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Sample records for adhesive removal test

  1. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  2. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  3. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 3201.16 Section 3201.16... Designated Items § 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue,...

  5. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  6. 7 CFR 3201.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 3201.16 Section 3201.16... Designated Items § 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue,...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 3201.16 Section 3201.16... Designated Items § 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue,...

  8. Testing Adhesive Bonds to Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive tool simple and inexpensive. Easy-to-use tool nondestructively tests strength of adhesive bond between cloth and straight rigid edge. Developed for testing advanced flexible reusable surface insulation.

  9. Effect of orthodontic debonding and residual adhesive removal on 3D enamel microroughness

    PubMed Central

    Tomkowski, Robert; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Stepien, Piotr; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Background Termination of fixed orthodontic treatment is associated with bracket debonding and residual adhesive removal. These procedures increase enamel roughness to a degree that should depend on the tool used. Enamel roughening may be associated with bacterial retention and staining. However, a very limited data exists on the alteration of 3D enamel roughness resulting from the use of different tools for orthodontic clean-up. Aims 1. To perform a precise assessment of 3D enamel surface roughness resulting from residual adhesive removal following orthodontic debonding molar tubes. 2. To compare enamel surfaces resulting from the use of tungsten carbide bur, a one-step polisher and finisher and Adhesive Residue Remover. Material and Methods Buccal surfaces of forty-five extracted human third molars were analysed using a confocal laser microscope at the magnification of 1080× and 3D roughness parameters were calculated. After 20 s etching, molar tubes were bonded, the teeth were stored in 0.9% saline solution for 24 hours and debonded. Residual adhesive was removed using in fifteen specimen each: a twelve-fluted tungsten carbide bur, a one-step finisher and polisher and Adhesive Residue Remover. Then, surface roughness analysis was repeated. Data normality was assessed using Shapiro–Wilk test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare between variables of normal distribution and for the latter—Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Sa (arithmetical mean height) was significantly different between the groups (p = 0, 01326); the smoothest and most repeatable surfaces were achieved using Adhesive Residue Remover. Similarly, Sq (root mean square height of the scale-limited surface) had the lowest and most homogenous values for Adhesive Residue Remover (p = 0, 01108). Sz (maximum height of the scale-limited surface) was statistically different between the groups (p = 0, 0327), however no statistically significant differences were found concerning Ssk (skewness of the

  10. Tape-Smoothing Tool For Adhesion Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1992-01-01

    Small tool smoothes adhesive tape uniformly to ensure consistency and repeatability of tape-peel tests of adhesion of paint to substrate. Includes resilient pad covered with tough, smooth fabric. Internal spring regulates force applied to tape.

  11. Effect of adhesive remnant removal on enamel topography after bracket debonding

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Larissa Adrian Meira; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Vedovello, Mario; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: At orthodontic treatment completion, knowledge about the effects of adhesive remnant removal on enamel is paramount. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the effect of different adhesive remnant removal methods on enamel topography (ESI) and surface roughness (Ra) after bracket debonding and polishing. METHODS: A total of 50 human premolars were selected and divided into five groups according to the method used for adhesive remnant removal: high speed tungsten carbide bur (TCB), Sof-Lex discs (SL), adhesive removing plier (PL), ultrasound (US) and Fiberglass burs (FB). Metal brackets were bonded with Transbond XT, stored at 37oC for 24 hours before debonding with adhesive removing plier. Subsequently, removal methods were carried out followed by polishing with pumice paste. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted with pre-bonding, post-debonding and post-polishing analyses. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with F test (ANOVA) and Tukey's (Ra) as well as with Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests (ESI) (P < 0.05). RESULTS: US Ra and ESI were significantly greater than TCB, SL, PL and FB. Polishing minimized Ra and ESI in the SL and FB groups. CONCLUSION: Adhesive remnant removal with SL and FB associated with polishing are recommended due to causing little damage to the enamel. PMID:25628087

  12. Effect of sulfur removal on Al2O3 scale adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of removing sulfur impurity on the adhesion of Al2O3 scale to NiCrAl was investigated in four experiments. It was found that removing sulfur to concentration less than 1 ppm per weight is sufficient to produce a very significant degree of alpha-Al2O3 scale adhesion to undoped NiCrAl alloys. Results of experiments show that repeated oxidation, and polishing after each oxidation cycle, of pure NiCrAl alloy lowered sulfur content from 10 to 2 ppm by weight (presumably by removing the segregated interfacial layer after each cycle); thinner samples became adherent after fewer oxidation-polishing cycles because of more limited supply of sulfur. It was found that spalling in subsequent cyclic oxidation tests was a direct function of the initial sulfur content. The transition between the adherent and nonadherent behavior was modeled in terms of sulfur flux, sulfur content, and sulfur segregation.

  13. Thermal Characterization of Epoxy Adhesive by Hotfire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.; Haddock, M. Reed; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes subscale solid-rocket motor hot-fire testing of epoxy adhesives in flame surface bondlines to evaluate heat-affected depth, char depth and ablation rate. Hot-fire testing is part of an adhesive down-selection program on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle to provide additional confidence in the down-selected adhesives. The current nozzle structural adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Prior to hot-fire testing, adhesives were tested for chemical, physical and mechanical properties, which resulted in the selection of two potential replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's TIGA 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. Hot-fire testing consisted of four forty-pound charge (FPC) motors fabricated in configurations that would allow side-by-side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives with the current RSRM adhesives. Results of the FPC motor testing show that: 1) the phenolic char depths on radial bondlines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used, 2) the replacement candidate adhesive char depths are equivalent to the char depths of the current adhesives, 3) the heat-affected depths of the candidate and current adhesives are equivalent, and 4) the ablation rates for both replacement adhesives were equivalent to the current adhesives.

  14. Tests of the Performance of Coatings for Low Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Reich, Allen D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports studies of the performance of low-ice-adhesion coatings by NASA Lewis and BFGoodrich. Studies used impact ice accreted both in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) and in the BFGoodrich Icing Wind Tunnel (IWT) and static ice in a BFGoodrich bench-top parallel-plate shear rig. Early tests at NASA Lewis involved simple qualitative evaluations of the ease of removing impact ice from a surface. Coated surfaces were compared with uncoated ones. Some of the coatings were tested again with static ice at BFGoodrich to obtain quantitative measurements. Later, methods to establish the adhesion force on surfaces subjected to impact ice were explored at Lewis. This paper describes the various test programs and the results of testing some of the coatings looked at over the past 5 years. None of the coatings were found to be truly ice-phobic; however, the most effective coatings were found to reduce the adhesion of ice to about 1/2 that of an uncoated aluminum sample.

  15. Effect of collagen removal on shear bond strength of two single-bottle adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Saboia, V P; Rodrigues, A L; Pimenta, L A

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of collagen removal on the shear bond strength for two single-bottle adhesive systems. The ultrastructure of the dentin after treatments and the dentin-resin interface were examined under SEM. The buccal and lingual surfaces of 80 extracted human third molars were ground to expose dentin. Teeth were randomly assigned to four groups and received the following treatments: Group 1(P&B 2.1), Prime & Bond 2.1 adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's directions and Restorative Z100 composite resin was bonded to the dentin surface; Group 2 (P&B 2.1/NaOCl), the same procedures were followed as for Group 1 except that the surfaces were treated with 10% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for one minute after acid conditioning; Group 3 (SB), Single Bond (3M) was applied according to the manufacturer's recommendations; Group 4 (SB/NaOCl), the same procedure was followed for Group 2, using Single Bond. The specimens were stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and tested in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Multiple Comparisons were used for statistical analysis of the data. A one-minute exposure of dentin to 10% NaOCl following acid conditioning resulted in a significant increase of the dentin shear bond strength for Prime & Bond 2.1. The same treatment for Single Bond resulted in a significant reduction in bond strength. Groups 1 and 3 were not statistically different from each other. The presence of a collagen layer resulted in the formation of a hybrid layer and similar values of adhesion for both adhesive systems. The results may suggest that collagen removal improves the bond strength for this acetone-based adhesive system but several such systems would need to be investigated.

  16. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  17. Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Ceramics Using an Asymmetric Wedge Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Kern, M.; Wegner, S. M. Bonding to Zirconia Ceramic: Adhesion Methods and Their Durability. Dental Materials 1998, 14 (1), 64. 18. Newman, S. M...moisture durability of adhesive bonding of ceramics is dental applications (12–14). The adhesive bonding of ceramic orthodontic inserts presents unique...removal and repair (15, 18). Determining fracture mechanics–based strain energy release rates across the interface of dental bonds has been

  18. Adhesive bubble removal method and apparatus for fiber applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, John R. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An assembly for supporting a fiber optic termination or connector in a centrifuge and comprising a cylindrical body member having a top portion adapted to receive the ferrule body portion of a fiber optic termination or connector and a bottom portion for receiving a cylindrical piston/sealing unit. The piston portion of the piston/sealing unit includes a compressible tip which is adapted to a butt up against the outer end of the ferrule body portion of the fiber optic termination or connector. A cylindrical end cap fits over the upper end of the body member for holding the fiber optic termination in place on the body member and causing a seal to be formed between the termination or connector and the upper portion of the body member adjacent the compressible tip of the plunger. The parts, when fitted together, are placed in a centrifuge which is operated for a predetermined spin cycle, so as to cause any bubbles in the uncured liquid adhesive to be vented outwardly from the termination through the end cap. Subsequent removal of the fiber optic termination or connector from the centrifuge and assembly is bubble free and ready to be joined with an optical fiber which is inserted in the ferrule end of the termination or connector.

  19. Adhesive Bubble Removal Method and Apparatus for Fiber Optic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, John R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An assembly for supporting a fiber optic termination or connector in a centrifuge and comprising a cylindrical body member having a top portion adapted to receive the ferrule body portion of a fiber optic termination or connector and a bottom portion for receiving a cylindrical piston/sealing unit is presented. The piston portion of the piston/sealing unit includes a compressible tip which is adapted to a butt up against the outer end of the ferrule body portion of the fiber optic termination or connector. A cylindrical end cap fits over the upper end of the body member for holding the fiber optic termination in place on the body member and causing a seal to be formed between the termination or connector and the upper portion of the body member adjacent the compressible tip of the plunger. The parts, when fitted together, are placed in a centrifuge which is operated for a predetermined spin cycle, so as to cause any bubbles in the uncured liquid adhesive to be vented outwardly from the termination through the end cap. Subsequent removal of the fiber optic termination or connector from the centrifuge and assembly is "bubble free" and ready to be joined with an optical fiber which is inserted in the ferrule end of the termination or connector.

  20. Study of SU-8 to make a Ni master-mold: Adhesion, sidewall profile, and removal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yang, Haesik; Kim, Kyuwon; Lim, Yong Taik; Pyo, Hyeon-Bong

    2006-08-01

    For disposable microfluidic devices, easy and inexpensive fabrication is essential. Consequently, replication of microfluidic devices, using injection molding or hot embossing, from a master-mold is widely used. However, the conventional master-mold fabrication technique is unsatisfactory in terms of time and costs. In this regard, direct Ni growth (electroplating) from a back plate is promising when the photoresist is well-defined. Here, we demonstrate the use of SU-8 as a photoresist to define the Ni-growth region. We accomplish this application by focusing on the adhesion, the sidewall profile, and the removal of SU-8: the adhesion is enhanced by controlling the exposure dose, the soft-baking time, and by choosing the adhesion-promoting layer; the sidewall profile is regulated by selecting the intensity of each exposed wavelength, showing an aspect ratio of up to 20.9; and, easy removal is achieved by choosing a proper photoresist-stripper. Using the master-mold fabricated by this method, we test the mechanical stability of the features according to the aspect ratio and length; in the hot embossing process, the features are stable in the aspect ratio of up to 5.8 at a length of 200 microm. In addition, the plastic devices fabricated from this method are applied to the passive stop valves, showing a capillary pressure (-0.2 to -7.2 kPa).

  1. Comparisons of two approaches for removing excess adhesive during the bonding procedure.

    PubMed

    Bishara, S E; VonWald, L; Olsen, M E; Laffoon, J F

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects on shear bond strength of removing excess adhesive from around the bracket base at 2 time periods: (1) immediately after placing the bracket on the tooth, and (2) after subjecting the adhesive to 5 seconds of light curing to initially secure the bracket in its proper position. The debonding forces were evaluated at 2 times; within half an hour after bonding and after storing for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees qC. These comparisons will help determine the most advantageous time for the clinician to remove excess adhesive from around the brackets during the bonding process. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups according to: (a) the time of removal of the excess adhesive from around the bracket base namely; immediately after placing the bracket or after 5 seconds of light cure and (b) the time of debonding the brackets, namely within half an hour or after 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using a Zwick test machine and calculated in Megapascals. The results of the analysis of variance (F = 35.05) comparing the 4 experimental groups indicated the presence of significant differences between all 4 groups (P = .0001). In general, the shear bond strengths were significantly larger for the 2 groups debonded after 24 hours, whether they were light cured for a total of 40 seconds (X = 8.8 +/- 3.6 MPa) or 45 seconds (X = 6.9 +/- 3.4 MPa). On the other hand, the shear bond strengths was significantly lower in the 2 groups debonded within half an hour from their initial bonding, whether light cured for 40 seconds (X = 0.4 +/- 1.0 MPa) or 45 seconds (X = 3.4 +/- 2.7 MPa). In conclusion, the additional 5 seconds of light cure significantly increased the initial shear bond strength. On the other hand, removing excess adhesive after 5 seconds of light cure significantly decreased the shear bond strength at 24 hours.

  2. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  3. Grit Blasting Scribes Coats For Tests Of Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    1991-01-01

    Grit-blasting technique for cutting line gaps in paints, hard coats, lubricants, and other coating films undergoing development. Line gaps cut in chevron patterns, groups of parallel lines, or other prescribed patterns, in preparation for testing adhesions of coats to substrates by attempting to peel patterned areas off with adhesive tapes. Damage to substrate reduced.

  4. A model for quantitative evaluation of skin damage at adhesive wound dressing removal.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Imai, Ryutaro; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2013-06-01

    The removal of adhesive wound dressings from the wound surface involves a risk of damaging the intact stratum corneum and regenerating epithelium. Pain associated with the removal of wound dressings is a major issue for patients and medical personnel. Recently, wound dressings coated with a silicone adhesive have been developed to reduce such skin damage and pain on removal and they have received good evaluation in various clinical settings. However, there is neither a standard method to quantify whether or not the integrity of the stratum corneum and regenerating epithelium is retained or if both structures are damaged by the removal of wound dressings, nor are there standardised values with which to assess skin damage. We applied six different types of adhesive wound dressing on plain copy paper printed with black ink by a laser printer, removed the dressings, examined the adhesive-coated surface of the wound dressings using a high-power videoscope, and examined the stripped areas. Wound dressings coated with a silicone adhesive showed significantly less detachment of the stratum corneum and regenerating epithelium, followed by those coated with polyurethane, hydrocolloid, and acrylic adhesives. The assessment method utilised in this study revealed distinct differences between wound dressing types, but less variation in the evaluation outcome of each type. This assessment method may be useful for the evaluation of adhesive wound dressings, particularly during product development. However, further studies will be needed to examine the effectiveness of this assessment method in the clinical setting because the adherent properties of polyurethane and hydrocolloid adhesives may be altered by the absorption of water from the skin.

  5. Peel testing behavior of mushroom-top terminated structured adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossfeld, Craig Kenneth

    Synthetic structured surfaces have been created based on the extraordinary adhesive ability exhibited by insects, spiders, and geckos. The adhesion of synthetic and natural structured adhesives is attributed to the cumulative addition of van der Waals forces acting on the structures of the surface. It has been shown that for synthetic surfaces a "mushroom top" or "flanged" terminating structure exhibits the highest adhesion. Unfortunately, due to the variety of testing and fabrication techniques and the small scale of previous studies, the detachment behavior of these structures is not well understood. This research systematically investigated the effect of peel angle, pillar diameter, flange diameter, and pillar aspect ratio on the force required for peeling. Explicit emphasis was placed on relatively large pillar structures to allow for in situ optical visualization in order to gain insights into fundamental mechanisms which dictate peeling. Traditional molding techniques were used to fabricate optical-scale mushroom terminated structures with pillar diameters of 1mm and 400microm and aspect ratios of 1, 3, and 5. Results were quantitatively compared to peel testing theory for conventional adhesives. It was convincingly demonstrated that the adhesive energy of a patterned surface changes as function of angle, and cannot be treated as a constant. The variability in the energy was linked to mechanistic differences in detachment through in situ observations and finite element analysis. Experimental results show that smaller pillars do not necessarily lead to higher adhesion during peeling, aspect ratio plays little role in peeling adhesive behavior, and pillar flange size is critical to adhesion. The conclusions from this study outline design parameters for mushroom topped dry adhesives in peeling applications.

  6. Effects of removing adhesive from tooth surfaces by Er:YAG laser and a composite bur on enamel surface roughnessand pulp chamber temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Sogra; Aghili, Hossein; Joshan, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: At the end of fixed orthodontic treatment, the remnant of adhesive should be eliminated from the tooth surface. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three methods of removing adhesive on enamel surface roughness, dental pulp temperature, and also on the time spent. Materials and Methods: The brackets on 90 extracted teeth were debonded using bracket removal pliers. A thermocouple sensor was fitted on the buccal wall of the pulp chamber through access cavity to measure thermal changes during adhesive removal. The residue of adhesive was eliminated from enamel surface of teeth by either tungsten carbide bur, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, or fiber reinforced composite bur. Scanning electron micrographs images were taken to assess the roughness of enamel surface. The time spent for adhesive removal was recorded as well. Chi-square test was used to evaluate the remnants of adhesive and enamel surface roughness; t-test and also repeated measurement analysis of variance were applied at P < 0.05 to compare the thermal changes of the pulp chamber and time spent between the methods of surface treatment. Results: The results of surface roughness were significantly different (P < 0.001). The pulp temperature changed significantly (P < 0.001). Tungsten carbide bur increased the temperature by 5.5°C significantly slower than reinforced composite bur (P = 0.004), however removed the adhesive residue faster than two other methods although not significantly (P = 0.069). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, fiber reinforced composite bur created the smoothest enamel surface while Er:YAG laser the roughest. Tungsten carbide and composite burs generated more heat compared to Er:YAG laser. In addition, tungsten carbide bur was the fastest and Er:YAG laser the slowest devices to remove adhesive residue. PMID:26005466

  7. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  8. Chemical semi-IPN hydrogels for the removal of adhesives from canvas paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Joana; Bonelli, Nicole; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero

    2014-03-01

    Semi-interpenetrating (IPN) poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/polyvinylpyrrolidone hydrogels were synthesized and used for the removal of adhesives from the back of canvas paintings. The high water retention capability and the specific mechanical properties of these gels allow the safe cleaning of water-sensitive artifacts using water-based detergent systems. The cleaning action is limited to the contact area and layer-by-layer removal is achieved while avoiding water spreading and absorption within water-sensitive substrates, which could lead, for example, to paint detachment. The use of these chemical gels also avoids leaving residues over the treated surface because the gel network is formed by covalent bonds that provide high mechanical strength. In this contribution, the physicochemical characterization of semi-IPN chemical hydrogels is reported. The successful application of an o/w microemulsion confined in the hydrogel for the removal of adhesives from linen canvas is also illustrated.

  9. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  10. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  11. Test Plan for the overburden removal demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.; Thompson, D.; Winberg, M.; Skaggs, J.

    1993-06-01

    The removal of soil overburdens from contaminated pits and trenches involves using equipment that will remove a small layer of soil from 3 to 6 in. at any time. As a layer of soil is removed, overburden characterization techniques perform surveys to a depth that exceeds each overburden removal layer to ensure that the removed soil will be free of contamination. It is generally expected that no contamination will be found in the soil overburden, which was brought in after the waste was put in place. It is anticipated that some containers in the waste zone have lost their integrity, and the waste leakage from those containers has migrated by gravity downward into the waste zone. To maintain a safe work environment, this method of overburden removal should allow safe preparation of a pit or trench for final remediation. To demonstrate the soil overburden techniques, the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program has contracted vendor services to provide equipment and techniques demonstrating soil overburden removal technology. The demonstration will include tests that will evaluate equipment performance and techniques for removal of overburden soil, control of contamination spread, and dust control. To evaluate the performance of these techniques, air particulate samples, physical measurements of the excavation soil cuts, maneuverability measurements, and time versus volume (rate) of soil removal data will be collected during removal operations. To provide a medium for sample evaluation, the overburden will be spiked at specific locations and depths with rare earth tracers. This test plan will be describe the objectives of the demonstration, data quality objectives, methods to be used to operate the equipment and use the techniques in the test area, and methods to be used in collecting data during the demonstration.

  12. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  13. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... function. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  15. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  16. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  17. A test of the adhesion approximation for gravitational clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei F.; Weinberg, David H.

    1994-01-01

    We quantitatively compare a particle implementation of the adhesion approximation to fully nonlinear, numerical 'N-body' simulations. Our primary tool, cross-correlation of N-body simulations with the adhesion approximation, indicates good agreement, better than that found by the same test performed with the Zel'dovich approximation (hereafter ZA). However, the cross-correlation is not as good as that of the truncated Zel'dovich approximation (TZA), obtained by applying the Zel'dovich approximation after smoothing the initial density field with a Gaussian filter. We confirm that the adhesion approximation produces an excessively filamentary distribution. Relative to the N-body results, we also find that: (a) the power spectrum obtained from the adhesion approximation is more accurate that that from ZA to TZA, (b) the error in the phase angle of Fourier components is worse that that from TZA, and (c) the mass distribution function is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA. It appears that adhesion performs well statistically, but that TZA is more accurate dynamically, in the sense of moving mass to the right place.

  18. A test of the adhesion approximation for gravitational clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei; Weinberg, David H.

    1993-01-01

    We quantitatively compare a particle implementation of the adhesion approximation to fully non-linear, numerical 'N-body' simulations. Our primary tool, cross-correlation of N-body simulations with the adhesion approximation, indicates good agreement, better than that found by the same test performed with the Zel-dovich approximation (hereafter ZA). However, the cross-correlation is not as good as that of the truncated Zel-dovich approximation (TZA), obtained by applying the Zel'dovich approximation after smoothing the initial density field with a Gaussian filter. We confirm that the adhesion approximation produces an excessively filamentary distribution. Relative to the N-body results, we also find that: (a) the power spectrum obtained from the adhesion approximation is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA, (b) the error in the phase angle of Fourier components is worse than that from TZA, and (c) the mass distribution function is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA. It appears that adhesion performs well statistically, but that TZA is more accurate dynamically, in the sense of moving mass to the right place.

  19. Adhesive Testing for the BTeV Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, C.M.; Kwan, Simon; Hicks, D.; Hahn, Eileen; Hoffman, Jay; Austin, Sharon; Jones, Renee; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The basic unit of the BTeV pixel detector is a multi-chip module which is comprised of a silicon sensor module bump-bonded to a number of readout chips. The pixel module will then be glued to a high intensity interconnect (HDI) cable using electrically conductive adhesive, and then onto a substrate using another kind of adhesive with reasonable thermal conductivity. This report is mostly addressed to the need of the latter--the substrate adhesive. The aim of this technical note is to summarize the testing efforts and results of this substrate adhesive covering a period since 2001 till the end of 2004. The substrate will serve two purposes: mechanical support and cooling of the modules. Stresses and strains will be generated when there is a thermal change on the substrate. In addition, since there are many kinds of materials, with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), being glued together to form the complete detector assembly, the substrate may get distorted due to the CTE mismatches. As stress is directly proportional to the material modulus, a significant amount of effort was concentrated in understanding the adhesive modulus. There are other constraints which need to be considered as well. For instance, the detector will be placed in a vacuum close to the beam, and it will be exposed to significant radiation during operation. As there are so many requirements on the adhesive, it is certainly not that easy to find one that meets all the demands. With a reasonable screening that the adhesive candidates being radiation hard and have low outgassing, searching for suitable adhesives was focused on those with low modulus. That is because (1) a mechanically reliable and fail-proof adhesive structure with low stress is needed, and (2) the leaking current characteristics of the modules will increase if mechanical stresses are too high. However, much of the technical information needed is usually not available from the vendor and therefore testing on our own

  20. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  1. Tensile adhesion testing methodology for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thermally sprayed coatings consists of lamellae which are oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The lamellae separate and fracture by distinctive mechanisms which are reflected in the failure morphology, and these may be described as adhesive (between the coating and substrate), cohesive (within the coating), or mixed mode. There is a large variability in the failure stress for any nominally identical group of coatings. A lower bound for the fracture toughness of alumina coatings can be calculated as 0.2 MNm exp -3/2. The coating strength values may also be treated as belonging to the statistical distribution of the Weibull function. The Weibull modulus of the coating strength varied from 1.4 to 3.8. This analysis infers that the flaw size within coatings is highly variable and that the flaws are nonuniformly dispersed. The present work focuses on the question of whether tensile adhesion tests are an appropriate testing method for thermally sprayed materials.

  2. Tide effects removed from well tests

    SciTech Connect

    Aase, E.P.B.; Jelmert, T.A.; Vik, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    To avoid distorted data when analyzing well pressure tests of permeable offshore reservoirs, one needs to account for periodic ocean tidal stress. Quartz-crystal bottom hole pressure recorders provide a high resolution of reservoir pressure but also measures pressure fluctuations from tidal effects during well testing. Periodic oscillations in the reservoir pressure are due to the three mechanisms: solid earth tide; barometric tide/effect; and ocean tide. The paper uses sample data from an offshore reservoir to illustrate how tide effects can be identified in the data and the correction procedure to use to remove these effects.

  3. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  4. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives - effective securement technique for intravascular catheters: in vitro testing of safety and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Simonova, G; Rickard, C M; Dunster, K R; Smyth, D J; McMillan, D; Fraser, J F

    2012-05-01

    Partial or complete dislodgement of intravascular catheters remains a significant problem in hospitals despite current securement methods. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives (TA) are used to close skin wounds as an alternative to sutures. These adhesives have high mechanical strength and can remain in situ for several days. This study investigated in vitro use of TAs in securing intravascular catheters (IVC). We compared two adhesives for interaction with IVC material, comparing skin glues with current securement methods in terms of their ability to prevent IVC dislodgement and inhibit microbial growth. Two TAs (Dermabond, Ethicon Inc. and Histoacryl, B. Braun) and three removal agents (Remove™, paraffin and acetone) were tested for interaction with IVC material by use of tensile testing. TAs were also compared against two polyurethane (standard and bordered) dressings (Tegaderm™ 1624 and 1633, 3M Australia Pty Ltd) and an external stabilisation device (Statlock, Bard Medical, Covington) against control (unsecured IVCs) for ability to prevent pull-out of 16 G peripheral IVCs from newborn fresh porcine skin. Agar media containing pH-sensitive dye was used to assess antimicrobial properties of TAs and polyurethane dressings to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Neither TA weakened the IVCs (P >0.05). Of removal agents, only acetone was associated with a significant decrease in IVC strength (P <0.05). Both TAs and Statlock significantly increased the pull-out force (P <0.01). TA was quick and easy to apply to IVCs, with no irritation or skin damage noted on removal and no bacterial colony growth under either TA.

  5. Effect of Orthodontic Debonding and Adhesive Removal on the Enamel – Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives – a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Tomkowski, Robert; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    After orthodontic treatment, brackets are debonded and residual adhesive is removed, causing iatrogenic enamel damage. The aim of this study was to review the methods of orthodontic adhesive removal, find clear evidence, and provide a rationale for this procedure. A literature search was performed in PubMed, Dentistry and Oral Sciences, Scopus, Cochrane, Google, and Google Scholar using keywords: orthodontic adhesive removal, orthodontic debonding, orthodontic clean-up. Studies concerning human enamel roughness or loss from debonding and adhesive removal were considered. Forty-four full-text articles were analyzed and 3 were rejected after detailed reading; finally 41 papers were included. Fifteen qualitative studies, 13 studies based on indices of enamel surface, and 13 quantitative studies were found. No meta-analysis could be performed due to a lack of homogenous quantitative evidence. The most popular tools were tungsten carbide burs, which were faster and more effective than Sof-Lex discs, ultrasonic tools, hand instruments, rubbers, or composite burs. They remove a substantial layer of enamel and roughen its surface, but are less destructive than Arkansas stones, green stones, diamond burs, steel burs, and lasers. Multi-step Sof-Lex discs and pumice slurry are the most predictable enamel polishing tools. Arkansas stones, green stones, diamond burs, steel burs, and lasers should not be used for adhesive removal. The use of tungsten carbide bur requires multistep polishing. Further efforts should be made to find tools and methods for complete removal of adhesive remnants, minimizing enamel loss and achieving a smooth surface. PMID:25327612

  6. Evaluation of dry technology for removal of pellicle adhesive residue on advanced optical reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paracha, Shazad; Bekka, Samy; Eynon, Benjamin; Choi, Jaehyuck; Balooch, Mehdi; Varghese, Ivin; Hopkins, Tyler

    2013-09-01

    The fast pace of MOSFET scaling is accelerating the introduction of smaller technology nodes to extend CMOS beyond 20nm as required by Moore's law. To meet these stringent requirements, the industry is seeing an increase in the number of critical layers per reticle set as it move to lower technology nodes especially in a high volume manufacturing operation. These requirements are resulting in reticles with higher feature densities, smaller feature sizes and highly complex Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), built with using new absorber and pellicle materials. These rapid changes are leaving a gap in maintaining these reticles in a fab environment, for not only haze control but also the functionality of the reticle. The industry standard of using wet techniques (which uses aggressive chemicals, like SPM, and SC1) to repel reticles can result in damage to the sub-resolution assist features (SRAF's), create changes to CD uniformity and have potential for creating defects that require other means of removal or repair. Also, these wet cleaning methods in the fab environment can create source for haze growth. Haze can be controlled by: 1) Chemical free (dry) reticle cleaning, 2) In-line reticle inspection in fab, and 3) Manage the environment where reticles are stored. In this paper we will discuss a dry technique (chemical free) to remove pellicle adhesive residue from advanced optical reticles. Samsung Austin Semiconductors (SAS), jointly worked with Eco-Snow System (a division of RAVE N.P., Inc.) to evaluate the use of Dry Reactive Gas (DRG) technique to remove pellicle adhesive residue on reticles. This technique can significantly reduce the impact to the critical geometry in active array of the reticle, resulting in preserving the reticle performance level seen at wafer level. The paper will discuss results on the viability of this technique used on advanced reticles.

  7. Blister Test for Measurements of Adhesion and Adhesion Degradation of Organic Polymers on AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Troconis, Brendy Carolina

    A key parameter for the performance of corrosion protective coatings applied to metals is adhesion. Surface preparation prior to coating application is known to be critical, but there is a lack of understanding of what controls adhesion. Numerous techniques have been developed in the last decades to measure the adhesion strength of coatings to metals. Nonetheless, they are generally non-quantitative, non-reproducible, performed in dry conditions, or overestimate adhesion. In this study, a quantitative and reproducible technique, the Blister Test (BT), is used. The BT offers the ability to study the effects of a range of parameters, including the presence or absence of a wetting liquid, and simulates the stress situation in the coating/substrate interface. The effects of roughness and surface topography were studied by the BT and Optical Profilometry, using AA2024-T3 substrates coated with polyvinyl butyral (PVB). Random abrasion generated a surface with lower average roughness than aligned abrasion due to the continual cross abrasion of the grooves. The BT could discern the effects of different mechanical treatments. An adhesion strength indicator was defined and found to be a useful parameter. The effectiveness of standard adhesion techniques such as ASTM D4541 (Pull-off Test) and ASTM D3359 (Tape Test) was compared to the BT. Also, different attempts to measure adhesion and adhesion degradation of organic polymers to AA2024-T3 were tested. The pull-off test does not produce adhesive failure across the entire interface, while the tape test is a very qualitative technique and does not discern between the effects of different coating systems on the adhesion performance. The BT produces adhesive failure of the primer studied, is very reproducible, and is able to rank different coating systems. Therefore, it was found to be superior to the others. The approaches tested for adhesion degradation were not aggressive enough to have a measurable effect. The effects of

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes

  9. Adhesion and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus biofilms on Ni-PTFE modified stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; McLandsborough, Lynne A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm control remains a challenge to food safety. A well-studied non-fouling coating involves codeposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) during electroless plating. This coating has been reported to reduce foulant build-up during pasteurization, but opportunities remain in demonstrating its efficacy in inhibiting biofilm formation. Herein, the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus on Ni-PTFE-modified stainless steel (SS) are characterized. Coatings lowered the surface energy of SS and reduced biofilm formation by > 2 log CFU cm(-2). Characterization of the kinetics of biofilm removal during cleaning demonstrated improved cleanability on the Ni-PTFE coated steel. There was no evidence of biofilm after cleaning by either solution on the Ni-PTFE coated steel, whereas more than 3 log and 1 log CFU cm(-2) of bacteria remained on the native steel after cleaning with water and an alkaline cleaner, respectively. This work demonstrates the potential application of Ni-PTFE non-fouling coatings on SS to improve food safety by reducing biofilm formation and improving the cleaning efficiency of food processing equipment.

  10. Process Sensitivity, Performance, and Direct Verification Testing of Adhesive Locking Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Leatherwood, Michael D.; Montoya, Michael D.; Kato, Ken A.; Akers, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Phase I: The use of adhesive locking features or liquid locking compounds (LLCs) (e.g., Loctite) as a means of providing a secondary locking feature has been used on NASA programs since the Apollo program. In many cases Loctite was used as a last resort when (a) self-locking fasteners were no longer functioning per their respective drawing specification, (b) access was limited for removal & replacement, or (c) replacement could not be accomplished without severe impact to schedule. Long-term use of Loctite became inevitable in cases where removal and replacement of worn hardware was not cost effective and Loctite was assumed to be fully cured and working. The NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) and United Space Alliance (USA) recognized the need for more extensive testing of Loctite grades to better understand their capabilities and limitations as a secondary locking feature. These tests, identified as Phase I, were designed to identify processing sensitivities, to determine proper cure time, the correct primer to use on aerospace nutplate, insert and bolt materials such as A286 and MP35N, and the minimum amount of Loctite that is required to achieve optimum breakaway torque values. The .1900-32 was the fastener size tested, due to wide usage in the aerospace industry. Three different grades of Loctite were tested. Results indicate that, with proper controls, adhesive locking features can be successfully used in the repair of locking features and should be considered for design. Phase II: Threaded fastening systems used in aerospace programs typically have a requirement for a redundant locking feature. The primary locking method is the fastener preload and the traditional redundant locking feature is a self-locking mechanical device that may include deformed threads, non-metallic inserts, split beam features, or other methods that impede movement between threaded members. The self-locking resistance of traditional locking features can be directly verified

  11. Adhesion Testing of Firebricks from Launch Pad 39A Flame Trench after STS-124

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Curran, Jerome P.

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion testing was performed on the firebricks in the flame trench of Launch Complex 39A to determine the strength of the epoxy/firebrick bond to the backing concrete wall. The testing used an Elcometer 110 pneumatic adhesion tensile testing instrument (PATTI).

  12. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  13. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  14. A Method for Characterizing the Surface Cleanliness During Adhesion Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-03-01

    It has been shown that the degree of adhesion of metals depends upon the surface cleanliness . This paper presents a method that was used to...characterize the surface cleanliness of nickel during an adhesion experiment. The change in the work function of the surface as the metal was cleaned was used

  15. Bio-based wood adhesives--preparation, characterization, and testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesive bonding plays an increasing role in the forest product industry and is a key factor for efficiently utilizing timber and other lignocellulosic resources. As synthetic wood adhesives are mostly derived from depleting petrochemical resources and have resulted in increasing environmental conce...

  16. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Chapital, Dorselyn C

    2015-03-05

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environment-friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainability concerns. This work demonstrates the preparation and testing of the plant seed-based wood adhesives using cottonseed and soy meal as raw materials. In addition to untreated meals, water washed meals and protein isolates are prepared and tested. Adhesive slurries are prepared by mixing a freeze-dried meal product with deionized water (3:25 w/w) for 2 hr. Each adhesive preparation is applied to one end of 2 wood veneer strips using a brush. The tacky adhesive coated areas of the wood veneer strips are lapped and glued by hot-pressing. Adhesive strength is reported as the shear strength of the bonded wood specimen at break. Water resistance of the adhesives is measured by the change in shear strength of the bonded wood specimens at break after water soaking. This protocol allows one to assess plant seed-based agricultural products as suitable candidates for substitution of synthetic-based wood adhesives. Adjustments to the adhesive formulation with or without additives and bonding conditions could optimize their adhesive properties for various practical applications.

