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Sample records for adhesive remnant index

  1. Effects of Two Soft Drinks on Shear Bond Strength and Adhesive Remnant Index of Orthodontic Metal Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Materials and Methods: Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Conclusion: Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25584049

  2. Do adhesive systems leave resin coats on the surfaces of the metal matrix bands? An adhesive remnant characterization.

    PubMed

    Arhun, Neslihan; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Reestablishing proximal contacts with composite resins may prove challenging since the applied adhesives may lead to resin coating that produces additional thickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface of metal matrix bands after application of adhesive systems and blowing or wiping off the adhesive before polymerization. Seventeen groups of matrix bands were prepared. The remnant particles were characterized by energy dispersive spectrum and scanning electron microscopy. Total etch and two-step self-etch adhesives did not leave any resin residues by wiping and blowing off. All-in-one adhesive revealed resin residues despite wiping off. Prime and Bond NT did not leave any remnant with compomer. Clinicians must be made aware of the consequences of possible adhesive remnants on matrix bands that may lead to a defective definitive restoration. The adhesive resin used for Class II restorations may leave resin coats on metal matrix bands after polymerization, resulting in additional thickness on the metal matrix bands and poor quality of the proximal surface of the definitive restoration when the adhesive system is incorporated in the restoration. PMID:23484179

  3. Effect of adhesive remnant removal on enamel topography after bracket debonding

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Larissa Adrian Meira; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Vedovello, Mario; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: At orthodontic treatment completion, knowledge about the effects of adhesive remnant removal on enamel is paramount. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the effect of different adhesive remnant removal methods on enamel topography (ESI) and surface roughness (Ra) after bracket debonding and polishing. METHODS: A total of 50 human premolars were selected and divided into five groups according to the method used for adhesive remnant removal: high speed tungsten carbide bur (TCB), Sof-Lex discs (SL), adhesive removing plier (PL), ultrasound (US) and Fiberglass burs (FB). Metal brackets were bonded with Transbond XT, stored at 37oC for 24 hours before debonding with adhesive removing plier. Subsequently, removal methods were carried out followed by polishing with pumice paste. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted with pre-bonding, post-debonding and post-polishing analyses. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with F test (ANOVA) and Tukey's (Ra) as well as with Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests (ESI) (P < 0.05). RESULTS: US Ra and ESI were significantly greater than TCB, SL, PL and FB. Polishing minimized Ra and ESI in the SL and FB groups. CONCLUSION: Adhesive remnant removal with SL and FB associated with polishing are recommended due to causing little damage to the enamel. PMID:25628087

  4. The effects of two soft drinks on bond strength, bracket microleakage, and adhesive remnant on intact and sealed enamel.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Raúl; Vicente, Ascensión; Ortiz, Antonio J; Bravo, Luis A

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and Schweppes Limón on bond strength, adhesive remnant, and microleakage beneath brackets. One hundred and twenty upper central incisor brackets were bonded to bovine incisors and divided into three groups: (1) Control, (2) Coca-Cola, and (3) Schweppes Limón. The teeth were submerged in the drinks three times a day for 15 minutes over a 15 day period. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured with a universal testing machine, and adhesive remnant evaluated using image analysis equipment. Microleakage at the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces was determined using methylene blue. One hundred and eight teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of the drinks on intact and sealed enamel. SBS and adhesive remnant data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.05) and microleakage using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests applying Bonferroni correction (P < 0.017). No significant differences were found in SBS and adhesive remnant between the groups (P > 0.05). Microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface for groups 2 and 3 was significantly greater than for group 1 (P < 0.017). At the adhesive-bracket interface, microleakage was significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (P < 0.017) while microleakage in group 3 did not differ significantly from either group 1 or 2 (P < 0.017). The drinks produced enamel erosion, loss of adhesive and microleakage. Coca-Cola and Schweppes Limón did not affect the SBS of brackets or the adhesive remnant. PMID:20631082

  5. The modified equipartition calculation for supernova remnants with the spectral index α = 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urošević, Dejan; Pavlović, Marko Z.; Arbutina, Bojan; Dobardžić, Aleksandra

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the modified equipartition calculation for supernova remnants (SNRs) has been derived by Arbutina et al. (2012). Their formulae can be used for SNRs with the spectral indices between 0.5 < α < 1. Here, by using approximately the same analytical method, we derive the equipartition formulae useful for SNRs with spectral index α=0.5. These formulae represent next step upgrade of Arbutina et al. (2012) derivation, because among 30 Galactic SNRs with available observational parameters for the equipartition calculation, 16 have spectral index α = 0.5. For these 16 Galactic SNRs we calculated the magnetic field strengths which are approximately 40 per cent higher than those calculated by using Pacholczyk (1970) equipartition and similar to those calculated by using Beck & Krause (2005) calculation.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in Type Ia supernova remnants undergoing cosmic ray particle acceleration - low adiabatic index solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Yueh

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities in Type Ia supernova remnants that are associated with a low adiabatic index γ, where γ < 5/3, which reflects the expected change in the supernova shock structure as a result of cosmic ray particle acceleration. Extreme cases, such as the case with the maximum compression ratio that corresponds to γ= 1.1, are examined. As γ decreases, the shock compression ratio rises, and an increasingly narrow intershock region with a more pronounced initial mixture of R-T unstable gas is produced. Consequently, the remnant outline may be perturbed by small-amplitude, small-wavelength bumps. However, as the instability decays over time, the extent of convective mixing in terms of the ratio of the radius of the R-T fingers to the blast wave does not strongly depend on the value of γ for γ≥ 1.2. As a result of the age of the remnant, the unstable gas cannot extend sufficiently far to form metal-enriched filaments of ejecta material close to the periphery of Tycho's supernova remnant. The consistency of the dynamic properties of Tycho's remnant with the adiabatic model γ= 5/3 reveals that the injection of cosmic rays is too weak to alter the shock structure. Even with very efficient acceleration of cosmic rays at the shock, significantly enhanced mixing is not expected in Type Ia supernova remnants.

  7. Peritoneal adhesion index (PAI): proposal of a score for the "ignored iceberg" of medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; Manfredi, Roberto; Campanati, Luca; Poiasina, Elia; Bertoli, Paolo; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Cucchi, Michele; Lazzareschi, Daniel; Pisano, Michele; Catena, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions describe a condition in which pathological bonds form between the omentum, the small and large bowels, the abdominal wall, and other intra-abdominal organs. Different classification systems have been proposed, but they do not resolve the underlying problem of ambiguity in the quantification and definition of adhesions. We therefore propose a standardized classification system of adhesions to universalize their definition based on the macroscopic appearance of adhesions and their diffusion to different regions of the abdomen. By scoring with these criteria, the peritoneal adhesion index (PAI) can range from 0 to 30, unambiguously specifying precise adhesion scenarios. The standardized classification and quantification of adhesions would enable different studies to more meaningfully integrate their results, thereby facilitating a more comprehensive approach to the treatment and management of this pathology. PMID:23369320

  8. EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: WIDE-FIELD CONTINUUM AND SPECTRAL-INDEX IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Rupen, M. P.; Green, D. A. E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu E-mail: dag9@cam.ac.uk

    2011-09-20

    The radio continuum emission from the Galaxy has a rich mix of thermal and non-thermal emission. This very richness makes its interpretation challenging since the low radio opacity means that a radio image represents the sum of all emission regions along the line of sight. These challenges make the existing narrowband radio surveys of the Galactic plane difficult to interpret: e.g., a small region of emission might be a supernova remnant (SNR) or an H II region, or a complex combination of both. Instantaneous wide bandwidth radio observations in combination with the capability for high-resolution spectral-index mapping can be directly used to disentangle these effects. Here we demonstrate simultaneous continuum and spectral-index imaging capability at the full continuum sensitivity and resolution using newly developed wide-band wide-field imaging algorithms. Observations were conducted in the L and C bands with a total bandwidth of 1 and 2 GHz, respectively. We present preliminary results in the form of a full-field continuum image covering the wide-band sensitivity pattern of the EVLA centered on a large but poorly studied SNR (G55.7 + 3.4) and relatively narrower field continuum and spectral-index maps of three fields containing SNR and diffused thermal emission. We demonstrate that spatially resolved spectral-index maps differentiate regions with emission of different physical origins (spectral-index variation across composite SNRs and separation of thermal and non-thermal emission), superimposed along the line of sight. The wide-field image centered on the SNR G55.7+3.4 also demonstrates the excellent wide-field wide-band imaging capability of the EVLA.

  9. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation decreases remnant-like particle-cholesterol and increases omega-3 index in hypertriglyceridemic men1-3.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Plasma remnant-like particle-cholesterol (RLP-C) and RBC omega-3 index are novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on these risk factors in hypertriglyceridemic men have not been studied. Objective: We determined effects of DHA...

  10. A Novel Adhesion Index for Verifying the Extent of Adhesion for the Extensor Digitorum Communis in Patients with Metacarpal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ting-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-I; Shih, Cho-Chiang; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine if the relative displacement between the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon and its surrounding tissues can be used as an adhesion index (AI) for assessing adhesion in metacarpal fractures by comparing two clinical measures, namely single-digit-force and extensor lag (i.e., the difference between passive extension and full active extension). The Fisher–Tippett block-matching method and a Kalman-filter algorithm were used to determine the relative displacements in 39 healthy subjects and 8 patients with metacarpal fractures. A goniometer was used to measure the extensor lag, and a force sensor was used to measure the single-digit-force. Measurements were obtained twice for each patient to evaluate the performance of the AI in assessing the progress of rehabilitation. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to quantify the various correlations between the AI, extensor lag, and single-digit-force. The results showed strong correlations between the AI and the extensor lag, the AI and the single-digit-force, and the extensor lag and the single-digit-force (r = 0.718, −0.849, and −0.741; P = 0.002, P < 0.001, and P = 0.001, respectively). The AI in the patients gradually decreased after continuous rehabilitation, but remained higher than that of healthy participants. PMID:27492808

  11. A Novel Adhesion Index for Verifying the Extent of Adhesion for the Extensor Digitorum Communis in Patients with Metacarpal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ting-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-I; Shih, Cho-Chiang; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine if the relative displacement between the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon and its surrounding tissues can be used as an adhesion index (AI) for assessing adhesion in metacarpal fractures by comparing two clinical measures, namely single-digit-force and extensor lag (i.e., the difference between passive extension and full active extension). The Fisher-Tippett block-matching method and a Kalman-filter algorithm were used to determine the relative displacements in 39 healthy subjects and 8 patients with metacarpal fractures. A goniometer was used to measure the extensor lag, and a force sensor was used to measure the single-digit-force. Measurements were obtained twice for each patient to evaluate the performance of the AI in assessing the progress of rehabilitation. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to quantify the various correlations between the AI, extensor lag, and single-digit-force. The results showed strong correlations between the AI and the extensor lag, the AI and the single-digit-force, and the extensor lag and the single-digit-force (r = 0.718, -0.849, and -0.741; P = 0.002, P < 0.001, and P = 0.001, respectively). The AI in the patients gradually decreased after continuous rehabilitation, but remained higher than that of healthy participants. PMID:27492808

  12. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  13. Supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decourchelle, A.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants result from the explosion of a star and keep trace, in their young ejecta-dominated phase, both of the explosion mechanism and to a lesser extent of the nature of the progenitor. They inject a large amount of energy into their surroundings, which impacts significantly the interstellar medium and to a larger extent the working of the galaxy by distributing heavy elements, heating to tens of million degrees large fractions of gas, accelerating high-energy particles, generating turbulence and amplification of the magnetic field. I will review the observational results on supernova remnants and their related scientific issues before suggesting directions for future ambitious XMM-Newton observations.

  14. Apolipoprotein A-I inhibits chemotaxis, adhesion, activation of THP-1 cells and improves the plasma HDL inflammatory index.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Wei-Zhong; Wu, Man-Ping

    2010-02-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are well described, however, such effects of Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) are less studied. Building on our previous study, we further explored the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects of ApoA-I, and focused especially on the interaction between monocyte and endothelial cells and plasma HDL inflammatory index in LPS-challenged rabbits. Our results show that ApoA-I significantly decreased LPS-induced MCP-1 release from THP-1 cells and ox-LDL-induced THP-1 migration ratio (P<0.01, respectively). ApoA-I significantly decreased sL-selectin, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 release (P<0.01, P<0.01, P<0.05, respectively) from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. Furthermore, ApoA-I significantly inhibited LPS-induced CD11b and VCAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells (P<0.01, P<0.05, respectively). ApoA-I diminished LPS-induced mCD14 expression (P<0.01) and NFkappaB nuclear translocation in THP-1 cells. After single dose treatment of ApoA-I, the value of plasma HDL inflammatory index in LPS-challenged rabbits was improved significantly (P<0.05). These results suggest that ApoA-I can inhibit chemotaxis, adhesion and activation of human monocytes and improve plasma HDL inflammatory index with presenting beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:19819722

  15. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Three Self-etching Adhesives: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yadala, Chandrashekhar; Gaddam, Rajkumar; Arya, Siddarth; Baburamreddy, K V; Raju, V Ramakrishnam; Varma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine and compare the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with Adper Promt self-etching adhesive (3M ESPE), Xeno III self-etching adhesive (DENSPLY), Transbond plus self-etching adhesive (3M) with that of conversional bonding procedure, and to calculate the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Materials and Methods: Totally, 60 maxillary premolar teeth were collected, and divided into Group I (Blue): Transbond™ XT primer, Group II (Purple): Adper™ Prompt™ self-etching adhesive, Group III (Orange): Xeno III® self-etching adhesive, Group IV (Pink): Tranbond™ Plus self-etching adhesive. Results: The results of the study showed there was no statistical significance in the shear bond strength according to an analysis of variance (P = 0.207) of the four groups. The mean shear bond strength of Groups I, II, III, IV were 14.56 ± 2.97 Megapascals (MPa), 12.62 ± 2.48 MPa, 13.27 ± 3.16, and 12.64 ± 2.56, respectively. Chi-square comparison for the ARI indicated that there was a significant difference (P = 0.003) between the groups. Conclusion: All the four self-etching adhesives showed clinically acceptable mean shear bond strength. The ARI score showed a self-etching adhesive the debonding occurred more within the adhesive interface leaving less composite adhesive on the tooth surface making it easy to clean up. PMID:26229371

  16. Shear bond strength of orthodontic color-change adhesives with different light-curing times

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Ghassemi, Amirreza; Manafi, Safa; Delavarian, Mohadeseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing time on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two orthodontic color-change adhesives (CCAs). Materials and Methods: A total of 72 extracted premolars were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 12 teeth each. Subsequent to primer application, a metal bracket was bonded to the buccal surface using an orthodontic adhesive. Two CCAs (Greengloo and Transbond Plus) were tested and one conventional light-cured adhesive (Resilience) served as control. For each adhesive, the specimens were light-cured for two different times of 20 and 40 s. All the specimens underwent mechanical testing using a universal testing machine to measure the SBS. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the remnant adhesive material on the tooth surface. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software. The significance level for all statistical tests was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: The SBSs of the tested groups were in the range of 14.05-31.25 MPa. Greengloo adhesive showed the highest SBS values when light-cured for 40 s, and Transbond Plus adhesive showed the lowest values when light-cured for 20 s. ARI scores of Transbond Plus adhesive were significantly higher than those of controls, while other differences in ARI values were not significant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of his study, decreasing the light-curing time from 40 to 20 s decreased the SBS of the tested adhesives; however, this decline in SBS was statistically significant only in Transbond Plus adhesive PMID:26005468

  17. Efficacy of New Adhesion Promoters on Compromised Hypocalcified Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Kishore Mayakuntla Sai; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Sashidhar, Nagam Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The amount of technological progress occurred in the last few years has brought an add up to the benefits of bonding in Orthodontics. Research-based findings have constantly led to the development of new materials that are aimed to simplify the clinical procedures like bonding of brackets to compromised enamel surfaces. Hence, the present study is aimed to assess the bond strength of orthodontic brackets on fluorosed enamel using adhesion promoters. Aim To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded on fluorosed enamel using conventional Transbond XT and new adhesion promoters such as Enhance LC and All Bond 3. Materials and Methods The study involved 90 non carious, extracted teeth with mild to moderate fluorosis randomly divided into 3 Groups. In Group - I (control group) the teeth were bonded with conventional Transbond XT and cured with LED light. In Group - II Enhance LC was applied to fluorosed enamel before bonding and in Group - III All Bond 3 was used. Shear bond strength was tested by using Universal testing Instron machine. ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey’s tests were used to compare shear bond strength. Adhesive remnant on the tooth was assessed and scored using adhesive remnant index (ARI). Results Results showed a reduced SBS values (9.43MPa ±3.03) with conventional Transbond XT on fluorosed enamel. Among the adhesion boosters used Enhance LC illustrated lesser SBS values (12.03 MPa ± 4.42) compared with All Bond 3 (14.38MPa ±4.92). ARI showed bond failure at bracket resin interface in group I & group II and at enamel resin interface in group III although statistically insignificant. Conclusion It was concluded that using adhesion boosters on fluorosed enamel showed higher bond strength compared to the control group. Among the two adhesion promoters used All Bond 3 expressed highest bond strength compared to Enhance LC although statistically insignificant. PMID:26393196

  18. Remnant field detector

    DOEpatents

    Visser, Age T.

    1988-01-01

    A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

  19. Remnant field detector

    DOEpatents

    Visser, Age T.

    1988-05-03

    A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

  20. Evaluation of Self-Etching Adhesive and Er:YAG Laser Conditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J.; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura E.; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia; Olea-Mejía, Oscar F.; Alcántara-Galena, María del Carmen Z.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength, the adhesive remnant index scores, and etch surface of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with self-etching primer and Er:YAG laser conditioning. One hundred and twenty bovine incisors were randomly divided into four groups. In Group I (Control), the teeth were conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In Group II the teeth were conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (5 sec); III and IV were irradiated with the Er:YAG 150 mJ (11.0 J/cm2), 150 mJ (19.1 J/cm2), respectively, at 7–12 Hz with water spray. After surface preparation, upper central incisor stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change Adhesive. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours and shear bond strengths were measured, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined. The conditioned surface was observed under a scanning electron microscope. One-way ANOVA and chi-square test were used. Group I showed the significantly highest values of bond strength with a mean value of 8.2 megapascals (MPa). The lesser amount of adhesive remnant was found in Group III. The results of this study suggest that Er:YAG laser irradiation could not be an option for enamel conditioning. PMID:24228014

  1. Remnant cystic duct adenocarcinoma presenting as gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Samuel Tsoon Wuan; Cheng, Yue; Cheung, Frances; Tang, Chung Ngai

    2016-01-01

    Only a few case reports of remnant cystic duct carcinoma exist. The presented case of remnant cystic duct carcinoma with invasion to pylorus and bulbus of duodenum leading to gastric outlet obstruction was the first of its kind. We reviewed all cases of remnant cystic duct carcinoma that we found in the literature and summarized its definition, presentation, extent of invasion and clinical outcome after operation. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the rarity of disease, locally advanced nature of disease and distorted postoperative anatomy. A high index of suspicion can increase the likelihood of a preoperative diagnosis. PMID:27154747

  2. Remnants, fuzzballs or wormholes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2014-11-01

    The black hole information paradox has caused enormous confusion over four decades. But in recent years, the theorem of quantum strong-subadditivity has sorted out the possible resolutions into three sharp categories: (i) No new physics at r ≫ lp; this necessarily implies remnants/information loss. A realization of remnants is given by a baby universe attached near r 0. (ii) Violation of the "no-hair" theorem by nontrivial effects at the horizon r M. This possibility is realized by fuzzballs in string theory, and gives unitary evaporation. (iii) Having the vacuum at the horizon, but requiring that Hawking quanta at r M3 be somehow identified with degrees of freedom inside the black hole. A model for this "extreme nonlocality" is realized by conjecturing that wormholes connect the radiation quanta to the hole.

  3. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  4. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  5. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  6. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  7. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  8. HESS upper limits for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bolz, O.; Borrel, V.; Braun, I.; Brion, E.; Brucker, J.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Carrigan, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Cornils, R.; Costamante, L.; Dalton, M.; Degrange, B.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Feinstein, F.; Fiasson, A.; Förster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Hauser, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jung, I.; Katarzyński, K.; Kendziorra, E.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khélifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Lamanna, G.; Latham, I. J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Martin, J. M.; Martineau-Huynh, O.; Marcowith, A.; Masterson, C.; Maurin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-P.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Renaud, M.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruppel, J.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schröder, R.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sol, H.; Spangler, D.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Superina, G.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: Observations of Kepler's supernova remnant (G4.5+6.8) with the HESS telescope array in 2004 and 2005 with a total live time of 13 h are presented. Methods: Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov radiation from extensive air showers is used to reconstruct the energy and direction of the incident gamma rays. Results: No evidence for a very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray signal from the direction of the remnant is found. An upper limit (99% confidence level) on the energy flux in the range 230 GeV{-}12.8 TeV of 8.6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 is obtained. Conclusions: In the context of an existing theoretical model for the remnant, the lack of a detectable gamma-ray flux implies a distance of at least 6.4 kpc. A corresponding upper limit for the density of the ambient matter of 0.7 cm-3 is derived. With this distance limit, and assuming a spectral index Γ = 2, the total energy in accelerated protons is limited to Ep < 8.6 × 1049 erg. In the synchrotron/inverse Compton framework, extrapolating the power law measured by RXTE between 10 and 20 keV down in energy, the predicted gamma-ray flux from inverse Compton scattering is below the measured upper limit for magnetic field values greater than 52 μ G.

  9. A multiwavelength study of the remnant of nova GK Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.; Kantharia, N. G.

    2005-05-01

    We present new observations of the nebular remnant of the old nova GK Persei 1901 in the optical using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) and at low radio frequencies using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The dimensions of the shell in the optical emission lines of [NII], [OIII] and [OII] are 108× 94 arcsec2, 104× 94 arcsec2 and 99× 87 arcsec2, respectively. The evolution of the nova remnant indicates shock interaction with the ambient medium, especially in the southwest quadrant. Application of a simple model for the shock and its evolution to determine the time dependence of the radius of the shell in the southwest quadrant indicates that the shell is now expanding into an ambient medium that has a density of 0.12 cm-3, compared to the density of the ambient medium of 0.8 cm-3 ahead of the shock in 1987. There are indications of a recent interaction of the nova remnant with the ambient medium in the northeast quadrant. There is a distinct flattening of the shell, as well as an increase in the number and brightness of the knots in the region. The brightest optical knots in this region are also detected in the radio images. The nova remnant of GK Per is detected at all the observed radio frequencies and is of a similar extent to the optical remnant. Putting together our radio observations with VLA archival data on GK Per from 1997, we obtain three interesting results: 1. the spectrum above 1.4 GHz follows a power law with an index -0.7 (S∝ να) and below 1.4 GHz follows a power law with an index ˜ -0.85. This could be due to the presence of at least two populations of electrons dominating the global emission at different frequencies; 2. we record an annual secular decrease of 2.1% in the flux density of the nova remnant at 1.4 and 4.9 GHz between 1984 and 1997 which has left the spectral index unchanged at -0.7. No such decrease is observed in the flux densities below 1 GHz; 3. we record an increase in the flux density at 0.33 GHz compared to

  10. Remnants of Lost Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In eastern Arabia Terra, remnants of a once vast layered terrain are evident as isolated buttes, mesas, and deeply-filled craters. The origin of the presumed sediments that created the layers is unknown, but those same sediments, now eroded, may be the source of the thick mantle of dust that covers much of Arabia Terra today.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.5, Longitude 50 East (310 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  11. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  12. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  13. Pulsar-supernova remnant associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1994-04-01

    Pulsars and supernova remnants (SNRs) are both believed to be formed in the supernova explosions of massive stars. Therefore one might expect to see associations between the two classes of object. In fact, up until a couple of years ago, there was only a handful of believable associations and even now there are only nine or ten. It is relatively easy to explain why such a small fraction of the 600 or so known pulsars are associated with supernova remnants. The average pulsar lifetime is of the order of 106 years, whereas the average supernova remnant is detectable for about 104 years. Therefore, one would expect only about one percent of pulsars to be still associated, as is observed. It is somewhat more difficult to explain why so few of the 150 known supernova remnants have associated pulsars. The main factor is that supernova remnants are seen throughout the Galaxy whereas most pulsars are detectable only relatively close to the Sun, within a few kiloparsec. Another factor is that pulsar emission is beamed, so even if a pulsar exists in a relatively nearby supernova remnant, it may be undetectable. The most believable of the suggested associations are listed. Associations which are possible but by no means certain are indicated by question mark. For the more certain associations, the pulsar position is within the SNR boundaries (an exception is 'The Duck', where the pulsar is at the tip of the 'beak'), the distance estimates for the pulsar and SNR are compatible, and the age estimates are likewise compatible. References to most of these associations may be found in the pulsar catalog of Taylor, Manchester and Lyne (1993, Astrophys. J. Suppl., 88, 529). Recent references not included in the catalog are for PSR B1706-44 (McAdam, Osborne and Parkinson, 1993, Nature, 361, 516) and PSR B2334+61 (Kulkarni et al., 1993, Nature, 362, 135).

  14. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  15. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  16. Constraints on black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, S.B. )

    1994-01-15

    One possible fate of information lost to black holes is its preservation in black hole remnants. It is argued that a type of effective field theory describes such remnants (generically referred to as informons). The general structure of such a theory is investigated and the infinite pair production problem is revisited. A toy model for remnants clarifies some of the basic issues; in particular, infinite remnant production is not suppressed simply by the large internal volumes as proposed in cornucopion scenarios. Criteria for avoiding infinite production are stated in terms of couplings in the effective theory. Such instabilities remain a problem barring what would be described in that theory as a strong coupling conspiracy. The relation to Euclidean calculations of cornucopion production is sketched, and potential flaws in that analysis are outlined. However, it is quite plausible that pair production of ordinary black holes (e.g., Reissner-Noerdstrom or others) is suppressed due to strong effective couplings. It also remains an open possibility that a microsopic dynamics can be found yielding an appropriate strongly coupled effective theory of neutral informons without infinite pair production.

  17. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  18. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  19. X-Ray Measured Dynamics of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr-1 (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = tm ) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr-1 (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of [approx]0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr-1 and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of [less, similar]0.2 cm-3.

  20. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  1. Effects of adhesion promoter on orthodontic bonding in fluorosed teeth: A scanning electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Tariq, Mohd.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of the present study were to elucidate the effects of fluorosis in orthodontic bonding and to evaluate the efficiency of an adhesion promoter (Assure Universal Bonding Resin) in bonding to fluorosed teeth. Materials and Methods: Extracted premolars were divided into two groups on the basis of Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index. Ten samples from each group were etched and evaluated for etching patterns using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The remaining samples were subdivided into four groups of 20 each on the basis of adhesives used: IA, IIA - Transbond XT and IB, IIB - Transbond XT plus Assure Universal Bonding Resin. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured after 24 h using the universal testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were recorded using SEM. Statistical analysis was conducted using a two-way analysis of variance, and Tukey's post hoc test was performed on SBS and ARI scores. Results: Similar etching patterns were observed in both fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth. No significant differences were found in the SBS values observed in both groups (8.66 ± 3.19 vs. 8.53 ± 3.44, P = 1.000). Increase in SBS was observed when Assure Universal Bonding Resin was used. Higher ARI scores were observed when adhesion promoter was used for bonding. Conclusions: Mild-moderately fluorosed teeth etch in a manner similar to the nonfluorosed teeth. Similar bond strengths were achieved in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth when conventional composite was used. Use of adhesion promoter increases the bond strengths in both groups of teeth. PMID:27556020

  2. New supernova remnant results from radio surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    Our knowledge of the Galactic supernova remnant population is woefully incomplete A total of 231 remnants appear in the latest catalog Green 2004 whereas we expect the total population to be between 500 and 1000 Helfand et al 1989 The current discovery rate of new remnants has averaged about four per year over the past two decades In recent years a number of new Galactic plane radio surveys have been undertaken which offer the possibility of significantly increasing this discovery rate For example the VLA MAGPIS survey Helfand et al 2006 has identified fifty new remnant candidates in a 27-degree swath of Galactic longitude Unsurprisingly this high-resolution survey finds many more small-diameter remnants than past single-dish observations increasing by seven-fold the number of remnants with diameters less than 5 arcmin in this region of the Galaxy Brogan et al report 90 cm observations in this region identifying up to 35 new remnants I will review all published results on new radio remnants highlighting the impact of these discoveries on our understanding of the remnant population and noting the value of observations from the mid-infrared to TeV gamma rays in defining the Galaxy s remnant population This work is supported in part by grant AST 05-07598 from the National Science Foundation

  3. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  4. Charged black hole remnants at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberghi, G. L.; Bellagamba, L.; Calmet, X.; Casadio, R.; Micu, O.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate possible signatures of long-lived (or stable) charged black holes at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, we find that black hole remnants are characterised by quite low speed. Due to this fact, the charged remnants could, in some cases, be very clearly distinguished from the background events, exploiting dE/ dX measurements. We also compare the estimate energy released by such remnants with that of typical Standard Model particles, using the Bethe-Bloch formula.

  5. 16 CFR 303.13 - Sale of remnants and products made of remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.13... “remnants of undetermined fiber content.” (3) Where textile fiber products are made of such remnants,...

  6. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Daina, Paola; Tamagnone, Alessandra; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP) with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh) were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT) and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit) systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs), Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs. PMID:23984339

  7. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  8. Pacinian Corpuscles in a Cervical Chondrocutaneous Remnant: A Case Report and Update of Pacinian Corpuscles.

    PubMed

    Feito, Jorge; Ramos-García, José L; Gago, Ángel; Cobo, Juan L; García-Suárez, Olivia; Junquera, Luis M; Vega, José A

    2016-03-01

    Cervical chondrocutaneous remnants are congenital, benign, and rare neck masses. We present here for the first time the immunohistochemical profile of Pacinian corpuscles present in cervical chondrocutaneous remnants, removed, and localized in the territory of the second branchial arch from a 5-year-old girl. We have performed immunohistochemistry to analyze these sensory corpuscles using a battery of antibodies including markers for each corpuscle constituent. The central axon was immunoreactive for neurofilaments, neuron-specific enolase, and neural cell adhesion molecule; the Schwann-related cells forming the inner core displayed immunoreactivity for S100 protein, vimentin, and neural cell adhesion molecule; the outer core and the capsule were positive for vimentin, epithelial membrane antigen, and glucose transporter 1. These results are discussed in topographical differences. Moreover, a brief update about the structure, protein composition, and development of Pacinian corpuscles was performed. PMID:26894776

  9. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Materials and Methods Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. Results The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time

  10. Evaluation of enamel damages following orthodontic bracket debonding in fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoter

    PubMed Central

    Baherimoghadam, Tahreh; Akbarian, Sahar; Rasouli, Reza; Naseri, Navid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) of the orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth using Light Bond with and without adhesion promoters and compare their enamel damages following debonding. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 fluorosed (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index = 4–5) and 30 nonfluorosed teeth were randomly distributed between two subgroups according to the bonding materials: Group 1, fluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 2, fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond; Group 3, nonfluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 4, nonfluorosed bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopic evaluation was performed by unbiased stereology in all teeth to determine the amount of adhesive remnants and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and Mann–Whitney test. Results: While fluorosis reduced the SBS of orthodontic bracket (P = 0.017), Enhance Locus Ceruleus LC significantly increased the SBS of the orthodontic bracket in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth (P = 0.039). Significant increasing in the number and length of enamel crack after debonding was found in all four groups. There were no significant differences in the length of enamel crack increased after debonding among four groups (P = 0.768) while increasing in the number of enamel cracks after debonding was significantly different among the four groups (P = 0.023). Teeth in Group 2 showed the highest enamel damages among four groups following debonding. Conclusion: Adhesion promoters could improve the bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but conservative debonding methods for decreasing enamel damages would be necessary. PMID:27095895

  11. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Packaging, and Removal of Products § 19.359 Remnants. When at the end of a bottling run fewer bottles remain than the number necessary to fill a case, the remaining bottles may be placed in a case marked as a... remnant bottles may later be used to complete the filling of a case, or may be used for another...

  12. Optical supernova remnant observations from Skinakas Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatakis, F.; Papamastorakis, J.; Ventura, J.; Boumis, P.

    High energy studies of supernova remnants provide direct insight into major properties of these objects. Morphological and spectral studies of remnants in X-rays allow us to estimate parameters like the age of the remnant, the explosion energy and the ambient interstellar density. Optical studies of supernova remnants focus on the interaction of the primary blast wave with dense "clouds" found in the insterstellar medium. Optical observations of individual remnants performed at Skinakas Observatory in Crete, Greece consist of flux calibrated wide field CCD images taken with the 0.3 m telescope and absolute flux calibrated long-slit spectra obtained with the 1.3 m telescope. The site conditions and the unique capabilities of a small telescope equipped with a CCD camera allowed us to perform high quality deep observations leading to the discovery of optical emission from several remnants for the first time. We present results on the known supernova remnants G65.3+5.7, G82.2+5.3, G114.3+0.3 as well as current results on previously unknown filamentary structures and probable candidate remnants. Typical densities of the interstellar "clouds" are of the order of a few atoms per cm3 , and the shock velocities are found in the range of 90-140 km s-1 . The optical spectra further suggest the presence of moderate magnetic fields of several μG.

  13. A search for stellar remnants of supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The slitless spectra of the stars in the central regions of six galactic supernova remnants Cas A, Kepler, Tycho, SN 1006, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop were obtained with the prime focus transmission gratings at the 4M telescopes on Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. It was found that no stellar remnant with an unusually blue or peculiar spectrum is present in any of the remnants down to the limit of m sub pg of 18.5. Except for the Cygnus Loop, the area searched in each remnant is large enough that objects with transverse velocities of 1000 km/s would be well within the field. The results are also compared with a computation of emission from gas near a neutron star and with the unpulsed emission from the Crab pulsar; in both cases upper limits were set which place constraints on a possible condensed stellar remnant.

  14. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  15. Supernovae, young remnants, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshner, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical abundance data from extragalactic supernovae and from supernova remnants (SNR) less than 1000 yrs old are employed to show that nuclear burning beyond helium synthesis actually occurs. Supernova (SN) are classified into types I or II, having no hydrogen lines or featuring hydrogen lines, respectively. The SN I's have been observed as having a preponderance of Fe lines, and emitting from a source at around 12,000 K with a center continuum of approximately 10 AU. Decay chains which could account for detected luminosities and spectra are presented, noting a good fit of Fe II spectrum with observed SN spectra. SNR pass through younger and older stages, going from the outpouring of material to diffusion in the interstellar medium. Expanding flocculi from young SNR show oxygen abundances as well as lines from sulfur, calcium, and argon, with a corresponding necessity of an explosive source of 15 solar masses.

