outlines numerical schemes developed for quantitative evaluation of electrostatic and induction contributions to ionization potentials and electron affinities of organic molecules in a solid state, and illustrates two applications of these techniques: interpretation of photoelectron spectroscopy of thin films and energetics of heterointerfaces in organic solar cells.

  7. Electrostatic phenomena in organic semiconductors: fundamentals and implications for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avino, Gabriele; Muccioli, Luca; Castet, Frédéric; Poelking, Carl; Andrienko, Denis; Soos, Zoltán G.; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David

    2016-11-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of electrostatic phenomena in ordered and disordered organic semiconductors, outlines numerical schemes developed for quantitative evaluation of electrostatic and induction contributions to ionization potentials and electron affinities of organic molecules in a solid state, and illustrates two applications of these techniques: interpretation of photoelectron spectroscopy of thin films and energetics of heterointerfaces in organic solar cells.

  8. Electrostatic phenomena in organic semiconductors: fundamentals and implications for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Gabriele; Muccioli, Luca; Castet, Frédéric; Poelking, Carl; Andrienko, Denis; Soos, Zoltán G; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David

    2016-11-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of electrostatic phenomena in ordered and disordered organic semiconductors, outlines numerical schemes developed for quantitative evaluation of electrostatic and induction contributions to ionization potentials and electron affinities of organic molecules in a solid state, and illustrates two applications of these techniques: interpretation of photoelectron spectroscopy of thin films and energetics of heterointerfaces in organic solar cells. PMID:27603960

  9. Molecular Adhesion between Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen network, in simulated physiological conditions. Colloidal force spectroscopy was applied to measure the maximum adhesion force and total adhesion energy between aggrecan end-attached spherical tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) and trypsin-treated cartilage disks with undamaged collagen networks. Studies were carried out in various aqueous solutions to reveal the physical factors that govern aggrecan–collagen adhesion. Increasing both ionic strength and [Ca2+] significantly increased adhesion, highlighting the importance of electrostatic repulsion and Ca2+-mediated ion bridging effects. In addition, we probed how partial enzymatic degradation of the collagen network, which simulates osteoarthritic conditions, affects the aggrecan–collagen interactions. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in aggrecan–collagen adhesion even when there were no detectable changes at the macro- or microscales. It is hypothesized that the aggrecan–collagen adhesion, together with aggrecan–aggrecan self-adhesion, works synergistically to determine the local molecular deformability and energy dissipation of the cartilage matrix, in turn, affecting its macroscopic tissue properties. PMID:24491174

  10. Electrostatic formation of liquid marbles and agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanaarachchi, K. R.; Ireland, P. M.; Webber, G. B.; Galvin, K. P.

    2013-07-01

    We report observations of a sudden, explosive release of electrostatically charged 100 μm glass beads from a particle bed. These cross an air gap of several millimeters, are engulfed by an approaching pendant water drop, and form a metastable spherical agglomerate on the bed surface. The stability transition of the particle bed is explained by promotion of internal friction by in-plane electrostatic stresses. The novel agglomerates formed this way resemble the "liquid marbles" formed by coating a drop with hydrophobic particles. Complex multi-layered agglomerates may also be produced by this method, with potential industrial, pharmaceutical, environmental, and biological applications.

  11. Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-15

    Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

  12. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  13. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  14. Electrostatic Levitator Vaccum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  15. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  16. Electrostatic effects on hyaluronic acid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezney, John; Saleh, Omar

    2015-03-01

    In systems of polyelectrolytes, such as solutions of charged biopolymers, the electrostatic repulsion between charged monomers plays a dominant role in determining the molecular conformation. Altering the ionic strength of the solvent thus affects the structure of such a polymer. Capturing this electrostatically-driven structural dependence is important for understanding many biological systems. Here, we use single molecule manipulation experiments to collect force-extension behavior on hyaluronic acid (HA), a polyanion which is a major component of the extracellular matrix in all vertebrates. By measuring HA elasticity in a variety of salt conditions, we are able to directly assess the contribution of electrostatics to the chain's self-avoidance and local stiffness. Similar to recent results from our group on single-stranded nucleic acids, our data indicate that HA behaves as a swollen chain of electrostatic blobs, with blob size proportional to the solution Debye length. Our data indicate that the chain structure within the blob is not worm-like, likely due to long-range electrostatic interactions. We discuss potential models of this effect.

  17. Electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey

    2007-03-01

    We present the exact solutions of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory for several problems relevant to electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids. We calculate the electrostatic potential and energy for lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases, concentrating on the effects of water-membrane dielectric boundaries. Our results for the complex energy agree qualitatively well with the known numerical solutions of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Using the solution for the lamellar phase, we calculate its compressibility modulus and compare our findings with experimental data available suggesting a new scaling dependence on DNA-DNA separations in the complex. Also, we treat analytically charge-charge electrostatic interactions across, along, and in between two low-dielectric membranes. We obtain an estimate for the strength of electrostatic interactions of 1D DNA smectic layers across a lipid membrane. We discuss also some aspects of 2D DNA condensation and DNA-DNA attraction in DNA-lipid lamellar phase in the presence of di- and tri-valent cations and analyze the equilibrium intermolecular separations using the recently developed theory of electrostatic interactions of DNA helical charge motifs.

  18. Electrostatic curtain studies

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L C

    1992-05-01

    This report presents the results of experiments using electrostatic curtains (ESCS) as a transuranic (TRU) contamination control technique. The TRU contaminants included small (micrometer to sub micrometer) particles of plutonium and americium compounds associated with defense-related waste. Three series of experiments were conducted. The first was with uncontaminated Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) soil, the second used contaminated soil containing plutonium-239 (from a mixture of Rocky Flats Plant contaminated soil and INEL uncontaminated soil), and the third was uncontaminated INEL soil spiked with plutonium-239. All experiments with contaminated soil were conducted inside a glove box containing a dust generator, low volume cascade impactor (LVCI), electrostatic separator, and electrostatic materials. The data for these experiments consisted of the mass of dust collected on the various material coupons, plates, and filters; radiochemical analysis of selected samples; and photographs, as well as computer printouts giving particle size distributions and dimensions from the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The following results were found: (a) plutonium content (pCi/g) was found to increase with smaller soil particle sizes and (b) the electrostatic field had a stronger influence on smaller particle sizes compared to larger particle sizes. The SEM analysis indicated that the particle size of the tracer Pu239 used in the spiked soil experiments was below the detectable size limit (0.5 {mu}m) of the SEM and, thus, may not be representative of plutonium particles found in defense-related waste. The use of radiochemical analysis indicated that plutonium could be found on separator plates of both polarities, as well as passing through the electric field and collecting on LVCI filters.

  19. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  20. Electrostatic containerless processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Watkins, John L.; Zambrano, Brian

    1997-07-01

    We introduce a materials science tool for investigating refractory solids and melts: the electrostatic containerless processing system (ESCAPES). ESCAPES maintains refractory specimens of materials in a pristine state by levitating and heating them in a vacuum chamber, thereby avoiding the contaminating influences of container walls and ambient gases. ESCAPES is designed for the investigation of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature-transformation diagrams, and other aspects of materials processing. ESCAPES incorporates several design improvements over prior electrostatic levitation technology. It has an informative and responsive computer control system. It has separate light sources for heating and charging, which prevents runaway discharging. Both the heating and charging light sources are narrow band, which allows the use of optical pyrometry and other diagnostics at all times throughout processing. Heat is provided to the levitated specimens by a 50 W Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm. A deuterium arc lamp charges the specimen through photoelectric emission. ESCAPES can heat metals, ceramics, and semiconductors to temperatures exceeding 2300 K; specimens range in size from 1 to 3 mm diam. This article describes the design, capabilities, and applications of ESCAPES, focusing on improvements over prior electrostatic levitation technology.

  1. Electrostatic modeling for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaul, Diana N.; Sumner, Timothy J.

    2003-03-01

    LISA employs a capacitive sensing and positioning system to maintain the drag free environment of the test masses acting as interferometer mirror elements. The need for detailed electrostatic modelling of the test mass environment arises because any electric field gradient or variation associated with test mass motion can couple the test mass to its housing, and ultimately the spacecraft. Cross-couplings between components in the system can introduce direct couplings between sensing signals, sensing axes and the drive signal. A variation in cross-couplings or asymmetry in the system can introduce capacitance gradients and second derivatives, giving rise to unwanted forces and spring constant modifications. These effects will vary dependent on the precise geometry of the system and will also tend to increase the sensitivity to accumulated charge on the test-mass. Presented are the results of a systematic study of the effect of the principal geometry elements (e.g. machining imperfections, the caging mechanism) on the test mass electrostatic environment, using the finite element code ANSYS. This work is part of an ongoing ESA study into drag-free control for LISA and the LTP on SMART 2 and ultimately aims to eliminate geometries that introduce too large a disturbance and optimise the electrostatic design.

  2. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  3. Electrostatics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to continue developing an understanding of electrostatic phenomena in preparation for any future flight opportunities of the EGM experiment, originally slated for a 2004 Space Station deployment. Work would be based on theoretical assessments, ground-based lab experiments, and reduced-gravity experiments. The ability to examine dipoles in the lab proved to be elusive, and thus, effort was concentrated on monopoles -how materials become charged, the fate of the charge, the role of material type, and so forth. Several significant milestones were achieved in this regard. In regard of the dipoles, experiments were designed in collaboration with the University of Chicago school district who had access to reduced gravity on the KC-135 aircraft. Two experiments were slated to fly last year but were cancelled after the Columbia accident. One of the experiments has been given a second life and will fly sometime in 2005 if the Shuttle flights resume. There remains active interest in the question of electrostatic dipoles within the educational community, and experiments using magnetic dipoles as a substitute are to be examined. The KC-135 experiments will also examine dispersion methods for particles as a verification of possible future techniques in microgravity. Both laboratory and theoretical work established a number of breakthroughs in our understanding of electrostatic phenomena. These breakthroughs are listed in this paper.

  4. Antagonistic properties of a natural product - Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: Studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    (+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap Δ E, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline.

  5. Yes-mediated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase at tyrosine 861 increases metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tanushree; Varkaris, Andreas S; Parikh, Nila U; Song, Jian H; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Schweppe, Rebecca E; Alexander, Stephanie; Davis, John W; Troncoso, Patricia; Friedl, Peter; Kuang, Jian; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Gallick, Gary E

    2015-04-30

    To study the role of FAK signaling complexes in promoting metastatic properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, we selected stable, highly migratory variants, termed PC3 Mig-3 and DU145 Mig-3, from two well-characterized PCa cell lines, PC3 and DU145. These variants were not only increased migration and invasion in vitro, but were also more metastatic to lymph nodes following intraprostatic injection into nude mice. Both PC3 Mig-3 and DU145 Mig-3 were specifically increased in phosphorylation of FAK Y861. We therefore examined potential alterations in Src family kinases responsible for FAK phosphorylation and determined only Yes expression was increased. Overexpression of Yes in PC3 parental cells and src-/-fyn-/-yes-/- fibroblasts selectively increased FAK Y861 phosphorylation, and increased migration. Knockdown of Yes in PC3 Mig-3 cells decreased migration and decreased lymph node metastasis following orthotopic implantation of into nude mice. In human specimens, Yes expression was increased in lymph node metastases relative to paired primary tumors from the same patient, and increased pFAK Y861 expression in lymph node metastases correlated with poor prognosis. These results demonstrate a unique role for Yes in phosphorylation of FAK and in promoting PCa metastasis. Therefore, phosphorylated FAK Y861 and increased Yes expression may be predictive markers for PCa metastasis.

  6. Valorization of solid wastes from chestnut industry processing: Extraction and optimization of polyphenols, tannins and ellagitannins and its potential for adhesives, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Aires, Alfredo; Carvalho, Rosa; Saavedra, Maria José

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential of chestnut peels to produce pomaces enhanced with tannins to be used in the formulations of wood adhesives, leather tanning or as natural antioxidants in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry. An analytical procedure was planned as 2 factorial design to analyze the influence of solvent (water, Na2SO3 and NaOH at different concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% in water) and extraction time (30, 60, and 120, 240, 480 and 960min) on extraction yield, pH, Stiasny index, and tannins. HPLC-diode array detector equipped with an ionization mass spectrophotometer was used to assess the polyphenol composition. Our results showed that both extraction properties and phytochemicals were significantly affected (P<0.001) by all independent factors. The main tannins identified were the hydrolyzable gallic acid, vescalagin castalagin and ellagic acid, and the condensed epigallocatechin, catechin and epicatechin. The solvent 1% Na2SO3 was more effective to extract the condensed tannins whilst hydrolyzable tannins were extracted efficiently by 1% NaOH. The multivariable analysis and the Pearson's correlation coefficients showed a direct association between Stiasny number and the average levels of condensed tannins.

  7. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  8. Galileo internal electrostatic discharge program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, P. L.; Plamp, G. H.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft which will orbit Jupiter in 1988 will encounter a very harsh environment of energetic electrons. These electrons will have sufficient energy to penetrate the spacecraft shielding, consequently depositing charges in the dielectric insulating materials or ungrounded conductors. The resulting electric field could exceed the breakdown strength of the insulating materials, producing discharges. The transients produced from these Internal Electrostatic Discharges (IESD) could, depending on their relative location, be coupled to nearby cables and circuits. These transients could change the state of logic circuits or degrade or even damage spacecraft components, consequently disrupting the operation of subsystems and systems of the Galileo spacecraft during its expected mission life. An extensive testing program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the potential threats associated with these IESD events. Data obtained from these tests were used to define design guidelines.

  9. Internal Electrostatic Discharge Monitor - IESDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Wousik; Goebel, Dan M.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses an innovation designed to effectively monitor dielectric charging in spacecraft components to measure the potential for discharge in order to prevent damage from internal electrostatic discharge (IESD). High-energy electrons penetrate the structural materials and shielding of a spacecraft and then stop inside dielectrics and keep accumulating. Those deposited charges generate an electric field. If the electric field becomes higher than the breakdown threshold (approx. =2 x 10(exp 5) V/cm), discharge occurs. This monitor measures potentials as a function of dielectric depth. Differentiation of potential with respect to the depth yields electric field. Direct measurement of the depth profile of the potential in a dielectric makes real-time electronic field evaluation possible without simulations. The IESDM has been designed to emulate a multi-layer circuit board, to insert very thin metallic layers between the dielectric layers. The conductors serve as diagnostic monitoring locations to measure the deposited electron-charge and the charge dynamics. Measurement of the time-dependent potential of the metal layers provides information on the amount of charge deposited in the dielectrics and the movement of that charge with time (dynamics).

  10. Electrostatic particle precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiya, T.; Hikizi, S.; Yabuta, H.

    1984-04-03

    An electrostatic particle precipitator for removing dust particles from a flue gas. The precipitator includes a plurality of collecting electrodes in the shape of plates mounted on endless chains and moving between a first region through which flue gas to be treated flows and a second region where the flow of gas is extremely scarce. A dust removal mechanism is positioned in the second region to remove dust which accumulates on the electrode plates. The moving speed of the collecting electrodes is controlled within a certain range to maintain a prescribed thickness of dust on the electrodes whereby the ocurrence of reverse ionization phenomenon is prevented.