  17. 18. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW FROM REMOVABLE LEVEL DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. STATIC TEST TOWER - VIEW FROM REMOVABLE LEVEL DOWN TOWARDS GANTRY CRANE AND THREE TEST CELLS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. 41. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW LOOKING DOWN FROM REMOVABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. STATIC TEST TOWER - VIEW LOOKING DOWN FROM REMOVABLE WALKWAY LEVEL - LOOKING AT TEST CELLS AND GRILL OVER FLAME DEFLECTOR - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. 17. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW LOOKING DOWN FROM REMOVABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. STATIC TEST TOWER - VIEW LOOKING DOWN FROM REMOVABLE WALKWAY LEVEL - LOOKING AT TEST CELLS AND GRILL OVER FLAME DEFLECTOR. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  20. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  1. Adhesion scratch testing - A round-robin experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, A. J.; Valli, J.; Steinmann, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Six sets of samples, TiN coated by chemical or physical vapor deposition methods (CVD or PVD) onto cemented carbide or high-speed steel (HSS), and TiC coated by CVD onto cemented carbide have been scratch tested using three types of commercially available scratch adhesion tester. With exception of one cemented carbide set, the reproducibility of the critical loads for any given set with a given stylus is excellent, about + or - 5 percent, and is about + or - 20 percent for different styli. Any differences in critical loads recorded for any given sample set can be attributed to the condition of the stylus (clean, new, etc.), the instrument used, the stylus itself (friction coefficient, etc.), and the sample set itself. One CVD set showed remarkably large differences in critical loads for different styli, which is thought to be related to a mechanical interaction between stylus and coating which is enhanced by a plastic deformability in the film related to the coating microstructure. The critical load for TiN on HSS increases with coating thickness, and differences in frictional conditions led to a systematic variation in the critical loads depending on the stylus used.

  2. 16. STATIC TEST TOWER REMOVABLE FLOOR LEVEL VIEW OF FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. STATIC TEST TOWER REMOVABLE FLOOR LEVEL VIEW OF FLOOR THAT FOLDS BACK TO ALLOW ROCKET PLACEMENT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Water soluble/dispersible and easy removable cationic adhesives and coating for paper recycling

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Yulin; Yan, Zegui

    2005-11-29

    The present invention is an adhesive or coating composition that is dispersible or dissolvable in water, making it useful in as a coating or adhesive in paper intended for recycling. The composition of the present invention is cationically charged thereby binding with the fibers of the paper slurry and thus, resulting in reduced deposition of adhesives on equipment during the recycling process. The presence of the composition of the present invention results in stronger interfiber bonding in products produced from the recycled fibers.

  4. Laser-Doppler imaging assessment of skin hyperemia as an indicator of trauma after adhesive strip removal.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N; Carta, S G

    1996-01-01

    The effect of adhesive tape and dressing removal on skin integrity is particularly important for patients who have increased risk for skin damage or impaired physiological responses to skin trauma. Visual observation of skin erythema does not always provide an adequate assessment of acute injury; detection of trauma is limited by the naturally occurring wide range of skin color and tones. This study had two purposes: (1) to assess the sensitivity and objectivity of laser-Doppler perfusion imaging (LDI) in measuring skin blood perfusion in forearm skin before and after removal of adhesive strips and (2) to determine the relationship between skin perfusion levels after adhesive-strip removal and the peel force required to remove the strips. Variations in peel-force levels were obtained in two ways: first, from naturally occurring skin differences; and second, by using an adhesive remover product (ARP) developed to reduce skin trauma. In 10 subjects, acrylic adhesive strips (13 x 70 mm) were placed in pairs on standardized sites on both volar forearms and peeled off 24 hours later at a constant velocity of 5 mm/sec while the peel force was recorded. During peeling, an ARP was used with one strip; nothing was used on the adjacent paired strip (CONTROL). Skin blood perfusion was measured at 5 and 20 minutes after strip removal by non-contact LDI under the ARP and CONTROL conditions simultaneously. Results show that (1) hyperemia after strip removal is linearly related to peel force (r2 = 0.55, p < .01): (2) use of an ARP, as indexed by the hyperemic response, significantly reduces skin trauma (1.02 [SD = 0.11] versus 1.47 [SD = 0.11], p < .01) with a mean CONTROL/ARP ratio of 1.56; and (3) the peel force required is reduced by using an ARP. These findings indicate that LDI is a useful, sensitive tool for assessment of skin trauma and that reducing peel forces has a positive effect.

  5. Tests to Determine the Adhesive Power of Passenger-Car Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foerster, B.

    1956-01-01

    The concept of the adhesive power of a tire with respect to the road involves several properties which result from the purpose of the tire; namely, connecting link between vehicle and road: (1) The tire must transfer the tractive and braking forces acting in the direction of travel (tractive and braking adhesion); (2) The tire is to prevent lateral deviations of the vehicle from the desired direction of travel (track adhesion). Moreover, the rubber tire provides part of the springing of the vehicle. Above all, it has to level out the minor road irregularities; thus it smoothes, as it were, the road and simultaneously reduces the noise of driving. The springing properties of the tire affect the adhesive power. The tests described below comprise a determination of the braking and track adhesion of individual tires. The adhesion of driven wheels has not been investigated so far.

  6. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  7. Tests show that aluminum welds are improved by bead removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Tests with 2218-T87 aluminum alloy plate indicate improvements in strength, ductility, fatigue properties, and burst pressure result when one or both of the top and bottom weld beads are removed. There is, however, a drop in yield strength. The consistency of test data is considerably improved by weld bead removal.

  8. International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.

    2000-01-01

    Performance testing of the International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly flight hardware in the United States Laboratory during 1999 is described. The CDRA exceeded carbon dioxide performance specifications and operated flawlessly. Data from this test is presented.

  9. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  10. Laboratory test method for dirt pickup resistance and stain removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shiwei; Zheng, Xueying; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Quan

    2017-03-01

    The pollution characteristics of current atmospheric particulates was summarized in the present investigation. The composition and proportion of the pollution sources used for dirt pickup resistance and stain removal test were adjusted, and the pollution sources used for new type dirt pickup resistance and stain removal test produced. In addition, a new dirt pickup method was adopted, and a set of new type laboratory dirt pickup resistance and stain removal tests developed by taking comprehensive consideration of the existing state and dirt pickup mode of actual atmospheric particulates. It verifies the rationality, feasibility and effectiveness of new test methods for dirt pickup resistance and stain removal based on the contrast test over the new and old test methods.

  11. Comparison of two methods of visual magnification for removal of adhesive flash during bracket placement using two types of orthodontic bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Estefania Queiroga de Santana e; Nobrega, Maria de Lourdes Martins; Dametto, Fabio Roberto; dos Santos, Patrícia Bittencourt Dutra; Pinheiro, Fabio Henrique de Sá Leitão

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of two methods of visual magnification (operating microscope and light head magnifying glass) for removal of composite flash around orthodontic metal brackets. Material and Methods: Brackets were bonded in the center of the clinical crown of sixty well-preserved human premolars. Half of the sample was bonded with conventional Transbond XT (3M Unitek TM, USA), whereas the other half was bonded with Transbond TM Plus Color Change (3M Unitek TM, USA). For each type of composite, the choice of method to remove the flash was determined by randomly distributing the teeth into the following subgroups: A (removal by naked eye, n = 10), B (removal with the aid of light head magnifying glass, under 4x magnification, n = 10), and C (removal with the aid of an operating microscope, under 40x magnification, n = 10). Brackets were debonded and teeth taken to a scanning electron microscope (SS-x-550, Shimadzu, Japan) for visualization of their buccal surface. Quantification of composite flash was performed with Image Pro Plus software, and values were compared by Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn’s post-hoc test at 5% significance level. Results: Removal of pigmented orthodontic adhesive with the aid of light head magnifying glass proved, in general, to be advantageous in comparison to all other methods. Conclusion: There was no advantage in using Transbond TM Plus Color Change alone. Further studies are necessary to draw a more definitive conclusion in regards to the benefits of using an operating microscope. PMID:28125139

  12. Hanford single shell tank saltcake cesium removal test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-11

    This document provides the test preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake from tanks 241-BY-110, 241-U-108, 241 U 109, 241-A-101, and 241-S-102 in a benchscale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline silicotitanate

  13. Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31

    This document provides the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford DSSF supernatant liquor from tank 241-AW-101 in a bench-scale column. Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate.

  14. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  15. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  16. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  17. Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.C.

    1994-12-08

    The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

  18. Semiconductors can be tested without removing them from circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, B. C.

    1966-01-01

    Oscilloscope, with specially developed test circuitry, quickly checks semiconductors without removing them from the circuitry. For transistors, approximate gain and linearity, as well as PNP or NPN determinations are made. When testing diodes, open or short circuits, and reverse polarity show up plainly.

  19. Adhesion to tooth structure: a critical review of "micro" bond strength test methods.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Steve; Geraldeli, Saulo; Maia, Rodrigo; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Carlos José; Yamagawa, Junichiro

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to critically review the literature regarding the mechanics, geometry, load application and other testing parameters of "micro" shear and tensile adhesion tests, and to outline their advantages and limitations. The testing of multiple specimens from a single tooth conserves teeth and allows research designs not possible using conventional 'macro' methods. Specimen fabrication, gripping and load application methods, in addition to material properties of the various components comprising the resin-tooth adhesive bond, will influence the stress distribution and consequently, the nominal bond strength and failure mode. These issues must be understood; as should the limitations inherent to strength-based testing of a complicated adhesive bond joining dissimilar substrates, for proper test selection, conduct and interpretation. Finite element analysis and comprehensive reporting of test conduct and results will further our efforts towards a standardization of test procedures. For the foreseeable future, both "micro" and "macro" bond strength tests will, as well as various morphological and spectroscopic investigative techniques, continue to be important tools for improving resin-tooth adhesion to increase the service life of dental resin-based composite restorations.

  20. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    PubMed

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxic effects of six self-etching adhesives with direct and indirect contact tests.

    PubMed

    Kusdemir, Mahmut; Gunal, Solen; Ozer, Fusun; Imazato, Satoshi; Izutani, Naomi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Blatz, Markus B

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of self-etching primers/adhesives by direct contact and dentin barrier tests. The three two-step self-etching systems Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), Prime&Bond NT/NRC (PB) and one-step self-etching systems Reactmer Bond (RB), Clearfil Tri-S Bond (CTS), and Adper Prompt L-Pop (AP) were examined. In direct contact tests, L929 cells were cultured in the presence of diluted solutions (50, 20, 10, and 1%) of primer/conditioner of adhesive systems. For dentin barrier tests, each system was applied onto 0.5 or 1.5 mm thick human dentin assembled in a simple pulp chamber device and incubated for 24 h at 37°C to make the diffusive components contact the L929 cells placed at the bottom of the chamber. The cytotoxic effects were assessed by MTT assay. Cell culture without application of any primers/adhesives served as the control for both tests. One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used for statistical analyses. The direct contact tests demonstrated that CSE and CPB were less toxic than the other materials at all dilutions. In the dentin barrier tests, toxic effects of materials were reduced with an increase in thickness of intervening dentin. CSE and CPB showed less cytotoxicity than the other adhesives (p<0.05) when applied to 0.5 mm-thick dentin, and CSE was the least toxic in the 1.5 mm-dentin group (p<0.05). Dentin thickness positively affected biocompatibility of the tested bonding systems. Two-step self-etching systems with HEMA-based primers were more biocompatible than other self-etching adhesives.

  2. Erbium, chromium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet laser for caries removal: influence on bonding of a self-etching adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Arlene; Marques, Márcia Martins; Soler, Julia Maria Pavan; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2008-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the dental substrates obtained after the use of different caries removal techniques on bonding of a self-etching system. Forty, extracted, carious, human molars were ground to expose flat surfaces containing caries-infected dentine surrounded by sound dentine. The caries lesions of the specimens were removed or not (control--G1) either by round steel burs and water-cooled, low speed, handpiece (G2), or by irradiation with an erbium, chromium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (2W, 20 Hz, 35.38 J/cm(2), fiber G4 handpiece with 0.2826 mm(2), non-contact mode at a 2 mm distance, 70% air/20% water--G3) or using a chemo-mechanical method (Carisolv--G4). Caries-infected, caries-affected and sound dentines were submitted to a bonding system followed by construction of a resin-based composite crown. Hour-glass shaped samples were obtained and submitted to a micro-tensile bond test. The bond strength data were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA), complemented by Tukey's test (P adhesion. Moreover, amongst the caries removal methods tested, the Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation was the poorest in providing a substrate for bonding with the tested self-etching system.

  3. Adhesion determination of dental porcelain to zirconia using the Schwickerath test: strength vs. fracture energy approach.

    PubMed

    Kosyfaki, P; Swain, M V

    2014-11-01

    Two approaches to measure the fracture energy to delaminate four different porcelains from zirconia substrates are compared using Schwickerath adhesion strength test specimens. In all instances it was possible to stably extend the crack along or adjacent to the porcelain-zirconia interface. The fracture energy expended to delaminate the porcelain was found by determining the work of fracture upon loading to 12 N and then unloading. Additional tests were undertaken on specimens notched along the interface, which enabled the compliance of the cracked Schwickerath specimens to be calibrated. The strain energy and deflection of the Schwickerath specimen as a function of crack length were derived. On this basis a simple expression was determined for the strain energy release rate or interfacial fracture toughness from the minima in the force-displacement curves. Consequently two measures of the adhesion energy were determined, the work of fracture and the strain energy release rate. It was found that the ranking for the four porcelains bonded to zirconia differed depending upon the approach. The work of fracture was substantially different from the strain energy release rate for three of the porcelain-zirconia systems and appears to be directly related to the residual stresses present in the bonded structures. The relative merits of the strain energy release rate, work of fracture vs. the stress to initiate cracking in the case of the Schwickerath adhesion test, are discussed. The advantage of this test is that it enables three estimates of the adhesion for porcelain veneers bonded to zirconia.

  4. Permeability testing of composite material and adhesive bonds for the DC-XA composite feedline program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and Hysol EA 9394 epoxy adhesive bonded between composite/titanium were tested for permeability after various numbers of thermal cycles between 100 C and liquid nitrogen (-196 C). The specimens were quenched from the 100 C temperature into liquid nitrogen to induce thermal shock into the material. Results showed that the carbon/epoxy system was practically impermeable even after 12 thermal cycles. The EA 9394 adhesive bondline was more permeable than the carbon/epoxy, but vacuum mixing minimized the permeability and kept it within allowable limits. Thermal cycling had little effect on the permeability values of the bondline specimens.

  5. EP-toxicity testing of mercury removal resin grout

    SciTech Connect

    Mersman, K.E.

    1984-07-18

    To determine which category a waste will fit into, the EPA requires a classification test. The test, EP-toxicity, consists of a physical integrity test followed by an extraction. For the case of the mercury removal resin grout, the mercury concentration in the extract cannot exceed 0.2 mg/L if the waste is to be classified as ``solid waste.`` Otherwise, the waste is classified as ``hazardous.`` Simulated process solutions were used to load the mercury removal resin. The resin was solidified with the addition of cement and water using a formulation based on grout formulations typically used to solidify power reactor ion exchange resins. Envirodyne Engineers of St. Louis, Missouri, an EPA sanctioned laboratory, performed the EP-toxicity test for the two samples. One sample was a blank which was made with unloaded resin. For the formulation tested, the EP-toxicity test results showed that the mercury removal resin grout does not fit into the ``hazardous waste`` category.

  6. Investigation of a Wedge Adhesion Test for Edge Seals

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, Michael; Wohlgemuth, John; Miller, David; Postak, Lori; Booth, Dennis; Phillips, Nancy

    2016-09-26

    Many photovoltaic (PV) technologies have been found to be sensitive to moisture that diffuses into a PV package. Even with the use of impermeable frontsheets and backsheets, moisture can penetrate from the edges of a module. To limit this moisture ingress pathway from occurring, manufacturers often use a low permeability polyisobutylene (PIB) based edge seal filled with desiccant to further restrict moisture ingress. Moisture ingress studies have shown that these materials are capable of blocking moisture for the 25-year life of a module; but to do so, they must remain well-adhered and free of cracks. This work focuses on adapting the Boeing Wedge test for use with edge seals laminated using glass substrates as part of a strategy to assess the long-term durability of edge seals. The advantage of this method is that it duplicates the residual stresses and strains that a glass/glass module may have when the lamination process results in some residual glass bending that puts the perimeter in tension. Additionally, this method allows one to simultaneously expose the material to thermal stress, humidity, mechanical stress, and ultraviolet radiation. The disadvantage of this method generally is that we are limited by the fracture toughness of the glass substrates that the edge seal is adhered to. However, the low toughness of typical uncrosslinked or sparsely crosslinked PIB makes them suitable for this technique. We present data obtained during the development of the wedge test for use with PV edge seal materials. This includes development of the measuring techniques and evaluation of the test method with relevant materials. We find consistent data within a given experiment, along with the theoretical independence of fracture toughness measurements with wedge thickness. This indicates that the test methodology is reproducible. However, even though individual experimental sets are consistent, the reproducibility between experimental sets is poor. We believe this may be

  7. Investigation of a wedge adhesion test for edge seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempe, Michael; Wohlgemuth, John; Miller, David; Postak, Lori; Booth, Dennis; Phillips, Nancy

    2016-09-01

    Many photovoltaic (PV) technologies have been found to be sensitive to moisture that diffuses into a PV package. Even with the use of impermeable frontsheets and backsheets, moisture can penetrate from the edges of a module. To limit this moisture ingress pathway from occurring, manufacturers often use a low permeability polyisobutylene (PIB) based edge seal filled with desiccant to further restrict moisture ingress. Moisture ingress studies have shown that these materials are capable of blocking moisture for the 25-year life of a module; but to do so, they must remain well-adhered and free of cracks. This work focuses on adapting the Boeing Wedge test for use with edge seals laminated using glass substrates as part of a strategy to assess the long-term durability of edge seals. The advantage of this method is that it duplicates the residual stresses and strains that a glass/glass module may have when the lamination process results in some residual glass bending that puts the perimeter in tension. Additionally, this method allows one to simultaneously expose the material to thermal stress, humidity, mechanical stress, and ultraviolet radiation. The disadvantage of this method generally is that we are limited by the fracture toughness of the glass substrates that the edge seal is adhered to. However, the low toughness of typical uncrosslinked or sparsely crosslinked PIB makes them suitable for this technique. We present data obtained during the development of the wedge test for use with PV edge seal materials. This includes development of the measuring techniques and evaluation of the test method with relevant materials. We find consistent data within a given experiment, along with the theoretical independence of fracture toughness measurements with wedge thickness. This indicates that the test methodology is reproducible. However, even though individual experimental sets are consistent, the reproducibility between experimental sets is poor. We believe this may be

  8. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness.

  9. Ion Exchange Column Tests Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; McCabe, D.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.; Morse, M.

    2013-12-20

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed on site. There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important. Options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste, as well as to examine the volatility of 99Tc during the vitrification process. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. A conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. SuperLig® 639 is an elutable ion exchange resin. In the tank waste, 99Tc is predominantly found in the tank supernate as pertechnetate (TcO4-). Perrhenate (ReO4-) has been shown to be a good non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in laboratory testing for this ion exchange resin. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient and column resin maturation kinetics testing using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from simulated LAW. This revision includes results from testing to determine effective resin operating temperature range. Loading tests were performed at 45°C, and the computer modeling was updated to include the temperature effects. Equilibrium contact testing indicated that this batch of

  10. Testing a Regenerative Carbon Dioxide and Moisture Removal Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Button, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Curley, Suzanne

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration supported the development of a new vacuum-desorbed regenerative carbon dioxide and humidity control technology for use in short duration human spacecraft. The technology was baselined for use in the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Termed the Carbon Diox-ide And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS), the unit was developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and has undergone extensive testing at Johnson Space Center. The tests were per-formed to evaluate performance characteristics under range of operating conditions and human loads expected in future spacecraft applications, as part of maturation to increase its readiness for flight. Early tests, conducted at nominal atmospheric pressure, used human metabolic sim-ulators to generate loads, with later tests making us of human test subjects. During these tests many different test cases were performed, involving from 1 to 6 test subjects, with different activity profiles (sleep, nominal and exercise). These tests were conducted within the airlock portion of a human rated test chamber sized to simulate the Orion cabin free air volume. More recently, a test was completed that integrated the CAMRAS with a simulated suit loop using prototype umbilicals and was conducted at reduced atmospheric pressure and elevated oxygen levels. This paper will describe the facilities and procedures used to conduct these and future tests, and provide a summary of findings.

  11. Testing a Regenerative Carbon Dioxide and Moisture Removal Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Button, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Curley, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration supported the development of a new vacuum-desorbed regenerative carbon dioxide and humidity control technology for use in short duration human spacecraft. The technology was baselined for use in the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle s Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Termed the Carbon Dioxide And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS), the unit was developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and has undergone extensive testing at Johnson Space Center. The tests were performed to evaluate performance characteristics under range of operating conditions and human loads expected in future spacecraft applications, as part of maturation to increase its readiness for flight. Early tests, conducted at nominal atmospheric pressure, used human metabolic simulators to generate loads, with later tests making us of human test subjects. During these tests many different test cases were performed, involving from 1 to 6 test subjects, with different activity profiles (sleep, nominal and exercise). These tests were conducted within the airlock portion of a human rated test chamber sized to simulate the Orion cabin free air volume. More recently, a test was completed that integrated the CAMRAS with a simulated suit loop using prototype umbilicals and was conducted at reduced atmospheric pressure and elevated oxygen levels. This paper will describe the facilities and procedures used to conduct these and future tests, and provide a summary of findings.

  12. Adhesion and chemical vapor testing of second surface silver/glass solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Second surface silvered glass mirrors supplied by four different commercial manufacturers were evaluated for silver-to-glass adhesion and resistance to chemical vapor attack. The mirrors were chemically silvered on identical substrates of low iron float glass. Experiments were performed in order to assess the viability of using adhesion and chemical attack as screening tests for predicting the relative long-term durability of solar mirrors. The results of these tests will be compared at a future time with the survivability of field mirrors deployed in stationary exposure racks at ten locations throughout the United States. The adhesion tests were performed using a commercially-available thin film tensile pull tester in which a stud bonded to the film is pulled and the yield load recorded. Numerous subtleties regarding the selection of the adhesive used to bond the study and the validity of the testing procedure are discussed. Several different methods of normalizing the results were attempted in an effort to reduce the scatter in the data. The same set of samples were exposed to salt spray, water, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and HNO/sub 3/ vapors and then ranked according to their performance. Visual comparison of tested samples did not yield consistent results; however, definite trends were observed favoring one of the manufacturers. Some SEM/EDX analysis was performed on these mirrors subject to accelerated degradation in order to compare them to mirrors subject to natural degradation. However, insufficient data has been collected to show that any of the tests performed will accurately predict the relative life expectancy of the mirrors in an outdoor environment.

  13. PANDA asymmetric-configuration passive decay heat removal test results

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, O.; Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.

    1997-12-01

    PANDA is a large-scale, low-pressure test facility for investigating passive decay heat removal systems for the next generation of LWRs. In the first series of experiments, PANDA was used to examine the long-term LOCA response of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) for the General Electric (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The test objectives include concept demonstration and extension of the database available for qualification of containment codes. Also included is the study of the effects of nonuniform distributions of steam and noncondensable gases in the Dry-well (DW) and in the Suppression Chamber (SC). 3 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Coracoid pain test: a new clinical sign of shoulder adhesive capsulitis

    PubMed Central

    Gumina, S.; Vestri, A. R.; Postacchini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with adhesive capsulitis were clinically evaluated to establish whether pain elicited by pressure on the coracoid area may be considered a pathognomonic sign of this condition. The study group included 85 patients with primary adhesive capsulitis, 465 with rotator cuff tear, 48 with calcifying tendonitis, 16 with glenohumeral arthritis, 66 with acromioclavicular arthropathy and 150 asymptomatic subjects. The test was considered positive when pain on the coracoid region was more severe than 3 points (VAS scale) with respect to the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral subacromial area. The test was positive in 96.4% of patients with adhesive capsulitis and in 11.1%, 14.5%, 6.2% and 10.6% of patients with the other four conditions, respectively. A positive result was obtained in 3/150 normal subjects (2%). With respect to the other four diseases, the test had a sensitivity of 0.96 and a specificity ranging from 0.87 to 0.89. With respect to controls, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. The coracoid pain test could be considered as a pathognomonic sign in physical examination of patients with stiff and painful shoulder. PMID:19418052

  15. A biological phosphorus removal potential test for wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Park, J K; Whang, L M; Wang, J C; Novotny, G

    2001-01-01

    A simple test was proposed to assess whether phosphorus in a wastewater can be removed using a biological phosphorus removal (BPR) process. The test includes the measurement of phosphorus release during 2 hours of the anaerobic stage in a batch reactor containing phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAOs) and estimation of the effluent phosphorus concentration using biochemical relationships. The BPR potential test developed allowed for the successful evaluation of BPR feasibility for five wastewater samples. The BPR potential test was validated by comparing the test results with the effluent phosphorus concentrations measured in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). An effluent phosphorus concentration of 1.9 mg P/L predicted for the BPR potential test performed was close to the effluent phosphorus concentration of 1.8 mg P/L obtained from an SBR on the same day. During the anaerobic stage, phosphorus release was significantly affected by the sludge concentration initially, but became insignificant after 2 hours. The initial sludge concentration affected the phosphorus release rate; thus, it is recommended that the BPR potential test be conducted at a target mixed liquor volatile suspended solids concentration. It is also recommended that the BPR potential test be conducted at the site where the PAO-containing sludge is available and the wastewater sample can be delivered at 4 degrees C in less than 24 hours. The PAOs in different sludges had almost identical phosphorus release after 2 hours; however, the characteristics of facultative bacteria in sludges affected the phosphorus release. If the wastewater is prefermented for at least 3 days before the BPR potential test, the amount of phosphorus released by various PAO-containing sludges is expected to be identical.

  16. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, M.; Fu, M.; Irving, M.; Neher, C.; Shi, M.; Tolfa, K.; Tripathi, M.; Vinson, Y.; Wang, R.; Zheng, G.

    2017-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal performance and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported, along with initial radiation damage test results.

  17. Application of Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy in nondestructive testing of adhesion quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Duo; Ren, Jiaojiao; Qao, Xiaoli; Li, Lijuan

    2015-10-01

    Multilayer composites assembled flexibly with have important effect on the performance and safety of aircrafts. The nondestructive detection on the adhesion layer is an important index to evaluate the quality of aircraft assembly. Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a newly developed spectroscopy technique based on femtosecond laser technology which currently applied to qualitative analysis as a means of security detection and material identification. Compared with the traditional tensile testing, the detection of defects in the adhesion layer could be nondestructive, visible, positioning and more accurate. The spectral analysis on the material to be assembled was done respectively. The testing model was established in accord with the extracted optical parameters. With the employment of a reflective THz-TDS device, X-Y spot scanning was done to obtain waveforms of every location on an assembled sample. Layered analysis was done by selecting region of interest in time domain waveforms. Conclusions of Time- Frequency spectrum analysis and scanning imaging performance are relatively satisfying through the experiments. The defects could be located and analyzed accurately and efficiently. The research reveals that THz-TDS (0.1THz~5THz) has good testing performance on the adhesion quality of multilayer composites.

  18. A test rig for analysis of adhesive tapes at 4 K cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Thomas; Germer, Alexander; Haberstroh, Christoph; Mayrhofer, Robert; Stipsitz, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Cryostats and dewar vessels, in particular those used for liquid helium applications, are usually equipped with multi-layer insulation (MLI). Thereby, multiple foils are wrapped around the respective vessels, tubing and components. As standard, different foils are bonded edge to edge using adhesive tapes either based on aluminized non-metallic films or on aluminum foil. There are a number of standard test procedures for adhesive tapes near ambient temperatures (e.g. AFERA 5012/ISO 29863) allowing a standardized characterization of tapes in terms of holding force and long-term reliability. Unfortunately this does not hold true for adhesive tapes to be used at cryogenic temperatures. In this respect, a test rig comprised of a spring-based traction mechanism has been developed by the authors. Combined with a liquid helium dewar, the fabricated test set-up allows a precise and reproducible application of an adjustable tensile load at 4.2 K and measurements of the respective holding time. In the following, the overall set-up including its significant features is described and first experimental results with aluminum tapes are presented.

  19. Children's memories of removal: a test of attachment theory.

    PubMed

    Melinder, Annika; Baugerud, Gunn Astrid; Ovenstad, Kristianne Stigsdatter; Goodman, Gail S

    2013-02-01

    We report a study of parents' attachment orientations and children's autobiographical memory for an experience that according to Bowlby's (1982) attachment theory should be particularly threatening-children's forced separation from their parents. It was hypothesized that individual differences in parents' attachment orientations would be associated with children's distress and memory for this highly traumatic event. Children (n = 28) were observed during forced removal from home or school by Child Protective Services due to allegations of child maltreatment. Children's memory for the removal was tested 1 week later, and biological parents (n = 28) completed an adult attachment measure. Parental attachment anxiety significantly predicted children's distress during less stressful phases of the removal, R(2) = .25, and parents' attachment-related avoidance predicted fewer correct memory reports from the children (i.e., fewer hits to open-ended questions, R(2) = .16, and fewer hits to direct questions, R(2) = .27). The findings indicate that attachment theory provides important guidance for understanding children's autobiographical memory for traumatic events.

  20. Characterization Test Results On The Solar Cell Glassing Adhesive RTV-S690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, Emanuele; Riva, Stefano; Zanella, Pietro; Marin, Juan Manuel Fernandez; D'Accolti, Gianfelice

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this program is to achieve a Technological Rediness Level (TRL) 8 for the new coverglassing adhesive RTV-S690 produced by Wacker Chemie GmbH. TRL 8 corresponds to a coplete flight qualification through test and demonstration so, at the end, the material is ready to be used onboard future space PVA. The need of a full European alternative with respect to state of the art US adhesives is primarily due to International Traffic Army Regulation (ITAR) that more often than not imposes stringent limitations to the export of such items. Furthermore the currently used European adhesive, the RTV-S695, is becoming obsolete and will be replaced in short media terms by the above mention new product. The RTV-S690 qualification is achieved by means of a twofold program: at first the qualification at solar cell assembly level together with advanced characterization by means of testing of glass sandwiches and secondly the complete Photo Voltaic Assembly (PVA) qualification at coupon level. A description of the approach we followed is given in the present paper.

  1. Testing the Oncogenic Relevance of Cell Adhesion and Cytosketal Genes Affected by DNA Deletions in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    and hair follicle derived cells as targets for the v-rasHa oncogene in mouse skin carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis 12, 1119–1124. Wicki, A., Lehembre, F...potential oncogenic significance of genes directly involved in cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton. The aim of this study was therefore to directly test ...expression of candidate cancer genes belonging to the cytoskeletal/cell adhesion category, (2) use these tools to test the oncogenic significance of

  2. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

  3. Prevailing Torque Locking Feature in Threaded Fasteners Using Anaerobic Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Alan; Hess, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from tests to assess the use of anaerobic adhesive for providing a prevailing torque locking feature in threaded fasteners. Test procedures are developed and tests are performed on three fastener materials, four anaerobic adhesives, and both unseated assembly conditions. Five to ten samples are tested for each combination. Tests for initial use, reuse without additional adhesive, and reuse with additional adhesive are performed for all samples. A 48-hour cure time was used for all initial use and reuse tests. Test data are presented as removal torque versus removal angle with the specification required prevailing torque range added for performance assessment. Percent specification pass rates for the all combinations of fastener material, adhesive, and assembly condition are tabulated and reveal use of anaerobic adhesive as a prevailing torque locking feature is viable. Although not every possible fastener material and anaerobic adhesive combination provides prevailing torque values within specification, any combination can be assessed using the test procedures presented. Reuse without additional anaerobic adhesive generally provides some prevailing torque, and in some cases within specification. Reuse with additional adhesive often provides comparable removal torque data as in initial use.

  4. In vitro cell culture, platelet adhesion tests and in vivo implant tests of plasma-polymerized para-xylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Yeh, Chou-Ming; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-polymerized para-xylene (PPX) was developed in a previous study by adjusting the process parameters: pulse frequency of the power supply (ωp) and para-xylene monomer flow rate (fp). All the obtained PPX films exhibit an amorphous structure and present hydrophobicity (water contact angle ranging from 98.5° to 121.1°), higher film growth rate and good fibroblast cell proliferation. In this study, in vitro tests (fibroblast cell compatibility and platelet adhesion) and an in vivo animal study were performed by using PPX deposited industrial-grade silicone sheets (IGS) and compared with medical-grade silicone ones (MS), which were commonly manufactured into catheters or drainage tubes in clinical use. The results reveal that PPX deposited at high ωp or high fp, in comparison with MS, exhibit better cell proliferation and clearly shows less cell adhesion regardless of ωp and fp. PPX also exhibit a comparatively lower level of platelet adhesion than MS. In the animal study, PPX-coated IGS result in similar local tissue responses at 3, 7 and 28 days (short-term) and 84 days (long-term) after subcutaneous implantation the abdominal wall of rodents compared with respective responses to MS. These results suggest that PPX-coated industrial-grade silicone is one alternative to high cost medical-grade silicone.

  5. 27 CFR 25.196 - Removals for research, development or testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Removals for research... Analysis, Research, Development Or Testing § 25.196 Removals for research, development or testing. (a) A brewer may remove beer, without payment of tax, for use in research, development, or testing (other...

  6. Flight Testing Surfaces Engineered for Mitigating Insect Adhesion on a Falcon HU-25C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, Michelle; Wohl, Chris J.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residue contamination on aircraft wings can decrease fuel efficiency in aircraft designed for natural laminar flow. Insect residues can cause a premature transition to turbulent flow, increasing fuel burn and making the aircraft less environmentally friendly. Surfaces, designed to minimize insect residue adhesion, were evaluated through flight testing on a Falcon HU-25C aircraft flown along the coast of Virginia and North Carolina. The surfaces were affixed to the wing leading edge and the aircraft remained at altitudes lower than 1000 feet throughout the flight to assure high insect density. The number of strikes on the engineered surfaces was compared to, and found to be lower than, untreated aluminum control surfaces flown concurrently. Optical profilometry was used to determine insect residue height and areal coverage. Differences in results between flight and laboratory tests suggest the importance of testing in realistic use environments to evaluate the effectiveness of engineered surface designs.

  7. Physical approach to adhesion testing using laser-driven shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, C.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.; Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M.

    2007-05-01

    This paper deals with an adhesion test of coatings using laser-driven shock waves. Physical aspects concerning laser-matter interaction, shock wave propagation and interface fracture strength are described. This comprehensive approach using two numerical codes (HUGO and SHYLAC) allows the determination of mechanisms responsible for coating debonding and a quantitative evaluation of fracture strength. From this description, a coating test protocol is also designed. To diagnose coating debonding, it is based on the analysis of experimental rear free surface velocity profiles measured by velocity interferometer system for any reflectors (VISAR). Ni electrolytic coating (70-90 µm) deposited on a Cu substrate (120-190 µm) is used for the experimental validation of the test. The fracture strength is 1.49 ± 0.01 GPa for a laser pulse duration of 10 ns at 1.064 µm.

  8. On use of double cantilever beam for coatings and adhesion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troczynski, Tom; Camire, Jean

    1995-05-01

    The compliance model of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) for testing coatings and adhesion has been proposed and verified experimentally. The model is based on the assumption that the coating modifies the stiffness of a foundation of DCB onto which the beam is fixed, according to a simple series-spring law. The model includes multi-coated specimens, in particular the specimen with thermal sprayed ceramic coating, with an additional layer of epoxy adhesive for attachment of a symmetrical DCB arm. It was found, that the compliance of DCB specimens with a coating is significantly increased for a coating thickness larger than approximately 1% of the arm thickness, and a coating Young's modulus smaller than approximately 50% of the arm modulus. The model results, verified by experiment, have profound consequences on calculations of the strain energy release rate in fracture tests for coatings, brazed joints etc. The total compliance of the arm and coating assembly scales with the coating stiffness, and thus the model can be utilised for rigidity evaluation of a variety of coatings on standard substrates, e.g. paints or polymer coatings on metals.

  9. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of metal adhesively bonded joints using cellular polypropylene transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Amos, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Adhesively bonded aluminum components have been widely used in the aerospace industry for weight-efficient and damage-tolerant structures. Automated squirter jet immersion ultrasonic testing is a common inspection technique to assure the bond integrity of large, contoured assemblies. However, squirter jet inspection presents several limitations in scanning speed, related to water splash noise over protruding stiffeners and splash interference crosstalk in multi-channel inspection systems. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing has been evaluated as an alternative, possibly offering the benefits of increased throughput by enabling higher speeds, and eliminating the contamination concerns and maintenance issues of water couplant systems. Adhesive joints of multi-layer aluminum plates with artificial disbonds were inspected with novel air-coupled ultrasonic probes based on cellular polypropylene. Disbonds of various sizes were engineered in several multi-layer configurations and at various depths. Results were compared with squirter jet immersion and conventional piezoelectric transducer designs in terms of scan contrast, resolution and inspection time.