  16. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  18. Supernova remnant evolution in non-uniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. E. S.; de Jager, O. C.

    In this work numerical simulations showing the time evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) in an uniform and non-uniform intersteller medium (ISM) are presented. For this we use a hydrodynamic model including a kinematic calculation of the interstellar magnetic field. Important parameters include the ejecta mass and energy of the remnant, as well as interstellar medium density and adiabatic index. By varying these we constructed an analytical expression giving the return time of the reverse shock to the origin. We also computed the evolution of the remnant in non-uniform media. As the SNR evolves from one into another medium of higher density a reflection shock is created which is driven back toward the center. As the reflection shock moves inward it also drags some of the compressed ISM field lines with it and heats the inside of the SNR. When a SNR explodes in a medium with a high density and the blast waves propagate into a medium with a lower density a cavity is being blown away changing the geometry of the high density region. Also, once the forward shock moves into the medium of less density, a second reverse shock will start to form in this region.

  19. Effect of acid etching on bond strength of nanoionomer as an orthodontic bonding adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A new Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement known as nanoionomer containing nanofillers of fluoroaluminosilicate glass and nanofiller 'clusters' has been introduced. An in-vitro study aimed at evaluating shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of nanoionomer under etching/unetched condition for use as an orthodontic bonding agent. Material and Methods: A total of 75 extracted premolars were used, which were divided into three equal groups of 25 each: 1-Conventional adhesive (Enlight Light Cure, SDS, Ormco, CA, USA) was used after and etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by Ortho Solo application 2-nanoionomer (Ketac™ N100, 3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used after etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s 3-nanoionomer was used without etching. The SBS testing was performed using a digital universal testing machine (UTM-G-410B, Shanta Engineering). Evaluation of ARI was done using scanning electron microscopy. The SBS were compared using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test for intergroup comparisons and ARI scores were compared with Chi-square test. Results: ANOVA (SBS, F = 104.75) and Chi-square (ARI, Chi-square = 30.71) tests revealed significant differences between groups (P < 0.01). The mean (SD) SBS achieved with conventional light cure adhesive was significantly higher (P < 0.05) (10.59 ± 2.03 Mpa, 95% CI, 9.74-11.41) than the nanoionomer groups (unetched 4.13 ± 0.88 Mpa, 95% CI, 3.79-4.47 and etched 9.32 ± 1.87 Mpa, 95% CI, 8.58-10.06). However, nanoionomer with etching, registered SBS in the clinically acceptable range of 5.9–7.8 MPa, as suggested by Reynolds (1975). The nanoionomer groups gave significantly lower ARI values than the conventional adhesive group. Conclusion: Based on this in-vitro study, nanoionomer with etching can be successfully used as an orthodontic bonding agent leaving less adhesive remnant on enamel surface, making cleaning easier. However, in-vivo studies are needed to confirm the validity

  20. Optical supernova remnant observations from Skinakas Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatakis, F.; Papamastorakis, J.; Ventura, J.; Boumis, P.

    High energy studies of supernova remnants provide direct insight into major properties of these objects. Morphological and spectral studies of remnants in X-rays allow us to estimate parameters like the age of the remnant, the explosion energy and the ambient interstellar density. Optical studies of supernova remnants focus on the interaction of the primary blast wave with dense "clouds" found in the interstellar medium. Optical observations of individual remnants performed at Skinakas Observatory in Crete, Greece consist of flux calibrated wide field CCD images taken with the 0.3 m telescope and absolute flux calibrated long-slit spectra obtained with the 1.3 m telescope. The site conditions and the unique capabilities of a small telescope equipped with a CCD camera allowed us to perform high quality deep observations leading to the discovery of optical emission from several remnants for the first time. We present results on the known supernova remnants G73.9+0.9, G82.2+5.3 as well as current results on previously unknown filamentary structures. Typical densities of the interstellar "clouds" are of the order of a few atoms per cm 3, and the shock velocities are found in the range of 90-140 km s -1. The optical spectra further suggest the presence of moderate magnetic fields.

  1. Using Poisson statistics to analyze supernova remnant emission in the low counts X-ray regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Quentin Jeffrey

    We utilize a Poisson likelihood in a maximum likelihood statistical analysis to analyze X-ray spectragraphic data. Specifically, we examine four extragalactic supernova remnants (SNR). IKT 5 (SNR 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4) which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants, and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not "classical" Type Ia SNR, but may be examples of so-called "prompt" Type Ia SNR. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest a new subclass of prompt Type Ia SNR, Fe-rich CC remnants. In addition, we examine IKT 18. This remnant is positionally coincident with the X-ray point source HD 5980. Due to an outburst in 1994, in which its brightness changed by 3 magnitudes (corrsponding to an increase in luminosity by a factor of 16) HD 5980 was classified as a luminous blue variable star. We examine this point source and the remnant IKT 18 in the X-ray, and find that its non-thermal photon index has decreased from 2002 to 2013, corresponding to a larger proportion of more energetic X-rays, which is unexpected.

  2. Progenitor's Signatures in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The remnants of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can provide important clues about their progenitor histories. We discuss two well-observed supernova remnants (SNRs) that are believed to have resulted from SNe Ia, and use various tools to shed light on the possible progenitor histories. We find that Kepler's SNR is consistent with a symbiotic binary progenitor consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB star. Our hydrosimulations can reproduce the observed kinematic and morphological properties. For Tycho's remnant we use the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and kinematics to show that the ejecta has likely interacted with dense circumstellar gas.

  3. HFPK 334: An Unusual Supernova Remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, E. J.; Filipović, M. D.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Brantseg, T.; Heitritter, K.; Roper, Q.; Haberl, F.; Urošević, D.

    2014-11-01

    We present new Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-continuum and XMM-Newton/Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the unusual supernova remnant (SNR) HFPK 334 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The remnant follows a shell-type morphology in the radio continuum and has a size of ~20 pc at the SMC distance. The X-ray morphology is similar; however, we detect a prominent point source close to the center of the SNR exhibiting a spectrum with a best-fit power law with a photon index of Γ = 2.7 ± 0.5. This central point source is most likely a background object and cannot be directly associated with the remnant. The high temperature, nonequilibrium conditions in the diffuse region suggest that this gas has been recently shocked and points toward a younger SNR with an age of <~ 1800 yr. With an average radio spectral index of α = -0.59 ± 0.09, we find that an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant is ~90 μG, a value typical of younger SNRs in low-density environments. Also, we report the detection of scattered radio polarization across the remnant at 20 cm, with a peak fractional polarization level of 25% ± 5%.

  4. HFPK 334: An unusual supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, E. J.; Filipović, M. D.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Brantseg, T.; Heitritter, K.; Roper, Q.; Haberl, F.; Urošević, D.

    2014-11-01

    We present new Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-continuum and XMM-Newton/Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the unusual supernova remnant (SNR) HFPK 334 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The remnant follows a shell-type morphology in the radio continuum and has a size of ∼20 pc at the SMC distance. The X-ray morphology is similar; however, we detect a prominent point source close to the center of the SNR exhibiting a spectrum with a best-fit power law with a photon index of Γ = 2.7 ± 0.5. This central point source is most likely a background object and cannot be directly associated with the remnant. The high temperature, nonequilibrium conditions in the diffuse region suggest that this gas has been recently shocked and points toward a younger SNR with an age of ≲ 1800 yr. With an average radio spectral index of α = –0.59 ± 0.09, we find that an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant is ∼90 μG, a value typical of younger SNRs in low-density environments. Also, we report the detection of scattered radio polarization across the remnant at 20 cm, with a peak fractional polarization level of 25% ± 5%.

  5. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  6. Isaac's Remnants; Tropical Storms Kirk, Michael

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of GOES-13 satellite observations from Sept. 1-4, 2012, showing Isaac's remnants move from the central to eastern U.S., Tropical Storm Leslie nearing Bermuda, Kirk fading in the No. Atlan...

  7. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  8. X-ray imaging - Supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to imaging observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) obtained during the first year of the Einstein Observatory's operation. Inferences are drawn regarding models for stellar explosions, remnant evolution, neutron star formation and the interstellar medium. Because the X-ray emission traces the expanding shock boundary and dominates the radiative energy losses of an SNR over much of its lifetime, it can provide data on the possible collapsed remnants of the explosion, such as neutron stars and/or black holes. X-ray emission also allows a supernova shock to be used as a probe of interstellar medium structure. The imaging instrument aboard the Einstein satellite has been used to observe over 30 known Galactic remnants, and a similar number of objects in other galaxies, in the 0.15-4.5 keV band.

  9. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  10. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  11. Observation of Crab-Like Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to observe the supernova remnants 3C58 and G21.5-0.9 and to search for pulsed emission. If a pulsar were to be found, the period derivative and inferred magnetic field would have extreme values if pulsar evolution had followed the standard model. If this is not the case, the standard model must be revised. We also sought to obtain very accurate measurement of the synchrotron emission spectrum of each remnant.

  12. The Rediscovery of the Antlia Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin; Haffner, L. Matthew; Hill, Alex S.; Barger, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    While undertaking a survey of velocity-resolved diffuse optical emission from the [S II] 6716 A line with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper, we have rediscovered the Antlia Supernova remnant, a 26 degree diameter remmant near the Gum Nebula that was originally detected in SHASSA (Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas) by P. McCullough in 2002. The original discovery showed this remnant was associated with ¼ keV X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, and argued that Antlia was potentially the closest remnant to the Sun. We will present an analysis of the H-alpha and [S II] lines in this direction: the ratio of these lines indicate the shell is consistent with being a supernova remnant and the velocities allow us to constrain its age. We discuss this remnant in the context of the evolution of the entire Gum Nebula region, noting that its proximity and age make it possible to search for geochemical evidence of this remnant on Earth. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  13. Multi-frequency study of supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Confirmation of the supernova remnant status of DEM L205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipović, M. D.; Points, S. D.; Chu, Y.-H.; Sasaki, M.; Pietsch, W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Dickel, J.; Smith, R. C.; Sturm, R.; Crawford, E. J.; De Horta, A. Y.

    2012-10-01

    Context. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is an ideal target for the study of an unbiased and complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs). We started an X-ray survey of the LMC with XMM-Newton, which, in combination with observations at other wavelengths, will allow us to discover and study remnants that are either even fainter or more evolved (or both) than previously known. Aims: We present new X-ray and radio data of the LMC SNR candidate DEM L205, obtained by XMM-Newton and ATCA, along with archival optical and infrared observations. Methods: We use data at various wavelengths to study this object and its complex neighbourhood, in particular in the context of the star formation activity, past and present, around the source. We analyse the X-ray spectrum to derive some remnant's properties, such as age and explosion energy. Results: Supernova remnant features are detected at all observed wavelengths : soft and extended X-ray emission is observed, arising from a thermal plasma with a temperature kT between 0.2 keV and 0.3 keV. Optical line emission is characterised by an enhanced [S ii]-to-Hα ratio and a shell-like morphology, correlating with the X-ray emission. The source is not or only tentatively detected at near-infrared wavelengths (shorter than 10 μm), but there is a detection of arc-like emission at mid and far-infrared wavelengths (24 and 70 μm) that can be unambiguously associated with the remnant. We suggest that thermal emission from dust heated by stellar radiation and shock waves is the main contributor to the infrared emission. Finally, an extended and faint non-thermal radio emission correlates with the remnant at other wavelengths and we find a radio spectral index between -0.7 and -0.9, within the range for SNRs. The size of the remnant is ~79 × 64 pc and we estimate a dynamical age of about 35 000 years. Conclusions: We definitely confirm DEM L205 as a new SNR. This object ranks amongst the largest remnants known in the LMC. The numerous

  14. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  15. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  16. "Suzaku Highlight Results on Supernova Remnants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Highlights of the early Suzaku (formerly Astro-E2) observations of supernova remnants are presented. Suzaku offers unique capabilities for the study of supernova remnants. The unprecedented combination of imaging and spectral resolution below 1 keV in the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) makes possible mapping of C, N and O abundances in Galactic remnants of all ages. The first detection of carbon lines in the Cygnus Loop and mapping of the O VII to O VIII ratio in SN 1006 demonstrate this capability. The XIS sensitivity to soft, low surface brightness emission is exemplified by spectroscopy in the 0.3-1.0 keV band of the North Polar Spur and other Galactic ISM structures. Such observations make possible inferences about plasma conditions and abundances. The sensitivity above 6 keV via a combination of the XIS (below 10 keV) and the Hard X-ray Detector (above 10 keV) allows broad band (2-40 keV) spectroscopy and mapping of extended remnants with hard emission components. These components are generally associated with sites of particle acceleration, and measuring their spectral shape potentially provides information about the TeV electron population and its acceleration and energy loss mechanisms. Examples of such remnants observed by Suzaku are the non-thermal emission dominated remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and RX J0852.0-4622, for which flux beyond 30 keV has been detected. The status of the mission and prospects for future groundbreaking observations of supernova remnants will be discussed.

  17. Structure of merger remnants. 4: Isophotal shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyl, Jeremy S.; Hernquist, Lars; Spergel, David N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the shapes of isophotes of galaxy merger remnants. More specifically, we perform a series of numerical experiments to study galaxy mergers. The simulations explore a variety of encounter geometries, types of progenitor galaxies, and particle numbers. We 'observe' each of the remnants from 64 viewpoints to estimate how the isophotal shapes vary with the orientation of the remnant. Also, by comparing the results from the various simulations, we learn how encounter geometry and the structure of the progenitors can affect the shape of the remnants. The encounter geometry, the structure of the progenitors, and the orientation of the remnant play deciding roles in the shape of the 'observed' isophotes, so much so that these simulated merger remnants have both 'boxy' and 'disky' isophotes and ellipticities ranging from E0 to E7. Thus, the shapes seen in our merger simulation remnants span a similar range to observed isophotal shapes of real galaxies. Furthermore, to estimate the errors in this analysis, we introduce the statistical bootstrap. Bootstrapping is used rather widely in observational astronomy when dealing with small samples; however, its use is practically unheard of for tackling theoretical problems. We believe that bootstrapping can be extremely useful for dealing with the small samples found in numerical simulations; therefore, we present the rudiments and basis of the technique with emphasis on its use in N-body calculations. Also, by comparing the errors for the smaller simulations with those of the larger ones, we speculate on the number of particles required to accurately explore isophotal shapes in simulations.

  18. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  19. Evolution of multiple supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Heating of the interstellar medium (ISM) by multiple supernova (SN) explosions is at the heart of producing galaxy-scale outflows in starburst galaxies. Standard models of outflows assume a high efficiency of SNe in heating the gas to X-ray emitting temperatures and filling the central region of starburst with hot gas, in order to launch vigorous outflows. We use hydrodynamical simulations to study the efficiency of multiple SNe in heating the ISM and filling the volume with gas of high temperatures. We argue that it is important for SN remnants to have a large filling factor and a large heating efficiency. For this, they have to be clustered in space and time, and keep exploding until the hot gas percolates through the whole region, in order to compensate for the radiative loss. In the case of a limited number of SNe, we find that although the filling factor can be large, the heating efficiency declines after reaching a large value. In the case of a continuous series of SNe, the hot gas (T ≥ 3 × 106 K) can percolate through the whole region after the total volume filling factor reaches a threshold of ˜0.3. The efficiency of heating the gas to X-ray temperatures can be ≥0.1 after this percolation epoch, which occurs after a period of ≈10 Myr for a typical starburst SN rate density of νSN ≈ 10-9 pc-3 yr-1 and gas density of n ≈ 10 cm-3 in starburst nuclei regions. This matches the recent observations of a time delay of similar order between the onset of star formation and galactic outflows. The efficiency to heat gas up to X-ray temperatures (≥106.5 K) roughly scales as ν _SN^{0.2} n^{-0.6}. For a typical SN rate density and gas density in starburst nuclei, the heating efficiency is ˜0.15, also consistent with previous interpretations from X-ray observations. We discuss the implications of our results with regard to observational diagnostics of ionic ratios and emission measures in starburst nuclei regions.

  20. Does the time interval after bleaching influence the adhesion of orthodontic brackets?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Glaucia Cristina Rodrigues; de Miranda, Cyndi Albuquerque; Machado, Sissy Maria Mendes; Brandão, Gustavo Antonio Martins; de Almeida, Haroldo Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that no difference exists between the effects of at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching on shear bond strength (SBS) with bracket bonding at 4 different time intervals after dental bleaching. Methods Ninety extracted human premolars were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 10) according to the bleaching methods used (at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching) and the storage time in artificial saliva (30 min, 1 day, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks before bonding). The control group was stored in artificial saliva for 7 days. Brackets were bonded with the Transbond XT adhesive system, and SBS testing was performed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of resin remaining on the enamel surfaces after debonding. The SBS data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. For the ARI, the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed. Significance for all statistical tests was predetermined to be p < 0.05. Results The SBS of the unbleached group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the bleached groups (except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching). Conclusions The null hypothesis was not totally rejected. All bleaching groups tested had decreased SBS of the brackets to the enamel, except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching. The SBS returned to values close to those of the unbleached enamel within 3 weeks following bleaching. PMID:24228239

  1. Observations of TeV Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, James H.

    1994-12-01

    Measurements of the gamma ray flux from a number of supernova remnants (SNRs) at energies above 250 GeV have been made with the Whipple Imaging air \\v Cerenkov detector. Observation of the gamma ray emission of SNRs at energies above 1 GeV should provide a sensitive test of shock acceleration models of particle acceleration in SNRs. Gamma-ray luminosities of supernova remnants are well constrained by the observed supernova rate and the cosmic ray flux if supernovae are indeed the source of cosmic rays. Drury et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 287, 959 (1994)) predict that the luminosity of nearby Sedov-phase SNRs should be observable by the Whipple telescope. In this model, diffusive shock acceleration produces energetic charged particles which interact with the ambient medium forming gamma rays. There is an indication that a number of unidentified EGRET sources may correspond to supernova remnants (G. Kanbach, private communication), although at these energies (>100 MeV) the diffuse background is somewhat uncertain. Measurements of the gamma-ray flux with the Whipple instrument have a similar sensitivity to the EGRET detector for a source spectral index of 2.15, and less sensitivity to diffuse background. A number of observations of SNRs including: Tycho, W66, IC443, and others have been made. Currently for Tycho an upper limit of 9times 10(-12) cm(-2) sec(-1) is obtained. The status of these observations will be presented, and it will be shown that these measurements combined with the EGRET observations are beginning to provide a useful constraint on models of cosmic ray origin. Gamma-ray observations may also be used to constrain models of particle acceleration in SNRs exhibiting pulser-powered synchrotron nebula (plerions). The status of observations of this class of objects, including the Crab nebula, will also be presented. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  2. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  3. Temperature relaxation in supernova remnants, revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, H.

    1984-01-01

    Some supernova remnants are expanding into a partially neutral medium. The neutral atoms which are engulfed by the fast blast shock are collisionally ionized to eject low-energy secondary electrons. Calculations are conducted of the temperature relaxation through Coulomb collisions among the secondary electrons, the shocked electrons, and the ions, assuming that the three species have Maxwellian velocity distributions. The results are applied to a self-similar blast wave. If the efficiency of collisionless electron heating at the shock front is high in young remnants such as Tycho, the secondary electrons may be much cooler than both the shocked electrons and the ions. In this case, the emergent X-ray continuum spectrum will have a two-temperature, or a power-law, appearance. This effect may have been observed in the bright rim of the remnant of SN 1006.

  4. REMNANTS OF BINARY WHITE DWARF MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, Cody; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.; Fryer, Chris; Rockefeller, Gabriel

    2012-02-10

    We carry out a comprehensive smooth particle hydrodynamics simulation survey of double-degenerate white dwarf binary mergers of varying mass combinations in order to establish correspondence between initial conditions and remnant configurations. We find that all but one of our simulation remnants share general properties such as a cold, degenerate core surrounded by a hot disk, while our least massive pair of stars forms only a hot disk. We characterize our remnant configurations by the core mass, the rotational velocity of the core, and the half-mass radius of the disk. We also find that some of our simulations with very massive constituent stars exhibit helium detonations on the surface of the primary star before complete disruption of the secondary. However, these helium detonations are insufficiently energetic to ignite carbon, and so do not lead to prompt carbon detonations.

  5. Serial segment method for measuring remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magdaleno, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    For tracking tasks where a sum of sine waves forcing function is used it is often difficult and/or expensive to obtain the pilot's remnant in the vicinity of the sine waves. For the case where each sine wave has at least four times an integer number of cycle per run length, this paper illustrates the serial segments method for measuring remnant power spectral density in a frequency band centered on each sine wave. This method can be implemented on digital, hybrid, or analog Fourier coefficient analyzers, and is particularly advantageous on the latter since properties of Fourier coefficients are exploited to yield both a remnant measure and an improved estimate of the correlated component.

  6. Planck intermediate results. XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Maino, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Rho, J.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for microwave emission. In only one case, IC 443, is there high-frequency emission clearly from dust associated with the supernova remnant. In all cases, the low-frequency emission is from synchrotron radiation. As predicted for a population of relativistic particles with energy distribution that extends continuously to high energies, a single power law is evident for many sources, including the Crab and PKS 1209-51/52. A decrease in flux density relative to the extrapolation of radio emission is evident in several sources. Their spectral energy distributions can be approximated as broken power laws, Sν ∝ ν-α, with the spectral index, α, increasing by 0.5-1 above a break frequency in the range 10-60 GHz. The break could be due to synchrotron losses.

  7. A Peculiar Linear Radio Feature In The Supernova Remnant N206

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, R. J.; Dickel, J. R.; Fields, B. D.; Milne, D. K.

    We present images of the supernova remnant N206 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 3 and 6 cm. Based on our data and previously published flux densities, the spectral index of N206 is -0.27+-0.06. The 6-cm radio morphology shows a filled center morphology, which along with the spectral index has led us to classify this remnant as Crab-type. Most interesting is the discovery of a peculiar linear feature previously undetected at any wavelength. The feature lies to the east of the center of the remnant, stretching from about one-fourth to three-fourths of the remnant's radius. It is wedge-shaped, with a steady opening angle from an apex on the eastern side. The feature resembles the disturbance expected from an object moving through the material supersonically. We present arguments suggesting that the linear feature may have been produced by the passage of a low-mass companion star ejected at about 800 km/s from a binary system whose other member was the star responsible for the supernova explosion.

  8. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  9. Approximate supernova remnant dynamics with cosmic ray production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voelk, H. J.; Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Supernova explosions are the most violent and energetic events in the galaxy and have long been considered probably sources of Cosmic Rays. Recent shock acceleration models treating the Cosmic Rays (CR's) as test particles nb a prescribed Supernova Remnant (SNR) evolution, indeed indicate an approximate power law momentum distribution f sub source (p) approximation p(-a) for the particles ultimately injected into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). This spectrum extends almost to the momentum p = 1 million GeV/c, where the break in the observed spectrum occurs. The calculated power law index approximately less than 4.2 agrees with that inferred for the galactic CR sources. The absolute CR intensity can however not be well determined in such a test particle approximation.

  10. Gamma-Ray Emission From Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Blandford, Roger D.; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-10-27

    It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found 'GeV-bright' supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of {pi}{sup 0}-mesons produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

  11. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  12. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma in a thyroglossal duct remnant

    PubMed Central

    Warner, E.; Ofo, E.; Connor, S.; Odell, E.; Jeannon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroglossal duct cysts (TDC) are common midline neck swellings resulting from embryological remnants of the thyroglossal duct. They often contain ectopic thyroid tissue and malignant transformation has been reported, most commonly to papillary thyroid carcinoma. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) usually occurs in the salivary glands and only rarely in the thyroid. This is the first case of a MEC occurring within a thyroglossal duct remnant. Presentation of a case A 73 year old lady presented with a thyroglossal duct cyst. She declined surgical excision, as she was adamant she wanted to avoid surgery. The neck mass rapidly enlarged at two years following initial diagnosis. Fine needle aspiration cytology was suspicious for carcinoma. She underwent total thyroidectomy and selective central compartment neck dissection with adjuvant radiotherapy. She remains alive and well two years post treatment. Discussion Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm of salivary glands, although it has rarely been reported in diverse locations including the thyroid, lung and pancreas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from a thyroglossal duct remnant. Conclusion This case adds weight to the literature favouring surgical excision of thyroglossal duct remnants due to the risk of malignant transformation. PMID:26101054

  13. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  14. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for Bottling, Packaging, and Removal of Products §...

  15. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for Bottling, Packaging, and Removal of Products §...

  16. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for Bottling, Packaging, and Removal of Products §...

  17. 27 CFR 19.389 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remnants. 19.389 Section 19.389 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing Operations Other Than Denaturation and Manufacture of Articles Bottling, Packaging,...

  18. Spectral Mapping of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen; Blair, William; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox; Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian

    2008-03-01

    We propose to leverage our extensive previous multi-wavelength investigations of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN 1604) by obtaining IRS spectral maps of this premier example of a 'massive Type Ia' remnant. Of particular interest is the dense circumstellar medium (CSM) evidently surrounding Kepler. This material is best investigated in infrared, where shock-heated dust reveals the thermal-gas density and possible composition clues such as the 10-micron silicate feature. Full LL coverage (14-38 um) will permit detailed mapping of continuum shape changes with spatial position that are only hinted at from our previous MIPS 24 and 70 um imaging. SL mapping of selected regions will permit detailed studies of changes in the silicate feature with position, suggested by two slit positions in earlier observations. Combined with our deep Chandra observation (750 ks), these data will permit a detailed study of dust destruction in fast shocks. Kepler also shows regions near the remnant edge dominated by synchrotron X-ray emission, indicating electron acceleration to energies of order 100 TeV. However, the dominance of synchrotron continuum means that properties of the thermal medium, important for understanding shock-acceleration physics, cannot be diagnosed with X-rays. Our IRS spectra should allow such diagnosis. Kepler's unique position among Type Ia supernova remnants makes it a critical target for the understanding of the Type Ia phenomenon.

  19. A Multiwavelength Study of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Robert

    The remnant of the supernova of 1572 A.D., now known as Tycho's Supernova Remnant (SNR), is one of the most well studied SNRs in existence, having been observed with telescopes from radio waves to gamma-rays. We propose a multi-wavelength study of this remnant, with particular focus on archival data in the infrared from Spitzer, WISE, and Herschel, and in gamma-rays from Fermi. The IR data is of extremely high-quality, and will allow us to answer or further constrain several mysteries regarding Tycho, known to be the remnant of a Type Ia supernova. Is the remnant a source of particle acceleration producing cosmic-rays in excess of 10^15 ev? What is the source of the gamma-ray emission seen at both GeV and TeV energies? What is the nature of the medium surrounding the remnant, into which it is currently expanding at over 4000 km/s? Has any dust formed in the iron-rich ejected material from the supernova? The answers to all of these questions will require a multi-wavelength approach, and we will supplement the IR and gamma-ray data here with archival X-ray data from both Chandra and XMM- Newton. In young SNRs like Tycho, IR and X-ray emission is inherently connected, since the hot ions and electrons that give rise to the thermal X-ray emission also heat (and destroy) dust grains in the post-shock gas. Infrared spectroscopy is a highly sensitive function of gas density, and provides a more powerful diagnostic tool for this parameter than X-rays alone do. This post-shock density is a crucial parameter for both particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission models, and the IR data will allow us to measure this density at any point in the remnant. We will explore the relationship between dust and gas in the immediate post-shock region. Because the blast wave is encountering the ambient Galactic ISM, this will provide strong constraints on the dust composition and dust-to-gas mass ratio in the general ISM. At all wavelengths, Tycho is a wealth of information, and by

  20. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE VISHNIAC INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michaut, C.; Cavet, C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Roy, F.; Nguyen, H. C.

    2012-11-10

    The Vishniac instability is thought to explain the complex structure of radiative supernova remnants in their Pressure-Driven Thin Shell (PDTS) phase after a blast wave (BW) has propagated from a central explosion. In this paper, the propagation of the BW and the evolution of the PDTS stage are studied numerically with the two-dimensional (2D) code HYDRO-MUSCL for a finite-thickness shell expanding in the interstellar medium (ISM). Special attention is paid to the adiabatic index, {gamma}, and three distinct values are taken for the cavity ({gamma}{sub 1}), the shell ({gamma}{sub 2}), and the ISM ({gamma}{sub 3}) with the condition {gamma}{sub 2} < {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 3}. This low value of {gamma}{sub 2} accounts for the high density in the shell achieved by a strong radiative cooling. Once the spherical background flow is obtained, the evolution of a 2D-axisymmetric perturbation is computed from the linear to the nonlinear regime. The overstable mechanism, previously demonstrated theoretically by E. T. Vishniac in 1983, is recovered numerically in the linear stage and is expected to produce and enhance anisotropies and clumps on the shock front, leading to the disruption of the shell in the nonlinear phase. The period of the increasing oscillations and the growth rate of the instability are derived from several points of view (the position of the perturbed shock front, mass fluxes along the shell, and density maps), and the most unstable mode differing from the value given by Vishniac is computed. In addition, the influence of several parameters (the Mach number, amplitude and wavelength of the perturbation, and adiabatic index) is examined and for wavelengths that are large enough compared to the shell thickness, the same conclusion arises: in the late stage of the evolution of the radiative supernova remnant, the instability is dampened and the angular initial deformation of the shock front is smoothed while the mass density becomes uniform with the

  1. Molecular environment of the supernova remnant IC 443: Discovery of the molecular shells surrounding the remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang

    2014-06-20

    We have carried out {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O observations toward the mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443. The observations cover a 1.°5 × 1.°5 area and allow us to investigate the overall molecular environment of the remnant. Some northern and northeastern partial shell structure of CO gas is around the remnant. One of the partial shells, about 5' extending beyond the northeastern border of the remnant's bright radio shell, seems to just confine the faint radio halo. On the other hand, some faint CO clumps can be discerned along the eastern boundary of the faint remnant's radio halo. Connecting the eastern CO clumps, the northeastern partial shell structures, and the northern CO partial shell, we can see that a half molecular ring structure appears to surround the remnant. The LSR velocity of the half-ring structure is in the range of –5 km s{sup –1} to –2 km s{sup –1}, which is consistent with that of the –4 km s{sup –1} molecular clouds. We suggest that the half-ring structure of the CO emission at V {sub LSR} ∼ –4 km s{sup –1} is associated with the SNR. The structures are possibly swept up by the stellar winds of SNR IC 443's massive progenitor. Based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and the Two Micron All Sky Survey near-IR database, 62 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are selected within the radio halo of the remnant. These YSO candidates concentrated along the boundary of the remnant's bright radio shell are likely to be triggered by the stellar winds from the massive progenitor of SNR IC 443.

  2. Quantitation of Endothelial Cell Adhesiveness In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Donna J.; Raj, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    One of the cardinal processes of inflammation is the infiltration of immune cells from the lumen of the blood vessel to the surrounding tissue. This occurs when endothelial cells, which line blood vessels, become adhesive to circulating immune cells such as monocytes. In vitro measurement of this adhesiveness has until now been done by quantifying the total number of monocytes that adhere to an endothelial layer either as a direct count or by indirect measurement of the fluorescence of adherent monocytes. While such measurements do indicate the average adhesiveness of the endothelial cell population, they are confounded by a number of factors, such as cell number, and do not reveal the proportion of endothelial cells that are actually adhesive. Here we describe and demonstrate a method which allows the enumeration of adhesive cells within a tested population of endothelial monolayer. Endothelial cells are grown on glass coverslips and following desired treatment are challenged with monocytes (that may be fluorescently labeled). After incubation, a rinsing procedure, involving multiple rounds of immersion and draining, the cells are fixed. Adhesive endothelial cells, which are surrounded by monocytes are readily identified and enumerated, giving an adhesion index that reveals the actual proportion of endothelial cells within the population that are adhesive. PMID:26132714

  3. Imagery and spectroscopy of supernova remnants and H-2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities relating to supernova remnants were summarized. The topics reviewed include: progenitor stars of supernova remnants, UV/optical/radio/X-ray imagery of selected regions in the Cygnus Loop, UV/optical spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop spur, and extragalactic supernova remnant spectra.

  4. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  5. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  6. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  7. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  8. Two evolved supernova remnants with newly identified Fe-rich cores in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Points, S. D.; Crawford, E. J.; Dickel, J.; Filipović, M. D.; Haberl, F.; Maggi, P.; Whelan, E. T.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the evolved supernova remnants MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: We used observational data from XMM-Newton, the Australian Telescope Compact Array, and the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey to study their broad-band emission and used Spitzer and H i data to gain a picture of the environment into which the remnants are expanding. We performed a multi-wavelength morphological study and detailed radio and X-ray spectral analyses to determine their physical characteristics. Results: Both remnants were found to have bright X-ray cores, dominated by Fe L-shell emission, which is consistent with reverse shock-heated ejecta with determined Fe masses in agreement with Type Ia explosion yields. A soft X-ray shell, which is consistent with swept-up interstellar medium, was observed in MCSNR J0506-7025, suggestive of a remnant in the Sedov phase. Using the spectral fit results and the Sedov self-similar solution, we estimated the age of MCSNR J0506-7025 to be ~16-28 kyr, with an initial explosion energy of (0.07-0.84) × 1051 erg. A soft shell was absent in MCSNR J0527-7104, with only ejecta emission visible in an extremely elongated morphology that extends beyond the optical shell. We suggest that the blast wave has broken out into a low density cavity, allowing the shock heated ejecta to escape. We find that the radio spectral index of MCSNR J0506-7025 is consistent with the standard -0.5 for supernova remnants. Radio polarisation at 6 cm indicates a higher degree of polarisation along the western front and at the eastern knot with a mean fractional polarisation across the remnant of P ≅ (20 ± 6)%. Conclusions: The detection of Fe-rich ejecta in the remnants suggests that both resulted from Type Ia explosions. The newly identified Fe-rich cores in MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 make them members of the expanding class of evolved Fe-rich remnants in the Magellanic Clouds

  9. Planets orbiting Quark Nova compact remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, P.; Ouyed, R.

    2003-08-01

    We explore planet formation in the Quark Nova scenario. If a millisecond pulsar explodes as a Quark Nova, a protoplanetary disk can be formed out of the metal rich fall-back material. The propeller mechanism transfers angular momentum from the born quark star to the disk that will go through viscous evolution with later plausible grain condensation and planet formation. As a result, earth-size planets on circular orbits may form within short radii from the central quark star. The planets in the PSR 1257+12 system can be explained by our model if the Quark Nova compact remnant is born with a period of ~ 0.5 ms following the explosion. We suggest that a good portion of the Quark Nova remnants may harbour planetary systems.