  11. Physics of electrostatic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this program was to study the physics of the ion-energy boosting electrostatic lens for collective ion acceleration in the Luce diode. Extensive work was done in preparation for experiments on the PI Pulserad 1150. Analytic work was done on the orbit of protons in a mass spectrometer and a copper stack for nuclear activation analysis of proton energy spectrum has been designed. Unfortunately, a parallel program which would provide the Luce diode for the collective ion acceleration experiment never materialized. As a result no experiments were actually performed on the Pulserad 1150.

  12. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  13. Electrostatics of Pharmaceutical Aerosols for Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lip Kwok, Philip Chi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a review on key research findings in the rapidly developing area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Solids and liquids can become charged without electric fields, the former by contact or friction and the latter by flowing or spraying. Therefore, charged particles and droplets carrying net charges are produced from pharmaceutical inhalers (e.g. dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers, and nebulisers) due to the mechanical processes involved in aerosolisation. The charging depends on many physicochemical factors, such as formulation composition, solid state properties, inhaler material and design, and relative humidity. In silico, in vitro, and limited in vivo studies have shown that electrostatic charges may potentially influence particle deposition in the airways. However, the evidence is not yet conclusive. Furthermore, there are currently no regulatory requirements on the characterisation and control of the electrostatic properties of inhaled formulations. Besides the need for further investigations on the relationship between physicochemical factors and charging characteristics of the aerosols, controlled and detailed in vivo studies are also required to confirm whether charges can affect particle deposition in the airways. Since pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics is a relatively new research area, much remains to be explored. Thus there is certainly potential for development. New findings in the future may contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical aerosol formulations and respiratory drug delivery.

  14. Electrostatics of Pharmaceutical Aerosols for Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lip Kwok, Philip Chi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a review on key research findings in the rapidly developing area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Solids and liquids can become charged without electric fields, the former by contact or friction and the latter by flowing or spraying. Therefore, charged particles and droplets carrying net charges are produced from pharmaceutical inhalers (e.g. dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers, and nebulisers) due to the mechanical processes involved in aerosolisation. The charging depends on many physicochemical factors, such as formulation composition, solid state properties, inhaler material and design, and relative humidity. In silico, in vitro, and limited in vivo studies have shown that electrostatic charges may potentially influence particle deposition in the airways. However, the evidence is not yet conclusive. Furthermore, there are currently no regulatory requirements on the characterisation and control of the electrostatic properties of inhaled formulations. Besides the need for further investigations on the relationship between physicochemical factors and charging characteristics of the aerosols, controlled and detailed in vivo studies are also required to confirm whether charges can affect particle deposition in the airways. Since pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics is a relatively new research area, much remains to be explored. Thus there is certainly potential for development. New findings in the future may contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical aerosol formulations and respiratory drug delivery. PMID:26290198

  15. Electrostatic Suspension Using Variable Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takaaki; Tsukada, Shinya; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya; Mizuno, Takeshi

    A new control system for electrostatic actuators was applied to electrostatic suspension. This control system was designed to use a variable capacitor connected with an electrostatic actuator in series. A high voltage was applied to this connection. The voltage applied to the actuator was controlled by varying the capacitance of the variable capacitor. An experimental apparatus was fabricated in order to study the controllability of electrostatic force using this control system. The experimental results show that electrostatic force can be controlled both statically and dynamically. Another experimental apparatus was fabricated for demonstrating the feasibility of electrostatic suspension. This apparatus was able to control the 3-DOF vertical motions of the suspended object. Non-contact suspension was achieved with the developed control system using variable capacitors.

  16. Spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman), molecular electrostatic potential, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis of P-bromobenzene sulfonyl chloride based on DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Jeyavijayan, S

    2015-02-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of P-bromobenzene sulfonyl chloride (P-BBSC) have been recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1), respectively. Utilizing the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. The optimum molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities, were calculated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method. A good agreement between experimental and calculated normal modes of vibrations has been observed. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of P-BBSC is also reported based on total energy distribution (TED). Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The MEP map shows the negative potential sites are on oxygen atoms as well as the positive potential sites are around the hydrogen atoms. The UV-vis spectral analysis of P-BBSC has also been done which confirms the charge transfer of the molecule.

  17. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  18. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  19. Asymmetric electrostatic and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interaction forces between mica surfaces and silicone polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Rapp, Michael; Jones, Louis C; Roiter, Yuri; Koenig, Peter H; Gizaw, Yonas; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-11-26

    We have synthesized model hydrophobic silicone thin films on gold surfaces by a two-step covalent grafting procedure. An amino-functionalized gold surface reacts with monoepoxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via a click reaction, resulting in a covalently attached nanoscale thin film of PDMS, and the click chemistry synthesis route provides great selectivity, reproducibility, and stability in the resulting model hydrophobic silicone thin films. The asymmetric interaction forces between the PDMS thin films and mica surfaces were measured with the surface forces apparatus in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. At an acidic pH of 3, attractive interactions are measured, resulting in instabilities during both approach (jump-in) and separation (jump-out from adhesive contact). Quantitative analysis of the results indicates that the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory alone, i.e., the combination of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attraction, cannot fully describe the measured forces and that the additional measured adhesion is likely due to hydrophobic interactions. The surface interactions are highly pH-dependent, and a basic pH of 10 results in fully repulsive interactions at all distances, due to repulsive electrostatic and steric-hydration interactions, indicating that the PDMS is negatively charged at high pH. We describe an interaction potential with a parameter, known as the Hydra parameter, that can account for the extra attraction (low pH) due to hydrophobicity as well as the extra repulsion (high pH) due to hydrophilic (steric-hydration) interactions. The interaction potential is general and provides a quantitative measure of interfacial hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity for any set of interacting surfaces in aqueous solution.

  20. Electrostatic precipitator having apparatus for sensing electrostatic field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, J.W.

    1984-03-27

    An electrostatic precipitator (10) of the type having a casing (12) defining a precipitation chamber (6) wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames (32) are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates (20). Paired probe devices (50) are mounted on the collecting electrode plates for sensing the strength of the electrostatic field generated by at least one discharge electrode wire (36) at at least one location on each of the collecting electrode plates (20) disposed adjacent thereto. The electrostatic field strength sensed by the paired probe devices are compared with each other to provide an indication of the degree of imbalance, if any, existing between the sensed electrostatic fields experienced by the bounding electrode plates. The existence of an imbalance and the strength of the electrostatic fields on the bounding collecting electrode plates and the degree of any such imbalance provide an indication of whether or not the discharge electrode frame is properly positioned within the assembly of collecting electrode plates.

  1. Synthetic Studies on Centromere-Associated Protein-E (CENP-E) Inhibitors: 2. Application of Electrostatic Potential Map (EPM) and Structure-Based Modeling to Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Derivatives as Anti-Tumor Agents.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Takaharu; Okaniwa, Masanori; Banno, Hiroshi; Kakei, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Akihiro; Iwai, Kenichi; Ohori, Momoko; Mori, Kouji; Gotou, Mika; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Yokota, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu

    2015-10-22

    To develop centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) inhibitors for use as anticancer therapeutics, we designed novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines, utilizing previously discovered 5-bromo derivative 1a. By site-directed mutagenesis analysis, we confirmed the ligand binding site. A docking model revealed the structurally important molecular features for effective interaction with CENP-E and could explain the superiority of the inhibitor (S)-isomer in CENP-E inhibition vs the (R)-isomer based on the ligand conformation in the L5 loop region. Additionally, electrostatic potential map (EPM) analysis was employed as a ligand-based approach to optimize functional groups on the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine scaffold. These efforts led to the identification of the 5-methoxy imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative (+)-(S)-12, which showed potent CENP-E inhibition (IC50: 3.6 nM), cellular phosphorylated histone H3 (p-HH3) elevation (EC50: 180 nM), and growth inhibition (GI50: 130 nM) in HeLa cells. Furthermore, (+)-(S)-12 demonstrated antitumor activity (T/C: 40%, at 75 mg/kg) in a human colorectal cancer Colo205 xenograft model in mice.

  2. Conditional ablation of the neural cell adhesion molecule reduces precision of spatial learning, long-term potentiation, and depression in the CA1 subfield of mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bukalo, Olena; Fentrop, Nikolas; Lee, Alan Y W; Salmen, Benedikt; Law, Janice W S; Wotjak, Carsten T; Schweizer, Michaela; Dityatev, Alexander; Schachner, Melitta

    2004-02-18

    NCAM, a neural cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in neuronal migration and differentiation, axon outgrowth and fasciculation, and synaptic plasticity. To dissociate the functional roles of NCAM in the adult brain from developmental abnormalities, we generated a mutant in which the NCAM gene is inactivated by cre-recombinase under the control of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II promoter, resulting in reduction of NCAM expression predominantly in the hippocampus. This mutant (NCAMff+) did not show the overt morphological and behavioral abnormalities previously observed in constitutive NCAM-deficient (NCAM-/-) mice. However, similar to the NCAM-/- mouse, a reduction in long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was revealed. Long-term depression was also abolished in NCAMff+ mice. The deficit in LTP could be rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+ concentrations from 1.5 or 2.0 to 2.5 mm, suggesting an involvement of NCAM in regulation of Ca2+-dependent signaling during LTP. Contrary to the NCAM-/- mouse, LTP in the CA3 region was normal, consistent with normal mossy fiber lamination in NCAMff+ as opposed to abnormal lamination in NCAM-/- mice. NCAMff+ mutants did not show general deficits in short- and long-term memory in global landmark navigation in the water maze but were delayed in the acquisition of precise spatial orientation, a deficit that could be overcome by training. Thus, mice conditionally deficient in hippocampal NCAM expression in the adult share certain abnormalities characteristic of NCAM-/- mice, highlighting the role of NCAM in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region.

  3. Membrane potential and endocytic activity control disintegration of cell-cell adhesion and cell fusion in vinculin-injected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Palovuori, Riitta; Myrsky, Essi; Eskelinen, Sinikka

    2004-09-01

    Cell fusion occurs during fertilization and in the formation of organs such as muscles, placenta, and bones. We have developed an experimental model for epithelial cell fusion which permits analysis of the processes during junction disintegration and formation of polykaryons (Palovuori and Eskelinen [2000] Eur. J. Cell. Biol. 79: 961-974). In the present work, we analyzed the process in detail. Cell fusion was achieved by microinjecting into the cytoplasm of kidney epithelial Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells TAMRA-tagged vinculin, which incorporated into lateral membranes, focal adhesions and nucleus, and, prior fusion, induced internalization of actin, cadherin and plakoglobin to small clusters in cytoplasm. Injected vinculin was still visible at lateral membranes after removal of junctional proteins indicating that it was tightly associated and perturbed the cell-cell contact sites resulting in membrane fragmentation. Injection of active Rac together with vinculin induced accumulation of cadherin to the membranes, but did not affect vinculin-membrane association. However, it hampered cell fusion probably by supporting adherens junctions. In order to stop endocytosis, we lowered intracellular pH of vinculin-injected cells to 5.5 with the aid of nigericin in KCl buffer. In acidified cells, injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as thick layers, cadherin remained in situ, and cell fusion was completely inhibited. Since this treatment also leads to cell depolarization, we checked the vinculin incorporation in a KCl solution containing nigericin at neutral pH. In these circumstances, both endogenous and injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as very thin discontinuous layers, but still fusion was hampered most likely due to perturbation in the initial vinculin-membrane association. We suggest that vinculin might function as a sensor of the environment triggering cell fusion during development in circumstances where membrane potential and local

  4. Electrostatically Guided Rydberg Positronium.

    PubMed

    Deller, A; Alonso, A M; Cooper, B S; Hogan, S D; Cassidy, D B

    2016-08-12

    We report experiments in which positronium (Ps) atoms were guided using inhomogeneous electric fields. Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n=10 and electric dipole moments up to 610 D were prepared via two-color two-photon optical excitation in the presence of a 670  V cm^{-1} electric field. The Ps atoms were created at the entrance of a 0.4 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide, and were detected at the end of the guide via annihilation gamma radiation. When the lasers were tuned to excite low-field-seeking Stark states, a fivefold increase in the number of atoms reaching the end of the guide was observed, whereas no signal was detected when high-field-seeking states were produced. The data are consistent with the calculated geometrical guide acceptance. PMID:27563960

  5. ELECTROSTATIC MEMORY SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-09-23

    An improved electrostatic memory system is de scribed fer a digital computer wherein a plarality of storage tubes are adapted to operate in either of two possible modes. According to the present irvention, duplicate storage tubes are provided fur each denominational order of the several binary digits. A single discriminator system is provided between corresponding duplicate tubes to determine the character of the infurmation stored in each. If either tube produces the selected type signal, corresponding to binazy "1" in the preferred embodiment, a "1" is regenerated in both tubes. In one mode of operation each bit of information is stored in two corresponding tubes, while in the other mode of operation each bit is stored in only one tube in the conventional manner.

  6. Electrostatically Guided Rydberg Positronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We report experiments in which positronium (Ps) atoms were guided using inhomogeneous electric fields. Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n =10 and electric dipole moments up to 610 D were prepared via two-color two-photon optical excitation in the presence of a 670 V cm-1 electric field. The Ps atoms were created at the entrance of a 0.4 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide, and were detected at the end of the guide via annihilation gamma radiation. When the lasers were tuned to excite low-field-seeking Stark states, a fivefold increase in the number of atoms reaching the end of the guide was observed, whereas no signal was detected when high-field-seeking states were produced. The data are consistent with the calculated geometrical guide acceptance.

  7. Teaching Electrostatics in University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an optional course on applied electrostatics that was offered to electrical engineers in their final year. Topics included the determination of electric fields, nature of the charging process, static electricity in liquids, solid state processes, charged particle applications, and electrostatic ignition. (GS)

  8. Conservation and Role of Electrostatics in Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Divita; Skouloubris, Stephane; Briffotaux, Julien; Myllykallio, Hannu; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of function across families of orthologous enzymes is generally accompanied by conservation of their active site electrostatic potentials. To study the electrostatic conservation in the highly conserved essential enzyme, thymidylate synthase (TS), we conducted a systematic species-based comparison of the electrostatic potential in the vicinity of its active site. Whereas the electrostatics of the active site of TS are generally well conserved, the TSs from minimal organisms do not conform to the overall trend. Since the genomes of minimal organisms have a high thymidine content compared to other organisms, the observation of non-conserved electrostatics was surprising. Analysis of the symbiotic relationship between minimal organisms and their hosts, and the genetic completeness of the thymidine synthesis pathway suggested that TS from the minimal organism Wigglesworthia glossinidia (W.g.b.) must be active. Four residues in the vicinity of the active site of Escherichia coli TS were mutated individually and simultaneously to mimic the electrostatics of W.g.b TS. The measured activities of the E. coli TS mutants imply that conservation of electrostatics in the region of the active site is important for the activity of TS, and suggest that the W.g.b. TS has the minimal activity necessary to support replication of its reduced genome. PMID:26612036

  9. Conservation and Role of Electrostatics in Thymidylate Synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Divita; Skouloubris, Stephane; Briffotaux, Julien; Myllykallio, Hannu; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-11-01

    Conservation of function across families of orthologous enzymes is generally accompanied by conservation of their active site electrostatic potentials. To study the electrostatic conservation in the highly conserved essential enzyme, thymidylate synthase (TS), we conducted a systematic species-based comparison of the electrostatic potential in the vicinity of its active site. Whereas the electrostatics of the active site of TS are generally well conserved, the TSs from minimal organisms do not conform to the overall trend. Since the genomes of minimal organisms have a high thymidine content compared to other organisms, the observation of non-conserved electrostatics was surprising. Analysis of the symbiotic relationship between minimal organisms and their hosts, and the genetic completeness of the thymidine synthesis pathway suggested that TS from the minimal organism Wigglesworthia glossinidia (W.g.b.) must be active. Four residues in the vicinity of the active site of Escherichia coli TS were mutated individually and simultaneously to mimic the electrostatics of W.g.b TS. The measured activities of the E. coli TS mutants imply that conservation of electrostatics in the region of the active site is important for the activity of TS, and suggest that the W.g.b. TS has the minimal activity necessary to support replication of its reduced genome.