  10. Advanced Surface Treatments and Adhesive Bonding Testing Schemes of Ceramic Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    2000]. Silane or other adhesion promoters coupled with structural adhesive formulations tailored for specific applications have vastly improved the...interactions of common adhesion promoters, such as silane coupling agents, have not been explored in the case of ceramic substrates. Performing an adhesive...cleaning procedures, silane coupling agent application, and surface drying. For surface cleaning, samples were degreased with an acetone rinse and grit

  11. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  12. Removal of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor - 13031

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, C. Brad; Guercia, Rudolph; LaCome, Matt

    2013-07-01

    The 309 Facility housed the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), an operating test reactor in the 300 Area at Hanford, Washington. The reactor first went critical in 1960 and was originally used for experiments under the Hanford Site Plutonium Fuels Utilization Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned in 1988-1989, and the facility was deactivated in 1994. The 309 facility was added to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response actions as established in an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) and Action Memorandum (AM). The IROD directs a remedial action for the 309 facility, associated waste sites, associated underground piping and contaminated soils resulting from past unplanned releases. The AM directs a removal action through physical demolition of the facility, including removal of the reactor. Both CERCLA actions are implemented in accordance with U.S. EPA approved Remedial Action Work Plan, and the Remedial Design Report / Remedial Action Report associated with the Hanford 300-FF-2 Operable Unit. The selected method for remedy was to conventionally demolish above grade structures including the easily distinguished containment vessel dome, remove the PRTR and a minimum of 300 mm (12 in) of shielding as a single 560 Ton unit, and conventionally demolish the below grade structure. Initial sample core drilling in the Bio-Shield for radiological surveys showed evidence that the Bio-Shield was of sound structure. Core drills for the separation process of the PRTR from the 309 structure began at the deck level and revealed substantial thermal degradation of at least the top 1.2 m (4LF) of Bio-Shield structure. The degraded structure combined with the original materials used in the Bio-Shield would not allow for a stable structure to be extracted. The water used in the core drilling process proved to erode the sand mixture of the Bio-Shield leaving the steel aggregate to act as ball bearings against the

  13. TEMPORARY REMOVAL: Channelopathies, genetic testing and risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Amin, Ahmad

    2017-03-18

    The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.

  14. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium.

  15. Microscratch testing method for systematic evaluation of the adhesion of atomic layer deposited thin films on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpi, Lauri Ylivaara, Oili M. E.; Vaajoki, Antti; Puurunen, Riikka L.; Ronkainen, Helena; Malm, Jari; Sintonen, Sakari; Tuominen, Marko

    2016-01-15

    The scratch test method is widely used for adhesion evaluation of thin films and coatings. Usual critical load criteria designed for scratch testing of coatings were not applicable to thin atomic layer deposition (ALD) films on silicon wafers. Thus, the bases for critical load evaluation were established and the critical loads suitable for ALD coating adhesion evaluation on silicon wafers were determined in this paper as L{sub CSi1}, L{sub CSi2}, L{sub CALD1}, and L{sub CALD2}, representing the failure points of the silicon substrate and the coating delamination points of the ALD coating. The adhesion performance of the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, TiN, and TaCN+Ru coatings with a thickness range between 20 and 600 nm and deposition temperature between 30 and 410 °C on silicon wafers was investigated. In addition, the impact of the annealing process after deposition on adhesion was evaluated for selected cases. The tests carried out using scratch and Scotch tape test showed that the coating deposition and annealing temperature, thickness of the coating, and surface pretreatments of the Si wafer had an impact on the adhesion performance of the ALD coatings on the silicon wafer. There was also an improved load carrying capacity due to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the magnitude of which depended on the coating thickness and the deposition temperature. The tape tests were carried out for selected coatings as a comparison. The results show that the scratch test is a useful and applicable tool for adhesion evaluation of ALD coatings, even when carried out for thin (20 nm thick) coatings.

  16. Determination of adhesion between thermoplastic and liquid silicone rubbers in hard-soft-combinations via mechanical peeling test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühr, C.; Spörrer, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of hard-soft-combinations via multi injection molding gained more and more importance in the last years. This is attributed to different factors. One principle reason is that the use of two-component injection molding technique has many advantages such as cancelling subsequent and complex steps and shortening the process chain. Furthermore this technique allows the combination of the properties of the single components like the high stiffness of the hard component and the elastic properties of the soft component. Because of the incompatibility of some polymers the adhesion on the interface has to be determined. Thereby adhesion is not only influenced by the applied polymers, but also by the injection molding parameters and the characteristics of the mold. Besides already known combinations of thermoplastics with thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), there consists the possibility to apply liquid silicone rubber (LSR) as soft component. A thermoplastic/LSR combination gains in importance due to the specific advantages of LSR to TPE. The faintly adhesion between LSR and thermoplastics is currently one of the key challenges when dealing with those combinations. So it is coercively necessary to improve adhesion between the two components by adding an adhesion promoter. To determine the promoters influence, it is necessary to develop a suitable testing method to investigate e.g. the peel resistance. The current German standard "VDI Richtlinie 2019', which is actually only employed for thermoplastic/TPE combinations, can serve as a model to determine the adhesion of thermoplastic/LSR combinations.

  17. Superhydrophobic and adhesive properties of surfaces: testing the quality by an elaborated scanning electron microscopy method.

    PubMed

    Ensikat, Hans J; Mayser, Matthias; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2012-10-09

    In contrast to advancements in the fabrication of new superhydrophobic materials, the characterization of their water repellency and quality is often coarse and unsatisfactory. In view of the problems and inaccuracies, particularly in the measurement of very high contact angles, we developed alternative methods for the characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces. It was found that adhering water remnants after immersion are a useful criterion in determining the repellency quality. In this study, we introduce microscopy methods to detect traces of water-resembling test liquids on superhydrophobic surfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or fluorescence light microscopy (FLM). Diverse plant surfaces and some artificial superhydrophobic samples were examined. Instead of pure water, we used aqueous solutions containing a detectable stain and glycerol in order to prevent immediate evaporation of the microdroplets. For the SEM examinations, aqueous solutions of lead acetate were used, which could be detected in a frozen state at -90 °C with high sensitivity using a backscattered electron detector. For fluorescence microscopy, aqueous solutions of auramine were used. On different species of superhydrophobic plants, varying patterns of remaining microdroplets were found on their leaves. On some species, drop remnants occurred only on surface defects such as damaged epicuticular waxes. On others, microdroplets regularly decorated the locations of increased adhesion, particularly on hierarchically structured surfaces. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the method is suitable for testing the limits of repellency under harsh conditions, such as drop impact or long-enduring contact. The supplementation of the visualization method by the measurement of the pull-off force between a water drop and the sample allowed us to determine the adhesive properties of superhydrophobic surfaces quantitatively. The results were in good agreement with former studies of the water

  18. Pseudomonas pellicle in disinfectant testing: electron microscopy, pellicle removal, and effect on test results.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, E C; Rutala, W A; Carson, J L; Alfano, E M

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 is a required organism in the Association of Official Analytical Chemists use-dilution method for disinfectant efficacy testing. When grown in a liquid medium, P. aeruginosa produces a dense mat or pellicle at the broth/air interface. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the pellicle by scanning electron microscopy, to evaluate three pellicle removal methods, and to determine the effect of pellicle fragments on disinfectant efficacy test results. The efficacies of three methods of pellicle removal (decanting, vacuum suction, and filtration) were assessed by quantifying cell numbers on penicylinders. The Association of Official Analytical Chemists use-dilution method was used to determine whether pellicle fragments in the tubes used to inoculate penicylinders affected test results. Scanning electron micrographs showed the pellicle to be a dense mass of intact, interlacing cells at least 10 microns thick. No significant differences in pellicle removal methods were observed, and the presence of pellicle fragments usually increased the number of positive tubes in the use-dilution method significantly. Images PMID:2497711

  19. Removal of sialic acid from the surface of human MCF-7 mammary cancer cells abolishes E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion in an aggregation assay.

    PubMed

    Deman, J J; Van Larebeke, N A; Bruyneel, E A; Bracke, M E; Vermeulen, S J; Vennekens, K M; Mareel, M M

    1995-09-01

    MCF-7 human breast cancer cells express E-cadherin and show, at least in some circumstances, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion (Bracke et al., 1993). The MCF-7/AZ variant spontaneously displays E-cadherin-dependent fast aggregation; in the MCF-7/6 variant, E-cadherin appeared not to be spontaneously functional in the conditions of the fast aggregation assay, but function could be induced by incubation of the suspended cells in the presence of insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) (Bracke et al., 1993). E-cadherin from MCF-7 cells was shown to contain sialic acid. Treatment with neuraminidase was shown to remove this sialic acid, as well as most of the sialic acid present at the cell surface. Applied to MCF-7/AZ, and MCF-7/6 cells, pretreatment with neuraminidase abolished spontaneous as well as IGF-I induced, E-cadherin-dependent fast cell-cell adhesion of cells in suspension, as measured in the fast aggregation assay. Treatment with neuraminidase did not, however, inhibit the possibly different, but equally E-cadherin-mediated, process of cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 cells on a flat plastic substrate as assessed by determining the percentage of cells remaining isolated (without contact with other cells) 24 h after plating.

  20. The effect of adhesive layer elasticity on the fracture mechanics of a blister test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model of a blister type specimen for evaluating adhesive bond strength was developed. Plate theory with shear deformation was used to model the deformation of the plate, and elastic deformation of the adhesive layer is taken into account. It is shown that the inclusion of the elastic deformation of the adhesive layer can have a significant influence in the energy balance calculations of fracture mechanics.

  1. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  2. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  3. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford complexant concentrate supernatant cesium removal using CST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-01-08

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Complexant Concentrate supernatant liquor from tank 241-AN-107, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-023, Hanford Complexant Concentrate Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  4. 27 CFR 25.196 - Removals for research, development or testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Analysis, Research, Development Or Testing § 25.196 Removals for research, development or testing. (a) A... consumer testing or other market analysis) of processes, systems, materials, or equipment relating to beer... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removals for...

  5. Shock adhesion test for composite bonded assembly using a high pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, E.; Berthe, L.; Buzaud, E.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    In a context of the rising use of composite assemblies in aeronautic or defense fields, the assessment of their strength is a key issue. The method developed in this study attempts to provide solutions. A shock adhesion test based on short compressive loads, obtained by a high pulsed power generator, is proposed as a proof test to ensure the quality of composite bonded assemblies. A calibrated load induces a local tensile stress able to damage the bond interface. The high pulsed power source is the GEnerateur de Pression Isentropique device (Isentropic Pressure Generator), used to generate the required stresses, with a 450 ns pulse duration to test assemblies above the mm thickness range. The understanding of the mechanisms of wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these multilayer assemblies are scientific challenges. The ability of the technique to induce a tensile stress able to disbond the laminates and the assemblies is demonstrated. This paper details the response of carbon epoxy laminates and their bonded assemblies to a shock loading near the damage threshold.

  6. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  7. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environmentally friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainable c...

  8. Environmental Durability Testing of Structural Adhesives. Part I. AF- 143-2/EC-3917; PL-729-3/PL-728

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    ten analytical wipes with methanol . The last three specimens contained two faces as a result of the lap shear test. One face was yellow (adhesive...8217I;. I I. .. .... . 1.;; 11 !1;: V3M: !M M: H .. .... 11 ... M; 7. -11 Ili: N it -if N .. ....l! itK it :1,:: nrM .. .... ... .. ::ij .. -I is

  9. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls--Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    SciTech Connect

    Ould, Choumad; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Gachon, Yves; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-04

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer (''roll coating'', ''pick up'') may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  10. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls—Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ould, Choumad; Gachon, Yves; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-01

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer ("roll coating", "pick up") may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  11. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  12. Benchmark specifications for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, T.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is hosting an IAEA-coordinated research project on benchmark analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor passive safety tests performed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The benchmark project involves analysis of a protected and an unprotected loss of flow tests conducted during an extensive testing program within the framework of the U.S. Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate the inherently safety features of EBR-II as a pool-type, sodium-cooled fast reactor prototype. The project is intended to improve the participants' design and safety analysis capabilities for sodium-cooled fast reactors through validation and qualification of safety analysis codes and methods. This paper provides a description of the EBR-II tests included in the program, and outlines the benchmark specifications being prepared to support the IAEA-coordinated research project. (authors)

  13. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  14. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  15. Test procedures and instructions for single shell tank saltcake cesium removal with crystalline silicotitanate

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1997-01-07

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake from tanks 24 t -BY- I 10, 24 1 -U- 108, 24 1 -U- 109, 24 1 -A- I 0 1, and 24 t - S-102, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline siticotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-024, Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  16. Interfacial adhesion in rayon/nylon sheath/core composite fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Weiying.

    1991-01-01

    The fibers with enhanced adhesion were produced using a wire coating type process. One objective was to determine an effective coupling agent and the most-appropriate application conditions for maximum interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon bicomponent fibers. The second objective was to characterize the interfacial adhesion between the core fiber and the rayon skin. After removal of the spin finish by water washing, the nylon core fibers were pretreated with fumaric acid (FA) as an adhesion promoter and then were coated with viscose rayon. The results indicated that the interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon composite fibers was significantly improved under the application conditions of 1.0% with 36 second pretreatment time, 1.5% with 18 second pretreatment, and 2% with 9 second pretreatment time. A fiber pull adhesion test method was developed to test the interfacial adhesion. This method effectively determined the adhesion between the core and the skin.

  17. Failure stress criterion for adhesively bonded joint at different strain rates by using dynamic Arcan test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Ludovic; Bourel, Benjamin; Lauro, Franck; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Carrere, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the failure criterion evolution of assembly bonded with a strain rate dependent adhesive. A new modified ARCAN device is then designed to obtain the average stress at failure under different loading angles and for strain up to 350 s-1. Tests are performed on a hydraulic jack machine and a Digital Image Correlation measurement is used to control the opening and the sliding displacements of the two substrates.

  18. Test report for K Basin MK I lid removal and replacement system

    SciTech Connect

    Omberg, R.P.; Roe, N.R.

    1996-08-21

    This report provides the results of acceptance testing of sampling equipment for use in the Hanford K Basin. The equipment, MK I Lid Removal/Replacement Tools, were designed to remove/replace MK I Spent Fuel Canister lids so that other equipment may be used to sample the canister contents. The tools were determined to be acceptable for their intended use.

  19. Adhesion and wear behaviour of NCD coatings on Si3N4 by micro-abrasion tests.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G; Neto, M A; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings offer an excellent alternative for tribological applications, preserving most of the intrinsic mechanical properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond and adding to it an extreme surface smoothness. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics are reported to guarantee high adhesion levels to CVD microcrystalline diamond coatings, but the NCD adhesion to Si3N4 is not yet well established. Micro-abrasion tests are appropriate for evaluating the abrasive wear resistance of a given surface, but they also provide information on thin film/substrate interfacial resistance, i.e., film adhesion. In this study, a comparison is made between the behaviour of NCD films deposited by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) and microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) techniques. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic discs were selected as substrates. The NCD depositions by HFCVD and MPCVD were carried out using H2-CH4 and H2-CH4-N2 gas mixtures, respectively. An adequate set of growth parameters was chosen for each CVD technique, resulting in NCD films having a final thickness of 5 microm. A micro-abrasion tribometer was used, with 3 microm diamond grit as the abrasive slurry element. Experiments were carried out at a constant rotational speed (80 r.p.m.) and by varying the applied load in the range of 0.25-0.75 N. The wear rate for MPCVD NCD (3.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(-5) mm3 N(-1) m(-1)) is compatible with those reported for microcrystalline CVD diamond. The HFCVD films displayed poorer adhesion to the Si3N4 ceramic substrates than the MPCVD ones. However, the HFCVD films show better wear resistance as a result of their higher crystallinity according to the UV Raman data, despite evidencing premature adhesion failure.

  20. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  1. Continual Non-Condensable Gas Removal Testing -- Performance and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mohr; Greg Mines

    2005-09-01

    The operating experience and plant benefit analysis of a membrane-based continuous non-condensable gas (NCG) removal system is discussed. Results from testing at the Mammoth Pacific (Ormat) geothermal plant provide the basis for the benefit analysis.

  2. Testing the differential adhesion hypothesis across the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Grosser, Steffen; Ahrens, Dave; Thalheim, Tobias; Riedel, Stefanie; Kießling, Tobias R.; Oswald, Linda; Zink, Mareike; Manning, M. Lisa; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the mechanical properties of three epithelial/mesenchymal cell lines (MCF-10A, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-436) that exhibit a shift in E-, N- and P-cadherin levels characteristic of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition associated with processes such as metastasis, to quantify the role of cell cohesion in cell sorting and compartmentalization. We develop a unique set of methods to measure cell-cell adhesiveness, cell stiffness and cell shapes, and compare the results to predictions from cell sorting in mixtures of cell populations. We find that the final sorted state is extremely robust among all three cell lines independent of epithelial or mesenchymal state, suggesting that cell sorting may play an important role in organization and boundary formation in tumours. We find that surface densities of adhesive molecules do not correlate with measured cell-cell adhesion, but do correlate with cell shapes, cell stiffness and the rate at which cells sort, in accordance with an extended version of the differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH). Surprisingly, the DAH does not correctly predict the final sorted state. This suggests that these tissues are not behaving as immiscible fluids, and that dynamical effects such as directional motility, friction and jamming may play an important role in tissue compartmentalization across the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  3. Testing the differential adhesion hypothesis across the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol; Grosser, Steffen; Oswald, Linda; Manning, Lisa; Kas, Josef

    We analyze the properties of three epithelial/mesenchymal cell lines that exhibit a shift in cadherin levels characteristic of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with processes such as metastasis, to quantify the role of cell cohesion in cell sorting and compartmentalization. We develop a unique set of methods to measure cell-cell adhesiveness, cell stiffness and cell shapes, and compare the results to predictions from cell sorting in mixtures of cell populations. We find that the final sorted state is extremely robust among all three cell lines independent of epithelial or mesenchymal state, suggesting that cell sorting may play an important role in organization and boundary formation in tumours. We find that surface densities of adhesive molecules do not correlate with measured cell-cell adhesion, but do correlate with cell shapes, cell stiffness and the rate at which cells sort, in accordance with an extended differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH). Surprisingly, the DAH does not correctly predict the final sorted state. This suggests that these tissues are not behaving as immiscible fluids, and that dynamical effects such as directional motility, friction and jamming may play an important role in tissue compartmentalization across the EMT.

  4. Screening Adhesively Bonded Single-Lap-Joint Testing Results Using Nonlinear Calculation Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Jonathan Kaufman, and Wendy Kosik Chaney Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Benjamin Henrie Dynetics Technical Services, Inc...February 2012.  Dynetics Technical Services, Inc., Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 14. ABSTRACT Adhesive needs for Army ground vehicles are...us.army.mil Benjamin Henrie Dynetics Technical Services, Inc. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center, Al

  5. Low-temperature curing of a nitrile-epoxy adhesive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1981-04-01

    Adhesive strength and glass transition temperature were correlated with cure times at 85/sup 0/C and above. The effect of moisture on adhesive cure and strength was tested. With a 3-hour cure at 85/sup 0/C, lap shear strength met specification requirements. The adhesive was found to absorb moisture with time, especially if one or both polyethylene covers are removed. Placing the adhesive in a desiccator for 30 minutes produced excellent room temperature shear strengths. Preconditioning (removal of moisture) is critical for elevated temperature cures.

  6. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, M; Ayerbe, J; Casares, M; Cañadas, E M; Lorite, J

    2017-04-03

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost.

  7. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, M.; Ayerbe, J.; Casares, M.; Cañadas, E. M.; Lorite, J.

    2017-01-01

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost. PMID:28367957

  8. SERDP AND NRMRL SPONSOR FIELD TEST OF COSOLVENT-ENHANCED DNAPL REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test of multicomponent cosolvent flooding for in-situ remediation of DNAPL source zones was conducted at the Dover National Test Site (DNTS) at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, in July, 2001. The test was part of an Enhanced Source Removal (ESR) demonstration project fund...

  9. A test method for determining adhesion forces and Hamaker constants of cementitious materials using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang Kejin; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2011-11-15

    A method for determining Hamaker constant of cementitious materials is presented. The method involved sample preparation, measurement of adhesion force between the tested material and a silicon nitride probe using atomic force microscopy in dry air and in water, and calculating the Hamaker constant using appropriate contact mechanics models. The work of adhesion and Hamaker constant were computed from the pull-off forces using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjagin-Muller-Toropov models. Reference materials with known Hamaker constants (mica, silica, calcite) and commercially available cementitious materials (Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS)) were studied. The Hamaker constants of the reference materials obtained are consistent with those published by previous researchers. The results indicate that PC has a higher Hamaker constant than GGBFS. The Hamaker constant of PC in water is close to the previously predicted value C{sub 3}S, which is attributed to short hydration time ({<=} 45 min) used in this study.

  10. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  11. Ceramic Adhesive for High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Everett G.

    1987-01-01

    Fused-silica/magnesium-phosphate adhesive resists high temperatures and vibrations. New adhesive unaffected by extreme temperatures and vibrations. Assuring direct bonding of gap filters to tile sidewalls, adhesive obviates expensive and time-consuming task of removal, treatment, and replacement of tiles.

  12. Fast Poisson noise removal by biorthogonal Haar domain hypothesis testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Fadili, M. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Digel, S. W.

    2008-07-01

    Methods based on hypothesis tests (HTs) in the Haar domain are widely used to denoise Poisson count data. Facing large datasets or real-time applications, Haar-based denoisers have to use the decimated transform to meet limited-memory or computation-time constraints. Unfortunately, for regular underlying intensities, decimation yields discontinuous estimates and strong “staircase” artifacts. In this paper, we propose to combine the HT framework with the decimated biorthogonal Haar (Bi-Haar) transform instead of the classical Haar. The Bi-Haar filter bank is normalized such that the p-values of Bi-Haar coefficients (p) provide good approximation to those of Haar (pH) for high-intensity settings or large scales; for low-intensity settings and small scales, we show that p are essentially upper-bounded by pH. Thus, we may apply the Haar-based HTs to Bi-Haar coefficients to control a prefixed false positive rate. By doing so, we benefit from the regular Bi-Haar filter bank to gain a smooth estimate while always maintaining a low computational complexity. A Fisher-approximation-based threshold implementing the HTs is also established. The efficiency of this method is illustrated on an example of hyperspectral-source-flux estimation.

  13. Transient testing of the FFTF for decay-heat removal by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, T R; Johnson, H G; Stover, R L

    1982-06-01

    This paper reports on the series of transient tests performed in the FFTF as a major part of the pre-operations testing program. The structure of the transient test program was designed to verify the capability of the FFTF to safely remove decay heat by natural convection. The series culminated in a scram from full power to complete natural convection in the plant, simulating a loss of all electrical power. Test results and acceptance criteria related to the verification of safe decay heat removal are presented.

  14. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  15. Adhesives: Test Method, Group Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading-Rate Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    RDRL-WMM-C APG, MD 21005 Send comments or inquiries to: usarmy.APG.arl.mbx.adhesive-research@mail.mil Reviewed by: CCEPB ISO 9001 :2008...approved for release. 0.2 06/06/2014 Updated per guidance by Coatings, Corrosion, and Engineered Polymers Branch (CCEPB) ISO 9001 :2008 Working Group...definitions apply. Database: As stated within ISO /IEC 2382-17:1999, a database shall be “a collection of data organized according to a conceptual

  16. Enamel loss associated with orthodontic adhesive removal on teeth with white spot lesions: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tüfekçi, Eser; Merrill, Thomas E; Pintado, Maria R; Beyer, John P; Brantley, William A

    2004-06-01

    Teeth with white spot lesions (WSL) might be more prone to enamel loss during bracket debonding. This in vitro study compared enamel loss from teeth with (n = 14) and without (n = 14) WSL after polishing with low-speed finishing burs or disks (Sof-Lex, 3M ESPE, St Paul, Minn). Debonded surfaces were analyzed with a contact stylus profilometer, and digitized data were compared with baseline readings by using AnSur NT software (Regents, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn). Specimen surfaces were also examined with a scanning electron microscope. Two-way analysis of variance was performed to analyze the data. In teeth without WSL, the volume losses were 0.16 mm(3) for the bur group and 0.10 mm(3) for the disk group; the mean maximum depths were 47.7 microm for the bur group and 54.3 microm for the disk group. In teeth with WSL, the volume losses were 0.06 and 0.17 mm(3), and the mean maximum depths were 35.1 and 48.7 microm for the bur and disk groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in enamel loss between the 2 groups of teeth without WSL (P =.12). However, in teeth with WSL, the burs removed less enamel than the disks (P = 0.006). Scanning electron microscope examination showed that any damage on the enamel surface was usually located in the cervical third of the teeth. On most specimens, even though tooth surfaces appeared resin-free to the naked eye, there were remnants of it. The differences between groups were so small that they might be clinically insignificant.

  17. THERMAL VACUUM TEST OF ORBITAL STATIC MOISTURE-REMOVAL FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report presents the results of a thermal vacuum chamber test of an orbital fuel cell of advanced design. The fuel cell package used a static moisture-removal system. The fuel cell , tested in the thermal vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson AFB, gave satisfactory results. This test constituted the second and final ground qualification of this orbital fuel cell prior to orbital test. (Author)

  18. Development of a new test for the easy characterization of the adhesion at the interface of bilayer tablets: proof-of-concept study by experimental design.

    PubMed

    Busignies, Virginie; Mazel, Vincent; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2014-12-30

    Although, adhesion at the interface of bilayer tablets is critical for their design it is difficult to characterize this adhesion between layers. In view of this, a new test with an easy implementation was proposed for the characterization of the interface of bilayer tablets. This work is presented as a proof-of-concept study to investigate the reliability of this new test with regard to the effects of some critical process parameters (e.g., compaction pressure applied on each layer) and material attributes (e.g., elasticity of the layered materials) on the interfacial adhesion of bilayer tablets. This was investigated using a design of experiment approach and the results obtained were in good accordance with those obtained with other tests and thus, confirms the potential of such a method for the measurement of the interfacial adhesion of bilayer tablets.

  19. 75 FR 56912 - Live Goats and Swine for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 91 RIN 0579-AD18 Live Goats and Swine for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... requirement for pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing of goats and breeding swine intended...

  20. Calibration of the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, B. W., Jr.; Runckel, J. F.; Igoe, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal (plenum suction) was calibrated to a Mach number of 1.3. The results of the calibration, including the effects of slot shape modifications, test section wall divergence, and water vapor condensation, are presented. A complete description of the wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment is included.

  1. Assessing Arsenic Removal by Metal (Hydr)Oxide Adsorptive Media Using Rapid Small Scale Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid small scale column test (RSSCT) was use to evaluate the the performance of eight commercially available adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic. Side-by-side tests were conducted using RSSCTs and pilot/full-scale systems either in the field or in the laboratory. ...

  2. Sorbent Structural Testing on Carbon Dioxide Removal Sorbents for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, David; Knox, James C.; West, Phillip; Bush, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Long term space missions require carbon dioxide removal systems that can function with minimal downtime required for maintenance, low power consumption and maximum efficiency for CO2 removal. A major component of such a system are the sorbents used for the CO2 and desiccant beds. Sorbents must not only have adequate CO2 and H2O removal properties, but they must have the mechanical strength to prevent structural breakdown due to pressure and temperature changes during operation and regeneration, as well as resistance to breakdown due to moisture in the system from cabin air. As part of the studies used to select future CO2 sorbent materials, mechanical tests are performed on various zeolite sorbents to determine mechanical performance while dry and at various humidified states. Tests include single pellet crush, bulk crush and attrition tests. We have established a protocol for testing sorbents under dry and humid conditions, and previously tested the sorbents used on the International Space Station carbon dioxide removal assembly. This paper reports on the testing of a series of commercial sorbents considered as candidates for use on future exploration missions.

  3. Laboratory tests using chlorine trifluoride in support of deposit removal at MSRE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.; Rudolph, J.C.; Del Cul, G.D.; Loghry, S.L.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-04-01

    Experimental trials were conducted to investigate some unresolved issues regarding the use of chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) for removal of uranium-bearing deposits in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) off-gas system. The safety and effectiveness of operation of the fixed-bed trapping system for removal of reactive gases were the primary focus. The chief uncertainty concerns the fate of chlorine in the system and the potential for forming explosive chlorine oxides (primarily chlorine dioxide) in the trapping operation. Tests at the MSRE Reactive Gas Removal System reference conditions and at conditions of low ClF{sub 3} flow showed that only very minor quantities of reactive halogen oxides were produced before column breakthrough. Somewhat larger quantities accompanied breakthrough. A separation test that exposed irradiated MSRE simulant salt to ClF{sub 3} confirmed the expectation that the salt is basically inert for brief exposures to ClF{sub 3} at room temperature.

  4. Nanoscratch test — A tool for evaluation of cohesive and adhesive properties of thin films and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomastik, J.; Ctvrtlik, R.

    2013-04-01

    Thin films and coatings play an essential role in the whole range of applications. The example par excellence are optical thin films that broaden the possibilities of design of optical components. Analogically to other applications of thin films their mechanical properties are very important for their successful applicability and reliability. This becomes especially vital when they are employed in rough service conditions. As thin films on substrates inherently create a compact system the strength of the film-substrate interface is of great importance. Several experimental methods have been developed for qualification and quantification of the mechanical stability of the film-substrate system. In this paper, some brief introduction into the nanoscratch test is introduced. It is currently the most widely used method to evaluate and to test cohesive-adhesive properties of thin films and coatings.

  5. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  6. Germline self-renewal requires cyst stem cells and stat regulates niche adhesion in Drosophila testes.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, Judith L; Dinardo, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    Adults maintain tissue-specific stem cells through niche signals. A model for niche function is the Drosophila melanogaster testis, where a small cluster of cells called the hub produce locally available signals that allow only adjacent cells to self-renew. We show here that the principal signalling pathway implicated in this niche, chemokine activation of STAT, does not primarily regulate self-renewal of germline stem cells (GSCs), but rather governs GSC adhesion to hub cells. In fact, GSC renewal does not require hub cell contact, as GSCs can be renewed solely by contact with the second resident stem cell population, somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs), and this involves BMP signalling. These data suggest a modified paradigm whereby the hub cells function as architects of the stem cell environment, drawing into proximity cellular components necessary for niche function. Self-renewal functions are shared by the hub cells and the CySCs. This work also reconciles key differences in GSC renewal between Drosophila testis and ovary niches, and highlights how a niche can coordinate the production of distinct lineages by having one stem cell type rely on a second.

  7. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1: testing for a role in insect immunity, behaviour and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Peuß, Robert; Wensing, Kristina U; Woestmann, Luisa; Eggert, Hendrik; Milutinović, Barbara; Sroka, Marlene G U; Scharsack, Jörn P; Kurtz, Joachim; Armitage, Sophie A O

    2016-04-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 (Dscam1) has wide-reaching and vital neuronal functions although the role it plays in insect and crustacean immunity is less well understood. In this study, we combine different approaches to understand the roles that Dscam1 plays in fitness-related contexts in two model insect species. Contrary to our expectations, we found no short-term modulation of Dscam1 gene expression after haemocoelic or oral bacterial exposure in Tribolium castaneum, or after haemocoelic bacterial exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated Dscam1 knockdown and subsequent bacterial exposure did not reduce T. castaneum survival. However, Dscam1 knockdown in larvae resulted in adult locomotion defects, as well as dramatically reduced fecundity in males and females. We suggest that Dscam1 does not always play a straightforward role in immunity, but strongly influences behaviour and fecundity. This study takes a step towards understanding more about the role of this intriguing gene from different phenotypic perspectives.

  8. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1: testing for a role in insect immunity, behaviour and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Wensing, Kristina U.; Eggert, Hendrik; Scharsack, Jörn P.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 (Dscam1) has wide-reaching and vital neuronal functions although the role it plays in insect and crustacean immunity is less well understood. In this study, we combine different approaches to understand the roles that Dscam1 plays in fitness-related contexts in two model insect species. Contrary to our expectations, we found no short-term modulation of Dscam1 gene expression after haemocoelic or oral bacterial exposure in Tribolium castaneum, or after haemocoelic bacterial exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated Dscam1 knockdown and subsequent bacterial exposure did not reduce T. castaneum survival. However, Dscam1 knockdown in larvae resulted in adult locomotion defects, as well as dramatically reduced fecundity in males and females. We suggest that Dscam1 does not always play a straightforward role in immunity, but strongly influences behaviour and fecundity. This study takes a step towards understanding more about the role of this intriguing gene from different phenotypic perspectives. PMID:27152227

  9. Initial testing of VS-4718, a novel inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), against pediatric tumor models by the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program.

    PubMed

    Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Gorlick, Richard; Kolb, E Anders; Keir, Stephen T; Maris, John M; Lock, Richard B; Carol, Hernan; Kang, Min; Reynolds, C Patrick; Wu, Jianrong; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A

    2017-04-01

    VS-4718, a novel inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), was tested against the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program's (PPTP's) in vitro cell line panel and showed a median relative IC50 of 1.22 μM. VS-4718 was tested in vivo against the PPTP xenograft models using a dose of 50 mg/kg administered by the oral route twice daily for 21 days. VS-4718 induced significant differences in an event-free survival distribution compared with control in 18 of 36 of the evaluable solid tumor xenografts and in 0 of 8 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) xenografts, but no xenograft lines showed tumor regression. Future plans include further evaluation of the role of FAK inhibition in combination with ABL kinase inhibitors for Ph(+) ALL.

  10. Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

    2006-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

  11. Results of Small-Scale Tests for Removing Mercury from ORNL Process Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.; Klasson, K.T.

    1999-06-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) received a new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit from the state of Tennessee in 1997. This permit reduced the limit for mercury in the effluent from the Process Wastewater Treatment Complex - Building 3608 (PWTC-3608) to 19 ppt for the monthly average, which is well below the current effluent concentration. The mercury limit is being appealed, so it is not currently being enforced, but experimental work is being done to determine if it is possible to meet this new limit. Various mercury sorbents were evaluated in small, continuous-flow columns. The first set of sorbent tests that were conducted at PWTC-3608 in August 1997 showed excellent mercury removal by the Forager Sponge, even at high flow rates. Subsequent tests, however, showed that the mercury removal by the Forager Sponge, even at high flow rates. Subsequent tests, however, showed that the mercury removal efficiency of the sorbents varied considerably over time, probably as a result of changes in the form of the mercury in the wastewater. A significant portion of the mercury in PWTC-3608 water was bound to small particles during the later tests, which made the mercury less accessible to the sorbents. Chlorination of the water, which could convert the mercury to an ionic form, improved the performance of some of the sorbents.

  12. Assessment of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Technology at the MSFC ECLS Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomes, Kristin; Long, David; Carter, Layne; Flynn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia. Removal (VPCAR) technology has been previously discussed as a viable option for. the Exploration Water Recovery System. This technology integrates a phase change process with catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase to produce potable water from exploration mission wastewaters. A developmental prototype VPCAR was designed, built and tested under funding provided by a National Research. Announcement (NRA) project. The core technology, a Wiped Film Rotating Device (WFRD) was provided by Water Reuse Technologies under the NRA, whereas Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International performed the hardware integration and acceptance test. of the system. Personnel at the-Ames Research Center performed initial systems test of the VPCAR using ersatz solutions. To assess the viability of this hardware for Exploration. Life Support (ELS) applications, the hardware has been modified and tested at the MSFC ECLS Test facility. This paper summarizes the hardware modifications and test results and provides an assessment of this technology for the ELS application.

  13. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  14. Effect of different adhesion strategies on fiber post cementation: Push-out test and scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Letícia Oliveria; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Costa, Leonardo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphoric acid etching and the dentin pre-treatment with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 48 human incisors were selected, post spaces were prepared and assigned to four groups: G1-37% phosphoric acid (15 s); G2-5.25% NaOCl (2 min) +37% phosphoric acid (15 s); G3-37% phosphoric acid (60 s); and G4-5.25% NaOCl (2 min) +37% phosphoric acid (60 s). Fiber post cementation was performed with two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system/dual-cured resin cement according to the manufacturer's recommendation. After 24 h, each root was sectioned transversally into three slices (cervical, middle and apical) and the bond strength of each section was determined using a push-out bond strength test. Morphology analysis of the bonded interface was evaluated using a scanning electron microscopy. Push-out strength data (MPa) were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Tukey-Kramer (α = 0.05). Results: Considering the NaOCl pre-treatment, no statistically significant differences were observed among groups; however, when the phosphoric acid was applied during 60 s in the apical portion without NaOCl pre-treatment, the bond strength was statistically significant increased. Conclusion: The NaOCl pre-treatment did not improve the bond strength of adhesive luting cement to root canal dentin. The findings suggest that the use of 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s may have a beneficial effect on bond strength in the apical root third. PMID:24403786

  15. TESTING OF A FULL-SCALE ROTARY MICROFILTER FOR THE ENHANCED PROCESS FOR RADIONUCLIDES REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Michael Poirier, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2009-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. One application involves use in the Enhanced Processes for Radionuclide Removal (EPRR) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). To assess this application, the authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit manufactured by SpinTek Filtration with 0.5 micron filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation. The filter includes proprietary enhancements by SRNL. The most recent enhancement is replacement of the filter's main shaft seal with a John Crane Type 28LD gas-cooled seal. The feed material was SRS Tank 8F simulated sludge blended with monosodium titanate (MST). Testing examined total insoluble solids concentrations of 0.06 wt % (126 hours of testing) and 5 wt % (82 hours of testing). The following are conclusions from this testing.

  16. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  17. FFTF/IEM (Fast Flux Test Facility/Interim Examination and Maintenance) cell fuel pin removal equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a fuel pin removal device used for pin removal from irradiated fuel assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). After irradiation in the FFTF, selected fuel assemblies are remotely disassembled in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell. The remote disassembly, following sodium removal, consists of slitting and removing the duct and then removing the fuel pins one-at-a-time by sliding the pins from parallel attachment rails. All pins are removed from one rail before starting on the next. The new pin removal equipment has been used very successfully on the last three fuel experiments disassembled in the IEM cell, including one assembly containing residual sodium. Pin removal time has been cut in half, and this once tedious and time-consuming activity has been turned into an almost effortless evolution.