  10. Universal aspects of brittle fracture, adhesion, and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1989-01-01

    This universal relation between binding energy and interatomic separation was originally discovered for adhesion at bimetallic interfaces involving the simple metals Al, Zn, Mg, and Na. It is shown here that the same universal relation extends to adhesion at transition-metal interfaces. Adhesive energies have been computed for the low-index interfaces of Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Fe, and W, using the equivalent-crystal theory (ECT) and keeping the atoms in each semiinfinite slab fixed rigidly in their equilibrium positions. These adhesive energy curves can be scaled onto each other and onto the universal adhesion curve. The effect of tip shape on the adhesive forces in the atomic-force microscope (AFM) is studied by computing energies and forces using the ECT. While the details of the energy-distance and force-distance curves are sensitive to tip shape, all of these curves can be scaled onto the universal adhesion curve.

  11. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  12. Supernova remnants in the GC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvarov, Abdul

    2016-07-01

    Along with the central Black hole the processes of active star formation play very important role in the energetics of the Galactic center region. The SNe and their remnants (SNRs) are the main ingredients of the processes of star formation. SNRs are also the sources of electromagnetic radiation of all wavelengths from the optical to hard gamma rays. In the presented work we consider the physics of supernova remnants evolving in extreme environmental conditions which are typical for the region of the Galactic center. Because of the high density and strong inhomogeneity of the surrounding medium these objects remain practically invisible at almost all wavelengths. We model evolution of SNR taking into account the pressure of the surrounding medium and the gravitational field of the matter (stars, compact clouds, dark matter) inside the remnant. As it is well established, considerable portion of the kinetic energy of the SNR can be converted into the cosmic ray particles by diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Therefore the effect of particle acceleration is also included in the model (with the effectiveness of acceleration as a free parameter). Using the observed radiation fluxes at different wavelengths we attempt to obtain limits on the parameters of the model of the Galactic Center, namely, the frequency of star birth, the average density of the matter and radiation field, etc.

  13. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  14. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  15. Syringomyelia caused by intrathecal remnants of oil-based contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mayumi; Shin, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Makoto; Terao, Toru; Nakauchi, Jun; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Oily contrast medium had been in use since the early 19th century as a radiographic agent for detecting spinal lesions and spinal cord tumors until the late 20th century. At that point computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging, or other hydrophilic contrast medium substituted for it. Adverse effects of oil-based dye, both acute and chronic, had been reported since the middle of the 20th century. In this paper the authors report the case of syringomyelia that seemed to be caused mainly by remaining oily contrast medium for 44 years. Syringomyelia secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis caused by oily contrast medium after a long period of time is well known. In the present case, however, surgery revealed only mild arachnoiditis at the level of syringomyelia as well as both solid and liquid remnants of contrast medium. Generally, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) blockage due to an arachnoid adhesion is considered to cause syringomyelia following adhesive arachnoiditis. The authors speculated that in the present case syringomyelia was induced by a mechanism different from that in the previously reported cases; the oily contrast medium itself seems to have induced the functional block of CSF and impaired the buffer system of the intrathecal pressure. No reports on thoracic adhesive arachnoiditis and syringomyelia caused by oil-based dye referred to this mechanism in reviewing the literature. PMID:18248289

  16. Shocked Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Unusually strong high-excitation C I has been detected in eleven lines of sight through the Vela supernova remnant by means of UV absorption-line studies of IUE data. Most of these lines of sight lie near the western edge of the X-ray bright region of the supernova remnant in a spatially distinct band approximately 1deg by 4deg oriented approximately north/south. The high-excitation C I (denoted C I*) is interpreted as evidence of a complex of shocked dense clouds inside the supernova remnant, due to the high pressures indicated in this region. To further analyze the properties of this region of C I*, we present new HIRES-processed IRAS data of the entire Vela SNR. A temperature map calculated from the HIRES IRAS data, based on a two-component dust model, reveals the signature of hot dust at several locations in the SNR. The hot dust is anti-correlated spatially with X-ray emission as revealed by ROSAT, as would be expected for a dusty medium interacting with a shock wave. The regions of hot dust are strongly correlated with optical filaments, supporting a scenario of dense clouds interior to the SNR that have been shocked and are now cooling behind the supernova blast wave. With few exceptions, the lines of sight to the strong C I* pass through regions of hot dust and optical filaments. Possible mechanisms for the production of the anomalously large columns of C I and C I* are discussed. Dense clouds on the back western hemisphere of the remnant may explain the relatively low X-ray emission in the western portion of the Vela supernova remnant due to the slower forward shock velocity in regions where the shock has encountered the dense clouds. An alternate explanation for the presence of neutral, excited state, and ionized species along the same line of sight may be a magnetic precusor that heats and compresses the gas ahead of the shock.

  17. Supernova remnant evolution in uniform and non-uniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. E. S.; de Jager, O. C.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:In this work numerical simulations showing the time evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) in uniform and non-uniform interstellar medium (ISM) are presented. Methods: We use a hydrodynamic model including a kinematic calculation of the interstellar magnetic field. Important parameters influencing SNR evolution include the ejecta mass and energy of the remnant, as well as the ISM density and adiabatic index. Results: By varying these parameters we constructed an analytical expression giving the return time of the SNR reverse shock to the origin, in terms of these parameters. We also found that the reverse shock spends half of its time moving outward and the other half returning to the origin. Also computed is SNR evolution in non-uniform media where the blast wave moves from one medium into either a less or more dense medium. As the SNR moves into a medium of higher density a reflection wave is created at the interface between the two media which is driven back toward the center. This drives mass via a nonspherical flow away from the discontinuity. As this wave moves inward it also drags some of the ISM field lines (if the field is parallel with the interface) with it and heats the inside of the SNR resulting in larger temperatures in this region. When a SNR explodes in a medium with a high density and the blast wave propagates into a medium with a lower density, a cavity is being blown away changing the geometry of the high density region. Also, once the forward shock moves into the medium of less density a second reverse shock will start to evolve in this region.

  18. Cosmic ray acceleration at perpendicular shocks in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Danos, Rebecca J.; Shalchi, Andreas; Safi-Harb, Samar; Edmon, Paul; Mendygral, Peter

    2014-09-10

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate particles up to high energies through the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Except for direct plasma simulations, all modeling efforts must rely on a given form of the diffusion coefficient, a key parameter that embodies the interactions of energetic charged particles with magnetic turbulence. The so-called Bohm limit is commonly employed. In this paper, we revisit the question of acceleration at perpendicular shocks, by employing a realistic model of perpendicular diffusion. Our coefficient reduces to a power law in momentum for low momenta (of index α), but becomes independent of the particle momentum at high momenta (reaching a constant value κ{sub ∞} above some characteristic momentum p {sub c}). We first provide simple analytical expressions of the maximum momentum that can be reached at a given time with this coefficient. Then we perform time-dependent numerical simulations to investigate the shape of the particle distribution that can be obtained when the particle pressure back-reacts on the flow. We observe that for a given index α and injection level, the shock modifications are similar for different possible values of p {sub c}, whereas the particle spectra differ markedly. Of particular interest, low values of p {sub c} tend to remove the concavity once thought to be typical of non-linear DSA, and result in steep spectra, as required by recent high-energy observations of Galactic SNRs.

  19. Observing Supernovae and Supernova Remnants with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable near- and mid-infrared studies of supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) in the Milky Way and galaxies throughout the local universe and to high redshift. JWST's instrumentation provides imaging, coronography, and spectroscopy (R<3000) over the wavelength range 1-29 microns. The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution will enable spectroscopic study of new and recent supernovae, including molecule and dust formation, in galaxies at least out to 30 Mpc, and imaging to much greater distances. The Target of Opportunity response time can be as short as 48 hours, enabling quick follow-up observations of important SN events. JWST will be ideal for the study of Galactic and Magellanic Clouds supernova remnants, particularly young remnants with hot dust. Its high angular resolution (0.07" at 2 microns, 0.7" at 20 microns) will allow direct comparison between the IR, optical, and X-ray morphologies, identifying sites of dust emission in both the ejecta and the shocked ISM unresolved by previous IR telescopes. There is a rich spectrum of atomic lines (H, He I, [Si I], [Fe II], [Ni I-III], [Co II-III], [S III-IV], [Ar II-III], [Ne II, III, V], [O IV]) and molecules (CO, SiO, H2) of importance for SN and SNR studies. JWST is a large aperture (6.5m), cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018. The JWST observatory will be placed in an Earth-Sun L2 orbit by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle provided by ESA. The observatory is designed for a 5-year prime science mission, with consumables for 10 years of science operations. The first call for proposals for JWST observations will be released in 2017.

  20. Induced population gradients in galaxy merger remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We use numerical models to investigate the nature of induced population gradients in merger remnants. As noted by White, we find that the population mixing in stellar-dynamical mergers is rather moderate, leading to metallicity gradients in the remnant that are closely tied to gradients in the progenitor galaxies. Furthermore, the resultant metallicity gradients are poorly fitted by power laws, showing significant nonlinearities within an effective radius. If constant metallicity bulges are added to the progenitor disks, the strong relation between final and initial metallicity gradients is diluted, but the final gradients are still not well fitted by power laws. Detailed studies of the shape of the metallicity gradients in elliptical galaxies should help determine the degree to which stellar-dynamical mergers have contributed to the population of present-day ellipticals. We also consider the effects of centrally concentrated starbursts on metallicity gradients. Using simple models for metallicity enhancement, we find that addition of a metal-rich starburst population can reproduce the magnitude and shape of metallicity gradients observed in elliptical galaxies. However, even in such cases the metallicity gradients in the merger remnant should steepen significantly beyond an effective radius. Modelling such merger-induced starbursts with population synthesis techniques, we find that if the starburst is characterized by solar metallicity, it should be detectable as a bluing of the nuclear regions for several Gyr. However, if the starburst is metal-rich, the reddening effects of higher metallicity makes the broad-band signature of the starburst much more difficult to detect.

  1. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006 supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest x-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 to 10 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology.

  2. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  3. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT TYCHO

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, F.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Ballet, J.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Raino, S.; Tibolla, O. E-mail: Melitta.Naumann-Godo@cea.fr

    2012-01-15

    After almost three years of data taking in sky-survey mode, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has detected {gamma}-ray emission toward Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). The Tycho SNR is among the youngest remnants in the Galaxy, originating from a Type Ia Supernova in AD 1572. The {gamma}-ray integral flux from 400 MeV up to 100 GeV has been measured to be (3.5 {+-} 1.1{sub stat} {+-} 0.7{sub syst}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a photon index of 2.3 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.1{sub syst}. A simple model consistent with TeV, X-ray, and radio data is sufficient to explain the observed emission as originating from {pi}{sup 0} decays as a result of cosmic-ray acceleration and interaction with the ambient medium.

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of the Young Supernova Remnant Tycho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, F.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Ballet, J.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Rainò, S.; Tanaka, T.; Tibolla, O.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    After almost three years of data taking in sky-survey mode, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has detected γ-ray emission toward Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). The Tycho SNR is among the youngest remnants in the Galaxy, originating from a Type Ia Supernova in AD 1572. The γ-ray integral flux from 400 MeV up to 100 GeV has been measured to be (3.5 ± 1.1stat ± 0.7syst)× 10-9 cm-2 s-1 with a photon index of 2.3 ± 0.2stat ± 0.1syst. A simple model consistent with TeV, X-ray, and radio data is sufficient to explain the observed emission as originating from π0 decays as a result of cosmic-ray acceleration and interaction with the ambient medium.

  5. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt-Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit.

  6. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  7. ASCA observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant sample: Typing supernovae from their remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.; Hayashi, Ichizo; Helfand, David; Hwang, Una; Itoh, Masayuki; Kirshner, Robert; Koyama, Katsuji; Markert, Thomas; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Woo, Jonathan

    1995-01-01

    We present our first results from a study of the supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from ASCA. The three remnants we have analyzed to date, 0509-67.5, 0519-69.0, and N103B, are among the smallest, and presumably also the youngest, in the Cloud. The X-ray spectra of these SNRs show strong K alpha emission lines of silicon, sulfur, argon, and calcium with no evidence for corresponding lines of oxygen, neon, or magnesium. The dominant feature in the spectra is a broad blend of emission lines around 1 keV which we attribute to L-shell emission lines of iron. Model calculations (Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi 1984) show that the major products of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae (SNs) are the elements from silicon to iron, as observed here. The calculated nucleosynthetic yields from Type Ib and II SNs are shown to be qualitatively inconsistent with the data. We conclude that the SNs which produced these remnants were of Type Ia. This finding also confirms earlier suggestions that the class of Balmer-dominated remnants arise from Type Ia SN explosions. Based on these early results from the LMC SNR sample, we find that roughly one-half of the SNRs produced in the LMC within the last approximately 1500 yr came from Type Ia SNs.

  8. The prevalence of supernova remnants among unidentified Galactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Velusamy, T.; Becker, R. H.; Lockman, Felix J.

    1989-01-01

    Nine Galactic radio sources were mapped to identify new Crab-like and composite supernova remnants. The sources were selected on the basis of existing stringent upper limits on their hydrogen recombination line fluxes. One new Cracb-like remnant, one new composite remnant, at least one, and probably two, new shell-like remnants, and a compact H II region were found, along with the expected collection of extragalactic objects. The results suggest that there are several hundred SNRs in the Galaxy which are detectable with current instruments, but which have yet to be identified.

  9. Ruprecht 3: An old star cluster remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavani, D. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2003-02-01

    2MASS J and H photometry and integrated spectroscopy are employed to study the nature of the poorly populated compact concentration of stars Ruprecht 3, which was previously catalogued as an open cluster. The integrated spectrum remarkably resembles that of a moderately metal-rich globular cluster. The distribution of the object stars in the colour-magnitude diagram is compatible with that of a 1.5 +/- 0.5 Gyr open cluster or older, depending on whether the bluer stars are interpreted as turnoff stars or blue stragglers, respectively. We derive for the object a distance from the Sun dsun = 0.72 +0.04-0.03 kpc and a colour excess E(B-V) = 0.04. Although a globular cluster remnant cannot be ruled out, the integrated spectrum resemblance to that of a globular cluster probably reflects a stochastic effect owing to the few brighter stars. The structural and photometric properties of Ruprecht 3 are compatible with what would be expected for an intermediate-age open cluster remnant. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  10. Thermophysical and flammability characterization of phosphorylated epoxy adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Giants, T. W.; Bilow, N.; Hsu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the thermophysical and flammability properties of a phosphorylated epoxy adhesive, which has potential applications in aircraft interior panels, are described. The adhesive consists of stoichiometric ratios of bis(3-glycidyloxphenyl)methylphosphine oxide and bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide containing approximately 7.5% phosphorus. Preliminary data are presented from adhesive bonding studies conducted utilizing this adhesive with polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) film and phenolic-glass laminates. Limiting oxygen index and smoke density data are presented and compared with those of the tetraglycidyl methylene dianiline epoxy resin-adhesive system currently used in aircraft interiors. Initial results indicate that the phosphorylated epoxy compound has excellent adhesive properties when used with PVF film and that desirable fire-resistant properties are maintained.

  11. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  12. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  13. Effect of surface treatment of brackets and mechanical cycling on adhesion to enamel.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Fabiola Rossato; Degrazia, Felipe; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Grehs, Renesio Armindo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate how surface conditioning from bracket and mechanical cycling aging affected the bond strength between metallic brackets and bovine enamel, and to determine the adhesive remnant index. Eighty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using polyvinyl chloride rings and divided into 4 groups based on surface treatment (n = 20). Group 1 (control) received no surface treatment, Group 2 specimens were sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, Group 3 specimens were sandblasted with silicon oxide and treated with a tribochemichemical silica coupling agent, and Group 4 specimens were primed with a multidomain protein-based agent. Half of the specimens were submitted to shear bond testing, while the others were subjected to mechanical cycling. ANOVA showed that mechanical cycling did not have a significant influence on bond strength (P = 0.9244), while surface conditioning of the brackets did (P = 0.0001). Tukey's test results were similar for mechanical cycling, and indicated that only Group 3 significantly improved the resin bond to the brackets; however, this group also demonstrated the highest percentage of enamel failure. PMID:24784526

  14. Indexing Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  15. A comparison of tungsten-quartz-halogen, plasma arc and light-emitting diode light sources for the polymerization of an orthodontic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Thind, Bikram S; Stirrups, David R; Lloyd, Charles H

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated whether there were differences between the debond stress and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of an adhesive cured with three different orthodontic light sources. Sixty sound premolar teeth were divided into three groups of 20. A standard pre-adjusted edgewise premolar bracket (Victory Series) was bonded to each tooth using a light-cured orthodontic adhesive, Transbond X. Group 1 (control) specimens were cured with an Ortholux XT (tungsten-quartz-halogen bulb) light for 20 seconds, group 2 with an Ortho lite (plasma arc) for 6 seconds and group 3 with an Ortholux LED light-emitting diode for 10 seconds. The specimens were debonded 24 hours later using a universal mechanical testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm minute(-1). The Weibull modulus and a Logrank test showed no statistically significant differences between the three groups for debond stress. The ARI was assessed at x10 magnification. The ARI scores for group 2 were significantly different (P < 0.01) from those of groups 1 and 3 (between which there was no significant difference). For group 2 there was a greater tendency for failure to occur at the adhesive/tooth interface than for the other two groups. There appears to be no reason why any of the three types of light source cannot be used in orthodontics. Polymerization, as effective as that produced by conventional bulb light sources, was obtained with the short exposure times recommended for the plasma arc or light-emitting diode sources. PMID:16199410

  16. The likely Fermi detection of the supernova remnant RCW 103

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2014-02-01

    We report on the results from our γ-ray analysis of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 103 region. The data were taken with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An extended source is found at a position consistent with that of RCW 103 and its emission was only detected above 1 GeV (10σ significance), with a power-law spectrum with a photon index of 2.0 ± 0.1. We obtain its 1-300 GeV spectrum and the total flux gives a luminosity of 8.3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} at a source distance of 3.3 kpc. Given the positional coincidence and property similarities of this source with other SNRs, we identify it as the likely Fermi γ-ray counterpart to RCW 103. Including radio measurements of RCW 103, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is modeled by considering emission mechanisms based on both hadronic and leptonic scenarios. We find that models in the two scenarios can reproduce the observed SED, while in the hadronic scenario the existence of SNR-molecular cloud interactions is suggested as a high density of the target protons is required.

  17. New Candidate Supernova Remnants in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. F.; Schmitt, M. D.; Winkler, P. F.

    1995-05-01

    We have used pure emission-line images (deep CCD images from which a continuum image has been subtracted; see Winkler & Williams, companion paper) to search for supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in M31. The ratio of \\sii\\ lambda \\ 6724\\ to \\ha\\ is used to distinguish SNRs from \\hii\\ regions, a technique that has been used effectively in other galaxies as well as in earlier photographic surveys of M31 (D'Odorico et al 1980, A&A Supp 40, 67; Blair et al 1981, Ap J 247, 879). The extensive cooling zone typically found behind SNR shocks emits strongly in \\sii, while in photoionized material such as \\hii\\ regions most of the S is twice ionized and hence \\sii\\ is weak. SNRs almost always have \\sii/\\ha\\ ratios > 0.4\\ vs values < 0.2\\ for \\hii\\ regions. Using this criterion, we have identified 105 nebulae in M31 which are strong SNR candidates, of which 13 were previously identified by D'Odorico et al and/or Blair et al. While this number probably represents a small minorit y of the SNRs which are actually present in M31, confirmation of a substantial fraction of these would increase the population of known remnants in M31 several-fold and would make it the galaxy with the largest sample of known optical SNRs, including our own. For the cumulative number of SNRs as a function of diameter we find N(remnants that is inevitable with our coarse scale, 2'' pixel(-1) \\ with an effective resolution of only ~ 5arcsec , equivalent to 18 pc at the distance of M31. We can, however, rule out N(

  18. Covering of fiber-reinforced composite bars by adhesive materials, is it necessary to improve the bond strength of lingual retainers?

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Farzin; Kerayechian, Navid; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Shafaee, Hooman; Heravi, Parya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers when bonding them to teeth with and without covering the FRC bars using two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Hundred and twenty extracted human maxillary premolars were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 15). FRC bars (4 mm length, Everstick Ortho®, Stick Tech, Oy, Turku, Finland) were bonded to the proximal (distal) surfaces of the teeth using two different adhesives (Tetric Flow [TF, Ivoclar Vivadent, Switzerland] and resin-modified glass ionomer cement [RMGIC, ODP, Vista, CA, USA]) with and without covering with the same adhesive. Specimens were exposed to thermocycling (625 cycles per day [5–55°C, intervals: 30 s] for 8 days). The SBS test was then performed using the universal testing machine (Zwick, GMBH, Ulm, Germany). After debonding, the remaining adhesive on the teeth was recorded by the adhesive remnant index (0–3). Results: The lowest mean SBS (standard deviation) was found in the TF group without covering with adhesive (12.6 [2.11] MPa), and the highest bond strength was in the TF group with covering with adhesive (16.01 [1.09] MPa). Overall, the uncovered RMGIC (15.65 [3.57] MPa) provided a higher SBS compared to the uncovered TF. Covering of FRC with TF led to a significant increase in SBS (P = 0.001), but this was not true for RMGIC (P = 0.807). Thermal cycling did not significantly change the SBS values (P = 0.537). Overall, eight groups were statistically different (ANOVA test, F = 3.32, P = 0.034), but no significant differences in bond failure locations were found between the groups (Fisher's exact tests, P = 0.92). Conclusions: The present findings showed no significant differences between SBS of FRC bars with and without covering by RMGIC. However, when using TF, there was a significant difference in SBS measurements between covering and noncovering groups. Therefore, the use of RMGIC without

  19. Characteristics of chylomicron remnant uptake into rat liver.

    PubMed

    Huettinger, M; Retzek, H; Eder, M; Goldenberg, H

    1988-04-01

    We have investigated uptake of 125I-labeled chylomicron remnants into livers of rats in the presence of lactoferrin. This glycoprotein possesses a cluster of four arginines at the N-terminus similar to the arginine rich binding sequence of apoprotein E (apoE) to the LDL-receptor. We found that this protein inhibits uptake of 125I-chylomicron remnant radioactivity by 50% when measured as accumulation of radioactivity into the intact organ, and even more pronounced, over 75%, when measured as uptake into an endosomal fraction prepared therefrom. Provided that the arginine rich sequence is responsible for the inhibition, a similarity in the characteristics of binding of apoE to the LDL (low density lipoprotein)- and chylomicron remnant-receptor is likely. Second, transferrin having sequence homologies with lactoferrin, but lacking the arginine cluster does not interfere with chylomicron remnant uptake. Third, lactoferrin does not inhibit the uptake of chylomicron remnants by the spleen, which is most likely mediated through scavenger cells by a mechanism different from the chylomicron remnant uptake system of the liver. We hypothesize from this that lactoferrin specifically interferes with the physiologically relevant chylomicron remnant uptake system of the liver. Investigation of the mechanism of this inhibition will provide information about the physical characteristics of the remnant receptor system. PMID:3390901

  20. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  1. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  2. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-L; Chiang, C-W; Shiao, C-C

    2015-12-01

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling. PMID:26790560

  3. Type Ia Progenitor Hunt in Ancient Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.

    2013-01-01

    There is broad agreement that the stars which explode as Type Ia supernovae are white dwarfs. They have accreted material in a binary system until they are near the Chandrasekhar mass and detonate/deflagrate. The two main scenarios for this accretion process are merging with a companion white dwarf (double degenerate scenario), or accretion from a main-sequence to red giant donor (single degenerate scenario). The donor star survives post-explosion and would provide substantial evidence for the single degenerate scenario, if found. Our team is analyzing stars in close proximity to Galactic Type Ia remnants to find surviving donor stars. In my talk I will introduce the different progenitor systems and the expected state for a donor star today. I will outline our search using high resolution spectroscopy and will present updated results.

  4. Semiclassical geons as solitonic black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D. E-mail: gonzalo.olmo@csic.es

    2013-07-01

    We find that the end state of black hole evaporation could be represented by non-singular and without event horizon stable solitonic remnants with masses of the order the Planck scale and up to ∼ 16 units of charge. Though these objects are locally indistinguishable from spherically symmetric, massive electric (or magnetic) charges, they turn out to be sourceless geons containing a wormhole generated by the electromagnetic field. Our results are obtained by interpreting semiclassical corrections to Einstein's theory in the first-order (Palatini) formalism, which yields second-order equations and avoids the instabilities of the usual (metric) formulation of quadratic gravity. We also discuss the potential relevance of these solutions for primordial black holes and the dark matter problem.

  5. Detecting supernova remnants in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.; Dodorico, S.

    1985-01-01

    Identification of supernova remnants (SNR) in external galaxies through the combined use of radio, optical and X-ray surveys is discussed. Some 24 likely distant galaxy SNR have been found in the past six years, though confirmation is often difficult. Radio surveys of other galaxies are restricted by background object contamination in the field, and confirmation of these candidates requires other techniques. Optical measurement of the ratio of the forbidden SII doublet at .6717 and .6731 microns to H-alpha, followed by spectroscopic or radio confirmation, has successfully identified SNR in the LMC and other galaxies, though few in number. Most of the SNR in the Magellanic Clouds have been detected as X-ray emitters, but towards M31 there are no coincidences between the lists of optical SNR and X-ray sources. An increase in SNR identifications should result from use of the Space Telescope and continued use of the VLA.

  6. New supernova remnant candidates in M 31.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Prins, S.; van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Supper, R.; Hasinger, G.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1995-12-01

    We have performed a CCD Hα, [SII], V survey of ~1.0 square degree of the disk of M 31 to search for new supernova remnant (SNR) candidates. We have identified candidates based on a combination of criteria: optical line-flux ratios, the presence or absence of ionizing blue stars, and optical morphology. We have identified a total of 178 candidate SNRs, divided into three confidence categories: 13 with the highest confidence, 54 with moderate confidence, and 111 with the lowest confidence. We have also identified 14 large structures with the characteristics of the superbubbles seen in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds. Of our 178 candidates, 15 have been identified in previous searches (Braun & Walterbos 1993; Blair et al. 1981; D'Odorico et al. 1980). We present finding charts of all candidate SNRs and the superbubbles we have noted. We also present a detailed discussion of SNR searches in the Local Group.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  8. Vivid View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This composite image of the Tycho supernova remnant combines infrared and X-ray observations obtained with NASA's Spitzer and Chandra space observatories, respectively, and the Calar Alto observatory, Spain. It shows the scene more than four centuries after the brilliant star explosion witnessed by Tycho Brahe and other astronomers of that era.

    The explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (green and yellow). The location of the blast's outer shock wave can be seen as a blue sphere of ultra-energetic electrons. Newly synthesized dust in the ejected material and heated pre-existing dust from the area around the supernova radiate at infrared wavelengths of 24 microns (red). Foreground and background stars in the image are white.

  9. Black hole remnant from gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag Ali, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we investigate black hole (BH) physics in the context of the gravity rainbow. We investigate this through rainbow functions that have been proposed by Amelino-Camelia [Living Rev. Relativity 16, 5 (2013)] and Amelino-Camelia et al. in [Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 12, 607 (1997)]. This modification will give corrections to both the temperature and the entropy of BHs, and hence it changes the picture of Hawking radiation greatly when the size of the BH approaches the Planck scale. It prevents the BH from total evaporation, predicting the existence of a BH remnant, which may resolve the catastrophic behavior of Hawking radiation as the BH mass approaches zero.

  10. Radio flux variation of young supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Bubukin, I.T.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    The 31.5-cm radio flux density of Cas A, the Crab Nebula, and the remnant of the 1572 supernova relative to that of the radio galaxies Cyg A and Vir A was measured in 1981. Comparison with similar observations in 1964 and 1972 shows that over the past decade the decline of the Cas A flux has slowed by a factor 2.2 and now amounts to (0.413 +- 0.08)%/yr. The Crab flux was (3.5 +- 1.0)% weaker in 1981 than in 1964 and 1972; it probably dropped abruptly between 1972 and 1977. For the 1572 SNR the annual mean decline over the 17-yr period is (0.5 +- 0.15)%/yr.

  11. The Origin of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Badenes, Carles; Park, Sangwook; Laming, J. Martin

    2012-09-01

    It is now well established that Kepler's supernova remnant (SNR) is the result of a Type Ia explosion. With an age of 407 yr and an angular diameter of ~4', Kepler is estimated to be between 3.0 and 7.0 kpc distant. Unlike other Galactic Type Ia SNRs such as Tycho and SN 1006, and SNR 0509-67.5 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Kepler shows evidence for a strong circumstellar interaction. A bowshock structure in the north is thought to originate from the motion of a mass-losing system through the interstellar medium prior to the supernova. We present results of hydrodynamical and spectral modeling aimed at constraining the circumstellar environment of the system and the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion. Using models that contain either 0.3 M ⊙ (subenergetic) or 1.0 M ⊙ (energetic) of 56Ni, we simulate the interaction between supernova Ia ejecta and various circumstellar density models. Based on dynamical considerations alone, we find that the subenergetic models favor a distance to the SNR of <6.4 kpc, while the model that produces 1 M ⊙ of 56Ni requires a distance to the SNR of >7 kpc. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with an explosion that produced ~1 M ⊙ of 56Ni, ruling out the subenergetic models, and suggesting that Kepler's SNR was an SN 1991T-like event. Additionally, the X-ray spectrum rules out a pure r -2 wind profile expected from isotropic mass loss up to the time of the supernova. Introducing a small cavity around the progenitor system results in modeled X-ray spectra that are consistent with the observed spectrum. If a wind-shaped circumstellar environment is necessary to explain the dynamics and X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in Kepler's SNR, then we require that the distance to the remnant be greater than 7 kpc.

  12. Fermi-Lat and WMAP Observations of the Puppis a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, John William; Grondin, M. H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Reposeur, T.; Ballet, J.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of GeV gamma-ray emission from the supernova remnant Puppis A with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Puppis A is among the faintest supernova remnants yet detected at GeV energies, with a luminosity of only 2.7×10(exp 34) (D/2.2 kpc)(exp 2) erg s(exp -1) between 1 and 100 GeV. The gamma-ray emission from the remnant is spatially extended, with a morphology matching that of the radio and X-ray emission, and is well described by a simple power law with an index of 2.1. We attempt to model the broadband spectral energy distribution, from radio to gamma-rays, using standard nonthermal emission mechanisms. To constrain the relativistic electron population we use 7 years of WMAP data to extend the radio spectrum up to 93 GHz. Both leptonic and hadronic dominated models can reproduce the nonthermal spectral energy distribution, requiring a total content of cosmic ray (CR) electrons and protons accelerated in Puppis A of at least WCR is approx. (1 - 5)×10 (exp 49) erg.

  13. Modelling the interaction of thermonuclear supernova remnants with circumstellar structures: the case of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The well-established Type Ia remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572) reveals discrepant ambient medium-density estimates based on either the measured dynamics or the X-ray emission properties. This discrepancy can potentially be solved by assuming that the supernova remnant (SNR) shock initially moved through a stellar wind bubble, but is currently evolving in the uniform interstellar medium with a relatively low density. We investigate this scenario by combining hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-loss phase and the SNR evolution with a coupled X-ray emission model, which includes non-equilibrium ionization. For the explosion models we use the well-known W7 deflagration model and the delayed detonation model that was previously shown to provide good fits to the X-ray emission of Tycho's SNR. Our simulations confirm that a uniform ambient density cannot simultaneously reproduce the dynamical and X-ray emission properties of Tycho. In contrast, models that considered that the remnant was evolving in a dense, but small, wind bubble reproduce reasonably well both the measured X-ray emission spectrum and the expansion parameter of Tycho's SNR. Finally, we discuss possible mass-loss scenarios in the context of single- and double-degenerate models which possibly could form such a small dense wind bubble.

  14. Spectra of the HB 21 supernova remnant: Evidence of spectrum flattening at the low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Borka Jovanovic, V.; Uroševic, D.

    2012-04-01

    We use observations of the continuum radio emission at 1420, 820, 408, 34.5 and 22 MHz to estimate the mean brightness temperatures of the HB 21 supernova remnant (SNR) at five frequencies. We also present mean spectral index of HB1. The spectra of HB 21 are estimated from mean temperatures versus frequency plots for 1420, 820, 408, 34.5 and 22 MHz. We also present T-T plots of three frequency pairs: between 1420-34.5, 1420-22, 34.5-22 MHz. We notice flatter spectral indices at frequencies below 408 MHz. Probably this is due to the absorption by thermal plasma at low frequencies.

  15. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles. PMID:20844908

  16. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  17. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  18. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  19. Interstellar scattering of compact radio sources near supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Mutel, R. L.; Benson, J. M.; Cordes, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A multifrequency VLBI search for interstellar scattering of extragalactic radio sources near supernova remnants is reported. VLBI observations at 610, 1663, and 4991 MHz were made of compact sources near the supernova remnants CTA 1, G33.6 + 0.1, G74.9 + 1.2, and HB 21, and 610 MHz observations were also made of a source near HB 9. These observations were motivated by the possibility of enhanced cosmic ray-induced turbulence in front of supernova remnants, as expected in 'diffusive' theories of shock wave acceleration. Angular broadening is definitely seen in the case of the source 2013 + 370, which lies within 4 arcmin of the supernova remnant G74.9 + 1.2. Present observations cannot unambiguously attribute the scattering material to the supernova remnant, as the line of sight also passes through the Cygnus OB1 association. The source 1849 + 005 appears to be highly scattered, as fringes were not detected even on short baselines at 5 GHz. This result may be due to the low galactic longitude of this source rather than its proximity to the supernova remnant G 33.6 + 0.1. Broadening was not detected for sources whose lines of sight pass close to the supernova remnants HB 9, HB 21, and CTA 1.

  20. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the

  1. Further analysis of LDEF FRECOPA micrometeroid remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, J.; Bunch, T. E.; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo

    1992-01-01

    Experiments dedicated to the detection of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) were exposed within the FRECOPA payload, installed on the face of the LDEF directly opposed to the velocity vector (west facing direction, location B3). We were mainly interested in the analysis of hypervelocity impact features of sizes less than or = 10 microns, found in thick Al targets devoted to the research of impact features. In the 15 craters found in the scanned area (approximately 4 sq. cm), the chemical analysis suggests an extraterrestrial origin for the impacting particles. The main elements we identified are usually refered to as chondrite elements: Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe are found in various proportions, intrinsic Al being masked by the Al target; we notice a strong depletion in Ni, never observed in our samples. Furthermore, C and O are present in 90 percent of the cases; the C/O peak height ratio varies from 0.1 to 3. Impactor simulations by light gas gun hypervelocity impact experiments have shown that meaningful biogenic element and compound information maybe obtained from IDP residues below impacts of critical velocities, that are less than or = 4 km/sec for particles larger than 100 microns in diameter. Our results obtained for the smaller size fraction IDP's suggest that at such sizes, the critical velocity could be higher by a factor of 2 or 3, as chemical analysis of the remnants were possible in all the identified impact craters, performed on targets possibly hit at velocities greater than or = 7.5 km/s, which is the spacecraft velocity. These samples are now subjected to an imagery and analytical protocol that includes FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) and LIMS (laser ionization mass spectrometry). The LIMS analyses were performed using the LIMA-ZA instrument. Results are presented, clearly indicating that such small events show crater features analogous to what is observed at larger sizes; our first analytical results, obtained for 2 events

  2. Electron acceleration by young supernova remnant blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Some general considerations regarding relativistic particle acceleration by young supernova remnants are reviewed. Recent radio observations of supernova remnants apparently locate the bounding shock and exhibit large electron density gradients which verify the presence of strong particle scattering. The radio 'rim' in Tycho's remnant has been found to contain a predominantly radial magnetic field. This may be attributable to an instability of the shock surface and a progress report on an investigation of the stability of strong shocks in partially ionized media is presented.