  10. ELECTROSTATICALLY ENHANCED BARRIER FILTER COLLECTION

    SciTech Connect

    John Erjavec; Michael D. Mann; Ryan Z. Knutson; Michael L. Swanson; Michael E. Collings

    2003-06-01

    This work was performed through the University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department with assistance from UND's Energy & Environmental Research Center. This research was undertaken in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Technology Center Program Solicitation No. DE-PS26-99FT40479, Support of Advanced Coal Research at U.S. Universities and Colleges. Specifically, this research was in support of the UCR Core Program and addressees Topic 1, Improved Hot-Gas Contaminant and Particulate Removal Techniques, introducing an advanced design for particulate removal. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offers the potential for very high efficiency and clean electric generation. In IGCC, the product gas from the gasifier needs to be cleaned of particulate matter to avoid erosion and high-temperature corrosion difficulties arising with the turbine blades. Current methods involve cooling the gases to {approx}100 C to condense alkalis and remove sulfur and particulates using conventional scrubber technology. This ''cool'' gas is then directed to a turbine for electric generation. While IGCC has the potential to reach efficiencies of over 50%, the current need to cool the product gas for cleaning prior to firing it in a turbine is keeping IGCC from reaching its full potential. The objective of the current project was to develop a highly reliable particulate collector system that can meet the most stringent turbine requirements and emission standards, can operate at temperatures above 1500 F, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, is compatible with various sorbent injection schemes for sulfur and alkali control, can be integrated into a variety of configurations for both pressurized gasification and combustion, increases allowable face velocity to reduce filter system capital cost, and is cost-competitive with existing technologies. The collector being developed is a new concept in particulate control called electrostatically enhanced

  11. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  12. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    PubMed

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  13. Electrostatic Interactions in Aminoglycoside-RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M.; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  14. Electrostatic interactions in aminoglycoside-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  15. Electrostatic interactions in aminoglycoside-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity.

  16. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  17. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  18. Effects of Hydrophobic and Electrostatic Cell Surface Properties of Bacteria on Feeding Rates of Heterotrophic Nanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Carsten; Jürgens, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cell surface hydrophobicity and electrostatic charge of bacteria on grazing rates of three common species of interception-feeding nanoflagellates was examined. The hydrophobicity of bacteria isolated from freshwater plankton was assessed by using two different methods (bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon and hydrophobic interaction chromatography). The electrostatic charge of the cell surface (measured as zeta potential) was analyzed by microelectrophoresis. Bacterial ingestion rates were determined by enumerating bacteria in food vacuoles by immunofluorescence labelling via strain-specific antibodies. Feeding rates varied about twofold for each flagellate species but showed no significant dependence on prey hydrophobicity or surface charge. Further evidence was provided by an experiment involving flagellate grazing on complex bacterial communities in a two-stage continuous culture system. The hydrophobicity values of bacteria that survived protozoan grazing were variable, but the bacteria did not tend to become more hydrophilic. We concluded that variability in bacterial cell hydrophobicity and variability in surface charge do not severely affect uptake rates of suspended bacteria or food selection by interception-feeding flagellates. PMID:11157248

  19. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  20. NR-150B2 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatz, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive based polyimide solutions which are more easily processed than conventional aromatic polyimide systems and show potential for use for extended times at 589K are discussed. The adhesive system is based on a solution containing diglyme as the solvent and 2,2 bis(3',4'-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane, paraphenylenediamine, and oxydianiline. The replacement of N-methylpyrrolidone with diglyme as the solvent was found to improve the adhesive strengths of lap shear samples and simplify the processing conditions for bonding both titanium and graphite fiber/polyimide matrix resin composites. Information was obtained on the effects of various environments including high humidity, immersion in jet fuel and methylethylketone on aluminum filled adhesive bonds. The adhesive was also evaluated in wide area bonds and flatwise tensile specimens using titanium honeycomb and composite face sheets. It was indicated that the developed adhesive system has the potential for use in applications requiring long term exposure to at least 589K (600 F).

  1. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  2. Removal of adhesive dusts from flue gas using corona discharges with spraying water.

    PubMed

    Xu, De-xuan; Zhao, Jian-wei; Ding, Yun-zheng; Ge, Wei-li

    2003-07-01

    Effective removal of adhesive and fine dusts from flue gas is very difficult. A new method of electrostatic precipitation of the corona discharges with spraying water (CDSW) was introduced. A new electrode configuration and the circulation spraying of water were employed in the method. The efficient electrostatic precipitation for adhesive and fine dusts can be accomplished without any drain water during a long operating period. The fundamental structure, discharge characteristics, mechanism of spraying and precipitation principle of the electrostatic precipitation using CDSW were described and analyzed. The V-I characteristics, spraying state, supplying water quantity, influence of temperature and clean of the electrodes were researched in series experiments. The treating effects of circulating spraying using the corona plasma at the same time of electrostatic precipitation were investigated. The fundamental theories and experimental data were proposed, in order to effectively remove the adhesive dusts from flue gas using CDSW in practice.

  3. Biofilm formation and local electrostatic force characteristics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 observed by electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y. J.; Jo, W.; Yang, Y.; Park, S.

    2007-04-01

    The authors report growth media dependence of electrostatic force characteristics in Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm through local measurement by electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The difference values of electrostatic interaction between the bacterial surface and the abiotic surface show an exponential decay behavior during biofilm development. In the EFM data, the biofilm in the low nutrient media shows a faster decay than the biofilm in the rich media. The surface potential in the bacterial cells was changed from 957to149mV. Local characterization of extracellular materials extracted from the bacteria reveals the progress of the biofilm formation and functional complexities.

  4. Evaluation of a lipopeptide biosurfactant from Bacillus natto TK-1 as a potential source of anti-adhesive, antimicrobial and antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-Hong; Liao, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ling; Yang, Wen-Yan; Lu, Mei-Fang

    2009-01-01

    A lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus natto TK-1 has a strong surface activity. The biosurfactant was found to be an anti-adhesive agent against several bacterial strains, and also showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The biosurfactant induced a significant reduction in tumor cells viability in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24031375

  5. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  6. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  7. Electrostatic Focusing Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Eric; Hopkins, Demitri

    2011-10-01

    We developed an electrostatic focusing lens capable of generating DD reactions, by focusing deuterium ions generated from a pointed emitter at a frozen heavy water target. Due to difficulty with the pointed emitter, we later switched to a hollow cathode design. To model the lenses, chamber, and calculate the dimensions for the design that would maximize ion energy and density, the program SIMION was used. During stable operation, vacuum was hand adjusted around 10-13 mTorr. To keep stable beam, DC voltage generator was varied between 15-25 kV. Hand adjusting was necessary, because at points in the operation the frozen heavy water would release vapor at an increased rate. This caused the pressure to rise and the beam current to spike, creating instabilities and an arc to the lens. Three methods were used to determine successful DD production. (1) Two differently shielded Geiger counters (unshielded and UHMW-PE insulated tube), (2) Spectrophotometer comparing control peaks with heavy water tests, and (3) a calibrated bubble dosimeter specific to neutrons. Analysis of the results suggest the neutrons flux varied from 532 to 1.4 × 106 neutrons/sec, and require further tests to plot and narrow results.

  8. An atmospheric-pressure plasma-treated titanium surface potentially supports initial cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation of cultured human prenatal-derived osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Minbu, Hiromi; Kamiya, Mana; Oda, Masafumi; Hara, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) treatment was recently reported to render titanium (Ti) surfaces more suitable for osteoblastic cell proliferation and osteogenesis. However, the mechanism of action remains to be clearly demonstrated. In this study, we focused on cell adhesion and examined the effects of the APP treatment on the initial responses of human prenatal-derived osteoblastic cells incubated on chemically polished commercially pure Ti (CP-cpTi) plates. In the medium containing 1% fetal bovine serum, the initial cell adhesion and the actin polymerization were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The expression of cell adhesion-related molecules and osteoblast markers at the messenger RNA level was assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Although the cells on the APP-treated CP-cpTi surface developed fewer cytoskeletal actin fibers, they attached with higher affinity and consequently proliferated more actively (1.46-fold over control at 72 h). However, most of the cell adhesion molecule genes were significantly downregulated (from 40 to 85% of control) in the cells incubated on the APP-treated CP-cpTi surface at 24 h. Similarly, the osteoblast marker genes were significantly downregulated (from 49 to 63% of control) at 72 h. However, the osteoblast marker genes were drastically upregulated (from 197 to 296% of control) in these cells by dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate treatment. These findings suggest that the APP treatment improves the ability of the CP-cpTi surface to support osteoblastic proliferation by enhancing the initial cell adhesion and supports osteoblastic differentiation when immature osteoblasts begin the differentiation process.

  9. Using visualizations to teach electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, Janet M.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2006-04-01

    We investigate the effect of visualizations of electrostatics phenomena on students' ability to integrate microscopic and macroscopic views of electrostatics in the context of a technology-enhanced inquiry project that features particle interactions. We used knowledge integration instructional design patterns to determine activity sequences. A pretest/post-test design was used to assess the students' overall gains. The results from the implementation of the project in two classes demonstrate that it helped students form a more integrated understanding of electrostatics. An analysis of student responses to prompts embedded with the visualizations reveals that interactions with the visualizations played a significant role in increasing understanding.

  10. Stability, Nonlinearity and Reliability of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang; Chen, Di

    2007-01-01

    Electrostatic micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) is a special branch with a wide range of applications in sensing and actuating devices in MEMS. This paper provides a survey and analysis of the electrostatic force of importance in MEMS, its physical model, scaling effect, stability, nonlinearity and reliability in detail. It is necessary to understand the effects of electrostatic forces in MEMS and then many phenomena of practical importance, such as pull-in instability and the effects of effective stiffness, dielectric charging, stress gradient, temperature on the pull-in voltage, nonlinear dynamic effects and reliability due to electrostatic forces occurred in MEMS can be explained scientifically, and consequently the great potential of MEMS technology could be explored effectively and utilized optimally. A simplified parallel-plate capacitor model is proposed to investigate the resonance response, inherent nonlinearity, stiffness softened effect and coupled nonlinear effect of the typical electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. Many failure modes and mechanisms and various methods and techniques, including materials selection, reasonable design and extending the controllable travel range used to analyze and reduce the failures are discussed in the electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. Numerical simulations and discussions indicate that the effects of instability, nonlinear characteristics and reliability subjected to electrostatic forces cannot be ignored and are in need of further investigation.

  11. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An extemely lightweight type of precision reflector antenna, being developed for potential deployment from the space shuttle, uses electrostatic forces to tension a thin membrane and form it into a concave reflector surface. The typical shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 meters and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. NASA Langley Research Center built and is currently testing a subscale (16 foot diameter) model of the membrane reflector portion of such an antenna. Preliminary test results and principal factors affecting surface quality are addressed. Factors included are the effect of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic pressure. Only readily available commercial membranes are considered.

  12. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  13. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report, [October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-01-14

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States. Since most of these ESPs are collecting flyash generated from medium- and high-sulfur coal, they are not experiencing operational limitations which are common when treating high-resistivity particles and are performing at an efficiency that is as high as could be expected. However, there are indications that the collection efficiency could be improved with flue gas conditioning. Conditioning is commonly used for solving operational problems associated with high-resistivity dusts. The purpose of conditioning for low- and moderate-resistivity applications is to increase the adhesive characteristics of the dust. Flue gas conditioning that increases particle adhesion has the potential to improve collection efficiency because a large percentage of particulate emissions from a well-performing ESP is due to reentrainment. Improved ESP performance should result if particle reentrainment could be reduced by making the particles more adhesive. This could produce a significant reduction in emissions from and ESP from the Following mechanisms: reduced erosion-type reentrainment; reduced rapping emissions; reduced hopper reentrainment; increased agglomeration of fine particles.

  14. Intermolecular electrostatic energies using density fitting.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A

    2005-07-22

    A method is presented to calculate the electron-electron and nuclear-electron intermolecular Coulomb interaction energy between two molecules by separately fitting the unperturbed molecular electron density of each monomer. This method is based on the variational Coulomb fitting method which relies on the expansion of the ab initio molecular electron density in site-centered auxiliary basis sets. By expanding the electron density of each monomer in this way the integral expressions for the intermolecular electrostatic calculations are simplified, lowering the operation count as well as the memory usage. Furthermore, this method allows the calculation of intermolecular Coulomb interactions with any level of theory from which a one-electron density matrix can be obtained. Our implementation is initially tested by calculating molecular properties with the density fitting method using three different auxiliary basis sets and comparing them to results obtained from ab initio calculations. These properties include dipoles for a series of molecules, as well as the molecular electrostatic potential and electric field for water. Subsequently, the intermolecular electrostatic energy is tested by calculating ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface. Results are presented for electron densities obtained at four different levels of theory using two different basis sets, fitted with three auxiliary basis sets. Additionally, a one-dimensional electrostatic energy surface scan is performed for four different systems (H2O dimer, Mg2+-H2O, Cu+-H2O, and n-methyl-formamide dimer). Our results show a very good agreement with ab initio calculations for all properties as well as interaction energies.

  15. Characterization of electrostatic glass actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, R.; Wüthrich, R.; Sache, L.; Higuchi, T.; Bleuler, H.

    2003-06-01

    Electrostatic glass actuators are a promising concept for various applications. The use of the interaction between glassy substances and electrostatic fields allows synchronous propulsion akin to the electret actuator. Even though some properties of electrostatic glass motors have been observed and described, a characterization is still missing. The authors would like to present the experimental work leading to the determination of the optimal glass blend and to the optimal electrode pattern in order to maximize the exploitable forces. An analytical model is also presented, satisfactorily close to the measured data. These measurements and models constitute a tool to design electrostatic glass actuators such as, for example, a miniature disk drive, which is presented as one of several promising applications.

  16. Computational Methods for Biomolecular Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Olsen, Brett; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of intermolecular interactions is essential for insight into how cells develop, operate, communicate and control their activities. Such interactions include several components: contributions from linear, angular, and torsional forces in covalent bonds, van der Waals forces, as well as electrostatics. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long range and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, and amino or nucleic acids, which are some of the primary components of living systems. Electrostatics, therefore, play important roles in determining the structure, motion and function of a wide range of biological molecules. This chapter presents a brief overview of electrostatic interactions in cellular systems with a particular focus on how computational tools can be used to investigate these types of interactions. PMID:17964951

  17. The Electrostatic Environments of Mars and the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical activity present in the environment near the surfaces of Mars and the moon has very different origins and presents a challenge to manned and robotic planetary exploration missions. Mars is covered with a layer of dust that has been redistributed throughout the entire planet by global dust storms. Dust, levitated by these storms as well as by the frequent dust devils, is expected to be electrostatically charged due to the multiple grain collisions in the dust-laden atmosphere. Dust covering the surface of the moon is expected to be electrostatically charged due to the solar wind, cosmic rays, and the solar radiation itself through the photoelectric effect. Electrostatically charged dust has a large tendency to adhere to surfaces. NASA's Mars exploration rovers have shown that atmospheric dust falling on solar panels can decrease their efficiency to the point of rendering the rover unusable. And as the Apollo missions to the moon showed, lunar dust adhesion can hinder manned and unmanned lunar exploration activities. Taking advantage of the electrical activity on both planetary system bodies, dust removal technologies are now being developed that use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to produce controlled dust motion. This paper presents a short review of the theoretical and semiempirical models that have been developed for the lunar and Martian electrical environments.