  18. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J; Kwon, Soondong; Katz, Lynn; Kinney, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ

  19. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, November 1995--May 1997. Addendum 1: Task 2 topical report -- Pollutant removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.T.; Jankura, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) uses two Condensing Heat Exchangers (CHXs{reg_sign}) in series to recover waste heat from the flue gas and remove a variety of pollutants from the flue gas. The Teflon{reg_sign}-covered internals of the condensing heat exchanger permit heat recovery at temperatures below the acid dew-point of the flue gas. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions in a pilot Integrated Flue Gas Treatment System rated at 1.2 MW{sub t} (4 million Btu/hr) using a wide range of coals. The coals tested included a high-sulfur coal, a medium-sulfur coal and a low-sulfur coal. The flue gas pollutants investigated included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was also investigated. Soda ash, lime and magnesium-lime scrubbing reagents were investigated. The test results show that the IFGT system can remove greater than 95% removal of acid gases with a liquid-to-gas ratio less than 1.34 l/m{sup 3} (10 gal/1,000 ft{sup 3}), and that lime reagents show promise as a substitute for soda ash. Particulate and ammonia gas removal was also very high. Ionic mercury removal averaged 80%, while elemental mercury removal was very low. Trace metals were found to be concentrated in the fine particulate with removal efficiencies in the range of 50% to 80%. The data measured in this task provides the basis for predictions of the performance of an IFGT system for both utility and industrial applications.

  20. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 3, Long term testing at the ECTC

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this task is to demonstrate long term operation of a condensing heat exchanger for coal-fired conditions. A small condensing heat exchanger will be installed at the Environmental Control Technology Center in Barker, New York. It will be installed downstream of the flue gas particulate removal system. The test will determine the amount of wear, if any, on the Teflon{trademark} covered internals of the heat exchanger. Visual inspection and measurements will be obtained for the Teflon{trademark} covered tubes during the test. The material wear study will conducted over a one year calendar period, and the CHX equipment will be operated to the fullest extent allowable.

  1. Development of sludge filterability test to assess the solids removal potential of a sludge bed.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Nidal; Zandvoort, Marcel; van Lier, Jules; Zeeman, Grietje

    2006-12-01

    A qualitative sludge characterisation technique called "sludge filterability technique" has been developed. This technique enables the determination of the sludge potential for the physical removal of solids, weighing the effect of different process parameters on solids removal and identifying the mechanisms of solids removal in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed system. In this paper guidelines for conducting the test are given and a "standardised" set-up is presented. The experimental set-up and protocol are simple and the results can be obtained in a period as short as a few hours. A sludge sample is added to an upflow reactor incubated at 4 degrees C, to limit gas production, washed with an anaerobically pre-treated and suspended solids free wastewater to remove solids washed out from the sludge, and then fed with a model substrate, prepared from fish meal with a standard procedure. Several experimental runs were conducted to validate and optimise the technique. The results showed that the technique is reliable, workable and reproducible.

  2. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing: PSI Energy`s Gibson Station High SO{sub 2} Removal Efficiency Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-20

    A program was conducted at PSI Energy`s Gibson Generating Station to evaluate options for achieving high sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency with the Unit 5 wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This program was one of six conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate low-capital-cost upgrades to existing FGD systems as a means for utilities to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The Gibson FGD system employs four absorber modules of the Kellogg/Weir horizontal gas flow design and uses limestone reagent with two additives. Dolomitic lime is added to introduce magnesium to increase liquid-phase alkalinity, and sulfur is added to inhibit sulfite oxidation. The high-efficiency options tested involved using sodium formate or dibasic acid (DBA) as a performance additive, increasing the absorber liquid-to-gas ratio (L/G), and/or increasing the limestone reagent stoichiometry. The unit changed coal sources during the test program. However, the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) FGD PRocess Integration and Simulation Model (FGDPRISM) was calibrated to the system and used to compare options on a consistent basis. An economic analysis was then done to determine the cost-effectiveness of each high-efficiency option. The results from this program are summarized below.

  3. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  4. Quantitative characterization of the interfacial adhesion of Ni thin film on steel substrate: A compression-induced buckling delamination test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Zhou, Y. C.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.

    2015-01-01

    A compression-induced buckling delamination test is employed to quantitatively characterize the interfacial adhesion of Ni thin film on steel substrate. It is shown that buckles initiate from edge flaws and surface morphologies exhibit symmetric, half-penny shapes. Taking the elastoplasticity of film and substrate into account, a three-dimensional finite element model for an edge flaw with the finite size is established to simulate the evolution of energy release rates and phase angles in the process of interfacial buckling-driven delamination. The results show that delamination propagates along both the straight side and curved front. The mode II delamination plays a dominant role in the process with a straight side whilst the curved front experiences almost the pure mode I. Based on the results of finite element analysis, a numerical model is developed to evaluate the interfacial energy release rate, which is in the range of 250-315 J/m2 with the corresponding phase angle from -41° to -66°. These results are in agreement with the available values determined by other testing methods, which confirms the effectiveness of the numerical model.

  5. Application of Rate Theory to Accelerated Durability Testing of Structural Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    comes too late to impact on material selection or design considerations. The analytical approach, coupled with an accelerated 10 testing program, is...estimated range and then evaluating the impact of each parameter on the failure rate and expected service life. The life-limiting components and the...interest of processing economy can be identified. This information can then be fed back into the system design process and the analyses repeated to

  6. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A.; Dierks, J.F.

    1993-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by ion-beam deposition of 400 eV methane (CH{sub 4}) ions on several smooth and rough ceramics, as well as on ceramics coated with a layer of Si and Ti. Adhesion was measured by the pin-pull method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but adhesion of DLC to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective because bonding between the DLC film and Ti was poor. The presence of surface roughness appeared to greatly increase the measured adhesion in all cases. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface. If the standard enthalpy of formation for reaction between CH{sub 4} and substrate is calculated assumpting a carbide or carbon phase is produced, a relation is seen between reaction enthalpy and relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. Lack of adhesion to Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for reaction with CH{sub 4} strongly positive and similar in magnitude to that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  7. Lightning protection guidelines and test data for adhesively bonded aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryzby, J. E.; Plumer, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The highly competitive marketplace and increasing cost of energy has motivated manufacturers of general aviation aircraft to utilize composite materials and metal-to-metal bonding in place of conventional fasteners and rivets to reduce weight, obtain smoother outside surfaces and reduce drag. The purpose of this program is protection of these new structures from hazardous lightning effects. The program began with a survey of advance-technology materials and fabrication methods under consideration for future designs. Sub-element specimens were subjected to simulated lightning voltages and currents. Measurements of bond line voltages, electrical sparking, and mechanical strength degradation were made to comprise a data base of electrical properties for new technology materials and basic structural configurations. The second hase of the program involved tests on full scale wing structures which contained integral fuel tanks and which were representative of examples of new technology structures and fuel systems. The purpose of these tests was to provide a comparison between full scale structural measurements and those obtained from the sub-element specimens.

  8. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  9. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  10. Electrochemical Technology for Oxygen Removal and Measurement in the CELSS Test Facility, Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael E.; Covington, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Life Support Flight Program is evaluating regenerative technologies, including those that utilize higher plants, as a means to reduce resupply over long duration space missions. Constructed to assist in the evaluation process is the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit (CTF-EDU) an environmentally closed (less than 1% mass and thermal leakage) technology test bed. This ground based fully functional prototype is currently configured to support crop growth, utilizing the power, volume and mass resources allocated for two space station racks. Sub-system technologies were selected considering their impact on available resources, their ability to minimize integration issues, and their degree of modularity. Gas specific mass handling is a key sub-system technology for both biological and physical/chemical life support technologies. The CTF-EDU requires such a system to accommodate non-linear oxygen production from crops, by enabling the control system to change and sustain partial pressure set points in the growth volume. Electrochemical cells are one of the technologies that were examined for oxygen handling in the CTF-EDU. They have been additionally considered to meet other regenerative life support functions, such as oxygen generation, the production of potable water from composite waste streams, and for having the potential to integrate life support functions with those of propulsion and energy storage. An oxygen removal system based on an electrochemical cell was chosen for the EDU due to it's low power, volume and mass requirements (10W, 0.000027 cu m, 4.5 kg) and because of the minimal number of integration considerations. Unlike it's competitors, the system doesn't require post treatments of its byproducts, or heat and power intensive regenerations, that also mandate system redundancy or cycling. The EDUs oxygen removal system only requires two resources, which are already essential to controlled plant growth: electricity and water. Additionally

  11. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Blythe, G.

    1994-04-28

    The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated mostly involve using additives in the FGD systems. On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Big Bend Station in November 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. For Option 1, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set point operation. Option 2 has involved testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. Both sodium formate and DBA additives were tested as potential upgrade options at Pirkey. On Option 3, for testing at the PSI Energy Gibson Station, a DBA additive performance and consumption test was conducted in late February through mid-March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are discussed in Section 3 of this progress report. Option 4 is for testing at the Duquesne Light Elrama Station. The FGD system employs magnesium-enhanced lime reagent and venturi absorber modules. An EPRI-funded model evaluation of potential upgrade options for this FGD system, along with a preliminary economic evaluation, determined that the most attractive upgrade options for this site were to increase thiosulfate ion concentrations in the FGD system liquor to lower oxidation percentages and increase liquid-phase sulfite alkalinity, and to increase the venturi absorber pressure drop to improve gas/liquid contacting. Parametric testing of these upgrade options was conducted in late March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are also discussed in Section 3 of this progress report.

  12. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  13. Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel J; Araújo, Paula A; Correia, Patricia B; Ramsey, Matthew M; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Freeman, Benny D; Paul, Donald R; Whiteley, Marvin; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2012-08-01

    Ultrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine-g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine-g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine-g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine-g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control.

  14. Simulating sterilization, vaccination, and test-and-remove as brucellosis control measures in bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebinger, M.; Cross, P.; Wallen, Rick; White, P.J.; Treanor, John

    2011-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, infects wildlife, cattle, and humans worldwide, but management of the disease is often hindered by the logistics of controlling its prevalence in wildlife reservoirs. We used an individually based epidemiological model to assess the relative efficacies of three management interventions (sterilization, vaccination, and test-and-remove). The model was parameterized with demographic and epidemiological data from bison in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Sterilization and test-and-remove were most successful at reducing seroprevalence when they were targeted at young seropositive animals, which are the most likely age and sex category to be infectious. However, these approaches also required the most effort to implement. Vaccination was less effective (even with a perfect vaccine) but also required less effort to implement. For the treatment efforts we explored (50–100 individuals per year or 2.5–5% of the female population), sterilization had little impact upon the bison population growth rate when selectively applied. The population growth rate usually increased by year 25 due to the reduced number of Brucella-induced abortions. Initial declines in seroprevalence followed by rapid increases (>15% increase in 5 years) occurred in 3–13% of simulations with sterilization and test-and-remove, but not vaccination. We believe this is due to the interaction of superspreading events and the loss of herd immunity in the later stages of control efforts as disease prevalence declines. Sterilization provided a mechanism for achieving large disease reductions while simultaneously limiting population growth, which may be advantageous in some management scenarios. However, the field effort required to find the small segment of the population that is infectious rather than susceptible or recovered will likely limit the utility of this approach in many free-ranging wildlife populations. Nevertheless, we encourage

  15. Interfacial adhesion and microfailure modes of electrodeposited carbon fiber/epoxy-PEI composites by microdroplet and surface wettability tests.

    PubMed

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Dae-Sik; Kong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Minyoung; Kim, Wonho; Park, In-Seo

    2002-05-01

    Interfacial properties and microfailure modes of electrodeposition (ED)-treated carbon fiber-reinforced polyetherimide (PEI) toughened epoxy composite were investigated using microdroplet test and the measurement of surface wettability. ED was performed to improve the interfacial shear strength (IFSS). As PEI content increased, IFSS increased due to enhanced toughness and plastic deformation of PEI. In the untreated case, IFSS increased with adding PEI content, and the IFSS of the pure PEI matrix showed the highest. On the other hand, for the ED-treated case IFSS increased with PEI content with rather low improvement rate. In the untreated case, neat epoxy resin appeared brittle microfailure mode, whereas the pure PEI matrix exhibited a more likely ductile microfailure mode. In the ED-treated case, neat epoxy exhibited a more ductile fracture than that of the untreated case. Critical surface tension and polar surface free energy of ED-treated carbon fiber was higher than those of the untreated fiber. The work of adhesion between fiber and matrix was not directly proportional to IFSS for both the untreated and ED-treated cases. The matrix toughness might contribute to IFSS more likely than the surface wettability. Interfacial properties of the epoxy-PEI composite can be affected efficiently by both the control of matrix toughness and ED treatment.

  16. Steady Heat Removal Test by BWR Drywell Cooler under Accident Management Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, Seiichi; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Akinaga, Makoto; Fukasawa, Masanori; Nagasaka, Hideo

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the heat removal performance of the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) applied as a Japanese phase-II accident management. Separated effect tests were conducted using a single DWC unit of a typical BWR plant under severe accident (SA) condition. It was demonstrated that noncondensable gas mixture with nitrogen and helium was constantly vented from the DWC casing and the favorable steam condensation rate was maintained even under the highest assumed gas condition. The DWC was found to be promising even under wide range of SA conditions. (authors)

  17. Performance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Tleimat, Maher; Nalette, Tim; Quinn, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of performance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed-a grant-to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. This paper presents the results of mass, power, volume, and acoustic measurements for the delivered system. Product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a simulated planetary base wastewater ersatz are also provided.

  18. In vivo tests of a novel wound dressing based on biomaterials with tissue adhesion controlled through external stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, C; Barcellos, L; Ferreira, M D; Moura, S A L; Soares, I A; Oréfice, R L

    2011-05-01

    The high incidence of wounds by second intention and the high costs associated with their treatment give rise to the need for the development of wound dressings that protect not only the wounds themselves but that are also able to promote cell proliferation and skin regeneration. Moreover, it is also very important that no damage to the new regenerated tissue is generated while removing the dressing. In this work, a novel wound dressing, which would be able to favor tissue repair and be removed at an appropriate scheduled moment by means of an external stimulus without promoting extensive damage to the new tissue, was produced and tested. Polyurethane membranes were modified by grafting polymers based on poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) (P-N-IPAAm). P-N-IPAAm undergoes a phase transition at approximately 32°C, which changes its behavior from hydrophilic (below 32°C) to hydrophobic. It was hypothesized that, by reducing the temperature near the wound dressing to values lower than 32°C, the detachment of the dressing would become more effective. The wound dressings containing P-N-IPAAm grafts were tested in vivo by covering excisional wounds produced in mice. The produced dressings were placed in direct contact with the lesions for 3 days. Results showed that the hypothermia due to anesthesia required to remove the dressings from mice lowered the local temperature to 28°C and favored the detachment of the wound dressings containing P-N-IPAAm grafts. Histological analyses showed that lesions covered by dressings presented less intense inflammatory events and denser connective tissue than did the wounds without dressings. The wounds covered by polyurethane membranes with P-N-IPAAm grafts showed signs of more intense re-epithelization and angiogenesis than did the lesions covered by polyurethane without grafts.

  19. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  20. Portable life support system regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal by metal oxide absorbents preprototype hardware development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Johnson has acquired a preprototype/full-scale metal oxide CO2 and humidity remover (MOCHR), together with its regeneration module. Tests conducted prior to delivery by the MOCHR's manufacturer have demonstrated the concurrent removal of H2O and CO2 at rates, and under conditions, that are applicable to EVA Portable Life Support Systems.

  1. Polymer adhesion test system: A mechatronic instrument to study the cohesion and adhesion properties of polymers in high-speed squeezing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolfi, Fred R.

    This thesis involves the design, fabrication and use of an instrument to characterize polymeric materials at high speed. The work comprises a study in the field of mechatronics. Mechatronics is the synergistic combination of precision mechanical engineering, electronics, control systems and computers. Each of these components was required for a different aspect of the instrument; it was only through their synergy that the goal of high-speed operation was achieved. Indicative of a mechatronics approach, the mechanical design included a direct drive actuator, a hardy, simple means of obtaining precision motion. Inertia had to be minimized. The structural integrity of the design had to be analyzed and verified. Wideband, low noise, electronics were used in the feedback control loop and for the sensors that measured various mechanical variables. A linear feedback control system gave the instrument, the reference signal tracking, disturbance rejection and robustness to unmodeled dynamics required for its operation. This control system, therefore, provided the system functionality for the mechanical components. Finally, a computer system was used for data acquisition, parameter model determination and reference signal generation. The whole instrument was clearly more than the sum of its component parts. The primary scientific advance from this work comes from the fact that this instrument enables a high-speed characterization of polymers with a precision not previously available. The instrument subjects the polymer to squeezing flow, a type of flow pattern more complex than shearing flow and characteristic of many engineering processes. The instrument measures the viscoelastic rheological properties of the polymer under this flow regime at high system speeds (high rates of strain). Further, the instrument characterizes the cohesive properties of the polymer under high-speed transient extension. Finally, the instrument measures the adhesive properties of the polymer in

  2. Test plan for valveless ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hauserman, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    This is a test plan to demonstrate a method of ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) systems through small beds of crushed rock rather than conventional pressure let-down valves and lock hoppers. The economic advantage of such a method is that process-inherent erosive damage will be inflicted upon the cheaply replaceable crushed rock, rather than upon expensive, fabricated valve trim components. The concept to be tested is an extension of the gravel bucket'' principle in which an erosive, high pressure slurry stream passes through a bed of crushed rock with an adjustable flow path and cross-section. The original gravel bucket concept was inspired by the costly valve erosion problems projected for coal liquefaction plants. This project extends the same approach to systems where solids are to be removed from PFBC systems, with more limited possibilities of application to some coal gasification processes. If proven successful, a hot-gas gravel bucket could offer an economic alternative to a lock hopper plus a pair of expensive block valves. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Carbon dioxide removal system for closed loop atmosphere revitalization, candidate sorbents screening and test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, E. M.; Knox, J. C.; Bardot, D. M.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the difficulty and expense it costs to resupply manned-spacecraft habitats, a goal is to create a closed loop atmosphere revitalization system, in which precious commodities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water are continuously recycled. Our aim is to test other sorbents for their capacity for future spacecraft missions, such as on the Orion spacecraft, or possibly lunar or Mars mission habitats to see if they would be better than the zeolite sorbents on the 4-bed molecular sieve. Some of the materials being tested are currently used for other industry applications. Studying these sorbents for their specific spacecraft application is different from that for applications on earth because in space, there are certain power, mass, and volume limitations that are not as critical on Earth. In manned-spaceflight missions, the sorbents are exposed to a much lower volume fraction of CO2 (0.6% volume CO2) than on Earth. LiLSX was tested for its CO2 capacity in an atmosphere like that of the ISS. Breakthrough tests were run to establish the capacities of these materials at a partial pressure of CO2 that is seen on the ISS. This paper discusses experimental results from benchmark materials, such as results previously obtained from tests on Grade 522, and the forementioned candidate materials for the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) system.

  4. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    The successful use of many security papers, foils and films depends on the technology of chemical fastening systems -- especially pressure sensitive adhesives. These are adhesives activated not by heat or by the evaporation of water or some other solvent, but simply by the act of application -- by pressure. These adhesives provide the means whereby laminations, substrates and seals are made effective. In addition to their physical properties these adhesives are often required to possess optical properties to allow the security materials to be visibly active and indeed the adhesive system may itself contribute as a carrier for a variety of security materials. Recent advances in adhesives chemistry have made it possible to achieve virtually all the required physical performance characteristics combined with a choice of optical properties ranging from total opacity to invisibility and including controlled translucency and tinting. The implications for security printing and packaging are important. Opacity is easy to achieve, for example by loading the adhesive with aluminum powder, by the selection of totally opaque materials like metallized film or by various printing processes. But achieving transparency is a different matter, and transparency is mandatory for applications involving the protection of documents, photographs, etc. with a clear film over-laminate. Obvious examples would be for passports, visas and other personal identification. But some security devices may themselves require protection; for example holograms or embossings. And transparency in the test laboratory is not enough. The Australian driving licence is stuck to the windshield, so the transparency of the adhesive must be sustained over long periods without deterioration due to prolonged u/v exposure, climatic conditions or aging. The commercial label market has helped to push the technology forward. There is a strong demand for the 'no-label look' for packaging of clear plastic and glass

  5. EPA/NSF ETV Equipment Verification Testing Plan for the Removal of Volatile Organic Chemical Contaminants by Adsorptive Media Processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific Test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of drinking water treatment equipment utilizing adsorptive media for synthetic organic chemical (SOC) removal. This TSTP is to be used within the structure provid...

  6. Laboratory tests in support of the MSRE reactive gas removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, J.C.; Del Cul, G.D.; Caja, J.; Toth, L.M.; Williams, D.F.; Thomas, K.S.; Clark, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since December 1969, at which time the molten salt mixture of LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} (64.5-30.3-5.0-0.13 mol%) was transferred to fuel salt drain tanks for storage. In the late 1980s, increased radiation in one of the gas lines from the drain tank was attributed to {sup 233}UF{sub 6}. In 1994 two gas samples were withdraw (from a gas line in the Vent House connecting to the drain tanks) and analyzed. Surprisingly, 350 mm Hg of F{sub 2}, 70 mm Hg of UF{sub 6}, and smaller amounts of other gases were found in both of the samples. To remote this gas from above the drain tanks and all of the associated piping, the reactive gas removal system (RGRS) was designed. This report details the laboratory testing of the RGRS, using natural uranium, prior to its implementation at the MSRE facility. The testing was performed to ensure that the equipment functioned properly and was sufficient to perform the task while minimizing exposure to personnel. In addition, the laboratory work provided the research and development effort necessary to maximize the performance of the system. Throughout this work technicians and staff who were to be involved in RGRS operation at the MSRE site worked directly with the research staff in completing the laboratory testing phase. Consequently, at the end of the laboratory work, the personnel who were to be involved in the actual operations had acquired all of the training and experience necessary to continue with the process of reactive gas removal.

  7. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  8. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Blythe, G.

    1995-10-18

    This project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The ``base`` project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy`s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy`s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light`s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation`s Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. Following the introduction, this report is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarter that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts anticipated for the first quarter of calendar year 1996. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgment.

  9. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  10. Effect of thermal shock loadings on stability of dentin-composite polymer material adhesive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Gribov, Andrey N.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several decades the problem of longevity and durability of adhesive interfaces between hard tooth tissues and composite resin-based materials are of great interest among dental researchers and clinicians. These parameters are partially determined by adhesive system mechanical properties. In the present research project nanoindentation has been examined to test hardness of dental adhesive systems. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to study the effect of light curing time and oxygen inhibition phenomenon on light-cured adhesive material hardness. An adhesive system AdperTM Single Bond (3M ESPE) was selected as a material for testing. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the maximum values of hardness were observed after the material had been light-cured for 20 seconds, as outlined in guidelines for polymerization time of the adhesive system. The experimental studies of oxygen inhibition influence on adhesive system hardness pointed out to the fact that the dispersive layer removal led to increase in adhesive system hardness. A long - time exposure of polymerized material of adhesive system at open air at room temperature resulted in no changes in its hardness, which was likely to be determined by the mutual effect of rival processes of air oxygen inhibition and directed light curing.

  11. 49 CFR 236.101 - Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 236.101 Section 236.101 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.101 Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or.../or equipment is maintained in condition to perform its intended function. Electronic device,...

  12. 49 CFR 236.101 - Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 236.101 Section 236.101 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.101 Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or.../or equipment is maintained in condition to perform its intended function. Electronic device,...

  13. 49 CFR 234.247 - Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 234.247 Section 234.247 Transportation Other... tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. (a) The inspections... electronic device, relay, or other electromagnetic device that fails to meet the requirements of...

  14. 49 CFR 234.247 - Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 234.247 Section 234.247 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests § 234.247 Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device... operations over the grade crossing resume. (c) Any electronic device, relay, or other electromagnetic...

  15. 49 CFR 236.101 - Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 236.101 Section 236.101 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.101 Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or.../or equipment is maintained in condition to perform its intended function. Electronic device,...

  16. 49 CFR 234.247 - Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 234.247 Section 234.247 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests § 234.247 Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device... operations over the grade crossing resume. (c) Any electronic device, relay, or other electromagnetic...

  17. 49 CFR 236.101 - Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 236.101 Section 236.101 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.101 Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or.../or equipment is maintained in condition to perform its intended function. Electronic device,...

  18. 49 CFR 234.247 - Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 234.247 Section 234.247 Transportation Other... tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. (a) The inspections... electronic device, relay, or other electromagnetic device that fails to meet the requirements of...

  19. 49 CFR 234.247 - Purpose of inspections and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 234.247 Section 234.247 Transportation Other... tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. (a) The inspections... electronic device, relay, or other electromagnetic device that fails to meet the requirements of...

  20. 49 CFR 236.101 - Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or device failing to meet test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... service of relay or device failing to meet test requirements. 236.101 Section 236.101 Transportation Other... Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.101 Purpose of inspection and tests; removal from service of relay or.../or equipment is maintained in condition to perform its intended function. Electronic device,...

  1. Approach for removing ghost-images in remote field eddy current testing of ferromagnetic pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Q. W.; Shi, Y. B.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    In the non-destructive testing of ferromagnetic pipes based on remote field eddy currents, an array of sensing coils is often used to detect local defects. While testing, the image that is obtained by sensing coils exhibits a ghost-image, which originates from both the transmitter and sensing coils passing over the same defects in pipes. Ghost-images are caused by transmitters and lead to undesirable assessments of defects. In order to remove ghost-images, two pickup coils are coaxially set to each other in remote field. Due to the time delay between differential signals tested by the two pickup coils, a Wiener deconvolution filter is used to identify the artificial peaks that lead to ghost-images. Because the sensing coils and two pickup coils all receive the same signal from one transmitter, they all contain the same artificial peaks. By subtracting the artificial peak values obtained by the two pickup coils from the imaging data, the ghost-image caused by the transmitter is eliminated. Finally, a relatively highly accurate image of local defects is obtained by these sensing coils. With proposed method, there is no need to subtract the average value of the sensing coils, and it is sensitive to ringed defects.

  2. Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

    2012-09-30

    A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

  3. Acceptance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark; Tleimat, Maher; Quinn, Gregory; Fort, James; Nalette, Tim; Baker, Gale

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of acceptance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed a grant to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant was peer reviewed and funded through the Advanced Life Support (ALS) National Research Announcement (NRA). The grant funded a contract with Water Reuse Technology Inc. to construct an engineering development unit. This contract concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. The objective of the acceptance testing was to characterize the performance of this new system. This paper presents the results of mass power, and volume measurements for the delivered system. In addition, product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a planetary base wastewater ersatz are provided. Acoustic noise levels, interface specifications and system reliability results are also discussed. An assessment of the readiness of the technology for human testing and recommendations for future improvements are provided.

  4. Evaluation of ozone generation and indoor organic compounds removal by air cleaners based on chamber tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kuo-Pin; Lee, Grace Whei-May; Hsieh, Ching-Pei; Lin, Chi-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Ozone can cause many health problems, including exacerbation of asthma, throat irritation, cough, chest ache, shortness of breath, and respiratory infections. Air cleaners are one of the sources of indoor ozone, and thus the evaluation of ozone generated by air cleaners is desired significant issue. Most evaluation methods proposed are based on chamber tests. However, the adsorption and desorption of ozone on the wall of test chamber and the deposition of ozone resulted from the surface reaction can influence the evaluation results. In this study, we developed a mass balance model that took the adsorption, desorption and deposition of ozone into consideration to evaluate the effective ozone emission rates of six selected air cleaners. The experiments were conducted in a stainless steel chamber with a volume of 11.3 m 3 at 25 °C and 60% relative humidity. The adsorption, desorption and deposition rate constants of ozone obtained by fitting the model to the experimental data were k a = 0.149 ± 0.052 m h -1, k d = 0.013 ± 0.007 h -1, and k r = 0.050 ± 0.020 h -1, respectively. The effective ozone emission rates of Air Cleaners No. 1, 2, and 3 ranged between 13,400-24,500 μg h -1, 7190-10,400 μg h -1, and 4880-6560 μg h -1, respectively, which were more stable than those of No.4, 5, and 6. The effective ozone emission rates of Air Cleaners No. 4, 5, and 6 increased with the time of operation which might be relevant to the decrease of ozone removal by the "aging" filter installed in these cleaners. The removal of toluene and formaldehyde by these six air cleaners were also evaluated and the clean air delivery rates (CADRs) of these two pollutants ranged from non-detectable to 0.42 ± 0.08 m 3 h -1, and from non-detectable to 0.75 ± 0.07 m 3 h -1, respectively. The CADRs showed an insignificant relationship with the effective ozone emission rates. Thus, the removal of toluene and formaldehyde might be resulted from the adsorption on the filters and the

  5. Adhesion Performance of Solid Film Lubricants on Substrates Cleaned With Environmentally Compliant Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P. B.; Thom, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Solid film adhesion testing was used to determine the effect different environmentally compliant cleaners have on the adhesion properties of solid film lubricants used for several NASA programs. In an action to remove ozone depleting chemicals from aerospace processes, a replacement cleaner must be identified that does not affect the adhesion of solid film lubricants used on flight critical NASA hardware. ASTM D251083 Standard Test Method for Adhesion of Solid Film Lubricants was used to evaluate the cleaners. Two different lubricants - Inlox 88 and Boosterlube - were tested using various commercially available cleaners. Inlox 88 is produced by E/M Corporation and is a liquid oxygen compatible lubricant used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine, and Boosterlube is a new lubricant being implemented for use on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. These lubricants were selected because of their specific use on flight critical NASA components. Results of this testing are presented in the paper.

  6. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  7. TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory

  8. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  9. CYANOACRYLATE ADHESIVES IN EYE WOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    adhesives. The following adhesives were tested: methyl, isobutyl, n-butyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, n-decyl, -trifluoroisopropyl 2- cyanoacrylate , and...Biobond. Of these, methyl and -trifluoroisopropyl cyanoacrylates are not well tolerated by eye tissues. Biobond sets too slowly, and does not seem... cyanoacrylate is the best adhesive found so far when tissue tolerance, tensile strength, and ability to seal eye perforations (alone and with silicone rubber patches) are the criteria. (Author)

  10. New and conventional pore size tests in virus-removing membranes.

    PubMed

    Duek, Aviv; Arkhangelsky, Elizabeth; Krush, Ronit; Brenner, Asher; Gitis, Vitaly

    2012-05-15

    Microorganisms are retained by ultrafiltration (UF) membranes mainly due to size exclusion. The sizes of viruses and membrane pores are close to each other and retention of viruses can be guaranteed only if the precise pore diameter is known. Unfortunately and rather surprisingly, there is no direct method to determine the membrane pore size. As a result, the UF membranes are not trusted to remove the viruses, and the treatment plants are required to enhance viral disinfection. Here we propose a new, simple and effective method for UF pore size determination using aquasols of gold and silver nanoparticles. We synthesized highly monodispersed suspensions ranging in diameter from 3 to 50 nm, which were later transferred through polymer and ceramic UF membranes. The retention percentage was plotted against the particle diameter to determine the pore size for which a membrane has a retention capability of 50, 90 and 100%. The d(50), d(90) and d(100) values were compared with data obtained from conventional transmembrane flux, polyethylene glycol, and dextran tests, and with the retention of phi X 174 and MS2 bacteriophages. The absolute pore size, d(100), for the majority of tested UF membranes is within 40-50 nm, and can only be detected with the new tests. The average 1.2 log retention of hydrophilic phi X 174 was predicted accurately by models based on the virus hydrodynamic radii and d(100) pore size. The 2.5 log MS2 retention suggests hydrophobic interactions in addition to simple ball-through-cylinder geometry.

  11. Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

  12. Development and First Results of the Width-Tapered Beam Method for Adhesion Testing of Photovoltaic Material Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, Nick; Tracy, Jared; Dauskardt, Reinhold; Kurtz, Sarah

    2016-11-21

    A fracture mechanics based approach for quantifying adhesion at every interface within the PV module laminate is presented. The common requirements of monitoring crack length and specimen compliance are circumvented through development of a width-tapered cantilever beam method. This technique may be applied at both the module and coupon level to yield a similar, quantitative, measurement. Details of module and sample preparation are described and first results on field-exposed modules deployed for over 27 years presented.

  13. [The evaluation of different agglutination and adhesion tests with erythrocytic reagents in determining antibodies to the O and H antigens of Salmonella typhimurium in comparison with immunoenzyme analysis (IEA)].

    PubMed

    Karal'nik, B V; Denisova, T G

    1996-01-01

    The comparison of the effectiveness of EIA with that of a number of agglutination and adhesion tests with erythrocyte diagnostica in the determination of antibodies to different S.typhimurium antigens demonstrated higher sensitivity of EIA. The relative specificity of the determination of O- and H-antibodies in EIA and in agglutination and adhesion tests depended on the isotype of antibodies to be determined and the specificity of sensitins used in the production of immunoreagents.

  14. Optimization of Saltcake Removal Flowsheet at SRS through Incorporation of Testing and In-Tank Waste Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Adam G.; Tihey, John R.

    2015-01-15

    Saltcake removal at SRS may be performed for several reasons: to provide space for evaporator operation (i.e., to precipitate more salt in the drop tank), to provide feed for salt processing (i.e. immobilize the waste), or to remove the salt for tank closure. Many different salt dissolution techniques have been employed in the 40 years that SRS has been performing salt removal, from a basic “Add, Sit, Remove” method (water is added on top of the saltcake and time is allowed for diffusion), to performing interstitial liquid removal, or using mixing devices to promote contact with the liquid. Lessons learned from previous saltcake removal campaigns, in addition to testing and modeling, have led to opportunities for improvements to the overall saltcake removal process. This includes better understanding of salt properties and behavior during dissolution; the primary concerns for salt dissolution are the release of radiolytic hydrogen and criticality prevention (post-dissolution). Recent developments in salt dissolution include the reuse of dilute supernate and a semi-continuous dissolution (SCD) process, where low volume mixing eductors are used to deliver water near the surface of the saltcake at the same rate as the salt solution is removed and transferred to a receipt tank.

  15. Modular glass chip system measuring the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal cells--application and drug testing with sodium valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Koester, Philipp Julian; Buehler, Sebastian Moritz; Stubbe, Marco; Tautorat, Carsten; Niendorf, Mathias; Baumann, Werner; Gimsa, Jan

    2010-06-21

    We developed a modular neurochip system by combining a small (16x16 mm2) glass neurochip (GNC) with a homemade head stage and commercial data acquisition hardware and software. The system is designed for the detection of the electric activity of cultivated nerve or muscle cells by a 52-microelectrode array (MEA). In parallel, cell adhesion can be registered from the electric impedance of an interdigitated electrode structure (IDES). The GNC was tested with various cell lines and primary cells. It is fully autoclavable and re-useable. Murine embryonic primary cells were used as a model system to correlate the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal networks in a drug test with sodium valproic acid. The test showed the advantage of the parallel IDES and MEA measurements, i.e. the parallel detection of cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects. Toxic exposure of the cells during neuronal network formation allows for the characterization of developmental neurotoxic effects even at drug concentrations below the EC50-value for acute neurotoxic effects. At high drug concentrations, the degree of cytotoxic damage can still be assessed from the IDES data in the event that no electric activity develops. The GNC provides optimal cell culture conditions for up to months in combination with full microscopic observability. The 4'' glass wafer technology allows for a high precision of the GNC structures and an economic production of our new system that can be applied in general and developmental toxicity tests as well as in the search for neuro-active compounds.

  16. Enhancing Rain Garden Design to Promote Nitrate Removal: Testing a media carbon amendment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens effectively remove some stressors from stormwater, in particular heavy metals, phosphorus, and oil and grease, but in most cases they show much smaller removal rates of nitrate. This is likely due to the high sand and low organic matter content specified for rain ga...

  17. Enhancing rain garden design to promote nitrate removal: testing a media carbon amendment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens effectively remove some stressors from stormwater, in particular heavy metals, phosphorus, and oil and grease, but in most cases they show much smaller removal rates of nitrate. This is likely due to the high sand and low organic matter content specified for rain ga...

  18. Nitrate removal in deep sediments of a nitrogen-rich river network: A test of a conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Robert S.; Bartsch, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Many estimates of nitrogen removal in streams and watersheds do not include or account for nitrate removal in deep sediments, particularly in gaining streams. We developed and tested a conceptual model for nitrate removal in deep sediments in a nitrogen-rich river network. The model predicts that oxic, nitrate-rich groundwater will become depleted in nitrate as groundwater upwelling through sediments encounters a zone that contains buried particulate organic carbon, which promotes redox conditions favorable for nitrate removal. We tested the model at eight sites in upwelling reaches of lotic ecosystems in the Waupaca River Watershed that varied by three orders of magnitude in groundwater nitrate concentration. We measured denitrification potential in sediment core sections to 30 cm and developed vertical nitrate profiles to a depth of about 1 m with peepers and piezometer nests. Denitrification potential was higher, on average, in shallower core sections. However, core sections deeper than 5 cm accounted for 70%, on average, of the depth-integrated denitrification potential. Denitrification potential increased linearly with groundwater nitrate concentration up to 2 mg NO3-N/L but the relationship broke down at higher concentrations (> 5 mg NO3-N/L), a pattern that suggests nitrate saturation. At most sites groundwater nitrate declined from high concentrations at depth to much lower concentrations prior to discharge into the surface water. The profiles suggested that nitrate removal occurred at sediment depths between 20 and 40 cm. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were much higher in deep sediments than in pore water at 5 cm sediment depth at most locations. The substantial denitrification potential in deep sediments coupled with the declines in nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations in upwelling groundwater suggest that our conceptual model for nitrate removal in deep sediments is applicable to this river network. Our results suggest that nitrate removal rates

  19. Field Testing of a Prototype Filter System for the Removal of the Human Pathogen Giardia intestinales from Ground Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, C.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Bowman, R.; Meier, D.