  3. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  4. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  5. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  6. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  7. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  8. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  9. MODIFIED EQUIPARTITION CALCULATION FOR SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Arbutina, B.; Urosevic, D.; Andjelic, M. M.; Pavlovic, M. Z.; Vukotic, B.

    2012-02-10

    Determination of the magnetic field strength in the interstellar medium is one of the more complex tasks of contemporary astrophysics. We can only estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field strength by using a few very limited methods. Besides the Zeeman effect and Faraday rotation, the equipartition or minimum-energy calculation is a widespread method for estimating magnetic field strength and energy contained in the magnetic field and cosmic-ray particles by using only the radio synchrotron emission. Despite its approximate character, it remains a useful tool, especially when there are no other data about the magnetic field in a source. In this paper, we give a modified calculation that we think is more appropriate for estimating magnetic field strengths and energetics in supernova remnants (SNRs). We present calculated estimates of the magnetic field strengths for all Galactic SNRs for which the necessary observational data are available. The Web application for calculation of the magnetic field strengths of SNRs is available at http://poincare.matf.bg.ac.rs/{approx}arbo/eqp/.

  10. Further analysis of LDEF FRECOPA micrometeoroid remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Janet; Bunch, Ted E.; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Mandeville, Jean Claude

    1993-01-01

    In the Al collectors of experiment A0138-1 of the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) payload, we identified a population of small craters (3-9 microns in diameter) induced by the impacts of micron-sized grains, mainly of extraterrestrial origin. Chemical analyses of the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) remnants were made in the bottoms and on the rims of the craters, in addition to immediate off-rim areas. So far, the compositional investigation of the craters by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) has shown evidence of an extraterrestrial origin for the impacting grains. The systematic presence of C and O in the residues has been reported and may be compared with the existence of particles showing high proportions of biogenic light elements and detected in the close environment of P-Halley comet nucleus (called CHON particles). An analytical protocol has been established in order to extract molecular and possible isotopic information on these grains, a fraction of which could be of cometary origin. Although these very small craters may show crater features that are typical of the larger Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) population (greater than 50 microns), some show unique morphologies that we have not previously observed. Our initial Laser Induced Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) analytical results show strong signals for nitrogen-bearing ions in craters characterized by high C and O contents; they also suggest that carbon contents in some craters could exceed that known for carbonaceous chondrites.

  11. Investigation of the Nebular Remnants of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Valério A. R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Classical and recurrent nova outbursts occur on the surface of a white dwarf in a close binary system. It is widely established that the outburst is due to a thermonuclear runaway. Their study provides a real-time laboratory for the understanding of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena. These include for example, mass transfer in close binary systems, nuclear powered outbursts, dust formation, mass loss from red giants, and many others. Recurrent novae have also been suggested as the progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae. This thesis concentrates on investigating the nebular remnants of novae by studying both resolved imaging (where available) and spectroscopic evolution and combining this with detailed modelling. Such studies have wider implications for example in our understanding of the shaping of proto-Planetary Nebulae. Here, using a morpho-kinematical code, the true 3D geometry, from which information such as the remnant's inclination angle and expansion velocity can be derived, of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi and classical novae V2491 Cygni, V2672 Ophiuchi and KT Eridani are established and related to other characteristics of each system. Each of the classical novae have also been suggested as a recurrent nova candidate. Furthermore, several enhancements to the modelling code were implemented prompted by the work described in this thesis. The RS Oph work entailed detailed modelling of Hubble Space Telescope resolved imaging combined with ground-based spectroscopic observations. Here it was shown that the bipolar morphology of RS Oph consisted of two distinct components with an outer dumbbell and an inner hour glass overdensity, which were required to reproduce both the observed images and spectra. This morphology was suggested to arise due to the interaction between the pre-existing anisotropic red-giant wind and the ejecta. The observed asymmetry in the ACS/HRC image was shown to be due to the finite width and offset from the [OIII] line's rest wavelength

  12. 11. REMNANTS OF FLUME BOX WITHIN CANAL. NOTE THE UPRIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REMNANTS OF FLUME BOX WITHIN CANAL. NOTE THE UPRIGHT SIDE POSTS BOLTED TO BASE STRINGER AND HORIZONTAL BOARD SIDE WALLS. VIEW IS TO THE SOUTHEAST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  13. Remnants of track girder of east roadbed showing detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remnants of track girder of east roadbed showing detail of granite piers at low tide. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. 3. HISTORIC ROADWAY 2 WITH MILL REMNANTS TO THE RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. HISTORIC ROADWAY 2 WITH MILL REMNANTS TO THE RIGHT OF TREE. CAMERA POINTED WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Historic Roadway No. 2, West flank Florida Mountain, East of Rich Gulch Mine & Mill, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  15. Western end of ATSF rail yard with remnant of rail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Western end of ATSF rail yard with remnant of rail spur and dumping location. Concrete vault foundation in foreground. Stone foundation and wood foundation in background. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  16. Detail, corner pilaster remnant, gable return on facade, Our Corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, corner pilaster remnant, gable return on facade, Our Corner Saloon, view to northeast (210mm lens with electronic flash fill) - Our Corner Saloon, 301 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  17. Hematite Mineralized Bacterial Remnants: Implications for Martian Hematite Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schelble, Rachel T.; Westall, Frances; Allen, Carlton C.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2001-01-01

    Hematite mineralized bacterial remnants in the Gunflint Formation [early Proterozoic] can be used as an analog for potential microfossils in martian iron deposits. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  19. GSH 90-28-17: a possible old supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Zhu, M.

    2014-02-01

    GSH 90-28-17 is a high-latitude Galactic H I supershell, identified in the H I supershell catalogues with a velocity vlsr ˜ -17 km s-1. We used the new Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array (GALFA) H I survey data, which have much higher resolution and sensitivity than was previously available, to re-examine the properties of the supershell. We derived a new distance of 400 pc for GSH 90-28-17 and suggested that it is related to the Lac OB1 association. The radius of GSH 90-28-17 is 66.0 ± 3.5 pc. The H I mass of the shell is (3.1 ± 0.1) × 104 M⊙. It has an age of ˜4.5 Myr and a total kinetic energy of (8.2 ± 0.3) × 1048 erg. We extracted radio continuum data for the GSH 90-28-17 region from the 408-MHz All-Sky Survey and Bonn 1420-MHz survey and filtered the diffuse background Galactic emission. A radio loop-like ridge is found to be associated with the H I shell at both frequencies and shows a non-thermal origin, with a temperature-temperature (TT)-plot index of α = -1.35 ± 0.69. In addition, the pulsar J2307+2225, with a similar distance, is found in the shell region. We conclude that GSH 90-28-17 is probably an old, type II supernova remnant in the solar neighbourhood.

  20. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  1. Ectopic endometrial tissue in mesonephric duct remnants in bitches.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Berghold, P; Walter, I

    2011-12-01

    Common congenital embryonic remnants of the canine female genital tract are Gartner cysts originating from mesonephric duct remnants. They can increase in size and lead to adverse effects in fertility and health. In the present study, three cases of mesonephric remnants in bitches were analysed. The mesonephric remnants featured an inner lining endometrium comprising surface epithelium, glands and stroma. This ectopic endometrium was further characterized by immunohistochemistry (oestrogen and progesterone receptors, proliferation activity, cytokeratin, alpha smooth muscle actin, and vimentin) and lectin histochemistry compared with normal uterine endometrium. Furthermore, hypertrophic cells at the serosal site of the uteri were detected and analysed in the same way compared with normal serosa. The ectopic endometrium of case no. 2 mesonephric remnant was comparable with normal endometrium whereas in nos 1 and 3 uteri the ectopic endometrium was reduced in thickness. In all mesonephric remnants, surface and glandular epithelial cells of the ectopic endometrium gave positive immunoreactions for cytokeratin, oestrogen and progesterone receptors and showed lectin-binding patterns comparable with normal endometrium. Some of the stromal cells of the ectopic endometria were smooth muscle actin and vimentin positive. Mitotic activity of the ectopic endometria was comparable with normal endometria. Hypertrophic epithelial cells of the serosal side showed positive reactions to anti-oestrogen receptor and anti-cytokeratin immunohistochemistry as well as lectin binding patterns and mitotic activity comparable with the normal canine serosa. The present study is the first considerable immunohistochemical characterization of canine mesonephric remnants and discusses the appearance of ectopic endometrium in mesonephric remnants. PMID:21366719

  2. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ∼ 0.55 and ∼0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  3. Properties of Optically Selected Supernova Remnant Candidates in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ~ 0.55 and ~0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L X (and L 20 cm) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  4. Black hole remnants and the information loss paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Ong, Y. C.; Yeom, D.-h.

    2015-11-01

    Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of the information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that the singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate the information loss paradox and the firewall controversy. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

  5. Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant (Crab Nebula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estakhr, Ahmad Reza

    2015-04-01

    Supernova remnant (at early phase) is a high temperature fluid of gas and dust. after the explosion of a star in a supernova, the viscousity of supernova remnant changes with temperature. as supernova expand by time its temperature decreases and the viscousity increases, (or alternatively, the fluidity of supernova remnant tends to decreases) and leb to resistance phase of supernova remnant fluid to flow. Uμ = γ (c , u (r-> , t)) denotes four-velocity vector field of supernova. Jμ = ρUμ denotes four-current density of supernova fluid of gas and dust. Estakhr's Material-Geodesic equation is developed analogy of Navier Stokes equation and Einstein Geodesic equation to describe Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant (Crab Nebula): DJμ/Dτ =dJμ/Dτ + ΓαβμJαUβ =JνΩμν +∂νTμν + ΓαβμJαUβ Covariant formulation of Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant, describe the motion of fluid substances of supernova.

  6. IKT 16: a composite supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, R. A.; Filipović, M. D.; Ballet, J.; Haberl, F.; Crawford, E. J.; Payne, J. L.; Sturm, R.; Pietsch, W.; Mereghetti, S.; Ehle, M.; Tiengo, A.; Coe, M. J.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Buckley, D. A. H.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: IKT 16 is an X-ray and radio-faint supernova remnant (SNR) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). A previous X-ray study of this SNR found a hard X-ray source near its centre. Using all available archival and proprietary XMM-Newton data, alongside new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and optical observations at Hα and forbidden [SII] and [OIII] lines, we aim to constrain the properties of the SNR and discover the nature of the hard source within. Methods: We combine XMM-Newton datasets to produce the highest quality X-ray image of IKT 16 to date. We use this, in combination with radio and optical images, to conduct a multi-wavelength morphological analysis of the remnant. We extract separate spectra from the SNR and the bright source near its centre, and conduct spectral fitting of both regions. Results: We find IKT 16 to have a radius of 37 ± 3 pc, with the bright source located 8 ± 2 pc from the centre. This is the largest known SNR in the SMC. The large size of the remnant suggests it is likely in the Sedov-adiabatic phase of evolution. Using a Sedov model to fit the SNR spectrum, we find an electron temperature kT of 1.03 ± 0.12 keV and an age of ≈14700 yr. The absorption found requires the remnant to be located deep within the SMC. The bright source is fit with a power law with index Γ = 1.58 ± 0.07, and is associated with diffuse radio emission extending towards the centre of the SNR. We argue that this source is likely to be the neutron star remnant of the supernova explosion, and infer its transverse kick velocity to be 580 ± 100 km s-1. The X-ray and radio properties of this source strongly favour a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) origin. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  7. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  8. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  9. Shock Destruction of Dust in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J.

    2009-07-01

    In this AR-Theory program, we propose to carry out a series of investigations of grain injection, transport, and destruction using hydrodynamical models of reverse-shocked SN ejecta. In a young supernova remnant {SNR} such as Cas A or SN 1987A the outer blast wave strikes surrounding circumstellar matter, and reverse shocks propagate inward toward the interior debris, which may contain large amounts of newly formed dust. Our major theoretical goals are to determine how much dust is destroyed in shocked SNR ejecta, as they are decelerated by the reverse shocks, and to study how these ejecta are lighted up in optical, X-ray, andIR line emission. Numerical codes will be used to study grain destruction in metal-enriched ejecta and to interpret the morphologies, proper motions, and emissivities of these fast-moving ejecta, observed by Hubble in many young SNRs. We intend to undertake the following tasks: {1} Compile the latest gas-grain data {sputtering yields vs projectile energy for H, He, and heavy ions}; {2} Incorporate gas-grain and grain-grain interactions with radiative cooling rates {X-ray, optical, IR line emission} of sputtered atoms and ions; {3} Compute adaptive-mesh hydrodynamical models of ejecta-shock interactions; {4} Use these ejecta models to compute grain destruction, grain heating, plasma cooling, and spectral diagnostics in metal-enriched environments; {5} Apply our results to specific SNRs {Cas A, SN 1987A, G292, etc} to interpret ejecta morphologies, proper motions, and emissivities; {6} assess the net efficiency of supernova dust injection.

  10. Observations of young core collapse supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziamtzis, Anestis

    Studies of young remnants offer an opportunity to test theoretical models of stellar evolution, explosion models and nucleosynthesis, as well as our understanding of the compact objects in the centre of the exploded stars. The first part of the thesis involves observations of the Crab nebula. We have used photometric and spectroscopic observations to search for a faint halo around the visible nebula, that could carry the missing mass and kinetic energy of the nebula. No halo was found. In the photometric data due to psf contamination, and in the spectroscopic no fast velocity components were present. We have also used optical and IR photometry to check for variation in the emissivity and dynamic structure of the Crab pulsar wind nebula (PWN), to try to understand the nature of plerionic PWNe. There, we measured flux variations up to 20% in the IR and also shifting of the wisps with velocities up to 0.2c. We also showed that the nearby red knot moves in tandem with the Crab pulsar. The second part of the thesis, deals with photometric & spectroscopic observations of SN 1987A in the LMC. The aim of the project was to monitor the evolution of the outer rings (ORs) of SN 1987A. The fading of the ORs is consistent with recombination and cooling after the initial flash ionization by the supernova. From the spectroscopic data we measured the density and temperature in the ORs where we found temperatures of ~ 12,000 K for the [N II] gas, and ~ 25,000 K for the [O III]. Finally, from the [O II], and [S II] ratios we estimated electron densities of ~ 1,000 cm-3 and ~ 2,500 cm-3, respectively. From the evolution of Hα, we argue that the highest density in the ORs could be 5,000 cm-3.

  11. Gamma-Ray Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, James

    2000-04-01

    Despite the growing evidence for shock acceleration of electrons in supernova remnants (SNR), there is still no direct evidence pointing unambiguously to SNR as sources of cosmic-ray nuclei. Observations of nonthermal synchrotron emission in the limbs of a number of shell-type SNR (SN1006, Tycho, Cas A, IC443, RCW86, and Kepler) provide convincing evidence for acceleration of electrons to energies greater than 10 TeV (Allen 1999). The CANGAROO group has now reported significant VHE gamma-ray emission from SN1006 (Tanimori et al. 1998) and RXJ1713-3946, and the HEGRA group has reported preliminary evidence for TeV emission from Cas A (Pülhofer et al. 1999); all of these measurements are consistent with the expected level of inverse-Compton emission in these objects. Following the predictions of an observable π^0-decay signal from nearby SNRs (e.g., Drury, Aharonian and Volk 1994) the discovery of >100 MeV emission from the direction of a number of SNR by the EGRET experiment (Esposito et al. 1996) and possible evidence for a π^0 component (Gaisser, Protheroe and Stanev 1996) led to some initial optimism that evidence for a SNR origin of cosmic-ray nuclei had been obtained. However, 200 GeV to 100 TeV measurements revealed no significant emission implying either a significantly steeper source spectrum than the canonical ~ E-2.1, a spectral cutoff below the knee energy in these sources, or that a re-interpretation of the EGRET results was required. I will discuss these results, as well as the considerable promise of future gamma-ray experiments to determine the sources of galactic cosmic-ray nuclei and to provide quantitative information about the acceleration mechanisms.

  12. Transport of magnetic turbulence in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brose, R.; Telezhinsky, I.; Pohl, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Supernova remnants are known as sources of Galactic cosmic rays for their nonthermal emission of radio waves, X-rays, and gamma rays. However, the observed soft broken power-law spectra are hard to reproduce within standard acceleration theory based on the assumption of Bohm diffusion and steady-state calculations. Aims: We point out that a time-dependent treatment of the acceleration process together with a self-consistent treatment of the scattering turbulence amplification is necessary. Methods: We numerically solve the coupled system of transport equations for cosmic rays and isotropic Alfvénic turbulence. The equations are coupled through the growth rate of turbulence determined by the cosmic-ray gradient and the spatial diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays determined by the energy density of the turbulence. The system is solved on a comoving expanding grid extending upstream for dozens of shock radii, allowing for the self-consistent study of cosmic-ray diffusion in the vicinity of their acceleration site. The transport equation for cosmic rays is solved in a test-particle approach. Results: We demonstrate that the system is typically not in a steady state. In fact, even after several thousand years of evolution, no equilibrium situation is reached. The resulting time-dependent particle spectra strongly differ from those derived assuming a steady state and Bohm diffusion. Our results indicate that proper accounting for the evolution of the scattering turbulence and hence the particle diffusion coefficient is crucial for the formation of the observed soft spectra. In any case, the need to continuously develop magnetic turbulence upstream of the shock introduces nonlinearity in addition to that imposed by cosmic-ray feedback.

  13. Flexibilized copolyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Two copolyimides, LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2, with flexible backbones were processed and characterized as adhesives. The processability and adhesive properties were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the three polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to water-boil and to thermal aging at 204 C for up to 1000 hours. The three adhesive systems possess exceptional lap shear strengths at room temperature and elevated temperatures both before and after thermal exposure. LARC-STPI, because of its high glass transition temperature provided high lap shear strengths up to 260 C. After water-boil, LARC-TPI exhibited the highest lap shear strengths at room temperature and 177 C, whereas the LARC-STPI retained a higher percentage of its original strength when tested at 204 C. These flexible thermoplastic copolyimides show considerable potential as adhesives based on this study and because of the ease of preparation with low cost, commercially available materials.

  14. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  15. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  16. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  17. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  18. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  19. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  20. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  1. Timer cover adhesive optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Carleton, J.J. II.

    1992-03-17

    The implementation of PROCODE as the data acquisition system for processing timers has required some modifications to the method of identifying timer assemblies. PROCODE requires machine-readable labelling of the assemblies. This report describes a series of experiments to find an adhesive that would keep labels attached to timers regardless of the condition of their surface when the label was applied and regardless of the heat, vibration, and shock they endured afterwards. The effect of the variation of these experimental factors on the performance of the adhesive was determined by using a Taguchi experimental design.

  2. Enamel Surface Evaluation after Removal of Orthodontic Composite Remnants by Intraoral Sandblasting Technique and Carbide Bur Technique: A Three-Dimensional Surface Profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mhatre, Amol C; Tandur, Arundhati P; Reddy, Sumitra S; Karunakara, B C; Baswaraj, H

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this thesis is to present a practical and efficient clinical method of returning enamel to as near its original condition as possible following removal of bonded orthodontic attachments. The main objective of this study is to evaluate and compare the iatrogenic enamel damage caused by use of two different remnant removal techniques – sandblasting technique and carbide bur technique. Materials and Methods: 40 extracted premolar teeth were selected as sample. Premolar brackets were bonded on these teeth with two different types of light cure adhesive composite resin. The remnants present on these samples after debonding the brackets were removed with two different types of remnant removal techniques namely – Carbide bur technique and sandblasting technique. Then these treated surfaces were studied under Scanning electron microscope and three-dimensional profilometer for the damage caused to the enamel. Statistical analysis used Student’s t-tests. Results: The enamel surface structure after remnant removal with intraoral sandblasting is better than that after removal with a low-speed handpiece using tungsten carbide bur. Conclusion: Sandblasting can be an acceptable alternative to rotatory handpieces to restore the enamel surface to its near-original state and prevent permanent damage to the tooth. PMID:26668478

  3. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  4. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  5. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  6. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  7. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  8. Adept Adhesion Reduction Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... icodextrin. The fluid is used during or after laparoscopic gynecological surgery to separate and protect tissues and decrease the number of new adhesions after surgery. Adept® is supplied sterile, in a single-use bag. How does it work? During surgery, ...

  9. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  10. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  11. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  12. Adhesion testing of aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobo, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion testing appeared to offer a less burdensome alternative to replace some of the dynamometer tests. Accordingly, test results and data were requested from retreaders who had used adhesion testing.

  13. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  14. Fermi-LAT observations of supernova remnants Kesteven 79

    SciTech Connect

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 79 (Kes 79). We analyzed approximately 52 months of data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Kes 79 is thought to be interacting with adjacent molecular clouds, based on the presence of strong {sup 12}CO J = 1 → 0 and HCO{sup +} J = 1 → 0 emission and the detection of 1720 MHz line emission toward the east of the remnant. Acceleration of cosmic rays is expected to occur at SNR shocks, and SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds provide a good testing ground for detecting and analyzing the production of γ-rays from the decay of π{sup 0} into two γ-ray photons. This analysis investigates γ-ray emission coincident with Kes 79, which has a detection significance of ∼7σ. Additionally, we present an investigation of the spatial and spectral characteristics of Kes 79 using multiple archival XMM-Newton observations of this remnant. We determine the global X-ray properties of Kes 79 and estimate the ambient density across the remnant. We also performed a similar analysis for Galactic SNR Kesteven 78 (Kes 78), but due to large uncertainties in the γ-ray background model, no conclusion can be made about an excess of GeV γ-ray associated with the remnant.

  15. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  16. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  17. Extravasation Mucocele Arising from a Lingual Thyroglossal Duct Remnant

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  18. Extravasation mucocele arising from a lingual thyroglossal duct remnant.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  19. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S. L.; McCollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.; Chevalier, R.

    1986-12-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  20. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Mccollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.

    1986-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  1. A HIRES analysis of the FIR emission of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1994-01-01

    The high resolution (HiRes) algorithm has been used to analyze the far infrared emission of shocked gas and dust in supernova remnants. In the case of supernova remnant IC 443, we find a very good match between the resolved features in the deconvolved images and the emissions of shocked gas mapped in other wavelengths (lines of H2, CO, HCO+, and HI). Dust emission is also found to be surrounding hot bubbles of supernova remnants which are seen in soft X-ray maps. Optical spectroscopy on the emission of the shocked gas suggests a close correlation between the FIR color and local shock speed, which is a strong function of the ambient (preshock) gas density. These provide a potentially effective way to identify regions of strong shock interaction, and thus facilitate studies of kinematics and energetics in the interstellar medium.

  2. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  3. Hydrodynamic instabilities in supernova remnants - Self-similar driven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Blondin, John M.; Emmering, Robert T.

    1992-01-01

    An initial study aimed at elucidating the multidimensional aspects of the hydrodynamic instabilities in supernova remnants is presented. Self-similar solutions are found to exist for the interaction of a steep power-law density profile expanding into a relatively flat stationary power-law density profile. Consideration of the pressure and entropy profiles in the shocked 1D flows shows that the flows are subject to convective instability, by a local criterion. The growth rate for the instability becomes very large near the contact discontinuity between the two shocked regions. A linear analysis of the complete self-similar solutions shows that the solutions are unstable above a critical wavenumber and that the growth rate is greatest at the position of the contact discontinuity. The X-ray image of the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho) shows emission from clumps of supernova ejecta, which is good evidence for instabilities in this remnant.

  4. 3D Simulations of Supernovae into the Young Remnant Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, Carola I.; Young, P. A.; Fryer, C.; Rockefeller, G.; Park, S.

    2013-01-01

    The explosion of massive stars as core-collapse supernovae is an inherently three dimensional phenomenon. Observations of the young, ejecta dominated remnants of those explosions unambiguously demonstrate that asymmetry on large and small scales is the rule, rather than the exception. Numerical models of supernova remnants connect the observed remnants to models of the exploding stellar system and thus facilitate both improved interpretations of the observations as well as improve our understanding of the explosion mechanism. We present first 3D simulations of core- collapse supernovae evolving into supernova remnants calculated with SNSPH. The calculations were started from 1D collapsed models of 2 progenitor stars of different types, and follow the explosion from revival of the shock wave to shock break out in 3D. Two different interstellar media, a cold neutral medium and a dense molecular cloud, as well as a red supergiant stellar wind profile, were added to the explosion calculations shortly before shock breakout, so that the blast wave stays in the simulation. With this setup we can follow the dispersal of the nucleosynthesis products from the explosion into the Sedov stage of the supernova remnant evolution starting from realistic initial conditions for the supernova ejecta. We will present a first investigation in the mixing between stellar and interstellar matter as the supernova evolves into the young supernova remnant phase, and contrasts differences that are observed between the scenarios that are investigated. One of the goals is to distinguish between features that arose in instabilities during the explosion from those that were created in the interaction with the surrounding medium.

  5. The Kinematics of Kepler's Supernova Remnant as Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-01

    I have determined the expansion of the supernova remnant of SN 1604 (Kepler's supernova) based on archival Chandra ACIS-S observations made in 2000 and 2006. The measurements were done in several distinct energy bands, and were made for the remnant as a whole, and for six individual sectors. The average expansion parameter indicates that the remnant expands on average as r propto t0.5, but there are significant differences in different parts of the remnant: the bright northwestern part expands as r propto t0.35, whereas the rest of the remnant's expansion shows an expansion r propto t0.6. The latter is consistent with an explosion in which the outer part of the ejecta has a negative power law slope for density (ρ propto v-n) of n = 7, or with an exponential density profile [ρ propto exp (- v/ve) ]. The expansion parameter in the southern region, in conjunction with the shock radius, indicates a rather low value (<5 × 1050 erg) for the explosion energy of SN 1604 for a distance of 4 kpc. A higher explosion energy is consistent with the results if the distance is larger. The filament in the eastern part of the remnant, which is dominated by X-ray synchrotron radiation, seems to mark a region with a fast shock speed r propto t0.7, corresponding to a shock velocity of v = 4200 km s-1, for a distance to SN 1604 of 4 kpc. This is consistent with the idea that X-ray synchrotron emission requires shock velocities in excess of ~2000 km s-1. The X-ray-based expansion measurements reported are consistent with results based on optical and radio measurements but disagree with previous X-ray measurements based on ROSAT and Einstein observations.

  6. G33.6 + 0.1 - A shell type supernova remnant with unusual structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Becker, R. H.; Seward, F. D.

    1991-01-01

    The morphology of Supernova Remnant G33.6 + 0.1 (Kes 79) has been studied in the X-rays with Einstein and in the radio wavelengths using the VLA. Multifrequency high resolution observations of the VLA at 327, 1500, and 5000 MHz are used to study the radio spectrum and polarization. The radio emission shows well formed outer shell structure and very bright central emission. Although the overall distribution of spectral index (about -0.6 to -0.75) is consistent with that of shell type remnants, the bright filamentary emission along the 'inner ring' has relatively flatter spectrum (alpha about -0.4). Both radio and X-rays show strong central emission; existence of a plerion near the center cannot be ruled out. The X-ray image does not show the characteristic limb brightening for shell type SNRs. The X-ray and radio morphology may be understood in terms of very thick shell and the bright central emission as due to reverse shock.

  7. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  8. A Compact Central Object in the Supernova Remnant Kesteven 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, F. D.; Slane, P. O.; Smith, R. K.; Sun, M.

    2003-02-01

    A Chandra X-ray observation has detected an unresolved source at the center of the supernova remnant Kes 79. The best single-model fit to the source spectrum is a blackbody with an X-ray luminosity of LX(0.3-8.0keV)=7×1033 ergs s-1. There is no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. There are no cataloged counterparts at other wavelengths, but the absorption is high. The source properties are similar to the central source in Cas A even though the Kes 79 remnant is considerably older.

  9. X-ray Observations of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation I summarize some key new findings from recent Chandra and XMM-Newton data on the remnant of the supernova (SN) observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572, which is widely believed to have been of Type Ia origin. Studies of the Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) at the current epoch address aspects of SN Ia physics, the evolution of young SNRs, and cosmic ray acceleration at high Mach-number shocks.Research on the Tycho SNR at Rutgers has been supported by Chandra grants GO3-4066X and AR5-6010X.

  10. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Regulation of Adhesive Force Involves Vinculin Recruitment to Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Steven K.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    Background information Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an essential non-receptor tyrosine kinase, plays pivotal roles in migratory responses, adhesive signaling, and mechanotransduction. FAK-dependent regulation of cell migration involves focal adhesion turnover dynamics as well as actin cytoskeleton polymerization and lamellipodia protrusion. Whereas roles for FAK in migratory and mechanosensing responses have been established, the contributions of FAK to the generation of adhesive forces are not well understood. Results Using FAK-null cells expressing wild-type and mutant FAK under an inducible tetracycline promoter, we analyzed the role of FAK in the generation of steady-state adhesive forces using micropatterned substrates and a hydrodynamic adhesion assay. FAK expression reduced steady-state strength by 30% compared to FAK-null cells. FAK expression reduced vinculin localization to focal adhesions by 35% independently from changes in integrin binding and localization of talin and paxillin. RNAi knockdown of vinculin abrogated the FAK-dependent differences in adhesive force. FAK-dependent changes in vinculin localization and adhesive force were confirmed in human primary fibroblasts with FAK knocked down by RNAi. The autophosphorylation Y397 and kinase domain Y576/Y577 sites were differentially required for FAK-mediated adhesive responses. Conclusions We demonstrate that FAK reduces steady-state adhesion strength by modulating vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions. These findings provide insights into the role of FAK in mechanical interactions between a cell and the extracellular matrix. PMID:19883375

  11. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24575424

  12. Clinical Recommendation: Labial Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Janice L; Romano, Mary E; Quint, Elisabeth H

    2015-10-01

    Labial adhesions, also known as labial agglutination, are a common finding in prepubertal adolescents. They are defined as fusion of the labia minora in the midline or are termed vulvar adhesions when they occur below the labia minora (inner labia). Patients are often asymptomatic but might present with genitourinary complaints. The decision for treatment is based on symptoms. The mainstay of treatment in asymptomatic patients is conservative, with careful attention to vulvar hygiene and reassurance to parents. In symptomatic patients, topical treatment with estrogen and/or steroid cream is often curative. Less often, corrective surgery is necessary. Recurrence is common until a patient goes through puberty. These recommendations are intended for pediatric and gynecologic health care providers who care for pediatric and adolescent girls to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26162697

  13. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  14. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  15. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  16. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  17. Arachnids Secrete a Fluid over Their Adhesive Pads

    PubMed Central

    Peattie, Anne M.; Dirks, Jan-Henning; Henriques, Sérgio; Federle, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background Many arachnids possess adhesive pads on their feet that help them climb smooth surfaces and capture prey. Spider and gecko adhesives have converged on a branched, hairy structure, which theoretically allows them to adhere solely by dry (solid-solid) intermolecular interactions. Indeed, the consensus in the literature is that spiders and their smooth-padded relatives, the solifugids, adhere without the aid of a secretion. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the adhesive contact zone of living spiders, solifugids and mites using interference reflection microscopy, which allows the detection of thin liquid films. Like insects, all the arachnids we studied left behind hydrophobic fluid footprints on glass (mean refractive index: 1.48–1.50; contact angle: 3.7–11.2°). Fluid was not always secreted continuously, suggesting that pads can function in both wet and dry modes. We measured the attachment forces of single adhesive setae from tarantulas (Grammostola rosea) by attaching them to a bending beam with a known spring constant and filming the resulting deflection. Individual spider setae showed a lower static friction at rest (26%±2.8 SE of the peak friction) than single gecko setae (Thecadactylus rapicauda; 96%±1.7 SE). This may be explained by the fact that spider setae continued to release fluid after isolation from the animal, lubricating the contact zone. Significance This finding implies that tarsal secretions occur within all major groups of terrestrial arthropods with adhesive pads. The presence of liquid in an adhesive contact zone has important consequences for attachment performance, improving adhesion to rough surfaces and introducing rate-dependent effects. Our results leave geckos and anoles as the only known representatives of truly dry adhesive pads in nature. Engineers seeking biological inspiration for synthetic adhesives should consider whether model species with fluid secretions are appropriate to their design goals

  18. Young Remnants of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Progenitors: A Study of SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Childs, Francesca; Soderberg, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    SNe Ia, with their remarkably homogeneous light curves and spectra, have been used as standardizable candles to measure the accelerating expansion of the universe. Yet, their progenitors remain elusive. Common explanations invoke a degenerate star (white dwarf) that explodes upon almost reaching the Chandrasekhar limit, by either steadily accreting mass from a companion star or violently merging with another degenerate star. We show that circumstellar interaction in young Galactic supernova remnants can be used to distinguish between these single and double degenerate (DD) progenitor scenarios. Here we propose a new diagnostic, the surface brightness index, which can be computed from theory and compared with Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) observations. We use this method to demonstrate that a DD progenitor can explain the decades-long flux rise and size increase of the youngest known galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G1.9+0.3. We disfavor a single degenerate scenario for SNR G1.9+0.3. We attribute the observed properties to the interaction between a steep ejecta profile and a constant density environment. We suggest using the upgraded VLA, ASKAP, and MeerKAT to detect circumstellar interaction in the remnants of historical SNe Ia in the Local Group of galaxies. This may settle the long-standing debate over their progenitors.

  19. Remnant wharf with two bollards at the south end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remnant wharf with two bollards at the south end of row within Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site. View facing south-southeast. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Hot interstellar tunnels. 1: Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. W.

    1976-01-01

    The theory required to build a numerical simulation of interacting supernova remnants is developed. The hot cavities within a population of remnants will become connected, with varying ease and speed, for a variety of assumed conditions in the outer shells of old remnants. Apparently neither radiative cooling nor thermal conduction in a large-scale galactic magnetic field can destroy hot cavity regions, if they grow, faster than they are reheated by supernova shock waves, but interstellar mass motions disrupt the contiguity of extensive cavities necessary for the dispersal of these shocks over a wide volume. Monte Carlo simulations show that a quasi-equilibrium is reached in the test space within 10 million yrs of the first supernova and is characterized by an average cavity filling fraction of the interstellar volume. Aspects of this equilibrium are discussed for a range of supernova rates. Two predictions are not confirmed within this range: critical growth of hot regions to encompass the entire medium, and the efficient quenching of a remnant's expansion by interaction with other cavities.