  18. Electrostatic prepregging of thermoplastic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzy, John D.; Varughese, Babu; Thammongkol, Vivan; Tincher, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    Thermoplastic towpregs of PEEK/AS-4, PEEK/S-2 glass and LaRC-TPI/AS-4, produced by electrostatic deposition of charged and fluidized polymer powders on spread continuous fiber tows, are described. Processing parameters for combining PEEK 150 powder with unsized 3k AS-4 carbon fiber are presented. The experimental results for PEEK 150/AS-4 reveal that electrostatic fluidized bed coating may be an economically attractive process for producing towpreg.

  19. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  20. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  1. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  2. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  3. Adhesive interactions between vesicles in the strong adhesion limit

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Arun; Anderson, Travers H.; Leal, L. Gary; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the adhesive interaction energy between a pair of vesicles in the strong adhesion limit, in which bending forces play a negligible role in determining vesicle shape compared to forces due to membrane stretching. Although force-distance or energy distance relationships characterizing adhesive interactions between fluid bilayers are routinely measured using the surface forces apparatus, the atomic force microscope and the biomembrane force probe, the interacting bilayers in these methods are supported on surfaces (e.g. mica sheet) and cannot be deformed. However, it is known that in a suspension, vesicles composed of the same bilayer can deform by stretching or bending, and can also undergo changes in volume. Adhesively interacting vesicles can thus form flat regions in the contact zone, which will result in an enhanced interaction energy as compared to rigid vesicles. The focus of this paper is to examine the magnitude of the interaction energy between adhesively interacting, deformed vesicles relative to free, undeformed vesicles as a function of the intervesicle separation. The modification of the intervesicle interaction energy due to vesicle deformability can be calculated knowing the undeformed radius of the vesicles, R0, the bending modulus kb, the area expansion modulus Ka, and the adhesive minimum WP(0) and separation DP(0) in the energy of interaction between two flat bilayers, which can be obtained from the force-distance measurements made using the above supported-bilayer methods. For vesicles with constant volumes, we show that adhesive potentials between non-deforming bilayers such as ∣WP(0)∣∼5×10−4mJ/m2, which are ordinarily considered weak in colloidal physics literature, can result in significantly deep (>10×) energy minima due to increase in vesicle area and flattening in the contact region. If the osmotic expulsion of water across the vesicles driven by the tense, stretched membrane in the presence of an osmotically active

  4. Adhesive interactions between vesicles in the strong adhesion limit.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Arun; Anderson, Travers H; Leal, L Gary; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    We consider the adhesive interaction energy between a pair of vesicles in the strong adhesion limit, in which bending forces play a negligible role in determining vesicle shape compared to forces due to membrane stretching. Although force−distance or energy−distance relationships characterizing adhesive interactions between fluid bilayers are routinely measured using the surface forces apparatus, the atomic force microscope, and the biomembrane force probe, the interacting bilayers in these methods are supported on surfaces (e.g., mica sheet) and cannot be deformed. However, it is known that, in a suspension, vesicles composed of the same bilayer can deform by stretching or bending, and can also undergo changes in volume. Adhesively interacting vesicles can thus form flat regions in the contact zone, which will result in an enhanced interaction energy as compared to rigid vesicles. The focus of this paper is to examine the magnitude of the interaction energy between adhesively interacting, deformed vesicles relative to free, undeformed vesicles as a function of the intervesicle separation. The modification of the intervesicle interaction energy due to vesicle deformability can be calculated knowing the undeformed radius of the vesicles, R0, the bending modulus, k(b), the area expansion modulus, k(a), and the adhesive minimum, W(P)(0), and separation, D(P)(0), in the energy of interaction between two flat bilayers, which can be obtained from the force−distance measurements made using the above supported-bilayer methods. For vesicles with constant volumes, we show that adhesive potentials between nondeforming bilayers such as |W(P)(0)| 5 × 10(−4) mJ/m2, which are ordinarily considered weak in the colloidal physics literature, can result in significantly deep (>10×) energy minima due to increase in vesicle area and flattening in the contact region. If the osmotic expulsion of water across the vesicles driven by the tense, stretched membrane in the presence

  5. A theoretical investigation into the strength of N-NO2 bonds, ring strain and electrostatic potential upon formation of intermolecular H-bonds between HF and the nitro group in nitrogen heterocyclic rings C n H2n N-NO2 (n = 2-5), RDX and HMX.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Guo; Ren, Fu-de; Shi, Wen-Jing

    2015-11-01

    Changes in N-NO2 bond strength, ring strain energy and electrostatic potential upon formation of intermolecular H-bonds between HF and the nitro group in nitrogen heterocyclic rings C n H2n N-NO2 (n = 2-5), RDX and HMX were investigated using DFT-B3LYP and MP2(full) methods with the 6-311++G(2df,2p) and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Analysis of electron density shifts was also carried out. The results indicate that H-bonding energy correlates well with the increment of ring strain energy. Upon complex formation, the strength of the N-NO2 trigger-bond is enhanced, suggesting reduced sensitivity, while judged by the increased ring strain energy, sensitivity is increased. However, some features of the molecular surface electrostatic potential, such as a local maximum above the N-NO2 bond and ring, σ + (2) and electrostatic balance parameter ν, remain essentially unchanged upon complex formation, and only a small change in the impact sensitivity h 50 is suggested. It is not sufficient to determine sensitivity solely on the basis of trigger bond or ring strain; as a global feature of a molecule, the molecular surface electrostatic potential is available to help judge the change of sensitivity in H-bonded complexes. Graphical Abstract The strengthened N-NO2 bond suggests reduced sensitivity, while it is reverse by theincreased ring strain energy upon the complex formation. However, the molecular surfaceelectrostatic potential (V S) shows the little change of h 50. The V S should be taken into accountin the analysis of explosive sensitivity in the H-bonded complex.

  6. Rethinking Electrostatic Solvers in Particle Simulations for the Exascale Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Járleberg, Erik; Apostolov, Rossen; Laure, Erwin

    2012-10-01

    In preparation to the exascale era, an alternative approach to calculate the electrostatic forces in Particle Mesh (PM) methods is proposed. While the traditional techniques are based on the calculation of the electrostatic potential by solving the Poisson equation, in the new approach the electric field is calculated by solving Ampère's law. When the Ampere's law is discretized explicitly in time, the electric field values on the mesh are simply updated from the previous values. In this way, the electrostatic solver becomes an embarrassingly parallel problem, making the algorithm extremely scalable and suitable for exascale computing platforms. An implementation PM code with the new electrostatic solver is presented to show that the proposed method produces correct results. It is a very promising algorithm for exascale PM simulations.

  7. Effects of the electrostatic environment on the Majorana nanowire devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuik, A.; Eeltink, D.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Wimmer, M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the promising platforms for creating Majorana bound states is a hybrid nanostructure consisting of a semiconducting nanowire covered by a superconductor. We analyze the previously disregarded role of electrostatic interaction in these devices. Our main result is that Coulomb interaction causes the chemical potential to respond to an applied magnetic field, while spin-orbit interaction and screening by the superconducting lead suppress this response. Consequently, the electrostatic environment influences two properties of Majorana devices: the shape of the topological phase boundary and the oscillations of the Majorana splitting energy. We demonstrate that both properties show a non-universal behavior, and depend on the details of the electrostatic environment. We show that when the wire only contains a single electron mode, the experimentally accessible inverse self-capacitance of this mode fully captures the interplay between electrostatics and Zeeman field. This offers a way to compare theoretical predictions with experiments.

  8. Formation of electrostatic solitons and hole structures in pair plasmas.

    PubMed

    Jao, C-S; Hau, L-N

    2012-11-01

    In an electron-proton plasma, electrostatic solitary waves and hole structures can easily be generated by streaming instability due to the asymmetric inertia between ions and electrons. It has been argued theoretically whether electrostatic solitons and/or hole structures can form in a pair plasma. This paper presents results on the formation of pair electrostatic hole structure in an electron-positron plasma based on one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. In particular, we show the feature of interlacing electron and positron holes in phase space generated by current-free electron and positron beams streaming in a stationary electron-positron background plasma. The coexistent electron and positron holes are associated with periodic interlacing of positive and negative potentials, respectively. Detailed comparisons between simulation results and linear theory of streaming instability in pair plasmas are made and the thermodynamic state is inferred. PMID:23214890

  9. Analysis of the effect of LRP-1 silencing on the invasive potential of cancer cells by nanomechanical probing and adhesion force measurements using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Cigne, A; Chièze, L; Beaussart, A; El-Kirat-Chatel, S; Dufrêne, Y F; Dedieu, S; Schneider, C; Martiny, L; Devy, J; Molinari, M

    2016-04-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies that target LRP-1 to modulate proteolysis could also affect adhesion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Here, we investigated the effect of LRP-1 silencing on parameters reflecting cancer cells' invasiveness by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that LRP-1 silencing induces changes in the cells' adhesion behavior, particularly the dynamics of cell attachment. Clear alterations in morphology, such as more pronounced stress fibers and increased spreading, leading to increased area and circularity, were also observed. The determination of the cells' mechanical properties by AFM showed that these differences are correlated with an increase in Young's modulus. Moreover, the measurements show an overall decrease in cell motility and modifications of directional persistence. An overall increase in the adhesion force between the LRP-1-silenced cells and a gelatin-coated bead was also observed. Ultimately, our AFM-based force spectroscopy data, recorded using an antibody directed against the β1 integrin subunit, provide evidence that LRP-1 silencing modifies the rupture force distribution. Together, our results show that techniques traditionally used for the investigation of cancer cells can be coupled with AFM to gain access to complementary phenotypic parameters that can help discriminate between specific phenotypes associated with different degrees of invasiveness. PMID:26965453

  10. Drosophila homologue of Diaphanous 1 (DIAPH1) controls the metastatic potential of colon cancer cells by regulating microtubule-dependent adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Na; Bhuwania, Ridhirama; Gromova, Kira; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Lange, Tobias; Riecken, Kristoffer; Linder, Stefan; Kneussel, Matthias; Izbicki, Jakob R; Windhorst, Sabine

    2015-07-30

    Drosophila homologue of Diaphanous 1 (DIAPH1) regulates actin polymerization and microtubule (MT) stabilization upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Recently, we showed strongly reduced lung metastasis of DIAPH1-depleted colon cancer cells but we found accumulations of DIAPH1-depleted cells in bone marrow. Here, we analyzed possible organ- or tissue-specific metastasis of DIAPH1-depleted HCT-116 cells. Our data confirmed that depletion of DIAPH1 strongly inhibited lung metastasis and revealed that, in contrast to control cells, DIAPH1-depleted cells did not form metastases in further organs. Detailed mechanistic analysis on cells that were not stimulated with LPA to activate the cytoskeleton-modulating activity of DIAPH1, revealed that even under basal conditions DIAPH1 was essential for cellular adhesion to collagen. In non-stimulated cells DIAPH1 did not control actin dynamics but, interestingly, was essential for stabilization of microtubules (MTs). Additionally, DIAPH1 controlled directed vesicle trafficking and with this, local clustering of the adhesion protein integrin-β1 at the plasma membrane. Therefore, we conclude that under non-stimulating conditions DIAPH1 controls cellular adhesion by stabilizing MTs required for local clustering of integrin-β1 at the plasma membrane. Thus, blockade of DIAPH1-tubulin interaction may be a promising approach to inhibit one of the earliest steps in the metastatic cascade of colon cancer. PMID:26124177

  11. Denture Adhesives

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone and give temporary relief from loosening dentures. Zinc and Potential Risk Zinc is a mineral that is an essential ingredient for good health. ... in some dietary supplements. However, an excess of zinc in the body can lead to health problems ...

  12. Electrostatic Surface Modifications to Improve Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shmueli, Ron B.; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Gene therapy has the potential to treat a wide variety of diseases including genetic diseases and cancer. Areas covered in this review This review introduces biomaterials used for gene delivery and then focuses on the use of electrostatic surface modifications to improve gene delivery materials. These modifications have been used to stabilize therapeutics in vivo, add cell-specific targeting ligands, and promote controlled release. Coatings of nanoparticles and microparticles as well as non-particulate surface coatings are covered in this review. Electrostatic principles are crucial for the development of multilayer delivery structures fabricated by the layer-by-layer method. What the reader will gain The reader will gain knowledge about the composition of biomaterials used for surface modifications and how these coatings and multilayers can be utilized to improve spatial control and efficiency of delivery. Examples are shown for the delivery of nucleic acids, including DNA and siRNA, to in vitro and in vivo systems. Take home message The versatile and powerful approach of electrostatic coatings and multilayers will lead to the development of enhanced gene therapies. PMID:20201712

  13. Electrostatic powder painting of non-conductive substrates

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, A.J.; Raghavan, S.; Lindstrom, T.; Leal, J.; Martin, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    A method to electrostatically powder coat non-conductive substrates has been developed. This method uses a thin coating of an aerosol antistat containing a fatty quaternary ammonium compound onto the substrate prior to powder painting. Microstructural analysis of the epoxy coatings has shown that gases are trapped within the coating causing voids. The formation of large voids with diameters as large as 50 {micro}m appear to be due to water-vapor released from the non-conductive substrate during curing of the epoxy coating. Even with the voids within the epoxy layer, the coating on the antistat treated substrate passed military specifications for adhesion and solvent resistance.

  14. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  15. Analysis of the effect of LRP-1 silencing on the invasive potential of cancer cells by nanomechanical probing and adhesion force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cigne, A.; Chièze, L.; Beaussart, A.; El-Kirat-Chatel, S.; Dufrêne, Y. F.; Dedieu, S.; Schneider, C.; Martiny, L.; Devy, J.; Molinari, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies that target LRP-1 to modulate proteolysis could also affect adhesion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Here, we investigated the effect of LRP-1 silencing on parameters reflecting cancer cells' invasiveness by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that LRP-1 silencing induces changes in the cells' adhesion behavior, particularly the dynamics of cell attachment. Clear alterations in morphology, such as more pronounced stress fibers and increased spreading, leading to increased area and circularity, were also observed. The determination of the cells' mechanical properties by AFM showed that these differences are correlated with an increase in Young's modulus. Moreover, the measurements show an overall decrease in cell motility and modifications of directional persistence. An overall increase in the adhesion force between the LRP-1-silenced cells and a gelatin-coated bead was also observed. Ultimately, our AFM-based force spectroscopy data, recorded using an antibody directed against the β1 integrin subunit, provide evidence that LRP-1 silencing modifies the rupture force distribution. Together, our results show that techniques traditionally used for the investigation of cancer cells can be coupled with AFM to gain access to complementary phenotypic parameters that can help discriminate between specific phenotypes associated with different degrees of invasiveness.Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies

  16. Engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents results from an engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration test. The electrostatic enclosure is part of an overall in-depth contamination control strategy for transuranic (TRU) waste recovery operations. TRU contaminants include small particles of plutonium compounds associated with defense-related waste recovery operations. Demonstration test items consisted of an outer Perma-con enclosure, an inner tent enclosure, and a ventilation system test section for testing electrostatic curtain devices. Three interchangeable test fixtures that could remove plutonium from the contaminated dust were tested in the test section. These were an electret filter, a CRT as an electrostatic field source, and an electrically charged parallel plate separator. Enclosure materials tested included polyethylene, anti-static construction fabric, and stainless steel. The soil size distribution was determined using an eight stage cascade impactor. Photographs of particles containing plutonium were obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM also provided a second method of getting the size distribution. The amount of plutonium removed from the aerosol by the electrostatic devices was determined by radiochemistry from input and output aerosol samplers. The inner and outer enclosures performed adequately for plutonium handling operations and could be used for full scale operations.