    2005-12-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoans tend to be negatively charged in the pH range of most ground waters. Thus, naturally occurring and modified materials such as surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZ), which have net positive surface charges and hydrophobic properties, are suitable as barriers to impede pathogen migration in aquifer systems. In our experiments SMZ has been used to remove E. coli and the bacteriophage MS-2 from sewage water with a high success rate ( E. coli 100%, MS-2 > 90%). Testing was conducted both in the laboratory and the field. Laboratory experiments were conducted to test the removal efficiency of SMZ for Giardia intestinales using the Giardia cysts and microsphere analogs. The SMZ was effective at removing Giardia intestinales cysts from the groundwater, but removal rates were not as high as for bacteria and viruses in the earlier experiments. The removal efficiency varied with the particular formulation of the SMZ used. The most effective SMZ formulation is being further tested at our field site using water amended with microspheres to simulate Giardia behavior. The field site is an existing multiple well site at the University of Idaho in Moscow. The wells are completed in the Lolo Basalt Formation; a highly heterogeneous and anisotropic fractured basalt aquifer system typical of the subsurface of most of eastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. The SMZ pathogen filter is installed directly in the well bore and the concentrations of microsphere-amended ground water are measured before and after filtration. Pumping over an extended period is continuing in order to test the lifetime of our prototype filter system. Our tests and results are targeted at developing a prototype filter system for removing a multitude of human pathogens in drinking water.

  20. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  1. The effect of water on the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alyssa Yeager

    The gecko adhesive system is a dry, reversible adhesive that is virtually surface-insensitive due to the utilization of intermolecular van der Waals forces. Remarkably, although detailed models of the adhesive mechanism exist and hundreds of gecko-inspired synthetics have been fabricated, our ability to fully replicate the system still falls short. One reason for this is our limited understanding of how the system performs in natural environments. To begin to resolve this I focused on one particular environmental parameter, water. Although thin layers of water can disrupt van der Waals forces, I hypothesized that geckos are able to retain or regain adhesive function on wet surfaces. I was motivated to investigate this hypothesis because many species of gecko are native to the tropics, a climate where we expect surface water to be prevalent, thus it is likely geckos have some mechanism to overcome the challenges associated with surface water and wetting. Despite the challenge water should pose to adhesion, I found that when tested on hydrophobic substrates geckos cling equally well in air and water. Conversely, on wet hydrophilic substrates geckos cannot support their body weight. Investigating these results further, I found that the superhydrophobic nature of the adhesive toe pads allows geckos to form an air bubble around their foot, which when pressed into contact with a hydrophobic substrate likely removes water from the adhesive interface. When the toe pads are no longer superhydrophobic however, geckos cannot support their body weight and fall from substrates. In order to regain adhesion geckos only need to take about ten steps on a dry substrate to self-dry their toe pads. Finally, when measuring a dynamic component of adhesion, running, we found that geckos are able to maintain speed on misted hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates, contrary to what we would predict based on static shear adhesion measurements. In conclusion, my research provides a detailed

  2. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  3. Chemical Characterization and Quality Control for an Adhesive.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *IDENTIFICATION, *CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, *QUALITY CONTROL, PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES, ACCEPTANCE TESTS, CLASSIFICATION, VIABILITY, TEST METHODS, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, PROCESSING, PRODUCTION CONTROL , AIRCRAFT .

  4. The effects of ethanol on the size-exclusion characteristics of type I dentin collagen to adhesive resin monomers

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, A; Zhou, J; Nakajima, M; Tan, J; Tagami, J; Scheffel, DLS; Hebling, J; Agee, KA; Breschi, L; Grégoire, G; Jang, SS; Tay, FR; Pashley, DH

    2016-01-01

    During dentin bonding with etch-and-rinse adhesive systems, phosphoric acid etching of mineralized dentin solubilizes the mineral crystallites and replaces them with bound and unbound water. During the infiltration phase of dentin bonding, solvated adhesive resin comonomers are supposed to replace all of the unbound collagen water and polymerize into copolymers. A recently published review suggested that dental monomers are too large to enter and displace water from tightly-packed collagen molecules. Conversely, recent work from the authors’ laboratory demonstrated that HEMA and TEGDMA freely equilibrate with water-saturated dentin matrices. However, because adhesive blends are solvated in organic solvents, those solvents may remove enough free water to allow collagen molecules to come close enough to exclude adhesive monomer permeation. The present study analyzed the size-exclusion characteristics of dentin collagen, using a gel permeation-like column chromatography technique, filled with dentin powder instead of Sephadex beads as the stationary phase. The elution volumes of different sized test molecules, including adhesive resin monomers, studied in both water-saturated dentin, and again in ethanol-dehydrated dentin powder, showed that adhesive resin monomers can freely diffuse into both hydrated and dehydrated collagen molecules. Under these in vitro conditions, all free and some of the loosely-bound water seems to have been removed by ethanol. These results validate the concept that adhesive resin monomers can permeate tightly-bound water in ethanol-saturated collagen molecules during infiltration by etch-and-rinse adhesives. PMID:26827779

  5. Fan noise reduction achieved by removing tip flow irregularities behind the rotor - forward arc test configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The noise source caused by the interaction of the rotor tip flow irregularities (vortices and velocity defects) with the downstream stator vanes was studied. Fan flow was removed behind a 0.508 meter (20 in.) diameter model turbofan through an outer wall slot between the rotor and stator. Noise measurements were made with far-field microphones positioned in an arc about the fan inlet and with a pressure transducer in the duct behind the stator. Little tone noise reduction was observed in the forward arc during flow removal; possibly because the rotor-stator interaction noise did not propagate upstream through the rotor. Noise reductions were maded in the duct behind the stator and the largest decrease occurred with the first increment of flow removal. This result indicates that the rotor tip flow irregularity-stator interaction is as important a noise producing mechanism as the normally considered rotor wake-stator interaction.

  6. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Peters, P. D.; Hendricks, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation, selection, and demonstration of structural adhesive systems for supersonic cruise research applications, and establishment of environmental durability of selected systems for up to 20,000 hours is described. Ten candidate adhesives were initially evaluated. During screening and evaluation, these candidates were narrowed to three of the most promising for environmental durability testing. The three adhesives were LARC-13, PPQ, and NR056X. The LARC-13 was eliminated because of a lack of stability at 505 K. The NRO56X was removed from the market. The LARC-TPI was added after preliminary evaluation and an abbreviated screening test. Only PPQ and LARC-TPI remained as the reasonable candidates late into the durability testing. Large area bond panels were fabricated to demonstrate the processibility of the selected systems. Specifications were prepared to assure control over critical material and process parameters. Surface characterization concentrated primarily upon titanium surface treatments of 10 volt chronic acid anodize, 5 volt chromic acid anodize and PASA-JELL. Failure analysis was conducted on lap shear adhesive bond failures which occurred in PPQ and LARC-13 test specimens after 10,000 hours at 505 K.

  7. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  8. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  9. Thrust Removal Scheme for the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model Tested in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Milholen, William E., II; Jones, Gregory S.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    A second wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control semi-span model was recently completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model allowed independent control of four circulation control plenums producing a high momentum jet from a blowing slot near the wing trailing edge that was directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged flap. The model was configured for transonic testing of the cruise configuration with 0deg flap deflection to determine the potential for drag reduction with the circulation control blowing. Encouraging results from analysis of wing surface pressures suggested that the circulation control blowing was effective in reducing the transonic drag on the configuration, however this could not be quantified until the thrust generated by the blowing slot was correctly removed from the force and moment balance data. This paper will present the thrust removal methodology used for the FAST-MAC circulation control model and describe the experimental measurements and techniques used to develop the methodology. A discussion on the impact to the force and moment data as a result of removing the thrust from the blowing slot will also be presented for the cruise configuration, where at some Mach and Reynolds number conditions, the thrust-removed corrected data showed that a drag reduction was realized as a consequence of the blowing.

  10. Final Report on Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment and small components results in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the EPA reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium. The new standard lowers OSHA's PEL for hexavalent chromium from 52 to 5 micrograms of Cr(V1) per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in the pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to remove prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation and non destructive evaluation is a relatively new technology that has shown itself to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The development of a Portable Laser Coating Removal System (PLCRS) started as the goal of a Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) project, led by the Air Force, where several types of lasers in several configurations were thoroughly evaluated. Following this project, NASA decided

  11. Final Report on NASA Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment, small parts and flight components result in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from 52 to 5 micrograms per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in numerous pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Space Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient, and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation, and non destructive evaluation (NDE) is a relatively new application of the technology that has been proven to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The novel process eliminates VOCs and blast media and captures the removed coatings with an integrated vacuum system. This means that the only waste generated are the coatings that are removed, resulting in an overall cleaner process. The development of a

  12. Evaluation of pharmaceuticals removal by sewage sludge-derived adsorbents with rapid small-scale column tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Ding, R.; Wallace, R.; Bandosz, T.

    2015-12-01

    New composite adsorbents were developed by pyrolyzing sewage sludge and fish waste (75:25 or 90:10 dry mass ratio) at 650 oC and 950 oC. Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated that the composite adsorbents were able to adsorb a wide range of organic contaminants (volatile organic compounds, pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and nitrosamine disinfection byproducts) with high capacities. Here we further examine the performance of the adsorbents for the simultaneous removal of 8 pharmaceuticals and EDCs with rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT). Results show that the order of breakthrough in RSSCT is in general consistent with the affinity determined via batch tests. As expected, the maximum amount of adsorption for each compound obtained from RSSCT is identical to or less than that obtained from batch tests (with only one exception), due to adsorption kinetics. However, despite the very different input concentration (1 mg/L vs. 100 mg/L) and contact time (2 min empty bed contact time vs. 16 hour equilibrium time) used in RSSCT and batch tests, the maximum amount of pharmaceuticals and EDCs adsorbed under RSSCT is still about one half of that under equilibrium batch tests, validating the approach of using batch tests with much higher input concentrations to determine adsorption capacities. Results of a pilot-scale column test in a drinking water treatment plant for pharmaceuticals removal will also be presented.

  13. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  14. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  15. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  16. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  17. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  18. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  19. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  20. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  1. Use of hairy roots extracts for 2,4-DCP removal and toxicity evaluation by Lactuca sativa test.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Vanina A; Agostini, Elizabeth; Medina, María I; González, Paola S

    2014-02-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) is widely distributed in wastewaters discharged from several industries, and it is considered as a priority pollutant due to its high toxicity. In this study, the use of different peroxidase extracts for 2,4-DCP removal from aqueous solutions was investigated. Tobacco hairy roots (HRs), wild-type (WT), and double-transgenic (DT) for tomato basic peroxidases (TPX1 and TPX2) were used to obtain different peroxidase extracts: total peroxidases (TPx), soluble peroxidases (SPx), and peroxidases ionically bound to the cell wall (IBPx). All extracts derived from DT HRs exhibited higher peroxidase activity than those obtained from WT HRs. TPx and IBPx DT extracts showed the highest catalytic efficiency values. The optimal conditions for 2,4-DCP oxidation were pH 6.5, H2O2 0.5 mM, and 200 U mL(-1) of enzyme, for all extracts analyzed. Although both TPx extracts were able to oxidize different 2,4-DCP concentrations, the removal efficiency was higher for TPx DT. Polyethylene glycol addition slightly improved 2,4-DCP removal efficiency, and it showed some protective effect on TPx WT after 2,4-DCP oxidation. In addition, using Lactuca sativa test, a reduction of the toxicity of post removal solutions was observed, for both TPx extracts. The results demonstrate that TPx extracts from both tobacco HRs appear to be promising candidate for future applications in removing 2,4-DCP from wastewaters. This is particularly true considering that these peroxidase sources are associated with low costs and are readily available. However, TPx DT has increased peroxidase activity, catalytic efficiency, and higher removal efficiency than TPx WT, probably due to the expression of TPX1 and TPX2 isoenzymes.

  2. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford waste via hydrothermal processing -- FY 1994/95 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R.; Lehmann, R.W.; Momont, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating and developing organic destruction technologies that may be incorporated into the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) to treat Hanford tank waste. Organic (and ferrocyanide) destruction removes the compounds responsible for waste safety issues, and conditions the supernatant for low-level waste disposal by removing compounds that may be responsible for promoting strontium and transuranic (TRU) components solubility. Destruction or defunctionalization of complexing organics in tank wastes eliminates organic species that can reduce the efficiency of radionuclide (E.g., {sup 90}Sr) separation processes, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, and precipitation. The technologies being evaluated and tested for organic destruction are low-temperature hydrothermal processing (HTP) and wet air oxidation (WAO). Four activities are described: Batch HTP/WAO testing with Actual Tank Waste (Section 3.0), Batch HTP Testing with Simulant (Section 4.0), Batch WAO testing with Simulant (Section 5.0), and Continuous Bench-scale WAO Testing with Simulant (Section 6.0). For each of these activities, the objectives, test approach, results, status, and direction of future investigations are discussed. The background and history of the HTP/WAO technology is summarized below. Conclusions and Recommendations are provided in Section 2.0. A continuous HTP off-gas safety evaluation conducted in FY 1994 is included as Appendix A.

  3. Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B.

    1997-04-01

    This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

  4. Evaluation of biogas production from seaweed in batch tests and in UASB reactors combined with the removal of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Murto, Marika

    2010-07-01

    Seaweed can be anaerobically digested for the production of energy-rich methane. However, the use of seaweed digestate as a fertilizer may be restricted because of the high heavy metal content especially cadmium. Reducing the concentration of heavy metals in the digestate will enable its use as a fertilizer. In this laboratory-scale study, the potential of seaweed and its leachate in the production of methane were evaluated in batch tests. The effect of removing the heavy metals from seaweed leachate was evaluated in both batch test and treatment in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The heavy metals were removed from seaweed leachate using an imminodiacetic acid (IDA) polyacrylamide cryogel carrier. The methane yield obtained in the anaerobic digestion of seaweed was 0.12 N l CH(4)/g VS(added). The same methane yield was obtained when the seaweed leachate was used for methane production. The IDA-cryogel carrier was efficient in removing Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) ions from seaweed leachate. The removal of heavy metals in the seaweed leachate led to a decrease in the methane yield. The maximum sustainable organic loading rate (OLR) attained in the UASB reactor was 20.6 g tCOD/l/day corresponding to a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12 h and with a total COD removal efficiency of about 81%. Hydrolysis and treatment with IDA cryogel reduced the heavy metals content in the seaweed leachate before methane production. This study also demonstrated the suitability of the treatment of seaweed leachate in a UASB reactor.

  5. Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal

    SciTech Connect

    Orcutt, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions.

  6. Method for removal of random noise in eddy-current testing system

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    Eddy-current response voltages, generated during inspection of metallic structures for anomalies, are often replete with noise. Therefore, analysis of the inspection data and results is difficult or near impossible, resulting in inconsistent or unreliable evaluation of the structure. This invention processes the eddy-current response voltage, removing the effect of random noise, to allow proper identification of anomalies within and associated with the structure.

  7. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials.

  8. Test plan for techniques to measure and remove coatings from K West Basin fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, A.E.

    1998-06-17

    Several types of coatings have previously been visually identified on the surface of 105-K East and 105-K West Basins fuel elements. One type of coating (found only in K West Basin) in particular was found to be a thick translucent material that was often seen to be dislodged from the elements as flakes when the elements were handled during visual examinations (Pitner 1997). Subsequently it was determined (for one element only in a hot cell) that this material, in the dry condition, could easily be removed from the element using a scraping tool. The coating was identified as Al(OH){sub 3} through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and to be approximately 60 {micro}m thick via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, brushing under water in the basin using numerous mechanical strokes failed to satisfactorily remove these coatings in their thickest form as judged by appearance. Such brushing was done with only one type of metal brush, a brush design previously found satisfactory for removing UO{sub 4}.xH{sub 2}O coatings from the elements.

  9. REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

    2010-03-31

    A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

  10. Enhanced bacterial adhesion on surfaces pretreated with fibrinogen and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, S.F.; Topham, N.S.; Burns, G.L.; Olsen, D.B.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of certain plasma proteins on the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis on polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, or glass was investigated. Test surfaces were treated with serum, plasma, albumin, immunoglobulin G, fibrinogen, or fibronectin. Using a specially designed test chamber, surfaces previously treated with test proteins were incubated with bacterial suspension. During the experiment, the test chamber was placed on a rotator to prevent settling of bacteria. At the end of the experiment, each test well was rinsed repeatedly to remove non-adherent bacteria. The number of bacteria adherent to the test surfaces was quantitated by a combination of methods including microscopic counting of cells, scintillation counting and autoradiography. It was noted that a greater number of bacteria adhered to surfaces coated with fibrinogen or fibronectin whereas surfaces treated with serum showed reduced bacterial adhesion. The inhibitory effect of serum appeared more pronounced with S. epidermidis when compared with P. aeruginosa under identical experimental conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that adherent bacteria were randomly distributed on the test surfaces and appeared to replicate while still adherent. These observations suggested that bacterial adhesion to biomaterials can be significantly influenced by the composition of the adsorbed proteins at the interface.

  11. Preliminary reliability test of lateral-current-injection GaInAsP/InP membrane distributed feedback laser on Si substrate fabricated by adhesive wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Kai; Inoue, Daisuke; Hiratani, Takuo; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2017-02-01

    A preliminary reliability test was performed for lateral-current-injection GaInAsP/InP membrane Distributed Feedback (DFB) lasers fabricated by multi-regrowth and adhesive wafer bonding. The measurement was conducted for lasers with two different types of p-side electrode: Ti/Au and Au/Zn/Au. The device with the Au/Zn/Au electrode, which had better current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, showed no degradation of differential quantum efficiency and threshold current after continuous aging for 310 h at a bias current density of 5 kA/cm2. This result indicates that the multi-regrowth and bonding process for the GaInAsP/InP membrane DFB laser will not impact the initial reliability.

  12. Surface modification of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering and correlation with cell adhesion and proliferation in in vitro tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rossokha, I.; Donkov, N.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The effect was analyzed of surface treatment by argon ions on the surface properties of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. The structural parameters of the as-deposited coatings were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction profiles and X-ray photoelectron spectra were also acquired. The total surface free energy (SFE), the polar, dispersion parts and fractional polarities, were estimated by the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaeble method. The adhesive and proliferative potentials of bone marrow cells were evaluated for both Ta2O5 coatings and Ta2O5 coatings deposited by simultaneous bombardment by argon ions in in vitro tests.

  13. Testing ecological tradeoffs of a new tool for removing fine sediment in a spring-fed stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam; Sechrist, Juddson D.; Marczak, Laurie B

    2014-01-01

    Excessive fine sediment is a focus of stream restoration work because it can impair the structure and function of streams, but few methods exist for removing sediment in spring-fed streams. We tested a novel method of sediment removal with the potential to have minimal adverse effects on the biological community during the restoration process. The Sand Wand system, a dredgeless vacuum developed by Streamside Technologies, was used to experimentally remove fine sediment from Kackley Springs, a spring creek in southeastern Idaho. We assessed the effects of the Sand Wand on stream physical habitat and macroinvertebrate composition for up to 60 days after the treatment. We documented changes in multiple habitat variables, including stream depth, median particle size, and the frequency of embedded substrate in stream reaches that were treated with the Sand Wand. We also found that macroinvertebrate composition was altered even though common macroinvertebrate metrics changed little after the treatment. Our results suggest that the Sand Wand was effective at removing fine sediments in Kackley Springs and did minimal harm to macroinvertebrate function, but the Sand Wand was not ultimately effective in improving substrate composition to desired conditions. Additional restoration techniques are still needed to decrease the amount of fine sediment.

  14. Laboratory testing on the removal of the veterinary antibiotic doxycycline during long-term liquid pig manure and digestate storage.

    PubMed

    Widyasari-Mehta, Arum; Suwito, Hanna Resti Kartika Ayu; Kreuzig, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The veterinary antibiotic doxycycline (DOXY) is today frequently applied in conventional pig husbandry for the control of respiratory diseases. After the treatment, pigs excrete major amounts of DOXY as the unchanged active substance. Thus, DOXY residues were found in liquid manures and digestates of biogas plants at concentrations of mg kg(-1) dry weight. In order to assess the impact of field applications of contaminated manures and digestates on the entry of DOXY residues into arable and grassland soils, thorough information about the removal of DOXY during long-term storage of farm fertilizers is required. Since this aspect has been only less investigated for manures but not for digestates, first long-term storage simulation tests were performed at laboratory scale. Within the 170-d incubation periods under strictly anaerobic conditions, doxycycline was removed in liquid pig manure by 61% and in digestate by 76%. The calculated half-lives of 120 d and 91 d thus emphasized the persistence of doxycycline in both matrices. Due to the substance specific properties of DOXY, this removal was caused neither by mineralization, epimerization nor biotransformation. According to the high affinity of DOXY to manure and digestate solids, however, the formation of non-extractable residues has to be taken into account as the predominant concentration determining process. This was indicated by the sequential extraction procedure applied. Hence, these results confirmed that a full removal capacity for doxycycline cannot be reached through the long-term storage of farm fertilizers.

  15. Investigation of package sealing using organic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic study was performed to evaluate the suitability of adhesives for sealing hybrid packages. Selected adhesives were screened on the basis of their ability to seal gold-plated Kovar butterfly-type packages that retain their seal integrity after individual exposures to increasingly severe temperature-humidity environments. Tests were also run using thermal shock, temperature cycling, mechanical shock and temperature aging. The four best adhesives were determined and further tested in a 60 C/98% RH environment and continuously monitored in regard to moisture content. Results are given, however, none of the tested adhesives passed all the tests.

  16. Acceptance Criteria for Aerospace Structural Adhesives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *AIRFRAMES, PRIMERS, STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION , DATA ACQUISITION , PARTICLE SIZE, ACCEPTANCE TESTS, ELASTOMERS, BONDING, QUALITY CONTROL, .

  17. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  18. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  19. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  20. Long-term field test of an electrochemical method for sulfide removal from sewage.

    PubMed

    Pikaar, Ilje; Li, Eugena; Rozendal, René A; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion caused by hydrogen sulfide leads to significant costs for the rehabilitation or replacement of corroded sewer pipes. Conventional methods to prevent sewer corrosion normally involve the dosing of significant amounts of chemicals with the associated transport and storage costs as well as considerable maintenance and control requirement. Recently, a novel chemical free method for sulfide abatement based on electrochemical sulfide oxidation was shown to be highly effective for the removal of sulfide from synthetic and real sewage. Here, we report on the electrochemical removal of sulfide using Ta/Ir and Pt/Ir coated titanium electrodes under simulated sewer conditions during field trials. The results showed that sulfide can successfully be removed to levels below the normal target value at the end of a simulated rising main (i.e. <1mg/L). A coulombic efficiency for dissolved oxygen generation of ≈ 60% was obtained and was independent of the current density. Scaling of the electrode and the membrane was observed in the cathode compartment and as a result the cell potentials increased over time. The cathode potentials returned to their original potential after switching the polarity every two days, but a more frequent switching would be needed to reduce the energy requirements of the system. Accelerated lifetime experiments indicated that a lifetime of 6.0 ± 1.9 years can be expected under polarity switching conditions at a pH of 14 and significantly longer at lower pH values. As operating the system without switching simplifies construction as well as operation, the choice whether to switch or not will in practice depend on operational cost (higher/lower energy) versus capital cost (reactor and peripherals). Irrespective of the approach, our study demonstrates that electrochemical sulfide control in sewer systems may be an attractive new option.

  1. Heap leach studies on the removal of uranium from soil. Report of laboratory-scale test results

    SciTech Connect

    Turney, W.R.J.R.; York, D.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Dander, D.C.; Longmire, P.A.; Morris, D.E.; Strait, R.K.; Brewer, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the initial results of laboratory-scale testing of heap leach that is being developed as a method for removing uranium from uranium-contaminated soil. The soil used was obtained from the site of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near the village of Fernald in Ohio. The testing is being conducted on a laboratory scale, but it is intended that this methodology will eventually be enlarged to field scale where, millions of cubic meters of uranium-contaminated soil can be remediated. The laboratory scale experiments show that, using carbonate/bicarbonate solutions, uranium can be effectively removed from the soil from initial values of around 600 ppM down to 100 ppM or less. The goal of this research is to selectively remove uranium from the contaminated soil, without causing serious changes in the characteristics of the soil. It is also hoped that the new technologies developed for soil remediation at FEMP will be transferred to other sites that also have uranium-contaminated soil.

  2. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  3. Double Lap Shear Testing of Coating Modified Ice Adhesion to Liquid Oxygen Feed Line Bracket, Space Shuttle External Tank

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Kruskal-Wallis test (Siegel and Castellan 1988, Zar 1999), was used in- stead. The results of this test show that at the 95% confidence level (α...strength. Huntsville, AL: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Siegel, S. and N. J. Castellan , Jr. (1988) Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral

  4. Mechanisms of self-cleaning in fluid-based smooth adhesive pads of insects.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Christofer J; Federle, Walter

    2012-12-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives such as tapes become easily contaminated by dust particles. By contrast, animal adhesive pads are able to self-clean and can be reused millions of times over a lifetime with little reduction in adhesion. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this ability are still unclear. Here we test in adhesive pads of stick insects (Carausius morosus) (1) whether self-cleaning is enhanced by the liquid pad secretion, and (2) whether alternating push-pull movements aid the removal of particles. We measured attachment forces of insect pads on glass after contamination with 10 µm polystyrene beads. While the amount of fluid present on the pad showed no effect on the pads' susceptibility to contamination, the recovery of adhesive forces after contamination was faster when higher fluid levels were present. However, this effect does not appear to be based on a faster rate of self-cleaning since the number of spheres deposited with each step did not increase with fluid level. Instead, the fluid may aid the recovery of adhesive forces by filling in the gaps between contaminating particles, similar to the fluid's function on rough surfaces. Further, we found no evidence that an alternation of pushing and pulling movements, as found in natural steps, leads to a more efficient recovery of adhesion than repeated pulling slides.

  5. Fibrin-Genipin Adhesive Hydrogel for Annulus Fibrosus Repair: Performance Evaluation with Large Animal Organ Culture, In Situ Biomechanics, and In Vivo Degradation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Likhitpanichkul, M.; Dreischarf, M.; Illien-Junger, S.; Walter, B. A.; Nukaga, T.; Long, R. G; Sakai, D.; Hecht, A. C.; Iatridis, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Annulus fibrosus (AF) defects from annular tears, herniation, and discectomy procedures are associated with painful conditions and accelerated intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Currently, no effective treatments exist to repair AF damage, restore IVD biomechanics and promote tissue regeneration. An injectable fibrin-genipin adhesive hydrogel (Fib-Gen) was evaluated for its performance repairing large AF defects in a bovine caudal IVD model using ex vivo organ culture and biomechanical testing of motion segments, and for its in vivo longevity and biocompatibility in a rat model by subcutaneous implantation. Fib-Gen sealed AF defects, prevented IVD height loss, and remained well-integrated with native AF tissue following approximately 14,000 cycles of compression in 6-day organ culture experiments. Fib-Gen repair also retained high viability of native AF cells near the repair site, reduced nitric oxide released to the media, and showed evidence of AF cell migration into the gel. Biomechanically, Fib-Gen fully restored compressive stiffness to intact levels validating organ culture findings. However, only partial restoration of tensile and torsional stiffness was obtained, suggesting opportunities to enhance this formulation. Subcutaneous implantation results, when compared with the literature, suggested Fib-Gen exhibited similar biocompatibility behaviour to fibrin alone but degraded much more slowly. We conclude that injectable Fib-Gen successfully sealed large AF defects, promoted functional restoration with improved motion segment biomechanics, and served as a biocompatible adhesive biomaterial that had greatly enhanced in vivo longevity compared to fibrin. Fib-Gen offers promise for AF repairs that may prevent painful conditions and accelerated degeneration of the IVD, and warrants further material development and evaluation. PMID:25036053

  6. Effects of Removing the Time Limit on First and Second Language Intelligence Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullane, Jennifer; McKelvie, Stuart J.

    2001-01-01

    Canadian postsecondary students (n=133) with moderate second-language competence took the Wonderlic Personnel Test with or without the standard time limit in English or French. Findings suggest that time accommodation can be applied to clients who are taking an intelligence test in their second language. (SLD)

  7. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  8. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Earl Brass, E; Stanley Brown, S; Mark Geeting, M; Lcurtis Johnson, L; Charles02 Coleman, C; S Crump, S; Mark Barnes, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-10-15

    Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar{reg_sign} L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar{reg_sign} L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC).

  9. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  10. ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION - LABORATORY SCALE VALIDATION ON WASTE SIMULANTS TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS T; HAGERTY K

    2011-01-27

    To reduce the additional sodium hydroxide and ease processing of aluminum bearing sludge, the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process has been invented by AREV A and demonstrated on a laboratory scale to remove alumina and regenerate/recycle sodium hydroxide prior to processing in the WTP. The method uses lithium hydroxide (LiOH) to precipitate sodium aluminate (NaAI(OH){sub 4}) as lithium hydrotalcite (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.4Al(OH){sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) while generating sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In addition, phosphate substitutes in the reaction to a high degree, also as a filterable solid. The sodium hydroxide enriched leachate is depleted in aluminum and phosphate, and is recycled to double-shell tanks (DSTs) to leach aluminum bearing sludges. This method eliminates importing sodium hydroxide to leach alumina sludge and eliminates a large fraction of the total sludge mass to be treated by the WTP. Plugging of process equipment is reduced by removal of both aluminum and phosphate in the tank wastes. Laboratory tests were conducted to verify the efficacy of the process and confirm the results of previous tests. These tests used both single-shell tank (SST) and DST simulants.

  11. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    PubMed

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units.

  12. NOX REMOVAL WITH COMBINED SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION: PILOT- SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale tests were conducted to develop a combined nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction technology using both selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). A commercially available vanadium-and titatnium-based composite honeycomb catalyst and enh...

  13. Hydrogen depolarized cell pair definition for space station application. [performance tests of carbon dioxide removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation testing of the cell pair design of an electrochemical carbon dioxide collection subsystem was conducted. The system is proposed for use with the space station prototype. The objectives of the analytical and miscellaneous tasks in support of the test program are explained. An analysis was made of the number of cells required for the space station prototype. It was determined that 33 cell pairs would satisfy the space station prototype performance.

  14. Russian refiner tests new one-stage H[sub 2]S removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    The Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk, Russia, has developed a new technology for purifying gas streams containing hydrogen sulfide. The one-stage process was tested at BashSKTP Concern Grozneftekhim's refinery in Ufa, Russia, near the southern Ural Mountains. In a pilot-size reactor, the process achieved 99% conversion of total H[sub 2]S and 98% selectivity to sulfur. The process and test results are described briefly.

  15. Design, fabrication and testing of a dual catalyst ammonia removal system for a urine VCD unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinikas, P.

    1980-01-01

    A three-man capacity catalytic system for the recovery of water from urine was designed, constructed, and tested, it was designed to operate with feed streams containing high concentrations of urine vapor and only 5 to 7% of oxygen for the oxidation of ammonia and volatile organic vapor.It can operate either in a flow-through or a recycle mode and is capable of accepting the urine vapor produced by a vapor compression distillation evaporator. Testing consisted of short preliminary and optimization test, an endurance test of 74 hours continuous operation, and recycle tests using both air and oxygen. The system was designed for a urine processing rate of 0.86 liters/hr; however, it was tested at rates up to 1.2 liter/hr. Untreated urine evaporated by an electrically heated evaporator was used. The quality of the recovered water meets the U.S. Drinking Water Standards, with the exception of a low pH. Accumulation of solids in the urine sludge is reduced to approximately 65% of the anticipated value.

  16. Ion Exchange Distribution Coefficient Tests and Computer Modeling at High Ionic Strength Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.; Hamm, L. Larry; Smith, Frank G.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2014-12-19

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and poured into canisters for disposition. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the water solubility properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the Hanford River Protection Project mission. To achieve the full target WTP throughput, additional LAW immobilization capacity is needed, and options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. To enable an informed decision regarding the viability of technetium removal, further maturation of available technologies is being performed. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient testing and computer modeling using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from high ionic strength simulated LAW. It is advantageous to operate at higher concentration in order to treat the waste

  17. A relatively small change in sodium chloride concentration has a strong effect on adhesion of ocular bacteria to contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Cowell, B A; Willcox, M D; Schneider, R P

    1998-06-01

    Adhesion of bacteria to hydrogel lenses is thought to be an initial step of ocular colonization allowing evasion of normal host defences. The salt concentration of media is an important parameter controlling microbial adhesion. Salinity varies from 0.97% NaCl equivalents in the open eye to 0.89% in the closed eye state. In this study, the effect of sodium chloride in the concentration range of 0.8-1.0% (w/v) NaCl on adhesion of ocular bacteria to soft contact lenses was investigated using a static adhesion assay. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to adhere to lenses in significantly greater amounts than Serratia marcescens, Flavobacterium meningosepticum, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Staphylococcus intermedius. Increasing NaCl from 0.8% to 1.0% (w/v) increased adhesion of all bacteria tested. This adhesion was strong since the organisms could not be removed by washing in low ionic buffer. Adhesion of these organisms did not correlate with their cell surface properties as determined by bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) and retention on sepharose columns.

  18. Double Lap Shear Testing of Coating Modified Ice Adhesion to Liquid Oxygen Food Line Bracket, Space Shuttle External Tank

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Styrofoam enclosure immediately after placement in the cold box, further regulating and stabilizing temperature (Fig. 8b). Following ice growth and cool...Insulated cover to isolate the samples inside the cold box for maximum temperature stability . Figure 8. Samples placed in the cold box for freezing and...this temperature for 1 hour prior to testing, allowing time for sample and chamber temperatures to equilibrate and stabilize . Samples were accessed

  19. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-06

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air.

  20. TEST PROGRAM FOR ALUMINA REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; GEINESSE D

    2011-01-28

    This test program sets a multi-phased development path to support the development of the Lithium Hydrotalcite process, in order to raise its Technology Readiness Level from 3 to 6, based on tasks ranging from laboratory scale scientific research to integrated pilot facilities.

  1. Analysis of Removal Alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B.

    1996-08-01

    This engineering study was developed to evaluate different options for decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) at the Savannah River Site. This document will be placed in the DOE-SRS Area reading rooms for a period of 30 days in order to obtain public input to plans for the demolition of HWCTR.

  2. BOND STRENGTH AND MORPHOLOGY OF ENAMEL USING SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVE SYSTEMS WITH DIFFERENT ACIDITIES

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Sandra Kiss; Reis, Alessandra; Pelizzaro, Arlete; Dal-Bianco, Karen; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the bond strength and the morphology of enamel after application of self-etching adhesive systems with different acidities. The tested hypothesis was that the performance of the self-etching adhesive systems does not vary for the studied parameters. Material and methods: Composite resin (Filtek Z250) buildups were bonded to untreated (prophylaxis) and treated (burcut or SiC-paper) enamel surfaces of third molars after application of four self-etching and two etch-and-rinse adhesive systems (n=6/condition): Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OP); AdheSe (AD); Tyrian Self Priming Etching (TY), Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (SBMP) and Adper Single Bond (SB). After storage in water (24 h/37°C), the bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area and the microtensile bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The etching patterns of the adhesive systems were also observed with a scanning electron microscope. Results: The main factor adhesive system was statistically significant (p<0.05). The mean bond strength values (MPa) and standard deviations were: CSE (20.5±3.5), OP (11.3±2.3), AD (11.2±2.8), TY (11.1±3.0), SBMP (21.9±4.0) and SB (24.9±3.0). Different etching patterns were observed for the self-etching primers depending on the enamel treatment and the pH of the adhesive system. Conclusion: Although there is a tendency towards using adhesive systems with simplified application procedures, this may compromise the bonding performance of some systems to enamel, even when the prismless enamel is removed. PMID:19668991

  3. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials, a review in 3 parts. Part 1: Approval requirements and standardized testing of composite materials according to ISO specifications.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this three-part review on the relevance of laboratory testing of composites and adhesives deals with approval requirements for composite materials. We compare the in vivo and in vitro literature data and discuss the relevance of in vitro analyses. The standardized ISO protocols are presented, with a focus on the evaluation of physical parameters. These tests all have a standardized protocol that describes the entire test set-up. The tests analyse flexural strength, depth of cure, susceptibility to ambient light, color stability, water sorption and solubility, and radiopacity. Some tests have a clinical correlation. A high flexural strength, for instance, decreases the risk of fractures of the marginal ridge in posterior restorations and incisal edge build-ups of restored anterior teeth. Other tests do not have a clinical correlation or the threshold values are too low, which results in an approval of materials that show inferior clinical properties (e.g., radiopacity). It is advantageous to know the test set-ups and the ideal threshold values to correctly interpret the material data. Overall, however, laboratory assessment alone cannot ensure the clinical success of a product.