  1. General exterior view showing remnants of loading dock at three ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General exterior view showing remnants of loading dock at three main doors, view to north - Charlestown Navy Yard, Oxygen Plant, Midway along northern boundary of Charlestown Navy Yard, on Little Mystic Channel, near junction of Eighteenth Street & Fourth Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Meteorological Station, interior with collapsed roof showing remnant wooden equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Meteorological Station, interior with collapsed roof showing remnant wooden equipment switch box on east wall; view southeast - Fort McKinley, Meteorological Station, East side of Weymouth Way, approximately 225 feet south of Cove Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  3. 15. VIEW SOUTH, DETAIL OF REMNANTS OF EAST SIDE BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW SOUTH, DETAIL OF REMNANTS OF EAST SIDE BRIDGE ABUTMENT - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  4. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  5. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  6. 6. OLD AND NEW TIOGA ROAD. NOTE REMNANTS OF OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OLD AND NEW TIOGA ROAD. NOTE REMNANTS OF OLD ROAD ON LEFT. NOTE ROAD CUT ON CANYON WALL IN CENTER REAR. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37 56 19.5 / W-119 13 53.3 - Tioga Road, Between Crane Flat & Tioga Pass, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  7. 8. VIEW OF REMNANTS OF COULTERVILLE ROAD BELOW FORESTA. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF REMNANTS OF COULTERVILLE ROAD BELOW FORESTA. NOTE ASPHALT AT LEFT CENTER. NOTE RETAINING WALL AT RIGHT REAR. LOOKING NW. GIS: N-37 42 40.6 / W-119 43 27.6 - Coulterville Road, Between Foresta & All-Weather Highway, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  8. Steam or water connection with remnant of concrete basin in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steam or water connection with remnant of concrete basin in foreground. Pipe connection located approximately 6' east of metal stairs leading to Bright Angel Lodge. Dry laid retaining wall in background. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  9. Circumstellar Dust in the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blair, W. P.; Borkowski, K. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Reynolds, S. P.; Sankrit, R.

    2012-01-01

    Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1604, is widely believed to be the result of a Type Ia supernova, and shows IR, optical, and X-ray evidence for an interaction of the blast wave with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM). We present low-resolution 7.5-38 μm IR spectra of selected regions within the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Spectra of those regions where the blast wave is encountering circumstellar material show strong features at 10 and 18 μm. These spectral features are most consistent with various silicate particles, likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution. While it is possible that some features may arise from freshly formed ejecta dust, morphological evidence suggests that it is more likely that they originate from dust in the CSM. We isolate the dust grain absorption efficiencies for several regions in Kepler and compare them to laboratory data for dust particles of various compositions. The hottest dust in the remnant originates in the regions of dense, radiatively shocked clumps of gas, identified in optical images. Models of collisionally heated dust show that such shocks are capable of heating grains to temperatures of > 150 K. We confirm the finding that Kepler's SNR is still interacting with CSM in at least part of the remnant after 400 years. The significant quantities of silicate dust are consistent with a relatively massive progenitor.

  10. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  11. Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Dolores' Remnants Bring Rains to U.S. Southwest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of images captured July 17 to 22 from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows Hurricane Dolores' remnants streaming over the southwestern U.S. The remnants dropped heavy rainfall in Califor...

  12. A 3D numerical model for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Esquivel, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Reynoso, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present new 3D numerical simulations for Kepler's supernova remnant. In this work we revisit the possibility that the asymmetric shape of the remnant in X-rays is the product of a Type Ia supernova explosion which occurs inside the wind bubble previously created by an AGB companion star. Due to the large peculiar velocity of the system, the interaction of the strong AGB wind with the interstellar medium results in a bow shock structure. In this new model we propose that the AGB wind is anisotropic, with properties such as mass-loss rate and density having a latitude dependence, and that the orientation of the polar axis of the AGB star is not aligned with the direction of motion. The ejecta from the Type Ia supernova explosion is modelled using a power-law density profile, and we let the remnant evolve for 400 yr. We computed synthetic X-ray maps from the numerical results. We find that the estimated size and peculiar X-ray morphology of Kepler's supernova remnant are well reproduced by considering an AGB mass-loss rate of 10-5 M⊙ yr-1, a wind terminal velocity of 10 km s-1, an ambient medium density of 10-3 cm-3 and an explosion energy of 7 × 1050 erg. The obtained total X-ray luminosity of the remnant in this model reaches 6 × 1050 erg, which is within a factor of 2 of the observed value, and the time evolution of the luminosity shows a rate of decrease in recent decades of ˜2.4 per cent yr-1 that is consistent with the observations.

  13. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M⊙ generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M⊙ progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M⊙ progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] λ 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  14. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  15. Ratio of remnant to total liver volume or remnant to body weight: which one is more predictive on donor outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Onur; Guler, Necdet; Altaca, Gulum; Dayangac, Murat; Demirbas, Tolga; Akyildiz, Murat; Ulusoy, Levent; Tokat, Yaman; Yuzer, Yildiray

    2012-01-01

    Backround Right lobe donations are known to expose the donors to more surgical risks than left lobe donations. In the present study, the effects of remnant volume on donor outcomes after right lobe living donor hepatectomies were investigated. Methods The data on 262 consecutive living liver donors who had undergone a right hepatectomy from January 2004 to June 2011 were retrospectively analysed. The influence of the remnant on the outcomes was investigated according to the two different definitions. These were: (i) the ratio of the remnant liver volume to total liver volume (RLV/TLV) and (ii) the remnant liver volume to donor body weight ratio (RLV/BWR). For RLV/TLV, the effects of having a percentage of 30% or below and for RLV/BWR, the effects of values lower than 0.6 on the results were investigated. Results Complication and major complication rates were 44.7% and 13.2% for donors with RLV/TLV of ≤30%, and 35.9% and 9.4% for donors with RLV/BWR of < 0.6, respectively. In donors with RLV/TLV of ≤30%, RLV/BWR being below or above 0.6 did not influence the results in terms of liver function tests, complications and hospital stay. The main impact on the outcome was posed by RLV/TLV of ≤30%. Conclusion Remnant volume in a right lobe living donor hepatectomy has adverse effects on donor outcomes when RLV/TLV is ≤30% independent from the rate of RLV/BWR with a cut-off point of 0.6. PMID:22672550

  16. Multifrequency studies of bright radio supernova remnants. 2: W49B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, David A.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    We report radio observations of the supernova remnant W49B using the Very Large Array (VLA) of the NRAO at 90, 20, and 6 cm. This work continues the study of the properties of young, bright supernova remnants (SNRs) begun with 3C 391 (Moffett & Reynolds 1994). Here we present high-resolution images of total intensity, polarization, and spectral index of W49B. In large-scale morphology it is basically a box-shaped remnant expanding into an apparently inhomogeneous medium, but we also find small-scale structures, arcs and filaments, which lie interior to the outer shell in projection. The actual spatial position of the filaments is unknown, though we suspect that they are in the remnant interior rather than on the front or back face of the blast wave. In addition, their distribution in two dimensions suggests the projection of a helical structure. The shell edge, sharply rising in brightness for at least 3/4 of its circumference, still remains unresolved at our highest resolution (4 sec). This for our assumed distance of 8 kpc, the width of the region in which the emission appears is less than 0.16 pc, indicating short mean free paths for shock-accelerated electrons and high levels of MHD turbulence presumably causing the scattering. We find no polarized flux at 90 or 20 cm, with 3 sigma upper limits in polarized intensity of 36 mJy at 90 cm (45 sec resolution) and 7.2 mJy at 20 cm (5 sec resolution), or 22 micro-Jy/sq arcsec and 370 micro-jy/sq arcsec, respectively, for any emission extended on those scales. Polarized flux is present at 6 cm, but at a very low mean polarized fraction (total polarized flux divided by total flux) of 0.44% +/- 0.06%, which, as for 3C 391, is much lower than typical for bright SNRs at this frequency. The morphology in polarized intensity is poorly correlated with that in total intensity. We see excursions in the polarized fraction up to at least 10% in a few locations, but even where polarization is seen, typical levels are a few

  17. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  18. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.; Patnaude, Daniel; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Williams, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained new HST/WFC3 images of Kepler's supernova remnant in H-alpha (F656N) and [N II] (F658N) emission line filters. The bright radiative shocks in dense clumps are detected in both filters, while non-radiative shocks are seen as faint filaments only in the H-alpha image. Most of these Balmer filaments lie around the periphery of the remnant where the blast wave encounters partially neutral interstellar gas. We compare the new images with HST/ACS images taken nearly 10 years previously, and find that these filaments tracing the forward shock have moved 0.6"-0.9" between the two epochs. Assuming a distance of 4 kpc to the remnant, these proper motions correspond to shock velocities of 1160-1740 km/s, which are consistent with the published values, 1550-2000 km/s (e.g. Blair et al. 1991, ApJ 366, 484). We also find a few Balmer filaments with highly non-radial proper motions. In one particularly interesting case in the projected interior of the remnant, SE of the center, the shock appears to have wrapped around a sharp density enhancement and moved about 0.3" in the period between the observations.The images allow us to study the evolution of the shock around an ejecta knot, which is punching through the remnant boundary in the northwest. The forward shock, visible as an arcuate Balmer filament, has moved about 1". At the trailing edges, the system of radiative knots formed by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have undergone significant changes - some knots have disappeared, new ones have appeared, and many have changed in brightness. Elsewhere in the remnant we find changes in the relative intensities of many small, bright knots over the 10 year baseline, indicating the short radiative lifetimes of these features.This work has been supported in part by grant HST-GO-12885 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  19. Asymmetric Circumstellar Matter in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, S. P.; Blondin, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are not well understood, but are likely to be of diverse origin, including single- and double-degenerate binary systems. Among single-degenerate progenitors, substantial amounts of circumstellar material (CSM) are expelled prior to the SN explosions by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companions to the accreting white dwarfs. A subsequent collision of SN ejecta with the dense AGB wind has been detected among several distant SNe such as SN 2002ic, SN 2008J, and more recently PTF11kx. Dense CSM ejected by an AGB companion is present in the remnant of Kepler's SN of 1604, a Type Ia event. Observations of distant SNe hint at strongly asymmetric CSM distributions. A recent study of the CSM in Kepler's SNR by Burkey et al. indicates a large (factor of 10) density contrast between the dense, disk-like equatorial outflow and the more tenuous AGB wind above the orbital plane. A significant fraction of mature Type Ia SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows the presence of dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors that cannot be explained by standard models of Type Ia explosions in a uniform ambient interstellar medium. We explore the hypothesis that these remnants originated in Type Ia explosions with strongly asymmetric CSM distributions such as found in Kepler's SNR. We present results of 2-D hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of SN ejecta with asymmetric, disk-like AGB winds throughout the whole adiabatic stage of SNR evolution. Dense, asymmetric, and highly-ionized Fe-rich ejecta are indeed present in the simulated remnants, while the blast wave assumes a spherical shape shortly after passage through the ambient CSM. We also present simulated X-ray images and spectra and compare them with X-ray observations of selected remnants in the LMC. These remnants include DEM L238 and L249, recently observed by Suzaku, whose X-ray emission is strongly dominated by dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors. We contrast these

  20. The Effects of Prophylactic Ozone Pretreatment of Enamel on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Total or Self-Etch Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Guzey, Asli; Arhun, Neslihan; Cetinsahin, Alev; Unver, Bahtiyar

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study is to determine (1) shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded with self-etch and total-etch adhesive after ozone treatment (2) bond failure interface using a modified Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Methods: 52 premolars were randomly assigned into four groups (n=13) and received the following treatments: Group 1: 30 s Ozone (Biozonix, Ozonytron, Vehos Medikal, Ankara, Turkey) application + Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer (SEP) (3M) + Transbond XT (3M), Group 2: Transbond Plus SEP + Transbond XT, Group 3: 30 s Ozone application + 37% orthophosphoric acid + Transbond XT Primer (3M) + Transbond XT, Group 4: 37% orthophosphoric acid + Transbond XT Primer + Transbond XT. All samples were stored in deionised water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear debonding test was performed by applying a vertical force to the base of the bracket at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Results: The mean SBS results were Group 1: 10.48 MPa; Group 2: 8.89 MPa; Group 3: 9.41 MPa; Group 4: 9.82 MPa. One-Way Variance Test revealed that the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P=0.267). Debonded brackets were examined by an optical microscope at X16 magnification to determine the bond failure interface using a modified ARI. The results were (mean) Group 1: 2.38; Group 2: 1.31; Group 3: 3.00; Group 4: 1.92. Multiple comparisons showed that Groups 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4 were statistically different (P=0.014, P<.001 and P=0.025). Conclusions: Ozone treatment prior to bracket bonding does not affect the shear bond strength. PMID:20922155

  1. Stickiness--some fundamentals of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cyprien

    2002-12-01

    We review some adhesion mechanisms that have been understood in the field of synthetic adhesives, and more precisely for adhesives that adhere instantaneously (a property named tackiness) and whose adhesive strength usually depends on the applied pressure (pressure-sensitive adhesives). The discussion includes effects of surface roughness, elasticity, cavitation, viscous and elastic fingering, substrate flexibility. PMID:21680396

  2. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  3. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  4. Effects of display format on pilot describing function and remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.; Allen, R. W.; Magdaleno, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a comprehensive theory of manual control displays, six display formats were used by three instrument-rated pilots to regulate against random disturbances with a controlled element under both foveal and 10 deg parafoveal viewing conditions. The six display formats were: CRT line, CRT thermometer bar, 14-bar quantized on a CRT, a rotary dial and pointer, and two variations of a moving scale tape-drive. All were scaled to equivalent movement and apparent brightness. Measures included overall performance, describing functions, error remnant power spectra, critical instability scores, and subjective display ratings. The results show that the main effect of display format is on the loop closure properties. Less desirable displays induce lower bandwidth closures with consequent effects on the closed-loop remnant and performance.

  5. Heating of the interstellar medium by supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Models for the mechanisms active during supernova (SN) heating of surrounding regions are examined. SNs heat both the matrix material and material in the nearby interstellar medium, and also accelerate cosmic rays with shock waves. Fountain and wind models vary according to the SN power and mass acquisition rate. Additionally, a warm intercloud medium may be fed by returning fountain material and stellar mass loss. The thermal wind temperature varies with the number of solar massess heated, although remnants have been observed to vanish in the LMC when more than 100 solar masses were heated. The possibility that the solar system is inside a remnant that produces the observed soft X-ray background is considered.

  6. A comparison of models for supernova remnants including cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Drury, L. O'C.

    1992-11-01

    A simplified model which can follow the dynamical evolution of a supernova remnant including the acceleration of cosmic rays without carrying out full numerical simulations has been proposed by Drury, Markiewicz, & Voelk in 1989. To explore the accuracy and the merits of using such a model, we have recalculated with the simplified code the evolution of the supernova remnants considered in Jones & Kang, in which more detailed and accurate numerical simulations were done using a full hydrodynamic code based on the two-fluid approximation. For the total energy transferred to cosmic rays the two codes are in good agreement, the acceleration efficiency being the same within a factor of 2 or so. The dependence of the results of the two codes on the closure parameters for the two-fluid approximation is also qualitatively similar. The agreement is somewhat degraded in those cases where the shock is smoothed out by the cosmic rays.

  7. Radio structure of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.; Van Breugel, W. J. M.; Strom, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The radio emission from the remnant of Tycho's supernova of 1572 arises in a nearly circular, clumpy shell. A very distinct, thin bright rim just outside the main shell can be seen around most of the periphery of the remnant. The outer edge of radio emission, usually defined by this bright rim, coincides perfectly with the outer X-ray boundary. Most of the emission is polarized by a modest amount, with the outer rim particularly prominent. Observations at several wavelengths are used to map out the rotation measure at high angular resolution, and determine the intrinsic magnetic field direction. The magnetic field shows a somewhat cellular pattern but with a net radial orientation and a generally fairly low degree of polarization.

  8. Radio structure of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572)

    SciTech Connect

    Dickel, J.R.; Van breugel, W.J.M.; Strom, R.G. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy, Dwingeloo )

    1991-06-01

    The radio emission from the remnant of Tycho's supernova of 1572 arises in a nearly circular, clumpy shell. A very distinct, thin bright rim just outside the main shell can be seen around most of the periphery of the remnant. The outer edge of radio emission, usually defined by this bright rim, coincides perfectly with the outer X-ray boundary. Most of the emission is polarized by a modest amount, with the outer rim particularly prominent. Observations at several wavelengths are used to map out the rotation measure at high angular resolution, and determine the intrinsic magnetic field direction. The magnetic field shows a somewhat cellular pattern but with a net radial orientation and a generally fairly low degree of polarization. 44 refs.

  9. Observations of nine supernova remnants at 10.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Kundu, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity contour and polarization observation maps of nine supernova remnants at a microwave frequency are presented and discussed. The data provided are the highest-frequency (10.6 GHz) measurements to date for several of these sources and should therefore be useful in determining their spectra. Polarization ranges from 2 or 3% to as high as 40-50%. Integrated fluxes for the sources vary from about 3 to more than 25.

  10. Cosmic Ray and Tev Gamma Ray Generation by Quasar Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, Elihu; Loewenstein, Michael; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Results from new broadband (radio to X-ray) high-resolution imaging studies of the dormant quasar remnant cores of nearby giant elliptical galaxies are now shown to permit the harboring of compact dynamos capable of generating the highest energy cosmic ray particles and associated curvature radiation of TeV photons. Confirmation would imply a global inflow of interstellar gas all the way to the accretion powered supermassive black hole at the center of the host galaxy.

  11. Recurrent Ectopic Pregnancy in the Tubal Remnant after Salpingectomy

    PubMed Central

    Samiei-Sarir, Bahareh; Diehm, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We present two cases of ectopic pregnancy located within the remnant tube following ipsilateral salpingectomy. This particular pathology is rare and yet has significant consequences for the patient, with mortality rates 10–15 times higher than other ectopic pregnancies. It demonstrates that salpingectomy does not exclude ectopic pregnancy on the ipsilateral side. We suggest careful clinical consideration and bring attention to the current surgical technique. PMID:24151570

  12. Midbody remnant licenses primary cilia formation in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ott, Carolyn M

    2016-08-01

    Tethered midbody remnants dancing across apical microvilli, encountering the centrosome, and beckoning forth a cilium-who would have guessed this is how polarized epithelial cells coordinate the end of mitosis and the beginning of ciliogenesis? New evidence from Bernabé-Rubio et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601020) supports this emerging model. PMID:27482049

  13. Radio-Quiet Pulsars and Point Sources in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David

    2002-04-01

    Since Baade and Zwicky made their prescient remark identifying the central blue star in the Crab Nebula as a neutron star, this pulsar's period has increased by 0.9 msec, turning 10^48 ergs of rotational kinetic energy into a relativistic wind that has been deposited in its surroundings. This makes the compact remnant of the supernova of 1054 AD highly conspicuous. It also makes this remnant highly anomalous. Nowhere else in the Galaxy does such a luminous young pulsar exists, despite the fact that at least half a dozen core-collapse supernovae have occurred since the Crab's birth. Indeed, the newly discovered central object in Cas A is four orders of magnitude less luminous in the X-ray band. While the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories are discovering an increasing number of Crab-like synchrotron nebulae (albeit, far less luminous than the prototype), they are also revealing X-ray point sources inside supernova remnants that lack detectable radio pulses and show no evidence of a relativistic outflow to power a surrounding nebula. I will provide an inventory of these objects, discuss whether or not truly radio-silent young neutron stars exist, and speculate on the emission mechanisms and power sources which make such objects shine. I will conclude with a commentary on the implications of this population for the distributions of pulsar birth parameters such as spin period, magnetic field strength, and space velocity, as well as offer a glimpse of what future observations might reveal about the demographics of core-collapse remnants.

  14. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  15. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  16. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  20. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  1. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of young supernova remnants observed with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stage, M. D.; Allen, G. E.; Houck, J. C.

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detectors on Chandra have captured the highest resolution X-ray images of several supernova remnants. These images of the shocks, filaments and interactions of the supernova shell with the interstellar medium (or in some cases central objects) are spectacular not only for the incredible imaging clarity they provide, but perhaps more so for the integrated spectral information they contain. Yet the volume of this spatial and spectral data--reaching a new extreme with the megasecond observation of Cassiopeia A this spring--can provide a challenge for analysis. Using a suite of software tools developed for use with the ISIS spectral fitting package, and utilzing distributed processing, we have mapped the variation of spectral line and continnum features throughout the Cassiopeia A and other supernova remnants. We present maps of the elemental distribution, distribution of thermal and non-thermal emission, and plasma temperatures for tens of thousands of individual regions in the remnants. These maps include the results of an analysis of the new megasecond observation of Cas A.

  2. Gravitational Waves from the Remnants of the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Volonteri, Marta; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S.; Barausse, Enrico; Magg, Mattis; Stacy, Athena

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) provide a revolutionary tool to investigate yet unobserved astrophysical objects. Especially the first stars, which are believed to be more massive than present-day stars, might be indirectly observable via the merger of their compact remnants. We develop a self-consistent, cosmologically representative, semi-analytical model to simulate the formation of the first stars. By extrapolating binary stellar evolution models at 10 % solar metallicity to metal-free stars, we track the individual systems until the coalescence of the compact remnants. We estimate the contribution of primordial stars to the merger rate density and to the detection rate of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO). Owing to their higher masses, the remnants of primordial stars produce strong GW signals, even if their contribution in number is relatively small. We find a probability of ≳ 1% that the current detection GW150914 is of primordial origin. We estimate that aLIGO will detect roughly 1 primordial BH-BH merger per year for the final design sensitivity, although this rate depends sensitively on the primordial initial mass function. Turning this around, the detection of black hole mergers with a total binary mass of ˜ 300 M⊙ would enable us to constrain the primordial initial mass function.

  3. Dynamical Evolution of Supernova Remnants Breaking Through Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-04-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code tep{har83}. We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the outermost dense shell of the remnant is divided into several layers. The divided layers are subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and fragmented. On the other hand, if an SNR breaks through an MC after the remnant enters the snowplow phase, the radiative shell is not divided to layers. We also compare the predictions of previous analytic solutions for the expansion of SNRs in stratified media with our one-dimensional simulations. Moreover, we produce synthetic X-ray surface brightness in order to research the center-bright X-ray morphology shown in thermal composite SNRs. In the late stages, a breakout SNR shows the center-bright X-ray morphology inside an MC in our results. We apply our model to the observational results of the X-ray morphology of the thermal composite SNR 3C 391.

  4. Structure of merger remnants. II - Progenitors with rotating bulges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Mergers of identical galaxies consisting of self-gravitating disks, bulges, and halos are examined in the context of the suggestion that such events may form elliptical galaxies. Unlike earlier studies, the simulations reported here include effects arising from intrinsic spin of bulges. It is found that the disks and bulges are able to redistribute their angular momentum so that the luminous remnants rotate slowly near their centers. In addition, if the bulges are sufficiently concentrated, the core radii of the remnants are significantly reduced relative to those of end-states formed in mergers between pure stellar disks to the extent that the remnants share structural properties with observed elliptical galaxies. Nevertheless, it does appear that stellar-dynamical mergers between spiral progenitors will represent a viable mechanism for the production of massive elliptical galaxies only if sufficient mass resides already in dense, spheroidal components. These results suggest that any ellipticals formed in this manner having featureless light profiles were victims of a 'disk-bulge conspiracy' analogous to the disk-halo conspiracy thought to give rise to smooth rotation curves in spiral galaxies. Possible observational signatures of mergers are discussed, along with implications of the findings for our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

  5. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-02-28

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  6. A comparison of remnants in noncommutative Bardeen black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, S. Hamid; Ahmadi, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    We derive the mass term of the Bardeen metric in the presence of a noncommutative geometry induced minimal length. In this setup, the proposal of a stable black hole remnant as a candidate to store information is confirmed. We consider the possibility of having an extremal configuration with one degenerate event horizon and compare different sizes of black hole remnants. As a result, once the magnetic charge g of the noncommutative Bardeen solution becomes larger, both the minimal nonzero mass M0 and the minimal nonzero horizon radius r0 get larger. This means, subsequently, under the condition of an adequate amount of g, the three parameters g, M0, and r0 are in a connection with each other linearly. According to our results, a noncommutative Bardeen black hole is colder than the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole and its remnant is bigger, so the minimum required energy for the formation of such a black hole at particle colliders will be larger. We also find a closely similar result for the Hayward solution.

  7. Tycho: ambient medium structure by analysis of the supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshley, V.; Dubner, G.; Kuzyo, T.; Miceli, M.; Orlando, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Petruk, O.

    2016-06-01

    The radio (VLA) and X-ray (Chandra) maps of the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN1572) are used to study the interstellar medium (ISM) density and magnetic field gradients in the ambient medium surrounding the remnant. The analysis uses also the GeV gamma-ray spectrum derived from the recent Fermi data, the radio fluxes from different radio instruments, X-ray spectrum from Suzaku and TeV gamma-ray spectrum from VERITAS. The inferred orientation of ISM density gradient is verified by comparing it to the VLA maps of interstellar medium surrounding the remnant, while the revealed orientation of the magnetic field gradient is checked by measurements of the magnetic field strength in a number of local regions around the shock. The two approaches are applied in order to estimate the magnetic field strength, involving analysis of the temporal variations of the X-ray synchrotron radiation from the shock and modeling the radial X-ray external shock profiles. As a result we reveal that the magnetic field gradient in vicinity of Tycho is almost parallel to the Galactic plane while the interstellar plasma density gradient is almost perpendicular to it. One should note that different approaches adopted in this study lead to fully compatible results.

  8. The First Reported Infrared Emission from the SN1006 Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 m image from MIPS clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 m emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly, but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lowera relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower densitybut higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the IRS instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM-as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other SNRs but whose cause remains unclear. As with other SNIa remnants, SN1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the supernova ejecta.

  9. Gravitational waves from the remnants of the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Volonteri, Marta; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S.; Barausse, Enrico; Magg, Mattis; Stacy, Athena

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) provide a revolutionary tool to investigate yet unobserved astrophysical objects. Especially the first stars, which are believed to be more massive than present-day stars, might be indirectly observable via the merger of their compact remnants. We develop a self-consistent, cosmologically representative, semi-analytical model to simulate the formation of the first stars. By extrapolating binary stellar-evolution models at 10 per cent solar metallicity to metal-free stars, we track the individual systems until the coalescence of the compact remnants. We estimate the contribution of primordial stars to the merger rate density and to the detection rate of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO). Owing to their higher masses, the remnants of primordial stars produce strong GW signals, even if their contribution in number is relatively small. We find a probability of ≳1 per cent that the current detection GW150914 is of primordial origin. We estimate that aLIGO will detect roughly 1 primordial BH-BH merger per year for the final design sensitivity, although this rate depends sensitively on the primordial initial mass function (IMF). Turning this around, the detection of black hole mergers with a total binary mass of ˜ 300 M⊙ would enable us to constrain the primordial IMF.

  10. Are young supernova remnants interacting with circumstellar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, R.A.

    1982-08-15

    The young remnants of galactic Type I supernovae (SN 1006, SN 1572, and SN 1604) appear to be interacting with moderately dense gas (n/sub O/> or =0.1 cm/sup -3/). If the gas in the ambient interstellar medium, the observations suggest that gas of this density is fairly pervasive. If the gas is circumstellar, there are important implications for the progenitors of Type I supernovae. A plausible density distribution for circumstellar gas is rhoinfinityr/sup -2/. The expansion of a supernova into such a medium is examined and is compared with expansion into a uniform medium. The two cases can be distinguished on the basis of their density profiles and their rates of expansion. Currently available data factor the hypothesis of expansion in a uniform medium for all three Type I remnants; the evidence is the strongest for SN 1572 and the weakest for SN 1604. Further X-ray and radio observations of the galactic remnants and of extragalactic Type I supernovae should serve to test this hypothesis.

  11. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  12. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  13. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  14. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  15. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  16. Epidural lysis of adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E; Hurley, Robert W; Cohen, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  17. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  18. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  19. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  20. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications. PMID:25841348

  1. Forward Shock Proper Motions of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Uchida, H.; Kimura, M.

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure of Kepler's supernova remnant shows a rounded shape delineated by forward shocks. We measure proper motions of the forward shocks on overall rims of the remnant, by using archival Chandra data taken in two epochs with time difference of 6.09 yr. The proper motions of the forward shocks on the northern rim are measured to be 0.076'' (±0.032'' ±0.016'') to 0.11'' (±0.014'' ±0.016'') yr-1, while those on the rest of the rims are measured to be 0.15'' (±0.017'' ±0.016'') to 0.30'' (±0.048'' ±0.016'') yr-1 here the first-term errors are statistical uncertainties and the second-term errors are systematic uncertainties. Combining the best-estimated shock velocity of 1660 +/- 120 km s-1 measured for Balmer-dominated filaments in the northern and central portions of the remnant (Sankrit et al. 2005) with the proper motions derived for the forward shocks on the northern rim, we estimate a distance of 3.3+1.6-0.4 kpc to the remnant. We measure the expansion indices, m (defined as R propto tm), to be 0.47-0.82 for most of the rims. These values are consistent with those expected in Type Ia SN explosion models, in which the ejecta and the circumstellar medium have power-law density profiles whose indices are 5-7 and 0-2, respectively. In addition, we should note the slower expansion on the northern rim than that on the southern rim. This is likely caused by the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium; the density of the circumstellar medium is higher in the north than that in the south of the remnant. The newly estimated geometric center, around which we believe the explosion point exists, is located at ~5'' offset to the north of the radio center.

  2. Optimal management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, S G; Cohen, H; Ranson, J H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluated methods of operative management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite reductions in mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy, leakage from the pancreatic remnant still may cause significant morbidity. Patients with small, unobstructed pancreatic ducts or soft, friable pancreata are at particularly high risk. Although numerous surgical techniques have been described to avoid such complications, no single method is suitable for all patients. METHODS: The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 114 consecutive patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Sixty-nine patients were men (61%) and 45 were women (39%), with median age 66 years. Underlying disease was malignant in 87 (76%) and benign in 27 (24%). Patients were divided into groups based on risk for postoperative pancreatic fistula and on the operative management of the pancreatic remnant. Sixty-eight patients underwent end-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy, 13 of whom were high risk (group 1A) and 55 of whom were low risk (group 1B). Thirty-seven patients, all high risk, had either pancreatic duct closure by oversewing (N = 19, group 2) or end-to-end pancreaticojejunal invagination (N = 18, group 3). Nine patients underwent total pancreatectomy (group 4). Morbidity related to prolonged pancreatic drainage (PPD) of greater than 20 days was determined. RESULTS: Overall incidence of PPD was 17% and caused the only death. Patients considered high risk for postoperative pancreatic fistula had a 36% incidence of PPD compared with 2% in patients considered low risk (p < 0.0001). Prolonged pancreatic drainage frequency related to the method of pancreatic remnant management was as follows: group 1A, 15%; group 1B, 2%; group 2, 79%; and group 3, 6% (p < 0.001 for group 2 vs. other groups). No serious sequelae followed PPD in 15 patients (79%); however, 4 patients required reoperation for pseudocyst or abscess drainage

  3. EVOLUTION OF POST-IMPACT REMNANT HELIUM STARS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITHIN THE SINGLE-DEGENERATE SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu

    2013-08-10

    The progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Based on recent hydrodynamics simulations, non-degenerate companions in the single-degenerate scenario (SDS) should survive the supernova (SN) impact. One way to distinguish between the SDS and the double-degenerate scenario is to search for the post-impact remnant stars (PIRSs) in SN Ia remnants. Using a technique that combines multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations, we have examined the post-impact evolution of helium-rich binary companions in the SDS. It is found that these helium-rich PIRSs (He PIRSs) dramatically expand and evolve to a luminous phase (L {approx} 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }) about 10 yr after an SN explosion. Subsequently, they contract and evolve to become hot blue-subdwarf-like (sdO-like) stars by releasing gravitational energy, persisting as sdO-like stars for several million years before evolving to the helium red-giant phase. We therefore predict that a luminous OB-like star should be detectable within {approx}30 yr after the SN explosion. Thereafter, it will shrink and become an sdO-like star in the central regions of SN Ia remnants within star-forming regions for SN Ia progenitors evolved via the helium-star channel in the SDS. These He PIRSs are predicted to be rapidly rotating (v{sub rot} {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1}) and to have high spatial velocities (v{sub linear} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1}). Furthermore, if SN remnants have diffused away and are not recognizable at a later stage, He PIRSs could be an additional source of single sdO stars and/or hypervelocity stars.

  4. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment on Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Quality of Peel Ply Prepared Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Ashley C.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could modify peel ply prepared composite surfaces to create strong adhesive bonds. Two peel ply surface preparation composite systems previously shown to create weak bonds (low fracture energy and adhesion failure) that were potential candidates for plasma treatment were Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepared with Precision Fabrics Group, Inc. (PFG) 52006 nylon peel ply and Hexcel T300/F155 CFRP prepared with PFG 60001 polyester peel ply. It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could functionalize and/or remove peel ply remnants left on the CFRP surfaces upon peel ply removal. Surface characterization measurements and double cantilever beam (DCB) testing were used to determine the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on surface characteristics and bond quality of peel ply prepared CFRP composites. Previous research showed that Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 52006 peel ply and bonded with Cytec MetlBond 1515-3M structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies when tested in the DCB configuration. Previous research also showed that DCB samples made of Hexcel T300/F155 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 60001 peel ply and bonded with Henkel Hysol EA 9696 structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies. Recent research suggested that plasma treatment could be able to activate these "un-bondable" surfaces and result in good adhesive bonds. Nylon peel ply prepared 177 °C cure and polyester peel ply prepared 127 °C cure CFRP laminates were treated with atmospheric pressure plasma after peel ply removal prior to bonding. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was capable of significantly increasing fracture energies and changing failure modes. For Toray T800/3900-2 laminates prepared with PFG 52006 and bonded with

  5. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  6. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  7. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  8. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  9. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  10. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  11. Characterisation of CFRP adhesive bonds by electromechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Pawel H.; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw M.

    2014-03-01

    In aircraft industry the Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) elements are joint using rivets and adhesive bonding. The reliability of the bonding limits the use of adhesive bonding for primary aircraft structures, therefore it is important to assess the bond quality. The performance of adhesive bonds depends on the physico-chemical properties of the adhered surfaces. The contamination leading to weak bonds may have various origin and be caused by moisture, release agent, hydraulic fluid, fuel, poor curing of adhesive and so on. In this research three different causes of possible weak bonds were selected for the investigation: 1. Weak bond due to release agent contamination, 2. Weak bond due to moisture contamination, 3. Weak bond due to poor curing of the adhesive. In order to assess the bond quality electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique was selected and investigation was focused on the influence of bond quality on electrical impedance of piezoelectric transducer. The piezoelectric transducer was mounted at the middle of each sample surface. Measurements were conducted using HIOKI Impedance Analyzer IM3570. Using the impedance analyzer the electrical parameters were measured for wide frequency band. Due to piezoelectric effect the electrical response of a piezoelectric transducer is related to mechanical response of the sample to which the transducers is attached. The impedance spectra were investigated in order to find indication of the weak bonds. These spectra were compared with measurements for reference sample using indexes proposed in order to assess the bond quality.