  17. Adhesive switching of membranes: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Behrisch, Almuth; Sackmann, Erich

    2000-04-01

    We report on a study of a model bioadhesion system: giant vesicles in contact with a supported lipid bilayer. Embedded in both membranes are very low concentrations of homophilic recognition molecules (contact site A receptors) competing with higher concentrations of repeller molecules: polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipids. These repellers mimic the inhibiting effect of the cell glycocalyx on adhesion. The effective adhesive interaction between the two membranes is probed by interferometric analysis of thermal fluctuations. We find two competing states of adhesion: initial weak adhesion is followed by slower aggregation of the adhesion molecules into small, tightly bound clusters that coexist with the regions of weak adhesion. We interpret our results in terms of a double-well intermembrane potential, and we present a theoretical analysis of the intermembrane interaction in the presence of mobile repeller molecules at a fixed chemical potential that shows that the interaction potential indeed should have just such a double-well shape. At a fixed repeller concentration we recover a conventional purely repulsive potential. We discuss the implications of our findings in terms of a general amplification mechanism of the action of sparse adhesion molecules by a nonspecific double-well potential. We also discuss the important role of the Helfrich undulation force for the proposed scenario.

  18. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  19. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  20. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-16

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of <5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  1. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of <5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  2. Thermal Characterization of Epoxy Adhesive by Hotfire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.; Haddock, M. Reed; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes subscale solid-rocket motor hot-fire testing of epoxy adhesives in flame surface bondlines to evaluate heat-affected depth, char depth and ablation rate. Hot-fire testing is part of an adhesive down-selection program on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle to provide additional confidence in the down-selected adhesives. The current nozzle structural adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Prior to hot-fire testing, adhesives were tested for chemical, physical and mechanical properties, which resulted in the selection of two potential replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's TIGA 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. Hot-fire testing consisted of four forty-pound charge (FPC) motors fabricated in configurations that would allow side-by-side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives with the current RSRM adhesives. Results of the FPC motor testing show that: 1) the phenolic char depths on radial bondlines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used, 2) the replacement candidate adhesive char depths are equivalent to the char depths of the current adhesives, 3) the heat-affected depths of the candidate and current adhesives are equivalent, and 4) the ablation rates for both replacement adhesives were equivalent to the current adhesives.

  3. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  4. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Nobrega, Marcelo M.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  5. Surface electrostatics: theory and computations

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, G.; Javili, A.; Steinmann, P.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the electrostatic response of materials accounting for boundary surfaces with their own (electrostatic) constitutive behaviour. The electric response of materials with (electrostatic) energetic boundary surfaces (surfaces that possess material properties and constitutive structures different from those of the bulk) is formulated in a consistent manner using a variational framework. The forces and moments that appear due to bulk and surface electric fields are also expressed in a consistent manner. The theory is accompanied by numerical examples on porous materials using the finite-element method, where the influence of the surface electric permittivity on the electric displacement, the polarization stress and the Maxwell stress is examined. PMID:24711720

  6. Electrostatic precipitator construction having spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-23

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A plurality of identical spacers is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the spacers is an elongated single unitary member and has one end fixed to a surface of one of a pair of adjacent surfaces of the plates and the other end abutting the other of the adjacent surfaces.

  7. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  8. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  9. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  10. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  11. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  12. Analyzing electrostatic induced damage risk to reticles with an in situ e-reticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Richard; Sebald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    E-Reticle system is an electrostatic field test device, which has the form factor of a conventional six inch quartz production reticle. The E-Reticle was used to assess the ESD damage risks in a mask cleaning tool. Test results indicate that a reticle may see higher than ITRS recommended electrostatic potential specifications when mechanical operations and cold DIW rinse start and in progress, hence seeing increased probability of electrostatic induced damages.

  13. Electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique for small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses: feasibility testing.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, G L; Rittgers, S E

    1997-01-01

    Multiple studies have indicated the importance of surface charge in the adhesion of multiple cardiovascular cell lines including platelets and endothelial cells on the substrate materials (1,4,7-10,12-15). It is the purpose of this article to report a feasibility study conducted using an electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique. The feasibility study was conducted using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a static pool apparatus, a voltage source, and a parallel plate capacitor. The HUVEC concentration and seeding times were constant at 560,000 HUVEC/ml and 30 min, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy examination of the endothelial cell adhesion indicated that an induced temporary positive surface charge on e-PTFE graft material enhances the number and the maturation (flattening) of HUVECs adhered. The results indicated that the total number of endothelial cells adhered (70.9 mm2) was increased from 9198 +/- 1194 HUVECs on the control (no induced surface charge) e-PTFE to 22,482 +/- 4814 HUVECs (2.4 x control) on the maximum induced positive surface charge. The total number of cells in the flattened phase of adhesion increased from 837 +/- 275 to 6785 +/- 1012 HUVECs (8.1x) under identical conditions. Thus, the results of the feasibility study support the premise that electrostatic interaction is an important factor in both the endothelial cell adhesion and spreading processes and suggest that the electrostatic seeding technique may lead to an increased patency of small diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses.

  14. An Electrostatic Stepper Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partington, E. C.; Wong, Edward Chun Kay; Bullough, W. A.

    This paper describes a new concept in pulse controlled motor and precision linear actuator techniques. Piezo translators [PZT] employed to provide reciprocating primary motion are connected to a load via a controllable electrorheological fluid [ERF] clutch to form a programmable speed and step-width drive. Ideal considerations are used to quantify the limiting potential of the drive and details are given of its development and progress.

  15. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  16. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  17. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  18. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  19. Electrostatic precipitator with precipitator electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Junkers, G.

    1980-12-16

    The invention relates to an electrostatic precipitator with collecting electrodes which are arranged in rows adjacent to each other and in respective pairs at equal distances from a respective discharge electrode with which they cooperate. Spring elements are provided between the collecting electrodes and influence the stiffness and oscillating properties of the array of the collecting electrodes.

  20. Defining protein electrostatic recognition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Roberts, Victoria A.

    The objective is to elucidate the nature of electrostatic forces controlling protein recognition processes by using a tightly coupled computational and interactive computer graphics approach. The TURNIP program was developed to determine the most favorable precollision orientations for two molecules by systematic search of all orientations and evaluation of the resulting electrostatic interactions. TURNIP was applied to the transient interaction between two electron transfer metalloproteins, plastocyanin and cytochrome c. The results suggest that the productive electron-transfer complex involves interaction of the positive region of cytochrome c with the negative patch of plastocyanin, consistent with experimental data. Application of TURNIP to the formation of the stable complex between the HyHEL-5 antibody and its protein antigen lysozyme showed that long-distance electrostatic forces guide lysozyme toward the HyHEL-5 binding site, but do not fine tune its orientation. Determination of docked antigen/antibody complexes requires including steric as well as electrostatic interactions, as was done for the U10 mutant of the anti-phosphorylcholine antibody S107. The graphics program Flex, a convenient desktop workstation program for visualizing molecular dynamics and normal mode motions, was enhanced. Flex now has a user interface and was rewritten to use standard graphics libraries, so as to run on most desktop workstations.

  1. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  2. Inertial electrostatic confinement I(IEC) neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Caramana, E.J.; Janssen, R.D.; Nystrom, W.D.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Trent, B.C.; Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J.

    1995-12-01

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P.T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2*10 [10]. neutrons/sec in steady state. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. This paper discusses the IEC concept and how it can be adapted to a steady-state assaying source and an intense pulsed neutron source. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented.

  3. Atomic processes in Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) devices

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.; Turner, L.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Barnes, D.C.; Nystrom, W.D.; Bussard, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P. T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2*10{sup 10} neutrons/sec. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. Atomic physics effects strongly influence the performance of all of these systems. Important atomic effects include elastic scattering, ionization, excitation, and charge exchange. This paper discusses how an IEC system is influenced by these effects and how to design around them. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented.

  4. First-principles simulations of electrostatic interactions between dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Itou, H. Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.

    2014-12-15

    We investigated the electrostatic interaction between two identical dust grains of an infinite mass immersed in homogeneous plasma by employing first-principles N-body simulations combined with the Ewald method. We specifically tested the possibility of an attractive force due to overlapping Debye spheres (ODSs), as was suggested by Resendes et al. [Phys. Lett. A 239, 181–186 (1998)]. Our simulation results demonstrate that the electrostatic interaction is repulsive and even stronger than the standard Yukawa potential. We showed that the measured electric field acting on the grain is highly consistent with a model electrostatic potential around a single isolated grain that takes into account a correction due to the orbital motion limited theory. Our result is qualitatively consistent with the counterargument suggested by Markes and Williams [Phys. Lett. A 278, 152–158 (2000)], indicating the absence of the ODS attractive force.

  5. Enteral n-3 fatty acids and micronutrients enhance percentage of positive neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion molecules: a potential mediator of pressure ulcer healing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Theilla, Miriam; Schwartz, Betty; Zimra, Yael; Shapiro, Haim; Anbar, Ronit; Rabizadeh, Esther; Cohen, Jonathan; Singer, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    n-3 Fatty acids are recognised as influencing both wound healing and immunity. We assessed the impact of a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula (study formula) on the healing of pressure ulcers and on immune function in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. A total of forty patients with pressure ulcers and receiving nutritional support were enrolled (intervention group, n 20, received study formula; and a control group, n 20, received an isoenergetic formula). Total and differential leucocyte count and percentage of adhesion molecule positive granulocyte and lymphocyte cells (CD11a, CD11b, CD18 and CD49b) were measured on days 0, 7 and 14. Percentage of positive lymphocytes for CD54, CD49b, CD49d and CD8 were also measured on days 0, 7 and 14. The state of pressure ulcers was assessed by using the pressure ulcer scale for healing tool score on days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. No between-group differences in patient demographics, anthropometry or diagnostic class were observed. Patients who received the study formula showed significant increases in the percentage of positive CD18 and CD11a lymphocytes and of CD49b granulocytes as compared to controls (P < 0·05). While the severity of pressure ulcers was not significantly different between the two groups on admission, severity increased significantly over time for the control group (P < 0·05), but not for the study group. The present study suggests that a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula may prevent worsening of pressure ulcers and that this effect may be mediated by an effect on adhesion molecule expression.

  6. Use of membrane collectors in electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D J; Pasic, H; Alam, M K; Shi, L; Haynes, B; Cochran, J; Khan, W

    2001-10-01

    Membrane collection surfaces, developed and patented by researchers at Ohio University, were used to replace steel plates in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Such replacement facilitates tension-based rapping, which shears the adhered particle layer from the collector surface more effectively than hammer-based rapping. Tests were performed to measure the collection efficiency of the membranes and to quantify the potential improvements of this novel cleaning technique with respect to re-entrainment. Results indicate that even semiconductor materials (e.g., carbon fibers) collect ash nearly as efficiently as steel plates, potentially indicating that collection surface resistivity is primarily dictated by the accumulated ash layer and not by the underlying plate conductivity. In addition, virtually all sheared particles separated from the collecting membranes fell within the boundary layer of the membrane, indicating extremely low potential for re-entrainment.

  7. Electrostatic Charging of the Pathfinder Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark W.; Kolecki, Joseph C.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission will send a lander and a rover to the martian surface. Because of the extremely dry conditions on Mars, electrostatic charging of the rover is expected to occur as it moves about. Charge accumulation may result in high electrical potentials and discharge through the martian atmosphere. Such discharge could interfere with the operation of electrical elements on the rover. A strategy was sought to mitigate this charge accumulation as a precautionary measure. Ground tests were performed to demonstrate charging in laboratory conditions simulating the surface conditions expected at Mars. Tests showed that a rover wheel, driven at typical rover speeds, will accumulate electrical charge and develop significant electrical potentials (average observed, 110 volts). Measurements were made of wheel electrical potential, and wheel capacitance. From these quantities, the amount of absolute charge was estimated. An engineering solution was developed and recommended to mitigate charge accumulation. That solution has been implemented on the actual rover.

  8. Geometric and electrostatic modeling using molecular rigidity functions

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    Geometric and electrostatic modeling is an essential component in computational biophysics and molecular biology. Commonly used geometric representations admit geometric singularities such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets that lead to computational instabilities in the molecular modeling. Our present work explores the use of flexibility and rigidity index (FRI), which has a proved superiority in protein B-factor prediction, for biomolecular geometric representation and associated electrostatic analysis. FRI rigidity surfaces are free of geometric singularities. We propose a rigidity based Poisson–Boltzmann equation for biomolecular electrostatic analysis. These approaches to surface and electrostatic modeling are validated by a set of 21 proteins.more » Our results are compared with those of established methods. Finally, being smooth and analytically differentiable, FRI rigidity functions offer excellent curvature analysis, which characterizes concave and convex regions on protein surfaces. Polarized curvatures constructed by using the product of minimum curvature and electrostatic potential is shown to predict potential protein–ligand binding sites.« less

  9. Discriminatory bio-adhesion over nano-patterned polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gon, Saugata

    1000/mum 2) was required for fibrinogen adsorption while a greater density comprised the adhesion threshold for albumin. Surface compositions between these two thresholds discriminated binding of the two proteins. The binding behavior of the two proteins from a mixture was well anticipated by the single- protein binding behaviors of the individual proteins. The mechanism for protein capture was shown to be multivalent: protein adhesion always occurred for averages spacings of the adhesive patches smaller than the dimensions of the protein of interest. For some backfill brush architectures, the spacing between the patches at the threshold for protein capture clearly corresponded to the major dimension of the target protein. For more dense PEG brush backfills however, larger adhesion thresholds were observed, corresponding to greater numbers of patches involved with the adhesion of each protein molecule. . The thesis demonstrates the tuning of the position of the adhesion thresholds, using fibrinogen as a model protein, using variations in brush properties and ionic strength. The directions of the trends indicate that the brushes do indeed exert steric repulsions toward the proteins while the attractions are electrostatic in nature. The surfaces also demonstrated sharp adhesion thresholds for S. Aureus bacteria, at smaller concentrations of adhesive surfaces elements than those needed for the protein capture. The results suggest that bacteria may be captured while proteins are rejected from these surfaces, and there may be potential to discriminate different bacterial types. Such discrimination from protein-containing bacterial suspensions was investigated briefly in this thesis using S. Aureus and fibrinogen as a model mixture. However, due to binding of fibrinogen to the bacterial surface, the separation did not succeed. It is still expected, however, that these surfaces could be used to selectively capture bacteria in the presence of non-interacting proteins. The

  10. Surface modification with poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) to reduce fibrinogen adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Wei, Ta-Chin; Lee, Chiapyng; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2011-12-12

    Zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA) polymers were known to possess excellent antifouling properties due to high hydration capacity and neutral charge surface. In this study, copolymers of SBMA and acrylic acid (AA) with a variety of compositions were synthesized and were immobilized onto polymeric substrates with layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte films via electrostatic interaction. The amounts of platelet adhesion and fibrinogen adsorption were determined to evaluate hemocompatibility of poly(SBMA-co-AA)-modified substrates. Among various deposition conditions by modulating SBMA ratio in the copolymers and pH of the deposition solution, poly(SBMA(56)-co-AA(44)) deposited at pH 3.0 possessed the best hemocompatibility. This work demonstrated that poly(SBMA-co-AA) copolymers adsorbed on polyelectrolyte-base films via electrostatic interaction improve hemocompatibility effectively and are applicable for various substrates including TCPS, PU, and PDMS. Furthermore, poly(SBMA-co-AA)-coated substrate possesses great durability under rigorous conditions. The preliminary hemocompatibility tests regarding platelet adhesion, fibrinogen adsorption, and plasma coagulation suggest the potential of this technique for the application to blood-contacting biomedical devices. PMID:22077421

  11. Strong, reversible underwater adhesion via gecko-inspired hydrophobic fibers.

    PubMed

    Soltannia, Babak; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-12-24

    Strong, reversible underwater adhesion using gecko-inspired surfaces is achievable through the use of a hydrophobic structural material and does not require surface modification or suction cup effects for this adhesion to be effective. Increased surface energy can aid in dry adhesion in an air environment but strongly degrades wet adhesion via reduction of interfacial energy underwater. A direct comparison of structurally identical but chemically different mushroom shaped fibers shows that strong, reversible adhesion, even in a fully wetted, stable state, is feasible underwater if the structural material of the fibers is hydrophobic and the mating surface is not strongly hydrophilic. The exact adhesion strength will be a function of the underwater interfacial energy between surfaces and the specific failure modes of individual fibers. This underwater adhesion has been calculated to be potentially greater than the dry adhesion for specific combinations of hydrophobic surfaces.