  4. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal testing and toxics characterization. Milestone report, phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcomb, J.; Tseng, Shiaw; Lani, B.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the work completed in the first phase of the Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} Removal Testing and Toxics Characterization test program. Tasks covered in this report as specified in the Statement of Work included: Task 1.2.0 Equipment Modification and Reagents Procurement; Task 1.3.0 Testing at the 5 kW Scale; Task 1.3.1 Temperature Enhanced Fe(III)EDTA Reduction; Task 1.3.2 Electrolytic Cell Fe(III) EDTA Reduction; Task 1.3.3 Chemical Regeneration Agents Testing; Task 1.3.4 Combination of Strategies; Task 1.4.0 Data Analysis and Phase I Report. Proposed in Task 1.3.4 are combinations of regeneration methods (based on data generated in Tasks 1.3.1 to 1.3.3) that gave the best results at the lowest possible cost. The Test Plan approval (Task 1.1.0) was previously submitted under separate cover.

  5. Relevance of in-vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials. A review in 3 parts. Part 2: non-standardized tests of composite materials.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Summary The first part of this review examined ISO approval requirements and in vitro testing. In the second part, non-standardized test methods for composite materials are presented and discussed. Physical tests are primarily described. Analyses of surface gloss and alterations, as well as aging simulations of dental materials are presented. Again, the importance of laboratory tests in determining clinical outcomes is evaluated. Differences in the measurement protocols of the various testing institutes and how these differences can influence the results are also discussed. Because there is no standardization of test protocols, the values determined by different institutes cannot be directly compared. However, the ranking of the tested materials should be the same if a valid protocol is applied by different institutes. The modulus of elasticity, the expansion after water sorption, and the polishability of the material are all clinically relevant, whereas factors measured by other test protocols may have no clinical correlation. The handling properties of the materials are highly dependent on operators' preferences. Therefore, no standard values can be given.

  6. Design guidelines for hybrid microcircuits; organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were studied to acquire an adequate information base to generate a guideline document for the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specific areas covered include: (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives; (2) effects of long term aging at 150C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives; (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics; (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive; (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters; (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives; and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  7. Evaluation of a metering, mixing, and dispensing system for mixing polysulfide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Kurt B.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate whether a metered mixing system can mix PR-1221 polysulfide adhesive as well as or better than batch-mixed adhesive; also, to evaluate the quality of meter-mixed PR-1860 and PS-875 polysulfide adhesives. These adhesives are candidate replacements for PR-1221 which will not be manufactured in the future. The following material properties were evaluated: peel strength, specific gravity and adhesive components of mixed adhesives, Shore A hardness, tensile adhesion strength, and flow rate. Finally, a visual test called the butterfly test was performed to observe for bubbles and unmixed adhesive. The results of these tests are reported and discussed.

  8. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing: Results of DBA and sodium formate additive tests at Southwestern Electric Power company`s Pirkey Station

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-30

    Tests were conducted at Southwestern Electric Power Company`s (SWEPCo) Henry W. Pirkey Station wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system to evaluate options for achieving high sulfur dioxide removal efficiency. The Pirkey FGD system includes four absorber modules, each with dual slurry recirculation loops and with a perforated plate tray in the upper loop. The options tested involved the use of dibasic acid (DBA) or sodium formate as a performance additive. The effectiveness of other potential options was simulated with the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) FGD PRocess Integration and Simulation Model (FGDPRISM) after it was calibrated to the system. An economic analysis was done to determine the cost effectiveness of the high-efficiency options. Results are-summarized below.

  9. Adhesives: Test Method, Group Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading-Rate Applications Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading- Rate Applications – Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited) by...Rate Applications – Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited) by Robert Jensen, Daniel DeSchepper, David Flanagan...Gerard Chaney, and Charles Pergantis Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Coatings, Corrosion, and Engineered Polymers Branch (CCEPB

  10. Evaluation and testing of sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Romanovski, V.V.; Veeck, A.C.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate and test the complexing ability of a variety of promising new complexing agents synthesized by Professor Kenneth Raymond`s group at the University of California, Berkeley (ESP-CP TTP Number SF16C311). Some of these derivatives have already shown the potential for selectivity binding Pu(IV) in a wide range of solutions in the presence of other metals. Professor Raymond`s group uses molecular modeling to design and synthesize ligands based on modification of natural siderophores, or their analogs, for chelation of actinides. The ligands are then modified for use as liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extractants. The authors` group at the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science (ITS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory determines the complex formation constants between the ligands and actinide ions, the capacity and time dependence for uptake on the resins, and the effect of other metal ions and pH.

  11. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Topical report - results of sodium formate additive tests at New York State Electric & Gas Corporation`s Kintigh Station

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1997-02-14

    Tests were conducted at New York State Gas & Electric`s (NYSEG`s) Kintigh Station to evaluate options for achieving high sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency in the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This test program was one of six conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate low-capital-cost upgrades to existing FGD systems as a means for utilities to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. The upgrade option tested at Kintigh was sodium formate additive. Results from the tests were used to calibrate the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) FGD PRocess Integration and Simulation Model (FGDPRISM) to the Kintigh scrubber configuration. FGDPRISM was then used to predict system performance for evaluating conditions other than those tested. An economic evaluation was then done to determine the cost effectiveness of various high-efficiency upgrade options. These costs can be compared with the estimated market value of SO{sub 2} allowance or the expected costs of allowances generated by other means, such as fuel switching or new scrubbers, to arrive at the most cost-effective strategy for Clean Air Act compliance.

  12. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  13. Effects of Varying Particle Sizes and Different Types of LDH-Modified Anthracite in Simulated Test Columns for Phosphorous Removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangling; Chen, Qiaozhen; Guo, Lu; Huang, Hualing; Ruan, Chongying

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out for the removal of phosphorus in simulated unplanted vertical-flow constructed wetlands with different layered double hydroxide (LDHs) coated anthracite substrates. Three particle sizes of anthracites were selected and modified separately with nine kinds of LDH coating. The simulated substrates test columns loaded with the original and modified anthracites were constructed to treat the contaminated water. For the medium and large particle size modified anthracite substrates, the purification effects of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate were improved by various degrees, and the purification effect of the medium particle size anthracite is better than that of the large size one. The medium size anthracite modified by ZnCo-LDHs had optimal performance with average removal efficiencies of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate reaching 95%, 95% and 98%, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity on ZnCo-LDHs and ZnAl-LDHs modified medium sizes anthracites were 65.79 (mg/kg) and 48.78 (mg/kg), respectively. In comparison, the small size anthracite is not suitable for LDHs modification. PMID:26086702

  14. Comparisons of RELAP5-3D Analyses to Experimental Data from the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew; Hu, Rui; Lisowski, Darius; Kraus, Adam

    2016-04-17

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is an important passive safety system being incorporated into the overall safety strategy for high temperature advanced reactor concepts such as the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) reflects a 1/2-scale model of the primary features of one conceptual air-cooled RCCS design. The project conducts ex-vessel, passive heat removal experiments in support of Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program, while also generating data for code validation purposes. While experiments are being conducted at the NSTF to evaluate the feasibility of the passive RCCS, parallel modeling and simulation efforts are ongoing to support the design, fabrication, and operation of these natural convection systems. Both system-level and high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed to gain a complete understanding of the complex flow and heat transfer phenomena in natural convection systems. This paper provides a summary of the RELAP5-3D NSTF model development efforts and provides comparisons between simulation results and experimental data from the NSTF. Overall, the simulation results compared favorably to the experimental data, however, further analyses need to be conducted to investigate any identified differences.

  15. Effects of Varying Particle Sizes and Different Types of LDH-Modified Anthracite in Simulated Test Columns for Phosphorous Removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangling; Chen, Qiaozhen; Guo, Lu; Huang, Hualing; Ruan, Chongying

    2015-06-16

    A comparative study was carried out for the removal of phosphorus in simulated unplanted vertical-flow constructed wetlands with different layered double hydroxide (LDHs) coated anthracite substrates. Three particle sizes of anthracites were selected and modified separately with nine kinds of LDH coating. The simulated substrates test columns loaded with the original and modified anthracites were constructed to treat the contaminated water. For the medium and large particle size modified anthracite substrates, the purification effects of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate were improved by various degrees, and the purification effect of the medium particle size anthracite is better than that of the large size one. The medium size anthracite modified by ZnCo-LDHs had optimal performance with average removal efficiencies of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate reaching 95%, 95% and 98%, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity on ZnCo-LDHs and ZnAl-LDHs modified medium sizes anthracites were 65.79 (mg/kg) and 48.78 (mg/kg), respectively. In comparison, the small size anthracite is not suitable for LDHs modification.

  16. Field scale testing of a hyperfiltration unit for removal of creosote and pentachlorophenol from ground water: Chemical and biological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Middaugh, D.P.; Thomas, R.L.; Lantz, S.E.; Heard, C.S.; Mueller, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical analyses and biological response data were used to assess the efficacy of a field-scale hyperfiltration unit in the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other organic compounds from creosote- and pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated ground water recovered from the former American Creosote Works in Escambia County, Pensacola, Florida. The hyperfiltration unit consisted of 4 modules containing porous stainless steel tubes which were coated with a formed-in-place zirconium hydrous oxide-polyacrylic acid (ZOPA) membrane. A 5-fold concentration of the feedwater (80% volume reduction) with up to 97% removal of high molecular weight PAHs was achieved during pre-demonstration and field-demonstration runs of the hyperfiltration unit. Toxicological and teratogenic data for embryonic inland silversides, Menidia beryllina, indicated that 100, 10 and 1% solutions of the ground water sample used in the pre-demonstration run caused statistically significant (p < or - 0.05) biological responses when compared to controls. Permeates from both runs, diluted to 1%, met the pre-condition of non-toxic responses in 48h tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia. Meeting this requirement allowed for discharge of diluted permeate into the county's sanitary sewerage collector system.

  17. Investigation on the components removed in loss on ignition test of sandy crushed construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masato; Inoue, Yuzo; Watanabe, Yoichi; Ono, Yusaku

    2010-01-01

    Processed sandy residue generated from mixed construction and demolition waste (mixed C&D-W) was investigated for possible deposition in landfill. The basic properties and the components removed in the loss on ignition (LOI) test were examined. The target material for decreasing LOI was elucidated and the validity of LOI used as landfill standard for inert industrial solid waste was discussed. LOI of most of the samples was above 5% and therefore, in principle, processed sandy residue should not be deposited in inert-type landfill. As LOI of sandy residue was mainly due to bound water, the LOI could not be decreased to below 5% even if wood, which is the major organic matter in the sandy residue, was removed. However, decreasing the amount of wood could lead to a subsequent decrease in the amount of dissolved organic matter. Therefore, the LOI of processed mixed C&D-W used as landfill standard for inert industrial solid waste should be re-evaluated.

  18. Lunar Simulation in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar has been assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a high fidelity lunar simulation facility to test the interactions of lunar dust and lunar dust simulant with candidate aerospace materials and coatings. It has a sophisticated design which enables it to treat dust in a way that will remove adsorbed gases and create a chemically reactive surface. It can simulate the vacuum, thermal, and radiation environments of the Moon, including proximate areas of illuminated heat and extremely cold shadow. It is expected to be a valuable tool in the development of dust repellant and cleaning technologies for lunar surface systems.

  19. Mechanical properties of Hysol EA-9394 structural adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D.; Stavig, M.E.

    1995-02-01

    Dextor`s Hysol EA-9394 is a room temperature curable paste adhesive representative of the adhesives used in wind turbine blade joints. A mechanical testing program has been performed to characterize this adhesive. Tension, compression stress relaxation, flexural, butt tensile, and fracture toughness test results are reported.

  20. Thermal-treated soil for mercury removal: Soil and phytotoxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Y.; Edwards, N.T.; Lee, S.Y.; Stiles, C.A.; Armes, S.; Foss, J.E.

    2000-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of soils and sediments is one of many environmental problems at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. Mercury-contaminated soil from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Reservation was treated thermally to reduce Hg concentration to a below target level (20 mg kg{sup {minus}1}) as a pilot scale thermal treatment demonstration. As a part of performance evaluation, the soil characteristics and plant growth response of the untreated and treated soil were examined. The soil treated at 350 C retained most of its original soil properties, but the soil treated at 600 C exhibited considerable changes in mineralogical composition and physicochemical characteristics. Growth and physiological response of the three plant species radish (Raphanus sativus L.), fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), and oat (Avena sativa L.) indicated adverse effects of the thermal treatment. The addition of N fertilizer had beneficial effects in the 350 C treated soil, but had little beneficial effect in the 600 C treated soil. Some changes of soil characteristics induced by thermal treatment cannot be avoided. Soil characteristics and phytotoxicity test results strongly suggest that changes occurring following the 350 C treatment do not limit the use of the treated soil to refill the excavated site for full-scale remediation. The only problem with the 350 C treatment is that small amounts of Hg compounds (<15 mg kg{sup {minus}1}) remain in the soil and a processing cost of $45/Mg.

  1. Investigation of Biological Adhesives and Polyurea Crosslinked Silica-Based Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Laura; Cauble, Meagan; Cole, Judith; Sabri, Firouzeh

    2009-11-01

    One of the key steps towards developing new technology for nerve repair is to look at the interaction mechanism and strength of biological components with the material under investigation. The existing technology for peripheral nerve repair relies on suturing techniques for attaching and immobilization of the implant. It is also limited to connecting two nerve components only, through a cylindrical-shaped unit which we will refer to as 1-D. The focus of our work is to develop an aerogel-based printed circuit board (PCB) system for precise guidance of multiple (n-D) neuronal components, simultaneously. Here we report on the adhesion strength of sciatic nerve segments removed from cadaver Sprague Dawley rats and the surface of treated and untreated polyurea cross-linked silica-based aerogels. The adhesion strength of the nerve to the aerogel surface was studied under varying environmental conditions as well as surface coating types. The coatings tested were basement membrane extract (BME), Cell Tak, and the combination. Since the mechanism of adhesion to cells and other surfaces is different and non-competing for BME and Cell Tak it is expected that a stronger adhesion should be accomplished by combining these two adhesives. The effect of temperature, nerve elasticity, and ionic concentration on the strength of adhesion was investigated also and will be reported.

  2. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  3. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  4. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  5. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  6. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  7. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  8. Adhesive-tape recovery combined with molecular and microscopic testing for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts on experimentally contaminated fresh produce and a food preparation surface.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santin, Monica; Macarisin, Dumitru; Bauchan, Gary

    2013-04-01

    A proof of concept study was conducted to determine if transparent double-sided adhesive tape could be used to recover and detect [by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFA)] Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts on fresh produce and on a food preparation surface. Oocysts were applied on the surface of ten apples, ten peaches, eight cucumbers, and eight tomatoes within circles drawn with a permanent marker. Approximately 18 h later, skin excised from three uncontaminated and three contaminated circles from each piece of produce was subjected to PCR. Pieces of transparent double-sided adhesive tape were lightly pressed onto the surface of three other contaminated circles and examined by PCR. Other pieces of adhesive tape were pressed against the surfaces of three other circles and examined by IFA. At concentrations of 100 and 50 oocysts per circle, every produce item examined by PCR of contaminated excised skin was found positive, and every item examined by adhesive tape subjected to PCR and IFA was found positive, except one. At ten oocysts per circle, every produce item was found positive by PCR of contaminated excised skin, and all apples, cucumbers, and tomatoes were found positive by adhesive tape subjected to IFA. Detection of low numbers of oocysts on peaches by IFA examination of adhesive tape was problematic because trichomes that cover peaches and impart the fuzzy surface partially restrict the tape from reaching some areas where oocysts adhere. Tape combined with IFA was successful in recovering and identifying oocysts from six areas of laminate countertop where the oocysts had been applied and allowed to dry for 30-60 min. These are the first findings to demonstrate that adhesive tape can be used to recover and identify a protozoan parasite from fresh produce and from a laminate food preparation surface.

  9. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  10. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  11. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  12. Numerical study on the adhesion and reentrainment of nondeformable particles on surfaces: the role of surface roughness and electrostatic forces.

    PubMed

    Henry, Christophe; Minier, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Grégory

    2012-01-10

    In this paper, the reentrainment of nanosized and microsized particles from rough walls under various electrostatic conditions and various hydrodynamic conditions (either in air or aqueous media) is numerically investigated. This issue arises in the general context of particulate fouling in industrial applications, which involves (among other phenomena) particle deposition and particle reentrainment. The deposition phenomenon has been studied previously and, in the present work, we focus our attention on resuspension. Once particles are deposited on a surface, the balance between hydrodynamic forces (which tend to move particles away from the surface) and adhesion forces (which maintain particles on the surface) can lead to particle removal. Adhesion forces are generally described using van der Waals attractive forces, but the limit of these models is that any dependence of adhesion forces on electrostatic forces (due to variations in pH or ionic strength) cannot be reproduced numerically. For this purpose, we develop a model of adhesion forces that is based on the DLVO (Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek) theory and which includes also the effect of surface roughness through the use of hemispherical asperities on the surface. We first highlight the effect of the curvature radius on adhesion forces. Then some numerical predictions of adhesion forces or adhesion energies are compared to experimental data. Finally, the overall effects of surface roughness and electrostatic forces are demonstrated with some applications of the complete reentrainment model in some simple test cases.

  13. Influence of adhesive systems on bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin cores in a pull-out test design.

    PubMed

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Agrafioti, Anastasia; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of post surface conditioning with adhesive systems on tensile bond strength between two composite resin core systems and FRP posts (ER DentinPost). Forty-eight posts were trimmed at the coronal part, and the upper part of 3 mm was covered with a standardized composite resin core build-up. Twenty-four posts were treated with the respective adhesive systems. Four groups were formed: G1 - ClearfilCore; G2 - Clearfil New Bond + ClearfilCore; G3 - MultiCore Flow; and G4 - AdheSE + MultiCore Flow. Mean (SD) bond strengths in MPa were 7.53 (0.89) for ClearfilCore and 8.08 (0.93) for New Bond + ClearfilCore; 5.80 (0.39) for MultiCore Flow and 5.92 (0.43) for AdheSE + MultiCore Flow. ClearfilCore achieved significantly higher bond strengths than MultiCore Flow (two-way ANOVA; p<0.0001). In conclusion, composite resin core materials exerted a significant influence on tensile bond strength, while adhesive systems did not significantly affect the results.

  14. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Ryan; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Miller, David C.

    2016-06-16

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  15. Integrated Testing of a Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J. C.; Mulloth, Lila; Frederick, Kenneth; Affleck, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. This paper describes the integrated test results of a flight-like CDRA and a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for carbon dioxide removal and compression. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of CDRA.

  16. Design and Testing of a Minimally Invasive Blood Clot Removal Device ConstructedWith Elements of Superelastic Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puffer, Andrew J.

    Many vascular system problems stem from insufficient blood return flow to the heart. One of the main causes is a blockage within veins or arteries known as a blood clot, or thrombus. This can occur after trauma, surgery, or other phenomenological reasons. Each year in the U.S. more than 175,000 bypass procedures and more than 160,000 amputations resulting from peripheral vessel disease are performed. Clinical data indicates that clot removal devices and procedures can reduce the need for an amputation by 80 percent. Percutaneous thrombectomy refers to the removal of thrombus using catheter based non-surgical methods. The ultimate goal of any modality to treat these conditions of the arterial or venous system is to restore patency, quickly, safely, and cost effectively. Catheter directed thrombectomy and thrombolysis is less traumatic and avoids the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional surgical technique. As a result, there has been a push recently for the use of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) devices. However, all devices have their own set of drawbacks: distal embolization, vessel wall trauma, hemolysis, to name a few. Ongoing efforts have been made to create a prototype thrombectomy device that uses elements of superelastic nitinol (a type of shape memory alloy), that seeks to address some of the drawbacks of current devices. The prototype was designed and tested in a simulated human circulatory system along side a commercially available device (The DiverCE Clot Extraction Catheter). The test evaluated how well the devices minimized distal embolization of a human blood clot created in vitro.. Results of the testing showed that the prototype device created significantly less embolization when compared to the DiverCE particles greater than 102mum (p = 0.0332). Means were statistically not different for particles between 25mum and 102mum (p = 0.2454), and particles between 5mum and 25mum (p = 0.6524). In addition the prototype was shown

  17. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  18. Scalability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) data to VHTR/NGNP RCCS designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R .B.; Feldman, E. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-07

    Passive safety in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is strongly dependent on the thermal performance of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Scaled experiments performed in the Natural Shutdown Test Facility (NSTF) are to provide data for assessing and/or improving computer code models for RCCS phenomena. Design studies and safety analyses that are to support licensing of the VHTR will rely on these models to achieve a high degree of certainty in predicted design heat removal rate. To guide in the selection and development of an appropriate set of experiments a scaling analysis has been performed for the air-cooled RCCS option. The goals were to (1) determine the phenomena that dominate the behavior of the RCCS, (2) determine the general conditions that must be met so that these phenomena and their relative importance are preserved in the experiments, (3) identify constraints specific to the NSTF that potentially might prevent exact similitude, and (4) then to indicate how the experiments can be scaled to prevent distortions in the phenomena of interest. The phenomena identified as important to RCCS operation were also the subject of a recent PIRT study. That work and the present work collectively indicate that the main phenomena influencing RCCS heat removal capability are (1) radiation heat transport from the vessel to the air ducts, (2) the integral effects of momentum and heat transfer in the air duct, (3) buoyancy at the wall inside the air duct giving rise to mixed convection, and (4) multidimensional effects inside the air duct caused by non-uniform circumferential heat flux and non-circular geometry.

  19. Surface roughness mediated adhesion forces between borosilicate glass and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Emily; Perni, Stefano; Nipiĉ, Damijan; Bohinc, Klemen; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-08-12

    It is well-known that a number of surface characteristics affect the extent of adhesion between two adjacent materials. One of such parameters is the surface roughness as surface asperities at the nanoscale level govern the overall adhesive forces. For example, the extent of bacterial adhesion is determined by the surface topography; also, once a bacteria colonizes a surface, proliferation of that species will take place and a biofilm may form, increasing the resistance of bacterial cells to removal. In this study, borosilicate glass was employed with varying surface roughness and coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to replicate the protein layer that covers orthopedic devices on implantation. As roughness is a scale-dependent process, relevant scan areas were analyzed using atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine Ra; furthermore, appropriate bacterial species were attached to the tip to measure the adhesion forces between cells and substrates. The bacterial species chosen (Staphylococci and Streptococci) are common pathogens associated with a number of implant related infections that are detrimental to the biomedical devices and patients. Correlation between adhesion forces and surface roughness (Ra) was generally better when the surface roughness was measured through scanned areas with size (2 × 2 μm) comparable to bacteria cells. Furthermore, the BSA coating altered the surface roughness without correlation with the initial values of such parameter; therefore, better correlations were found between adhesion forces and BSA-coated surfaces when actual surface roughness was used instead of the initial (nominal) values. It was also found that BSA induced a more hydrophilic and electron donor characteristic to the surfaces; in agreement with increasing adhesion forces of hydrophilic bacteria (as determined through microbial adhesion to solvents test) on BSA-coated substrates.

  20. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 viii FINAL REPORT List of Acronyms ACN Acetonitrile ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials BPA Bisphenol...the oven and immediately cooled to room temperature. Approximately 1.0 mL of acetonitrile ( ACN ) was added to each vial using a glass syringe. The

  1. Influence of conditioning time on bond strength: evaluation of self-etching adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marciano de Freitas; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Montagner, Anelise Fernandes; Marchiori, Jeferson da Costa; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo; Susin, Alexandre Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems with different dentin conditioning times. Sixty caries-free, extracted third molars were selected, with the occlusal surface removed by a diamond saw disc. The specimens were embedded in epoxy resin and divided randomly into six groups (n = 10), according to the conditioning time and adhesive system used. After restoration, the specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours; they then were submitted to the tensile bond strength test. The results were measured in MPa, then submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). The adhesive system used and the length of dentin conditioning time were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The application time of the conditioner before photocuring did not have a significant effect on tensile bond strength. These results indicate that the resting time of adhesive above the dentin does not directly affect the bond strength of the adhesive system.

  2. Effect of chlorhexidine on bonding durability of two self-etching adhesives with and without antibacterial agent to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Alikhani, Armaghan; Alavi, Ali Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Considering the possibility of remaining bacteria in the cavity or invading via microgaps, the use of antibacterial agents in adhesive restoration may be beneficial. This study evaluated the effect of chlorhexidine on immediate and long-term shear bond strength of adhesives with and without antibacterial agent to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the occlusal surfaces of 80 intact human premolars were removed to expose the flat midcoronal dentin. The teeth were assigned to four groups. Two adhesive systems, Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Clearfil Protect Bond (PB) were used according to manufacturer's instructions as the control groups. In the experimental groups, 2% chlorhexidine was applied prior to acidic primer of two adhesives. Then, resin composite was applied. Half of the specimens in each group were submitted to shear bond test after 24 h without thermocycling, and the other half were submitted to water storage for 6 months and thermocycling before testing. The data was analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-test (α = 0.05). Results: Chlorhexidine application significantly decreased the initial bond strength (BS) of the two self-etch adhesives to dentin (P < 0.05). There was a significant reduction in BS of SE and PB after aging compared to initial bonding (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between BS of the control and chlorhexidine-treated groups for the tested adhesives after aging. PB showed a lower BS than SE in two time periods (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Chlorhexidine was capable of diminishing the loss of BS of these adhesives over time. However, considering the negative effect of chlorhexidine on the initial BS, the benefits of chlorhexidine associated with these adhesives cannot possibly be used. PMID:24379870

  3. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  4. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  5. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  6. A feasibility study of using Langley 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel sidewall boundary-layer removal system for heavy gas testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.; Balakrishna, S.; Kilgore, W. Allen

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary study for using the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel sidewall boundary-layer removal system with heavy gas sulfur hexafluoride as the test medium. It is shown that the drive motor speed/power of the existing system and the additional heat load on the tunnel heat exchanger are the major problems limiting the boundary-layer removal system performance. Overcoming these problems can provide the capability to remove about 1.5 percent of the test section mass flow at Mach number M = 0.8 and about 5 percent at M = 0.25. Previous studies have shown that these boundary-layer mass flow removal rates can reduce the boundary-layer thickness by a factor of two at the model station. Also the effect of upstream boundary-layer removal on the airfoil test data is not likely to be significant under high lifting conditions. Near design conditions, corrections to the test Mach number may be necessary to account for sidewall boundary-layer effects.

  7. ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27

    Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

  8. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-03

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  9. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  10. The testing of several biological and chemical coupled treatments for Cibacron Red FN-R azo dye removal.

    PubMed

    García-Montaño, Julia; Domènech, Xavier; García-Hortal, José A; Torrades, Francesc; Peral, José

    2008-06-15

    Several biological and chemical coupled treatments for Cibacron Red FN-R reactive azo dye degradation have been evaluated. Initially, a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic biotreatment has been assessed for different dye concentrations (250, 1250 and 3135 mg l(-1)). 92-97% decolourisation was attained during the anaerobic digestion operating in batch mode. However, no dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal neither biogas production was observed during the process, indicating that no methanogenesis occurred. Additionally, according to Biotox and Zahn-Wellens assays, the anaerobically generated colourless solutions (presumably containing the resulting aromatic amines from azo bond cleavage) were found to be more toxic than the initial dye as well as aerobically non-biodegradable, thus impeding the anaerobic-aerobic biological treatment. In a second part, the use of an advanced oxidation process (AOP) like photo-Fenton or ozonation as a chemical post-treatments of the anaerobic process has been considered for the complete dye by-products mineralisation. The best results were obtained by means of ozonation at pH 10.5, achieving a global 83% mineralisation and giving place to a final harmless effluent. On the contrary, the tested photo-Fenton conditions were not efficient enough to complete oxidation.

  11. Results of thioclear testing: Magnesium-lime FGD with high SO{sub 2} removals and salable by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Lani, B.; College, J.; Babu, M.

    1995-06-01

    Wet scrubbing is the leading proven commercial post-combustion FGD technology available to meet the sulfur dioxide reductions required by the Clean Air Act Amendments. To reduce costs associated with wet FGD, Dravo Lime Company has developed the ThioClear process. ThioClear is an ex-situ forced oxidation magnesium-enhanced lime FGD process. The ThioClear process differs from the conventional magnesium-enhanced lime process in that the recycle liquor has minimal suspended solids and the by-products are wallboard quality gypsum and magnesium hydroxide, and excellent reagent for water treatment. The process has demonstrated sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies of 98% in both a vertical spray tower and a horizontal absorber operating at gas velocities of 16 fps and 23 fps, respectively. This paper reports the optimization studies and associated economics from testing being conducted at Dravo Lime Company`s pilot plant located at the Miami Fort Station of The Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company.

  12. Testing of CoTreat Inorganic Ion Exchange Media for the Removal of 60Co from Thorp Pond Water

    SciTech Connect

    Harjula, R.; Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Tusa, E.; Strandring, P.

    2003-02-25

    CoTreat, a new inorganic ion exchange media, has been studied in the laboratory to support its application as a pre- coat to existing Funda filters in THORP feed pond plant (Sellafield, UK). This is a novel way of application of CoTreat, which is usually utilized in fixed-bed ion exchange columns in a granular form. The results present the effect of operating conditions (CoTreat dose, pond water chemistry) on CoTreat performance for the removal of Co-57 tracer from simulated pond water. Major findings include the strong dependence of Co-57 decontamination factor (DF) on feed activity. At the 200 Bq/L feed level, the observed DF was 10-20 but rose to 1000 and above when the feed level was increased to 20000 Bq/L. Calcium present in the feed was found to decrease the DF at concentrations higher than 1 ppm. The laboratory studies showed significantly higher DF's than what has been observed in large-scale THORP tests. This discrepancy is likely to be due to the technique used in applying the Co Treat layer to the Thorp HEFP Funda filter. Options for improving Co Treat performance (i.e. application technique) under Funda filter operating conditions are being investigated by BNFL based on this laboratory work.

  13. Adhesiveness of a new testosterone-in-adhesive matrix patch after extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Jean-Pierre; Augès, Marie; Liorzou, Laurent; Turlier, Virginie; Lauze, Christophe

    2009-06-22

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the adhesiveness of a new thin, transparent and comfortable testosterone-in-adhesive matrix patch, Testopatch, after extreme conditions. The study was a single-centre, open-label with randomization of sites (upper arms, lower back, thighs) and sides (left, right) of two 45 cm(2) patches, in 24 healthy subjects. Patches were symmetrically applied on one of the three sites. One patch was removed after 2.0 h, under resting conditions and the other patch was removed at 3.5 h, after extreme conditions (physical exercise, sauna, whirl bath). Adhesiveness was assessed of the area stuck and the measure of the forces necessary for patch removal using a Peel Patch Tester. Local safety was assessed at 2.0 and 3.5 h. After physical exercise and after sauna, patch adhesiveness was excellent (95%) when applied on the thigh and very good (90%) on the upper arm. Forces of patch removal were significantly lower at 3.5 h than 2.0 h, and at the lower back compared to the other application sites. There were no adverse effects. Slight erythema was observed that was considered to be clinically insignificant. Testopatch was safe and displayed adhesiveness, compatible with physical activities.

  14. Demonstration of the iodine and NO/sub x/ removal systems in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated equipment test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.E.; Jubin, R.T.

    1987-03-01

    This report summarizes the findings from three sets of experiments on iodine and NO/sub x/ removal performance using dual downdraft condensers in the dissolver off-gas line. The initial experiments were conducted in the laboratory using glassware in proof-of-principle tests. Two additional sets of condenser experiments were conducted using equipment prototyical for a 0.5-t/d plant in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report also describes the NO/sub x/ removal performance of a packed scrubber in the IET during the dissolution of depleted uranium oxides. The overall iodine pass-through efficiency of the condensers in the IET was high as desired. Removal efficiencies ranged from only 0.35 to 6.29%, indicating that the bulk of the iodine in the off-gas will be transferred on through the condensers to the iodox process for final disposal rather than recycled to the dissolver. The optimum operating temperature for the first condenser was in the range of 50 to 70/sup 0/C, with the temperature of the second condenser held near 20/sup 0/C. The NO/sub x/ removal performance of the combined dual condensers and packed scrubber resulted in effluent off-gas stream NO/sub x/ compositions of approx.0.4 to 1.0%, which are acceptable levels for the iodox process. The NO/sub x/ removal efficiency of the condensers ranged from approx.5 to 58%, but was generally around 20%. The removal efficiency of the packed tower scrubber was observed to be in the range of 40 to 60%. The NO/sub x/ removal performance of the condensers tended to complement the performance of the scrubber in that the condenser removal afficiency was high when the scrubber efficiency was low and vice versa.

  15. Development of a Test for Evaluation of the Hydrothermal Stability of Sorbents Used in Closed-Loop CO2 Removal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Gauto, Hernando; Miller, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly uses zeolite 5A molecular sieve material packed into beds for the capture of cabin CO2. The beds are cyclically heated to drive off the CO2 and restore the removal capacity. Over time, the sorbent material has been found to break down resulting in dust that restricts flow through the beds. Humidity adsorbed in the 5A zeolite when it is heated is a suspected cause of this sorbent degradation. To evaluate the impact of adsorbed water during thermal cycling, the Hydrothermal Stability Test was developed. The test configuration provides comparative side-by-side flow restriction data for two sorbent materials at specifically controlled humidity levels. While the initial focus of the testing is on 5A zeolite materials currently used on the ISS, the system will also be used to evaluate future candidate materials. This paper describes the approach, the test system, current results, and future testing.

  16. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Hu; Zhao Hongwei; Shi Chengli; Wu Boda; Fan Zunqiang; Wan Shunguang; Geng Chunyang

    2012-12-15

    Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

  17. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato S; Leão, Paulo A G C; Piazzetta, Maria H O; Monteiro, Alessandra M; Shiroma, Leandro Y; Gobbi, Angelo L; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-21

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  18. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives. PMID:26293346

  19. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  20. Adhesion of microchannel-based complementary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun K; Bai, Ying; Nadermann, Nichole; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2012-03-06

    We show that highly enhanced and selective adhesion can be achieved between surfaces patterned with complementary microchannel structures. An elastic material, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), was used to fabricate such surfaces by molding into a silicon master with microchannel profiles patterned by photolithography. We carried out adhesion tests on both complementary and mismatched microchannel/micropillar surfaces. Adhesion, as measured by the energy release rate required to propagate an interfacial crack, can be enhanced by up to 40 times by complementary interfaces, compared to a flat control, and slightly enhanced for some special noncomplementary samples, despite the nearly negligible adhesion for other mismatched surfaces. For each complementary surface, we observe defects in the form of visible striations, where pillars fail to insert fully into the channels. The adhesion between complementary microchannel surfaces is enhanced by a combination of a crack-trapping mechanism and friction between a pillar and channel and is attenuated by the presence of defects.

  1. Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS CENTER TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TEST PLAN: REMOVAL OF MICROBIOLOGICL AND PARTICULATE CONTAMINANTS BY MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the Environmental technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of water treatment equipment for removal of microbiological and particulate contaminants using membrane filtration. This TSTP is to be used as a guide in the dev...

  3. Abdominal adhesions in laparoscopic hernia repair. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Eller, R; Twaddell, C; Poulos, E; Jenevein, E; McIntire, D; Russell, S

    1994-03-01

    Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is becoming an increasingly common procedure. The possible creation of intraperitoneal adhesions during laparoscopic herniorrhaphy has not been examined. For the transperitoneal hernia repair to be an acceptable option, the hypothesis that this approach will incite significant adhesions must be rejected. To test this hypothesis, 21 pigs underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy using a standard procedure with the implantation of a polypropylene mesh graft on one side while a sham procedure was performed on the other. These animals were later examined laparoscopically for adhesion formation and the condition of the graft. None of the 21 animals developed adhesions to the trocar sites, 12 animals developed adhesions to the area of the polypropylene mesh, and 3 developed adhesions to the side of the sham procedure. There were no adhesions involving the small intestine. It is therefore concluded that the hypothesis should be rejected and that laparoscopic herniorrhaphy does not incite significant adhesions.

  4. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products.

  5. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  6. Pilot-scale testing of a new sorbent for combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A new regenerable sorbent concept for SO{sub 2} and NOx removal was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station at a 1.5 to 2-MW(e) level. A radial panel-bed filter of a new dry, granular sorbent was exposed to flue gas and regenerated in an experimental proof-of-concept program. The project was successful in demonstrating the new sorbent`s ability to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal, 30% NOx removal, and over 80% removal of residual particulates with realistic approach temperatures and low pressure drops. Based on the results of this project, the retrofit cost of this technology is expected to be on the order of $400 per ton of SO{sub 2} and $900 per ton of NOx removed. This assumes that gas distribution is even and methane regeneration is used for a 30% average utilization. For a 2.5%-sulfur Ohio coal, this translates to a cost of approximately $17 per ton of coal. Two by-product streams were generated in the process that was tested: a solid, spent-sorbent stream and a highly-concentrated SO{sub 2} or elemental-sulfur stream. While not within the scope of the project, it was found possible to process these streams into useful products. The spent sorbent materials were shown to be excellent substrates for soil amendments; the elemental sulfur produced is innocuous and eminently marketable.