  12. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  13. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  14. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  15. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  16. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  17. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  18. Advances in light curing adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Andy

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new family of light curing adhesives containing a new reactive additive previously not used in optical grade light curing adhesives are obtained with the addition of functionalized cellulositics. Outgassing as low as 10-6 grams/gram has been observed based on headspace sampling. Other additives have lowered the shrinkage rates of positioning adhesives from near 1 percent to less than 0.1 percent with fractional, percentage movements over thermal range of -40 degrees C to +200 degrees C.

  19. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1990-01-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. To ensure an adequate retention over a number of years different factors have to be considered. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin (Panavia Ex) are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rets, interocclusal clearance of 0.4 mm and cingulum stops is equally important. Care should be taken not to remove all the enamel in the cervical region in preparing a mini chamfer. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Teeth with a different mobility should not be included in the same bridge. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. Only an exact impression, a precise model and a reliable casting technique will provide a metal frame with an optimal marginal adaptation and a close fit. The retention does not depend on one single factor but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 90% can be obtained. PMID:2077574

  20. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  1. Multi-frequency observations of SNR J0453-6829 in the LMC. A composite supernova remnant with a pulsar wind nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Filipović, M. D.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Crawford, E. J.; Points, S. D.; Pietsch, W.; De Horta, A. Y.; Tothill, N.; Payne, J. L.; Sasaki, M.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is rich in supernova remnants (SNRs), which can be investigated in detail with radio, optical, and X-ray observations. SNR J0453-6829 is an X-ray and radio-bright remnant in the LMC, within which previous studies revealed the presence of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), making it one of the most interesting SNRs in the Local Group of galaxies. Aims: We study the emission of SNR J0453-6829 to improve our understanding of its morphology, spectrum, and thus the emission mechanisms in the shell and the PWN of the remnant. Methods: We obtained new radio data with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and analysed archival XMM-Newton observations of SNR J0453-6829. We studied the morphology of SNR J0453-6829 from radio, optical, and X-ray images and investigated the energy spectra in the different parts of the remnant. Results: Our radio results confirm that this LMC SNR hosts a typical PWN. The prominent central core of the PWN exhibits a radio spectral index αCore of -0.04 ± 0.04, while in the rest of the SNR shell the spectral slope is somewhat steeper with αShell = -0.43 ± 0.01. We detect regions with a mean polarisation of P ≅ (12 ± 4)% at 6 cm and (9 ± 2)% at 3 cm. The full remnant is of roughly circular shape with dimensions of (31 ± 1) pc × (29 ± 1) pc. The spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS spectra allowed us to derive physical parameters for the SNR. Somewhat depending on the spectral model, we obtain for the remnant a shock temperature of around 0.2 keV and estimate the dynamical age to 12 000-15 000 years. Using a Sedov model we further derive an electron density in the X-ray emitting material of 1.56 cm-3, typical for LMC remnants, a large swept-up mass of 830 M⊙, and an explosion energy of 7.6 × 1050 erg. These parameters indicate a well evolved SNR with an X-ray spectrum dominated by emission from the swept-up material.

  2. N157B: X-ray evidence for a Crab-like supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, Eric V.; Wang, Q. Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The X-ray observation of the supernova remnant N 157B is described. The Rosat High Resolution Imager (HRI) X-ray emission from the remnant was decomposed into point-like sources. The spectra showed abundance-enhanced neon and magnesium lines, indicating that the remnant originated in a massive progenitor. The flat and featureless data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) confirm the Crab-like nature of the remnant. By interpreting both the thermal spectral component and the shell as representing the remnant's outer shock, the age of the remnant was estimated to be 4 x 10(exp 3) yr and the energy release approximately 2 x 10(exp 50) erg.

  3. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2010-01-08

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  4. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  5. ROSAT HRI observations of Magellanic Cloud supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of deep ROSAT high resolution imager (HRI) observations of two oxygen-rich supernova remnants (SNR's) in the Magellanic Clouds is described. For N132D, I exploit the limited spectral information provided by the HRI to investigate arcsecond scale spectral variations. I find that there is a region of harder X-ray emission near the southern limb and regions of softer emission near the center and northwestern limb. The remnant is believed to be interacting with a molecular cloud and the harder emission to the south is explained as a result of increased absorption along the line-of-sight there. I argue that the softer emission comes from X-ray emitting material with an enhanced abundance of oxygen. For the second SNR, E0102.2 72.2, the spatial structure is investigated in detail using two-dimensional image fitting techniques. Evidence is found for a ring-like and a spherically symmetric shell-like component both of which were modeled as homogeneous regions. In addition, a significant fraction of the observed flux (approximately 11 percent) must come from a resolved clumped component. A comparison with optical and radio imagery is made to provide a physical basis for the components identified in the X-ray analysis. The mass of X-ray emitting gas in the remnant is estimated and a value of approximately 75 M(solar mass) was determined. The dominant uncertainty on this quantity is the extent of unresolved clumping in the X-ray gas. Such clumping would tend to reduce the mass estimate by f(exp 1/2), where f is the mean volume filling factor of the gas.

  6. PHYSICAL STRUCTURE AND NATURE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN M101

    SciTech Connect

    Franchetti, Nicholas A.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua; Dunne, Bryan C.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Grimes, Caleb K.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Aldridge, Tabitha M. E-mail: gruendl@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: bdunne@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: ckgrim01@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: rchen@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2012-04-15

    Supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in the giant spiral galaxy M101 have been previously identified from ground-based H{alpha} and [S II] images. We have used archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) H{alpha} and broadband images as well as stellar photometry of 55 SNR candidates to examine their physical structure, interstellar environment, and underlying stellar population. We have also obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra to search for shocked high-velocity gas in 18 SNR candidates, and identified X-ray counterparts to SNR candidates using data from archival observations made by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Twenty-one of these 55 SNR candidates studied have X-ray counterparts, although one of them is a known ultraluminous X-ray source. The multi-wavelength information has been used to assess the nature of each SNR candidate. We find that within this limited sample, {approx}16% are likely remnants of Type Ia SNe and {approx}45% are remnants of core-collapse SNe. In addition, about {approx}36% are large candidates which we suggest are either superbubbles or OB/H II complexes. Existing radio observations are not sensitive enough to detect the non-thermal emission from these SNR candidates. Several radio sources are coincident with X-ray sources, but they are associated with either giant H II regions in M101 or background galaxies. The archival HST H{alpha} images do not cover the entire galaxy and thus prevents a complete study of M101. Furthermore, the lack of HST [S II] images precludes searches for small SNR candidates which could not be identified by ground-based observations. Such high-resolution images are needed in order to obtain a complete census of SNRs in M101 for a comprehensive investigation of the distribution, population, and rates of SNe in this galaxy.

  7. Asymmetries in the Expansion and Emission from Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigh, Carlos D.; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Gómez, Daniel O.; Reynoso, Estela M.; Esquivel, Alejandro; Matias Schneiter, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical simulations of asymmetric young supernova remnants (SNRs) carried out with the hydrodynamical code YGUAZÚ, aiming to quantitatively assess the role of different factors that may give origin to such asymmetries in their expansion. In particular, we are interested in modeling the morphology of Tycho's SNR to address whether the companion star of a Type Ia supernova progenitor has played a role in the subsequent evolution of the remnant. With the results from the numerical simulations, we can not only study the morphology of the SNR but also compute the emission of the remnant in different spectral bands. In particular, we simulate X-ray maps, which can be directly compared to recent and previous observations of Tycho's SNR. Our results suggest that the most likely explanation for Tycho's morphology is that after the supernova (SN) explosion the shock front stripped the envelope of its companion. We represent this effect by adding a conical region with an enhanced density into the initial sphere immediately after the explosion. Assuming that Tycho's companion was a massive red giant star, we explore different values of the angle of aperture and mass excess of the conical region. A good agreement with observational data was found for the model with a mass excess of 0.3 M sun and an aperture of 90°. After the collision with the SN shock wave, the companion would become an He-rich star. This scenario would gain observational support if a star with these characteristics is found in the vicinity of the center of the SN explosion.

  8. SPECTRUM OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS ACCELERATED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2010-07-20

    The spectra of high-energy protons and nuclei accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are calculated, taking into account magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift both upstream and downstream of the shock for different types of SNRs during their evolution. The maximum energy of accelerated particles may reach 5 x 10{sup 18} eV for Fe ions in Type IIb SNRs. The calculated energy spectrum of cosmic rays after propagation through the Galaxy is in good agreement with the spectrum measured at the Earth.

  9. Final remnant of binary black hole mergers: Multipolar analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robert

    2009-10-15

    Methods are presented to define and compute source multipoles of dynamical horizons in numerical relativity codes, extending previous work in the isolated and dynamical horizon formalisms to allow for horizons that are not axisymmetric. These methods are then applied to a binary black hole merger simulation, providing evidence that the final remnant is a Kerr black hole, both through the (spatially) gauge-invariant recovery of the geometry of the apparent horizon, and through a detailed extraction of quasinormal ringing modes directly from the strong-field region.

  10. Shocks in Dense Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant: FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 8 LWRS FUSE spectra to study a recently identified interaction of the Vela supernova remnant with a dense cloud region along its western edge. The goal is to quantify the temperature, ionization, density, and abundance characteristics associated with this shock/dense cloud interface by means of UV absorption line studies. Our detection of high-velocity absorption line C I at +90 to +130 km/s with IUE toward a narrow region interior to the Vela SNR strongly suggests the Vela supernova remnant is interacting with a dense ISM or molecular cloud. The shock/dense cloud interface is suggested by (1) the rarity of detection of high-velocity C I seen in IUE spectra, (2) its very limited spatial distribution in the remnant, and (3) a marked decrease in X-ray emission in the region immediately west of the position of these stars where one also finds a 100 micron emission ridge in IRAS images. We have investigated the shock physics and general properties of this interaction region through a focussed UV absorption line study using FUSE spectra. We have FUSE data on OVI absorption lines observed toward 8 stars behind the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). We compare the OVI observations with IUE observations of CIV absorption toward the same stars. Most of the stars, which are all B stars, have complex continua making the extraction of absorption lines difficult. Three of the stars, HD 72088, HD 72089 and HD 72350, however, are rapid rotators (v sin i less than 100 km/s) making the derivation of absorption column densities much easier. We have measured OVI and CIV column densities for the "main component" (i.e. the low velocity component) for these stars. In addition, by removing the H2 line at 1032.35A (121.6 km/s relative to OVI), we find high velocity components of OVI at approximately 150 km/s that we attribute to the shock in the Vela SNR. The column density ratios and magnitudes are compared to both steady shock models and results of hydrodynamical SNR

  11. TYPING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING X-RAY LINE EMISSION MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L. A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Badenes, C.; Huppenkothen, D.; Jeltema, T. E.

    2009-11-20

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in 17 Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse supernovae explosions are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  12. Remnant percolative disorder in highly-cured networks

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.; Martin, J.E. )

    1993-05-24

    The authors have previously reported viscoelastic measurements demonstrating that fully-cured networks and critical gels exhibit similar relaxation spectra, implying that fully-cured networks are somewhat ill- connected. Here, they present restricted valence percolation simulations of networks well beyond the percolation transition that explicitly display remnant disorder over length scales less than the correlation length of the network. They conclude that the topology of highly-cured networks is not well described by a regular three- dimensional tennis net but is ill-connected over length scales that correspond to relaxation modes of practical interest.

  13. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r→0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  14. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter. PMID:19792708

  15. Expansion of the Optical Remnant from Tycho’s Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putko, Joseph; Winkler, P. Frank; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is the expanding remnant from SN 1572, the penultimate Galactic supernova to have been recorded by contemporary observers. Its optical light is almost exclusively faint hydrogen Balmer emission around the periphery of the SNR, produced where fast nonradiative shocks encounter partly neutral preshock interstellar material. A variety of filaments, presumably thin sheets oriented tangentially, surround about one-third of the radio/X-ray shell. We have used CCD images, taken from KPNO over seven epochs from 1986 to 2009, to give the first optical expansion measurement of Tycho's SNR of the CCD era. Thirty filaments were identified and measured; the majority of them are at or near the remnant's outer rim and have proper motions from 0.19‧‧ ± 0.01‧‧ yr-1 to 0.26‧‧ ± 0.02‧‧ yr-1. The associated expansion indices, defined as the ratio of the current expansion rate to the historical mean, range from 0.35 ± 0.03 to 0.52 ± 0.05. Our measurements are consistent with those from the classic study by Kamper & van den Bergh (1978, ApJ, 224, 851) for the same filaments, but the CCD measurements have higher precision, and we have measured several additional fainter filaments. For direct comparison with X-ray and radio measurements, we selected the subset of optical filaments lying exactly at the outer rim, as identified in Chandra and VLA images. Considering only these filaments, virtually all have expansion indices greater than 0.40, the Sedov value. In addition to the rim filaments, there are several seen in the interior (in projection) that have smaller proper motions; these may have been decelerated, and/or they could be directed non-tangentially. Our final epoch of images, taken from the 3.5m WIYN telescope in 2009, reveals previously undetected extremely faint optical emission surrounding well over half of the remnant shell. This newly detected faint emission agrees well with the limb as defined in X-ray and radio images

  16. Proceedings of the 19th annual meeting of the Adhesion Society

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    This is the proceedings of the 19th Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society, held February 18-21, 1996. Papers are presented on various aspects of adhesion, ranging from studies at the molecular level, to studies of the intermixing of polymer chains across interface joints, to the study of polymer/metal joints. Separate abstracts of articles from this proceedings have been indexed into the database.

  17. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  18. A high-sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    A high-sensitivity scan of the galactic plane from 70 to 30 deg was performed to search for 2-20-keV X rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 and 31 deg longitude are presented, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants. Upper limits are given for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned.

  19. Remnant Trees Affect Species Composition but Not Structure of Tropical Second-Growth Forest

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Manette E.; Chazdon, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Remnant trees, spared from cutting when tropical forests are cleared for agriculture or grazing, act as nuclei of forest regeneration following field abandonment. Previous studies on remnant trees were primarily conducted in active pasture or old fields abandoned in the previous 2–3 years, and focused on structure and species richness of regenerating forest, but not species composition. Our study is among the first to investigate the effects of remnant trees on neighborhood forest structure, biodiversity, and species composition 20 years post-abandonment. We compared the woody vegetation around individual remnant trees to nearby plots without remnant trees in the same second-growth forests (“control plots”). Forest structure beneath remnant trees did not differ significantly from control plots. Species richness and species diversity were significantly higher around remnant trees. The species composition around remnant trees differed significantly from control plots and more closely resembled the species composition of nearby old-growth forest. The proportion of old-growth specialists and generalists around remnant trees was significantly greater than in control plots. Although previous studies show that remnant trees may initially accelerate secondary forest growth, we found no evidence that they locally affect stem density, basal area, and seedling density at later stages of regrowth. Remnant trees do, however, have a clear effect on the species diversity, composition, and ecological groups of the surrounding woody vegetation, even after 20 years of forest regeneration. To accelerate the return of diversity and old-growth forest species into regrowing forest on abandoned land, landowners should be encouraged to retain remnant trees in agricultural or pastoral fields. PMID:24454700

  20. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  1. G29.7-0.3: another supernova remnant with an identity crisis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    New radio and X-ray observations of the galactic supernova remnant G29.7-0.3 show that it is composed of two spectrally distinct components: a steep-spectrum, incomplete shell 3 arcmin in extent enclosing a flat-spectrum, X-ray emitting region 30 arcsec across. Thus, G29.7-0.3 joins the ranks of supernova remnants which exhibit a combination of Crab-like and shell remnant attributes. The Crab-like core has the highest ratio of X-ray radio luminosity of all the Crab-like remnants observed to date, suggesting that it is an extremely young object.

  2. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  3. Streptococcus thermophilus Biofilm Formation: A Remnant Trait of Ancestral Commensal Life?

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Céline; Renault, Pierre; Briandet, Romain; Guédon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have a long history of use in food production and preservation. Their adaptation to food environments has profoundly modified their features, mainly through genomic flux. Streptococcus thermophilus, one of the most frequent starter culture organisms consumed daily by humans emerged recently from a commensal ancestor. As such, it is a useful model for genomic studies of bacterial domestication processes. Many streptococcal species form biofilms, a key feature of the major lifestyle of these bacteria in nature. However, few descriptions of S. thermophilus biofilms have been reported. An analysis of the ability of a representative collection of natural isolates to form biofilms revealed that S. thermophilus was a poor biofilm producer and that this characteristic was associated with an inability to attach firmly to surfaces. The identification of three biofilm-associated genes in the strain producing the most biofilms shed light on the reasons for the rarity of this trait in this species. These genes encode proteins involved in crucial stages of biofilm formation and are heterogeneously distributed between strains. One of the biofilm genes appears to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. The other two are located in loci presenting features of reductive evolution, and are absent from most of the strains analyzed. Their orthologs in commensal bacteria are involved in adhesion to host cells, suggesting that they are remnants of ancestral functions. The biofilm phenotype appears to be a commensal trait that has been lost during the genetic domestication of S. thermophilus, consistent with its adaptation to the milk environment and the selection of starter strains for dairy fermentations. PMID:26035177

  4. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña na-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Ro´ska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  5. The NuSTAR Program for Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grefenstette, Brian; An, H.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Freyer, C.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Humensky, B.; Jakobsen, S.; Kaspi, V.; Kitaguchi, T.; Lopez, L. A.; Madsen, K.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Nynka, M.; Pivovaroff, M.; Reynolds, S. P.; Stern, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wik, D. R.; Zhang, W.; Zoglauer, A.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), successfully launched in June 2012, is the first telescope to bring the the hard X-ray (3 to 79 keV) sky into focus. One of NuSTAR's prime science goals is to study the morphology of the previously unresolved hard X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs). Spatial and spectral characterization of the hard X-ray synchrotron emission is essential to understanding the physics of particle acceleration in SNR and has implications for origin of galactic cosmic rays. Young (< 1 kyr) remnants may also show emission from decay products of Ti-44, which has great importance in understanding supernova explosion mechanisms. In this poster we present NuSTAR plans for observing SNRs as well as early results from SNRs observed in the first six months since launch, including preliminary results for Cassiopeia A. Discussions of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and G21.5-0.9 are presented in a companion posters by K. Madsen and M. Nynka, respectively.

  6. Model images of radio halos around supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    I present model calculations of profiles and two-dimensional images of the radio synchrotron emission of young supernova remnants, concentrating on observable effects of relativistic eletrons diffusing upstream of the shock wave. If the preshock electron scattering mean free path is sufficiently long, observable synchrotron halos outside the bulk of the radio emission can potentially result; their absence can constrain the mean free path from above. If scattering is primarily due, as expected, to Alfven waves with amplitude detla(B), the halo is expected to extend a distance of order r(sub g)c(delta(B)/B)(exp 2)/v(sub s) beyond the shock, where r(sub g) is the gyroradius of the electrons emitting at the observed frequency, B is the upstream magnetic field strength, v(sub s) is the shock velocity, and the amplitude delta(B) refers to wave with wavelength comparable to r(sub g), of order 10(exp 13) cm for typical supernova-remnant parameters. However, the detailed geometry of the halo varies with the assumptions about particle acceleration in the shock wave. I present an atlas of model profiles and images as a function of preshock diffusion length, of aspect angle between the magnetic field and the line of sight, and of other relevant parameters.

  7. Tycho's Remnant Provides Shocking Evidence for Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    Astronomers have found compelling evidence that a supernova shock wave has produced a large amount of cosmic rays, particles of mysterious origin that constantly bombard the Earth. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, supports theoretical arguments that shock waves from stellar explosions may be a primary source of cosmic rays. This finding is important for understanding the origin of cosmic rays, which are atomic nuclei that strike the Earth's atmosphere with very high energies. Scientists believe that some are produced by flares on the Sun, and others by similar events on other stars, or pulsars or black hole accretion disks. But, one of the prime suspects has been supernova shock waves. Now, a team of astronomers has used Chandra observations of Tycho's supernova remnant to strengthen the case for this explanation. "With only a single object involved we can't state with confidence that supernova shock waves are the primary source of cosmic rays," said John P. Hughes of Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey, and coauthor of a report to be published in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "What we have done is present solid evidence that the shock wave in at least one supernova remnant has accelerated nuclei to cosmic ray energies." In the year 1572, the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe observed and studied the sudden appearance of a bright "new star" in the constellation Cassiopeia. Now known as Tycho's supernova remnant, the event created a sensation in Tycho's time because it exploded the myth that stars never change. Four centuries later, the Chandra results on Tycho's remnant show that some modern ideas of the aftermath of supernova explosions may have to be revised. The report by Hughes and colleagues demonstrates that the shock wave produced by the explosive disruption of the star behaves in a way that cannot be explained by the standard theory. The supernova debris is observed to expand at a speed of about six million

  8. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  9. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  10. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  11. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Remnants: Targets for Therapy?

    PubMed

    Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Kroon, Jeffrey; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M John

    2016-07-01

    It is now evident that elevated circulating levels of triglycerides in the non-fasting state, a marker for triglyceride (TG)-rich remnant particles, are associated with increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent findings from basic and clinical studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the atherogenicity of these apoB-containing particles. Here, we review current knowledge of the formation, intravascular remodelling and catabolism of TG-rich lipoproteins and highlight (i) the pivotal players involved in this process, including lipoprotein lipase, glycosylphosphatidylinositol HDL binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1), apolipoprotein (apo) C-II, apoC-III, angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 3, 4 and 8, apoA-V and cholesteryl ester transfer protein; (ii) key determinants of triglyceride (TG) levels and notably rates of production of very-low-density lipoprotein 1 (VLDL1) particles; and (iii) the mechanisms which underlie the atherogenicity of remnant particles. Finally, we emphasise the polygenic nature of moderate hypertriglyceridemia and briefly discuss modalities for its clinical management. Several new therapeutic strategies to attenuate hypertriglyceridemia have appeared recently, among which those targeted to apoC-III appear to hold considerable promise. PMID:27216847

  12. Possible Population III remnants at redshift 3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; O'Meara, John M.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2016-03-01

    The first stars, known as Population III (PopIII), produced the first heavy elements, thereby enriching their surrounding pristine gas. Previous detections of metals in intergalactic gas clouds, however, find a heavy element enrichment larger than 1/1000 times that of the solar environment, higher than expected for PopIII remnants. In this letter, we report the discovery of a Lyman limit system (LLS) at z = 3.53 with the lowest metallicity seen in gas with discernable metals, 10-3.41±0.26 times the solar value, at a level expected for PopIII remnants. We make the first relative abundance measurement in such low metallicity gas: the carbon-to-silicon ratio is 10-0.26±0.17 times the solar value. This is consistent with models of gas enrichment by a PopIII star formation event early in the Universe, but also consistent with later, Population II enrichment. The metals in all three components comprising the LLS, which has a velocity width of 400 km s-1, are offset in velocity by ˜+6 km s-1 from the bulk of the hydrogen, suggesting the LLS was enriched by a single event. Relative abundance measurements in this near-pristine regime open a new avenue for testing models of early gas enrichment and metal mixing.

  13. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3–25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10‑25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10‑7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10‑5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  14. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  15. Effects of removing adhesive from tooth surfaces by Er:YAG laser and a composite bur on enamel surface roughnessand pulp chamber temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Sogra; Aghili, Hossein; Joshan, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: At the end of fixed orthodontic treatment, the remnant of adhesive should be eliminated from the tooth surface. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three methods of removing adhesive on enamel surface roughness, dental pulp temperature, and also on the time spent. Materials and Methods: The brackets on 90 extracted teeth were debonded using bracket removal pliers. A thermocouple sensor was fitted on the buccal wall of the pulp chamber through access cavity to measure thermal changes during adhesive removal. The residue of adhesive was eliminated from enamel surface of teeth by either tungsten carbide bur, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, or fiber reinforced composite bur. Scanning electron micrographs images were taken to assess the roughness of enamel surface. The time spent for adhesive removal was recorded as well. Chi-square test was used to evaluate the remnants of adhesive and enamel surface roughness; t-test and also repeated measurement analysis of variance were applied at P < 0.05 to compare the thermal changes of the pulp chamber and time spent between the methods of surface treatment. Results: The results of surface roughness were significantly different (P < 0.001). The pulp temperature changed significantly (P < 0.001). Tungsten carbide bur increased the temperature by 5.5°C significantly slower than reinforced composite bur (P = 0.004), however removed the adhesive residue faster than two other methods although not significantly (P = 0.069). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, fiber reinforced composite bur created the smoothest enamel surface while Er:YAG laser the roughest. Tungsten carbide and composite burs generated more heat compared to Er:YAG laser. In addition, tungsten carbide bur was the fastest and Er:YAG laser the slowest devices to remove adhesive residue. PMID:26005466

  16. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings. PMID:26618537

  17. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  18. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  19. OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: funk@slac.stanford.edu

    2011-06-10

    We present observations of the young supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We clearly detect a source positionally coincident with the SNR. The source is extended with a best-fit extension of 0.{sup 0}55 {+-} 0.{sup 0}04 matching the size of the non-thermal X-ray and TeV gamma-ray emission from the remnant. The positional coincidence and the matching extended emission allow us to identify the LAT source with SNR RX J1713.7-3946. The spectrum of the source can be described by a very hard power law with a photon index of {Gamma} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 that coincides in normalization with the steeper H.E.S.S.-detected gamma-ray spectrum at higher energies. The broadband gamma-ray emission is consistent with a leptonic origin as the dominant mechanism for the gamma-ray emission.

  20. G346.6-0.2: The Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant with Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Ng, Stephen C.-Y.; Wong, B. T. T.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a unique window into studying particle acceleration at the shock-front. All of the 14 or so SNRs in which non-thermal X-ray synchrotron emission has been detected are shell-like in nature, and show no evidence of interaction with large nearby molecular clouds. Here we present a new X-ray study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology (MM) SNR G346.6-0.2 using XMM-Newton. We found that the X-ray emission arises from a cool recombining plasma with subsolar abundances, confirming previous Suzaku results. In addition, we identified an additional power-law component in the spectrum, with a photon index of ˜2. We investigated its possible origin and conclude that it most likely arises from synchrotron emission produced by particles accelerated at the shock. This makes G346.6-0.2 an important new object in the class of synchrotron emitting SNRs, as unlike shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, MM SNRs are usually thought to have shock velocities that are effectively too slow to accelerate electrons. The dense environment and nature of the remnant, provide conditions unseen in shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect that these properties have on the production of X-ray synchrotron emission.

  1. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  2. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  3. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  4. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  5. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  6. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Michael J.; Steen, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials. PMID:20133725

  7. Laboratory evaluation of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of resin materials to acid-conditioned enamel is a clinically proven technique in preventative, restorative, and orthodontic procedures. Laboratory evaluations of etched-enamel resin bonding have shown excellent bond strengths and the virtual elimination of marginal microleakage. Adhesion to dentin has been more of a challenge. Earlier-generation dentin bonding systems did not yield high bond strengths in the laboratory or prevent marginal microleakage. Newer-generation adhesive systems generally use a dentin conditioner to modify or remove the smear layer and a subsequent application of an adhesive resin bonding agent. Laboratory evaluations of newer systems have shown bond strengths that approach or actually exceed that of etched enamel resin bonding. Bond strengths have improved with the evolution of dentin bonding systems, and microleakage from the cementum/dentin margin has been significantly reduced or prevented with the newer systems. Although laboratory testing of adhesive systems provides a mechanism to screen and compare newly developed systems, clinical trials are essential to document long-term clinical performance. PMID:1470553

  8. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE NON-THERMAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT HESS J1731-347

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Puehlhofer, Gerd; Klochkov, Dmitry; Acero, Fabio; Li Zhiyuan; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl

    2012-09-10

    A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N{sub H} of (1.0-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

  9. Suzaku Observations of the Non-thermal Supernova Remnant HESS J1731-347

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Aya; Pühlhofer, Gerd; Acero, Fabio; Klochkov, Dmitry; Tian, Wenwu; Yamazaki, Ryo; Li, Zhiyuan; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl; Komin, Nukri

    2012-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index Γ of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N H of (1.0-2.1) × 1022 cm-2. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

  10. A GeV Source in the Direction of Supernova Remnant CTB 37B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu-Liang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most attractive candidates for the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. We report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission with the Pass 8 events recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the vicinity of the shell-type SNR CTB 37B that is likely associated with the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1713-381. The photon spectrum of CTB 37B is consistent with a power law with an index of 1.89 ± 0.08 in the energy range of 0.5-500 GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1713-381 at a few hundred GeV. No significant spatial extension and time variation are detected. The multi-wavelength data can be well fitted with either a leptonic model or a hadronic one. However, parameters of both models suggest more efficient particle acceleration than typical SNRs. Meanwhile, the X-ray and γ-ray spectral properties of CTB 37B show that it is an interesting source bridging young SNRs dominated by non-thermal emission and old SNRs interacting with molecular clouds.

  11. HESS J1640-465 - an exceptionally luminous TeV γ-ray supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reyes, R. de los; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-04-01

    The results of follow-up observations of the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1640-465 from 2004 to 2011 with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) are reported in this work. The spectrum is well described by an exponential cut-off power law with photon index Γ = 2.11 ± 0.09stat ± 0.10sys, and a cut-off energy of E_c = 6.0^{+2.0}_{-1.2} TeV. The TeV emission is significantly extended and overlaps with the northwestern part of the shell of the SNR G338.3-0.0. The new HESS results, a re-analysis of archival XMM-Newton data and multiwavelength observations suggest that a significant part of the γ-ray emission from HESS J1640-465 originates in the supernova remnant shell. In a hadronic scenario, as suggested by the smooth connection of the GeV and TeV spectra, the product of total proton energy and mean target density could be as high as WpnH ˜ 4 × 1052(d/10kpc)2 erg cm-3.

  12. Detailed studies of shock-cloud interaction toward the young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, H.; Fukui, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In young supernova remnants (SNRs; ˜2000 yrs), the study of the interaction between the shock waves and the inhomogeneous interstellar gas is a key element in understanding the SNR evolution, cosmic-ray acceleration, and multi-wavelength emission. In particular, TeV γ-ray and synchrotron X-ray bright SNRs, RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, and N132D have been considered good candidates for an efficient cosmic-ray accelerator via shock-cloud interaction (Sano et al. 2013, 2015a; Fukui 2013). In RXJ1713, we performed imaging and spectral analysis of the Suzaku X-rays and compared it with the interstellar gas distribution (Sano et al. 2013; 2015b). The shock interaction with dense gas clumps enhances turbulence and magnetic fields up to mG around the clumps, which was observed as limb-brightening of the synchrotron X-rays and hard spectra with photon indexes of less than 2.4. Moreover, turbulence and magnetic field amplifications may promote an additional acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons. In contrast, the synchrotron X-rays also become bright toward diffuse gas regions due to the high shock velocity. In this talk, we introduce the recent results of shock-cloud interaction toward RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, and N132D using the Suzaku, XMM-Newton, Chandra X-rays, and interstellar gas datasets.

  13. Detailed Infrared views of the shock-cloud interactions in the supernova remnant HB 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Koo, Bon-Chul; Burton, Michael; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Moon, Dae-Sik

    HB 21 (G89.0+4.7) is a nearby (˜ 1 kpc), large (120 ×90 ), middle-aged (˜ 7000 yr) supernova remnant, whose interaction with nearby molecular clouds is known. We observed two specific regions (˜ 10 × 10 ), where the shock-cloud interactions are thought to be under way, with the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI. InfraRed Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI obtained several images at nearand mid-infrared wavebands (3, 4, 7, 11, 15, and 24 µm). Those images show diffuse filamentary features, together with some clumpy features, mainly in the 7, 11, and 15 µm bands. These features are generally consistent with those seen in H2 v = 1 → 0 S(1) 2.122 µm image. We analyzed the color ratios of the features in the IRC images using theoretically calculated emission lines from shocked H2 gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium and statistical equilibrium. The results show that the observed color-ratios are well described by power-law mixtures of H2 gas temperature, and that the degree of mixture varies from region to region (power-law index 4.0). Based on observations with AKARI, a JAXA project with the participation of ESA.

  14. An Optical Search For Supernova Remnants in NGC 2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonick, David M.; Fesen, Robert A.; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.