  12. Vibrating diaphragm measures high electrostatic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Meter with flexible conductive diaphragm measures electrostatic charge density on a conducting surface in a vacuum. The diaphragm is supported from an insulated conductive support ring rigidly attached to the conductive surface whose electrostatic charge density is to be measured.

  13. Catalog of materials as potential sources of indoor air emissions. Volume 1. Insulation, wallcoverings, resilient floor coverings, carpet, adhesives, sealants and caulks, and pesticides. Final report, September 1991-September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, A.E.; Scott, K.A.; Sarsony, E.C.; Huff, L.C.; Blackley, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    The catalog presents a discussion of and data on constituents and emissions from products that have the potential to impact the indoor air environment. The Catalog is intended as a tool to be used by researchers to help organize the study of materials as potential sources of indoor air emmisions. Included in the catalog are sections on seven product categories: insulation, wallcoverings, resilient floor coverings, carpet, adhesives, sealants and caulks, and pesticides. Each section presents a classification scheme for the product category, sales and usage volume data, qualitative data on product composition, and quantitative and qualitative data on emission rates to the indoor air. Emissions information is presented only for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) because these are the compounds most likely to be emitted from materials found in homes and office buildings. Data tables summarizing available emissions and constituent data are provided, and are organized according to the classification scheme presented for each product category.

  14. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Cartagena-Rivera, A. X.; Lošdorfer Božič, A.; Carrillo, P. J. P.; San Martín, C.; Mateu, M. G.; Raman, A.; Podgornik, R.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of

  15. Energetics of the initial phase of adhesion of Streptococcus sanguis to hydroxylapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, M M; Taylor, K G; Doyle, R J

    1987-01-01

    The initial adhesion of Streptococcus sanguis 10556 to artificial salivary pellicle and to bare hydroxylapatite was studied at several temperatures between 18 and 37 degrees C. When the natural logarithms of rate constants for adsorption and desorption were plotted against reciprocal temperatures in Arrhenius plots, curved lines were obtained, indicating that the thermodynamic quantities of enthalpy and entropy of activation were temperature dependent. For the bare hydroxylapatite system, the heat capacity (delta Cp = dH/dT) was large and negative. delta Cp was also negative for adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite, although its value was lower. Negative heat capacities, when coupled with favorable entropy, are often indicative of either electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. When electrolyte (100 mM ammonium sulfate) was added to the cell-hydroxylapatite bead mixture, the rate and extent of adhesion were decreased. Addition of nonpolar p-dioxane (10% [vol/vol], final concentration) to the mixture enhanced binding. This suggests that electrostatic linkages participate in the primary adhesion of streptococci to both substrata. The strongly positive entropy values and the lesser temperature dependence of the saliva-coated hydroxylapatite system suggest that another entropy-driven process is imposed on the electrostatic linkages. This supports a role for hydrophobicity, suggesting that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces mediate the initial adhesion of S. sanguis to the salivary pellicle. PMID:3036767

  16. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  17. Gecko adhesion: evolutionary nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Autumn, Kellar; Gravish, Nick

    2008-05-13

    If geckos had not evolved, it is possible that humans would never have invented adhesive nanostructures. Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1ms-1. Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive in requiring both strong attachment and easy rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). The gecko adhesive differs dramatically from conventional adhesives. Conventional PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective elastic modulus to that of PSAs. Setae are self-cleaning and maintain function for months during repeated use in dirty conditions. Setae are an anisotropic 'frictional adhesive' in that adhesion requires maintenance of a proximally directed shear load, enabling either a tough bond or spontaneous detachment. Gecko-like synthetic adhesives may become the glue of the future-and perhaps the screw of the future as well.

  18. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  19. α2,3-Sialyltransferase ST3Gal III Modulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Motility and Adhesion In Vitro and Enhances Its Metastatic Potential In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Garay, Marta; Arteta, Beatriz; Pagès, Lluís; de Llorens, Rafael; de Bolòs, Carme; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando; Peracaula, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell surface sialylation is emerging as an important feature of cancer cell metastasis. Sialyltransferase expression has been reported to be altered in tumours and may account for the formation of sialylated tumour antigens. We have focused on the influence of alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase ST3Gal III in key steps of the pancreatic tumorigenic process. Methodology/Principal Findings ST3Gal III overexpressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines Capan-1 and MDAPanc-28 were generated. They showed an increase of the tumour associated antigen sialyl-Lewisx. The transfectants' E-selectin binding capacity was proportional to cell surface sialyl-Lewisx levels. Cellular migration positively correlated with ST3Gal III and sialyl-Lewisx levels. Moreover, intrasplenic injection of the ST3Gal III transfected cells into athymic nude mice showed a decrease in survival and higher metastasis formation when compared to the mock cells. Conclusion In summary, the overexpression of ST3Gal III in these pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines underlines the role of this enzyme and its product in key steps of tumour progression such as adhesion, migration and metastasis formation. PMID:20824144

  20. The Genetically Modified Polysialylated Form of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule-Positive Cells for Potential Treatment of X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jiho; Kim, Han-Soo; Kang, Joon Won

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cell transplantation of myelin-producing exogenous cells is being extensively explored as a means of remyelinating axons in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We determined whether 3,3',5-Triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) overexpresses the ABCD2 gene in the polysialylated (PSA) form of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-positive cells and promotes cell proliferation and favors oligodendrocyte lineage differentiation. Materials and Methods PSA-NCAM+ cells from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were grown for five days on uncoated dishes in defined medium with or without supplementation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or T3. Then, PSA-NCAM+ spheres were prepared in single cells and transferred to polyornithine/fibronectin-coated glass coverslips for five days to determine the fate of the cells according to the supplementation of these molecules. T3 responsiveness of ABCD2 was analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the growth and fate of cells were determined using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Results Results demonstrated that T3 induces overexpression of the ABCD2 gene in PSA-NCAM+ cells, and can enhance PSA-NCAM+ cell growth in the presence of bFGF, favoring an oligodendrocyte fate. Conclusion These results may provide new insights into investigation of PSA-NCAM+ cells for therapeutic application to X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. PMID:23225827

  1. Test instrumentation evaluates electrostatic hazards in fluid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, L. H.; Henry, R.; Krebs, D.

    1967-01-01

    RJ-1 fuel surface potential is measured with a probe to determine the degree of hazard originating from static electricity buildup in the hydraulic fluid. The probe is mounted in contact with the fluid surface and connected to an electrostatic voltmeter.

  2. Electrostatic mirror objective with eliminated spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Bimurzaev, Seitkerim B; Serikbaeva, Gulnur S; Yakushev, Evgeniy M

    2003-01-01

    Computational formulae for the coefficients of the third-order spherical aberration and the second-order axial chromatic aberration are presented for an axially symmetric electrostatic electron mirror. A technique for eliminating the high-order derivatives of the potential axial distribution in mirror systems from the integrands is described. Conditions for elimination of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations, either separately or simultaneously, are found for a three-electrode axially symmetric mirror composed of coaxial cylinders of the same diameter. A principal scheme of the transmission electron microscope, where an electrostatic electron mirror serves as its objective, is presented. PMID:14599097

  3. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    minimize actuation potentials while eliminating stiction. Two strategies were developed to overcome challenges with electrode screening in the presence of aqueous fluids. First, instead of using the electrostatic actuators to interact directly with aqueous solutions, the actuators were used to regulate pressurized control lines for pneumatic microvalves. Secondly, by adopting a normally-closed architecture, the actuators were converted into microvalves capable of directly interacting with aqueous solutions. The two strategies are complementary, and together should enable sophisticated microfluidic systems for applications ranging from point-of-care diagnostics to portable chemical detection. To conclude the dissertation, I demonstrate a proof-of-principle microfluidic system that contained sixteen independently-operated electrostatic valves, operated with battery-operated electrical ancillaries in a hand-held format.

  4. Electrostatic Spraying With Conductive Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Dawn, Frederic S.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Atkins, Loren E.

    1989-01-01

    Thin, uniform polymer coatings applied in water base normally impossible to charge. Electrostatic sprayer modified so applies coatings suspended or dissolved in electrically conductive liquids. Nozzle and gun constructed of nonconductive molded plastic. Liquid passageway made long enough electrical leakage through it low. Coaxial hose for liquid built of polytetrafluoroethylene tube, insulating sleeve, and polyurethane jacket. Sprayer provided with insulated seal at gun-to-hose connection, nonconductive airhose, pressure tank electrically isolated from ground, and special nozzle electrode. Supply of atomizing air reduced so particle momentum controlled by electrostatic field more effectively. Developed to apply water-base polyurethane coating to woven, shaped polyester fabric. Coating provides pressure seal for fabric, which is part of spacesuit. Also useful for applying waterproof, decorative, or protective coatings to fabrics for use on Earth.

  5. Electrostatic Interactions Between Glycosaminoglycan Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fan; Moyne, Christian; Bai, Yi-Long

    2005-02-01

    The electrostatic interactions between nearest-neighbouring chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS-GAG) molecular chains are obtained on the bottle brush conformation of proteoglycan aggrecan based on an asymptotic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation the CS-GAGs satisfy under the physiological conditions of articular cartilage. The present results show that the interactions are associated intimately with the minimum separation distance and mutual angle between the molecular chains themselves. Further analysis indicates that the electrostatic interactions are not only expressed to be purely exponential in separation distance and decrease with the increasing mutual angle but also dependent sensitively on the saline concentration in the electrolyte solution within the tissue, which is in agreement with the existed relevant conclusions.

  6. Electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Fredricks, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Electric dipole antennas on magnetospheric spacecraft measure E field components of many kinds of electromagnetic waves. In addition, lower hybrid resonance emissions are frequently observed well above the ionosphere. The Ogo 5 plasma wave experiment has also detected new forms of electrostatic emissions that appear to interact very strongly with the local plasma particles. Greatly enhanced wave amplitudes have been found during the expansion phases of substorms, and analysis indicates that these emissions produce strong pitch angle diffusion. Intense broadband electrostatic turbulence is also detected at current layers containing steep magnetic field gradients. This current-driven instability is operative at the bow shock and also at field null regions just within the magnetosheath, and at the magnetopause near the dayside polar cusp. The plasma turbulence appears to involve ion acoustic waves, and the wave particle scattering provides an important collisionless dissipation mechanism for field merging.

  7. Closed loop electrostatic levitation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An electrostatic levitation system is described, which can closely control the position of objects of appreciable size. A plurality of electrodes surround the desired position of an electrostatically charged object, the position of the objects is monitored, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied to hold the object at a desired position. In one system, the object is suspended above a plate-like electrode which has a concave upper face to urge the object toward the vertical axis of the curved plate. An upper electrode that is also curved can be positioned above the object, to assure curvature of the field at any height above the lower plate. In another system, four spherical electrodes are positioned at the points of a tetrahedron, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied in accordance with the object position as detected by two sensors.

  8. Electrostatic interactions in molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna; Terenziani, Francesca

    2004-03-01

    Non-additive collective behavior appears in molecular materials as a result of intermolecular interactions. We present a model for interacting polar and polarizable molecules that applies to different supramolecular architectures of donor-π-acceptor molecules. We follow a bottom-up modeling strategy: the detailed analysis of spectroscopic data of solvated molecules leads to the definition of a simple two-state model for the molecular units. Classical electrostatic interactions are then introduced to model molecular clusters. The molecular properties are strickingly affected by supramolecular interactions, as demonstrated by spectroscopic studies. Brand new phenomena, like phase transitions and multielectron transfer, with no counterpart at the molecular level are observed as direct consequences of electrostatic intermolecular interactions.

  9. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Metzger, Vincent T.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2014-03-01

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems.

  10. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO2 pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO2, N2O and O2 seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no greater than

  11. Electrostatic generator/motor configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F

    2014-02-04

    Electrostatic generators/motors designs are provided that generally may include a first cylindrical stator centered about a longitudinal axis; a second cylindrical stator centered about the axis, a first cylindrical rotor centered about the axis and located between the first cylindrical stator and the second cylindrical stator. The first cylindrical stator, the second cylindrical stator and the first cylindrical rotor may be concentrically aligned. A magnetic field having field lines about parallel with the longitudinal axis is provided.

  12. KSC Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Discussion of key electrostatic issues that have arisen during the past few years at KSC that the Electrostatics Laboratory has studied. The lab has studied in depth the Space Shuttle's Thermal Control System Blankets, the International Space Station Thermal Blanket, the Pan/Tilt Camera Blankets, the Kapton Purge Barrier Curtain, the Aclar Purge Barrier Curtain, the Thrust Vector Controller Blankets, the Tyvek Reaction Control System covers, the AID-PAK and FLU-9 pyro inflatable devices, the Velostat Solid Rocket Booster mats, and the SCAPE suits. In many cases these materials are insulating meaning that they might be a source of unsafe levels of electrostatic discharge (ESD). For each, the lab provided in-depth testing of each material within its current configuration to ensure that it does not cause an ESD concern that may violate the safety of the astronauts, the workers and equipment for NASA. For example the lab provides unique solutions and testing such as Spark Incendivity Testing that checks whether a material is capable of generating a spark strong enough to ignite a flammable gas. The lab makes recommendations to changes in specifications, procedures, and material if necessary. The lab also consults with a variety of non-safety related ESD issues for the agency.

  13. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material. PMID:26228582

  14. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  15. Surface micromachined electrostatically actuated micro peristaltic pump.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Shih, Jason; Lin, Qiao; Yang, Bozhi; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2004-10-01

    An electrostatically actuated micro peristaltic pump is reported. The micro pump is entirely surface micromachined using a multilayer parylene technology. Taking advantage of the multilayer technology, the micro pump design enables the pumped fluid to be isolated from the electric field. Electrostatic actuation of the parylene membrane using both DC and AC voltages was demonstrated and applied to fluid pumping based on a 3-phase peristaltic sequence. A maximum flow rate of 1.7 nL min(-1) and an estimated pumping pressure of 1.6 kPa were achieved at 20 Hz phase frequency. A dynamic analysis was also performed with a lumped-parameter model for the peristaltic pump. The analysis results allow a quantitative understanding of the peristaltic pumping operation, and correctly predict the trends exhibited by the experimental data. The small footprint of the micro pump is well suited for large-scale integration of microfluidics. Moreover, because the same platform technology has also been used to fabricate other devices (e.g. valves, electrospray ionization nozzles, filters and flow sensors), the integration of these different devices can potentially lead to versatile and functional micro total analysis systems (microTAS).

  16. Designing and operating electrostatically driven microengines

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Miller, S.L.; LaVigne, G.F.

    1998-02-01

    Microelectromechanical engines that convert the linear outputs from dual orthogonal electrostatic actuators to rotary motion were first developed in 1993. Referred to as microengines, these early devices demonstrated the potential of microelectromechanical technology, but, as expected from any first-of-its-kind device, were not yet optimized. Yield was relatively low, and the 10 micronewtons of force generated by the actuators was not always enough to ensure reliable operation. Since initial development, these engines have undergone a continuous series of significant improvements on three separate fronts: design, fabrication, and electrical activation. Although all three areas will be discussed, emphasis will be on aspects related to mechanical design and generation of the electrical waveforms used to drive these devices. Microtransmissions that dramatically increase torque will also be discussed. Electrostatically driven microengines can be operated at hundreds of thousands of revolutions per minute making large gear reduction ratios feasible; overall ratios of 3,000,000:1 have been successfully demonstrated. Today`s microengines have evolved into high endurance (one test device has seen over 7,000,000,000 revolutions), high yield, robust devices that have become the primary actuation source for MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) at Sandia National Laboratories.

  17. Using 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) degrading Aminobacter sp. MSH1 in flow through biofilters--initial adhesion and BAM degradation potentials.

    PubMed

    Albers, Christian Nyrop; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Aamand, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Micropollutants in groundwater are given significant attention by water companies and authorities due to an increasing awareness that they might be present even above the legal threshold values. As part of our investigations of the possibility to remove the common groundwater pollutant 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) by introducing the efficient BAM degrader Aminobacter sp. MSH1 into biologically active sand filters, we investigated if the strain adheres to filters containing various filter materials and if the initial adherence and subsequent degradation of BAM could be optimized. We found that most of the inoculated MSH1 cells adhered fast and that parameters like pH and ionic strength had only a minor influence on the adhesion despite huge influence on cell surface hydrophobicity. At the given growth protocol, the MSH1 strain apparently developed a subpopulation that had lost its ability to adhere to the filter materials, which was supported by attempted reinoculation of non-adhered cells. Analysis by quantitative PCR showed that most cells adhered in the top of the filters and that some of these were lost from the filters during initial operation, while insignificant losses occurred after 1 day of operation. The inoculated filters were found to degrade 2.7 μg/L BAM to below 0.1 μg/L at a 1.1-h residence time with insignificant formation of known degradation products. In conclusion, most filter materials and water types should be feasible for inoculation with the MSH1 strain, while more research into degradation at low concentrations and temperatures is needed before this technology is ready for use at actual waterworks. PMID:23670436

  18. Using 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) degrading Aminobacter sp. MSH1 in flow through biofilters--initial adhesion and BAM degradation potentials.

    PubMed

    Albers, Christian Nyrop; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Aamand, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Micropollutants in groundwater are given significant attention by water companies and authorities due to an increasing awareness that they might be present even above the legal threshold values. As part of our investigations of the possibility to remove the common groundwater pollutant 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) by introducing the efficient BAM degrader Aminobacter sp. MSH1 into biologically active sand filters, we investigated if the strain adheres to filters containing various filter materials and if the initial adherence and subsequent degradation of BAM could be optimized. We found that most of the inoculated MSH1 cells adhered fast and that parameters like pH and ionic strength had only a minor influence on the adhesion despite huge influence on cell surface hydrophobicity. At the given growth protocol, the MSH1 strain apparently developed a subpopulation that had lost its ability to adhere to the filter materials, which was supported by attempted reinoculation of non-adhered cells. Analysis by quantitative PCR showed that most cells adhered in the top of the filters and that some of these were lost from the filters during initial operation, while insignificant losses occurred after 1 day of operation. The inoculated filters were found to degrade 2.7 μg/L BAM to below 0.1 μg/L at a 1.1-h residence time with insignificant formation of known degradation products. In conclusion, most filter materials and water types should be feasible for inoculation with the MSH1 strain, while more research into degradation at low concentrations and temperatures is needed before this technology is ready for use at actual waterworks.

  19. Neuron adhesion and strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Aracely; Jian, Kuihuan; Ko, Gladys; Liang, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the neuron/material adhesion is important for neuron stimulation and growth. The current challenges remain in the lack of precision of measuring techniques and understanding the behavior of neuron. Here, we report a fluid shear method to investigate adhesion at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface. In this study, the adhesion of 12-day-old chick embryo-retina neurons cultured on poly-D-lysine coated glass coverslips was measured via parallel disk rotational flow. The shear stress experienced by the cells increases with the disk radius. There is a critical point along the radius (Rc) where the stress experienced by the neurons equals their adhesion. The measured Rc can be used to calculate the neuron adhesion. Our results demonstrate that neurons adhered to the poly-D-lysine had a strain hardening effect. The adhesive shear stress of the neuron-material increased with applied shear (τa). When the τa reached or exceeded the value of 40 dyn/cm2, the adhesion remained constant at approximately 30 dyn/cm2. The present work allowed us not only to quantify the adhesive strength and force but also to evaluate the value of strain hardening at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface.

  20. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  1. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  2. [Bacteriophage λ: electrostatic properties of the genome and its elements].

    PubMed

    Krutinina, G G; Krutinin, E A; Kamzolova, S G; Osypov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage λ is a classical model object in molecular biology, but little is still known on the physical properties of its DNA and regulatory elements. A study was made of the electrostatic properties of phage λ DNA and regulatory elements. A global electrostatic potential distribution along the phage genome was found to be nonuniform with main regulatory elements being located in a limited region with a high potential. The RNA polymerase binding frequency on the linearized phage chromosome directly correlates with its local potential. Strong promoters of the phage and its host Escherichia coli have distinct electrostatic upstream elements, which differ in nucleotide sequence. Attachment and recombination sites of phage λ and its host have a higher potential, which possibly facilitates their recognition by integrase. Phage λ and host Rho-independent terminators have a symmetrical M-shaped potential profile, which only slightly depends on the annotated terminator palindrome length, and occur in a region with a substantially higher potential, which may cause polymerase retention, facilitating the formation of a terminator hairpin in RNA. It was concluded that virtually all elements of phage λ genome have potential distribution specifics, which are related to their structural properties and may play a role in their biological function. The global potential distribution along the phage genome reflects the architecture of the regulation of its transcription and integration in the host genome. PMID:26107891

  3. Design, fabrication and testing of laterally driven electrostatic motors employing walking motion and mechanical leverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, N. R.; Sonnenberg, T.; Molenaar, R.; Elwenspoek, M.

    2003-01-01

    Laterally driven linear electrostatic micromotors have been fabricated by standard surface micromachining. We attempt to employ mechanical leverage with the aim to increase the force from the order of 1 μN up to the order of 0.1 mN, in combination with walking motion to increase the stroke to virtually unlimited. Three designs have been made and tested. We conclude that mechanical levers with proper stiffness characteristics to be driven by electrostatic actuators are feasible. Friction as a function of the applied electrostatic clamp force has been measured, showing that there is a significant adhesion in the clamps. Walking motion has been successfully generated in one of the designs, generating a stroke of 15 μm and a force of 3 μN. Improvement of the clamping is needed to benefit from the implemented levers to increase the generated force.

  4. CATALOG OF MATERIALS AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS - VOLUME 1. INSULATION, WALLCOVERINGS, RESI- LIENT FLOOR COVERINGS, CARPET, ADHESIVES, SEALANTS AND CAULKS, AND PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses and presents data on constituents and emissions from products that have the potential to impact the indoor air environment. t is a tool to be used by researchers to help organize the study of materials as potential sources of indoor air emissions. ncluded are...

  5. Adhesives in larynx repair.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M B; Lyons, G D; Webster, D; Wheeler, V R

    1989-04-01

    Guinea pig laryngeal fractures were used as a model to compare the ease of application and effectiveness of the fibrinogen-adhesive system with the ease of application and effectiveness of cyanoacrylate glue and control fractures stinted with contralateral gelatin film. Seven fibrin adhesive-treated and two cyanoacrylate glue-treated guinea pigs were perfused after 60 and 35 days, respectively. The larynges were serial sectioned, and the wound sites were compared. The fibrinogen adhesive system was easier to dispense than cyanoacrylate glue, did not require a completely dry surface, and stabilized within 3 minutes. Cartilage segment alignment with focal, complete fracture healing and symmetrical chondrocyte proliferation were seen in fibrogen adhesive-stinted larynges. In the cyanoacrylate glue-treated larynges, there was no alignment and minimal, asymmetrical chondrocyte proliferation. Gelatin film-stinted controls exhibited similar features. Thus, fibrogen adhesive was easier to apply and more effectively bound laryngeal fractures than cyanoacrylate glue or gelatin film.

  6. Prevention of peritoneal adhesions: A promising role for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Hussein M

    2011-01-01

    Adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominopelvic surgery, yet the extent of the problem, and its serious consequences, has not been adequately recognized. Adhesions evolved as a life-saving mechanism to limit the spread of intraperitoneal inflammatory conditions. Three different pathophysiological mechanisms can independently trigger adhesion formation. Mesothelial cell injury and loss during operations, tissue hypoxia and inflammation each promotes adhesion formation separately, and potentiate the effect of each other. Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that interruption of a single pathway does not completely prevent adhesion formation. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of adhesion formation and the results of single gene therapy interventions. It explores the promising role of combinatorial gene therapy and vector modifications for the prevention of adhesion formation in order to stimulate new ideas and encourage rapid advancements in this field. PMID:22171139

  7. Electrostatic attraction between overall neutral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adar, Ram M.; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Two overall neutral surfaces with positively and negatively charged domains ("patches") have been shown in recent experiments to exhibit long-range attraction when immersed in an ionic solution. Motivated by the experiments, we calculate analytically the osmotic pressure between such surfaces within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, using a variational principle for the surface-averaged free energy. The electrostatic potential, calculated beyond the linear Debye-Hückel theory, yields an overall attraction at large intersurface separations, over a wide range of the system's controlled length scales. In particular, the attraction is stronger and occurs at smaller separations for surface patches of larger size and charge density. In this large patch limit, we find that the attraction-repulsion crossover separation is inversely proportional to the square of the patch-charge density and to the Debye screening length.

  8. Electrostatic attraction between overall neutral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adar, Ram M; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Two overall neutral surfaces with positively and negatively charged domains ("patches") have been shown in recent experiments to exhibit long-range attraction when immersed in an ionic solution. Motivated by the experiments, we calculate analytically the osmotic pressure between such surfaces within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, using a variational principle for the surface-averaged free energy. The electrostatic potential, calculated beyond the linear Debye-Hückel theory, yields an overall attraction at large intersurface separations, over a wide range of the system's controlled length scales. In particular, the attraction is stronger and occurs at smaller separations for surface patches of larger size and charge density. In this large patch limit, we find that the attraction-repulsion crossover separation is inversely proportional to the square of the patch-charge density and to the Debye screening length. PMID:27627373

  9. Invited review article: the electrostatic plasma lens.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexey

    2013-02-01

    The fundamental principles, experimental results, and potential applications of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating high-current, energetic, heavy ion beams are reviewed. First described almost 50 years ago, this optical beam device provides space charge neutralization of the ion beam within the lens volume, and thus provides an effective and unique tool for focusing high current beams where a high degree of neutralization is essential to prevent beam blow-up. Short and long lenses have been explored, and a lens in which the magnetic field is provided by rare-earth permanent magnets has been demonstrated. Applications include the use of this kind of optical tool for laboratory ion beam manipulation, high dose ion implantation, heavy ion accelerator injection, in heavy ion fusion, and other high technology.

  10. Invited Review Article: The electrostatic plasma lens

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexey

    2013-02-15

    The fundamental principles, experimental results, and potential applications of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating high-current, energetic, heavy ion beams are reviewed. First described almost 50 years ago, this optical beam device provides space charge neutralization of the ion beam within the lens volume, and thus provides an effective and unique tool for focusing high current beams where a high degree of neutralization is essential to prevent beam blow-up. Short and long lenses have been explored, and a lens in which the magnetic field is provided by rare-earth permanent magnets has been demonstrated. Applications include the use of this kind of optical tool for laboratory ion beam manipulation, high dose ion implantation, heavy ion accelerator injection, in heavy ion fusion, and other high technology.

  11. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  12. Advances in the Pathogenesis of Adhesion Development

    PubMed Central

    Awonuga, Awoniyi O.; Belotte, Jimmy; Abuanzeh, Suleiman; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been increasing recognition that pathogenesis of adhesion development includes significant contributions of hypoxia induced at the site of surgery, the resulting oxidative stress, and the subsequent free radical production. Mitochondrial dysfunction generated by surgically induced tissue hypoxia and inflammation can lead to the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase which when optimal have the potential to abrogate mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, preventing the cascade of events leading to the development of adhesions in injured peritoneum. There is a significant cross talk between the several processes leading to whether or not adhesions would eventually develop. Several of these processes present avenues for the development of measures that can help in abrogating adhesion formation or reformation after intraabdominal surgery. PMID:24520085

  13. APBSmem: A Graphical Interface for Electrostatic Calculations at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Callenberg, Keith M.; Choudhary, Om P.; de Forest, Gabriel L.; Gohara, David W.; Baker, Nathan A.; Grabe, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic forces are one of the primary determinants of molecular interactions. They help guide the folding of proteins, increase the binding of one protein to another and facilitate protein-DNA and protein-ligand binding. A popular method for computing the electrostatic properties of biological systems is to numerically solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, and there are several easy-to-use software packages available that solve the PB equation for soluble proteins. Here we present a freely available program, called APBSmem, for carrying out these calculations in the presence of a membrane. The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) is used as a back-end for solving the PB equation, and a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI) coordinates a set of routines that introduce the influence of the membrane, determine its placement relative to the protein, and set the membrane potential. The software Jmol is embedded in the GUI to visualize the protein inserted in the membrane before the calculation and the electrostatic potential after completing the computation. We expect that the ease with which the GUI allows one to carry out these calculations will make this software a useful resource for experimenters and computational researchers alike. Three examples of membrane protein electrostatic calculations are carried out to illustrate how to use APBSmem and to highlight the different quantities of interest that can be calculated. PMID:20949122

  14. The influence of electrostatic forces on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Lubarsky, G V; Browne, M M; Mitchell, S A; Davidson, M R; Bradley, R H

    2005-07-25

    In this paper we investigate the importance of electrostatic double layer forces on the adsorption of human serum albumin by UV-ozone modified polystyrene. Electrostatic forces were measured between oxidized polystyrene surfaces and gold-coated atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. The variation in surface potential with surface oxygen concentration was measured. The observed force characteristics were found to agree with the theory of electrical double layer interaction under the assumption of constant potential. Chemically patterned polystyrene surfaces with adjacent 5 microm x 5 microm polar and non-polar domains have been studied by AFM before and after human serum albumin adsorption. A topographically flat surface is observed before protein adsorption indicating that the patterning process does not physically modify the surface. Friction force imaging clearly reveals the oxidation pattern with the polar domains being characterised by a higher relative friction compared to the non-polar, untreated domains. Far-field force imaging was performed on the patterned surface using the interleave AFM mode to produce two-dimensional plots of the distribution of electrostatic double-layer forces formed when the patterned polystyrene surfaces is immersed in PBS. Imaging of protein layers adsorbed onto the chemically patterned surfaces indicates that the electrostatic double-layer force was a significant driving force in the interaction of protein with the surface.

  15. Adhesion of Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis on a Planar Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; Joy, David Charles; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion of spores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and spherical silica particles on surfaces was experimentally and theoretically investigated in this study. Topography analysis via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy indicates that Bt spores are rod shaped, {approx}1.3 {mu}m in length and {approx}0.8 {mu}m in diameter. The adhesion force of Bt spores and silica particles on gold-coated glass was measured at various relative humidity (RH) levels by AFM. It was expected that the adhesion force would vary with RH because the individual force components contributing to the adhesion force depend on RH. The adhesion force between a particle and a planar surface in atmospheric environments was modeled as the contribution of three major force components: capillary, van der Waals, and electrostatic interaction forces. Adhesion force measurements for Bt spore (silica particle) and the gold surface system were comparable with calculations. Modeling results show that there is a critical RH value, which depends on the hydrophobicity of the materials involved, below which the water meniscus does not form and the contribution of the capillary force is zero. As RH increases, the van der Waals force decreases while the capillary force increases to a maximum value.

  16. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  17. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  18. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  19. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  20. The calculation of electrostatic interactions and their role in determining the energies and geometries of explosive molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.P.; Kober, E.M.; Copenhaver, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Three different procedures were used to calculate electrostatic interactions in explosive molecular crystals. The use of Potential Derived Charges (PDC's) and atom-centered multipole expansions (ACME's) provides reasonable fits of the molecular electrostatic potential. The ability of these approaches to reproduce observed crystal structures was also evaluated.

  1. The direct approach to gravitation and electrostatics method for periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Losilla, S A; Sundholm, D; Jusélius, J

    2010-01-14

    The direct approach to gravitation and electrostatics (DAGE) algorithm is an accurate, efficient, and flexible method for calculating electrostatic potentials. In this paper, we show that the algorithm can be easily extended to consider systems with many different kinds of periodicities, such as crystal lattices, surfaces, or wires. The accuracy and performance are nearly the same for periodic and aperiodic systems. The electrostatic potential for semiperiodic systems, namely defects in crystal lattices, can be obtained by combining periodic and aperiodic calculations. The method has been applied to an ionic model system mimicking NaCl, and to a corresponding covalent model system.

  2. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes.

  3. Dual excitation multiphase electrostatic drive

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Toshiki; Higuchi, Toshiro |; Egawa, Saku

    1995-12-31

    A novel electrostatic drive technology named Dual Excitation Multiphase Electrostatic Drive (DEMED) was presented. A basic DEMED consisted of two plastic films in which 3-phase parallel electrodes were embedded and was driven by a 3-phase ac excitation to the electrodes. Static characteristics of DEMED were calculated and tested and the results agreed very well. Three prototype motors of DEMED were fabricated using commercially available technique. The first prototype consisted of a single slider and stator and generated a linear motion with a slider`s motion range of about 5mm. It weighed 7g and generated a power of 1.6W and a thrust force of 4.4N. The second prototype consisted of 50 layer stack of linear motors, summing their outputs. It weighed 3.6kg and generated a propulsive force of 310N being powered with boosted commercial 3-phase electricity. The third prototype consisted of a rotor and a stator in which electrodes were arranged radially and generated rotational motion. The maximum power of 36mW was generated by the prototype weighing only 260mg for its rotor and stator. From the results of the numerical calculation, a practical design methodology for the motor was determined. An optimal design for a motor employing currently available material and fabrication techniques is provided as an example. Analyses predict that force generation over the interfacial area between the slider and stator of this motor would be 3,900N/m{sup 2}.

  4. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor); Cassanto, John M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microencapsulation and electrostatic processing (MEP) device is provided for forming microcapsules. In one embodiment, the device comprises a chamber having a filter which separates a first region in the chamber from a second region in the chamber. An aqueous solution is introduced into the first region through an inlet port, and a hydrocarbon/ polymer solution is introduced into the second region through another inlet port. The filter acts to stabilize the interface and suppress mixing between the two immiscible solutions as they are being introduced into their respective regions. After the solutions have been introduced and have become quiescent, the interface is gently separated from the filter. At this point, spontaneous formation of microcapsules at the interface may begin to occur, or some fluid motion may be provided to induce microcapsule formation. In any case, the fluid shear force at the interface is limited to less than 100 dynes/sq cm. This low-shear approach to microcapsule formation yields microcapsules with good sphericity and desirable size distribution. The MEP device is also capable of downstream processing of microcapsules, including rinsing, re-suspension in tertiary fluids, electrostatic deposition of ancillary coatings, and free-fluid electrophoretic separation of charged microcapsules.

  5. Electrostatic charging of lunar dust

    SciTech Connect

    Walch, Bob; Horanyi, Mihaly; Robertson, Scott

    1998-10-21

    Transient dust clouds suspended above the lunar surface were indicated by the horizon glow observed by the Surveyor spacecrafts and the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite Experiment (Apollo 17), for example. The theoretical models cannot fully explain these observations, but they all suggest that electrostatic charging of the lunar surface due to exposure to the solar wind plasma and UV radiation could result in levitation, transport and ejection of small grains. We report on our experimental studies of the electrostatic charging properties of an Apollo-17 soil sample and two lunar simulants MLS-1 and JSC-1. We have measured their charge after exposing individual grains to a beam of fast electrons with energies in the range of 20{<=}E{<=}90 eV. Our measurements indicate that the secondary electron emission yield of the Apollo-17 sample is intermediate between MLS-1 and JSC-1, closer to that of MLS-1. We will also discuss our plans to develop a laboratory lunar surface model, where time dependent illumination and plasma bombardment will closely emulate the conditions on the surface of the Moon.

  6. Electrostatic doping in oxide heterostructures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkov, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Sai, Na

    2009-03-01

    Recent experiments on perovskite heterostructures grown by methods ranging from molecular beam epitaxy to pulsed laser deposition suggest the existence of two dimensional electron gas of high mobility at the oxide/oxide interface, and even a possibility of a superconducting state. Both p-type and n-type interfaces have been reported. However, the origin of charge in these insulating materials is still under debate. We report a first-principles study of several heterostructures where we employ the internal filed in a polar oxide LaAlO3 to demonstrate the possibility of the electrostatic doping, an effect similar to a well known polar catastrophe in e.g., III-V semiconductors. We use density functional theory at the LDA+U level. We mainly focus on the electronic structure of the oxide/oxide junctions. The results of our calculations suggest that once the critical thickness of the aluminate layer is reached the internal electric field is sufficient to produce the electrostatic doping. We will discuss simple estimates for the temperature of the superconducting transition and the role of oxygen-related defects such as vacancies in the electronic structure and thermodynamic stability of these fascinating oxide structures.

  7. Electrostatic discharge concepts and definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Borovina, Dan L

    2008-01-01

    Many objects -like a human body, plastic wrap, or a rolling cart -that are electrically neutral, overall, can gain a net electrostatic charge by means of one of three methods: induction, physical transfer, or triboelectric charging (separation of conductive surfaces). The result is a voltage difference between the charged object and other objects, creating a situation where current flow is likely if two objects come into contact or close proximity. This current flow is known as electrostatic discharge, or ESD. The energy and voltage of the discharge can be influenced by factors such as the temperature and humidity in the room, the types of materials or flooring involved, or the clothing and footwear a person uses. Given the possible ranges of the current and voltage characteristic of an ESD pulse, it is important to consider the safety risks associated with detonator handling, assembly and disassembly, transportation and maintenance. For main charge detonators, these safety risks include high explosive violent reactions (HEVR) as well as inadvertent nuclear detonations (lND).

  8. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  9. Preconceptual design for the electrostatic enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a preconceptual design (design criteria and assumptions) for electrostatic enclosures to be used during buried transuranic waste recovery operations. These electrostatic enclosures (along with the application of dust control products) will provide an in-depth contamination control strategy. As part of this preconceptual design, options for electrostatic curtain design are given including both hardwall and fabric enclosures. Ventilation systems, doors, air locks, electrostatic curtains, and supporting systems also are discussed. In addition to the conceptual design, engineering scale tests are proposed to be run at the Test Reactor Area. The planned engineering scale tests will give final material specifications for full-scale retrieval demonstrations.

  10. Preventing Electrostatic-Discharge Damage to Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, W. S.; Dozois, P. C.; Lonborg, J. O.

    1986-01-01

    Booklet discusses damage to electronic components caused by electrostatic discharges during assembly. Describes procedure for setting up static-free workplace for handling and assembling electronic components.

  11. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  12. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  13. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  14. Novel Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Binding Sites on Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, recruited to focal adhesions, and engages in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. Diverse cellular responses, such as cell migration, proliferation, and survival, are regulated by FAK. Prior to activation, FAK adopts an autoinhibited conformation in which the FERM domain binds the kinase domain, blocking access to the activation loop and substrate binding site. Activation of FAK occurs through conformational change, and acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) are known to facilitate this process. PIP2 binding alters the autoinhibited conformation of the FERM and kinase domains and subsequently exposes the activation loop to phosphorylation. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of PIP2 binding and its role in FAK activation remain unclear. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding of FAK to PIP2. Our simulations identified novel areas of basic residues in the kinase domain of FAK that potentially undergo transient binding to PIP2 through electrostatic attractions. Our investigation provides a molecular picture of PIP2-initiated FAK activation and introduces promising new pathways for future studies of FAK regulation. PMID:26186725

  15. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  16. A Triboelectric Sensor Array for Electrostatic Studies on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.; Mackey, Paul J.; Calle, C. I.

    2015-01-01

    The moons electrostatic environment requires careful consideration in the development of future lunar landers. Electrostatically charged dust was well documented during the Apollo missions to cause thermal control, mechanical, and visibility issues. The fine dust particles that make up the surface are electrostatically charged as a result of numerous charging mechanisms. The relatively dry conditions on the moon creates a prime tribocharging environment during surface operations. The photoelectric effect is dominant for lunar day static charging, while plasma electrons are the main contributor for lunar night electrostatic effects. Electrostatic charging is also dependent on solar intensity, Earth-moon relative positions, and cosmic ray flux. This leads to a very complex and dynamic electrostatic environment that must be studied for the success of long term lunar missions.In order to better understand the electrostatic environment of planetary bodies, Kennedy Space Center, in previous collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has developed an electrostatic sensor suite. One of the instruments included in this package is the triboelectric sensor array. It is comprised of strategically selected materials that span the triboelectric series and that also have previous spaceflight history. In this presentation, we discuss detailed testing with the triboelectric sensor array performed at Kennedy Space Center. We will discuss potential benefits and use cases of this low mass, low cost sensor package, both for science and for mission success.

  17. Modeling of a High Force Density Fishbone Shaped Electrostatic Comb Drive Microactuator

    PubMed Central

    Megat Hasnan, Megat Muhammad Ikhsan; Mohd Sabri, Mohd Faizul; Mohd Said, Suhana; Nik Ghazali, Nik Nazri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a high force density fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive actuator. This comb drive actuator has a branched structure similar to a fishbone, which is intended to increase the capacitance of the electrodes and hence increase the electrostatic actuation force. Two-dimensional finite element analysis was used to simulate the motion of the fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive actuator and compared against the performance of a straight sided electrostatic comb drive actuator. Performances of both designs are evaluated by comparison of displacement and electrostatic force. For both cases, the active area and the minimum gap distance between the two electrodes were constant. An active area of 800 × 300 μm, which contained 16 fingers of fishbone shaped actuators and 40 fingers of straight sided actuators, respectively, was used. Through simulation, improvement of drive force of the fishbone shaped electrostatic comb driver is approximately 485% higher than conventional electrostatic comb driver. These results indicate that the fishbone actuator design provides good potential for applications as high force density electrostatic microactuator in MEMS systems. PMID:25165751

  18. Under-water adhesion of rigid spheres on soft, charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion in a liquid medium is fundamentally important for understanding a myriad of physiological and technological issues such as nanoparticle or bacteria uptake by cells, attachment of viruses on bacterial surfaces, adhesion of a bacteria on a preformed biofilm, biofouling of ships and marine vehicles, and many more. In this paper, we provide a theory to analyze the under-water adhesion of a rigid spherical particle on a soft, charged surface, which is represented as a layer of grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). Our model is based on calculating and minimizing the free energy, appropriately modified to account for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. The central result of our paper is that the presence of surface charge typically enhances the adhesion, indicated by a larger negative value of the equilibrium free energy and larger value of the equilibrium depth of indentation. Such a behavior can be explained by noting that the lowering of EDL electrostatic energy due to adhesion better balances the increase in elastic energy caused by the adhesion-induced deformation. We anticipate that our theory will provide the hitherto unknown basis of quantifying the effect of surface charge in under-liquid adhesion, which is central to the vast number of phenomena involving charged bio-systems, like cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  19. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  20. Charge contribution to patch-charged microparticle adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallabh, Chaitanya Krishna Prasad; Vahdat, Armin Saeedi; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    Microparticle adhesion influenced by electrostatic charge has been a significant research interest for over past three decades or so in a wide spectrum of areas of interest from manufacturing (electrophotography, powder technology, metallurgy, and semi-conductor manufacturing) to natural phenomena (desert sandstorms and northern lights (auroras)). However, over the years, as a result of the strong discrepancies between the experimental adhesion measurements data and theoretical predictions, some key issues regarding the contributors of adhesion forces in charged microparticles and the nature of surface charge distribution still remain unresolved. In the current work, a non-contact ultrasonic approach is presented and employed for understanding the nature of charge distribution on a single microparticle and determining the effect of electrostatic charge on its adhesion in a non-invasive manner. From the vibrational spectra of the charged particle response to the ultrasonic substrate oscillations under various electrostatic loading conditions, three distinct shifting patterns of vibrational (rocking) resonance frequencies are observed for each level of applied substrate surface voltage, implying an un-symmetric force field on the particle, thus depicting non-uniform non-symmetric surface charge distribution on its surface. Also, a simple mathematical model was presented and employed for predicting the equivalent bulk charge on a single microparticle (toner) from resonance frequency shifts. In summary, it is found that the charge levels reported here are consistent with the previously published data, and it is demonstrated that, in a non-invasive manner, non-uniform charge distribution on a single microparticle can be observed and its total charge can be predicted.