  7. Permeability of dentin to adhesive agents.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Ciucchi, B; Sano, H; Horner, J A

    1993-09-01

    The permeability of dentin to adhesive agents is of crucial importance in obtaining good dentinal bonding. In those systems that remove the smear layer, the opportunity exists for resin to infiltrate both tubules and intertubular dentin. Resin penetration into tubules can effectively seal the tubules and can contribute to bond strength if the resin bonds to the tubule wall. Resin infiltration into intertubular dentin can only occur if the mineral phase of dentin is removed by acidic conditioners or chelators. This is more easily accomplished in fractured dentin than in smear layer-covered dentin because of the residual collagen debris that remains on the surface following acid etching of smear layers. The channels for resin infiltration are the perifibrillar spaces created around the collagen fibers of dentin following removal of apatite mineral by acids. The diffusion of adhesive resins through these narrow, tortuous, long channels in 1 to 2 minutes offers a number of challenges that require further research.

  8. Adhesion of oil to kaolinite in water.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Evgenia V; Fogden, Andrew

    2010-12-15

    Uniform coats of kaolinite particles on a flat glass substrate were prepared to be sufficiently smooth and thin to allow reliable measurement of contact angles of captive crude oil drops in a range of salt solutions, without any particle removal. The contact angle hysteresis was used to infer the extent of oil adhesion via rupture of the intervening water film and anchoring of charged groups to kaolinite. For sodium chloride solutions, adhesion decreases monotonically with pH and/or salinity, with strong adhesion only manifested under acidic conditions with salinity at most 0.1 M. Calcium chloride solutions at pH around 6 switch from strong adhesion in the range 0.001-0.01 M to weak adhesion at higher concentrations. For all mixtures of sodium and calcium chlorides investigated, a total ionic strength above 0.1 M guarantees a weak adhesion of oil to kaolinite. Results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations of electrostatic interactions, with H(+) and Ca(2+) being potential-determining ions for both interfaces.

  9. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  10. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ralph Robert

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  11. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  12. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  13. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  14. Nanoleakage of fiber posts luted with different adhesive strategies and the effect of chlorhexidine on the interface of dentin and self-adhesive cements.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the nanoleakage of fiber posts luted using different adhesive strategies and to investigate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interfaces of self-adhesive cements. The self-adhesive and etch-and-rinse adhesive groups tested demonstrated similar results with regard to nanoleakage. Pretreatment with CHX promoted an adequate seal at the resin-dentin interface for self-adhesive cements.

  15. Do the microshear test variables affect the bond strength values?

    PubMed

    Andrade, Andrea M; Garcia, Eugenio; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Pimentel, Gustavo H D; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of specimen preparation and testing protocols on the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) results. To evaluate whether variations in polyethylene rod use affect (μSBS)). Human dentin disks were randomly distributed into six groups (n = 5): polyethylene tube (3 levels) and adhesive system (2 levels). In Group 1, polyethylene tubes filled with polymerized composite) were placed on adhesive covered surfaces. Tubes were removed 24 h after water storage, leaving the rods only. In Group 2, the same procedure was performed; however, tubes were kept in place during testing. In Group 3, composite rods without tubes were placed on adhesive covered dentin. In all groups, adhesives were photoactivated after positioning filled tubes/rods on adhesive covered surfaces. Specimens were tested under shear mode and the data subjected to a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Groups 1 and 2 resulted in statistically similar mean μSBS (P > 0.05); however, a greater number of pretest failures were observed for Group 1. Higher μSBS values were detected for Group 3, irrespective of adhesive system used (P < 0.05). Removing the polyethylene tube before composite rod is placed on dentin affects μSBS values.

  16. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  17. Ice adhesion on super-hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulinich, S. A.; Farzaneh, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, ice adhesion strength on flat hydrophobic and rough super-hydrophobic coatings with similar surface chemistry (based on same fluoropolymer) is compared. Glaze ice, similar to naturally accreted, was prepared on the surfaces by spraying super-cooled water microdroplets at subzero temperature. Ice adhesion was evaluated by spinning the samples at constantly increasing speed until ice delamination occurred. Super-hydrophobic surfaces with different contact angle hysteresis were tested, clearly showing that the latter, along with the contact angle, also influences the ice-solid adhesion strength.

  18. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  19. Alkaline and Stretford scrubbing tests for H/sub 2/S removal from in-situ oil retort offgas. Final report, February 1983-February 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Taback, H.J.; Quartucy, G.C.; Goldstick, R.J.

    1985-06-01

    The report gives results of an evaluation of two mobile pilot-plant scrubbers (one alkaline, the other Stretford) for removing reduced sulfur compounds from the offgas of an in-situ retort at Geokinetics. The alkaline scrubber had a tray tower and a venturi contactor used alternately with NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH to investigate the effects of scrubbing chemical, chemical concentration, and residence time on removal efficiency and H/sub 2/S selectivity. The Stretford plant employed a venturi contactor (near the end of the test, a packed-tower contactor was added downstream of the venturi). A computer model of the alkaline scrubber, based on the penetration theory, was developed and agrees well with the observed performance. Based on this model, it appears possible to design an alkaline scrubber system that can achieve 95% H/sub 2/S removal at a selectivity of 37.

  20. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  1. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  2. Semi-microdroplet assay for cell adhesion molecules. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, Lawrence Shinzo

    1988-01-01

    A new cell-to-cell adhesion assay was devised. Using dissociated embryos of the sea urchin, this procedure involves rotating a 0.100 ml suspension of single cells with 0.100 ml of the solution to be tested in the bulb portion of a transfer pipet with the tip removed. After 1 hour of rotation at 60 rpm at 15 C, the contents of each bulb were transferred into individual wells of a 96 well flat bottom plate. After the plate was incubated for 1 hour at 15 C, black and white photographs were taken with a 35 mm camera attached to an inverted photomicroscope. Examining a proof sheet of the negatives directly allowed a rapid evaluation of suspected cell adhesion promoting factors. A ranking system was used to evaluate all samples. The assay was tested by examining the effect of specific solutions on the aggregation of single cells obtained from dissociated 23 hour embryos.

  3. Rheological studies on pressure-sensitive silicone adhesives and drug-in-adhesive layers as a means to characterise adhesive performance.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kwong Yat; Dodou, Kalliopi

    2007-03-21

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives are viscoelastic polymers used in the formulation of transdermal patches that allow attachment of a patch onto the skin. Established criteria exist that correlate viscoelastic parameters with adhesive performance. In this study, fulfillment of the adhesive performance criteria was examined using two silicone adhesives with different tack properties. The viscoelastic parameters of high and low tack silicone adhesives (BIO-PSA High Tack 7-4302 and BIO-PSA Low Tack 7-4102) were determined and compared with the criteria described by Chu and Dahlquist. Drug-in-adhesive layers were prepared using the high tack adhesive combined with nortriptyline HCl or paracetamol. The effect of drug addition on the viscoelastic properties of the adhesive was examined. The high tack adhesive showed congruence with the established criteria although with a modified range of viscoelastic moduli to that described by Chu. Examination of the low tack adhesive showed that it did not possess the appropriate viscoelastic properties for bonding onto the skin. The addition of the drugs into the high tack adhesive caused a concentration-dependent increase in its cohesive strength. This effect was independent of the physicochemical properties of the drugs tested.

  4. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  5. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  6. Surface Contamination of Adhesive Bonding Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    test is illustrated in Figure 19. The specimen is then exposed to some environment such as high temperature and humidity and monitored for crack growth...bonded and subsequently failed at high humidity and elevated temperatures indicate early crack propagation at the adhesive-oxide interface. Large...Adhesive Tape (A) and a Point Not Exposed to the Tape (B) 21 Positive Secondary Ion Mass Spectra from 44 6AI-4V-Ti at Room Temperature (156-1) and after

  7. Tensiometer for Band-Wound Adhesion Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-08

    Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 hemostasis, hemorrhage, bandage, liver , adhesion REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...that are of interest to the DoD. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Trauma, hemorrhage, hemostasis, exsanguination, coagulopathy, hemodilution, liver injury...Proposal title: Tensiometer for bandage-wound adhesion studies List of Appendices A. Figure of liver peel test. B. Description of ex vivo

  8. 78 FR 48907 - Intertek Testing Services NA, Inc.: Grant of Expansion of Recognition and Request To Remove a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Intertek Testing Services NA, Inc.: Grant of Expansion of... recognition that involves testing and evaluating hazardous-location equipment for Intertek Testing Services NA... Testing Services NA, Inc. (ITSNA), as a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL). ITSNA's...

  9. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  10. Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

    2006-05-01

    This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection

  11. Cell adhesion to proteins separated by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted onto a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane: a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-12-02

    Cell blotting, although conceptually simple, has failed to achieve wide practical application. Described here is a new cell-blotting technique which involves cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane at 4 degrees C. Cell bands adherent on PVDF are detected using hematoxylin, or propidium iodide (PI) staining followed by viewing under ultraviolet (UV) light. The technique allows quick microscopic visualization of adherent cells composing the bands, without requiring clearing of the membrane. Representative cell adhesion proteins from different sources, i.e., plant lectins (e.g., phytohemagglutinin, PHA; concanavalin A, ConA; and wheat germ agglutinin, WGA); extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; and integral membrane proteins (e.g., recombinant soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, rs VCAM-1) were tested for cell binding by the new cell-blotting technique using human lymphoid progenitor (NALM-6) and myeloid progenitor (KG1a) cell lines. Cell adhesion proteins retained their adhesion function in all cases tested. Specificity of cell binding on PVDF blot was demonstrated by inhibition of cell adhesion to WGA protein bands using an appropriate sugar, i.e., N-acetyl D-glucosamine. The cell blotting assay was comparable in sensitivity to Coomassie blue staining of protein bands. The ability to conduct protein extraction, separation and blotting at low temperature avoids thermal denaturation, thereby preserving the adhesion properties of the proteins. The electrophoretic/blotting system has unique detergent removal/protein renaturation properties and the ability to preserve functionally active adhesion protein complexes. The cell-blotting technique described is sufficiently robust for routine application in the investigation of novel cell adhesion proteins.

  12. On the mechanical properties of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adhesives.

    PubMed

    Berchane, N S; Andrews, M J; Kerr, S; Slater, N K H; Jebrail, F F

    2008-04-01

    Biological adhesives, natural and synthetic, are of current active interest. These adhesives offer significant advantages over traditional sealant techniques, in particular, they are easier to use, and can play an integral part in the healing mechanism of tissue. Thus, biological adhesives can play a major role in medical applications if they possess adequate mechanical behavior and stability over time. In this work, we report on the method of preparation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) into a biological adhesive. We present quantitative measurements that show the effect of BSA concentration and cross-linker content on the bonding strength of BSA adhesive to wood. A comparison is then made with synthetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) adhesive, and a commercial cyanoacrylate glue, which was used as a control adhesive. In addition, BSA samples were prepared and characterized for their water content, tensile strength, and elasticity. We show that on dry surface, BSA adhesive exhibits a high bonding strength that is comparable with non-biological commercial cyanoacrylate glues, and synthetic PGMA adhesive. Tensile testing on wet wood showed a slight increase in the bonding strength of BSA adhesive, a considerable decrease in the bonding strength of cyanoacrylate glue, and negligible adhesion of PGMA. Tests performed on BSA samples demonstrate that initial BSA concentration and final water content have a significant effect on the stress-strain behavior of the samples.

  13. Development of a qualification standard for adhesives used in hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licari, J. J.; Weigand, B. L.; Soykin, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Improved qualification standards and test procedures for adhesives used in microelectronic packaging are developed. The test methods in specification for the Selection and Use of Organic Adhesives in Hybrid Microcircuits are reevaluated versus industry and government requirements. Four electrically insulative and four electrically conductive adhesives used in the assembly of hybrid microcircuits are selected to evaluate the proposed revised test methods. An estimate of the cost to perform qualification testing of an adhesive to the requirements of the revised specification is also prepared.

  14. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  15. Adenoid removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... This does not cause problems most of the time. Alternative Names Adenoidectomy; Removal of adenoid glands Images Adenoid removal - series References Wetmore RF. Tonsils and adenoids. In: Kliegman ...

  16. Joining veneers to ceramic cores and dentition with adhesive interlayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J-W; Wang, Y; Lloyd, I K; Lawn, B R

    2007-08-01

    Adhesive joining of veneers to cores offers potential simplicity and economy in the fabrication of all-ceramic crowns. We tested the hypothesis that resin-based adhesives can be used for such fabrication without compromising mechanical integrity of the crown structure. A simple test procedure for quantifying this hypothesis was proposed. A model glass veneer layer 1 mm thick (representative of porcelain), adhesively bonded onto a glass-like core substrate (ceramic or dental enamel), was loaded at its top surface with a hard sphere (occlusal force) until a radial crack initiated at the veneer undersurface. The critical loads for fracture, visually observable in the transparent glass, afforded a measure of the predisposition for the adhesive to cause veneer failure in an occlusal overload. Two adhesives were tested, one a commercial epoxy resin and the other a relatively stiff in-house-developed composite. The results confirmed that stiffer adhesives provide higher resistance to failure.

  17. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  18. Biomimetic adhesive materials containing cyanoacryl group for medical application.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sueng Hwan; Sohn, Jeong Sun

    2014-10-17

    For underwater adhesives with biocompatible and more flexible bonds using biomimetic adhesive groups, DOPA-like adhesive molecules were modified with cyanoacrylates to obtain different repeating units and chain length copolymers. The goal of this work is to copy the mechanisms of underwater bonding to create synthetic water-borne underwater medical adhesives through blending of the modified DOPA and a triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO) for practical application to repair wet living tissues and bones, and in turn, to use the synthetic adhesives to test mechanistic hypotheses about the natural adhesive. The highest values in stress and modulus of the biomimetic adhesives prepared in wet state were 165 kPa and 33 MPa, respectively.

  19. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  20. Scoping Tests of Technetium and Iodine Removal from Tank Waste Using SuperLig® 639 Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2013-09-26

    The primary chemical form of 99Tc found in Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) is pertechnetate anion (TcO4 -), which is highly soluble in water, and is mobile if released to the environment. Pertechnetate will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford waste treatment plant, and the primary disposition path is immobilization in the LAW glass waste form, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate, and the potential for impact to the Performance Assessment (PA), effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the River Protection Project mission. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow-sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. While 99Tc is the primary radionuclide of interest, 129I also contributes to the calculated future dose of disposed LAW, and it would be of interest to examine if removal is possible.

  1. A novel model for testing the efficiency of removal of calcium hydroxide from complex root canal anatomies.

    PubMed

    Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Aksel, Hacer; Parashos, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several irrigation protocols in the removal of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2 ] from simulated internal root resorption cavities in a complex root canal anatomy model. The 20° to 35° curved mesiobuccal roots of 94 maxillary molars were sectioned longitudinally; internal resorption cavities were prepared in the apical third of the canal walls. Calcium hydroxide was placed into the cavities and the root halves reassembled. Four teeth were used as controls, and 90 teeth were randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 15), according to the irrigation protocols used: syringe irrigation; H2 O2 (HP); Navitip FX; Vibringe-syringe; Vibringe-NaviTip FX; ultrasonically activated irrigation (UAI) using an ultrasonic K-file. In the HP group, 2.5% NaOCl and 3% H2 O2 were used, while 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were used in the remaining groups. Stereomicroscope images and radiographs were used to measure the remaining Ca(OH)2 . The model proved to be suitable for simulating complex anatomy. Positive correlation was found between stereomicroscope and radiographic analyses (P < 0.05). UAI removed significantly more Ca(OH)2 than the other experimental groups (P < 0.05). The HP group was the least efficient protocol (P < 0.05). It would appear that a reliable model has been developed that simulates complex root canal anatomy. Irrigant activation protocols enhanced Ca(OH)2 removal.

  2. The use of mathematical modeling and pilot plant testing to develop a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Nolasco, D.A.; Daigger, G.T.; Stafford, D.R.; Kaupp, D.M.; Stephenson, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for carbon oxidation, nitrogen removal, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal was used to develop the Step Bio-P process, a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process with a step-feed configuration. A 9,000-L pilot plant with diurnally varying influent process loading rates was operated to verify the model results and to optimize the Step Bio-P process for application at the lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, wastewater treatment plant. The pilot plant was operated for 10 months. An automatic on-line data acquisition system with multiple sampling and metering points for dissolved oxygen, mixed liquor suspended solids, ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, ortho-phosphate, and flow rates was used. A sampling program to obtain off-line data was carried out to verify the information from the on-line system and monitor additional parameters. The on-line and off-line data were used to recalibrate the model, which was used as an experimental design and process optimization tool.

  3. Amelioration de l'adhesion de revetements organiques deposes par plasma froid sur polymeres pour applications biomedicales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbai, Marouan

    Plasma surface modification is commonly used in biomedical field, for example to enhance cell adhesion and growth surrounding the stent covers without affecting its bulk properties. Plasma polymer (PP) deposition used to create thin films rich in functional groups, e.g. primary amines, known to enhance the cellular response and allow grafting of biomolecules especially on stent grafts. Thin film adhesion to stent polymeric cover should be considered especially as they will evolve in a biological environment. The aim of this project is to evaluate the adhesion of PP on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET). Thereafter, an ammonia plasma treatment on PTFE is performed prior to deposition of PP to optimize the PP/PTFE adhesion. PP studied here (referred to as "LP") is prepared from a mixture of ethylene (C2H4) and ammonia (NH3). It is deposited on two supports, PET and PTFE. The interfacial adhesion between the LP coating and the substrate was evaluated by "Peel-test 180 °" according to ASTM F1842. Staining of the surface after peel test followed by an image analysis was performed to determine the percentage of removed coating. Adhesion optimization is done by varying operating plasma parameters such as power, pressure and pretreatment time. Chemical analyses and wettability of LP and pretreated surfaces in dry and wet conditions are characterized by XPS and contact angle measurements, respectively. The adhesion of LP/PET was excellent in a dry environment (<1%), but lower under wet conditions (4+/-6% and 44+/-7% as minimum and maximum values at 5min and 60min of immersion in deionized water, respectively). However, 56% to 75% of the LP is removed from virgin PTFE in a dry and wet environment, respectively; percentages can be substantially reduced by plasma pretreatment (0% and 8+/-3% in air and 30min in deionized water). Almost no delamination was observed with NH3 plasma pretreatment at 15s, 100 mTorr and 50W. N2 plasma pretreatment

  4. Environmental durability of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, Lawrence Michael

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the environmental durability of adhesively bonded aircraft joints using fracture mechanics. Three aerospace adhesives, two epoxies and one polyimide, were investigated. Adhesive specimens were tested for tensile and toughness behavior. Bonded joint specimens were subject to Mode I, Mode II, and mixed mode fracture and fatigue tests. Prior to testing, selected specimens were exposed for up to 10,000 hours to isothermal and thermally cyclic conditions similar to aircraft service environments. Analysis was accomplished using finite element programs and closed-form solutions. Environmental exposure caused reductions in the failure strain, strength, and toughness, of the adhesive specimens and in the toughness and fatigue threshold of the bonded joint specimens. Specimens exposed to high temperature and humidity prior to testing and those tested at low temperatures indicative of high altitude operations experienced the most significant toughness losses. Results are discussed in terms of their relationship to bonded joint design and should prove valuable to efforts aimed at extending the lives of aging aircraft using bonded repairs as well as to efforts focused on using adhesive bonding for future aerospace structures.

  5. Single-Phase Photo-Cross-Linkable Bioinspired Adhesive for Precise Control of Adhesion Strength.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tristan; Slegeris, Rimantas; Pramudya, Irawan; Chung, Hoyong

    2017-01-18

    A bioinspired, modular terpolymer adhesive, poly(N-methacryloyl-3,4-dihydroxyl-l-phenylalanine-co-9-(acryloyloxy)butyl anthracene-9-carboxylate-co-acrylic acid), has been synthesized containing three different functionalities: a photo-cross-linking segment, a wet interfacial adhesion segment, and a water-soluble segment. The synthesized adhesive polymer is the first example of a single-phase, photo-cross-linkable adhesive which does not require additional photoinitiator or other cross-linking agents. The terpolymer demonstrates strong adhesion when it swells in water and/or ethanol. The terpolymer is composed of three repeating units: N-methacryloyl-3,4-dihydroxyl-l-phenylalanine (MDOPA), which has been known to generate strong adhesion under wet conditions, poly(acrylic acid), which has been known to increase water solubility of polymers, and a photo-cross-linking segment consisting of an anthracene-based monomer used for enhancement of cohesion properties via UV irradiation (352 nm). A photomediated [4 + 4] cycloaddition reaction of anthracene results in the cross-linking of individual polymer chains after interfacial adhesion between substrates and adhesive polymers. Chemically, the covalent photo-cross-linking was confirmed by UV-vis, (1)H NMR, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The cross-linking-fortified cohesion of the adhesive polymer network yields strengthened cohesion properties of the bulk material. The photoreaction was conveniently controlled via the duration of UV-irradiation. The adhesion properties of new adhesives were characterized by lap shear strength on transparent Mylar film and glasses after the adhesive was swollen in biologically friendly solvents including water and ethanol. The adhesion strength (J/m(2)) was enhanced by 850% under 352 nm UV-irradiation. Multiple application variables were tested to determine the optimal conditions, such as solvent, concentration, polymer composition, and substrate. The best adhesion properties were

  6. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  7. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  8. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  9. Adhesive Bonding for Shelters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    weru uvaluated, the type of etch bath " sweetener " and the type of rinse\\water used. The type of etch bath " sweetener " was found to have a dramatic effect...EA9601NW Adhesives on 50521134 Bare Adherenas 39 13 Stress-Durability Behavior Sun-mary 40 14 Effect of Ltch Bath Sweetening Alloy on Interracial Durability...34"’ -,,• , •’• •"• " ,,,,, 9 Adhesive/Primer/Adherend Alloy/Surface Preparation Combinations Adherend OFPL Sweetening Rinse Adhesive:Primer Alloy Alloy

  10. Bacterial contamination of cucumber fruit through adhesion.

    PubMed

    Reina, Laura D; Fleming, Henry P; Breidt, Frederick

    2002-12-01

    In this study, the adhesion of bacteria to fresh cucumber surfaces in aqueous suspension was shown to be dependent on time of incubation, inoculum species and concentration, and temperature. The adhesion of bacteria to the fruit in wash water was less extensive at lower temperatures and shorter exposure times. Various species of bacteria were adsorbed to cucumber surfaces in the following relative order: Salmonella Typhimurium > Staphylococcus aureus > Lactobacillus plantarum > Listeria monocytogenes. Cells were adsorbed at all temperatures tested (5, 15, 25, and 35 degrees C) at levels that depended on incubation time, but the numbers of cells adsorbed were larger at higher incubation temperatures. Levels of adhesion of bacteria to dewaxed fruit were higher for L. monocytogenes and lower for Salmonella Typhimurium, L. plantarum, and S. aureus than were levels of adhesion to waxed fruit.

  11. Enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces produced by mild self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) released by adhesive procedures may degrade collagen in the hybrid layer and so compromise the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, endogenous enzymatic degradation was evaluated for several simplified self-etch adhesives. In addition, primers were modified by adding two MMP inhibitors: chlorhexidine, a commonly used disinfectant, but also a non-specific MMP inhibitor; and SB-3CT, a specific inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography of fresh human dentin powder was used to identify the enzymes released by the adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to assess the mechanical properties of resin-dentin interfaces over time. In none of the experimental groups treated with the mild self-etch adhesives was MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 identified. Also, no difference in the μTBS was measured for the inhibitor-modified and the control inhibitor-free adhesives after 6 months of water storage. It is concluded that in contrast to etch-and-rinse adhesives, the involvement of endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the bond-degradation process is minimal for mild self-etch adhesives.

  12. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  13. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  14. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  15. Evaluation of surgical anti-adhesion products to reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Hui; Liao, Ni-Na; Luo, Jing-Wan; Sun, Yu-Long

    2017-01-01

    Background Adhesions frequently occur after abdominal surgery. Many anti-adhesion products have been used in clinic. However, the evidences are short for surgeons to reasonably choose the suitable anti-adhesion produces in clinical practice. This study provided such evidence by comparing the efficiency of five products to prevent abdominal adhesion formation in a rat model. Methods Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven groups: sham-operation group, adhesion group, and five product groups (n = 8). The abdomens of rats were opened. The injuries were created on abdominal wall and cecum in the adhesion and product groups. The wounds on abdominal wall and cecum of rats in the adhesion group were not treated before the abdomens were closed. The wounds on abdominal wall and cecum of rats in the product groups were covered with anti-adhesion product: polylactic acid (PLA) film, Seprafilm®, medical polyethylene glycol berberine liquid (PEG), medical sodium hyaluronate gel (HA), or medical chitosan (Chitosan). Fourteen days after surgery, the adhesions were evaluated by incidence, severity, adhesion area on abdominal wall and adhesion breaking strength. Results The application of PLA film and Seprafilm® significantly reduced the incidence, severity, adhesion area and breaking strength of cecum-abdomen adhesion (P<0.05). HA, PEG and Chitosan failed to significantly reduce the cecum-abdomen adhesion (P>0.05). The statistical significances in the incidence and severity of abdomen-adipose adhesion between adhesion group and the product groups were not achieved. However, Seprafilm® was more effective to reduce abdomen-adipose adhesion than PLA film. Furthermore, it was found that the products tested in this study did not effectively reduce cecum-adipose adhesion. The application of PEG could result in abdomen-small intestine adhesion. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, the preference order of anti-adhesion products used to reduce

  16. Removing Bonded Integrated Circuits From Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Small resistance heater makes it easier, faster, and cheaper to remove integrated circuit from hybrid-circuit board, package, or other substrate for rework. Heater, located directly in polymeric bond interface or on substrate under integrated-circuit chip, energized when necessary to remove chip. Heat generated softens adhesive or solder that bonds chip to substrate. Chip then lifted easily from substrate.

  17. A chitosan based, laser activated thin film surgical adhesive, 'SurgiLux': preparation and demonstration.

    PubMed

    Foster, L John R; Karsten, Elizabeth

    2012-10-23

    cross-linking and through irradiation using a comparatively low-powered (120 mW) infrared laser instead of UV light. Chitosan films have a natural but weak adhesive attraction to collagen (~3 KPa), laser activation of the chitosan based SurgiLux films emphasizes the strength of this adhesion through polymer chain interactions as a consequence of transient thermal expansion.(5) Without this 'activation' process, SurgiLux films are readily removed.(6-9) SurgiLux has been tested both in vitro and in vivo on a variety of tissues including nerve, intestine, dura mater and cornea. In all cases it demonstrated good biocompatibility and negligible thermal damage as a consequence of irradiation.(6-10).

  18. Strengthening of dental adhesives via particle reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Belli, Renan; Kreppel, Stefan; Petschelt, Anselm; Hornberger, Helga; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The bond between methacrylic polymer adhesives and dental restoratives is not perfect and may fail either in the short or in the long term. This study aims to evaluate the effects of particle incorporation in a self-etch model adhesive on mechanical and physical properties that are relevant during application and service. Filled adhesives containing 5, 10, 15 or 25wt% glass fillers were compared to their unfilled counterpart in terms of water sorption and solubility; viscosity and dynamic viscosity during polymerization were recorded using rheological measurements and compared to FTIR analysis of the real-time degree of cure. Elastic modulus and ultimate tensile strength measurements were performed in uniaxial tension; the energy to fracture was used to calculate the fracture toughness of the adhesives. Finally, the experimental adhesives were applied on dentin substrate to test the bond strength using the microtensile test. Results showed that the incorporation of 5-10wt% nanofiller to self-etching dental adhesives is efficient in accelerating the polymerization reaction and increasing the degree of cure without compromising the film viscosity for good wettability or water sorption and solubility. Fillers increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and fracture toughness to a plateau between 5 and 15wt% filler concentration, and despite the tendency to form agglomerations, active crack pinning/deflection toughening mechanisms have been observed. The bond strength between resin composite and dentin was also improved when adhesives with up to 10wt% fillers were used, with no additional improvements with further packing. The use of fillers to reinforce dental adhesives may therefore be of great practical benefit by improving curing and mechanical properties.

  19. Evaluation of intrauterine adhesion treatment by laser hysteroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutrynowski, Andrzej; Zabielska, Renata

    1996-03-01

    Hysteroscopy, which is a kind of endoscopy, makes it possible to evaluate macroscopically the cervical canal, uterine cavity, and the uterine opening of the oviducts. Laser hysteroscopy is used for removing septa and intrauterine adhesions, polyps, small submucosus myomas, and for endometrium ablation in abnormal metrorrhagias. The paper aims at the initial evaluation of laser hysteroscopy in removing intrauterine adhesions in the cases of 41 infertile women. Among all infertile patients 16 women (39%) conceived. Among others 1 woman (2.5%) did not want to conceive and 19 had other causes of infertility. Thirteen (93%) out of 14 patients with hypomenorrhea before surgery reported improvement of the menstruation cycle after the treatment. Five patients (12%) had adhesions for the second time. The patients had the second laser hysteroscopy. The control diagnostic hysteroscopy showed no adhesions in those cases.

  20. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most

  1. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  2. Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2003-11-29

    An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

  3. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  4. Adhesion in hydrogels and model glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvendiren, Murat

    adhesion tests were performed on thin layers of poly(tetramethyl bisphenol-A polycarbonate) (TMPC)/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) blends with different blend compositions. The tests were designed to investigate the effects of temperature and contact time on interfacial adhesion between two blend surfaces. Adhesion in this system is controlled by diffusive motions of the highly mobile PEO component.

  5. Adhesive and Elastic Properties of DOPA-Containing Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Shull, Ken; Messersmith, Phillip; Madhav, Priti

    2001-03-01

    It was recently determined that L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is primarily responsible for both the adhesion and crosslinking that occurs in mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). In wet environments, MAPs form strong adhesive bonds to a large variety of substrates, making DOPA-modified polymers very interesting for adhesion studies. Polymer materials modified from or modeled after DOPA have large potential as biomedical adhesives and as adhesives in aqueous environments. The mechanical and adhesive properties of a DOPA-containing hydrogel were tested using an axisymmetric adhesion test modified from the method of Johnson, Kendall and Roberts. In accordance with this technique, a rigid, hemispherical indenter was brought into contact with hydrogel samples, generating load and displacement data. In addition, images were taken of the contact between the sample and indenter. Using the collected data and images, the adhesive properties of the material were calculated. Separate experiments were conducted in conditions of varying humidity and aqueous environments in order to determine any changes in the adhesive behavior of the hydrogel. Data resulting from experiments in each type of environment will be presented.

  6. Ultrafast UV-Curable Adhesives for Optical Pick-Ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chang-Kyu; Jang, Kyung-Woon; Choi, Hyoung Gil; Jang, Jiyoung; Moon, Youngjun; Jeon, Chulho

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes novel ultraviolet (UV)-curable adhesives with an ultrafast curing rate which are fully cured within 8 s for optical pick-up (OPU) applications. Two kinds of oligomers (novolac epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate), additives, and inorganic fillers were prepared for the formulation of the adhesives. In addition, three kinds of photo-initiator [2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone and 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropiophenone for surface curing and (2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl) diphenyl phosphine oxide (TMDPO) for deep curing] were mixed to increase the curing rate. Photo-differential scanning calorimetry (photo-DSC) analyses showed that the newly formulated UV adhesives had faster curing rate than conventional UV adhesives. The UV adhesives were applied to OPUs for DVD/CD-RW, and five kinds of reliability tests, i.e., thermal shock, low-temperature storage, high-temperature storage, high temperature/high humidity, and nonoperation shock tests, were conducted to evaluate the adhesive reliability. According to the results of reliability tests and thermal stress simulations, the UV adhesives with lower storage modulus ( E') showed better thermal shock reliability due to lower thermal stresses. In addition, OPUs assembled using the UV adhesives passed all reliability tests. Consequently, the UV adhesives were successfully applied to OPUs in OPU production lines, contributing to mass production.

  7. Controllable ON-OFF adhesion for Earth orbit grappling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parness, Aaron; Hilgendorf, Tyler; Daniel, Phillip; Frost, Matt; White, Victor; Kennedy, Brett

    ON-OFF adhesives can benefit multiple Earth orbit applications by providing the capability to selectively anchor two surfaces together repeatedly and releasably without significant preload. Key to this new capability, targets will not need special preparation; ON-OFF adhesives can be used with cooperative and non-cooperative objects, like defunct satellites or space debris. Using an ON-OFF adhesive gripper allows large surfaces on a target to serve as potential grapple points, reducing the precision needed in the sensing and control throughout the grapple operation. A space-rated adhesive structure is presented that can be turned ON-OFF using a slight sliding motion. This adhesive mimics the geometry and performance characteristics of the adhesive structures found on the feet of gecko lizards. Results from adhesive testing on common orbital surfaces like solar panels, thermal blankets, composites, and painted surfaces are presented. Early environmental testing results from cold temperature and vacuum tests are also presented. Finally, the paper presents the design, fabrication, and preliminary testing of a gripping mechanism enabled by these ON-OFF adhesives in preparation for satellite-servicing applications. Adhesive levels range from near zero on rough surfaces to more than 75 kPa on smooth surfaces like glass.

  8. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  9. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  10. Selenium removal from drinking water by adsorption to chitosan-clay composites and oxides: batch and columns tests.

    PubMed

    Bleiman, Nimrod; Mishael, Yael G

    2010-11-15

    Polymer-clay composites were designed to adsorb selenium from water. The highest adsorption efficiency was obtained for chitosan-montmorillonite composites. These composites were characterized by XRD, zeta potential, and FTIR measurements. Adsorption isotherms of selenate on the composite, on Al-oxide and on Fe-oxide were in good agreement with the Langmuir model, yielding a somewhat higher capacity for the composite, 18.4, 17.2 and 8.2 mg/g, respectively. In addition, adsorption by the composite was not pH dependent while its adsorption by the oxides decreased at high pH. Selenium removal from well water (closed due to high selenium concentrations, 0.1 mg/L) by the composite, brought levels to below the WHO limit (0.01 mg/L) and was selective for selenium even in the presence of sulfur (13 mg/L). Selenium adsorption by the composite was higher than by the Al-oxide due to high adsorption of sulfur by the later. Unlike employment in batch Al-oxide is more suitable for employment in filtration columns due to its high hydraulic conductivity. A semi-pilot columns experiment demonstrated selenium removal from the well water below the recommended limit (first 400 pore volumes) by Al-oxide columns. Regeneration of Al-oxide and of the composite was studied and readsorption of selenium was demonstrated.

  11. Can we remove iodine-131 from tap water in Japan by boiling? - Experimental testing in response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Tagami, K; Uchida, S

    2011-08-01

    Iodine-131 concentrations in tap water higher than 100 BqL(-1) were reported by several local governments in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Some individuals in the emergency-response community recommended the boiling of tap water to remove iodine-131. However, the tap water boiling tests in this study showed no iodine-131 loss from the tap water with either short-term boiling (1-10 min) or prolonged boiling (up to 30 min) resulting in up to 3-fold volume reductions. In this situation, boiling was shown to be not effective in removing iodine-131 from tap water; indeed even higher concentrations may result from the liquid-volume reduction accompanying this process.

  12. Tooth structure removal associated with various preparation designs for posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Sorensen, John A

    2002-06-01

    The amount of tooth structure removed for various innovative and conventional preparation designs for fixed prosthodontics was quantified. Four Typodont resin teeth representing maxillary and mandibular premolars and molars were prepared in various abutment designs: adhesive, box (A2); adhesive, wing and groove (A3); mesioocclusal or distoocclusal inlay; mesio-occlusodistal inlay (13); mesio-occlusodistal onlay; partial crown; half crown (only molars); complete crown, 0.8-mm circumferential tapered chamfer (F1); complete crown, 1.0-mm circumferential rounded shoulder; and complete crown, 1.4-mm axial reduction facial shoulder, 0.7-mm lingual chamfer (F3). After tooth preparation (10 per group), the root was separated from the anatomic crown at the cementoenamel junction. Removal of tooth structure was measured by gravimetric analysis in a high-precision balance. Preparations A3 and F3 were assigned as abutments for metal-supported restorations, whereas all other preparations were used for all-ceramic restorations. When the mean structure removal of all teeth tested was compared, the adhesive and inlay abutments were the least invasive preparation designs, ranging from approximately 5.5% (A2) to 27.2% (13) tooth structure removal. Complete crowns required the most invasive preparations, ranging from 67.5% (F1) to 75.6% (F3) tooth structure removal. The tooth structure removal required for F3 retainers was almost 14 times greater than for an A2 preparation. Tooth structure removal was also influenced by the morphology of the tooth. The first comprehensive tooth preparation design classification system was introduced. The measurement system used in this study provides an accurate method of quantifying tooth structure removal for fixed prosthodontic preparations. The innovative preparation designs studied conserved significant amounts of tooth structure, yielding a better prognosis for the restored tooth.

  13. Comparison of Adhesion and Retention Forces for Two Candidate Docking Seal Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartzler, Brad D.; Panickar, Marta B.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    To successfully mate two pressurized vehicles or structures in space, advanced seals are required at the interface to prevent the loss of breathable air to the vacuum of space. A critical part of the development testing of candidate seal designs was a verification of the integrity of the retaining mechanism that holds the silicone seal component to the structure. Failure to retain the elastomer seal during flight could liberate seal material in the event of high adhesive loads during undocking. This work presents an investigation of the force required to separate the elastomer from its metal counter-face surface during simulated undocking as well as a comparison to that force which was necessary to destructively remove the elastomer from its retaining device. Two silicone elastomers, Wacker 007-49524 and Esterline ELASA-401, were evaluated. During the course of the investigation, modifications were made to the retaining devices to determine if the modifications improved the force needed to destructively remove the seal. The tests were completed at the expected operating temperatures of -50, +23, and +75 C. Under the conditions investigated, the comparison indicated that the adhesion between the elastomer and the metal counter-face was significantly less than the force needed to forcibly remove the elastomer seal from its retainer, and no failure would be expected.

  14. Doxycycline-encapsulated nanotube-modified dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, S A; Palasuk, J; Kamocki, K; Geraldeli, S; Gregory, R L; Platt, J A; Windsor, L J; Bottino, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti-matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)-encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)-modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives-but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels-we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of encapsulated MMP

  15. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-02

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  16. Epoxy Nanocomposites—Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  17. Thickness dependence of ice removal stress for a polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite: Sylgard 184.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyu; Fuller, Trae; Zhang, Wei; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2014-11-04

    Minimizing adhesion of ice has been the subject of extensive studies because of importance to applications such aircraft wings, spacecraft, and power transmission wires. A growing interest concerns coatings for wind turbine blades and refrigeration. Herein, a new laboratory test was employed to obtain the thickness dependence of ice adhesion for Sylgard 184-a filled polydimethylsiloxane elastomer. A correlation between ice adhesion and coating thickness (t) was found that follows a relationship developed by Kendall over 40 years ago for removal of a rigid object from an elastomer. With a 0.05 mm/s probe speed a nearly linear relationship between peak removal stress (Ps) and 1/t(1/2) was obtained with Ps ∼ 460 kPa for an 18 μm coating, decreasing to ∼120 kPa for 533 μm. Preliminary results suggest that below ∼10 μm Ps departs from the 1/t(1/2) correlation while above ∼500 μm a limiting value for Ps may be reached. We previously reported that probe speed has negligible effect on the glassy polymer PMMA. In contrast, probe speed is identified as an important variable for testing ice release on elastomeric Sylgard 184 coatings. While work of adhesion, which is related to surface free energy, is recognized as an important factor that can affect ice release, the results reported herein show that coating thickness can override this single parameter for elastomeric substrates.

  18. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  19. Adhesive characterization in prestressed piezoelectric laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Charles A.; Mossi, Karla M.; Scott, Lisa A.

    2003-08-01

    Pre-stressed piezoelectric laminates, consisting of one or more metal layers and a piezoelectric material bonded together with an adhesive, have been widely studied over the past few years, both numerically and experimentally. Most of the current research has concentrated on the effect of the metal layers, types and geometry, along with variations in the active layer of the laminate. Historically, the adhesive layer has been neglected as a contributing factor in the overall performance of the final device. This paper attempts to address the effect of the adhesive line thickness and its influence on the performance of pre-stressed piezoelectric laminates under specific boundary conditions. All laminates tested were constructed with the following lay-up: 0.354 mm thick stainless steel, adhesive, 0.381 mm PZT ceramic, adhesive, and a 0.0254 mm aluminum layer. The devices having an adhesive line thickness of 0.169 mm were classified as group A, and group B were the devices with an adhesive line thickness of 0.036 mm. The adhesive line thickness for group A was approximately 21% more than the line thickness of group B. The devices were tested in a simply supported, free-free condition under a series of loads at a constant frequency of 5 Hz over a voltage range from 400 to 800 Volts peak-to-peak. Displacement was measured using loads of 25, 50, 75, 100, and 200 grams for each actuator. The data from each group was averaged and compared. The results showed group B generated more displacement at the same "arm weight" applied as compared to group A. However, only three samples for group B were measured since the rest of the samples failed during testing. Failure of the devices of group B may be due to the ultimate stress of the devices and their ability to lift a load under those conditions. The study demonstrated that adhesive layer thickness, along with the manufacturing process, has to be taken into account when developing an application that requires load

  20. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  1. Creation of Abdominal Adhesions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Clement D; Hu, Michael S; Leavitt, Tripp; Barnes, Leandra A; Cheung, Alexander T M; Malhotra, Samir; Lorenz, H Peter; Longaker, Michael T

    2016-08-27

    Abdominal adhesions consist of fibrotic tissue that forms in the peritoneal space in response to an inflammatory insult, typically surgery or intraabdominal infection. The precise mechanisms underlying adhesion formation are poorly understood. Many compounds and physical barriers have been tested for their ability to prevent adhesions after surgery with varying levels of success. The mouse and rat are important models for the study of abdominal adhesions. Several different techniques for the creation of adhesions in the mouse and rat exist in the literature. Here we describe a protocol utilizing abrasion of the cecum with sandpaper and sutures placed in the right abdominal sidewall. The mouse is anesthetized and the abdomen is prepped. A midline laparotomy is created and the cecum is identified. Sandpaper is used to gently abrade the surface of the cecum. Next, several figure-of-eight sutures are placed into the peritoneum of the right abdominal sidewall. The abdominal cavity is irrigated, a small amount of starch is applied, and the incision is closed. We have found that this technique produces the most consistent adhesions with the lowest mortality rate.

  2. Small Column Ion Exchange Testing of Superlig 644 for Removal of 137Cs from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (Tank 241-AN-107)

    SciTech Connect

    DE Kurath; DL Blanchard; JR Bontha

    2000-06-28

    The current BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment of the Hanford high-level tank wastes includes the use of Superlig{reg_sign} materials for removing {sup 137}Cs from the aqueous fraction of the waste. The Superlig materials applicable to cesium removal include the cesium-selective Superlig 632and Superlig 644. These materials have been developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, Utah. This report describes the testing of the Superlig 644 ion exchange material in a small dual-column system. The bed volume of the lead column was 18.6 mL (L/D = 7), and the bed volume of the lag column was 15.9 mL (L/D = 6) during the loading phase. The sample processed was approximately 1.6 L of diluted waste ([Na{sup +}] = 4.84 M) from Tank 241-AN-107 (Envelope C). This sample had been previously treated for removal of Sr/transuranic (TRU) values and clarified in a single tube cross-flow filtration unit. All ion exchange process steps were tested, including resin-bed preparation, loading, feed displacement, water rinse, elution, eluant rinse, and resin regeneration. A summary of performance measures for both columns is shown in Table S1. The Cs {lambda} values represent a measure of the effective capacity of the SL-644 resin. The Cs {lambda} of 20 for the lead column is much lower than the estimated 150 obtained by the Savannah River Technology Center during Phase 1A testing. Equilibrium data obtained with batch contacts using the AN-107 Cs IX feed predicts a Cs {lambda} of 183. A Cs {lambda} for the lag column could not be determined due to insufficient breakthrough, but it appeared to work well and removed nearly all of the cesium not removed by the lead column. The low value for the lead column indicates that it did not perform as expected. This may have been due to air or gas in the bed that caused fluid channeling or blinding of the resin. The maximum decontamination factor (DF) for {sup 137}Cs listed in Table S1 is based on {sup 137}Cs

  3. Removal of white mineral trioxide aggregate cement: a promising approach.

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L; Sheibani, Nader; Asatourian, Armen; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Elyasi, Mayam

    2013-01-01

    Removal of MTA from dentin by applying 37% hydrochloric acid (HCl) to reduce microhardness and push-out bond strength. Forty dentin slices were filled with WMTA and divided into two groups (n = 20). Ten slices remained untreated while others were exposed to either HCl or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and all samples were subjected to pushout test. The mode of bond failures was determined by SEM analysis. Later, twenty glass tubes were filled with WMTA and divided into two groups (n = 10). One side of tube was exposed to HCl or PBS while the other side remained untreated and the microhardness was analyzed by testing machine. HCl showed significantly lower pushout strength and microhardness values (P = 0.0001), (P = 0.0001). HCl treated samples showed mixed bond failures dominantly, while PBS samples mostly showed adhesive failures. The results of this study can suggest the 37% HCl as an effective solution to aid the removal of MTA from the dentin surfaces.

  4. Laser treatment of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic matrix for adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Ucciardello, N.; Giuliani, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laser surface treatment of CFRP made of PPS thermoplastic matrix by means of a 30 W Q-Switched Yb:YAG fiber laser, is investigated with the aim to improve adhesive bonding. The process parameters pulse power, scanning speed, hatch distance and scanning strategy, were varied to the aim to study the influence of the process condition on the first top resin layer removal and fibre damage. The operating window was experimentally determined. The effectiveness of laser treatment was verified by single lap shear test.

  5. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  6. Arsenic waste management: a critical review of testing and disposal of arsenic-bearing solid wastes generated during arsenic removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Tara M; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-10-01

    Water treatment technologies for arsenic removal from groundwater have been extensively studied due to widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources. Central to the successful application of arsenic water treatment systems is the consideration of appropriate disposal methods for arsenic-bearing wastes generated during treatment. However, specific recommendations for arsenic waste disposal are often lacking or mentioned as an area for future research and the proper disposal and stabilization of arsenic-bearing waste remains a barrier to the successful implementation of arsenic removal technologies. This review summarizes current disposal options for arsenic-bearing wastes, including landfilling, stabilization, cow dung mixing, passive aeration, pond disposal, and soil disposal. The findings from studies that simulate these disposal conditions are included and compared to results from shorter, regulatory tests. In many instances, short-term leaching tests do not adequately address the range of conditions encountered in disposal environments. Future research directions are highlighted and include establishing regulatory test conditions that align with actual disposal conditions and evaluating nonlandfill disposal options for developing countries.

  7. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  8. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the blood-testis barrier and the apical ectoplasmic specialization in the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2011-04-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive junction restructuring takes place at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as the apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES, a testis-specific adherens junction) in the seminiferous epithelium. However, the mechanism(s) that regulates these critical events in the testis remains unknown. Based on the current concept in the field, changes in the phosphorylation status of integral membrane proteins at these sites can induce alterations in protein endocytosis and recycling, causing junction restructuring. Herein, c-Yes, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, was found to express abundantly at the BTB and apical ES stage-specifically, coinciding with junction restructuring events at these sites during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. c-Yes also structurally associated with adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin and N-cadherin) and the apical ES (e.g., β1-integrin, laminins β3 and γ3), possibly to regulate phosphorylation status of proteins at these sites. SU6656, a selective c-Yes inhibitor, was shown to perturb the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier in vitro, which is mediated by changes in the distribution of occludin and N-cadherin at the cell-cell interface, moving from cell surface to cytosol, thereby destabilizing the tight junction-barrier. However, this disruptive effect of SU6656 on the barrier was blocked by testosterone. Furthermore, c-Yes is crucial to maintain the actin filament network in Sertoli cells since a blockade of c-Yes by SU6656 induced actin filament disorganization. In summary, c-Yes regulates BTB and apical ES integrity by maintaining proper distribution of integral membrane proteins and actin filament organization at these sites.

  9. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m−3 and from 61 to 104 MJ m−3, respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91–158 MJ m−3, which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  10. Regional bond strengths of adhesive resins to pulp chamber dentin.

    PubMed

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Ozer, F; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    Microleakage of oral microorganisms, which can occur due to the lack of sealing ability of permanent restorative materials, may cause failure of root canal treatments. Although a great deal of research has been done on sealing enamel and coronal dentin with resins, little research has been done on the adhesion of resins to the walls of pulp chambers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional bond strengths of two adhesive systems to the walls of pulp chambers. A section was made horizontally through the middle of the pulp chamber of extracted human third molars to divide the chamber into upper and lower halves. The pulp tissue was removed and the tooth segments were then divided into treatment subgroups. The pulp chambers were bonded with C&B Metabond (Parkell) or One-Step (Bisco), with or without 5% NaOCI pretreatment. The microtensile bond strengths of these resins to four different pulp chamber regions (bottom, wall, roof, and pulp horn areas) were then measured using an Instron machine. The data were expressed in MPa and were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA. Statistically significant differences were found among the test groups (p < 0.001). One-Step produced higher bond strengths to all pulp chamber regions except the floor, compared with C&B Metabond. The results indicated that high bond strengths can be achieved between adhesive resins and the various regions of the pulp chamber. This should permit the use of a thick layer of unfilled resin along the floor of the pulp chamber and over the canal orifices as a secondary protective seal after finishing root canal therapy.

  11. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  12. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  13. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  14. Adhesion assessment of copper thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kriese, M.D.; Gerberich, W.W.; Moody, N.R.

    1997-06-01

    Nano-indentation testing has been used to quantitatively assess the adhesion of thin copper films, sputtered to thicknesses of 150 nm to 1500 nm. Copper films of low residual stress were deposited via RF diode cathode sputtering onto SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. Overlayers of DC magnetron sputtered tungsten, 850 nm thick with high residual stress, were additionally used to provide a driving force for delamination. All films tested exhibited buckle-driven delamination, from which the interfacial toughness was estimated to be 0.2 - 2 J/m{sup 2}, which is comparable to the thermodynamic work of adhesion. The use of an overlayer requires extensions of existing models, but otherwise does not change the interfacial adhesion, allowing measurements of films that would not otherwise delaminate.

  15. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  16. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  17. Distinguishing metal bioconcentration from particulate matter in moss tissue: testing methods of removing particles attached to the moss surface.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, V; Giordano, S; Pérez-Llamazares, A; Ares, A; Carballeira, A; Fernández, J A; Aboal, J R

    2013-10-01

    Accurate differentiation of the proportion of bioconcentrated metals (i.e. incorporated into cells) and the proportion that is not bioconcentrated (i.e. adsorbed at the surface) would lead to a better understanding of the uptake processes and would represent an advance in the use of mosses as biomonitors. Traditionally the methods used to remove contaminants that are not bioconcentrated were to wash the plant material with water or to apply the sequential elution technique, but nowadays both options are considered inaccurate for these purposes. The remaining possibilities are to clean the moss samples with a nitrogen jet or by power ultrasound. Samples of terrestrial moss Pseudoscleropodium purum (Hewd.) Fleisch. were collected from five sampling stations. Different nitrogen jet cleaning procedures and ultrasound cleaning procedures were applied to the mosses. To determine whether any of the treatments altered the membrane integrity of the moss samples, the concentrations of K were determined. The shoots were observed under a scanning electron microscope, and the size and number of particles were determined. Nitrogen jet cleaning was determined to be unacceptable because it damaged the phyllids and/or altered the membrane permeability and did not eliminate the particles from the moss surface. Moreover, ultrasound cleaning treatment should also discarded because of the loss of extracellular metals that are transferred to the water in which the moss is cleaned.

  18. Bilateral surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar teeth as a model for drug evaluation: a test with oxyphenbutazone (Tanderil).

    PubMed

    Album, B; Olsen, I; Lokken, P

    1977-06-01

    Twenty-four healthy patients undergoing two separate operations for removal of an impacted third molar from one or the other side of the mandible, were included in a double-blind crossover study. On the two occasions either oxyphenbutazone (Tanderil) or placebo was given for 5 days, commencing on the day before surgery. Plasma analyses confirmed drug intake. A number of objective and subjective assessments were recorded for a paired comparison of the postoperative course, including swelling, trismus, local temperature and pain. On the 1st, 3rd and 5th postoperative days after the oxyphenbutazone-operation, the measured swelling averaged 86, 85 and 83%, respectively, of that after the placebo-operation; the corresponding P-values were less than or equal to 0.11, 0.03 and 0.06. Oxyphenbutazone did not significantly reduce the local hyperpyrexia. It exerted, however, an excellent pain relief, which may have contributed to less trismus and patient preference for the course with this drug. The results obtained with this model in humans showed considerable discrepancies with the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects ascribed to oxyphenbutazone from results in animal models. Side effects were mild and infrequent, and no unfavorable effects on bleeding or wound healing were noted. Routine use of oxyphenbutazone in oral surgery, however, is not recommended.

  19. Qualification of room-temperature-curing epoxy adhesives for spacecraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Alain; O'Donnell, Tim

    1988-01-01

    An adhesive-bonding test program is being conducted in order to develop structural adhesives applicable to JPL spacecraft. A noteworthy application for such an adhesive will be JPL's Galileo mission, whose trajectory will involve the circumnavigation of the planet Venus prior to Jupiter rendezvous, and will accordingly require stringent temperature and radiation environment requirements. The baseline adhesive for the test program is the EA 934 room temperature-cure epoxy, which has been widely used as a 'space-qualified' material.

  20. Adhesion of mussel foot proteins to different substrate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qingye; Danner, Eric; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Mussel foot proteins (mfps) have been investigated as a source of inspiration for the design of underwater coatings and adhesives. Recent analysis of various mfps by a surface forces apparatus (SFA) revealed that mfp-1 functions as a coating, whereas mfp-3 and mfp-5 resemble adhesive primers on mica surfaces. To further refine and elaborate the surface properties of mfps, the force–distance profiles of the interactions between thin mfp (i.e. mfp-1, mfp-3 or mfp-5) films and four different surface chemistries, namely mica, silicon dioxide, polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene, were measured by an SFA. The results indicate that the adhesion was exquisitely dependent on the mfp tested, the substrate surface chemistry and the contact time. Such studies are essential for understanding the adhesive versatility of mfps and related/similar adhesion proteins, and for translating this versatility into a new generation of coatings and (including in vivo) adhesive materials. PMID:23173195

  1. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  2. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  3. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  4. Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

    2009-04-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Power’s (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was met—sorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO® Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC®-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.5–2.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The

  5. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  6. Natural Underwater Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Ransom, Todd C; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)(3) coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  7. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  8. Role of cellular adhesions in tissue dynamics spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel A.; An, Ran; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2014-02-01

    Cellular adhesions play a critical role in cell behavior, and modified expression of cellular adhesion compounds has been linked to various cancers. We tested the role of cellular adhesions in drug response by studying three cellular culture models: three-dimensional tumor spheroids with well-developed cellular adhesions and extracellular matrix (ECM), dense three-dimensional cell pellets with moderate numbers of adhesions, and dilute three-dimensional cell suspensions in agarose having few adhesions. Our technique for measuring the drug response for the spheroids and cell pellets was biodynamic imaging (BDI), and for the suspensions was quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS). We tested several cytoskeletal chemotherapeutic drugs (nocodazole, cytochalasin-D, paclitaxel, and colchicine) on three cancer cell lines chosen from human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29), human pancreatic carcinoma (MIA PaCa-2), and rat osteosarcoma (UMR-106) to exhibit differences in adhesion strength. Comparing tumor spheroid behavior to that of cell suspensions showed shifts in the spectral motion of the cancer tissues that match predictions based on different degrees of cell-cell contacts. The HT-29 cell line, which has the strongest adhesions in the spheroid model, exhibits anomalous behavior in some cases. These results highlight the importance of using three-dimensional tissue models in drug screening with cellular adhesions being a contributory factor in phenotypic differences between the drug responses of tissue and cells.

  9. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ‧) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ‧, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  10. Clinical experience with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Moschos, M; Droutsas, D; Boussalis, P; Tsioulias, G

    In this paper 385 cases treated with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive during the years 1980-1995 are studied. The indications, outcomes and complications of cyanoacrylate adhesive are investigated and the results are analysed. It is encouraging that except for three cases of ocular hypotony and two cases of microbial infection no other complications occurred. Even in desperate cases with corneal perforation greater than 3 mm and ocular infection, enucleation was avoided. The early use of a bandage contact lens, inserted just after the glue application and the coverage with topical antibiotics switched every 15 days until the removal of the glue, may explain the small incidence of infection. Our experience from the use of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive in cases with corneal perforation greater than 3 mm is very encouraging. In these cases a running 10.0 nylon suture was used to create a reticulum over the space of the corneal perforation upon which the glue was applied. The use of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive offers to the clinician a safe technique for healing corneal wounds that avoids tectonic penetrating keratoplasty with its associated complications.

  11. Doxycycline-Encapsulated Nanotube-Modified Dentin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, S.A.; Palasuk, J.; Kamocki, K.; Geraldeli, S.; Gregory, R.L.; Platt, J.A.; Windsor, L.J.; Bottino, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti–matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)–encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)–modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives—but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels—we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of

  12. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  13. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts.

    PubMed

    Torres, J R; Jay, G D; Kim, K-S; Bothun, G D

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  14. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  15. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  16. Surface wettability plays a significant role in gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Badge, Ila; Wucinich, Nicholas A; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-04-16

    Although we now have thousands of studies focused on the nano-, micro-, and whole-animal mechanics of gecko adhesion on clean, dry substrates, we know relatively little about the effects of water on gecko adhesion. For many gecko species, however, rainfall frequently wets the natural surfaces they navigate. In an effort to begin closing this gap, we tested the adhesion of geckos on submerged substrates that vary in their wettability. When tested on a wet hydrophilic surface, geckos produced a significantly lower shear adhesive force (5.4 ± 1.33 N) compared with a dry hydrophilic surface (17.1 ± 3.93 N). In tests on an intermediate wetting surface and a hydrophobic surface, we found no difference in shear adhesion between dry and wet contact. Finally, in tests on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), we found that geckos clung significantly better to wet PTFE (8.0 ± 1.09 N) than dry PTFE (1.6 ± 0.66 N). To help explain our results, we developed models based on thermodynamic theory of adhesion for contacting surfaces in different media and found that we can predict the ratio of shear adhesion in water to that in air. Our findings provide insight into how geckos may function in wet environments and also have significant implications for the development of a synthetic gecko mimic that retains adhesion in water.

  17. Fractionation of cottonseed flour for improving its adhesive properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As early as the 1950's, cottonseed flour (i. e. meal) was tested for use as wood adhesives. Recently, renewed interest exists in the use of plant proteins as wood adhesives, as these materials are renewable and biodegradable. In this research, we separated cottonseed flour into several fractions wit...

  18. Surface wettability plays a significant role in gecko adhesion underwater

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Badge, Ila; Wucinich, Nicholas A.; Sullivan, Timothy W.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although we now have thousands of studies focused on the nano-, micro-, and whole-animal mechanics of gecko adhesion on clean, dry substrates, we know relatively little about the effects of water on gecko adhesion. For many gecko species, however, rainfall frequently wets the natural surfaces they navigate. In an effort to begin closing this gap, we tested the adhesion of geckos on submerged substrates that vary in their wettability. When tested on a wet hydrophilic surface, geckos produced a significantly lower shear adhesive force (5.4 ± 1.33 N) compared with a dry hydrophilic surface (17.1 ± 3.93 N). In tests on an intermediate wetting surface and a hydrophobic surface, we found no difference in shear adhesion between dry and wet contact. Finally, in tests on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), we found that geckos clung significantly better to wet PTFE (8.0 ± 1.09 N) than dry PTFE (1.6 ± 0.66 N). To help explain our results, we developed models based on thermodynamic theory of adhesion for contacting surfaces in different media and found that we can predict the ratio of shear adhesion in water to that in air. Our findings provide insight into how geckos may function in wet environments and also have significant implications for the development of a synthetic gecko mimic that retains adhesion in water. PMID:23576727

  19. Room Temperature Characteristics of Polymer-Based Low Ice Adhesion Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiwei; Vågenes, Elisabeth T.; Delabahan, Chrisrosemarie; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Ice adhesion is mainly dictated by surface properties, and water wettability is frequently correlated with ice adhesion strength. However, these established correlations are limited to high ice adhesion and become invalid when the ice adhesion strength is low. Here we carried out an experimental study to explore the relationships between low ice adhesion strength and room temperature surface properties. A variety of room temperature properties of 22 polymer-based hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples consisting of both low and high ice adhesion surfaces were analysed. The properties investigated include water adhesion force, water wettability, roughness, elastic modulus and hardness. Our results show that low ice adhesion strength does not correlate well with water contact angle and its variants, surface roughness and hardness. Low elastic modulus does not guarantee low ice adhesion, however, surfaces with low ice adhesion always show low elastic modulus. Low ice adhesion (below 60 kPa) of tested surfaces may be determinative of small water adhesion force (from 180 to 270 μN). Therefore, measurement of water adhesion force may provide an effective strategy for screening anti-icing or icephobic surfaces, and surfaces within specific values of water adhesion force will possibly lead to a low ice adhesion. PMID:28169370

  20. Room Temperature Characteristics of Polymer-Based Low Ice Adhesion Surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiwei; Vågenes, Elisabeth T; Delabahan, Chrisrosemarie; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2017-02-07

    Ice adhesion is mainly dictated by surface properties, and water wettability is frequently correlated with ice adhesion strength. However, these established correlations are limited to high ice adhesion and become invalid when the ice adhesion strength is low. Here we carried out an experimental study to explore the relationships between low ice adhesion strength and room temperature surface properties. A variety of room temperature properties of 22 polymer-based hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples consisting of both low and high ice adhesion surfaces were analysed. The properties investigated include water adhesion force, water wettability, roughness, elastic modulus and hardness. Our results show that low ice adhesion strength does not correlate well with water contact angle and its variants, surface roughness and hardness. Low elastic modulus does not guarantee low ice adhesion, however, surfaces with low ice adhesion always show low elastic modulus. Low ice adhesion (below 60 kPa) of tested surfaces may be determinative of small water adhesion force (from 180 to 270 μN). Therefore, measurement of water adhesion force may provide an effective strategy for screening anti-icing or icephobic surfaces, and surfaces within specific values of water adhesion force will possibly lead to a low ice adhesion.

  1. Room Temperature Characteristics of Polymer-Based Low Ice Adhesion Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiwei; Vågenes, Elisabeth T.; Delabahan, Chrisrosemarie; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2017-02-01

    Ice adhesion is mainly dictated by surface properties, and water wettability is frequently correlated with ice adhesion strength. However, these established correlations are limited to high ice adhesion and become invalid when the ice adhesion strength is low. Here we carried out an experimental study to explore the relationships between low ice adhesion strength and room temperature surface properties. A variety of room temperature properties of 22 polymer-based hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples consisting of both low and high ice adhesion surfaces were analysed. The properties investigated include water adhesion force, water wettability, roughness, elastic modulus and hardness. Our results show that low ice adhesion strength does not correlate well with water contact angle and its variants, surface roughness and hardness. Low elastic modulus does not guarantee low ice adhesion, however, surfaces with low ice adhesion always show low elastic modulus. Low ice adhesion (below 60 kPa) of tested surfaces may be determinative of small water adhesion force (from 180 to 270 μN). Therefore, measurement of water adhesion force may provide an effective strategy for screening anti-icing or icephobic surfaces, and surfaces within specific values of water adhesion force will possibly lead to a low ice adhesion.

  2. Testing of Performance of a Scroll Pump in Support of Improved Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Mass Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Yee, Glenda F.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Flynn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the results of ground testing of a scroll pump with a potential of being a substitute for the current vacuum pump of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR). Assessments of the pressure-time, pump-down time, pump power and the pump noise were made for three configurations of the pump the first of which was without the gas ballast, the second with the gas ballast installed but not operating and the third with the gas ballast operating. The tested scroll pump exhibited optimum characteristics given its mass and power requirements. The pump down time required to reach a pressure of 50 Torr ranged from 60 minutes without the ballast to about 120 minutes with the gas ballast operational. The noise emission and the pump power were assessed in this paper as well.

  3. Significant role of adhesion properties of primary osteoblast-like cells in early adhesion events for chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Stanford, C M; Solursh, M; Keller, J C

    1999-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the role of cell surface adhesive macromolecules through enzyme modulation and metabolic recovery prior to and during a kinetic cell adhesion assay. Primary rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells were derived from Sprague-Dawley calvarial plates. Cell adhesion kinetics was evaluated with the definition of first-order adhesion kinetics. Osteoblasts were incubated in an adhesion buffer for 1 h prior to a cell attachment assay using various enzymes to remove cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A subtractive adhesion analysis was performed by plating cells at 5 x 10(4)/well for variable periods through 2 h. The medium was collected, the well surface washed and pooled, and the number of cells enumerated with a Coulter Counter. Cell adhesion demonstrated first-order logarithmic adhesion kinetics in the first 60 min. Scatchard analysis demonstrated a linear relationship. Preexposure of cells to various enzyme combinations demonstrated that 50% of the equilibrium adhesion was dependent on chondroitin sulfate or dermatan sulfate surface macromolecules. These results were confirmed with pretreatment with a metabolic inhibitor of GAG synthesis (beta-D-xyloside). These results suggest an important role for cell associated chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate in cell adhesion in addition to Arg-Gly-Asp or integrin mediated adhesion events.

  4. Application of tung oil to improve adhesion strength and water resistance of cottonseed meal and protein adhesives on maple veneer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed meal-based products show promise in serving as environment-friendly wood adhesives. However, their practical utilization is currently limited due to low durability and water resistant properties. In this research, we tested the improvement of adhesion strength and water resistance of cott...

  5. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  6. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  7. Advanced Fast Curing Adhesives for Adverse Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    set of battle damage repair adhesives include Belzona 2311 elastomer , Belzona 1221 super metal, and Belzona metal plug, which are very fast curing...resin, and dinonylphenol (10). Marine use A-788 Splash Zone epoxy- polyamide mastic from Z Spar, Los Angeles, CA was used for testing (11). The

  8. High Temperature Adhesives for Bonding Kapton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; Stclair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/Kapton bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  9. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  10. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  11. [Studies on the use of tissue adhesives in cataract microsurgery].

    PubMed

    Hermel, B

    1980-01-01

    Corneal incision employed according to Paufique's method for microsurgical cataract removal was dressed with cyanoacrylic adhesive Histoacryl n-blau after the previous wound filling with biological adhesive from freeze dried human plasma. The experiments were performed on 80 enucleated cattle eyeballs and on 60 eyeballs of rabbits. The material were divided into groups depending on the method of wound dressing. In the I group wounds were dressed with adaptation sutures according to the Liegard method and filled with biological adhesive; cyanoacrylic adhesive was applied supplementary. In the II group wounds were filled with biological adhesive and sutured. In the III group wounds were only sutured. The rabbits were observed for 21 days and the resistance of wound anastomosis examined. In the I group wound resistance immediately after the operation and after 24 hours was found to be two times higher than in other groups. 7 days after the operation the values obtained in all groups were similar. In all groups the eyeballs irritation was similar within the first five days. 7 days after the operation plates of cyanoacrylic adhesive were removed without difficulties. In all groups linear corneal scars with mistiness 2 mm wide was found, also singular blood vessels penetrating the cornea were observed.

  12. Laser ablation assisted adhesive bonding of automotive structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Laser ablation has been evaluated as a surface pretreatment prior to adhesive bonding. In prior experimental work, it was observed that when adhesively bonded, composite, single lap shear samples fail, the fracture often occurs at either the adhesive/adherend interface or in the resin rich surface layer of the composite. These two areas represent the weakest portion of the joint. Laser ablation pretreatment generates areas where the resin on the composite surface is selectively removed leaving behind exposed reinforcing fibers which are the major load bearing members of the composite. In a subsequent adhesive bonding operation, this allows portions of the fibers to be encapsulated in the adhesive while other portions of the fiber remain in the composite resin. This type of pretreatment permits fibers to bridge and reinforce the interface between adhesive and adherend. A secondary benefit is the removal of surface contaminantes by pyrolysis. Microscopic observation of laser ablated surfaces indicates a prominent, fiber rich area. Results of the mechanical evaluation indicated that the lap shear strength for laser ablated samples was significantly higher than specimens with no pretreatment or with solvent cleaning only, but were slightly lower than specimens that were mechanically roughened and cleaned with solvents prior to bonding.

  13. Evaluation of adhesives for adhering carbon/epoxy composites to various metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, R.B.; Osterndorf, J.F.; Ambrosio, A.M.; Pettenger, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    The strength properties of composite matrix resins and adhesive are dependent on time, temperature, environment, and stress factors. All of these conditions combine to influence the properties of adhesives and composites in ways that are not yet fully known or quantifiable. Therefore, it is important to know the service conditions that structural adhesive bonded composite joints will encounter prior to fielding. This paper details an evaluation of five epoxy adhesives used to adhere a carbon/epoxy composite to 7075-T6 aluminum, 4340 steel and aluminum coated steel. Test results indicate that certain paste adhesives are capable of better lap-shear and peel performance than film adhesives, especially at elevated temperatures.

  14. Environmentally Compliant Coating Remover Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    Penetrating Lubricants 16 10 Metalworking Fluids 62 8 Sorbents 72 17 Adhesive and Mastic Removers 25 19 Greases 18 5 Glass Cleaners 11 11 Firearm...Lubricants 8 2 Chain, Cable, and Gear Lubricants 33 13 Corrosion Preventatives 19 10 Industrial and Multipurpose Cleaners 114 40 Parts Wash Solutions...AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for

  15. Adhesives For Use In Vacuum, Radiation, And Cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of literature searches and tests of eight adhesives for use in high-radiation, low-temperature, vacuum environment of Galileo spacecraft mission to Jupiter. Used as bonding agents for thermal blankets, instruments, structural members, and coatings. Adhesives tested for contamination, reflectance, bond integrity, color, transmittance, outgassing, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, optical interference, peel strength, and shear strength. Some of tests conducted at temperature of liquid nitrogen (-150 degree C).

  16. Mechanistic investigation of rubber-brass adhesion: Effect of formulation ingredients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pankaj Y.

    . In order to understand the effect of resins on the rubber-brass adhesion interface, brass-plated steel cords and highly polished brass coupons were sulfidized against the natural rubber compounds. The cured rubber was removed using a unique approach, i.e., ortho dichlorobenzene solvent cleaning method. The sulfidized brass cords were tested for their corrosion-resistance properties using electrochemical (DC polarization) techniques. Furthermore, the effect of resins on the crystal structure of copper sulfide adhesion layer was understood by analyzing the sulfidized brass coupons using synchrotron source grazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) method. A better understanding of the effect of one-component resins on the rubber-brass bonding was achieved. Based on the results obtained in this research work, a new mechanism of action for the one-component resins is proposed that explains the effect of these resins in improving the rubber-to-brass adhesion performance, especially after aging.

  17. Quantitative adhesion characterization of antireflective coatings in multijunction photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Ryan; Rewari, Raunaq; Novoa, Fernando D.; Hebert, Peter; Ermer, James; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method, which enables the quantitative measurement of adhesion on the thin and fragile substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. In particular, we address the adhesion of several 2- and 3-layer antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology through processing, we demonstrate the marked effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We demonstrate that even with germanium substrates that fracture relatively easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  18. High-vacuum adhesion and friction properties of sliding contact-mode micromachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of adhesion and friction in contact-mode micromachines operated in high vacuum was studied by tracking changes in the adhesive pressure, interfacial shear strength, and static coefficient of friction with accumulating sliding cycles. Low adhesion and high static friction observed during the initial stage of sliding were followed by monotonically intensifying adhesion and decreasing friction until reaching an equilibrium stage at steady-state sliding. This trend revealed the existence of two friction regimes in which asperity deformation and adhesion were the dominant friction mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations indicated that sliding resulted in physical and chemical surface changes. The evolution of the adhesion and friction properties with sliding cycles is attributed to the increase of both the real contact area and the work of adhesion due to nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of contaminant adsorbents, respectively.

  19. Experimental study of the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and scale formation in limestone FGD process with lab and pilot test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Baek, J.J.; Kim, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    There are several tens of processes applied to Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) process in the world, which can be classified as wet, semi-dry and dry type. Among them, the wet type FGD is the most widely applied process for the large scale plant, such as power plant. The fundamental reasons of the preference for the wet type process are its high reliability and economic aspects. About 90% of the wet type process applied to actual plants is using the limestone -based gypsum process. Even though the limestone-based FGD process has simple construction and reliable SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, it has some problems in long-period continuous operation. Among these, the most serious one is the scaling. Scale is the solid mixture of reaction intermediate and by-product formed during various chemical reaction steps of FGD process. There are three types of scale in FGD absorber: calcium sulfite, gypsum, and CSS (Coprecipitated Calcium Sulfate and Sulfite). They have the tendency to precipitate on the absorber internals, such as packing, spray nozzles, mist eliminator, and surface of absorber itself, causing plugging, thus reducing the operation reliability. The major factor responsible for such problem is the lack of understanding for calcium sulfur salts chemistry, which occurred during the reaction steps of FGD process. In this study, the effect of operating conditions--gas velocity, gas temperature, SO{sub 2} concentration, L/G ratio, slurry concentration, etc.--on the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and scale formation will be investigated. The scale formation mechanism will be studied to verify in a lab-scale test and the control method of scale for reliable operation will be established by the application of the lab-scale test result to pilot-scale facility test.

  20. Irrigant divalent cation concentrations influence bacterial adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Clarissa L.; Walsh, Mary F.; Seo, Sue; Shiratsuchi, Hiroe; Craig, David H.; Basson, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical wounds are frequently contaminated by microbes, but rarely become infected if the bacterial burden is low, and irrigation is used to reduce contamination. Wound fluids are low in calcium and high in magnesium. We hypothesized that manipulating irrigant divalent cation concentrations might influence bacterial adhesion. Methods Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were stained with fluorescent Calcein AM before plating onto fibroblast monolayers, collagen I, or uncoated bacteriologic plastic. After one hour, wells were washed with HEPES-buffered pH-balanced sterile water without or with 5mM CaCl2, 5mM MgCl2 or 1mM EDTA+EGTA, and the remaining adherent bacteria were assayed fluorometrically. Results Supplementing the irrigation with magnesium or chelators increased but calcium-supplemented irrigation reduced bacterial adhesion to collagen or fibroblasts. Non-specific electrostatic bacterial adhesion to uncoated plastic was unaffected by calcium. Conclusion Bacterial adhesion to mammalian cells and matrix proteins is influenced by divalent cations, and pathogenic bacteria may be adapted to adhere under the low calcium high magnesium conditions in wounds. Although these results await confirmation for other bacteria, and in vivo validation and safety-testing, they suggest that supplementing wound irrigation with 5mM CaCl2 may reduce bacterial adhesion and subsequent wound infection. PMID:19577252