    1997-12-01

    We present the results of an optical search for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Scd galaxy NGC 2403 using image and spectral observations of a ~8' × 8' field covering nearly all of this galaxy. Our SNR identification technique consisted of constructing continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] λλ6716, 6731 images, obtaining spectra of a few [S II]-bright emission nebulae found in these images, and then using the [S II]/Hα ratios obtained from these spectra to correct the image [S II]/Hα ratios. Thirty-five emission nebulae with [S II]/Hα >= 0.45 were identified as SNRs and have diameters of 20-200 pc, reddening-corrected Hα intensities of 2.2 × 10-15 to 1.4 × 10-13 ergs cm-2 s-1, [S II]/Hα ratios of 0.45-1.11, and a variety of optical morphologies (shell, arc, and filled). Spectra of 15 of these remnants were obtained and are presented. The two NGC 2403 SNRs previously identified by D'Odorico, Dopita, & Benvenuti were among the 35 SNRs detected. Our final NGC 2403 SNR sample appears biased against detecting large, faint remnants, and no SNRs were detected inside bright H II regions. An examination of the [S II]/Hα values for all the nebulae measured in NGC 2403 shows no sharp dividing line between SNRs and H II regions, similar to what was found in M31, NGC 300, and NGC 7793 (Walterbos & Braun; Blair & Long). We estimate roughly that there are about 4 times more SNRs in NGC 2403 than we detected, which, assuming the observable lifetime of a SNR is ~20,000 yr, yields a crude rate of 1 SN in 150 yr. Analysis of the 15 SNR spectra show a detectable nitrogen gradient, a larger scatter in oxygen abundances than in nitrogen, and a lower mean oxygen abundance than from published H II region data, all of which have been seen in previous SNR studies of other galaxies. Based in part on research done at the Michigan-Dartmouth-M.I.T. (MDM) Observatory, operated by the University of Michigan, Dartmouth College, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  15. Supernova remnant masers: Shock interactions with molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John William

    Maser emission from the 1720-MHz transition of hydroxyl(OH) has identified shock interactions in 10% of all supernova remnants(SNRs). Such maser-emitting SNRs are also bright in molecular line emission. Though somewhat rare, SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds are an important class in which to study cosmic ray acceleration, SNR evolution, and effects on the energetics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. To study molecular shocks via a multiwavelength approach, the VLA, GBT, Spitzer Space Telescope have been used in the following ways: (i) With the GBT widespread OH(1720 MHz) emission and absorption in other OH lines is observed across the interaction site. Observations of all four ground-state transitions at 1720, 1667/5 and 1612 MHz allows us to model OH excitation, yielding the temperature, density and OH abundance in the post-shock gas. Maser emission is found to have a higher flux density with the GBT than with high-resolution VLA observations for 10 of 15 observed remnants, suggesting maser emission is present on large spatial scales. (ii) Sensitive VLA observations of select SNRs (W44, IC 443, Kes 69, 3C 391, G357.7+0.3) reveal the nature of enhanced 1720 MHz emission. Numerous weak compact masers as well as diffuse extended emission are detected tracing the shock-front. Zeeman splitting of masers permits the post-shock magnetic field strength and the line of sight field direction to be directly measured. (iii) Rotational lines of molecular hydrogen are detected at the position of several masers with Spitzer IRS spectroscopy between 5 and 35 mm. Excitation of the hydrogen lines requires the passage of a C-type shock through dense molecular gas, in agreement with the conditions derived from OH excitation. The presence of bright ionic lines requires multiple shocks present at the interaction site. (iv) A new survey for SNR-masers has identified four new interacting SNRs within 10 degrees of the Galactic Center. Maser-emitting SNRs are found to

  16. Shear bond strength of rebonded brackets after removal of adhesives with Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Katsuyuki; Endo, Toshiya; Shinkai, Koichi; Katoh, Yoshiroh

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to examine the bond strength of rebonded orthodontic brackets after adhesive residuals on the surface of the bracket bases were removed by Er,Cr:YSGG lasers. Seventy-six brackets bonded to premolars with a self-etching primer adhesive system were equally divided into four groups after the first debonding with the bracket bases (Group 1) untreated, and treated by (Group 2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser, (Group 3) sandblaster, and (Group 4) Er,Cr:YSGG laser/sandblaster. The treated brackets were rebonded to the new premolars in the same manner as the first-stage experiment. The shear bond strengths were measured, with the bonding/debonding procedures repeated once after the first debonding, and the bracket/adhesive failure modes were evaluated after each debonding. The treated bracket base surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean rebond strengths were significantly lower in group 1 than in other groups, and there were no significant differences between the other groups. The mean initial bond strength was significantly higher than the mean rebond strength in group 1 but there was no significant difference between the two in the other three groups. Failures at the bracket-adhesive interface occurred frequently at second debonding in group 1. Under the SEM, residual adhesive was removed from the bracket bases by Er,Cr:YSGG laser, while adhesive remnant was seen underneath the meshwork of the bracket bases and microroughness appeared on the meshwork after sandblasting. Er,Cr:YSGG laser certainly could serve the purpose of promoting the use of recycled orthodontic brackets. PMID:21553071

  17. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  18. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  19. Liposome adhesion generates traction stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael P.; Voituriez, Raphaël; Joanny, Jean-François; Nassoy, Pierre; Sykes, Cécile; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells modulate global shape changes required for essential life processes, such as polarization, division and spreading. Although the contribution of the cytoskeleton to cellular force generation is widely recognized, the role of the membrane is considered to be restricted to passively transmitting forces. Therefore, the mechanisms by which the membrane can directly contribute to cell tension are overlooked and poorly understood. To address this, we directly measure the stresses generated during liposome adhesion. We find that liposome spreading generates large traction stresses on compliant substrates. These stresses can be understood as the equilibration of internal, hydrostatic pressures generated by the enhanced membrane tension built up during adhesion. These results underscore the role of membranes in the generation of mechanical stresses on cellular length scales and that the modulation of hydrostatic pressure due to membrane tension and adhesion can be channelled to perform mechanical work on the environment.

  20. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  1. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  2. Unilateral hypoplastic kidney and ureter associated with diverse mesonephric remnant hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Jerome, Jean-Gilles; Wu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Mesonephric remnants have been rarely reported in the genitourinary system and sometimes impose a diagnostic challenge both clinically and pathologically. We reported a case of mesonephric remnant hyperplasia with mixed acinar/tubular and epididymis/vas deferens-like morphologies occurring in the renal parenchyma of a unilateral hypoplastic kidney, which has not been previously described. PMID:26309900

  3. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  4. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  5. Radio observations of supernova remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least ˜ 1014 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  6. Type Ia supernova remnants: shaping by iron bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsebrenko, Danny; Soker, Noam

    2015-10-01

    Using 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of Type Ia supernova remnants (SNR Ia) we show that iron clumps few times denser than the rest of the SN ejecta might form protrusions in an otherwise spherical SNR. Such protrusions exist in some SNR Ia, e.g. SNR 1885 and Tycho. Iron clumps are expected to form in the deflagration to detonation explosion model. In SNR Ia where there are two opposite protrusions, termed `ears', such as Kepler's SNR and SNR G1.9+0.3, our scenario implies that the dense clumps, or iron bullets, were formed along an axis. Such a preferred axis can result from a rotating white dwarf progenitor. If our claim holds, this offers an important clue to the SN Ia explosion scenario.

  7. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  8. Phosphorus in the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Moon, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Raymond, John C

    2013-12-13

    Phosphorus ((31)P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here, we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ((56)Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. PMID:24337291

  9. Thrombin A-Chain: Activation Remnant or Allosteric Effector?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Isis S. R.; Vanden Hoek, Amanda L.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although prothrombin is one of the most widely studied enzymes in biology, the role of the thrombin A-chain has been neglected in comparison to the other domains. This paper summarizes the current data on the prothrombin catalytic domain A-chain region and the subsequent thrombin A-chain. Attention is given to biochemical characterization of naturally occurring prothrombin A-chain mutations and alanine scanning mutants in this region. While originally considered to be simply an activation remnant with little physiologic function, the thrombin A-chain is now thought to play a role as an allosteric effector in enzymatic reactions and may also be a structural scaffold to stabilize the protease domain. PMID:22084659

  10. Historical Supernova Explosions in Our Galaxy and Their Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David A.

    Supernova explosions mark the end points of stellar evolution, releasing large amounts of material and energy into the interstellar medium. In our Galaxy the expected rate of supernovae is about 1 in every 50 years or so, although it is only the relatively nearby ones that are expected to be visible optically, due to obscuration. Over the last two thousand years or so there are historical records of nine Galactic supernovae. The majority of these records are from East Asia (i.e. China, Japan and Korea), although the most recent historical supernovae have European records, and there are a variety of Arabic records also available for some events. Here I review these records of the historical supernovae, and the modern observations of the supernova remnants that they have produced.

  11. The Likely Fermi Detection of the Supernova Remnant SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2016-05-01

    We report the likely detection of γ-ray emission from the northeast shell region of the historical supernova remnant (SNR) SN 1006. Having analyzed seven years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Pass 8 data for the region of SN 1006, we found a GeV gamma-ray source detected with ∼ 4σ significance. Both the position and spectrum of the source match those of HESS J1504‑418, respectively, which is TeV emission from SN 1006. Considering the source as the GeV γ-ray counterpart to SN 1006, the broadband spectral energy distribution is found to be approximately consistent with the leptonic scenario that has been proposed for the TeV emission from the SNR. Our result has likely confirmed the previous study of the SNRs with TeV shell-like morphology: SN 1006 is one of them sharing very similar peak luminosity and spectral shape.

  12. NGC 2419-Another Remnant of Accretion by the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Kirby, Evan N.; Simon, Joshua D.; Geha, Marla

    2010-12-01

    We isolate a sample of 43 upper red giant branch stars in the extreme outer halo Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419 from two Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. The probability that there is more than one contaminating halo field star in this sample is extremely low. Analysis of moderate-resolution spectra of these cluster members, as well as of our Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectra of a subsample of them, demonstrates that there is a small but real spread in Ca abundance of ~0.2 dex within this massive metal-poor GC. This provides additional support to earlier suggestions that NGC 2419 is the remnant of a dwarf galaxy accreted long ago by the Milky Way. Based in part on observations obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. Remnant group of local Lorentz transformations in f (T ) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Rafael; Fiorini, Franco

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the extended teleparallel gravitational theories, known as f (T ) theories, inherit some on shell local Lorentz invariance associated with the tetrad field defining the spacetime structure. We discuss some enlightening examples, such as Minkowski spacetime and cosmological (Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I) manifolds. In the first case, we show that the absence of gravity reveals itself as an incapability in the selection of a preferred parallelization at a local level, due to the fact that the infinitesimal local Lorentz subgroup acts as a symmetry group of the frame characterizing Minkowski spacetime. Finite transformations are also discussed in these examples and, contrary to the common lore on the subject, we conclude that the set of tetrads responsible for the parallelization of these manifolds is quite vast and that the remnant group of local Lorentz transformations includes one- and two-dimensional Abelian subgroups of the Lorentz group.

  14. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  15. New Candidates for Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    We propose observations of five new candidates for X-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which were detected in ROSAT data and classified as SNR candidates based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. Five sources have already been observed (AO9 and AO12, Prop. IDs 65188 and 72044; AO11, VLP-LMC survey) and confirm the reliability of our candidate selection. The high sensitivity of XMM-Newton will allow us to detect SNRs that are X-ray faint due to their age or ambient medium, and complete the sample of known SNRs to lower fluxes. We will thus be able to perform statistical studies by, e.g., constructing a more complete X-ray luminosity function of SNRs in the LMC and will obtain information about typical abundances, densities, and initial supernova energies.

  16. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  17. SN1987A: The Birth of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This grant was intended to support the development of theoretical models needed to interpret and understand the observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray telescope of the rapidly developing remnant of Supernova 1987A. In addition, we carried out a few investigations of related topics. The project was spectacularly successful. The models that we developed provide the definitive framework for predicting and interpreting this phenomenon. Following is a list of publications based on our work. Some of these papers include results of both theoretical modeling supported by this project and also analysis of data supported by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We first list papers published in refereed journals, then conference proceedings and book chapters, and also an educational web site.

  18. High-Resolution Polarimetry of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Mufson, S. L.; Dickel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Reported here are high-resolution 6 cm measurements of the adolescent supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 69 made with the hybrid BnC configuration of the Very Large Array. Several three-field mosaics of the polarized and total intensity have been used to study this SNR. These investigations lead to a coherent picture of this region. The expanding shock defines an outer rim of high total intensity, suggesting the front is running into large dense clouds with random magnetic field directions. The SNR consists of predominantly of two types of regions, those with high total and relatively weak polarized emission and those with relatively weak total and strong polarized emission. This morphology can be generally explained by the number of clouds with organized magnetic field along the line of sight. Within this SNR there are regions where the field is varying from radial to tangential. As the SN shock encounters clouds, magnetic fields within clouds will strongly affect cloud dynamics.

  19. Free at Last: AN Energetic Pulsar Escapes its Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, Fernando

    2002-09-01

    PSR J1016-5857 is a young and energetic pulsar located just outside the supernova remnant (SNR) G284.3-1.8. The morphology of the system argues that the pulsar has a high space velocity, and has caught up with and now overtaken its associated SNR. We have identified an EINSTEIN source, which in the above hypothesis is likely to be a cometary nebula powered by the pulsar. We here propose a short CHANDRA observation of this X-ray source to determine whether it is indeed associated with the pulsar. With the resulting morphological data, we can confirm or refute the pulsar/SNR association, and can probe the pulsar's spin history and interaction with its environment.

  20. EVOLUTION OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAYS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ryoko; Bamba, Aya; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ishida, Manabu; Kohri, Kazunori

    2012-02-20

    A systematic study of the synchrotron X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) has been conducted. We selected a total of 12 SNRs whose synchrotron X-ray spectral parameters are available in the literature with reasonable accuracy and studied how their luminosities change as a function of radius. It is found that the synchrotron X-ray luminosity tends to drop especially when the SNRs become larger than {approx}5 pc, despite large scatter. This may be explained by the change of spectral shape caused by the decrease of the synchrotron roll-off energy. A simple evolutionary model of the X-ray luminosity is proposed and is found to reproduce the observed data approximately, with reasonable model parameters. According to the model, the total energy of accelerated electrons is estimated to be 10{sup 47-48} erg, which is well below the supernova explosion energy. The maximum energies of accelerated electrons and protons are also discussed.

  1. 1. Remnants of the last lock on the George Washington ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Remnants of the last lock on the George Washington 'Potowmack Canal, just before the barge entered the Potomac River. The latter can be seen through the foliage of the tree which has grown up in the old canal bed. On the left hand side of the photograph, not shown here in its entirety, are the old iron studdings which held the gates, to permit the barges to pass easily into the river. On the right hand side of the photograph is shown the crumbling remains of the lock with their receased oval space clearly shown, into which the lock gate retrieved when the barge was lowered to the next level. The depth from the spot where the individual is shown pointing to the top of the lock, is about 24 or 25 ft., and the canal has been filled up with broken ... - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal, Locks No. 3, 4, 5, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  2. Supernova remnants, planetary nebulae and the distance to NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E.; MacKenty, John; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Frogel, Jay A.; O'Connell, Robert; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Walker, Alistair R.; Silk, Joe; Sirianni, Marco; Trauger, John; Windhorst, Rogier; Young, Erick

    2010-11-01

    We present narrow band, continuum subtracted H α, [S ii], H β, [O iii] and [O ii] data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4214. From these images, we identify seventeen new planetary nebula candidates, and seven supernova remnant candidates. We use the observed emission line luminosity function of the planetary nebulae to establish a new velocity-independent distance to NGC 4214. We conclude that the PNLF technique gives a reddening independent distance to NGC 4214 of 3.19±0.36 Mpc, and that our current best-estimate of the distance to this galaxy ids 2.98±0.13 Mpc.

  3. Remnant Pacemaker Lead Tips after Lead Extractions in Pacemaker Infections.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Yong-Soo; Lee, Misol; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Joung, Boyoung

    2016-07-01

    Complete hardware removal is recommended in the case of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections. However, the complete extraction of chronically implanted leads is not always achieved. The outcomes and optimal management of CIED infections with retained material after lead extractions have not been elucidated. In this case report, we present five patients with CIED infections with remnant lead tips even after lead extractions. Two patients had localized pocket infections, and were managed with antibiotics for a period of more than two weeks. The other three patients had infective endocarditis, and were managed with antibiotics for a period of more than four weeks. In one patient, the lead tip migrated to the right pulmonary artery, but did not produce any symptoms or complications. Only one of five patients experienced a resurgence of an infection. PMID:27482268

  4. NON-MAXWELLIAN Halpha PROFILES IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Winkler, P. Frank; Blair, William P.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook E-mail: winkler@middlebury.ed E-mail: lee.j.joon@gmail.co

    2010-04-01

    The broad components of the Halpha lines in most non-radiative shocks can be fit with single-Gaussian components. We have obtained a high-quality spectrum of a position in Tycho's supernova remnant with the MMT and Blue Channel Spectrograph which shows, for the first time, that a single Gaussian does not provide an acceptable fit. This implies that a single temperature Maxwellian particle velocity distribution cannot produce the emission. Possible alternative explanations are explored, including multiple shocks along the line of sight, a pickup ion contribution, a non-thermal tail (Kappa distribution), emission from a precursor in a cosmic ray modified shock, or turbulence. An Hubble Space Telescope image shows a bright knot that might account for a low temperature contribution, and all the possibilities probably contribute at some level. We discuss the implications of each explanation for the shock parameters and physics of collisionless shocks, but cannot conclusively rule out any of them.

  5. Automatic template-guided classification of remnant trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Peter

    Spectral features within satellite images change so frequently and unpredictably that spectral definitions of land cover are often only accurate for a single image. Consequently, land-cover maps are expensive, because the superior pattern recognition skills of human analysts are required to manually tune spectral definitions of land cover to individual images. To reduce mapping costs, this study developed the Template-Guided Classification (TGC) algorithm, which classifies land cover automatically by reusing class information embedded in freely available large-area land-cover maps. TGC was applied to map remnant forest within six 10-m resolution SPOT images of the Vermilion River watershed in Alberta, Canada. Although the accuracy of the resulting forest maps was low (58 % forest user's accuracy and 67 % forest producer's accuracy), there were 25 % and 8 % fewer errors of omission and commission than the original maps, respectively. This improvement would be very useful if it could be obtained automatically over large-areas.

  6. Intermediate-age globular clusters in four galaxy merger remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Trancho, Gelys; Miller, Bryan W.; Schweizer, François; Burdett, Daniel P.; Palamara, David

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of combining Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry with ground-based K{sub s} -band photometry from the Gemini imagers NIRI and FLAMINGOS-I to study the globular cluster (GC) populations in four early-type galaxies that are candidate remnants of recent mergers (NGC 1700, NGC 2865, NGC 4382, and NGC 7727). These galaxies were chosen based on their blue colors and fine structure, such as shells and ripples that are indicative of past interactions. We fit the combined VIK{sub s} GC data with simple toy models of mixed cluster populations that contain three subpopulations of different age and metallicity. The fits, done via chi-squared mapping of the parameter space, yield clear evidence for the presence of intermediate-age clusters in each galaxy. We find that the ages of ∼1-2 Gyr for these GC subpopulations are consistent with the previously estimated merger ages for the host galaxies.

  7. What Are the Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2002-04-01

    Recent Chandra observations of the compact central objects in supernova remnants have shown puzzling results that do not seem to be consistent with either black holes or neutron stars. (See e.g. Pavlov, Sanwal, Garmire and Zavlin, astro-ph-0112322.) In particular, the inferred effective emitting surface is too small to be the entire surface of a neutron star, but too bright to be a black hole. We discuss the possibility that these compact objects might be red holes instead of black holes or neutron stars. Red holes, which occur in alternate theories of gravity, naturally predict both the greater brightness of the emissions and the smaller effective size of the emitting surface from a collapsed object of the appropriate mass.

  8. Remnant Pacemaker Lead Tips after Lead Extractions in Pacemaker Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Yong-Soo; Lee, Misol; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Complete hardware removal is recommended in the case of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections. However, the complete extraction of chronically implanted leads is not always achieved. The outcomes and optimal management of CIED infections with retained material after lead extractions have not been elucidated. In this case report, we present five patients with CIED infections with remnant lead tips even after lead extractions. Two patients had localized pocket infections, and were managed with antibiotics for a period of more than two weeks. The other three patients had infective endocarditis, and were managed with antibiotics for a period of more than four weeks. In one patient, the lead tip migrated to the right pulmonary artery, but did not produce any symptoms or complications. Only one of five patients experienced a resurgence of an infection. PMID:27482268

  9. Shock Velocity Variations in Supernova Remnant Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. P.; Carroll, J. J., III; Smith, T. B.; Reisig, H. N.; Glendinning, S. G.; Estabrook, K.; Remington, B. A.; Wallace, R.; McCray, R.

    1998-11-01

    We are studying the hydrodynamic behavior of a laboratory system that is a good scaled model of young supernova remnants. The hydrodynamic effects are driven by a supersonic flow, produced by the Nova laser. It does this by driving a strong shock, produced by x-ray ablation, out the back of a plastic slab. The ejecta expand, accelerate, cool, and then impact a low-density foam. There the ejecta stagnate and form a reverse shock while driving a strong shock forward through the foam. We observe this hydrodynamic assembly by x-ray radiography. The shock velocities in one case agree with those found by a computer simulation, while in another case they do not. We will report our investigation of this discrepancy. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under LLNL LDRD-ER Grant No. 97-ERD-022 and by the University of Michigan.)

  10. TWO-STEP ACCELERATION MODEL OF COSMIC RAYS AT MIDDLE-AGED SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: UNIVERSALITY IN SECONDARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be M{approx_equal} 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This 'two-step' acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  11. Two-step Acceleration Model of Cosmic Rays at Middle-aged Supernova Remnants: Universality in Secondary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be Msime 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This "two-step" acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  12. Comparing supernova remnants around strongly magnetized and canonical pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; Papitto, A.

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the strong magnetic fields measured in magnetars is one of the main uncertainties in the neutron star field. On the other hand, the recent discovery of a large number of such strongly magnetized neutron stars is calling for more investigation on their formation. The first proposed model for the formation of such strong magnetic fields in magnetars was through alpha-dynamo effects on the rapidly rotating core of a massive star. Other scenarios involve highly magnetic massive progenitors that conserve their strong magnetic moment into the core after the explosion, or a common envelope phase of a massive binary system. In this work, we do a complete re-analysis of the archival X-ray emission of the supernova remnants (SNRs) surrounding magnetars, and compare our results with all other bright X-ray emitting SNRs, which are associated with compact central objects (which are proposed to have magnetar-like B-fields buried in the crust by strong accretion soon after their formation), high-B pulsars and normal pulsars. We find that emission lines in SNRs hosting highly magnetic neutron stars do not differ significantly in elements or ionization state from those observed in other SNRs, neither averaging on the whole remnants, nor studying different parts of their total spatial extent. Furthermore, we find no significant evidence that the total X-ray luminosities of SNRs hosting magnetars, are on average larger than that of typical young X-ray SNRs. Although biased by a small number of objects, we found that for a similar age, there is the same percentage of magnetars showing a detectable SNR than for the normal pulsar population.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  14. POPULATION III STARS AND REMNANTS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Wise, John H. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu

    2013-08-20

    Recent simulations of Population III star formation have suggested that some fraction form in binary systems, in addition to having a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. The deaths of metal-free stars result in the initial chemical enrichment of the universe and the production of the first stellar-mass black holes. Here we present a cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulation of an overdense region that forms a few 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter halos and over 13,000 Population III stars by redshift 15. We find that most halos do not form Population III stars until they reach M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} because this biased region is quickly enriched from both Population III and galaxies, which also produce high levels of ultraviolet radiation that suppress H{sub 2} formation. Nevertheless, Population III stars continue to form, albeit in more massive halos, at a rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at redshift 15. The most massive starless halo has a mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, which could host massive black hole formation through the direct gaseous collapse scenario. We show that the multiplicity of the Population III remnants grows with halo mass above 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, culminating in 50 remnants located in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} halos on average. This has implications that high-mass X-ray binaries and intermediate-mass black holes that originate from metal-free stars may be abundant in high-redshift galaxies.

  15. An Optical Search For Supernova Remnants in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonick, D. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Blair, W. P.; Long, K. S.

    1994-12-01

    Imaging with narrow-band Hα , [S II], and red continuum filters has been used to distinguish supernova remnant (SNR) candidates from photoionized nebulae in seven nearby spiral galaxies: NGC 2403, NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 5194 (M51), NGC 5204, NGC 5457 (M101), NGC 5585, and NGC 6946. Nebulae which show [S II]/Hα > 0.45, indicating shock-heated emission, are identified as SNR candidates. The number of SNRs found in each galaxy using this technique is 3 in NGC 5204, 5 in NGC 5585, 30 in NGC 2403, 32 in M81, 35 in NGC 6946, and 112 in M101. Spectra of some of the emission nebulae have also been obtained, and were used to confirm SNR identifications. Because of its comparatively high radial velocity, M51 could not be examined adequately with our filter set; however, one bright SNR was found and spectroscopically confirmed. In NGC 2403, we obtained spectra on remnant candidates 1 and 2 of D'Odorico et al. (1980, A&AS, 40, 67), and confirmed them to be SNRs. We also detect the optical SNR identified by Blair & Fesen (1994, ApJ, 424, L103) in NGC 6946, and find an optical SNR counterpart to the X-ray source S2 identified by Schlegel (1994, ApJ, 424, L99). Sizes of observed SNRs range from unresolved (< 50 pc) to over 300x150 pc for one object in NGC 5585. Although our search technique limits our detection of SNRs embedded in bright H II regions, in the galaxies with clearly defined spiral arms (i.e NGC 6946, M81, M101), most SNRs appear to trace the spiral arms. Analysis of luminosity functions, diameters, abundances, and distributions of the samples of SNRs will also be discussed.

  16. The Extraordinary Supernova Remnant in NGC 4449 Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Winkler, P. Frank

    2015-01-01

    NGC 4449, a Magellanic-type irregular galaxy at a distance of about 4 Mpc, contains the most luminous known supernova remnant (SNR) in both X-ray and optical bands. Its optical spectrum is characterized by broad lines from O, Ne, S, Ar, and Ca, and its size and expansion velocity (6000 km/s) suggest that the unobserved SN exploded about 65 years ago. The remnant¹s extraordinary brightness can be attributed to the interaction of supernova ejecta with unusually dense and extensive circumstellar material. We will present new Chandra imaging, together with UV/Optical spectra of the SNR from HST/STIS and the MMT. The X-ray luminosity of the SNR is less than when it was detected with Einstein in 1980, but the luminosity and X-ray spectral shape have remained relatively constant over the last 10 years. In the FUV, the HST spectra show for the first time broad line emission from C IV 1550 Å, as well as Si IV + O IV at 1400 Å and O III] at 1660 Å. The new NUV and optical spectra are fairly similar to earlier HST/FOS spectra and to ground-based spectra we have obtained over the last decade. Here we describe these new observations, and our attempts to understand the nature of the progenitor of the SNR.We acknowledge support for this effort from NASA through grant GO-12462 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc, under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and through Chandra Award Number GO9-0075, issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, under NASA contract NAS8-03060.

  17. New Candidate Supernova Remnants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Lewinter, R.

    1992-12-01

    We have surveyed six 30(') times 30(') fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the Curtis Schmidt telescope at CTIO with a Thomson CCD, to search for previously undetected supernova remnants (SNRs). Narrow-band images are obtained in lines of [S II] (lambda lambda \\ 6716,31), Hα , and a nearby continuum band. The ratio of [S II]/Hα \\ emission discriminates well between shock-heated material charcteristic of SNRs and photo-ionized material such as H II regions. This technique has proved highly effective in surveys of other galaxies (e.g. Long et al., Ap J Supp, 72, 61). Deep emission-line images and a continuum band closely matched in wavelength enable us to subtract virtually the entire stellar contribution and thus achieve high sensitivity to faint, diffuse emission. We have identified 13 objects, all of which have [S II]/Hα \\ ratios > 0.4\\ and a full or partial shell-like morphology, making them extremely strong SNR candidates. Several other diffuse objects have high [S II]/Hα \\ ratios, and many of these may also be SNRs. Compared with the 12 previously known remnants of Mathewson et al., (Ap J Supp 51, 345; 55, 189), the new candidates are generally larger and have lower surface brightness. An investigation of the cumulative number vs diameter relation for our larger sample indicates a slope significantly steeper than the value near unity originally found by Mathewson et al., and is more consistent with standard models for SNR evolution. Selection effects may well have led to an excess of small, bright objects in the earlier samples. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-9114935 and by the W.M. Keck Foundation through the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium.

  18. Supernova Remnants in the Most Fertile Galaxy: NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.

    2014-08-01

    As the host to more recorded supernovae (nine in the past century) than any other galaxy, ngal is a unique venue for studying young (and old) supernova remnants (SNRs). Using deep emission-line images of ngal we obtained from WIYN, we have identified 148 new emission nebulae through their high S II:Hα ratios, indicating that they are strong SNR candidates. This is over 5 times as many as have previously been identified; yet of the 175 total objects, only 6 have been spectroscopically confirmed. We propose multislit spectroscopy from GMOS-N to study the majority of those with no spectra to date. Some 26 are essentially unresolved in our images (diameters ≲ 1 arcsec=27 pc at ngal) and hence probably are relatively young. Several are also coincident with soft X-ray sources (a further indicator of youthful vigor) and have strong O III emission. Some may be rare, ejecta- dominated core-collapse SNRs akin to Cas A, where ``fresh" nucleosynthesis products can be seen. Only spectroscopy, to look for broad emission lines from fast-moving ejecta, can confirm this. We will include spectra of two of the nine recorded SNe in ngal-the first late-time spectrum of SN 2004et, and the first of SN 1980K with high signal-to-noise-adding to the extremely small number of spectra for SNRs only a few decades old. Finally we will use the H II:Hα ratio in a large number of ISM-dominated SNRs to map the N abundance and its gradient across the disk of ngal, and we will use archival HST images to identify the stellar environments that produced the SNe whose remnants we see today.

  19. Supernova remnant W49B and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Zuo, P. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    We study gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) W49B and its environment using recent radio and infrared data. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low resolution data of W49B shows shocked excitation lines of H{sub 2} (0,0) S(0)-S(7) from the SNR-molecular cloud interaction. The H{sub 2} gas is composed of two components with temperatures of ∼260 K and ∼1060 K, respectively. Various spectral lines from atomic and ionic particles are detected toward W49B. We suggest that the ionic phase has an electron density of ∼500 cm{sup –3} and a temperature of ∼10{sup 4} K by the spectral line diagnoses. The mid- and far-infrared data from MSX, Spitzer, and Herschel reveal a 151 ± 20 K hot dust component with a mass of 7.5 ± 6.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} and a 45 ± 4 K warm dust component with a mass of 6.4 ± 3.2 M {sub ☉}. The hot dust is likely from materials swept up by the shock of W49B. The warm dust may possibly originate from the evaporation of clouds interacting with W49B. We build the H I absorption spectra of W49B and four nearby H II regions (W49A, G42.90+0.58, G42.43-0.26, and G43.19-0.53) and study the relation between W49B and the surrounding molecular clouds by employing the 2.12 μm infrared and CO data. We therefore obtain a kinematic distance of ∼10 kpc for W49B and suggest that the remnant is likely associated with the CO cloud at about 40 km s{sup –1}.

  20. A 3-dimensional Analysis of the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isensee, Karl

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the nearby supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Easily resolvable supernova remnants such as Cas A provide a unique opportunity to test supernova explosion models. Additionally, we can observe key processes in the interstellar medium as the ejecta from the initial explosion encounter Cas A's powerful shocks. In order to accomplish these science goals, we used the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph to create a high resolution spectral map of select regions of Cas A, allowing us to make a Doppler reconstruction of its 3-dimensional structure structure. In the center of the remnant, we find relatively pristine ejecta that have not yet reached Cas A's reverse shock or interacted with the circumstellar environment. We observe O, Si, and S emission. These ejecta can form both sheet-like structures as well as filaments. Si and O, which come from different nucleosynthetic layers of the star, are observed to be coincident in some regions, and separated by >500 km s -1 in others. Observed ejecta traveling toward us are, on average, ˜800 km s -1 slower than the material traveling away from us. We compare our observations to recent supernova explosion models and find that no single model can simultaneously reproduce all the observed features. However, models of different supernova explosions can collectively produce the observed geometries and structures of the emission interior to Cas A's reverse shock. We use the results from the models to address the conditions during the supernova explosion, concentrating on asymmetries in the shock structure. We also predict that the back surface of Cassiopeia A will begin brightening in ∼30 years, and the front surface in ˜100 years. We then used similar observations from 3 regions on Cas A's reverse shock in order to create more 3-dimensional maps. In these regions, we observe supernova ejecta both immediately before and during the shock-ejecta interaction. We determine that the

  1. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins. PMID:18727911

  2. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  3. New adhesive withstands temperature extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Seidenberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive, developed for high-temperature components aboard satellites, is useful at both high and low temperatures and exhibits low-vacuum volatility and low shrinkage. System uses polyfunctional epoxy with high aromatic content, low equivalent weight, and more compact polymer than conventional bisphenol A tape.

  4. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  5. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  6. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  7. Microfluidic adhesion induced by subsurface microstructures.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2007-10-12

    Natural adhesives in the feet of different arthropods and vertebrates show strong adhesion as well as excellent reusability. Whereas the hierarchical structures on the surface are known to have a substantial effect on adhesion, the role of subsurface structures such as the network of microchannels has not been studied. Inspired by these bioadhesives, we generated elastomeric layers with embedded air- or oil-filled microchannels. These adhesives showed remarkable enhancement of adhesion ( approximately 30 times), which results from the crack-arresting properties of the microchannels, together with the surface stresses caused by the capillary force. The importance of the thickness of the adhesive layer, channel diameter, interchannel spacing, and vertical position within the adhesive has been examined for developing an optimal design of this microfluidic adhesive. PMID:17932295

  8. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  9. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  10. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  11. KSC Construction Cost Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center cost Index aids in conceptual design cost estimates. Report discusses development of KSC Cost Index since January 1974. Index since January 1974. Index provides management, design engineers, and estimators an up-to-data reference for local labor and material process. Also provides mount and rate of change in these costs used to predict future construction costs.

  12. The Index cohesive effect on stock market correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Y.; Kenett, D. Y.; Ben-Jacob, E.

    2009-12-01

    We present empirical examination and reassessment of the functional role of the market Index, using datasets of stock returns for eight years, by analyzing and comparing the results for two very different markets: 1) the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), representing a large, mature market, and 2) the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE), representing a small, young market. Our method includes special collective (holographic) analysis of stock-Index correlations, of nested stock correlations (including the Index as an additional ghost stock) and of bare stock correlations (after subtraction of the Index return from the stocks returns). Our findings verify and strongly substantiate the assumed functional role of the index in the financial system as a cohesive force between stocks, i.e., the correlations between stocks are largely due to the strong correlation between each stock and the Index (the adhesive effect), rather than inter-stock dependencies. The Index adhesive and cohesive effects on the market correlations in the two markets are presented and compared in a reduced 3-D principal component space of the correlation matrices (holographic presentation). The results provide new insights into the interplay between an index and its constituent stocks in TASE-like versus NYSE-like markets.

  13. 21 CFR 175.105 - Adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adhesives. 175.105 Section 175.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives §...

  14. 21 CFR 175.105 - Adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adhesives. 175.105 Section 175.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives §...

  15. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  16. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  17. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  18. A review of chemical-approach and ultramorphological studies on the development of fluoride-releasing dental adhesives comprising new pre-reacted glass ionomer (PRG) fillers.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tay, Franklin R; Endo, Takeshi; Pashley, David H

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on fluoride-releasing adhesives and the related studies in this field based on information from original research papers, reviews, and patent literatures. A revolutionary PRG (pre-reacted glass ionomer) filler technology--where fillers were prepared by the acid-base reaction of a fluoroaluminosilicate glass with polyalkenoic acid in water, was newly developed, and a new category as "Giomer" was introduced into the market. On fluoride release capability, SIMS examination revealed in vitro fluoride ion uptake by dentin substrate from the PRG fillers in dental adhesive. On bonding durability, it was found that the improved durability of resin-dentin bonds might be achieved not only via the strengthened dentin due to fluoride ion uptake from the PRG-Ca fillers, but also due to retention of relatively insoluble 4-AETCa formed around remnant apatite crystallites within the hybrid layer in 4-AET-containing self-etching adhesives. On ultramorphological study of the resin-dentin interface, TEM images of the PRG-Ca fillers revealed that the dehydrated hydrogel was barely distinguishable from normal glass fillers, if not for the concurrent presence of remnant, incompletely reacted glass cores. In conclusion, it was expected that uptake of fluoride ions with cariostatic effect from PRG-Ca fillers would endow dentin substrates with the benefit of secondary caries prevention, together with an effective and durable adhesion to dentin. PMID:18717159

  19. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant with a Cool Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSATs bandpass (approx. 0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant s centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = l9(sup h) 36(sup m) 46(sup s). dec = 30 deg.40 min.07 sec.and extending 6.5 arc min in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at this location.

  20. Receptor-mediated uptake of remnant lipoproteins by cholesterol-loaded human monocyte-macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lenten, B.J.; Fogelman, A.M.; Jackson, R.L.; Shapiro, S.; Haberland, M.E.; Edwards, P.A.

    1985-07-25

    Normal human monocyte-macrophages were cholesterol-loaded, and the rates of uptake and degradation of several lipoproteins were measured and compared to rates in control cells. Receptor activities for SVI-rabbit beta-very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL), SVI-human low density lipoprotein, and SVI-human chylomicrons were down-regulated in cholesterol-loaded cells; however, the rate of uptake and degradation of SVI-human chylomicron remnants was unchanged from control cells. Cholesterol-loaded alveolar macrophages from a Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit, which lack low density lipoprotein receptors, showed receptor down-regulation for SVI-beta-VLDL but not for SVI-human chylomicron remnants. In addition to chylomicron remnants, apo-E-phospholipid complexes competed for SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake, but apo-A-I-phospholipid complexes did not. Chylomicron remnants and beta-VLDL were equally effective in competing for SVI-beta-VLDL and SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake in cholesterol-loaded macrophages. The authors conclude: 1) specific lipoprotein receptor activity persists in cholesterol-loaded cells; 2) this receptor activity recognizes lipo-proteins (at least in part) by their apo-E content; and 3) cholesteryl ester accumulation can occur in monocyte-macrophages incubated with chylomicron remnants.

  1. Nature of the adhesion bond between epoxy adhesive and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Savitskii, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Sytov, V. V.; Sytov, V. A.

    2014-03-01

    The potential difference that appears in the epoxy resin located between two grade 3 steel plates is studied. One of them is stored in epoxy resin to reach equilibrium, and the second plate is coated with an asprepared mixture of epoxy resin with a hardener. It is found that the potential difference decreases in time because of charge transfer by Fe2+ ions through epoxy resin. The luminescence and infrared absorption spectra of the epoxy adhesive on the grade 3 steel surface are recorded. An analysis of these spectra shows that Fe2+ ions penetrate into the as-prepared mixture of epoxy resin with the hardener, and interact with CN groups in the mixture, and form coordination compounds. As a result, a diffusion layer saturated by the coordination compounds forms at the interface between the steel and the adhesive.

  2. Ceramic adhesive restorations and biomimetic dentistry: tissue preservation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tirlet, Gil; Crescenzo, Hélène; Crescenzo, Dider; Bazos, Panaghiotis

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to sophisticated adhesive techniques in contemporary dentistry, and the development of composite and ceramic materials, it is possible to reproduce a biomimetic match between substitution materials and natural teeth substrates. Biomimetics or bio-emulation allows for the association of two fundamental parameters at the heart of current therapeutic treatments: tissue preservation and adhesion. This contemporary concept makes the retention of the integrity of the maximum amount of dental tissue possible, while offering exceptional clinical longevity, and maximum esthetic results. It permits the conservation of the biological, esthetic, biomechanical and functional properties of enamel and dentin. Today, it is clearly possible to develop preparations allowing for the conservation of the enamel and dentin in order to bond partial restorations in the anterior and posterior sectors therefore limiting, as Professor Urs Belser from Geneva indicates, "the replacement of previous deficient crowns and devitalized teeth whose conservation are justified but whose residual structural state are insufficient for reliable bonding."1 This article not only addresses ceramic adhesive restoration in the anterior area, the ambassadors of biomimetic dentistry, but also highlights the possibility of occasionally integrating one or two restorations at the heart of the smile as a complement to extensive rehabilitations that require more invasive treatment. PMID:25126616

  3. Bio-inspired adhesion: local chemical environments impact adhesive stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2014-03-01

    3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) is an amino acid that is naturally synthesized by marine mussels and exhibits the unique ability to strongly bind to surfaces in aqueous environments. However, the Dopa functional group undergoes auto-oxidation to a non-adhesive quinone form in neutral to basic pH conditions, limiting the utilization of Dopa in biomedical applications. In this work, we performed direct surface force measurements with in situ electrochemical control across a Dopa-rich native mussel foot protein (mfp-5), as well as three simplified model peptide sequences. We find that the neighboring peptide residues can significantly impact the redox stability of Dopa functional groups, with lysine residues imparting a substantial degree of Dopa redox stabilization. Surprisingly, the local chemical environments only minimally impact the magnitude of the adhesion forces measured between molecularly-smooth mica and gold surfaces. Our results provide molecular level insight into approaches that can be used to mitigate the detrimental impact of Dopa auto-oxidation, thus suggesting new molecular design strategies for improving the performance of Dopa-based underwater adhesives.

  4. Chandra Captures Remnant of Star-Shattering Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a true color image from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) of N132D showing the remnant of an explosion of a massive star in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy about 180,000 light years from Earth. The colors represent different ranges of X-rays, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and higher X-ray energies respectively. The horseshoe shaped remnant is thought to be due to shock waves from the collision of the supernova ejecta with cool giant gas clouds. As the shock wave moves through the gas, it is heated to millions of degrees, producing the glowing x-ray shell. The CXO, formerly the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in 1999. The CXO is the world's most powerful and most sophisticated x-ray telescope ever built. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers worldwide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission.

  5. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass

  6. Nitric Oxide Modulates Vascular Disease in the Remnant Kidney Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Feng, Lili; Johnson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A loss of the microvascular endothelium occurs in the remnant kidney model of renal disease and may play an important role in progression (Kang et al, J Am Soc Nephrol, 12:1434, 2001). Given that nitric oxide (NO) is a potent endothelial cell survival factor, we hypothesized that stimulating (with l-arginine) or blocking (with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, (l-NAME)) NO synthesis could modulate the integrity of the microvasculature and hence affect progression of renal disease. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (RK) and then were randomized at 4 weeks to receive vehicle, l-NAME, or l-arginine for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and renal function was measured, and tissues were collected at 8 weeks for histological and molecular analyses. The effect of modulation of NO on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and mouse medullary thick ascending limb tubular epithelial cells (mTAL) was also studied. Inhibition of NO with l-NAME was associated with more rapid progression compared to RK alone, with worse blood pressure, proteinuria, renal function, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The injury was also associated with more glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cell loss in association with an impaired endothelial proliferative response. Interestingly, the preglomerular endothelium remained intact or was occasionally hyperplastic, and this was associated with a pronounced proliferation of the vascular SMCs with de novo expression of VEGF. Cell culture studies confirmed a divergent effect of NO inhibition on VEGF expression, with inhibition of VEGF synthesis in mTAL cells and stimulation of VEGF in vascular SMC. In contrast to the effects of NO inhibition, stimulation of NO with l-arginine had minimal effects in this rat model of progressive renal disease. These studies confirm that blockade of NO synthesis accelerates progression of renal disease in the remnant kidney model, and

  7. Shape-dependent adhesion and friction of Au nanoparticles probed with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Youngji; Hong, Jong Wook; Lee, Hyunsoo; Han, Sang Woo; Young Park, Jeong

    2015-03-27

    The relation between surface structure and friction and adhesion is a long-standing question in tribology. Tuning the surface structure of the exposed facets of metal nanoparticles is enabled by shape control. We investigated the effect of the shape of Au nanoparticles on friction and adhesion. Two nanoparticle systems, cubic nanoparticles with a low-index (100) surface and hexoctahedral nanoparticles with a high-index (321) surface, were used as model nanoparticle surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale friction and adhesion on the nanoparticle surface. Before removing the capping layers, the friction results include contributions from both the geometric factor and the presence of capping layers. After removing the capping layers, we can see the exclusive effect of the surface atomic structure while the geometric effect is maintained. We found that after removing the capping layer, the cubic Au nanoparticles exhibited higher adhesion and friction, compared with cubes capped with layers covering 25% and 70%, respectively. On the other hand, the adhesion and friction of hexoctahedral Au nanoparticles decreased after removing the capping layers, compared with nanoparticles with capping layers. The difference in adhesion and friction forces between the bare Au surfaces and Au nanoparticles with capping layers cannot be explained by geometric factors, such as the slope of the nanoparticle surfaces. The higher adhesion and friction forces on cubic nanoparticles after removing the capping layers is associated with the atomic structure of (100) and (321) (i.e., the flat (100) surfaces of the cubic nanoparticles have a larger contact area, compared with the rough (321) surfaces of the hexoctahedral nanoparticles). This study implies an intrinsic relation between atomic structure and nanomechanical properties, with potential applications for controlling nanoscale friction and adhesion via colloid chemistry. PMID:25765817

  8. Shape-dependent adhesion and friction of Au nanoparticles probed with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Youngji; Hong, Jong Wook; Lee, Hyunsoo; Han, Sang Woo; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-03-01

    The relation between surface structure and friction and adhesion is a long-standing question in tribology. Tuning the surface structure of the exposed facets of metal nanoparticles is enabled by shape control. We investigated the effect of the shape of Au nanoparticles on friction and adhesion. Two nanoparticle systems, cubic nanoparticles with a low-index (100) surface and hexoctahedral nanoparticles with a high-index (321) surface, were used as model nanoparticle surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale friction and adhesion on the nanoparticle surface. Before removing the capping layers, the friction results include contributions from both the geometric factor and the presence of capping layers. After removing the capping layers, we can see the exclusive effect of the surface atomic structure while the geometric effect is maintained. We found that after removing the capping layer, the cubic Au nanoparticles exhibited higher adhesion and friction, compared with cubes capped with layers covering 25% and 70%, respectively. On the other hand, the adhesion and friction of hexoctahedral Au nanoparticles decreased after removing the capping layers, compared with nanoparticles with capping layers. The difference in adhesion and friction forces between the bare Au surfaces and Au nanoparticles with capping layers cannot be explained by geometric factors, such as the slope of the nanoparticle surfaces. The higher adhesion and friction forces on cubic nanoparticles after removing the capping layers is associated with the atomic structure of (100) and (321) (i.e., the flat (100) surfaces of the cubic nanoparticles have a larger contact area, compared with the rough (321) surfaces of the hexoctahedral nanoparticles). This study implies an intrinsic relation between atomic structure and nanomechanical properties, with potential applications for controlling nanoscale friction and adhesion via colloid chemistry.

  9. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed study entails use of archival data, primarily from past and active X-ray observatories, to study the properties of a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) which display a centrally-bright X-ray morphology. Several models which have been proposed to explain the morphology are being investigated for comparisons with measured characteristics of several remnants: nonthermal emission from a central synchrotron nebula; thermal emission enhanced by slow evaporation of cool clouds in the hot SNR interior; and relic thermal emission from the SNR interior after the remnant has entered the radiative phase of evolution, thus causing the shell emission to cease.

  10. Endovascular Coiling of Aneurysm Remnants after Clipping in Patients with Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, S.; Cellerini, M.; Villa, G.; Ammannati, F.; Paoli, L.; Mennonna, P.

    2005-01-01

    Summary The vast majority of intracranial aneurysms can be obliterated completely with surgical clipping. However, postoperative remnants occur in about 4 to 8% of patients who undergo postoperative angiography. Endovascular embolization has been successfully performed in patients with postoperative aneurysm remnant and it may represent a therapeutic alternative to surgical reintervention. Twelve aneurysm remnants after surgical clipping were treated with endovascular embolization using GDC. All aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation. Our experience confirms the feasibility and relative safety of this treatment strategy that may be considered a valid alternative to reintervention. PMID:20584434

  11. Gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants: Hadronic or leptonic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The debate on the nature of the gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants is still open. Ascribing such emission to hadronic rather than leptonic processes would provide an evidence for the acceleration of protons and nuclei, and this fact would fit with the very popular (but not proven) paradigm that supernova remnants are the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Here, we discuss this issue with a particular focus on the best studied gamma-ray-bright supernova remnant: RX J1713.7-3946.

  12. The x-ray structure of the supernova remnant W49B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, John R.; Murphy, Rosa; Chu, You-Hua; Garcia, Guillermo; Goscha, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of x-ray and radio images of W49B and other supernova remnants (SNR) provides detailed information on the mechanisms responsible for the emission and on the evolution of the remnants. There is faint x-ray emission from all parts of W49B but most of it is concentrated near the center of the remnant, unlike the radio emission which arises in a shell near the periphery. This structure indicates that this SNR is in the adolescent phase of its lifetime.

  13. DEM L241, A SUPERNOVA REMNANT CONTAINING A HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F. D.; Charles, P. A.; Foster, D. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Romero, P. S.; Edwards, Z. I.; Perry, M.; Williams, R. M.

    2012-11-10

    A Chandra observation of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant DEM L241 reveals an interior unresolved source which is probably an accretion-powered binary. The optical counterpart is an O5III(f) star making this a high-mass X-ray binary with an orbital period likely to be of the order of tens of days. Emission from the remnant interior is thermal and spectral information is used to derive density and mass of the hot material. Elongation of the remnant is unusual and possible causes of this are discussed. The precursor star probably had mass >25 M {sub Sun}.

  14. X-ray iron-line emission from the SN 185 remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    Radio and optical research was carried out in order to show that the supernova remnant RCW86 is a remnant of the earliest supernova event ever recorded in history (185 AD). The results are as follows: (1) an iron-line emission was found at 6.7 keV; (2) the temperature measured from HEAO-1 was approximately 6 keV; and (3) the equivalent width was consistent within the uncertainties with a cosmic iron abundance. These results support the identification of the supernova remnant RCW86 (it's X-ray source) with the historic supernova event.

  15. Information Sources on Scientific Research Related to the Preservation of Books, Paper, and Adhesives. Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access, Washington, DC.

    Produced as part of an effort by the Commission on Preservation and Access to assist with the formation of a preservation research agenda, this report contains: (1) a directory of laboratories and organizations working in the four specific areas of concern in preservation--books, paper, adhesives, and mold; (2) directories of indexes, abstracts,…

  16. Adhesives for the composite wood panel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.S.; Klareich, F.; Exstrum, B.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a market and technology analysis of current fossil-fuel-based adhesives for the composite wood panel industry. It is also a study of the potential for, and technology of, less-energy-intensive biomass-derived adhesives for use in the industry. Adhesives manufacturer and production account for a significant portion of overall wood panel industry energy use as well as overall production costs, and the wood panel industry consumes about 25% of the total U.S. adhesives production. Significant savings might be realized if current fossil-fuel-based resins could be replaced with alternative biomass-derived adhesives.

  17. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  18. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper an adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  19. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1980-01-01

    An adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads, namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  20. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  1. Nanocapillary Adhesion between Parallel Plates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study capillary adhesion from a nanometer scale liquid bridge between two parallel flat solid surfaces. The capillary force, Fcap, and the meniscus shape of the bridge are computed as the separation between the solid surfaces, h, is varied. Macroscopic theory predicts the meniscus shape and the contribution of liquid/vapor interfacial tension to Fcap quite accurately for separations as small as two or three molecular diameters (1-2 nm). However, the total capillary force differs in sign and magnitude from macroscopic theory for h ≲ 5 nm (8-10 diameters) because of molecular layering that is not included in macroscopic theory. For these small separations, the pressure tensor in the fluid becomes anisotropic. The components in the plane of the surface vary smoothly and are consistent with theory based on the macroscopic surface tension. Capillary adhesion is affected by only the perpendicular component, which has strong oscillations as the molecular layering changes. PMID:27413872

  2. Particle adhesion in powder coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Wankum, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Williams, S.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Electrostatic powder coating is a widely used industrial painting process. It has three major advantages: (1) it provides high quality durable finish, (2) the process is environmentally friendly and does not require the use of organic solvents, and (3) it is economically competitive. The adhesion of electrostatically deposited polymer paint particles on the grounded conducting substrate depends upon many parameters: (a) particle size and shape distributions, (b) electrostatic charge distributions, (c) electrical resistivity, (d) dielectric strength of the particles, (e) thickness of the powder film, (f) presence and severity of the back corona, and (g) the conductivity and surface properties of the substrate. The authors present a model on the forces of deposition and adhesion of corona charged particles on conducting substrates.

  3. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  4. Labial adhesions in pubertal girls.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Roy Kallol; Sonika, Agarwal; Charu, Chanana; Sunesh, Kumar; Neena, Malhotra

    2006-01-01

    Labial adhesions after puberty are rare and are usually the result of chronic inflammation, urinary tract infection, hypoestrogenism or surgical procedures leading to vulval trauma. Sexual abuse leading to labial adhesions is extremely rare in girls who have attained menarche. Complete vulval fusion can rarely occur without any evidence of hypoestrogenism. We address this rare entity in three young pubertal girls wherein one had a history of genital trauma, the second had a history of surgical intervention due to urinary retention and the last one had a history of sexual abuse. All patients had history of genital trauma in common. Accepted management of this condition is adhesiolysis followed by application of estrogen cream in the postoperative period. PMID:16189695

  5. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-43 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples. Previously announced in STAR as N83-18910

  6. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  7. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown. PMID:17110356

  8. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  10. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  11. Ecosystem characteristics of remnant, headwater tallgrass prairie streams.

    PubMed

    Larson, Danelle M; Dodds, Walter K; Jackson, Karen E; Whiles, Matt R; Winders, Kyle R

    2013-01-01

    North America has lost >95% of its native tallgrass prairie due to land conversion, making prairie streams one of the most endangered ecosystems. Research on the basic ecosystem characteristics of the remaining natural prairie streams will inform conservation and management. We examined the structure and function of headwater streams draining tallgrass prairie tracts at Osage Prairie in Missouri and the Konza Prairie Biological Station in Kansas and compared those values with literature values for streams draining agricultural watersheds in the region. We quantified physicochemical and biological characteristics for 2 yr. Streams at Osage and Konza were characterized by low nutrients and low suspended sediments (substantially lower than impacted sites in the region), slight heterotrophic status, and high temporal variability. Suspended sediments and nutrient concentrations were generally low in all prairie streams, but storms increased concentrations of both by 3- to 12-fold. Spring prescribed burns were followed by a slight increase in chlorophyll and decreased nutrients, potentially due to greater light availability. Benthic macroinvertebrate communities at Osage showed seasonal patterns that were probably linked to variable hydrology. We found nine amphibian species using the Osage streams as habitat or breeding sites, but little usage at Konza was probably due to dry conditions and low discharge. Our study indicates that two remnant tallgrass prairie streams along a longitudinal gradient are fairly similar in terms of physicochemical features and have good water quality relative to agricultural watersheds but can differ considerably in macroinvertebrate and amphibian abundance. PMID:23673759

  12. Magnetic Field Amplification by Cosmic Rays in Supernova Remnant Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2010-02-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) accelerated in supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are though to produce significant magnetic field amplification (a factor of 100 in their downstream medium). This amplification is believed to be caused by plasma instabilities driven by CRs as they stream in front of the shocks. Using particle-in-cell plasma simulations, we investigate possible instabilities, considering arbitrary angles between the CR streaming and the magnetic field. In the limit of quasi-parallel propagation, we recover Bell's cosmic ray current-driven (CRCD) instability. In the quasi-perpendicular case we find a new instability, the perpendicular current-driven (PCD) instability, and elucidate its physical nature. The PCD instability is driven by CRs protruding into regions of pre-amplified transverse field, which is likely to occur near the shocks. We study the expected saturation mechanisms of these instabilities for the case of SNR shocks. We find that the maximum amplification factor of the PCD instability is 50 in the upstream medium of the shocks, which is 5 times larger than the one corresponding to the CRCD instability. This result shows that CR-driven instabilities would play an essential role in the magnetic amplification inferred from SNR shock observations.

  13. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  14. WHAM Observations of High-latitude Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Sky Survey (WHAM-SS) traces numerous large-angle, diffuse regions containing filamentary and shell-like structures. The largest of these are complex supershells that harbor recent and on-going star formation, such as the Orion-Eridanus complex, the Gum Nebula, and the extended emission above and below the W3/W4/W5 star-forming regions in the Perseus Arm. Several large-diameter regions with simpler morphologies are also present, which we focus on here. While some of these structures are diffuse H II regions powered by nearby, isolated stars, others are clearly supernova remnants (SNRs) due to their association with X-ray or non-thermal radio emission. We highlight the structure, kinematics, and multi-wavelength properties of several SNRs using Hα maps from the WHAM-SS and data from on-going WHAM multi-wavelength surveys. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  15. HST/ACS Narrowband Imaging of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Frattare, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Harrus, Ilana M.; Ennis, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    We present narrowband images of the Kepler supernova remnant obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The images, with an angular resolution of 0.05" reveal the structure of the emitting gas in unprecedented detail. Radiative and nonradiative shocks are found in close proximity, unresolvable in gromd-based spectra, indicating that the pre-shock medium is highly clumped. The ionization structure, traced by differences in the [0 111] to [N 11] flux ratio, varies on subarcsecond scales. The variation is due to 110th differences in shock velocity as well as gradients in the evolutionary stage of the shocks. A prollinent complex of knots protruding beyond the boundary of the rennallt in the northwest is found to consist of bright radiative knots, collected by arcuate nonradiative filaments. Based on the coincidence of the optical emission with a bright isolated knot of X-ray emission, we infer that this feature is due to a Rayleigh-Taylor finger that formed at the contact discontinuity and overtook the primary blast wave.

  16. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-06

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  17. The Fate of the Compact Remnant in Neutron Star Mergers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztoff; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rosswog, Stephan; Shen, Gang; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2015-10-06

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts. They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the coresmore » of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3-2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing gamma-ray bursts, LIGO observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.« less

  18. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  19. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  20. Asymmetric velocity anisotropies in remnants of collisionless mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    Dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations are affected by processes such as mergers, accretion and the gravitational interaction with baryonic matter. Typically the analysis of dark matter haloes is performed in spherical or elliptical bins and the velocity distributions are often assumed to be constant within those bins. However, the velocity anisotropy, which describes differences between the radial and tangential velocity dispersion, has recently been show to have a strong dependence on direction in the triaxial halos formed in cosmological simulations. In this study we derive properties of particles in cones parallel or perpendicular to the collision axis of merger remnants. We find that the velocity anisotropy has a strong dependence on direction. The finding that the direction-dependence of the velocity anisotropy of a halo depends on the merger history, explains the existence of such trends in cosmological simulations. It also explains why a large diversity is seen in the velocity anisotropy profiles in the outer parts of high-resolution simulations of cosmological haloes.

  1. Non-cosmological FRBs from young supernova remnant pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Liam; Sievers, Jonathan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new extra but non-cosmological explanation for fast radio bursts (FRBs) based on very young pulsars in supernova remnants. Within a few hundred years of a core-collapse supernova, the ejecta is confined within ˜1 pc, providing a high enough column density of free electrons for the observed 375-1600 pc cm-3 of dispersion measure (DM). By extrapolating a Crab-like pulsar to its infancy in an environment like that of SN 1987A, we hypothesize such an object could emit supergiant pulses sporadically which would be bright enough to be seen at a few hundred megaparsecs. We hypothesize that such supergiant pulses would preferentially occur early in the pulsar's life when the free electron density is still high, which is why we do not see large numbers of moderate DM FRBs (≲300 pc cm-3). In this scenario, Faraday rotation at the source gives rotation measures (RMs) much larger than the expected cosmological contribution. If the emission were pulsar-like, then the polarization vector could swing over the duration of the burst, which is not expected from non-rotating objects. In this model, the scattering, large DM, and commensurate RM all come from one place which is not the case for the cosmological interpretation. The model also provides testable predictions of the flux distribution and repeat rate of FRBs, and could be furthermore verified by spatial coincidence with optical supernovae of the past several decades and cross-correlation with nearby galaxy maps.

  2. SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Karna M.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Dluger, William; Katz, Marshall; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie W.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Hughes, Annie; Muller, Erik; Ott, Juergen; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2010-08-15

    It has often been suggested that supernova remnants (SNRs) can trigger star formation. To investigate the relationship between SNRs and star formation, we have examined the known sample of 45 SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to search for associated young stellar objects (YSOs) and molecular clouds. We find seven SNRs associated with both YSOs and molecular clouds, three SNRs associated with YSOs but not molecular clouds, and eight SNRs near molecular clouds but not associated with YSOs. Among the 10 SNRs associated with YSOs, the association between the YSOs and SNRs either can be rejected or cannot be convincingly established for eight cases. Only two SNRs have YSOs closely aligned along their rims; however, the time elapsed since the SNR began to interact with the YSOs' natal clouds is much shorter than the contraction timescales of the YSOs, and thus we do not see any evidence of SNR-triggered star formation in the LMC. The 15 SNRs that are near molecular clouds may trigger star formation in the future when the SNR shocks have slowed down to <45 km s{sup -1}. We discuss how SNRs can alter the physical properties and abundances of YSOs.

  3. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  4. Expectation on Observation of Supernova Remnants with the LHAASO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Cao, Zhen; Chen, Songzhan; Chen, Yang; Cui, Shuwang; He, Huihai; Huang, Xingtao; Ma, Xinhua; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao; LHAASO Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the most important acceleration sites for cosmic rays (CRs) below ∼1015 eV in the Galaxy. High-energy photons, either directly from the shocks of the SNRs or indirectly from the interaction between SNRs and the nearby clouds, are crucial probes for the CR acceleration. Big progresses on observations of SNRs have been achieved by space- and ground-based γ-ray facilities. However, whether γ-rays come from accelerated hadrons or not, as well as their connection with the CRs observed at Earth, remains in debate. Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a next-generation experiment, is designed to survey the northern part of the very high energy γ-ray sky from ∼0.3 TeV to PeV with the sensitivity of ≲1% of the Crab Nebula flux. In this paper, we indicate that LHAASO will be dedicated to enlarging the γ-ray SNR samples and improving the spectral and morphological measurements. These measurements, especially at energies above 30 TeV, will be important for us to finally understand the CR acceleration in SNRs.

  5. A NEW EVOLUTIONARY PHASE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangwook; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Burrows, David N.; Racusin, Judith L.; McCray, Richard

    2011-06-01

    We have been monitoring the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A with Chandra observations since 1999. Here we report on the latest change in the soft X-ray light curve of SNR 1987A. For the last {approx}1.5 yr (since day {approx}8000), the soft X-ray flux has significantly flattened, staying (within uncertainties) at f{sub X} {approx} 5.7 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (corresponding to L{sub X} {approx} 3.6 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) in the 0.5-2 keV band. This remarkable change in the recent soft X-ray light curve suggests that the forward shock is now interacting with a decreasing density structure, after interacting with an increasing density gradient over {approx}10 yr prior to day {approx}8000. Possibilities may include the case that the shock is now propagating beyond a density peak of the inner ring. We briefly discuss some possible implications on the nature of the progenitor and the future prospects of our Chandra monitoring observations.

  6. Eocene Tibetan plateau remnants preserved in the northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, Peter; van Melle, Jérémie; Guillot, Stéphane; Pêcher, Arnaud; Reiners, Peter W.; Nicolescu, Stefan; Latif, Mohammad

    2009-05-01

    The northwest Himalaya shows strongly contrasting relief. Deeply incised mountain ranges that are characterized by extremely rapid exhumation and some of the highest peaks in the world are in contrast with high-elevation, low-relief areas such as the Deosai plateau in northern Pakistan, which lies at an altitude of 4,000m. The origin and evolution of such plateau regions at the convergence of the most active continental collision in the world remain elusive. Here we report low-temperature thermochronology data from the Deosai plateau and use thermal history modelling to show that the plateau has undergone continuous slow denudation at rates below 250mMyr-1 for the past 35Myr at least. This finding suggests tectonic and morphologic stability of the plateau since at least Eocene times, only 15-20Myr after the onset of the India-Asia collision. Our work contradicts the hypothesis that widespread low-relief surfaces in the northwest Himalaya result from efficient kilometre-scale glacial erosion during Quaternary times. We show that similarly stable surfaces exist throughout the entire northwest Himalaya and share common morphologic characteristics and denudation histories, which are comparable to those of the western Tibetan plateau. Our results suggest that these surfaces are preserved remnants of an Eocene southwestern Tibetan plateau that was more extensive than today.

  7. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  8. Sub-Lyman-alpha observations of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The first map of O VI lambda 1035 emission of the Cygnus Loop has now been obtained with Voyager. The first good spectra of the sub-Lyman-alpha region in the Cygnus Loop and in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remnant N49 have been obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. The lines detected below 1200 A include S VI lambda lambda 933,945, C III lambda 977, N III lambda 991, and O VI lambda lambda 1032,1038. The O VI luminosities of the Cygnus Loop and of N49 exceed their soft X-ray luminosities. There is O VI emission at the primary shock front in the Cygnus Loop and from the bright optical filaments. The HUT spectra of the Cygnus Loop can be interpreted in terms of shocks with velocities of 170-190 km/s; the differences between the two spectra are due to the time since the beginning of the shock-cloud encounter.

  9. IS THERE A HIDDEN HOLE IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.; Serichol, N. E-mail: carles@astro.tau.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we report on the bulk features of the hole carved by the companion star in the material ejected during a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion. In particular we are interested in the long-term evolution of the hole as well as in its fingerprint in the geometry of the supernova remnant (SNR) after several centuries of evolution, which is a hot topic in current SN Ia studies. We use an axisymmetric smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to characterize the geometric properties of the SNR resulting from the interaction of this ejected material with the ambient medium. Our aim is to use SNR observations to constrain the single degenerate scenario for SN Ia progenitors. Our simulations show that the hole will remain open during centuries, although its partial or total closure at later times due to hydrodynamic instabilities is not excluded. Close to the edge of the hole, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows faster, leading to plumes that approach the edge of the forward shock. We also discuss other geometrical properties of the simulations, like the evolution of the contact discontinuity.

  10. A XMM Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the project is to identify candidate neutron stars in Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) through their X-ray emission. With XMM we observed the SNRs and typically find 10 - 50 X-ray sources. Almost all are either background galaxies or foreground stars. Therefore we must also pursue detailed optical/infrared follow-up observations to find counterparts for these X-ray sources and classify them. At the depth of the XMM observations, practically all confusing X-ray sources should have identifiable optical/IR counterparts. We have done a preliminary analysis of the XMM data and identified likely counterparts to the X-ray sources from available surveys(DSS, 2MASS). We then obtained wide-field optical/IR data from Palomar to get counterparts for the remaining sources. This analysis is underway: while often a single bright source is in the XMM error circle and can be considered a counterpart, in a number of cases we must do more detailed studies and evaluate several fainter optical/lR sources. We hope to have the final analysis of the XMM + Palomar data done this Fall. It is possible that additional, deeper optical/IR data may be necessary. We expect to publish our results by the end of this year.

  11. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Halpha, [O I] 6300, and [O III] 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was not observed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M(sun), and the presence of broad Halpha in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise time since the explosion.We acknowledge STScI grants under the umbrella program ID GO-12513 to Johns Hopkins University, STScI, and Middlebury College. PFW acknowledges additional support from the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0908566.

  12. Thyroglossal Duct Remnant with Follicular Hyperplasia Presenting After Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Ryan E.; Ahmad, Hassan; Hildrew, Douglas M.; Lawlor, Claire M.; Aslam, Rizwan; Sholl, Andrew; Kandil, Emad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The thyroglossal duct fails to involute in up to 7% of adults, creating a thyroglossal duct remnant (TGDR) attached to the hyoid bone. Thyroid malignancies have been reported in approximately 1% of TGDRs. In previous reports of TGDR carcinoma, patients had radiographic evidence of a TGDR at initial clinical presentation. Alternatively, hypertrophy of a TGDR is well described in patients with hypothyroidism because of the growth of functional ectopic thyroid tissue. We present the case of a patient who had no radiographic evidence of a TGDR prior to thyroidectomy but presented 14 months after surgery with a recurrent cervical mass. Case Report: A 58-year-old female underwent total thyroidectomy for micropapillary thyroid cancer. Fourteen months later, she presented with an enlarging cervical mass. She underwent a Sistrunk procedure, and surgical pathology revealed a TGDR with compensatory glandular hypertrophy. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a TGDR follicular adenoma initially appearing as a result of compensatory thyroid glandular hypertrophy following total thyroidectomy for a micropapillary thyroid carcinoma. Our case presented a novel clinical dilemma regarding the best management for a patient with a new TGDR along with a recent history of micropapillary thyroid cancer. PMID:27303226

  13. Search for Surviving Companions in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  14. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  15. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  16. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  17. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.' PMID:27186047

  18. Adhesive evaluation of new polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, Terry L.; Progar, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    During the past 10 to 15 years, the Materials Division at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed several novel high temperature polyimide adhesives for anticipated needs of the aerospace industry. These developments have resulted from fundamental studies of structure-property relationships in polyimides. Recent research at LaRC has involved the synthesis and evaluation of copolyimides which incorporate both flexibilizing bridging groups and meta-linked benzene rings. The purpose was to develop systems based on low cost, readily available monomers. Two of these copolyimides evaluated as adhesives for bonding titanium alloy, Ti(6Al-4V), are identified as LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2. Lap shear strength (LSS) measurements were used to determine the strength and durability of the adhesive materials. LSS results are presented for LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI lap shear specimens thermally exposed in air at 232 C for up to 5000 hrs. LARC-TPI was shown to perform better than the copolymer LARC-STPI which exhibited poor thermooxidative performance possibly due to the amines used which would tend to oxidize easier than the benzophenone system in LARC-TPI.

  19. [Adhesion to the antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Carballo, M

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the therapy antiretroviral is to improve the quality of life and the survival of the persons affected by the VIH through the suppression of the viral replication. Nevertheless one of the present problems is the resistant apparition of stumps to the new medicines caused by an incorrect management of the therapeutic plan; by an incorrect adhesion of the personal processing. Since the therapeutic success will depend, among others factors, and of important form of the degree of implication and commitment of the person affected, is a matter of identifying prematurely the possible situations concomitants (personal factors and of addiction, psycho-social, related to the processing and its possible secondary effects, associated factors to the own illness or even to the relation professional-patient) that can interfere in a correct adhesion. For it is necessary of the interaction multidisciplinary of the welfare team, and fundamental the work of nursing at the moment of to detect the possible determinant factors and the intervention definition of strategies arrived at by consensus with the own person, that they promote it or it improve. The quantification of the degree of adhesion (measure in %) values through various direct and indirect methods and should keep in mind in it takes of therapeutic decisions being able to come to be advised the suspension of the processing until obtaining to conscience to the person affected of the importance of a correct therapeutic compliance. PMID:15672996

  20. Pair of bollards and remnant seawall of Pan American Airways/Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pair of bollards and remnant seawall of Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site. View facing north. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI