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Sample records for adhesive single bond

  1. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  2. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Nouri, Hossein; Koohpeima, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was created by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit) under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond) and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond) were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350) was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter) on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa) was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany) at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive system at 25 ˚C and 40 ˚C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ˚C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001). Conclusion Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond. PMID:25759852

  3. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  4. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  5. Single-cycle and fatigue strengths of adhesively bonded lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Metzinger, K.E.; Guess, T.R.

    1998-12-31

    This study considers a composite-to-steel tubular lap joint in which failure typically occurs when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. The same basic joint was subjected to compressive and tensile axial loads (single-cycle) as well as bending loads (fatigue). The purpose of these tests was to determine whether failure is more dependent on the plastic strain or the peel stress that develops in the adhesive. For the same joint, compressive and tensile loads of the same magnitude will produce similar plastic strains but peel stresses of opposite signs in the adhesive. In the axial tests, the tensile strengths were much greater than the compressive strengths - indicating that the peel stress is key to predicting the single-cycle strengths. To determine the key parameter(s) for predicting high-cycle fatigue strengths, a test technique capable of subjecting a specimen to several million cycles per day was developed. In these bending tests, the initial adhesive debonding always occurred on the compressive side. This result is consistent with the single-cycle tests, although not as conclusive due to the limited number of tests. Nevertheless, a fatigue test method has been established and future tests are planned.

  6. Effect of warm air-drying on dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yukari; Shimizu, Yusuke; Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    The effect of warm air-drying on the dentin bond strengths of the single-step self-etch adhesives was determined. The adhesives were applied to bovine dentin followed by drying in a stream of warm air for 5, 10, and 15 s at 37°C. Resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, then shear tested. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The dentin bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time. The value of the acid component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the base component decreased significantly. These data suggested that warm air-drying was essential to obtain adequate bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength. PMID:22864201

  7. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  8. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  9. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Tabai, Elaheh; Mohammadi Basir, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage during six months of water storage. Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB), and All-Bond SE (ABSE). After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05). Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage. Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. PMID:27123015

  10. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  11. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  12. Analysis and testing of adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    An adhesive fracture mechanics approach is described with reference to the identification and design of the best tests for evaluating a given adhesive, the definition of the most meaningful fundamental parameters by which adhesives might be characterized, and the application of these parameters to the design of joints and to the prediction of their performance. Topics include standard adhesive test techniques, the theory of adhesive fracture, and adhesive fracture energy tests. Analytical methods and computer techniques for adhesive bonding, chemical and physical aspects of adhesive fracture, and specific applications and aspects of adhesive fracture mechanics are discussed.

  13. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  14. Fatigue behavior of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.

    1983-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of composite to composite adhesively bonded joints was characterized. The mechanics of the possible modes of fatigue damage propagation in these joints when subjected to constant amplitude cyclic mechanical loading were investigated. The possible failure modes in composite bonded joints may be cyclic debonding (i.e., progressive separation of the adhesive), interlaminar damage (delamination), adherend fatigue or a combination of these. Two composite systems - graphite/epoxy adhesively bonded to graphite/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy adhesively bonded to Kevlar 49/epoxy were investigated. Both composite systems consisted of quasi-isotropic lay-ups, i.e., 0 deg/-45 deg/+45 deg/90 degs. The two adhesives, employed in the study were (1) EC 3445 with cure temperature of 250 F for secondary bonding and (2) FM 300 with cure temperature of 350 F for co-cure bonding.

  15. Sealing and dentin bond strengths of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Del Nero, M O; de la Macorra, J C

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (1) to analyze the variations of the permeability of dentin after restoration with two polyacid-modified resin composites (Compoglass, Dyract) and four single-bottle adhesives (Prime & Bond 2.0, Syntac Single Component, OptiBond Solo, and Single Bond--Scotch Bond 1 in Europe--immediately (approximately 1 hour) after insertion. A perfusion system with distilled water was used at a pressure of 32.5 cm of water; (2) to study the bond strength of their interfaces; and (3) to find the correlation, if any, between both parameters. None of the materials used produced a complete cessation in fluid filtration. Tensile bond strengths were very low (maximum: P&B = 3.96 MPa) probably because of the very large bonding surfaces used (mean bonded surface area = 88.8 mm2). No significant correlation was found between tensile bond strength and the sealing ability for any material.

  16. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  17. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  18. Heat-shrinkable film improves adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, J. M.; Reed, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure is applied during adhesive bonding by wrapping parts in heat-shrinkable plastic film. Film eliminates need to vacuum bag or heat parts in expensive autoclave. With procedure, operators are trained quickly, and no special skills are required.

  19. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  20. Adhesive bonding via exposure to variable frequency microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.; McMillan, A.D.; Warren, C.D.

    1996-05-01

    Adhesive bonding through the application of variable frequency microwave (VFM) radiation has been evaluated as an alternative curing method for joining composite materials. The studies showed that the required cure time of a thermosetting epoxy adhesive is substantially reduced by the use of VFM when compared to conventional (thermal) curing methods. Variable frequency microwave processing appeared to yield a slight reduction in the required adhesive cure time when compared to processing by the application of single frequency microwave radiation. In contrast to the single frequency processing, the variable frequency methodology does not readily produce localized overheating (burnt or brown spots) in the adhesive or the composite. This makes handling and location of the sample in the microwave oven less critical for producing high quality bonds and allows for a more homogeneous distribution of the cure energy. Variable frequency microwave processing is a valuable alternative method for rapidly curing thermoset adhesives at low input power levels.

  1. Adhesion through single peptide aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Appleyard, David C.; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Fadiran, Oluwatimilehin O.; Kunkel, Jacquelyn; Lang, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamer and antibody mediated adhesion is central to biological function and valuable in the engineering of “lab on a chip” devices. Single molecule force spectroscopy using optical tweezers enables direct non-equilibrium measurement of these non-covalent interactions for three peptide aptamers selected for glass, polystyrene, and carbon nanotubes. A comprehensive examination of the strong attachment between anti-fluorescein 4-4-20 and fluorescein was also carried out using the same assay. Bond lifetime, barrier width, and free energy of activation are extracted from unbinding histogram data using three single molecule pulling models. The evaluated aptamers appear to adhere stronger than the fluorescein antibody under no- and low-load conditions, yet weaker than antibodies at loads above ~25pN. Comparison to force spectroscopy data of other biological linkages shows the diversity of load dependent binding and provides insight into linkages used in biological processes and those designed for engineered systems. PMID:20795685

  2. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Fathi, Zakaryae; Wei, Jianghua

    1998-01-01

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  3. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  4. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-08-25

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  5. Verification of surface preparation for adhesive bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Rodney S.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of solid rocket booster (SRB) production operations identified potential contaminants which might adversely affect bonding operations. Lap shear tests quantified these contaminants' effects on adhesive strength. The most potent contaminants were selected for additional studies on SRB thermal protection system (TPS) bonding processes. Test panels were prepared with predetermined levels of contamination, visually inspected using white and black light, then bonded with three different TPS materials over the unremoved contamination. Bond test data showed that white and black light inspections are adequate inspection methods for TPS bonding operations. Extreme levels of contamination (higher than expected on flight hardware) had an insignificant effect on TPS bond strengths because of the apparent insensitivity of the adhesive system to contamination effects, and the comparatively weak cohesive strength of the TPS materials.

  6. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  7. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  8. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  9. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  10. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  11. Single-molecule mechanics of mussel adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin; Scherer, Norbert F.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2006-08-01

    The glue proteins secreted by marine mussels bind strongly to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments in which most adhesives function poorly. Studies of these functionally unique proteins have revealed the presence of the unusual amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), which is formed by posttranslational modification of tyrosine. However, the detailed binding mechanisms of dopa remain unknown, and the chemical basis for mussels' ability to adhere to both inorganic and organic surfaces has never been fully explained. Herein, we report a single-molecule study of the substrate and oxidation-dependent adhesive properties of dopa. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of a single dopa residue contacting a wet metal oxide surface reveal a surprisingly high strength yet fully reversible, noncovalent interaction. The magnitude of the bond dissociation energy as well as the inability to observe this interaction with tyrosine suggests that dopa is critical to adhesion and that the binding mechanism is not hydrogen bond formation. Oxidation of dopa, as occurs during curing of the secreted mussel glue, dramatically reduces the strength of the interaction to metal oxide but results in high strength irreversible covalent bond formation to an organic surface. A new picture of the interfacial adhesive role of dopa emerges from these studies, in which dopa exploits a remarkable combination of high strength and chemical multifunctionality to accomplish adhesion to substrates of widely varying composition from organic to metallic. 3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine | atomic force microscopy | mussel adhesive protein

  12. Coatings for rubber bonding and paint adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, M. S.; Petschel, M.

    1997-08-01

    Conversion coatings form an important base for the adhesion of paint to metal substrates and for the bonding of rubber to metal parts. Four types of conversion coatings were assessed as base treatments for the bonding of rubber to steel and for the corrosion protection of metal substrates under paint: amorphous iron phosphate, heavy zinc phosphate, and three types of modified zinc phosphates that utilized one or more metal cations in addition to zinc. When applied, these conversion coatings formed a thin film over the metal substrate that was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and chemical methods. The performance of the coatings was assessed using physical methods such as dry adhesion, conical mandrel, impact, and stress adhesion for the rubber-bonded parts, and by corrosion resistance methods such as humidity, salt spray, and cyclic corrosion. Coating characterization and performance were correlated.

  13. Assessment of piezoelectric sensor adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandowski, T.; Moll, J.; Malinowski, P.; Opoka, S.; Ostachowicz, W.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are widely utilized in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). They are used both in guided wave-based and electromechanical impedance-based methods. Transducer debonding or unevenly distributed glue underneath the transducer reduce the performance and reliability of the SHM system. Therefore, quality assessment methods for glue layer need to be developed. In this paper, the authors present results obtained from two methods that allow the quality assessment of adhesive bonds of piezoelectric transducers. The electromechanical impedance method is utilized to analyze transducer adhesive bonding. An improperly prepared bonding layer is a source for changes in the electromechanical impedance characteristics in comparison to a perfectly bonded transducer. In the resistance characteristics of the properly bonded transducer the resonance peaks of the structure were clearly visible. In the case when adhesive layer is not equally distributed under sensor, the amplitudes of structural resonance peaks are reduced. In the case of completely detached transducer, the structural resonance peaks disappear and only resonance peaks of the transducer itself are visible. These peaks (peaks of free transducer hanging on wires) are significantly larger than the resonance peaks of the investigated structure in the considered frequency interval. The bonding layer shape is also analyzed using time-domain terahertz spectroscopy in reflection mode. This method allows to visualize the adhesive layer distribution based on C-scan analysis. C-scans of signals or envelope-detected signals can be used to estimate the area of proper adhesion between bonding agent and transducer and hence provides a more quantitative approach towards transducer inspection.

  14. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a simple composite to composite bonded joint was analyzed. The cracked lap shear specimen subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loading was studied. Two specimen geometries were tested for each bonded system: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies; and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive strap interface.

  15. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0–100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  16. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0-100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  17. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  18. Stresses in adhesively bonded joints - A closed-form solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Aydinoglu, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The general plane strain problem of adhesively bonded structures consisting of two different, orthotropic adherends is considered, under the assumption that adherend thicknesses are constant and small in relation to the lateral dimensions of the bonded region, so that they may be treated as plates. The problem is reduced to a system of differential equations for the adhesive stresses which is solved in closed form, with a single lap joint and a stiffened plate under various loading conditions being considered as examples. It is found that the plate theory used in the analysis not only predicts the correct trend for adhesive stresses but gives surprisingly accurate results, the solution being obtained by assuming linear stress-strain relations for the adhesive.

  19. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To analyze the fatigue behavior of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint, a combined experimental and analytical study of the cracked-lap-shear specimen subjected to constant-amplitude cyclic loading was undertaken. Two bonded systems were studied: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with adhesives EC 3445 and with FM-300. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies, and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens tested, the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull-off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode I (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive-strap interface. Furthermore, the measured cyclic debond growth rates correlated well with total strain energy release rates G(T) as well as with its components G(I) (peel) and G(II) (shear) for the mixed-mode loading in the present study.

  20. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Bonini, Gabriela; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS) of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days). Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250). Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37 °C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400 ×). Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time. PMID:26154377

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    The final report consists of 5 published papers in referred journals and a technical letter to the technical monitor. These papers include the following: (1) Comparison of the effects of debonds and voids in adhesive; (2) On the peak shear stresses in adhesive joints with voids; (3) Nondestructive evaluation of adhesively bonded joints by acousto-ultrasonic technique and acoustic emission; (4) Multiaxial fatigue life evaluation of tubular adhesively bonded joints; (5) Theoretical and experimental evaluation of the bond strength under peeling loads. The letter outlines the progress of the research. Also included is preliminary information on the study of nondestructive evaluation of composite materials subjected to localized heat damage. The investigators studied the effects of localized heat on unidirectional fiber glass epoxy composite panels. Specimens of the fiber glass epoxy composites were subjected to 400 C heat for varying lengths of time. The specimens were subjected to nondestructive tests. The specimens were then pulled to their failure and acoustic emission of these specimens were measured. The analysis of the data was continuing as of the writing of the letter, and includes a finite element stress analysis of the problem.

  2. Analysis of adhesively bonded composite lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.; Kuruppu, M.; Kelly, D.

    1994-12-31

    A new nonlinear formulation is developed for the governing equations for the shear and peel stresses in adhesively bonded composite double lap joints. The new formulation allows arbitrary nonlinear stress-strain characteristics in both shear and peel behavior. The equations are numerically integrated using a shooting technique and Newton-Raphson method behind a user friendly interface. The failure loads are predicted by utilizing the maximum stress criterion, interlaminar delamination and the energy density failure criteria. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effect of the nonlinear adhesive behavior on the stress distribution and predict the failure load and the associated mode.

  3. Adhesive bond durability with conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoba, E. A.; Kodali, S. P.; Curley, R. C.; McNamara, D.; Venables, J. D.

    The effect of processing time during conversion coating of 2024-T3 clad aluminum alloy on adhesive bond strength and durability was investigated. Iridite 14-2, both by immersion (leached and non-leached) and brush application methods, and alodine 1500 processes were studied. Bond durability and strength were determined on both primed and unprimed surfaces by performing wedge and T-peel tests, respectively. The morphology and thickness of the conversion coatings prepared by varying the processing time were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The chemical composition of the surfaces was determined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). It was found that wedge test crack extensions for brush iridite 14-2 (both primed and unprimed) and primed leached iridite 14-2 surfaces were comparable to those of FPL-prepared surfaces when recommended application times were observed. Unfavorable crack extensions for primed iridite 14-2, alodine 1500 (both primed and unprimed) and unprimed leached iridite 14-2 surfaces dictate that those surface preparation methods should not be used where adhesive bond durability is desired. All crack extension behavior observed can be explained by radiations in surface roughness. Surface roughness seems to be critical in achieving durable adhesive bonds.

  4. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  5. Comparative study of the dentin bond strength of a new universal adhesive.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Myoung Geun; Woo, Sang Uk; Lee, Chung Ok; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Duck-Su

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the dentin bond strength of a new universal adhesive with that of contemporary multi-step dentin adhesives. Six experimental groups were prepared according to the adhesives used and their application modes: Optibond FL (OB), Adper Single Bond Plus (SB), One-Step Plus (OS), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), All-Bond Universal using etch-and-rinse mode (ABE), and AllBond Universal using self-etch mode (ABS). Micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) and failure mode were evaluated for each group. The bonded interface was analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result, µTBS of 6 experimental groups was followed as: OB=ABE=SE=ABS>SB>OS group. TEM micrographs of ABE and ABS groups revealed a homogenous adhesive layer formation. In conclusion, a new universal adhesive can make reliable bond to dentin, regardless of the application mode. PMID:27477226

  6. Solventless adhesive bonding using reactive polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; McClelland, Arthur A; Chen, Zhan; Lahann, Joerg

    2008-06-01

    A novel solventless adhesive bonding (SAB) process is reported, which is applicable to a wide range of materials including, but not limited to, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The bonding is achieved through reactions between two complementary polymer coatings, poly(4-aminomethyl-p-xylylene-co-p-xylylene) and poly(4-formyl-p-xylylene-co-p-xylylene), which are prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization of the corresponding [2.2]paracyclophanes and can be deposited on complementary microfluidic units to be bonded. These CVD-based polymer films form well-adherent coatings on a range of different substrate materials including polymers, glass, silicon, metals, or paper and can be stored for extended periods prior to bonding without losing their bonding capability. Tensile stress data are measured on PDMS with various substrates and compared favorably to current methods such as oxygen plasma and UV/ozone. Sum frequency generation (SFG) has been used to probe the presence of amine and aldehyde groups on the surface after CVD polymerization and their conversion during bonding. In addition to bonding, unreacted functional groups present on the luminal surface of microfluidic channels provide free chemical groups for further surface modification. Fluorescently labeled molecules including rhodamine-conjugated streptavidin and atto-655 NHS ester were used to verify the presence of active functional groups on the luminal surfaces after bonding.

  7. Strength of adhesive-bonded hybrid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschke, L.; Prinz, R.; Schnell, H.

    1979-01-01

    Structures prepared from materials with different thermal and mechanical properties by means of fiber-strengthened binders can fail in a number of ways. The present lecture is focused on failures through debonding at the metal or at the fiber-reinforced plastic. A method for calculating the stress distribution in adhesive layers as a function of the load is outlined, and its usefulness in providing insight into the behavior of bonds in hybrid structures is noted. Means of eliminating the unfavorable effects of temperature, humidity, creep and relaxation on the bonds in the manufacture of hybrid structures are examined, along with test methods developed for such structures.

  8. Plasma treatment of aluminum for adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Catherine Elizabeth

    Plasma polymerized silicon-containing films were deposited onto aluminum coupons and used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Hexamethyldisiloxane was polymerized within radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) plasmas to deposit coatings that were less than 1000 A thick. Substrate pre-treatments, carrier gas, excitation frequency, and plasma post-treatments were varied to produce films that performed well as primers. These plasma polymerized films were characterized with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ellipsometry. Lap joints were used to measure the strength and durability of the bonding between pre-treated aluminum, the primer and the epoxy adhesive. Lap joints were placed under load and subjected to 24 hour cycles of immersion in salt water, heat and humidity to test corrosion resistance. The interface between the aluminum oxide on the substrate surface and the plasma polymerized primer was investigated with RAIR and XPS depth profiling techniques. Changes in processing variables were related to differences in the chemical structure of the plasma polymerized films and to their performance as primers. Siloxane-like coatings, deposited in the RF reactor with argon as a carrier gas, did not bond well to the epoxy adhesive, performing poorly as primers. An oxygen plasma post-treatment resulted in a more wettable surface which enhanced this bonding. However, the siloxane-like films proved to be mechanically weak. Silica-like primers deposited in the RF and MW reactors onto acid etched, Ar plasma pre-treated aluminum were excellent primers forming strong, durable bonds to the aluminum substrate and the epoxy adhesive. The plasma pre-treatment of the aluminum coupons was found to be important for durability. Ar and Ar/Hsb2 plasma pre-treatments removed some hydrocarbon contamination and adsorbed water, hydroxyl and oxyhydroxide groups from the aluminum surface

  9. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond rupture. By definition, bond strength is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of rupture forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond strength progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond strength emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, strength grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which strength continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond strength, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale

  10. The effect of different adhesive system applications on push-out bond strengths of glass fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Deniz Arısu, Hacer; Üçtaşlı, Mine Betül; Okay, Tufan Can

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Over the past years, the adhesion of fiber posts luted with simplified adhesive systems has been a matter of great interest. The aim of this study was to assess the post retentive potential of a self-adhesive resin cement using different adhesive systems to compare the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS The post spaces of 56 mandibular premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups and further divided into 2 subgroups according to testing time (n=7). The fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and one of the following adhesive systems: no adhesive, a total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond), a two-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil SE Bond) and a one-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil S3 Bond). Each root was cut horizontally, and 1.5 mm thick six root segments were prepared. Push-out tests were performed after one week or three months (0.5 mm/min). Statistical analysis were performed with three-way ANOVA (α=.05). RESULTS Cervical root segments showed higher bond strength values than middle segments. Adhesive application increased the bond strength. For one week group, the total-etch adhesive resin Single Bond showed higher bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem applied without adhesive resin at middle region. For 3 months group, the two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond showed the highest bond strength for both regions. Regarding the time considered, Clearfil SE Bond 3 months group showed higher bond strength values than one week group. CONCLUSION Using the adhesive resins in combination with the self-adhesive resin cement improves the bond strengths. The bond strength values of two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond improved as time passes. PMID:24049572

  11. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus) adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003). Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064). Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant. PMID:25984475

  12. The bonding properties of elastomer tray adhesives.

    PubMed

    Davis, G B; Moser, J B; Brinsden, G I

    1976-09-01

    1. The surface yielded by the acrylic resin formed against tinfoil provided better retention for the rubber base than any other surface tested. 2. Wax consistently gave the worst results in spite of careful boiling out. 3. The use of wax or asbestos spacers would not degrade the resin surface if tinfoil, or presumably the more easily obtainable aluminum foil, were used as a separating medium. 4. For drying times of between 15 minutes and 72 hours, no significant change was found in bond strength of elastomer to tray material. 5. Drying times of less than 15 minutes were found to be inadequate and to decrease bond strength; they are clinically inadvisable. 6. If, as a result of unavoidable delay, a tray is painted and then left for a number of days prior to making the impression, satisfactory bonding will still occur. However, if the dentist wishes to apply a second coat and dry it for 15 minutes, an increase in bond strength is likely to occur. 7. In the six systems tested, failure occurred at varied levels, from a low of 20 p.s.i. to a high of 80 p.s.i. 8. In the silicone and polyether systems, cohesive failure of the elastomer occurred before the adhesive bond between elastomer and tray failed. This finding correlates with the clinical observation that silicones and polyethers are more difficult to remove completely from acrylic resin trays when an impression has to be repeated. PMID:784960

  13. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Thermal Degradation in Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Mal, Ajit K.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in lap joints is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds in lap joints is a prerequisite to the design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures. Furthermore, the lap joint may be subject to high-temperature environments in service. Early detection of the degree of thermal degradation in adhesive bonds is required under these circumstances. A variety of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques can be used to determine the thickness and the elastic moduli of adhesively bonded joints. In this paper we apply a previously developed technique based on the leaky Lamb wave (LLW) experiment to investigate the possibility of characterizing the thermal degradation of adhesive bonds in lap joints. The degradation of the adhesive bonds is determined through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  14. Strategies for precision adhesive bonding of micro-optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Kotnur Venu, Vyshak; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Today's piezo-based micromanipulator technology allows for highly precise manipulation of optical components. A crucial question for the quality of optical assemblies is the misalignment after curing. The challenge of statistical deviations in the curing process requires a sophisticated knowledge on the relevant process parameters. An approach to meet these requirements is the empirical analysis such as characterization of shrinkage. Gaining sophisticated knowledge about the statistical process of adhesive bonding advances the quality of related production steps like beam-shaping optics, mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling or building resonators evaluating power, mode characteristics and beam shape. Maximizing the precision of these single assembly steps fosters the scope of improving the overall efficiency of the entire laser system. At Fraunhofer IPT research activities on the identification of relevant parameters for improved adhesive bonding precision have been undertaken and are ongoing. The influence of the volumetric repeatability of different automatic and manual dispensing methods play an important role. Also, the evaluation of UV-light sources and the relating illumination properties have a significant influence on the bonding result. Furthermore, common UV-curing adhesives are being examined on their performance and reliability for both highest precision prototyping, as well as their application as robust bonding medium in automated optics assembly cells. This paper sums up the parameters of most influence. Overall goal of these activities is the development of a prediction model for optimized shrinkage compensation and thus improved assembly quality.

  15. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Mendonça, Adriano Augusto Melo; Garcez, Rosa Maria Viana de Bragança; Oliveira, Aline da Silva de; Moreira, Andressa Goicochea; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10): SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC); AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP) activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem). Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05). The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  16. Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds from Guided Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, A. K.; Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in the fracture and failure of composites and other bonded materials is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of these adhesion joints is a prerequisite to reliable design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures.

  17. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1997-01-01

    Qualitative measurements of adhesion or binding forces can be accomplished, for example, by using the reflection coefficient of an ultrasound or by using thermal waves (Light and Kwun, 1989, Achenbach and Parikh, 1991, and Bostrom and wickham, 1991). However, a quantitative determination of binding forces is rather difficult. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasound passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such non-linearity can be effectively used to characterize the bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect (Adler and Nagy, 1991; Achenbach and Parikh, 1991; Parikh and Achenbach, 1992; and Hirose and Kitahara, 1992; Anastasi and Roberts, 1992). Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear interface binding force, a quantitative method was presented by Pangraz and Arnold (1994). Recently, Tang, Cheng and Achenbach (1997) made a comparison between the experimental and simulated results based on this theoretical model. A water immersion mode-converted shear wave through-transmission setup was used by Berndt and Green (1997) to analyze the nonlinear acoustic behavior of the adhesive bond. In this project, the nonlinear responses of an adhesive joint was investigated through transmission tests of ultrasonic wave and analyzed by the finite element simulations. The higher order harmonics were obtained in the tests. It is found that the amplitude of higher harmonics increases as the aging increases, especially the 3dorder harmonics. Results from the numerical simulation show that the material nonlinearity does indeed generate higher order harmonics. In particular, the elastic-perfect plastic behavior generates significant 3rd and 5th order harmonics.

  18. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems.

  19. Composite bonding to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding and single-bottle systems.

    PubMed

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alomari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  20. Composite Bonding to Stainless Steel Crowns Using a New Universal Bonding and Single-Bottle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; AlOmari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems. PMID:23606844

  1. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  2. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    PubMed Central

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  3. Improved primer for bonding polyurethane adhesives to metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constanza, L. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primer ensures effective bonding integrity of polyurethane adhesives on metal surfaces at temperatures ranging from minus 423 degrees to plus 120 degrees F. It provides greater metal surface protection and bond strengths over this temperature range than could be attained with other adhesive systems.

  4. Bond Assembly FOD Zones - A Procedure for Assuring Acceptable Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Kurt; Wurth, Laura; Mitchell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Rocket motor components are primarily assembled by adhesion. a) For example, the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - part of the Space Shuttle Boosters) system contains 10,000 sq ft of bondline area. b) Rocket motors contain a variety of adhesive/substrate bond systems c) Bond system performance requirements also vary. To assemble reliable components, ATK Space Systems and customers invest substantial resources to the study of bond assembly processes. a) Surface and adhesion science; b) Adhesive chemistry; c) Process parameters; d) Contamination effects.

  5. Adhesive bonding of composite aircraft structures: Challenges and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Tserpes, K. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper, the challenges and some recent developments of adhesive bonding technology in composite aircraft structures are discussed. The durability of bonded joints is defined and presented for parameters that may influence bonding quality. Presented is also, a numerical design approach for composite joining profiles used to realize adhesive bonding. It is shown that environmental ageing and pre-bond contamination of bonding surfaces may degrade significantly fracture toughness of bonded joints. Moreover, it is obvious that additional research is needed in order to design joining profiles that will enable load transfer through shearing of the bondline. These findings, together with the limited capabilities of existing non-destructive testing techniques, can partially explain the confined use of adhesive bonding in primary composite aircraft structural parts.

  6. Resin bonding to primary teeth using three adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, N; Ott, N W; Hondrum, S O

    1995-01-01

    In vitro bond strengths of three resin adhesive systems were tested using 111 primary teeth. Ninety-six flat dentin surface specimens were divided into six groups consisting of 16 primed or 16 unprimed samples for each adhesive system. The remaining 15 tooth samples were divided into three groups of five to determine each adhesive system's bond strength to primary etched enamel. Resin buttons were polymerized to all specimens with visible light, thermocycled for 2000 cycles between 5 and 55 degrees C, and shear bond strength was measured with a Instron Testing Machine (Instron Engineering Corp, Canton, MA). ANOVA and multiple comparison tests showed that Optibond Multiuse Bonding Agent had a statistically greater mean shear bond strength to primary dentin (20.5 +/- 3.5 MPa) than Prisma Universal Bond 3 Multi-purpose Bonding System (9.1 +/- 4.4 MPa), Scotchbond Multi-purpose Dental Adhesive System (7.3 +/- 3.7 MPa), and primary etched enamel (9.8 +/- 4.4 MPa) at P < 0.05. This study demonstrated that resin adhesive systems may achieve bond strengths to primary dentin comparable to those of primary enamel, and that these bonds may be as strong as bonds to permanent enamel and dentin. These adhesive systems may allow more confident esthetic restoration of primary anterior teeth.

  7. Rapid adhesive bonding and field repair of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process are often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid Adhesive Bonding concepts are developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens can be cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press or autoclave bonding. The development of Rapid Adhesive Bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1002 and D3163), for aerospace panel or component bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric-matrix composite structures is reviewed. Equipment and procedures are described for bonding and repairing thin sheets, simple geometries, and honeycomb core panels.

  8. Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded section beams under torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tomioka, Noboru; Kakiage, Masashi; Niisawa, Junetsu; Kitagawa, Hideo

    1995-11-01

    Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded box beams was investigated. From results of the fatigue tests, it was seen that the fatigue strength of bonded beams was higher than that of spot welded beams. Fatigue strength of bonded beams was independent of plate thickness and partition. The flexural rigidity of the box beams in the plane of partition can increase without decrease of torsional rigidity and torsional fatigue strength, if the partition is jointed by adhesive bonding instead of spot welding. Since the fatigue strength and rigidity of adhesive bonded joints can be higher than the spot welded joints in the weight saving structures, it is expected that the structural adhesive joints will be employed more in the automobile body structure. For assuring the introduction of this joint more into the automobile body structures, it is necessary that the fatigue tests on the model members of the actual members used in the automobile body structure are conducted, in addition to those of the simple joints such as tension shear and T-type tension, and the property of the fatigue strength on the adhesive bonded members is known. But, the authors now have little data on fatigue tests of the adhesive bonded members. In the present research to be reported, the fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams under torsion, which are typical members in automobile body structure, were carried out and the effects of the presence of longitudinal partition and plate thickness on fatigue strength were investigated. Comparing the results of fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams with those on spot welded box beams, the property of fatigue strength on these adhesive bonded box beams was cleared.

  9. A microtensile bond strength evaluation of a single-bottle adhesive to caries-affected dentin in conventional versus minimal invasive caries removal techniques: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Saraswathi V; Shashikiran, N D; Chaitra, N L; Syed, Ghousia

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: The current dental restorative concepts are characterized by an increased effort towards a less invasive treatment of carious lesions. Minimally invasive cavity preparation techniques are intended to preserve as much sound enamel and dentin as possible, during the treatment of carious lesions. The objective of this in vitro study is to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of single-etch adhesives (Adper Easy one) on caries-affected dentin, following three different caries removal techniques, namely, Carisolv, Conventional carbide bur at slow speed, and aqueous calcium hydroxide. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 teeth were divided into three groups and arranged with 10 samples in each group - round bur (Group A), Carisolv (Group B), Aqueous calcium hydroxide (Group C). Following caries excavation by using the three above -mentioned techniques, application of the bonding agent and composite buildup was done. Following sectioning of the samples with the help of a hard tissue microtome, Group A, B, and C were again trimmed into an hour-glass shape, maintaining a width of 1.2 mm in the center of an hour glass. These were debonded under a microtensile load at failure, using the Instron Universal Testing Machine. Results: There was a significantly lower microtensile bond strength in the group where the caries was removed by the round bur, as compared to the group where the caries was removed by using Carisolv and calcium hydroxide, which showed higher microtensile bond strength, that is, the significant pairing of Groups were Group A to Group B and Group A to Group C, exhibiting statistically significant difference with a P < 0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference between Group B and Group C. Interpretation and Conclusion: Carisolv and aqueous calcium hydroxide have proven to be good methods of caries removal for achieving a higher microtensile bond strength of the single-bottle self-etch adhesive on dentin. PMID

  10. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested. PMID:22714927

  11. Automation Tools for Finite Element Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article presents two new automation creation tools that obtain stresses and strains (Shear and peel) in adhesively bonded joints. For a given adhesively bonded joint Finite Element model, in which the adhesive is characterised using springs, these automation tools read the corresponding input and output files, use the spring forces and deformations to obtain the adhesive stresses and strains, sort the stresses and strains in descending order, and generate plot files for 3D visualisation of the stress and strain fields. Grids (nodes) and elements can be numbered in any order that is convenient for the user. Using the automation tools, trade-off studies, which are needed for design of adhesively bonded joints, can be performed very quickly.

  12. Resolving fundamental limits of adhesive bonding in microfabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jessica S.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Emerson, John Allen; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Kent, Michael Stuart; Read, Douglas H.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Lamppa, Kerry P.; Kawaguchi, Stacie; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-04-01

    As electronic and optical components reach the micro- and nanoscales, efficient assembly and packaging require the use of adhesive bonds. This work focuses on resolving several fundamental issues in the transition from macro- to micro- to nanobonding. A primary issue is that, as bondline thicknesses decrease, knowledge of the stability and dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films is important to obtain robust, void-free adhesive bonds. While researchers have studied dewetting dynamics of thin films of model, non-polar polymers, little experimental work has been done regarding dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films, which exhibit much more complex behaviors. In this work, the areas of dispensing small volumes of viscous materials, capillary fluid flow, surface energetics, and wetting have all been investigated. By resolving these adhesive-bonding issues, we are allowing significantly smaller devices to be designed and fabricated. Simultaneously, we are increasing the manufacturability and reliability of these devices.

  13. Antibacterial activity and bonding ability of an adhesive incorporating an antibacterial monomer DMAE-CB.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu-Hong; Ma, Sai; Chen, Ji-Hua; Chai, Zhi-Guo; Li, Fang; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial effect and microtensile bond strength of a resin-based adhesive containing an antibacterial monomer DMAE-CB (methacryloxylethyl cetyl dimethyl ammonium chloride). Cured specimens of 1, 2, and 3% DMAE-CB-containing Single Bond 2 (crosslinking monomer: Bis-GMA, dimethacrylates; functional monomer: HEMA) were prepared, and their antibacterial effects on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were investigated. Antibacterial property after 0, 30, 90, and 180 days of aging was also tested. Bonding ability of the experimental adhesive incorporating 3% DMAE-CB was evaluated by microtensile bond strength test. The cured experimental adhesive exhibited an inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth, and the adhesive containing 3% DMAE-CB showed higher antibacterial efficiency compared with those incorporating 1 or 2% anibacterial monomer. Antibacterial activities of the specimens lasted for at least 180 days. Microtensile bond strength test revealed that the bonding ability of the experimental adhesive was not significantly adversely affected by the incorporation of DMAE-CB. Therefore, dental adhesives with strong and long-lasting bacteriostatic property could be achieved by incorporating DMAE-CB without negatively influencing bonding ability.

  14. Bond strength of a fluoride-releasing bracket adhesive. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Graf, I; Breier, M; Huck, L; Schwarze, C W

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine a new fluoride-releasing light-cured filling composite for its bonding and debonding qualities when used as a bracket adhesive. The material investigated was a hybrid composite containing a chemically modified fluoride apatite, which is claimed to provide the enamel with phosphate, calcium, and fluoride ions in the presence of an acid pH, recharging its resources of these ions through fluoride-containing toothpastes used in daily oral hygiene. Concurrently suitability as an enamel conditioner was tested in a new self-etching primer, which does not require water rinsing but is gently air dried instead. For comparison a conventional light-cure single-component adhesive was used together with 37% orthophosphoric acid. After application of the respective conditioners, mesh-backed metal brackets were bonded to 20 human premolars in each of the 2 adhesive groups and subjected to a shear test. Bond failure location was evaluated using the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Average bond strength of the experimental bracket adhesive and the conventional etchant was 8.96 MPa. Conditioning with the self-etching primer led to a decrease of mean shear bond strength values to 6.55 MPa. Highest bond strength was determined in the control group (12.19 MPa). The bond strength results obtained in the shear test recommend the new material as a bracket adhesive to be used with orthophosphoric acid for etching. PMID:10028788

  15. Induction thermography for non-destructive evaluation of adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, L.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive bonding is widely used in automotive industry in the recent times. One of the major problems with adhesive bonds is the lack of a suitable non-destructive evaluation technique for assessing bonding. In this paper, an experimental study was carried out to apply induction thermography technique to evaluate adhesively bonded steel plates. Samples were fabricated with artificial defects such as air gap, foreign material, and improper adhesive filling. Induction thermography technique was found to detect defects and foreign inclusions. The sample specimen was also inspected using standard techniques such as Ultrasonic testing and Radiography testing. Defect detecting capabilities of the three techniques are compared. Induction thermography heating was FE modelled in 3D using COMSOL 3.5a. The simulated Induction thermography model was compared and validated with experimental results.

  16. Investigation of Adhesive Bond Cure Conditions using Nonlinear Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Tobias P.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to investigate various cure conditions of adhesive bonds using nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling. Several samples were used to obtain normal incidence, oblique incidence, and wave mixing.

  17. The effect of cavity disinfectants on the micro-shear bond strength of dentin adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Elkassas, Dina Wafik; Fawzi, Elham Mostafa; El Zohairy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the effect of application of four different disinfecting agents on the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) of an etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred flat dentin surfaces of human molars were produced by wet grinding the buccal surfaces. Specimens were randomly assigned to five groups according to the disinfectant used: Group I: Control (no disinfectant); Group II: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite based; Group III: 2% chlorhexidine based (Consepsis), Group IV: 0.1% benzalkoniumchloride based (Tubulicid red) and Group V: 3% doxycycline based (Biopure, MTAD). Specimens were bonded using either Adper Single Bond 2 or Clearfil S3 Bond, which were employed according to the manufacturer's instructions. Resin composite microcylinders were bonded using Tygon® tubes for μ-SBS testing. The modes of failure were noted after visual examination using a binocular stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Failures were classified as adhesive, or mixed. μ-SBS results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. Results: Dentin disinfectants tested significantly negated the bonding of Adper Single bond 2 and the groups were ranked; Group I > Group V = Group IV > Group II = Group III, meanwhile they enhanced significantly the μ-SBS values upon using Clearfil S3 Bond and were ranked; Group II > Group III = Group IV = Group V > Group I. Most failures were adhesive with the Adper single bond adhesive system. Mixed modes of failure were evident with Clearfil S3 bond. Conclusions: The disinfectants tested should not be used with Adper Single Bond 2 when applied before the etching step, However they could be used safely prior to bonding with Clearfil S3 Bond. PMID:24966768

  18. Effect of adhesive application methods on bond strength to bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Ando, Susumu; Watanabe, Takayuki; Tsubota, Keishi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Irokawa, Atsushi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2008-06-01

    Single-step self-etch adhesive systems have been developed to simplify and shorten bonding procedures. With the gain in popularity of these simplified systems, their reliability has become a focus of interest. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of adhesive application method on enamel bond strength. Two commercial single-step self-etch adhesive systems, Clearfil tri-S Bond, and G-Bond, were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial enamel surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper. Adhesives were only applied without agitation (inactive) or were agitated by a brush (active), and resin composites were condensed into the mold on the enamel surface and light-activated. Ten specimens per test group were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, then shear-tested at a cross-head speed of 1.0 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test were used. The bond strengths for active application were higher than those for inactive application. Significant differences were found for both adhesive systems. From the results of this study, active application of single-step self-etch adhesive may help to ensure the creation of a roughened enamel surface and enhance the penetration of resin monomer into the subsurface demineralized enamel. PMID:18587208

  19. Bond strength and SEM observation of CO2 laser irradiated dentin, bonded with simplified-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koshiro, K; Inoue, S; Niimi, K; Koase, K; Sano, H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated, mechanically and morphologically, whether the dentin surface irradiated by CO2 laser could be a possible adherent when bonded with simplified-step adhesives. Buccal enamel and cementum of extracted human premolars were removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were irradiated continuously with CO2 laser at 1.0 W. Before bonding with either a single-bottle adhesive (Single Bond) or a self-etching priming system (Mega Bond), the irradiated dentin surface was treated as follows: no treatment, NaHCO3 powder abrasion and wet-grinding with 600-grit SiC paper. The treated dentin surfaces were bonded to resin composite with either of the two adhesives. Non-irradiated dentin surfaces were also used as control. Resin bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and subjected to microtensile bond test. Additionally, to observe the resin/irradiated dentin interface, resin-bonded specimens were similarly prepared, sectioned into slabs, embedded in epoxy resin, polished with diamond pastes, sputter coated Au-Pd and examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After SEM observation, the specimens were further polished with diamond paste to remove the Au-Pd sputter-coat, immersed in HCL and NaOCl and finally observed by SEM again. In the presence of carbonized dentin, microtensile bond strength drastically decreased but recovered to the control value by removing the carbonized dentin layer visually with SiC paper for both adhesive systems. However, the laser-affected dentin that remained on the bonded interface was easily dissolved with NaOCl and HCl. PMID:15853101

  20. Gun facilitates adhesive bonding of studs to surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. K.; Simpson, W. G.

    1969-01-01

    Gun facilitates adhesive bonding of thermoplastic-backed studs to smooth, hard surfaces. Such studs can be used for mounting loads where defacement with drilled holes cannot be tolerated. These studs can be easily removed by softening the plastic bonding with heat from the gun.

  1. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  2. Evaluating the bonding of two adhesive systems to enamel submitted to whitening dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Toseto, Roberta Mariano; de Arruda, Alex Mendes; Tolentino, Patricia Ramos; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by micro-shear bond strength test, the bond strength of composite resin restoration to enamel submitted to whitening dentifrices. Forty bovine teeth were embedded in polystyrene resin and polished. The specimens were randomly divided into eight groups (n=5), according to the dentifrice (carbamide peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and conventional dentifrice) and the adhesive system (Prime & Bond 2.1 and Adper Single Bond 2). Dentifrice was applied for 15 minutes a day, for 21 days. Thirty minutes after the last exposure to dentifrice, the samples were submitted to a bonding procedure with the respective adhesive system. After that, four buttons of resin were bonded in each sample using transparent cylindrical molds. After 24 hours, the teeth were submitted to the micro-shear bond strength test and subsequent analysis of the fracture mode. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test (alpha = 0.05). The micro-shear bond strength showed no difference between adhesives systems but a significant reduction was found between the control and carbamide groups (p = 0.0145) and the control and hydrogen groups (p = 0.0370). The evaluation of the failures modes showed that adhesive failures were predominant. Cohesive failures were predominant in group IV The use of dentifrice with peroxides can decrease bonding strength in enamel.

  3. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  4. Stresses in adhesively bonded joints: A closed form solution. [plate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Aydinoglu, M. N.

    1980-01-01

    The plane strain of adhesively bonded structures which consist of two different orthotropic adherents is considered. Assuming that the thicknesses of the adherends are constant and are small in relation to the lateral dimensions of the bonded region, the adherends are treated as plates. The transverse shear effects in the adherends and the in-plane normal strain in the adhesive are taken into account. The problem is reduced to a system of differential equations for the adhesive stresses which is solved in closed form. A single lap joint and a stiffened plate under various loading conditions are considered as examples. To verify the basic trend of the solutions obtained from the plate theory a sample problem is solved by using the finite element method and by treating the adherends and the adhesive as elastic continua. The plate theory not only predicts the correct trend for the adhesive stresses but also gives rather surprisingly accurate results.

  5. Effects of a newly designed HEMA-free, multi-purpose, single-bottle, self-etching adhesive on bonding to dental hard tissues, zirconia-based ceramics, and gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Jogetsu, Yoshiyuki; Shinno, Kazuya; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding effectiveness of newly designed self-etching adhesives to four types of adherends--enamel, dentin, zirconia, and gold (Au) alloy. Five experimental adhesives were prepared, which contained 3.0-5.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP), 3.0 wt% 4-acryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-AET) or 17.0 wt% 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET), 0-0.5 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) or 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT), and varying contents of Bis-GMA, dimethacrylate monomers, water, acetone, and a photoinitiator system. After 2,000 times of thermal cycling, shear bond strengths (SBSs) between a resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Japan) and the four adherends, bonded using the experimental adhesives, were measured at 1.0 mm/min. No statistically significant differences in SBS for bonding to ground enamel, dentin, sandblasted zirconia and Au alloy (p>0.05) were found between experimental adhesives which contained 6-MHPA and/or 6-MHPP, 4-MET or 4-AET, 6-MHDT and/or 10-MDDT, Bis-GMA, and dimethacrylates. An adhesive layer of less than 5.0 µm thickness, by scanning electron microscopy observation, revealed strong adhesion to the four adherends. Therefore, the newly designed multi-purpose, self-etching adhesive strongly adhered to all the four adherend materials tested.

  6. Structural adhesives for bonding optics to metals: a study of optomechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, John G.; Daly, Damien J.

    2001-11-01

    With so many new adhesives available, characteristics affecting performance are not always well-defined. The user often selects an adhesive based on a single property and later finds his application compromised. This is an effort to study relevant properties of several different structural-type adhesives. The bonding geometry will utilize three types of glass bonded to metal mounts. The mounting geometry will include five different design approaches. These designs will investigate: face bonding, counter-bored mounts, edge bonding, and a flexure mount. The three metals selected are not only common to the industry but often used for matching the Coefficient of Expansion to the optical glass. Each optical flat will have its reflective surface used as a reference for angular stability. The adhesives selected will compare more traditional epoxies with one-part UV light cured products. The obvious advantage of the UV- cured adhesives is the instant cure on-demand. Several adhesives have been selected for differing properties including: viscosity, cure temperature, CTE, modulus of elasticity, out-gassing, and shrinkage upon cure. Discussion will compare each adhesive, its properties, and ease of use. Angular stability will be monitored as a function of: pre vs. post cure, accelerated life testing, thermal exposure, and vibration/shock exposure. Some discussion will be included on the wavefront distortion and stress birefringence.

  7. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  8. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  9. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  10. Computed tomography analysis of wood-adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzel, Gunter Georg Rolf

    The importance of wood bonding increased in the last decades due to the increased usage of wood composites whose performance depends to a large extent on the adhesive penetration and subsequent bonding of the adherends. The presented research used XMT (x-ray microtomography) to perform a non-destructive, three-dimensional analysis of the adhesive bondline and wood-structure of Southern yellow pine, Douglas-fir and yellow-poplar samples. A phenol-formaldehyde adhesive was used. The sodium hydroxide catalyst was replaced with rubidium hydroxide during resin formulation. This was done to improve the image contrast. The reconstructions of the wood structure of Southern yellow pine showed tracheids, rays, fusiform rays, resin canals and pits. On the Douglas-fir sample tracheids, pits and rays were displayed clearly. The yellow-poplar images showed vessels, fibers, bordered pits, scalariform sieve plates and rays. The renderings of the adhesive-bondline of Southern yellow pine proved the dominant role of tracheids for the adhesive flow and showed rays as a secondary pathway of adhesive flow. The results revealed no adhesive flow occured through bordered pits, while simple pits permitted some adhesive flow through ray parenchyma. The results for Douglas-fir showed a similar result; the tracheids were the predominant path of adhesive penetration, while rays played a secondary role and no adhesive flow through the pit aperture was visible. The adhesive flow through the microstructure of yellow-poplar wood occured mainly through vessels and also through rays, but no adhesive flow through the pits was directly observed. The segmentation of the images in three phases: void space, cell wall substance and adhesive, enabled the calculation of the effective bondline thickness based on the adhesive, as well as the volumetric measurement of all three elements and their share on the sample volume. Subsequent experiments showed that the exposure of the Southern yellow pine and yellow

  11. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  12. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel of primary teeth molars. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 180 extracted primary molars. They were randomly divided into 6 groups and each group was divided into 2 subgroups (treated with CPP-ACP and untreated). In subgroups with CPP-ACP, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP paste 1 h/d for 5 days. Types of adhesives that were evaluated in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, AdheSE One F, single Bond 2, SE Bond, and Adper Prompt L-Pop. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine and mode of failure was evaluated under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by T test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and Fisher exact test using SPSS18. P < 0.05 was considered as significance level. Results: Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to enamel of primary teeth treated and untreated with CPP-ACP showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mode of failure in all groups regardless of CPP-ACP administration was mainly adhesive type. Our results indicated that CPP-ACP did not affect shear bond strength of studied adhesives to primary teeth enamel. Conclusions: To have a successful and durable composite restoration, having a high strength bonding is essential. Considering the wide use of CPP-ACP in preventing tooth decay and the role of adhesive shear bond strength (SBS) in success of composite restoration, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP on the SBS of adhesives to primary teeth

  13. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  14. Effect of molecular architecture on single polymer adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Sandra; Gallei, Markus; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Baozhong; Krysiak, Stefanie; Balzer, Bizan N; Rehahn, Matthias; Schlüter, A Dieter; Hugel, Thorsten

    2014-04-22

    Several applications require strong noncovalent adhesion of polymers to substrates. Graft and branched polymers have proven superior to linear polymers, but the molecular mechanism is still unclear. Here, this question is addressed on the single molecule level with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based method. It is determined how the presence of side chains and their molecular architecture influence the adhesion and the mobility of polymers on solid substrates. Surprisingly, the adhesion of mobile polymers cannot significantly be improved by side chains or their architecture. Only for immobile polymers a significantly higher maximum rupture force for graft, bottle-brush, and branched polymers compared to linear chains is measured. Our results suggest that a combination of polymer architecture and strong molecular bonds is necessary to increase the polymer-surface contact area. An increased contact area together with intrachain cohesion (e.g., by entanglements) leads to improved polymer adhesion. These findings may prove useful for the design of stable polymer coatings.

  15. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  16. Soft Matrices Suppress Cooperative Behaviors among Receptor-Ligand Bonds in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Gao, Huajian

    2010-01-01

    The fact that biological tissues are stable over prolonged periods of time while individual receptor-ligand bonds only have limited lifetime underscores the critical importance of cooperative behaviors of multiple molecular bonds, in particular the competition between the rate of rupture of closed bonds (death rate) and the rate of rebinding of open bonds (birth rate) in a bond cluster. We have recently shown that soft matrices can greatly increase the death rate in a bond cluster by inducing severe stress concentration near the adhesion edges. In the present paper, we report a more striking effect that, irrespective of stress concentration, soft matrices also suppress the birth rate in a bond cluster by increasing the local separation distance between open bonds. This is shown by theoretical analysis as well as Monte Carlo simulations based on a stochastic-elasticity model in which stochastic descriptions of molecular bonds and elastic descriptions of interfacial force/separation are unified in a single modeling framework. Our findings not only are important for understanding the role of elastic matrices in cell adhesion, but also have general implications on adhesion between soft materials. PMID:20808789

  17. Adhesive bonding between polyamide and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Bashkarev, A. Ya.; Savitskii, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Sytov, V. V.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence and IR absorption spectra are taken of coatings obtained by applying polyamide 6 powder on a steel substrate heated above the polymer melting point and subsequently cooling to room temperature. It follows from the coating spectra that the energy of a π* → n transition in the C—O bonds of polyamide decreases. Simultaneously, the maximum of a band assigned to the deformation vibrations of N—H bonds shifts toward longer wavelengths. These effects are explained by the formation of coordination bonds between Fe2+ ions having diffused from the steel into the polymer and nitrogen atoms entering into polyamide 6 molecules. As a result, a coordination-compound-saturated diffusion layer up to 100 µm thick arises near the steel surface. Coordination compounds squeeze the framework of the polyamide 6 molecule roughly by 0.06%. Eventually, a polyamide layer that is stronger than the surroundings appears at the polyamide 6—steel interface.

  18. Adhesive Bonding Characterization of Composite Joints for Cryogenic Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Schieleit, Gregory F.; Biggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite cryogenic tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future reusable launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW). This weight reduction is possible due to the large reduction in weight that composite materials can provide over current aluminum technology. In addition to composite technology, adhesively bonded joints potentially have several benefits over mechanically fastened joints, such as weight savings and cryogenic fluid containment. Adhesively bonded joints may be used in several areas of these cryogenic tanks, such as in lobe-to-lobe joints (in a multi-lobe concept), skirt-to-tank joint, strut-to-tank joint, and for attaching stringers and ring frames. The bonds, and the tanks themselves, must be able to withstand liquid cryogenic fuel temperatures that they contain. However, the use of adhesively bonded composite joints at liquid oxygen and hydrogen temperatures is largely unknown and must be characterized. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Michoud Operations performed coupon-level tests to determine effects of material selection, cure process parameters, substrate surface preparation, and other factors on the strength of these composite joints at cryogenic temperatures. This led to the selection of a material and process that would be suitable for a cryogenic tank. KEY WORDS: Composites, Adhesive Bonding, Cryogenics

  19. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  20. Robust adhesive precision bonding in automated assembly cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Haag, Sebastian; Bastuck, Thomas; Gisler, Thomas; Moser, Hansruedi; Uusimaa, Petteri; Axt, Christoph; Brecher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Diode lasers are gaining importance, making their way to higher output powers along with improved BPP. The assembly of micro-optics for diode laser systems goes along with the highest requirements regarding assembly precision. Assembly costs for micro-optics are driven by the requirements regarding alignment in a submicron and the corresponding challenges induced by adhesive bonding. For micro-optic assembly tasks a major challenge in adhesive bonding at highest precision level is the fact, that the bonding process is irreversible. Accordingly, the first bonding attempt needs to be successful. Today's UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects crucial for submicron tolerances of e.g. FACs. The impact of the shrinkage effects can be tackled by a suitable bonding area design, such as minimal adhesive gaps and an adapted shrinkage offset value for the specific assembly parameters. Compensating shrinkage effects is difficult, as the shrinkage of UV-curing adhesives is not constant between two different lots and varies even over the storage period even under ideal circumstances as first test results indicate. An up-to-date characterization of the adhesive appears necessary for maximum precision in optics assembly to reach highest output yields, minimal tolerances and ideal beamshaping results. Therefore, a measurement setup to precisely determine the up-to-date level of shrinkage has been setup. The goal is to provide necessary information on current shrinkage to the operator or assembly cell to adjust the compensation offset on a daily basis. Impacts of this information are expected to be an improved beam shaping result and a first-time-right production.

  1. Develop, demonstrate, and verify large area composite structural bonding with polyimide adhesives. [adhesively bonding graphite-polyimide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhombal, B. D.; Wykes, D. H.; Hong, K. C.; Stenersen, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The technology required to produce graphite-polyimide structural components with operational capability at 598 K (600 F) is considered. A series of polyimide adhesives was screened for mechanical and physical properties and processibility in fabricating large midplane bonded panels and honeycomb sandwich panels in an effort to fabricate a structural test component of the space shuttle aft body flap. From 41 formulations, LaRC-13, FM34B-18, and a modified LaRC-13 adhesive were selected for further evaluation. The LaRC-13 adhesive was rated as the best of the three adhesives in terms of availability, cost, processibility, properties, and ability to produce void fee large area (12" x 12") midplane bonds. Surface treatments and primers for the adhesives were evaluated and processes were developed for the fabrication of honeycomb sandwich panels of very good quality which was evidenced by rupture in the honeycomb core rather than in the facesheet bands on flatwise tensile strength testing. The fabrication of the adhesively bonded honeycomb sandwich cover panels, ribs, and leading edge covers of Celion graphite/LARC-160 polyimide laminates is described.

  2. Effects of Temperature and Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fusahito

    This paper deals with the temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity behaviour of a highly ductile acrylic adhesive and its effect on plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. Tensile lap shear tests of aluminium single-lap joints were performed at various temperature of 10-40°C at several tensile speeds. Based on the experimental results, a new constitutive model of temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity of the adhesive is presented. From V-bending experiments and the corresponding numerical simulation, it was found that the gull-wing bend is suppressed by high-speed forming at a lower temperature.

  3. Protein adhesion force dynamics and single adhesion events.

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G

    1999-01-01

    Using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope, the adhesion forces of bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, ferritin, and lysozyme proteins to glass and polystyrene substrates were characterized by following the force necessary to displace an adsorbed protein-covered microsphere over several orders of magnitude in time. This force was consistent with a power law with exponent a = 0.37 +/- 0.03 on polystyrene, indicating that there is no typical time scale for adhesion on this substrate. On glass, the rate of adhesion depended strongly on protein charge. Forces corresponding to single protein adhesion events were identified. The typical rupture force of a single lysozyme, ferritin, bovine serum albumin, and myoglobin protein adhering to glass was estimated to be 90 +/- 10 pN, 115 +/- 13 pN, 277 +/- 44 pN, and 277 +/- 44 pN, respectively, using a model of the experimental system. These forces, as well as the force amplitudes on hydrophobic polystyrene, correlate with protein stiffness. PMID:10388777

  4. Optimal tubular adhesive-bonded lap joint of the carbon fiber epoxy composite shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki S.; Kim, Won T.; Lee, Dai G.; Jun, Eui J.

    The effects of the adhesive thickness and the adherend surface roughness on the fatigue strength of a tubular adhesive-bonded single lap joint were investigated using fatigue test specimens whose adherends were made of S45C carbon steel. Results of fatigue tests showed that the optimal arithmetic surface roughness of the adherends is about 2 microns and the optimal adhesive thickness is about 0.15 mm. Using these values, the prototype torsional adhesive joints were manufactured for power transmission shafts of an automotive vehicle or a small helicopter, and static tests under torque were performed on a single-lap joint, a single-lap joint with scarf, a double-lap joint, and a double-lap joint with scarf. It was found that the double-lap joint was superior among the joints, in terms of torque capacity and manufacturing cost.

  5. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  6. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Cadhesive. Air-abrasion and the use of the universal primer improved the bond strength of zirconia to dentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used.

  7. The Effect of Peel Stress on the Strength of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Metzinger, K.E.

    1998-10-14

    Composite wind turbine blades are often attached to a metallic structure with an adhesive bond. The objective of this investigation is to determine which parameters affect the durability of these adhesively bonded joints. The composite-to-steel joint considered in this study typically fails when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. Previously, this joint was monotonically loaded in either compression or tension. Compressive and tensile axial loads of the same magnitude produce adhesive stresses with very similar magnitudes but opposite signs. (For the joint considered, tensile loads produce compressive peeh stresses in the adhesive at the location where debonding initiates.) The tensile specimens failed at much higher loads, establishing that the sign of the adhesive peel stresses strongly influences the single-cycle strength of these joints. Building on this earlier work, this study demonstrates that the adhesive peel stresses are also critical for fatigue loading. The results of low-cycle (axial) and high- cycle (bending) fatigue tests are presented. To complement the test results, finite element analyses demonstrate the localized nature of the peel stresses that develop in the adhesive. In addition, these analyses are used to investigate some of the causes of these peel stresses.

  8. Adhesive-based bonding technique for PDMS microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C Shea; Abate, Adam R

    2013-02-21

    We present a simple and inexpensive technique for bonding PDMS microfluidic devices. The technique uses only adhesive tape and an oven; plasma bonders and cleanroom facilities are not required. It also produces channels that are immediately hydrophobic, allowing formation of aqueous-in-oil emulsions.

  9. High-temperature adhesives for bonding polyimide film. [bonding Kapton film for solar sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575 K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/"Kapton" bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  10. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  11. [Bond strength to dentin of resin composites associated with filled and unfilled adhesive systems].

    PubMed

    Youssef, J A; Turbino, M L; Youssef, M N; Matson, E

    2001-01-01

    This study analyzed in vitro two brands of one-step adhesive systems of fourth generation (Optisolo--Kerr, filled; and Single Bond--3M, unfilled) and two composite resins (Prodigy--Kerr and Z100--3M), aiming at evaluating their bond strength to dentin. Eighty human extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin and grounded until dentin was exposed in longitudinal direction. The specimens were divided in 4 groups. Composite resin cones were bonded to the specimens using the mentioned adhesive systems, following the instructions of the manufacturers. The test-specimens were submitted to tensile tests using a 4442 Universal Mini-Instron Machine with the speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were converted into MPa, according to the area of adhesion, and submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA. There was significant statistical difference (p < 0.01) between the adhesive systems (F = 7.24). Optisolo (m = 11.03 +/- 4.23) showed better bond strength than Single Bond (m = 8.37 +/- 4.54). There was no significant statistical difference (p > 0.05) between the composites (F = 0.43).

  12. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  13. Evaluation of the micro-shear bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin with and without adhesive area limitation.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Niu, Guangliang; Du, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding ability of four representative dentin-adhesive systems by applying the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) test method and to evaluate the influence of adhesive area limitation on the bond strength. Two different adhesive application methods were used in the μ-SBS test (with and without adhesives area limitation), and four representative adhesive systems were used in this study. Each dentin surface was treated with one of the four representative adhesive systems, and with twenty samples per group (n=20), each of the four groups underwent a μ-SBS test. The results showed that the bond strength was significantly influenced by the adhesive application method (p<0.05), the adhesive type (p<0.05) and the interaction between the two factors (p<0.05). With regard to the four representative dentin-adhesive systems, 3-E&R has a much better bond quality compared to the other adhesive systems. Furthermore, the micro-shear bond strength test method of restricting the area of both the adhesive and the resin is more reliable for evaluating the bonding property of adhesives to dentin, and it is also adequate for comparing the different adhesives systems. PMID:26406058

  14. Surface preparation of polyolefins prior to adhesive bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Rosty, R.; Martinelli, D.; Devine, A.; Bodnar, M.J.; Beetle, J.

    1987-08-01

    The standard polyolefin surface treatment for adhesive bonding specifies using a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid/water solution. This solution is both carcinogenic and polluting due to chromate inclusion. A study was made of the treated surface of polyolefin versus a control (untreated) surface in an attempt to find an alternate chemical polyolefin pretreatment for adhesive bonding. The new pretreatment solution would have to be noncarcinogenic and nonpolluting. Scanning electron microscope photos of a polyethylene surface treated in the standard solution show pitting not seen in the controls, similar to the P2 etch effect on aluminum surfaces. This pitting roughens the surface and leaves a larger surface area for adhesive bonding, suggesting one of the reasons this pretreatment yielded such good bond strengths. Another reason may be because it is an oxidant. Many nonchromate-bearing alternative solutions were tested. A good number of these were oxidizing agents, patterning the standard solution. Several test solutions resulted in bond strengths close in magnitude to those resulting from standard solution usage. 7 references.

  15. Adhesive bond cryogenic lens cell margin of safety test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, David M.; Hom, Craig L.; Holmes, Howard C.; Cannon-Morret, Joseph C.; Lindstrom, Obert F.; Irwin, J. Wes; Ryder, Leigh A.; Hix, Troy T.; Bonvallet, Jane A.; Hu, Hsin-Kuei S.; Chapman, Ira V.; Lomax, Curtis; Kvamme, E. Todd; Feller, Gregory S.; Haynes, Mark M.

    2011-09-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an optical prescription which employs four triplet lens cells. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at approximately 295K and the optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain an exceptional wavefront during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) was tasked to design and qualify the bonded cryogenic lens assemblies for room temperature launch, cryogenic operation, and thermal survival (25K) environments. The triplet lens cell designs incorporated coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) matched bond pad-to-optic interfaces, in concert with flexures to minimize bond line stress and induced optical distortion. A companion finite element study determined the bonded system's sensitivity to bond line thickness, adhesive modulus, and adhesive CTE. The design team used those results to tailor the bond line parameters, minimizing stress transmitted into the optic. The challenge for the Margin of Safety (MOS) team was to design and execute a test that verified all bond pad/adhesive/ optic substrate combinations had the required safety factor to generate confidence in a very low probability optic bond failure during the warm launch and cryogenic survival conditions. Because the survival temperature was specified to be 25K, merely dropping the test temperature to verify margin was not possible. A shear/moment loading device was conceived that simultaneously loaded the test coupons at 25K to verify margin. This paper covers the design/fab/SEM measurement/thermal conditioning of the MOS test articles, the thermal/structural analysis, the test apparatus, and the test execution/results.

  16. Durability of bonds and clinical success of adhesive restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Manso, Adriana P.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Resin-dentin bond strength durability testing has been extensively used to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive systems and the applicability of new strategies to improve that property. Clinical effectiveness is determined by the survival rates of restorations placed in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). While there is evidence that the bond strength data generated in laboratory studies somehow correlates with the clinical outcome of NCCL restorations, it is questionable whether the knowledge of bonding mechanisms obtained from laboratory testing can be used to justify clinical performance of resin-dentin bonds. There are significant morphological and structural differences between the bonding substrate used in in vitro testing versus the substrate encountered in NCCL. These differences qualify NCCL as a hostile substrate for bonding, yielding bond strengths that are usually lower than those obtained in normal dentin. However, clinical survival time of NCCL restorations often surpass the durability of normal dentin tested in the laboratory. Likewise, clinical reports on the long-term survival rates of posterior composite restorations defy the relatively rapid rate of degradation of adhesive interfaces reported in laboratory studies. This article critically analyzes how the effectiveness of adhesive systems is currently measured, to identify gaps in knowledge where new research could be encouraged. The morphological and chemical analysis of bonded interfaces of resin composite restorations in teeth that had been in clinical service for many years, but were extracted for periodontal reasons, could be a useful tool to observe the ultrastructural characteristics of restorations that are regarded as clinically acceptable. This could help determine how much degradation is acceptable for clinical success. PMID:22192252

  17. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  18. A fracture mechanics approach for designing adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if the adhesive debond initiation stress could be predicted for arbitrary joint geometries. The analysis was based upon a threshold total strain-energy-release rate (Gth) concept. Two bonded systems were tested: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with either EC-3445 or FM-300 adhesive. The Gth for each adhesive was determined from cracked-lap-shear (CLS) specimens by initiation tests. Finite-element analyses of various tapered CLS specimen geometries predicted the specimen stress at which the total strain-energy-release rate (GT) equaled Gth at the joint tip. Experiments verified the predictions. The approach described herein predicts the maximum stress at which an adhesive joint can be cycled yet not debond. Furthermore, total strain-energy-release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding and debond initiation in structural adhesives. In addition, debond initiation and growth were found to occur with virtually no peel stress present.

  19. A fracture mechanics approach for designing adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if the adhesive debond initiation stress could be predicted for arbitrary joint geometries. The analysis was based upon a threshold total strain-energy-release rate (Gth) concept. Two bonded systems were tested: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with either EC-3445 or FM-300 adhesive. The Gth for each adhesive was determined from cracked-lap-shear (CLS) specimens by initiation tests. Finite-element analyses of various tapered CLS specimen geometries predicted the specimen stress at which the total strain-energy-release rate (GT) equaled Gth at the joint tip. Experiments verified the predictions. The approach described herein predicts the maximum stress at which an adhesive joint can be cycled yet not debond. Furthermore, total strain-energy-release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding and debond initiation in structural adhesives. In addition, debond initiation and growth were found to occur with virtually no peel stress present.

  20. Effect of salivary contamination during different bonding stages on shear dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch and total etch adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Kermanshah, H.; Ghabraei, Sh.; Bitaraf, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination during bonding procedures without removing saliva on shear dentin bond strength of three adhesive generations when rubber dam isolation is not feasible. Materials and Methods: Flat superficial dentin surfaces of seventy-two extracted human molars were randomly divided into three groups (A: Scotch Bond MP Plus (SBMP), B: Single Bond (SB), C: Prompt L-Pop) according to the applied adhesives and twelve subgroups (n=6) according to the following saliva contamination applied in different bonding steps. The specimens were contaminated with saliva after etching (A1 and B1), after primer application (A2), after adhesive application before polymerization (A3, B2 and C1), and after adhesive polymerization (A4, B3 and C2). Three subgroups were not contaminated as controls (A5, B4 and C3). Resin composite was placed on dentin subsequently followed by thermocycling. Shear test was performed by Universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The collected data were statically analyzed using one and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD. Results: In contrast to SBMP and SB, the mean shear bond strength of Promote L-Pop was not significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated subgroups. Mean shear bond strengths of SBMP subgroups contaminated after adhesive polymerization or uncontaminated were significantly higher compared to the other two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: Unlike Promote L-Pop, saliva contamination could reduce shear bond strength of the total-etch adhesives. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesive contaminated with saliva. PMID:21998787

  1. Toward Optimum Scale and TBC Adhesion on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystal superalloys exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance if their sulfur content is reduced from typical impurity levels of approximately 5 ppmw to below 0.5 ppmw. Excellent alumina scale adhesion was documented for PWA 1480 and PWA 1484 without yttrium additions. Hydrogen annealing produced effective desulfurization of PWA 1480 to less than 0.2 ppmw and was also used to achieve controlled intermediate levels. The direct relationship between cyclic oxidation behavior and sulfur content was shown. An adhesion criterion was proposed based on the total amount of sulfur available for interfacial segregation, e.g., less than or equal to 0.2 ppmw S will maximize adhesion for a 1 mm thick sample. PWA 1484, melt desulfurized to 0.3 ppmw S, also exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance and encouraging TBC lives (10 mils of 8YSZ, plasma sprayed without a bond coat) in 1100 C cyclic oxidation tests.

  2. High-performance adhesive systems for polymer composite bonding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Jeremy Hager

    Adhesive films are utilized for polymeric composite bonding in numerous high-performance products including aerospace structures. These films must provide high bond strengths over the life-cycle of the part while not compromising the thermal or mechanical performance of the overall system. Currently, epoxy materials are most often employed in commercial adhesive films because of their versatility, cost, processing characteristics, and performance. However, there still exists a desire to improve these materials so that highly robust systems capable of optimized thermal, mechanical, and fracture resistance properties can be realized. In order to create these improved systems, a better understanding of the fundamental characteristics important in adhesion between dissimilar resin systems is needed. The goal of this research was to provide a means for obtaining this knowledge using an engineering approach. A methodology was developed by which model adhesive systems could be designed to explore processing-structure-property relationships. These model systems were designed to be characteristically similar and not chemically identical to commercial adhesive films. The methodology included a simulation engineering step to characterize the commercial product and develop the model system and a re-engineering step that occurs with the material manufacturer and customer to produce an improved product. The methodology was used to explore several issues for toughened epoxy adhesives including the adducting influence on performance, flexibilized liquid elastomer content importance, the relation between elastomer dispersed phase conversion and properties, the feasibility and performance of hybrid toughened resins, and the microcracking behavior of layered composite materials. Collectively, this research created a process that was applied to explore and identify important material parameters and provided information that can be used to design improved film adhesives.

  3. Optimizing Scale Adhesion on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    To improve scale adhesion, single crystal superalloys have been desulfurized to levels below 1 ppmw by hydrogen annealing. A transition to fully adherent behavior has been shown to occur at a sulfur level of about 0.2 ppmw, as demonstrated for PWA 1480, PWA 1484, and Rene N5 single crystal superalloys in 1100-1150 C cyclic oxidation tests up to 2000 h. Small additions of yttrium (15 ppmw) also have been effective in producing adhesion for sulfur contents of about 5 ppmw. Thus the critical Y/S ratio required for adhesion was on the order of 3-to-1 by weight (1-to-1 atomic), in agreement with values estimated from solubility products for yttrium sulfides. While hydrogen annealing greatly improved an undoped alloy, yielding <= 0.01 ppmw S, it also produced benefits for Y-doped alloys without measurably reducing the sulfur content.

  4. Curli mediate bacterial adhesion to fibronectin via tensile multiple bonds

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Gruber, Hermann J.; Cui, Yidan; Traxler, Lukas; Siligan, Christine; Park, Sungsu; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many enteric bacteria including pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains produce curli fibers that bind to host surfaces, leading to bacterial internalization into host cells. By using a nanomechanical force-sensing approach, we obtained real-time information about the distribution of molecular bonds involved in the adhesion of curliated bacteria to fibronectin. We found that curliated E. coli and fibronectin formed dense quantized and multiple specific bonds with high tensile strength, resulting in tight bacterial binding. Nanomechanical recognition measurements revealed that approximately 10 bonds were disrupted either sequentially or simultaneously under force load. Thus the curli formation of bacterial surfaces leads to multi-bond structural components of fibrous nature, which may explain the strong mechanical binding of curliated bacteria to host cells and unveil the functions of these proteins in bacterial internalization and invasion. PMID:27652888

  5. Adhesive bone bonding prospects for lithium disilicate ceramic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennila Thirugnanam, Sakthi Kumar

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) implants articulating mandible with temporal bone in humans have a very high failure rate. Metallic TMJ implants available in the medical market are not osseointegrated, but bond only by mechanical interlocking using screws which may fail, mandating a second surgery for removal. Stress concentration around fixture screws leads to aseptic loosening or fracture of the bone. It has been proposed that this problem can be overcome by using an all-ceramic TMJ implant bonded to bone with dental adhesives. Structural ceramics are promising materials with an excellent track record in the field of dentis.

  6. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  7. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Júnior, Lindomar Corrêa; de Souza Almeida, Mauro; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Honório, Heitor Marques; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; De Souza, Grace Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse). Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10) and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05). Results: According to the results, Kruskal–Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001). The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05). Group PSM8 (P90 + SM) showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP), PSB2 (P90 + SB), and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE). Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin. PMID:26752846

  8. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent. PMID:22414513

  9. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT ADHESIVE SYSTEMS ON THE PULL-OUT BOND STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER POSTS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Andrade, Andréa Mello; Machuca, Melissa Fernanda Garcia; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; da Silva, Ricardo Virgolino C.; Veronezi, Maria Cecília

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost – Angelus-Brazil) cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC – 3M/ESPE) associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP) Plus – 3M/ESPE), using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10): G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE) + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost – Angelus) + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin – Angelus) + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf) and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 ± 7.123; G2- 37.752 ±13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; α=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the groups. Adhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1). The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength. PMID:19089224

  10. Design of adhesive bonded composite-to-titanium cylindrical joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depasquale, F.; Ciranna, M.; Ciavatta, G.; Vittori, A.

    1993-02-01

    The ASTER composite-case solid-rocket motor (SRM) development program has addressed the problem posed by the requirement of adhesively bonding a metallic dome attach ring to the filament-wound composite case. An account is given of the numerical and experimental activities undertaken to optimize and verify the design solution, whose full opening at the aft end of the motor case facilitates mandrel extraction and propellant grain shape flexibility.

  11. Structural Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Fady

    In recent years, many aerospace organizations have researched and implemented composite materials to achieve better fuel efficiency as well as reduced maintenance cost. In addition to the use of composites, manufacturers are investigating the use of adhesive bonded joints and composite patch bonded repairs to extend the life of their in-service aircraft. Adhesive joints are superior to traditional mechanical fasteners as they reduce stress concentration zones and overall part count. However, the integrity of an adhesive joint is difficult to inspect. Inspection of adhesive joints may be carried out using interrogation technology such as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This thesis focuses on the evaluation of Acoustic-Ultrasonic (AU) SHM technique for the detection of crack and disbond growth. In addition to AU, Capacitance Disbond Detection Technique (CDDT) and the Surface Mountable Crack Detection System (SMCDS) were evaluated for the detection disbonds. Results of the AU system demonstrated that AU technology may be used to detect and quantify crack and disbond growth. It was also found that SMCDS and CDDT both complement each other, as SMCDS identified the location of disbond while CDDT quantify disbond.

  12. A novel composite-to-composite adhesive bond mechanism.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Naotake; Sakamoto, Tominori; Kubota, Yuya; Kondo, Yoshie; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if adhesion between various resin composites can occur by a chelation reaction of elemental ions. The surface composition of four commercially available resin composites (Beautifil II, Clearfil AP-X, Estelite Σ Quick and Solare) were measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Composite-to-composite adhesion with conventional silane coupling treatment was compared to self-etching primer treatment and evaluated by conventional shear bond strength testing. Our results detected Strontium and Barium (alkaline metallic earth ions) on the surface of Beautifil II and Clearfil AP-X resins. The shear bond strength values of self-etching primer treatments of Beautifil II and Clearfil AP-X was significantly higher than Estelite Σ Quick and Solare. Our data suggest that self-etching primer treatment is effective for adhesion of resin composites, depending on their filler composition, due to the chelation adhesion reaction between the acidic monomer and incorporated alkaline metal ions. PMID:21778602

  13. Adhesion of hydrogels under water by hydrogen bonding: from molecular interactions to macroscopic adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creton, Costantino

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogels are an essential part of living organisms and are widely used in biotechnologies, health care and food science. Although swelling properties, cell adhesion on gel surfaces and gel elasticity have attracted much interest, macroscopic adhesion of hydrogels on solid surfaces in aqueous environment is much less well understood. We studied systematically and in aqueous environment, the reversible adhesion by hydrogen bonding of macroscopic model hydrogels of polydimethylacrylamide (PDMA) or of polyacrylamide (PAAm) on solid surfaces functionalized with polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymer brushes. The hydrogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization and the brushes were prepared by grafting polytertbutyl acrylate chains and converting them by pyrolisis into polyacrylic acid. A new adhesion tester based on the flat punch geometry was designed and used to control the contact area, contact time, contact pressure and debonding velocity of the gels from the surface while the samples were fully immersed in water. The adhesion tests were performed at different pH and temperatures and the modulus of the gel and grafting density and molecular weight of the brushes was varied. Macroscopic adhesion results were compared with phase diagrams in dilute solution to detect molecular interactions. While the PDMA/PAA pair behaved very similarly in solution and in macroscopic adhesion tests, the PAAm/PAA pair showed an unexpectedly high adhesion level relatively to its complexation ability in dilute solution. Surprisingly, time dependent experiments showed that the kinetics of H-bond formation and breakup at interfaces was very slow resulting in adhesion energies which were very dependent on contact time up to one hour of contact. At the molecular level, neutron reflectivity showed that the equilibrium brush conformation when in contact with the gels was more extended at pH2 (H-bonds activated) than at pH9 (H-bonds deactivated) and that a certain applied pressure was

  14. Contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; de Gee, A J; Kaga, M; Feilzer, A J

    2006-08-01

    Adhesives cured under constrained conditions develop contraction stresses. We hypothesized that, with dentin as a bonding substrate, the stress would reach a maximum, followed by a continuous decline. Stress development was determined with a tensilometer for two total-etch systems and two systems with self-etching primers. The adhesives were placed in a thin layer between a glass plate and a flat dentin surface pretreated with phosphoric acid or self-etching primer. After an initial maximum shortly after light-curing, the stress decreased dramatically for the total-etch systems (70%) and, to a lesser extent, for the adhesives with self-etching primers (30%). The greater stress decrease for the total-etch systems was ascribed to water and/or solvents released into the adhesives from the fully opened dentinal tubules by the pulling/sucking action of the contraction stress. This happened less with the adhesives with self-etching primers, where the tubules remained mainly closed.

  15. The Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Advanced Composite Joints Using Joint Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  16. The analysis of adhesively bonded advanced composite joints using joint finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  17. Construction of microfluidic chips using polydimethylsiloxane for adhesive bonding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongkai; Huang, Bo; Zare, Richard N

    2005-12-01

    A thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) prepolymer, which is coated on a glass slide, is transferred onto the embossed area surfaces of a patterned substrate. This coated substrate is brought into contact with a flat plate, and the two structures are permanently bonded to form a sealed fluidic system by thermocuring (60 degrees C for 30 min) the prepolymer. The PDMS exists only at the contact area of the two surfaces with a negligible portion exposed to the microfluidic channel. This method is demonstrated by bonding microfluidic channels of two representative soft materials (PDMS substrate on a PDMS plate), and two representative hard materials (glass substrate on a glass plate). The effects of the adhesive layer on the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in glass channels are calculated and compared with the experimental results of a CE separation. For a channel with a size of approximately 10 to 500 microm, a approximately 200-500 nm thick adhesive layer creates a bond without voids or excess material and has little effect on the EOF rate. The major advantages of this bonding method are its generality and its ease of use.

  18. Effect of prolonged air drying on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Werle, Stefanie Bressan; Steglich, Ana; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Rocha, Rachel Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of air-drying time on degree of solvent evaporation (DE), dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS), and degree of conversion (DC) of 5 adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2, XP Bond, Prime & Bond 2.1, OptiBond Solo, and Adper Easy One. For DE testing, 20 µL of each material was submitted to measurements in a digital balance after an air stream of 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, or 60 seconds; the weight loss was computed and converted to a percentage (DE). For µTBS testing, 50 sound human molars were divided into groups (n = 5). The 5 adhesive systems were applied either in accordance with manufacturers' instructions for solvent drying time (control) or with a prolonged drying time (20-30 seconds). After composite resin was built up on the hybridized surfaces, the teeth were stored for 24 hours and then sectioned to obtain beams that were loaded until fracture. For DC testing, specimens of each adhesive and air-drying condition (n = 3) were evaluated by means of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data were submitted to 2-way analysis of variance, t test, and Spearman test for correlation analysis. Prolonged air drying resulted in significantly greater DE than did the time suggested by the manufacturers. The adhesives XP Bond and Adper Easy One showed significantly greater µTBS with prolonged air drying. The DC was not affected by air-drying time. No statistically significant correlation was found between DC and µTBS values. Depending on the material, bond strength can be improved by prolonged air-drying times.

  19. Effect of prolonged air drying on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Werle, Stefanie Bressan; Steglich, Ana; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Rocha, Rachel Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of air-drying time on degree of solvent evaporation (DE), dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS), and degree of conversion (DC) of 5 adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2, XP Bond, Prime & Bond 2.1, OptiBond Solo, and Adper Easy One. For DE testing, 20 µL of each material was submitted to measurements in a digital balance after an air stream of 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, or 60 seconds; the weight loss was computed and converted to a percentage (DE). For µTBS testing, 50 sound human molars were divided into groups (n = 5). The 5 adhesive systems were applied either in accordance with manufacturers' instructions for solvent drying time (control) or with a prolonged drying time (20-30 seconds). After composite resin was built up on the hybridized surfaces, the teeth were stored for 24 hours and then sectioned to obtain beams that were loaded until fracture. For DC testing, specimens of each adhesive and air-drying condition (n = 3) were evaluated by means of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data were submitted to 2-way analysis of variance, t test, and Spearman test for correlation analysis. Prolonged air drying resulted in significantly greater DE than did the time suggested by the manufacturers. The adhesives XP Bond and Adper Easy One showed significantly greater µTBS with prolonged air drying. The DC was not affected by air-drying time. No statistically significant correlation was found between DC and µTBS values. Depending on the material, bond strength can be improved by prolonged air-drying times. PMID:26545278

  20. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    PubMed

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  1. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    PubMed

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling. PMID:22790477

  2. Bonding efficacy of etch-and-rinse adhesives after dentin biomodification using ethanol saturation and collagen cross-linker pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pallavi; Nagpal, Rajni; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Manuja, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether the application of two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives to biomodified dentin using ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) and collagen cross-linker (CCL) pretreatment improves their sealing ability. Materials and Methods: In 176 extracted human molars, the pulp-chambers were deroofed, and teeth were sectioned horizontally. Samples were randomly divided into eight groups according to four bonding techniques using two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives; Adper Single Bond 2 (ASB) and XP Bond (XPB). The bonding protocols included: (a) Water-wet bonding (WWB); (b) EWB; (c) WWB and CCL application; (d) EWB and CCL application. After composite resin restorations, dye leakage evaluation and scanning electron microscope analysis were done. Leakage scores were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Result: For both ASB and XPB adhesives, least dye leakage was observed in EWB groups (b and d) (P = 0.918 and P = 0.399 respectively) which showed no significant difference, while maximum leakage scores were seen in WWB groups (a and c). Regardless of CCL application and adhesives used, EWB technique depicted (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004) significantly greater sealing ability than WWB. Conclusion: Bonding of ASB and XPB using EWB significantly improved their sealing ability. Biomodification using CCL pretreatment had no significant effect on the sealing ability of adhesives bonded with either WWB or EWB. PMID:26180421

  3. Adhesive bonding via exposure to microwave radition and resulting mechanical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.; Meek, T.T.

    1996-04-01

    Adhesive bonding/joining through microwave radiation curing has been evaluated as an alternative processing technology. This technique significantly reduces the required curing time for the adhesive while maintaining equivalent physical characteristics as the adhesive material is polymerized (crosslinked). This results in an improvement in the economics of the process. Testing of samples cured via microwave radiation for evaluation of mechanical properties indicated that the obtained values from the single lap-shear test are in the range of the conventionally cured samples. In general, the ultimate tensile strength, {sigma}{sub B}, for the microwave processed samples subjected to this single lap-shear test was slightly higher than for conventionally cured samples. This technology shows promise for being applicable to a wide range of high volume, consumer goods industries, where plastics and polymer composites will be processed.

  4. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  5. Adhesive-bonded scarf and stepped-lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Continuum mechanics solutions are derived for the static load-carrying capacity of scarf and stepped-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses account for adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch. The scarf joint solutions include a simple algebraic formula which serves as a close lower bound, within a small fraction of a per cent of the true answer for most practical geometries and materials. Digital computer programs were developed and, for the stepped-lap joints, the critical adherend and adhesive stresses are computed for each step. The scarf joint solutions exhibit grossly different behavior from that for double-lap joints for long overlaps inasmuch as that the potential bond shear strength continues to increase with indefinitely long overlaps on the scarf joints. The stepped-lap joint solutions exhibit some characteristics of both the scarf and double-lap joints. The stepped-lap computer program handles arbitrary (different) step lengths and thickness and the solutions obtained have clarified potentially weak design details and the remedies. The program has been used effectively to optimize the joint proportions.

  6. Analysis Method for Inelastic, Adhesively Bonded Joints with Anisotropic Adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Klang, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional analysis method for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives with nonlinear material behavior is presented in the proposed paper. The strain and resulting stress field in a general, bonded joint overlap are determined by using a variable-step, finite-difference solution algorithm to iteratively solve a system of first-order differential equations. Applied loading is given by a system of combined extensional, bending, and shear forces that are applied to the edge of the joint overlap. Adherends are assumed to behave as linear, cylindrically bent plates using classical laminated plate theory that includes the effects of first-order transverse shear deformation. Using the deformation theory of plasticity and a modified von-Mises yield criterion, inelastic material behavior is modeled in the adhesive layer. Results for the proposed method are verified against previous results from the literature and shown to be in excellent agreement. An additional case that highlights the effects of transverse shear deformation between similar adherends is also presented.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of Adhesive Bonded Sheet Metal Joints at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kiyomi; Azimin, Muhd; Tanaka, Masashi; Ikeda, Takashi

    A new approach is expected for heat resisting metal joints with inorganic adhesive. In the present study, the mechanical characterization of the inorganic adhesive and the strength evaluation of metal joints are realized by an experimental procedure that includes a static test for single lap joints bonded with inorganic adhesives. The inorganic adhesive can be cured at 150°C, and the maximum temperature resistance proposed is up to 1,200°C. A tensile shear test for the joints with a nickel adherend is performed at an elevated temperature of up to 400°C. The effect of material property, overlap length, and thickness of adherend on the joint strength is discussed based on stress analysis for corresponding joint models using a Finite Element Method. It is important to confirm whether fracture occurred in the adhesive layer or at the interface between the adhesive and the adherend. Therefore, the deformation and fracture behavior of the adhesive layer is investigated microscopically by the photographs of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for the fracture surface.

  8. Simplified procedures for designing adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures for the preliminary design of composite adhesive joints are described. Typical joints, their respective free body diagrams, and approximate equations for estimating the stresses in each of these typical joints are summarized. Equations are also presented to check the critical conditions of the joint such as minimum length, maximum adhesive shear stress, and peel-off stress. To illustrate the procedure, sample designs are described in step-by-step fashion for a butt joint with single doubler subjected to static loads, cyclic loads, and environmental effects. The results show that unsymmetric adhesive joints are inefficient and should be avoided, and hygrothermal environments and cyclic loads dramatically reduce the structural integrity of the joint and require several joint lengths compared with those for static load with no environmental effects.

  9. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur.

  10. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  11. Torsional Stiffness Verification of an Adhesively Bonded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annicchiarico, A.; Caputo, F.; De Angelis, G.; Frascà, F.; Lamanna, G.

    2010-06-01

    In the present work numerical-experimental analysis for the characterization of a structural adhesive has been performed. The numerical analysis has been carried out through the finite element method by using, for the phases pre / post processing were used commercial programs while for the phase of numerical solution the Abaqus code was used. The experimental analyses were carried out at laboratories of C.R.F. S.C.p.A. by using of a standard quasi static testing machine. Later numerical analysis was performed comparing the torsional stiffness of a vehicle in which the welded connection between the pavilion and the flank has been substituted by bonded one. This comparison has allowed to demonstrate the ability of the bonded joint discussed to provide mechanical performances comparable with those of a welded joint widely used in the automotive industry.

  12. Adhesive Bonding of Polymeric Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, C.D., Boeman, R.G., Paulauskas, F.L.

    1994-11-18

    In 1992, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began a cooperative research program with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to develop technologies that would overcome obstacles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures. By reducing the weight of current automobiles, greater fuel economy and reduced emissions can be achieved. The bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance since this enabling technology gives designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low-mass materials for structural component weight reduction. Early in the project`s conception, five key areas were identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry.

  13. Improved Bond Strength of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives Through Nanostructured Chromium Adhesion Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobble, Kyle; Stark, Amelia; Stagon, Stephen P.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of many consumer products suffers due to weak and inconsistent bonds formed to low surface energy polymer materials, such as polyolefin-based high-density polyethylene (HDPE), with adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate. In this letter, we present an industrially relevant means of increasing bond shear strength and consistency through vacuum metallization of chromium thin films and nanorods, using HDPE as a prototype material and cyanoacrylate as a prototype adhesive. For the as received HDPE surfaces, unmodified bond shear strength is shown to be only 0.20 MPa with a standard deviation of 14 %. When Cr metallization layers are added onto the HDPE at thicknesses of 50 nm or less, nanorod-structured coatings outperform continuous films and have a maximum bond shear strength of 0.96 MPa with a standard deviation of 7 %. When the metallization layer is greater than 50 nm thick, continuous films demonstrate greater performance than nanorod coatings and have a maximum shear strength of 1.03 MPa with a standard deviation of 6 %. Further, when the combination of surface roughening with P400 grit sandpaper and metallization is used, 100-nm-thick nanorod coatings show a tenfold increase in shear strength over the baseline, reaching a maximum of 2.03 MPa with a standard deviation of only 3 %. The substantial increase in shear strength through metallization, and the combination of roughening with metallization, may have wide-reaching implications in consumer products which utilize low surface energy plastics.

  14. Heat Transfer in Adhesively Bonded Honeycomb Core Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship has been used as a standard in aerospace industry to predict the effective thermal conductivity of honeycomb core panels. Recent measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of an adhesively bonded titanium honeycomb core panel using three different techniques, two steady-state and one transient radiant step heating method, at four laboratories varied significantly from each other and from the Swann and Pittman predictions. Average differences between the measurements and the predictions varied between 17 and 61% in the temperature range of 300 to 500 K. In order to determine the correct values of the effective thermal conductivity and determine which set of the measurements or predictions were most accurate, the combined radiation and conduction heat transfer in the honeycomb core panel was modeled using a finite volume numerical formulation. The transient radiant step heating measurements provided the best agreement with the numerical results. It was found that a modification of the Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship which incorporated the facesheets and adhesive layers in the thermal model provided satisfactory results. Finally, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the influence of adhesive thickness and thermal conductivity on the overall heat transfer through the panel.

  15. [Study of tensile bond strength of 3 different adhesive systems associated with composites on dentinal surfaces].

    PubMed

    Matos, A B; Saraceni, C H; Jacobs, M M; Oda, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the tensile bond strength of 3 different bonding systems, associated to composite resins, bonded to dentinal surfaces. Forty-four dentinal surfaces were obtained from recently extracted human molars. A standardized smear layer was obtained and the surfaces were divided in 3 groups: G1) self etch + microhybrid composite; G2) single-component adhesive + phosphoric acid + microhybrid composite and G3) conventional system (acid + primer + bond) + microhybrid composite. Specimens made of composite resin were constructed in the shape of an inverted truncated cone with 3 mm of diameter. Tensile bond strength test was performed at the speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the results were expressed in MPa. The analysis of variance ANOVA (p < 0.05) determined that the type of bonding system used influenced tensile bond strength. Tukey's test, however, showed that the results of the comparison between G2 and G3 were the only statistically significant ones, with G2 showing greater values of tensile bond strength.

  16. Adhesive bonding and the use of corrosion resistant primers. [for metal surface preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockridge, R. R.; Thibault, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    The use of an anti-corrosive primer has been shown to be essential to assure survival of a bonded structure in a hostile environment, particularly if a stress is to be applied to the adhesively bonded joint during the environmental exposure. For example, the Lockheed L-1011 TriStar assembly, after exhaustive evaluation tests specifies use of chromate filled inhibitive polysulfide sealants, and use of corrosion inhibiting adhesive primers prior to structural bonding with film adhesive.

  17. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  18. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  19. Mechanical switching and coupling between two dissociation pathways in a P-selectin adhesion bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Evan; Leung, Andrew; Heinrich, Volkmar; Zhu, Cheng

    2004-08-01

    Many biomolecular bonds exhibit a mechanical strength that increases in proportion to the logarithm of the rate of force application. Consistent with exponential decrease in bond lifetime under rising force, this kinetically limited failure reflects dissociation along a single thermodynamic pathway impeded by a sharp free energy barrier. Using a sensitive force probe to test the leukocyte adhesion bond P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1)-P-selectin, we observed a linear increase of bond strength with each 10-fold increase in the rate of force application from 300 to 30,000 pN/sec, implying a single pathway for failure. However, the strength and lifetime of PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds dropped anomalously when loaded below 300 pN/sec, demonstrating unexpectedly faster dissociation and a possible second pathway for failure. Remarkably, if first loaded by a "jump" in force to 20-30 pN, the bonds became strong when subjected to a force ramp as slow as 30 pN/sec and exhibited the same single-pathway kinetics under all force rates. Applied in this way, a new "jump/ramp" mode of force spectroscopy was used to show that the PSGL-1-P-selectin bond behaves as a mechanochemical switch where force history selects between two dissociation pathways with markedly different properties. Furthermore, replacing PSGL-1 by variants of its 19-aa N terminus and by the crucial tetrasaccharide sialyl LewisX produces dramatic changes in the failure kinetics, suggesting a structural basis for the two pathways. The two-pathway switch seems to provide a mechanism for the "catch bond" response observed recently with PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds subjected to small-constant forces.

  20. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  1. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  2. Influence of Surface Treatments and Adhesive Systems on Lithium Disilicate Microshear Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Garboza, Celso Sebastião; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Fugolin, Ana Paula Piovezan; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Lopes, Murilo Baena

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength of ceramic prosthetic structures reinforced by lithium disilicate cemented with resin cement under conditions of different surface treatments and adhesive systems. Seventy-two rectangular blocks of lithium disilicate (6.5 mm long × 5 mm wide × 1 mm thick) were fabricated, air abraded with 50-μm Al2O3 particles and divided into six groups (n=12) depending on the surface pretreatments. The groups were as follows: 10HF/S/SBM: 10% hydrofluoric acid etched for 20 s (10HF) + silane (S) + Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBM); 10HF/S/SB: 10HF + S + Single Bond Universal (SB); 10HF/SBM; 10HF/SB; S/SBM and S/SB. Two 1-mm-long plastic tubes were placed on the specimens, filled with RelyX ARC resin cement and cured for 20 s per tube. The plastic tube was removed, and the microshear bond strength was tested. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Fractured specimens were observed under optical microscopy. For both adhesives, the bond strengths (MPa) of groups treated with acid-etching and silane (10HF/S/SB: 24.82, 10HF/S/SBM: 24.90) were higher (p<0.001) than those of groups treated with acid-etching (10HF/SB: 16.47, 10HF/SBM: 19.94) only or only silane (S/SB: 18.42, S/SBM: 13.24). All groups showed a predominance of failure adhesive. The silanization should be a clinical step in cementing ceramic structures reinforced by lithium disilicate, even with the application of universal adhesive that contains silane in its formulation. PMID:27652711

  3. Laser Ablation Surface Preparation of Ti-6A1-4V for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Watson, Kent A.; Morales, Guillermo; Williams, Thomas; Hicks, Robert; Wohl, Christopher J.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires certification before it can be incorporated in primary structures for commercial aviation without disbond-arrestment features or redundant load paths. Surface preparation is widely recognized as the key step to producing robust and predictable bonds. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface which can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-dip, manual abrasion and grit blast treatments which are expensive, hazardous, polluting, and less precise. This report documents preliminary testing of a surface preparation technique using laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends. Failure mode, surface roughness, and chemical makeup were analyzed using fluorescence enhanced visualization, microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Single lap shear tests were conducted on bonded and aged specimens to observe bond strength retention and failure mode. Some promising results showed increasing strength and durability of lap shear specimens as laser ablation coverage area and beam intensity increased. Chemical analyses showed trends for surface chemical species which correlated with improved bond strength and durability. Combined, these results suggest that laser ablation is a viable process for inclusion with or/and replacement of one or more currently used titanium surface treatments. On-going work will focus on additional mechanical tests to further demonstrate improved bond durability.

  4. Improved Bond Strength of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives Through Nanostructured Chromium Adhesion Layers.

    PubMed

    Gobble, Kyle; Stark, Amelia; Stagon, Stephen P

    2016-12-01

    The performance of many consumer products suffers due to weak and inconsistent bonds formed to low surface energy polymer materials, such as polyolefin-based high-density polyethylene (HDPE), with adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate. In this letter, we present an industrially relevant means of increasing bond shear strength and consistency through vacuum metallization of chromium thin films and nanorods, using HDPE as a prototype material and cyanoacrylate as a prototype adhesive. For the as received HDPE surfaces, unmodified bond shear strength is shown to be only 0.20 MPa with a standard deviation of 14 %. When Cr metallization layers are added onto the HDPE at thicknesses of 50 nm or less, nanorod-structured coatings outperform continuous films and have a maximum bond shear strength of 0.96 MPa with a standard deviation of 7 %. When the metallization layer is greater than 50 nm thick, continuous films demonstrate greater performance than nanorod coatings and have a maximum shear strength of 1.03 MPa with a standard deviation of 6 %. Further, when the combination of surface roughening with P400 grit sandpaper and metallization is used, 100-nm-thick nanorod coatings show a tenfold increase in shear strength over the baseline, reaching a maximum of 2.03 MPa with a standard deviation of only 3 %. The substantial increase in shear strength through metallization, and the combination of roughening with metallization, may have wide-reaching implications in consumer products which utilize low surface energy plastics. PMID:27650290

  5. Effects of surface preparation on the long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Jason Dante

    The long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints is critical to modern aircraft structures, which are increasingly adopting bonding as an alternative option to mechanical fastening. The effects of the surface preparation of the adherends are critical, affecting initial strength, long-term durability, fracture toughness, and failure modes of bonded joints. In this study, several potential factors are evaluated, with focus on the following: (1) Effects of possible chemical contamination from release fabrics, release films, and peel plies during adherend cure. (2) Chemical and mechanical effects of abrasion on the fracture toughness and failure mode. (3) Characterization of paste and film adhesives. There are several standard test methods used to evaluate specimen fracture, but the majority concentrate on bonded metals and interlaminar composite fracture. Testing concentrated on mode I tests; a custom double cantilever beam specimen was devised and utilized, and two forms of a wedge crack test (traveling and static) were also used. Additionally, single lap shear tests were run to contrast the mode I tests. Non-destructive testing included X-ray photography of crack fronts, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface chemistry analyses, and scanning electron microscope imaging of prepared surfaces. All mode I test methods tended to be in agreement in the ranking of different surface preparation methods. Test results revealed that release agents deposited on adherend surfaces during their cure cycle prevented proper adhesion. While mechanical abrasion did improve their fracture toughness and lower their contamination greatly, the test values did not reach the levels of samples that were not contaminated before bonding, and the interfacial modes of failure did not always change to desirable modes.

  6. Evaluation of Adhesive Bonding of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Material with Duel Cured Resin Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gundawar, Sham M.; Radke, Usha M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the adhesive bonding of dual cured resin luting agents with lithium disilicate ceramic material. Materials and Methods: Porcelain laminate veneers were prepared with lithium disilicate ceramic material i.e. IPS Empress II( E-Max Press). These laminates were bonded with RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Duolink and Nexus NX3.The porcelain laminates were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (Pulpdent Corporation) for one minute, washed for 15 sec with three way syringe and dried for 15 sec with air syringe. The silane (Ultradent) was applied with the help of applicator tip in a single coat and kept undisturbed for one minute. The prepared surfaces of the premolars were treated with 37% phosphoric acid (Prime dent) for 15 sec, thoroughly rinsed and dried as per manufactures instructions. The shear bond test was carried out on all samples with the Universal testing machine (Instron U.S.A.) The scanning electron microscopic study was performed at the fractured interface of representative samples from each group of luting agents. Result: In this study, the highest value of shear bond strength was obtained for NEXUS NX3 and the lowest for VARIOLINK II. Conclusion: The difference in bond strength can be interpreted as the difference in fracture resistance of luting agents, to which shearing load was applied during the shear bond strength test. It is inferred from this study that the composition of the luting agent determines the adhesive characteristics in addition to surface treatment and bonding surface area. PMID:25859514

  7. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  8. Bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentin treated with Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malta, D. A. M. P.; Costa, M. M.; Pelino, J. E. P.; de Andrade, M. F.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to verify through micro tensile bond test the bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentine previously treated with Er:YAG laser. Twenty caries free extracted human third molars were used. The teeth were divided in four experimental groups (n = 5): (G1) control group; (G2) irradiation of the adhesive system with the Nd:YAG laser; (G3) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser; (G4) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser followed by the irradiation of the adhesive system with Nd:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser fluency parameter for the dentin treatment was of 60 J/cm2. The adhesive system was irradiated with the Nd:YAG laser with fluency of 100 J/cm2. Dental restorations were performed with Adper Single Bond 2/Z250. One tooth from each group was prepared for the evaluation of the adhesive interface under SEM and bond failure tests were also performed and evaluated. The statistical analysis showed statistical significant difference between the groups G1 and G3, G1 and G4, G2 and G3, and G2 and G4; and similarity between the groups G1 and G2, and G3 and G4. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The SEM analysis showed an adhesive interface with features confirming the results of the mechanical tests. The Nd:YAG laser on the adhesive system did not influence the bond strength in dentin treated or not with the Er:YAG laser.

  9. Increasing the Strength of Adhesively Bonded Joints by Tapering the Adherends

    SciTech Connect

    GUESS,TOMMY R.; METZINGER,KURT E.

    1999-09-09

    Wind turbine blades are often fabricated with composite materials. These composite blades are frequently attached to a metallic structure with an adhesive bond. For the baseline composite-to-steel joint considered in this study, failure typically occurs when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. Previous efforts established that the adhesive peel stresses strongly influence the strength of these joints for both single-cycle and fatigue loading. This study focused on reducing the adhesive peel stresses present in these joints by tapering the steel adherends. Several different tapers were evaluated using finite element analysis before arriving at a final design. To confirm that the selected taper was an improvement to the existing design, the baseline joint and the modified joint were tested in both compression and tension. In these axial tests, the compressive strengths of the joints with tapered adherends were greater than those of the baseline joints for both single-cycle and low-cycle fatigue. In addition, only a minor reduction in tensile strength was observed for the joints with tapered adherends when compared to the baseline joints. Thus, the modification would be expected to enhance the overall performance of this joint.

  10. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  11. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  12. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  13. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength.

  14. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength. PMID:23841790

  15. On structural health monitoring of aircraft adhesively bonded repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlopoulou, Sofia

    The recent interest in life extension of ageing aircraft and the need to address the repair challenges in the new age composite ones, led to the investigation of new repair methodologies such as adhesively bonded repair patches. The present thesis focuses on structural health monitoring aspects of the repairs, evaluating their performance with guided ultrasonic waves aiming to develop a monitoring strategy which would eliminate unscheduled maintenance and unnecessary inspection costs. To address the complex nature of the wave propagation phenomena, a finite element based model identified the existing challenges by exploring the interaction of the excitation waves with different levels of damage. The damage sensitivity of the first anti-symmetric mode was numerically investigated. An external bonded patch and a scarf repair, were further tested in static and dynamic loadings, and their performance was monitored with Lamb waves, excited by surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers.. The response was processed by means of advanced pattern recognition and data dimension reduction techniques such as novelty detection and principal component analysis. An optimisation of these tools enabled an accurate damage detection under complex conditions. The phenomena of mode isolation and precise arrival time determination under a noisy environment and the problem of inadequate training data were investigated and solved through appropriate transducer arrangements and advanced signal processing respectively. The applicability of the established techniques was demonstrated on an aluminium repaired helicopter tail stabilizer. Each case study utilised alternative non-destructive techniques for validation such as 3D digital image correlation, X-ray radiography and thermography. Finally a feature selection strategy was developed through the analysis of the instantaneous properties of guided waves for damage detection purposes..

  16. Effect of acid etching on bond strength of nanoionomer as an orthodontic bonding adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A new Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement known as nanoionomer containing nanofillers of fluoroaluminosilicate glass and nanofiller 'clusters' has been introduced. An in-vitro study aimed at evaluating shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of nanoionomer under etching/unetched condition for use as an orthodontic bonding agent. Material and Methods: A total of 75 extracted premolars were used, which were divided into three equal groups of 25 each: 1-Conventional adhesive (Enlight Light Cure, SDS, Ormco, CA, USA) was used after and etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by Ortho Solo application 2-nanoionomer (Ketac™ N100, 3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used after etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s 3-nanoionomer was used without etching. The SBS testing was performed using a digital universal testing machine (UTM-G-410B, Shanta Engineering). Evaluation of ARI was done using scanning electron microscopy. The SBS were compared using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test for intergroup comparisons and ARI scores were compared with Chi-square test. Results: ANOVA (SBS, F = 104.75) and Chi-square (ARI, Chi-square = 30.71) tests revealed significant differences between groups (P < 0.01). The mean (SD) SBS achieved with conventional light cure adhesive was significantly higher (P < 0.05) (10.59 ± 2.03 Mpa, 95% CI, 9.74-11.41) than the nanoionomer groups (unetched 4.13 ± 0.88 Mpa, 95% CI, 3.79-4.47 and etched 9.32 ± 1.87 Mpa, 95% CI, 8.58-10.06). However, nanoionomer with etching, registered SBS in the clinically acceptable range of 5.9–7.8 MPa, as suggested by Reynolds (1975). The nanoionomer groups gave significantly lower ARI values than the conventional adhesive group. Conclusion: Based on this in-vitro study, nanoionomer with etching can be successfully used as an orthodontic bonding agent leaving less adhesive remnant on enamel surface, making cleaning easier. However, in-vivo studies are needed to confirm the validity

  17. Nanoleakage of dentin adhesive systems bonded to Carisolv-treated dentin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shisei; Li, Heping; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid layer created in caries-affected dentin has not been fully elucidated and may influence bond durability. This study investigated the nanoleakage patterns of caries-affected dentin after excavation with Carisolv or conventional instruments treated with one of three adhesive systems. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces, including carious lesions, were prepared from extracted human molars and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Carious dentin was removed with Carisolv or round steel burs in conjunction with Caries Detector. PermaQuik, Single Bond or One-Up Bond F was bonded to the excavated dentin surfaces and adjacent flat occlusal surfaces and it was covered with Silux Plus resin-based composite. After 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water, the bonded interfaces were polished to remove flash, and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. Specimens were immersed in 50% (w/v) silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, exposed to photo developing solution for eight hours, then sectioned longitudinally through the bonded, excavated dentin or "normal" dentin surfaces. The sectioned surfaces were polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using back scattered electrons. Silver deposition occurred along the base of the hybrid layer for all specimens. However, Single Bond showed a greater density of silver deposition in the caries-affected dentin compared with normal dentin. PermaQuik had a thicker hybrid layer in caries-affected dentin than normal dentin. One-Up Bond F exhibited a thin hybrid layer in normal dentin, but the hybrid layer was often difficult to detect in caries-affected dentin.

  18. Nanoleakage of dentin adhesive systems bonded to Carisolv-treated dentin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shisei; Li, Heping; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid layer created in caries-affected dentin has not been fully elucidated and may influence bond durability. This study investigated the nanoleakage patterns of caries-affected dentin after excavation with Carisolv or conventional instruments treated with one of three adhesive systems. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces, including carious lesions, were prepared from extracted human molars and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Carious dentin was removed with Carisolv or round steel burs in conjunction with Caries Detector. PermaQuik, Single Bond or One-Up Bond F was bonded to the excavated dentin surfaces and adjacent flat occlusal surfaces and it was covered with Silux Plus resin-based composite. After 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water, the bonded interfaces were polished to remove flash, and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. Specimens were immersed in 50% (w/v) silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, exposed to photo developing solution for eight hours, then sectioned longitudinally through the bonded, excavated dentin or "normal" dentin surfaces. The sectioned surfaces were polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using back scattered electrons. Silver deposition occurred along the base of the hybrid layer for all specimens. However, Single Bond showed a greater density of silver deposition in the caries-affected dentin compared with normal dentin. PermaQuik had a thicker hybrid layer in caries-affected dentin than normal dentin. One-Up Bond F exhibited a thin hybrid layer in normal dentin, but the hybrid layer was often difficult to detect in caries-affected dentin. PMID:12120777

  19. Laser treatment of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic matrix for adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Ucciardello, N.; Giuliani, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laser surface treatment of CFRP made of PPS thermoplastic matrix by means of a 30 W Q-Switched Yb:YAG fiber laser, is investigated with the aim to improve adhesive bonding. The process parameters pulse power, scanning speed, hatch distance and scanning strategy, were varied to the aim to study the influence of the process condition on the first top resin layer removal and fibre damage. The operating window was experimentally determined. The effectiveness of laser treatment was verified by single lap shear test.

  20. Plasticity of hydrogen bond networks regulates mechanochemistry of cell adhesion complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion receptor proteins regulate a range of cellular functions by formation and rupture of noncovalent interactions with ligands. Typically, force decreases the lifetimes of intact complexes (“slip bonds”), making the discovery that these lifetimes can also be prolonged (“catch bonds”) a surprise. We created a microscopic analytic theory by incorporating the structures of selectin and integrin receptors into a conceptual framework based on the theory of stochastic equations, which quantitatively explains a wide range of experimental data (including catch bonds at low forces and slip bonds at high forces). Catch bonds arise due to force-induced remodeling of hydrogen bond networks, a finding that also accounts for unbinding in structurally unrelated integrin–fibronectin and actomyosin complexes. For the selectin family, remodeling of hydrogen bond networks drives an allosteric transition resulting in the formation of the maximum number of hydrogen bonds determined only by the structure of the receptor and independent of the ligand. A similar transition allows us to predict the increase in the number of hydrogen bonds in a particular allosteric state of α5β1 integrin–fibronectin complex, a conformation which is yet to be crystallized. We also make a testable prediction that a single point mutation (Tyr51Phe) in the ligand associated with selectin should dramatically alter the nature of the catch bond compared with the wild type. Our work suggests that nature uses a ductile network of hydrogen bonds to engineer function over a broad range of forces. PMID:24927549

  1. Stress ratio effect on cyclic debonding in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.; Rezaizdeh, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the stress ratio effect on cyclic debond growth behavior in adhesively bonded composite joints. The system studied consisted of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy adhesive. This study showed that the strain energy release rate range was the driving factor for cyclic debonding of the tested bonded system when subjected to cyclic loads with different stress ratios for both mode I and mixed mode I-II loadings.

  2. Effect of a caries-detecting solution on the tensile bond strength of four dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Haruka; Kubo, Shisei; Yokota, Hiroaki; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2006-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of a caries-detecting solution on the tensile bond strength (TBS) to sound bovine dentin--which was either rinsed thoroughly of or contaminated with the caries-detecting solution. Caries Detector (1.0% acid red in propylene glycol) was applied on flat dentin surfaces for 10 seconds, rinsed, and dried with syringe air. In another group, Caries Detector was not rinsed but air-dried. Then, the surfaces were treated with one of the following adhesive systems: Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil SE Bond, One-Up Bond F, or Single Bond. Furthermore, an ingredient of Caries Detector, either 1.0% acid red aqueous solution or propylene glycol, was applied to evaluate the effect of each component. In the control groups, Caries Detector was not applied to the dentin surfaces. Finally, a resin composite was light-cured and the TBS measured. Fractured specimens and treated dentin surfaces were observed by SEM. Caries Detector did not reduce the tensile bond strength of any adhesive system (p>0.05) when rinsed thoroughly. On the other hand, when dentin surface was contaminated with Caries Detector, TBS decreased significantly with Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond. As for the ingredients of Caries Detector, the effect of acid red on TBS was not significant, but that of propylene glycol was significant.

  3. Using Engineered Single-Chain Antibodies to Correlate Molecular Binding Properties and Nanoparticle Adhesion Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Jered B.; Pepper, Lauren R.; Boder, Eric T.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200 nm diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested however, but did appear to effect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. Based on this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that bear

  4. Using engineered single-chain antibodies to correlate molecular binding properties and nanoparticle adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Haun, Jered B; Pepper, Lauren R; Boder, Eric T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2011-11-15

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200-nm-diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models, we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested, however, but did appear to affect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. On the basis of this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that

  5. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives: pH influence

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values to enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 200 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values were tested both on enamel and on dentin: Adper™ Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive (pH = 0.8-1), Futurabond NR (pH=2), G-aenial Bond (pH = 1.5), Clearfil S3 Bond (pH = 2.7). After adhesive systems application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the bonded surface. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until the sample rupture. The shear bond strength values (MPa) of the different groups were compared with analysis of variance after that Kolmogorov and Smirnov tests were applied to assess normality of distributions. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In enamel shear bond strength, the highest shear bond strength values were reported with Futurabond NR (P < 0.01); however, no significant differences were found with Clearfil S3 Bond. The others adhesive systems showed lower shear bond strength values with significant differences between them (P < 0.05). When comparing the dentin shear bond strength, the lowest shear bond strength values were reported with Clearfil S3 Bond (P < 0.05), while there were no significant differences among the other three products (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The pH values of adhesive systems did not influence significantly their shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. PMID:26005459

  6. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  7. Effect of desensitizing agents on the microtensile bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Cortiano, Fernanda M; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; de Souza, Evelise M

    2016-06-01

    Desensitizers can be used to control postoperative sensitivity in adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents on the bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to dentin. Forty-two human molars were sectioned to obtain 3-mm-thick dentin discs. The discs were divided into three groups (n = 14 in each) - no-treatment control group (CT), and oxalic acid [BisBlock (BB)] and calcium phosphate [Desensibilize Nano-P (NP)] desensitizers - before the application of two adhesive systems [Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) and One-Step Plus (OSP)]. A nanoparticle composite resin was used to create a 3-mm-thick build-up. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h before a microtensile bond-strength test was performed. The failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope at 100 × magnification. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the interface for scanning electron microscopy analyses. The CT-SB group exhibited the highest bond strength, differing significantly from BB-SB and BB-OSP groups. Mixed failures were prevalent for all groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a continuous hybrid layer and resin tags in all groups. Dentin bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems was reduced by an oxalic acid desensitizer but was not affected by a calcium phosphate-containing desensitizer. PMID:27038226

  8. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  9. Adhesive Bonding for Optical Metrology Systems in Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohlke, Martin; Schuldt, Thilo; Döringshoff, Klaus; Peters, Achim; Johann, Ulrich; Weise, Dennis; Braxmaier, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Laser based metrology systems become more and more attractive for space applications and are the core elements of planned missions such as LISA (NGO, eLISA) or NGGM where laser interferometry is used for distance measurements between satellites. The GRACE-FO mission will for the first time demonstrate a Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) in space, starting 2017. Laser based metrology also includes optical clocks/references, either as ultra-stable light source for high sensitivity interferometry or as scientific payload e.g. proposed in fundamental physics missions such as mSTAR (mini SpaceTime Asymmetry Research), a mission dedicated to perform a Kennedy-Thorndike experiment on a satellite in a low-Earth orbit. To enable the use of existing optical laboratory setups, optimization with respect to power consumption, weight and dimensions is necessary. At the same time the thermal and structural stability must be increased. Over the last few years we investigated adhesive bonding of optical components to thermally highly stable glass ceramics as an easy-to-handle assembly integration technology. Several setups were implemented and tested for potential later use in space applications. We realized a heterodyne LISA related interferometer with demonstrated noise levels in the pm-range for translation measurement and nano-radiant-range for tilt measurements and two iodine frequency references on Elegant Breadboard (EBB) and Engineering Model (EM) level with frequency stabilities in the 10-15 range for longer integration times. The EM setup was thermally cycled and vibration tested.

  10. The influence of cyclical environmental exposure on the durability of adhesively bonded titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Creegan, C.A.; Shephard, N.E.; Dillard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Bonded systems must be able to withstand a variety of conditions including environmental exposure throughout their lifetime. This is especially important in the aerospace industry where adhesives are used for fastening as well as sealing and insulating. Conditions such as high and low temperatures and high relative humidity may be particularly detrimental to adhesive bonds. Previous durability studies have focused on exposing bonded joints to static environments. This study examines the potential differences in durability when comparing static and cyclical environmental exposure of adhesively bonded titanium. Cyclical tests may more readily simulate actual use exposure conditions for aerospace applications. Base/acid cleaning and chromic acid anodization (CAA) treatments were used to treat the titanium-6Al-4V, and the adherends were bonded with a polyimide adhesive. After static and cyclical environmental exposure tests were conducted, failed samples were characterized via surface sensitive analytical methods.

  11. An Ultrasonic Technique to Determine the Residual Strength of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach, J. D.; Tang, Z.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, ultrasonic techniques to nondestructively evaluate adhesive bond degradation have been studied. The key to the present approach is the introduction of an external factor which pulls the adhesive bond in the nonlinear range, simultaneously with the application of an ultrasonic technique. With the aid of an external static tensile loading, a superimposed longitudinal wave has.been used to obtain the slopes of the stress-strain curve of an adhesive bond at a series of load levels. The critical load, at which a reduction of the slope is detected by the superimposed longitudinal wave, is an indication of the onset of nonlinear behavior of the adhesive bond, and therefore of bond degradation. This approach has been applied to the detection of adhesive bond degradation induced by cyclic fatigue loading. Analogously to the longitudinal wave case, a superimposed shear wave has been used to obtain the effective shear modulus of adhesive layers at different shear load levels. The onset of the nonlinear behavior of an adhesive bond under shear loading has been detected by the use of a superimposed shear wave. Experiments show that a longitudinal wave can also detect the nonlinear behavior when an adhesive bond is subjected to shear loading. An optimal combination of ultrasonic testing and mechanical loading methods for the detection of degradation related nonlinear behavior of adhesive bonds has been discussed. For the purpose of a practical application, an ultrasonic technique that uses a temperature increase as an alternative to static loading has also been investigated. A general strain-temperature correspondence principle that relates a mechanical strain to a temperature has been presented. Explicit strain-temperature correspondence relations for both the tension and shear cases have been derived. An important parameter which quantifies the relation between the wave velocity and temperature has been defined. This parameter, which is indicative of adhesive

  12. Evaluation of enamel damages following orthodontic bracket debonding in fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoter

    PubMed Central

    Baherimoghadam, Tahreh; Akbarian, Sahar; Rasouli, Reza; Naseri, Navid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) of the orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth using Light Bond with and without adhesion promoters and compare their enamel damages following debonding. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 fluorosed (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index = 4–5) and 30 nonfluorosed teeth were randomly distributed between two subgroups according to the bonding materials: Group 1, fluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 2, fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond; Group 3, nonfluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 4, nonfluorosed bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopic evaluation was performed by unbiased stereology in all teeth to determine the amount of adhesive remnants and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and Mann–Whitney test. Results: While fluorosis reduced the SBS of orthodontic bracket (P = 0.017), Enhance Locus Ceruleus LC significantly increased the SBS of the orthodontic bracket in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth (P = 0.039). Significant increasing in the number and length of enamel crack after debonding was found in all four groups. There were no significant differences in the length of enamel crack increased after debonding among four groups (P = 0.768) while increasing in the number of enamel cracks after debonding was significantly different among the four groups (P = 0.023). Teeth in Group 2 showed the highest enamel damages among four groups following debonding. Conclusion: Adhesion promoters could improve the bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but conservative debonding methods for decreasing enamel damages would be necessary. PMID:27095895

  13. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ginel C; Soto, Daniel R; Peattie, Anne M; Full, Robert J; Kenny, T W

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts.

  14. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ginel C.; Soto, Daniel R.; Peattie, Anne M.; Full, Robert J.; Kenny, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts. PMID:21288955

  15. Cytotoxicity of orthodontic bonding adhesive resins on human oral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Tavakkol Afshari, Jalil; Poosti, Maryam; Brook, Azam

    2010-12-01

    There is little information concerning the cytotoxic effects of no-mix and flowable adhesives used in orthodontics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of a no-mix (Unite), a light-cured (Tranbond XT), and a flowable (Denfil Flow) adhesives on human oral fibroblasts. Twelve discs of each adhesive were prepared and aged for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). Cell viability was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the difference between the groups was tested by analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). After 1 day of storage, the no-mix adhesive showed moderate cytotoxic effects (P < 0.05), while the light-cured and flowable adhesives were essentially non-cytotoxic. Ageing considerably reduced the cytotoxicity of the no-mix adhesive. On days 5 and 7 of the experiment, the cell viability of three adhesives did not differ significantly (P > 0.05), but cell viability was slightly reduced on day 7. Moderate cytotoxic effects of no-mix adhesive on the first day of the experiment suggest that care should be taken to protect dentists and patients when these adhesives are being handled. Despite higher resin components, the flowable adhesive showed excellent biocompatibility.

  16. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems to Er:YAG-laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Brulat, Nathalie; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Leforestier, Eric; Fiorucci, Gilbert; Nammour, Samir; Bertrand, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin bonded to Er:YAG laser or bur-prepared dentin surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems. The occlusal surfaces of 120 human third molars were ground flat to expose dentin. The dentin was prepared using either a carbide bur or an Er:YAG laser at 350 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (fluence, 44.5 J/cm(2)). Three different self-etching adhesive systems were applied: iBond, Xeno III and Clearfil SE Bond. Rods of composite resin were bonded to dentin surfaces and shear bond tests were carried out. Both dentin surfaces after debonding and resin rods were observed using a scanning electron microscope. When the Xeno III was used, no difference was observed on shear bond strength values when bur and Er:YAG laser were compared. When using iBond and Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values measured on Er:YAG-laser-prepared surfaces were lower than those observed on bur-prepared surfaces. The absence of smear layer formation during the preparation of the dentin by the Er:YAG laser did not improve the adhesion values of self-etching adhesive systems.

  17. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Load Cycling on the Dentin Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond-2

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Davari, Abdolrahim; Akbari, Mohammad Javad; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have shown the uncertain effects of thermal cycling (TC) and mechanical load cycling (MC) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composites. This study designed to investigate the effects of TC and MC on the dentin µTBS of single bond-2. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface was prepared on 48 sound extracted human third molar teeth, and were bonded by single bond-2 adhesive and Z250 resin composite. The teeth were randomly divided into eight equal groups, according to the thermal/mechanical protocol. TC and MC were proceeded at 5-55°C and 90 N with 0.5 Hz. Then restorations were sectioned to shape the hour-glass form and subjected to µTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. To evaluate the bonding failure, the specimens were observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance, t-test, Tukey HSD and post-hoc by using SPSS software version 17 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: µTBS of all groups were significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.001). Adhesive failure was predominant in all groups and increased with TC and MC. Conclusions: TC and MC had an adverse effect on µTBS of the tested adhesive resin to dentin. PMID:26464532

  18. Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerny, Jennifer; Morscher, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    High temperature adhesives with good thermal conductivity, mechanical performance, and long term durability are crucial for the assembly of heat rejection system components for space exploration missions. In the present study, commercially available adhesives were used to bond high conductivity carbon-carbon composites to titanium sheets. Bonded pieces were also exposed to high (530 to 600 Kelvin for 24 hours) and low (liquid nitrogen 77K for 15 minutes) temperatures to evaluate the integrity of the bonds. Results of the microstructural characterization and tensile shear strengths of bonded specimens will be reported. The effect of titanium surface roughness on the interface microstructure will also be discussed.

  19. Non-uniform breaking of molecular bonds, peripheral morphology and releasable adhesion by elastic anisotropy in bio-adhesive contacts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-01-01

    Biological adhesive contacts are usually of hierarchical structures, such as the clustering of hundreds of sub-micrometre spatulae on keratinous hairs of gecko feet, or the clustering of molecular bonds into focal contacts in cell adhesion. When separating these interfaces, releasable adhesion can be accomplished by asymmetric alignment of the lowest scale discrete bonds (such as the inclined spatula that leads to different peeling force when loading in different directions) or by elastic anisotropy. However, only two-dimensional contact has been analysed for the latter method (Chen & Gao 2007 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 55, 1001–1015 (doi:10.1016/j.jmps.2006.10.008)). Important questions such as the three-dimensional contact morphology, the maximum to minimum pull-off force ratio and the tunability of releasable adhesion cannot be answered. In this work, we developed a three-dimensional cohesive interface model with fictitious viscosity that is capable of simulating the de-adhesion instability and the peripheral morphology before and after the onset of instability. The two-dimensional prediction is found to significantly overestimate the maximum to minimum pull-off force ratio. Based on an interface fracture mechanics analysis, we conclude that (i) the maximum and minimum pull-off forces correspond to the largest and smallest contact stiffness, i.e. ‘stiff-adhere and compliant-release’, (ii) the fracture toughness is sensitive to the crack morphology and the initial contact shape can be designed to attain a significantly higher maximum-to-minimum pull-off force ratio than a circular contact, and (iii) since the adhesion is accomplished by clustering of discrete bonds or called bridged crack in terms of fracture mechanics terminology, the above conclusions can only be achieved when the bridging zone is significantly smaller than the contact size. This adhesion-fracture analogy study leads to mechanistic predictions that can be readily used to design biomimetics and

  20. Non-uniform breaking of molecular bonds, peripheral morphology and releasable adhesion by elastic anisotropy in bio-adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-01-01

    Biological adhesive contacts are usually of hierarchical structures, such as the clustering of hundreds of sub-micrometre spatulae on keratinous hairs of gecko feet, or the clustering of molecular bonds into focal contacts in cell adhesion. When separating these interfaces, releasable adhesion can be accomplished by asymmetric alignment of the lowest scale discrete bonds (such as the inclined spatula that leads to different peeling force when loading in different directions) or by elastic anisotropy. However, only two-dimensional contact has been analysed for the latter method (Chen & Gao 2007 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 55, 1001-1015 (doi:10.1016/j.jmps.2006.10.008)). Important questions such as the three-dimensional contact morphology, the maximum to minimum pull-off force ratio and the tunability of releasable adhesion cannot be answered. In this work, we developed a three-dimensional cohesive interface model with fictitious viscosity that is capable of simulating the de-adhesion instability and the peripheral morphology before and after the onset of instability. The two-dimensional prediction is found to significantly overestimate the maximum to minimum pull-off force ratio. Based on an interface fracture mechanics analysis, we conclude that (i) the maximum and minimum pull-off forces correspond to the largest and smallest contact stiffness, i.e. 'stiff-adhere and compliant-release', (ii) the fracture toughness is sensitive to the crack morphology and the initial contact shape can be designed to attain a significantly higher maximum-to-minimum pull-off force ratio than a circular contact, and (iii) since the adhesion is accomplished by clustering of discrete bonds or called bridged crack in terms of fracture mechanics terminology, the above conclusions can only be achieved when the bridging zone is significantly smaller than the contact size. This adhesion-fracture analogy study leads to mechanistic predictions that can be readily used to design biomimetics and

  1. Effect of Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Fusahito

    Using highly ductile acrylic adhesive, the present authors proposed a new technique of plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. In this process, the suppression of large transverse shear deformation occurring in the adhesive layer, which in some cases would induce the geometrical imperfection (so-called ‘gull-wing bend') and the delamination of the sheet, is one of the most important technical issues. In the present work, the effect of forming speed on bending deformation was investigated. From experimental observations in V-bending experiments of adhesively bonded aluminium sheets, as well as the corresponding numerical simulations which consider the viscoplasticity nature of the adhesive resin, it was found that the large shear deformation and ‘gull-wing bend' are successfully suppressed by high-speed forming since the deformation resistance of the adhesive resin becomes higher at a high strain rate.

  2. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition. PMID:27498501

  3. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition.

  4. Effect of Thermocycling, Degree of Conversion, and Cavity Configuration on the Bonding Effectiveness of All-in-One Adhesives.

    PubMed

    El-Damanhoury, H M; Gaintantzopoulou, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five all-in-one bonding agents with respect to microleakage, microtensile bond strength (μTBS), degree of conversion (DC) and the impact of cavity configuration. The materials tested were Adper Easy Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond, iBond, Optibond All-in-One, Xeno IV, and Adper Single Bond Plus as a control. The DC of each adhesive was measured on the surfaces of dentin discs (n=5) by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. One hundred and forty-four extracted human molars were randomly divided and assigned to one of the five tested adhesives and the control group. The μTBS to dentin was measured on flat occlusal dentin with and without thermocycling and to the gingival floor dentin of class II cavities (n=8). All specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 resin composite. Class II samples were immersed in a 5% methylene blue dye solution for 24 hours, and microleakage was examined under a stereomicroscope. Micromorphological analysis of demineralized/deproteinized specimens was done using scanning electron microscopy. The DC and microleakage data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and μTBS data by two-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni multiple comparison post hoc test (α=0.05) and Weibull-distribution survival analysis. The relation between different variables and μTBS and microleakage was tested by the Pearson correlation coefficient and regression statistics. A moderate direct relation between DC and μTBS durability was found for all the adhesives tested. Significant wide variations exist among the results obtained for single-bottle adhesives tested regarding their μTBS and microleakage. Some of the all-in-one materials tested have shown significantly inferior results under a high C-factor or after aging. The use of these materials should be carefully considered. PMID:25748210

  5. Assessing the integrity of structural adhesive bonds by the measurement of acoustic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagasivamani, V.; Smith, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing the influence of externally applied shear stresses on the acoustic properties in the bondline region. The changes in the acoustic properties with a change in the temperature of the test samples are measured. The results of these tests are employed to evaluate the quality of the adhesive bonds. The dependence of time-of-flight on the temperature of plain steel and of steel adhesively bonded to rubber is illustrated in graphic form.

  6. Introduction to the adhesive bonding session. [foam system for attaching thermal insulation on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle unique requirements call for the development of a specific adhesive system to reliable attach reusable surface insulation. A low density foam system has been developed that provides strain isolation from the support structure and remains structurally stable in space shuttle thermal environment. Surface preparation and its stabilization by an adhesive primer system are the most important factors in preventing corrosion from reducing the reliability and durability of the adhesive bonding component.

  7. Embedded proteins and sacrificial bonds provide the strong adhesive properties of gastroliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thormann, Esben; MizunoPresent Address: Nihon L'Oreal, Research; Innovation Center, 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan., Hiroyasu; Jansson, Kjell; Hedin, Niklas; Fernández, M. Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Rutland, Mark W.; PaiPresent Address: CenterFunctional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 735 Brookhaven Avenue, Upton, New York 11973., Ranjith Krishna; Bergström, Lennart

    2012-06-01

    The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO3. The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude.The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO3. The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30536d

  8. In vitro degradation of resin-dentin bonds with one-bottle self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Fujita, Shinichi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durability of one-bottle self-etching adhesive during long-term water-storage testing. Resin-dentin bonded specimens were prepared using four commercially available one-bottle self-etching adhesives. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce beam-shaped specimens that were stored in water for 24 h (control group) and 100, 200, and 300 d (experimental groups). After each storage period, the beams were subjected to a microtensile bond test. After the bond test, fractured surfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope. In addition, interfacial observations of the silver tracer were performed using the secondary and back-scatter modes of the scanning electron microscope. The bond strength of all tested adhesives decreased significantly after 100 or more days in water. The interfacial observations showed an oxygen-inhibition zone as electron lucent in the adhesive-composite border in control specimens, displaying silver impregnation with breakage after aging. The deterioration of the oxygen-inhibition zone in the adhesive-resin composite junction resulted in a decrease in bond strength after 100 d in water for one-bottle self-etching adhesives.

  9. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  10. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Cécile; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  11. The effect of organic solvents on one-bottle adhesives' bond strength to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Reis, André Figueiredo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Giannini, Marcelo; De Goes, Mário Fernando; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (pTBS) of ethanol/water- and acetone-based, one-bottle adhesive systems to enamel (E) and dentin (D) in the presence (P) or absence (A) of their respective solvents. Thirty-two freshly extracted third molars were flattened with 600-grit SiC paper and restored with Single Bond (SB) or Prime&Bond 2.1 (PB) according to the manufacturers' instructions and after full solvent elimination. The molars were divided into eight test groups (n = 4): G1-SB-E-P, G2-SB-E-A, G3-PBE-P, G4-PB-E-A, G5-SB-D-P, G6-SB-D-A, G7-PB-D-P and G8-PB-D-A. After applying the adhesive resins, composite crowns of approximately 8 mm were built up with TPH Spectrum composite. After 24-hour water storage, the specimens were serially sectioned bucco-lingually to obtain 0.8 mm slabs that were trimmed to an hourglass shape, approximately 0.8 mm2 at the bonded interface. The specimens were tested in tension using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/minute). The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test. The frequency of fracture mode was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. There were no statistically significant differences in mean bond strength among the groups restored with or without solvent for enamel. However, the results were significantly different for the dentin groups (MPa): G5-26.2 +/- 8.6a; G7-23.6 +/- 11.3ab; G6-12.8 +/- 2.1bc; G8-6.2 +/- 3.1c. SEM examination indicated that the dentin group failure modes were significantly different from the enamel groups. The results suggest that the presence of organic solvents does not influence microTBS to enamel. However, microTBS to dentin was significantly affected by the absence of solvents in the adhesive system.

  12. Adhesion of single bacterial cells in the micronewton range

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Peter H.; Li, Guanglai; Brun, Yves V.; Freund, L. Ben; Tang, Jay X.

    2006-01-01

    The adhesion of bacteria to surfaces plays critical roles in the environment, disease, and industry. In aquatic environments, Caulobacter crescentus is one of the first colonizers of submerged surfaces. Using a micromanipulation technique, we measured the adhesion force of single C. crescentus cells attached to borosilicate substrates through their adhesive holdfast. The detachment forces measured for 14 cells ranged over 0.11 to 2.26 μN, averaging 0.59 ± 0.62 μN. Based on the calculation of stress distribution with the finite element analysis method (dividing an object into small grids and calculating relevant parameters for all of the elements), the adhesion strength between the holdfast and the substrate is >68 N/mm2 in the central region of contact. To our knowledge, this strength of adhesion is the strongest ever measured for biological adhesives. PMID:16585522

  13. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    PubMed Central

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Results The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Conclusions Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution. PMID:26082572

  14. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  15. Bond strength of self-etch adhesives after saliva contamination at different application steps.

    PubMed

    Cobanoglu, N; Unlu, N; Ozer, F F; Blatz, M B

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared the effect of saliva contamination and possible decontamination methods on bond strengths of two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Optibond Solo Plus SE [OSE]). Flat occlusal dentin surfaces were created on 180 extracted human molar teeth. The two bonding systems and corresponding composite resins (Clearfil AP-X, Kerr Point 4) were bonded to the dentin under six surface conditions (n=15/group): group 1 (control): primer/bonding/composite; group 2: saliva/drying/primer/bonding/composite; group 3: primer/saliva/rinsing/drying/primer/bonding/composite; group 4: primer/saliva/rinsing/drying/bonding/composite; group 5: primer/bonding (cured)/saliva/rinsing/drying/primer/bonding/composite; group 6: primer/bonding (cured)/saliva/removing contaminated layer with a bur/rinsing/drying/primer/bonding/composite. Shear bond strength was tested after specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. For CSE, groups 2, 3, and 4 and for OSE, groups 6, 2, and 4 showed significantly lower bond strengths than the control group (p<0.05). CSE groups 5 and 6 and OSE groups 3 and 5 revealed bond strengths similar to the control. When saliva contamination occurred after light polymerization of the bonding agent, repeating the bonding procedure recovered the bonding capacity of both self-etch adhesives. However, saliva contamination before or after primer application negatively affected their bond strength. PMID:23327232

  16. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  17. Adhesive-bonded double-lap joints. [analytical solutions for static load carrying capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Explicit analytical solutions are derived for the static load carrying capacity of double-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses extend the elastic solution Volkersen and cover adhesive plasticity, adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch between the adherends. Both elastic-plastic and bi-elastic adhesive representations lead to the explicit result that the influence of the adhesive on the maximum potential bond strength is defined uniquely by the strain energy in shear per unit area of bond. Failures induced by peel stresses at the ends of the joint are examined. This failure mode is particularly important for composite adherends. The explicit solutions are sufficiently simple to be used for design purposes

  18. Haemostatic agents on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Akansha; Sekhar, Anand; Ginjupalli, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin surface contaminated with haemostatic agents can interfere with the bonding of self-adhesive resin cement. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various haemostatic agents such as Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate and Tannic acid on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting agent. Material and Methods The buccal surfaces of extracted premolars were flattened to expose the dentine. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. In Group I Aluminium Chloride was applied on the flattened dentinal surface, in Group II Ferric Sulphate was applied to exposed dentin surface, in Group III tannic acid was applied on to the dentinal surface, and the control group, i.e. Group IV was rinsed with saline. After the surface treatment, all the teeth were air dried. Then a predetermined dimension of RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the pretreated dentin surfaces. The samples were then stored under 370C in distilled water for 24 hours under 100 % humidity. Following this each sample was tested for shear bond strength with an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Results There was significant difference in the shear bond strength of control and tannic acid contaminated group (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant differences between the shear bond strength between control and aluminium chloride and ferric sulphate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The usage of haemostatic agent can negatively affect the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X) on to the dentin surface. As per the study Tannic acid significantly weakened the bond between the self-adhesive resin and dentin. Key words:Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, self-adhesive resin cement, shear bond strength, Tannic acid. PMID:26330930

  19. New primers for adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrell, B. W.; Port, W. S.

    1971-01-01

    Synthetic polypeptide adhesive primers are effective, with high temperature epoxy resins, at temperatures from 100 deg to 300 deg C. Lap-shear failure loads and lap-shear strength of both primers are discussed.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of adhesion strength measurement devices for ceramic/titanium matrix composite bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlchuck, Bobby; Zeller, Mary V.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesive bond between ceramic cement and a titanium matrix composite substrate to be used in the National Aerospace Plane program is evaluated. Two commercially available adhesion testers, the Sebastian Adherence Tester and the CSEM REVETEST Scratch Tester, are evaluated to determine their suitability for quantitatively measuring adhesion strength. Various thicknesses of cements are applied to several substrates, and bond strengths are determined with both testers. The Sabastian Adherence Tester has provided limited data due to an interference from the sample mounting procedure, and has been shown to be incapable of distinguishing adhesion strength from tensile and shear properties of the cement itself. The data from the scratch tester has been found to be difficult to interpret due to the porosity and hardness of the cement. Recommendations are proposed for a more reliable adhesion test method.

  1. Adhesives deliver low-shrink low-stress bonds and fast UV cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Kyle T.

    2001-03-01

    Lower stress, higher quality assemblies as well as quantum increases in productivity are now possible with `new generation', light curing adhesives. This new technology makes obsolete the industry-accepted assumption that low strain requires slow curing UV adhesives, epoxies and cements. Curing in only seconds and without the need for secondary thermal cure, these new light curing adhesives produce laminates which are essentially strain-free, and edge bonds with shrinkage as low as 0.2%. This paper will compare and contrast these new adhesives with existing bonding technologies in typical applications. Included are comparison between epoxies, UV curing mercaptoesters, and the new light curing Aerobic Acrylates, as well as the incorporation of adhesives into optical component design.

  2. Adhesives deliver low-shrink low-stress bonds and fast UV cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Kyle T.

    2001-06-01

    Lower stress, higher quality assemblies as well as quantum increases in productivity are now possible with `new generation', light curing adhesives. This new technology makes obsolete the industry-accepted assumption that low strain requires slow curing UV adhesives, epoxies and cements. Curing in only seconds and without the need for secondary thermal cure, these new light curing adhesives produce laminates which are essentially strain-free, and edge bonds with shrinkage as low as 0.2%. This paper will compare and contrast these new adhesives with existing bonding technologies in typical applications. Included are comparisons between epoxies, UV curing mercaptoesters, and the new light curing Aerobic Acrylates, as well as the incorporation of adhesives into optical component design.

  3. The shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nimish; Chaman, Chandrakar; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Singh, Udai Pratap; Sharma, Apoorv

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems- self-adhering flowable composite, etch and rinse adhesive system and self etch adhesive system. Methodology: MTA specimens (n = 60) were prepared using cylindrical acrylic blocks, having a central cavity with 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. MTA was mixed and placed in the prepared cavity, and was covered with a moist cotton pellet and temporary filling material. The specimens were divided into 3 groups which were further divided into 2 sub-groups (45 Minutes and 24 hours). After the application of bonding agents composite resin was placed over the MTA surface. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength and readings were statically analyzed. Result: After 24 hrs the mean value of etch and rinse group was significantly higher than self etch and the self adhering composite groups. Among the 45 minutes groups there were no significant difference. Conclusion: In single visit after 45 minutes self adhering flowable can be used successfully as a final restorative material in place of conventional flowable composite without using any alternative adhesive system over MTA. PMID:27099417

  4. The effect of saliva decontamination procedures on dentin bond strength after universal adhesive curing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayang; Hong, Sungok; Choi, Yoorina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of multiple decontamination procedures for salivary contamination after curing of a universal adhesive on dentin bond strength according to its etch modes. Materials and Methods Forty-two extracted bovine incisors were trimmed by exposing the labial dentin surfaces and embedded in cylindrical molds. A universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal, Bisco) was used. The teeth were randomly divided into groups according to etch mode and decontamination procedure. The adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions for a given etch mode. With the exception of the control groups, the cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva for 20 sec. In the self-etch group, the teeth were divided into three groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive. In the etch-and-rinse group, the teeth were divided into four groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive. A composite resin (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE) was used for filling and was cured on the treated surfaces. Shear bond strength was measured, and failure modes were evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variation and Tukey's HSD test. Results The etch-and-rinse subgroup that was decontaminated by rinse, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive showed a significantly higher bond strength. Conclusions When salivary contamination occurs after curing of the universal adhesive, additional etching improves the bond strength to dentin. PMID:26587416

  5. Thin resin coating by dual-application of all-in-one adhesives improves dentin bond strength of resin cements for indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Ariyoshi, Meu; Kitayama, Shuzo; Sadr, Alireza; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2010-10-01

    This study was evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin cements to bovine dentin resin-coated with all-in-one adhesive systems. Each of the dual-polymerizing resin cements; Link Max, Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Bistite II and Chemiace II were used to bond indirect resin disks to bovine dentin, as control, or coated by single-application or by dual-application of an adhesive system from the same manufacturer; G-Bond, Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Tokuyama Bond Force and Hybrid-Coat (n=10). After 24-hour water storage, TBSs were measured. The fracture pattern and the adhesive interface were observed using an SEM. Dual-application of the adhesive yielded significantly higher TBSs compared to control and single-application groups for all materials (p<0.001). From the limited information of this study, it was concluded that dual-application of all-in-one adhesive systems created a thin coating on dentin, and significantly improved the bond strengths of resin cements.

  6. Thin resin coating by dual-application of all-in-one adhesives improves dentin bond strength of resin cements for indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Ariyoshi, Meu; Kitayama, Shuzo; Sadr, Alireza; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2010-10-01

    This study was evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin cements to bovine dentin resin-coated with all-in-one adhesive systems. Each of the dual-polymerizing resin cements; Link Max, Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Bistite II and Chemiace II were used to bond indirect resin disks to bovine dentin, as control, or coated by single-application or by dual-application of an adhesive system from the same manufacturer; G-Bond, Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Tokuyama Bond Force and Hybrid-Coat (n=10). After 24-hour water storage, TBSs were measured. The fracture pattern and the adhesive interface were observed using an SEM. Dual-application of the adhesive yielded significantly higher TBSs compared to control and single-application groups for all materials (p<0.001). From the limited information of this study, it was concluded that dual-application of all-in-one adhesive systems created a thin coating on dentin, and significantly improved the bond strengths of resin cements. PMID:20823621

  7. [Butylcyanoacrylate--an adhesive for bonding strain gages to non-fixed biological materials (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Küsswetter, W; Permooser, F; Ungethüm, M

    1978-05-30

    Creep, hysteresis, stability, elongation capability and repeatbility of butylcyanoacrylate as a proper adhesive for bonding strain gages to non-fixed tissues have been tested with good results. Due to its excellent bonding performance butylcyanoacrylate provides the only means for bonding electrical resistance foil strain gages to biological materials for the time being. This opens new aspects for strain measurements with strain gages in the biomechanical field.

  8. The dual bonding technique: a modified method to improve adhesive luting procedures.

    PubMed

    Paul, S J; Schärer, P

    1997-12-01

    Indirect restorative procedures usually require temporary restorations for protection of the pulp and for restoring the patients esthetic and functional needs. The use of temporary cements, either with or without eugenol, however, considerably decreases the adhesion of the bond on dentin if--according to the conventional technique--such dentin bonding systems are applied once at the moment of final cementation. With a dual application of the dentin bonding agents a considerable increase in bond strength values was discovered. This article presents a modified luting procedure called the "dual bonding technique."

  9. 27 CFR 70.282 - Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds. 70.282 Section 70.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Bonds § 70.282 Single bond in lieu of...

  10. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  11. [Bonding strength of metal frameworks and adhesive agents in the resin-bonded bridge technic. 3. Comparative research on various retention mechanisms and adhesive systems].

    PubMed

    Wirz, J; Besimo, C; Schmidli, F

    1989-01-01

    In fixed denture prosthetics, macro- and micromechanical as well as chemical adhesive mechanisms may be used between metal and bonding agent. The in vitro research presented here determines the adhesive strength of six different bonding agents and five different retention mechanisms on twelve precious and nonprecious metal alloys using shearing stress. The evaluation of the results should help to assess the suitability of the various combinations of materials and anchoring methods for the fixation of adhesive bridges. On the basis of the adhesive strengths and the examination of the various clinical advantages and disadvantages of the different methods that were analyzed, the electrolytic etching of nonprecious metal alloys appears to be particularly suitable for fixed denture prostheses. An efficient combination between alloy and bonding agent is of particular importance in this area. Macromechanical mesh and negative retentions can only be used to a limited clinical extent due to their high space requirements. Very good results were produced by the preconditioning of inner anchor surfaces with silanes. Sandblasting, however, provided unsatisfactory shear-stress results over a broad front independently of the type of alloy.

  12. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on the Dentin Bond Durability of Two Self-etch Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khamverdi, Zahra; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Rostamzadeh, Tayebeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Self-etch adhesives can activate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) which hydrolyzes organic matrix of demineralized dentin. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), especially found in green tea, could inhibit the activation of MMP. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) into two types of adhesives on dentin bond strength. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 64 extracted third molars were randomly divided into 16 groups. Clearfil SE Bond and Filtek Silorane System with 0 µM, 25µM, 50µM, and 100µM concentration of 95% EGCG were used for bonding. Following the bonding and fabrication of beams (1±0.1 mm2) and storage in distilled water, the specimens were subjected to thermal cycles. Microtensile bond strengths of 8 groups were examined after 24 hours and others were tested after 6 months. The fracture modes of specimens were evaluated by stereomicroscope and SEM. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t-test (α = 0.05). Results The results of the three- way ANOVA test showed that types of bonding, storage time and interactive effect of EGCG concentration and bonding influenced the bond strength of specimens significantly (p<0.05). The results of the t-test indicated that storage time only had significant effect on bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond with no EGCG (p= 0.017). The most common failure modes in Filtek Silorane System groups and Clearfil SE Bond groups were adhesive and mixed/cohesive, respectively. The results of SEM at different magnifications showed that most fractures have occurred in the hybrid layer. Conclusion Although adding 100 µM volume of EGCG to Clearfil SE Bond can preserve the dentin bond, incorporation of EGCG in the silorane system, especially in high concentrations, decreases the bond strength after 6 months. PMID:26046100

  13. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond

  14. Bond Strength of a Bisphenol-A-Free Fissure Sealant With and Without Adhesive Layer under Conditions of Saliva Contamination.

    PubMed

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Sabbatini, Iliana Ferraz; Almeida, Cintia Guimarães de; Galo, Rodrigo; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Dental sealants are important for prevention of carious lesions, if they have good shear strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two sealants to saliva-contaminated and non-contaminated enamel with and without an intermediate adhesive layer underneath the sealant. Ninety flat enamel surfaces from human third molars were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=15): F (control): Fluroshield(tm) sealant; EWB (control): Embrace(tm) WetBond(tm); SB/F: Single Bond adhesive system + F; SB/EWB, s-SB/F and s-SB/EWB. In the s-SB/F and s-SB/EWB groups, the acid-etched enamel was contaminated with 0.01 mL of fresh human saliva for 20 s. Sealant cylinders were bonded to enamel surface with and without an intermediate adhesive system layer. The shear tests were performed using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). F presented higher mean SBS than EWB in all experimental conditions. The lowest SBS mean was obtained for EWB on contaminated enamel (p<0.05). In conclusion, an adhesive system layer should be used prior to sealant placement, in both dry and saliva-contaminated enamel. F had the best performance in all experimental conditions. EWB sealant showed very low results, but an adhesive layer underneath the sealant increased its SBS even after salivary contamination. PMID:27224565

  15. Effects of adhesion promoter on orthodontic bonding in fluorosed teeth: A scanning electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Tariq, Mohd.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of the present study were to elucidate the effects of fluorosis in orthodontic bonding and to evaluate the efficiency of an adhesion promoter (Assure Universal Bonding Resin) in bonding to fluorosed teeth. Materials and Methods: Extracted premolars were divided into two groups on the basis of Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index. Ten samples from each group were etched and evaluated for etching patterns using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The remaining samples were subdivided into four groups of 20 each on the basis of adhesives used: IA, IIA - Transbond XT and IB, IIB - Transbond XT plus Assure Universal Bonding Resin. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured after 24 h using the universal testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were recorded using SEM. Statistical analysis was conducted using a two-way analysis of variance, and Tukey's post hoc test was performed on SBS and ARI scores. Results: Similar etching patterns were observed in both fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth. No significant differences were found in the SBS values observed in both groups (8.66 ± 3.19 vs. 8.53 ± 3.44, P = 1.000). Increase in SBS was observed when Assure Universal Bonding Resin was used. Higher ARI scores were observed when adhesion promoter was used for bonding. Conclusions: Mild-moderately fluorosed teeth etch in a manner similar to the nonfluorosed teeth. Similar bond strengths were achieved in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth when conventional composite was used. Use of adhesion promoter increases the bond strengths in both groups of teeth. PMID:27556020

  16. The Evaluation of High Temperature Adhesive Bonding Processes for Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Daniel; Smith, Jeffrey; Rice, Brian; Blohowiak, Kay; Anderson, Robert; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda; Sutter, James

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is currently evaluating the possibility of using high- temperature polymer matrix composites to reinforce the combustion chamber of a rocket engine. One potential design utilizes a honeycomb structure composed of a PMR-II- 50/M40J 4HS composite facesheet and titanium honeycomb core to reinforce a stainless steel shell. In order to properly fabricate this structure, adhesive bond PMR-II-50 composite. Proper prebond surface preparation is critical in order to obtain an acceptable adhesive bond. Improperly treated surfaces will exhibit decreased bond strength and durability, especially in metallic bonds where interface are susceptible to degradation due to heat and moisture. Most treatments for titanium and stainless steel alloys require the use of strong chemicals to etch and clean the surface. This processes are difficult to perform due to limited processing facilities as well as safety and environmental risks and they do not consistently yield optimum bond durability. Boeing Phantom Works previously developed sol-gel surface preparations for titanium alloys using a PETI-5 based polyimide adhesive. In support of part of NASA Glenn Research Center, UDRI and Boeing Phantom Works evaluated variations of this high temperature sol-gel surface preparation, primer type, and primer cure conditions on the adhesion performance of titanium and stainless steel using Cytec FM 680-1 polyimide adhesive. It was also found that a modified cure cycle of the FM 680-1 adhesive, i.e., 4 hrs at 370 F in vacuum + post cure, significantly increased the adhesion strength compared to the manufacturer's suggested cure cycle. In addition, the surface preparation of the PMR-II-50 composite was evaluated in terms of surface cleanness and roughness. This presentation will discuss the results of strength and durability testing conducted on titanium, stainless steel, and PMR-II-50 composite adherends to evaluate possible bonding processes.

  17. Influence of interface ply orientation on fatigue damage of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of cracked-lap-shear specimens was conducted to determine the influence of adherend stacking sequence on debond initiation and damage growth in a composite-to-composite bonded joint. Specimens consisted of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy adherends bonded together with either FM-300 or EC 3445 adhesives. The stacking sequence of the adherends was varied such that 0 deg, 45 deg, or 90 deg plies were present at the adherend-adhesive interfaces. Fatigue damage initiated in the adhesive layer in those specimens with 0 deg nd 45 deg interface plies. Damage initiated in the form of ply cracking in the strap adherend for the specimens with 90 deg interface plies. The fatigue-damage growth was in the form of delamination within the composite adherends for specimens with the 90 deg and 45 deg plies next to the adhesive, while debonding in the adhesive resulted for the specimens with 0 deg plies next to the adhesive. Those joints with the 0 deg and 45 deg plies next to either adhesive has essentially the same fatigue-damage-initiation stress levels. These stress levels were 13 and 71 percent higher, respectively, than those for specimens with 90 deg plies next to the EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives.

  18. Influence of interface ply orientation on fatigue damage of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of cracked-lap-shear specimens was conducted to determine the influence of adherend stacking sequence on debond initiation and damage growth in a composite-to-composite bonded joint. Specimens consisted of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy adherends bonded together with either FM-300 or EC 3445 adhesives. The stacking sequence of the adherends was varied such that 0 deg, 45 deg, or 90 deg plies were present at the adherend-adhesive interfaces. Fatigue damage initiated in the adhesive layer in those specimens with 0 deg and 45 deg interface plies. Damaage initiated in the form of ply cracking in the strap adherend for the specimens with 90 deg interface plies. The fatigue-damage growth was in the form of delamination within the composite adherends for specimens with the 90 deg and 45 deg plies next to the adhesive, while debonding in the adhesive resulted for the specimens with 0 deg plies next to the adhesive. Those joints with the 0 deg and 45 deg plies next to either adhesive has essentially the same fatigue-damage-initiation stress levels. These stress levels were 13 and 71 percent higher, respectively, than those for specimens with 90 deg plies next to the EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives.

  19. Shear bond strength of fibre-reinforced composite nets using two different adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Scribante, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different adhesive systems (Tetric Flow and Transbond XT) in combination with fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) net (Ever Stick) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Eighty bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into four equal groups. Stainless steel maxillary central incisor brackets with a 0.018 inch slot (DB Leone) were bonded to the teeth using the two different adhesive systems. Fifty per cent of the brackets were bonded without and 50 per cent with a FRC net under the bracket base. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested for SBS. Analysis of variance indicated significant differences among the various groups. Brackets bonded with FRC nets under the base showed a significantly lower SBS than those bonded without nets (P < 0.05). Moreover, teeth bonded with Transbond XT showed a significantly higher SBS than the other groups. Additionally, significant differences in debond locations [adhesive remnant index (ARI) score] were found among the various groups. Transbond XT can successfully be used for direct bonding of FRC nets, thus improving their SBS values. PMID:20573712

  20. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coating with 110 µm Al2O3 particles which modified with silica; and, Group 3, tribochemical treatment - silica coating + silanization. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours before testing shear bond strength. Results Silica coating and tribochemical treatment significantly increased the bond strength of the MA, UN, BR, BI, SE and CL to zirconia compared to #600 polishing. For both #600 polished and silica coating treatments, MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement CL had the highest bond strengths to zirconia. Conclusion Applying silica coating and tribochemical treatment improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to zirconia, especially for CL. PMID:20690416

  1. Shear bond strength of orthodontic color-change adhesives with different light-curing times

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Ghassemi, Amirreza; Manafi, Safa; Delavarian, Mohadeseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing time on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two orthodontic color-change adhesives (CCAs). Materials and Methods: A total of 72 extracted premolars were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 12 teeth each. Subsequent to primer application, a metal bracket was bonded to the buccal surface using an orthodontic adhesive. Two CCAs (Greengloo and Transbond Plus) were tested and one conventional light-cured adhesive (Resilience) served as control. For each adhesive, the specimens were light-cured for two different times of 20 and 40 s. All the specimens underwent mechanical testing using a universal testing machine to measure the SBS. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the remnant adhesive material on the tooth surface. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software. The significance level for all statistical tests was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: The SBSs of the tested groups were in the range of 14.05-31.25 MPa. Greengloo adhesive showed the highest SBS values when light-cured for 40 s, and Transbond Plus adhesive showed the lowest values when light-cured for 20 s. ARI scores of Transbond Plus adhesive were significantly higher than those of controls, while other differences in ARI values were not significant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of his study, decreasing the light-curing time from 40 to 20 s decreased the SBS of the tested adhesives; however, this decline in SBS was statistically significant only in Transbond Plus adhesive PMID:26005468

  2. Effect of Saliva on the Tensile Bond Strength of Different Generation Adhesive Systems: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Saha, Sonali; Dhinsa, Kavita; Garg, Aarti

    2015-01-01

    Background Newer development of bonding agents have gained a better understanding of factors affecting adhesion of interface between composite and dentin surface to improve longevity of restorations. Objective The present study evaluated the influence of salivary contamination on the tensile bond strength of different generation adhesive systems (two-step etch-and-rinse, two-step self-etch and one-step self-etch) during different bonding stages to dentin where isolation is not maintained. Materials and Methods Superficial dentin surfaces of 90 extracted human molars were randomly divided into three study Groups (Group A: Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system; Group B: Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Group C: One-step self-etch adhesive system) according to the different generation of adhesives used. According to treatment conditions in different bonding steps, each Group was further divided into three Subgroups containing ten teeth in each. After adhesive application, resin composite blocks were built on dentin and light cured subsequently. The teeth were then stored in water for 24 hours before sending for testing of tensile bond strength by Universal Testing Machine. The collected data were then statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results One-step self-etch adhesive system revealed maximum mean tensile bond strength followed in descending order by Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system both in uncontaminated and saliva contaminated conditions respectively. Conclusion Unlike One-step self-etch adhesive system, saliva contamination could reduce tensile bond strength of the two-step self-etch and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesives contaminated with saliva. PMID:26393214

  3. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  4. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  5. Effect of adhesive on molten pool structure and penetration in laser weld bonding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. M.; Ren, D. X.

    2010-09-01

    Laser weld bonding (LWB) is a new hybrid technique that combines adhesive bonding with laser seam welding together, and can achieve higher joint strength than adhesive bonding or laser welding individually. Some new physical phenomena have been observed in this welding method, and the phenomena are different from the normal laser welding process, such as a remarkable deeper penetration in LWB than that in laser welding direct (LWD). The adhesive-induced gas can influence the molten pool structure in front of the keyhole, so that less energy is required for laser keyhole through the upper sheet; thus, higher laser power density can interact with the lower sheet, leading to deeper penetration. Simulation comparison experiments are set to indirectly verify these conclusions above.

  6. Polymer Composition and Substrate Influences on the Adhesive Bonding of a Biomimetic, Cross-Linking Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R.; White, James D.; Wilker, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels, however bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examined the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) were distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to cyanoacrylate “Krazy” or “Super” glue. Performance was also examined using low (e.g., plastics) and high (e.g., metals, wood) energy surfaces. Adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues. PMID:22582754

  7. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  8. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  9. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  10. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  11. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bronzato, Juliana Delatorre; Cecchin, Doglas; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone) on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control); G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl); G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05). Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05). G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently. PMID:26957789

  12. Study on the structural evolution of modified phenol formaldehyde resin adhesive for the high-temperature bonding of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jigang; Jiang, Nan; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Lang; Song, Jinren

    2006-01-01

    A novel adhesive for carbon materials composed of phenol-formaldehyde resin, boron carbide and fumed silica, was prepared. The adhesive property of graphite joints bonded by the above adhesive treated at high-temperatures was tested. Results showed that the adhesive was found to have outstanding high-temperature bonding properties for graphite. The adhesive structure was dense and uniform even after the graphite joints were heat-treated at 1500 °C. Bonding strength was 17.1 MPa. The evolution of adhesive structure was investigated. The results indicated that the addition of the secondary additive, fumed silica, improved the bonding performance greatly. Borosilicate phase with better stability was formed during the heat-treatment process, and the volume shrinkage was restrained effectively, which was responsible for the satisfactory high-temperature bonding performance of graphite.

  13. Interaction of mixed mode loading on cyclic debonding in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively-bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the fracture mode dependence of cyclic debonding. The system studied consisted of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive. Several types of specimens are tested which provide the cyclic debond growth rate measurements under various load conditions: mode 1, mixed mode 1 to 2, and mostly mode 2. This study shows that the total strain-energy-release rate is the governing factor for cyclic debonding.

  14. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; List, Martina S.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesively bonded structures are potentially lighter in weight than mechanically fastened ones, but existing surface treatments are often considered unreliable. Two main problems in achieving reproducible and durable adhesive bonds are surface contamination and variability in standard surface preparation techniques. In this work three surface pretreatments were compared: laser etching with and without grit blasting and conventional Pasa-Jell treatment. Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry, optical microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Laser -etching was found to produce clean surfaces with precisely controlled surface topographies and PETI-5 lap shear strengths and durabilities were equivalent to those produced with Pasa-Jell.

  15. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

  16. Effect of the application of a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste and adhesive systems on bond durability of a fissure sealant.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Catelan, Anderson; Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Reis, André Figueiredo; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the previous application of a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste (MI Paste, MI) and adhesive systems on the bond durability of a fissure sealant. Ninety-eight enamel blocks were obtained from proximal surfaces of erupted third molars. Specimens were divided into 14 groups (n = 7) according to the previous application of MI (with and without) and the adhesive systems used (no adhesive system; hydrophobic resin of a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system; etch-and-rinse single-bottle adhesive system; all-in-one adhesive system; two-step self-etching adhesive system; additional phosphoric acid conditioning and all-in-one adhesive system; additional phosphoric acid conditioning and two-step self-etching adhesive system). A fissure sealant (Fluroshield) was applied and photoactivated for 20 s. Beams (~0.7 mm(2)) were prepared for the microtensile bond strength test, which was executed after 24 h or 6 months of water storage. Fractured specimens were analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA with repeated measures/Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Groups that received MI application and adhesive systems presented higher means than those groups where MI was not applied. Higher frequency of cohesive failures was observed for groups with MI. Applying a CPP-ACP containing paste on enamel before adhesive systems was an effective method to increase bond durability of the sealant tested.

  17. Push-out bond strength of quartz fibre posts to root canal dentin using total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Navimipour, Elmira J.; Shakerifar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several adhesive systems are available for cementation of fibre posts into the root canal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the push-out bond strengths of quartz fibre posts to root dentin with the use of different total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements. Study Design: Ninety single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and standardized post-spaces were prepared. Fibre posts were cemented with different luting agents: total-etch (Nexus NX3, Duo-Link, and RelyX ARC) and self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, BisCem, and RelyX Unicem). Three post/dentin sections (coronal, middle and apical) were obtained from each specimen, and push-out bond strength test was performed in each section at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed with two-factor and one-way analysis of variance and a post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Cement type, canal region, and their interaction significantly influenced bond strength. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in the apical region of self-adhesive cements. Only Duo-Link and RelyX ARC cements resulted in homogeneous bond strengths. Conclusions: Cementation of quartz fibre posts using self-adhesive cements provided higher push-out bond strengths especially in the apical region, while total-etch cements resulted in more uniform bond strengths in different regions of the root canal. Key words: Push-out bond strength; quartz fibre post; total-etch resin cement; self-adhesive resin cement. PMID:22143695

  18. Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds from Guided Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, A.; Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by interface zones in the fracture and failure of composites and other bonded materials is well known. The existing nondestructive evaluation methods are generally not capable of yielding useful quantitative information of the strength of an interface.

  19. Environmental Aging of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M Structural Adhesive in Composite to Composite Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Miner, Gilda A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Baughman, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites have found increased usage in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance is not well established. In this study, adhesive bonds were prepared by the secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminate. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of single-lap-shear (SLS) specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The aging results of strength retention and failure modes to date are reported.

  20. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  1. Shear bond strength and ultrastructural interface analysis of different adhesive systems to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Guven, Yeliz; Aktoren, Oya

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of a microhybrid composite resin bonded with three different adhesive systems to Er:YAG laser- (EL) or bur-prepared dentin surfaces and to analyze the quality and ultrastructure of the adhesive-dentin interfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The specimens prepared for SBS test and SEM analysis were randomly assigned to eight groups (G1-G8): G1, EL (Fidelis PlusIII, Fotona) + Clearfil S3 Bond (C3S); G2, EL + AdperSE Plus (SE); G3, EL + laser etch + Adper Single Bond2 (SB2); G4, EL + acid etch + SB2; G5, EL + SB2 (no etching); G6, bur + acid etch + SB2; G7, bur + S3; G8, bur + SE. Laser was used in very short pulse mode at a setting of 200 mJ/20 Hz for dentin preparation and at 80 mJ/10 Hz for dentin etching. Bond strength test: 3.5 × 2.0 mm cylindrical molds were placed onto adhesives and filled with the composites. After 24 h in distilled water, SBS was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. SEM analysis: The dentin-adhesive interfaces were evaluated for the ultrastructure of hybrid layer. Data of SBS (MPa) were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD. ER:YAG laser-prepared dentin has demonstrated significantly more SBS (p < 0.01) for SE when compared to bur-prepared dentin. No significancies (p > 0.05) in SBS have been determined between the total-etch adhesive applied groups with regard to etching types. SEM analysis revealed that hybrid layers obtained in Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin exhibited more irregular and non-homogeneous pattern than the conventionally prepared dentin. In conclusion, SE Bond demonstrated superior results in Er:YAG laser-ablated dentin compared to bur-prepared dentin. PMID:23982720

  2. Integrin and glycocalyx mediated contributions to cell adhesion identified by single cell force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, D.; Wehrle-Haller, B.

    2010-05-01

    The measurement of cell adhesion using single cell force spectroscopy methods was compared with earlier methods for measuring cell adhesion. This comparison provided a means and rationale for separating components of the measurement retract curve that were due to interactions between the substrate and the glycocalyx, and interactions that were due to cell surface integrins binding to a substrate-bound ligand. The glycocalyx adhesion was characterized by multiple jumps with dispersed jump sizes that extended from 5 to 30 µm from the origin. The integrin mediated adhesion was represented by the Fmax (maximum detachment force), was generally within the first 5 µm and commonly detached with a single rupture cascade. The integrin peak (Fmax) increases with time and the rate of increase shows large cell to cell variability with a peak ~ 50 nN s - 1 and an average rate of increase of 75 pN s - 1. This is a measure of the rate of increase in the number of adhesive integrin-ligand bonds/cell as a function of contact time.

  3. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to systematically review the literature for the effect of digluconate chlorhexidine (CHX) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine. The search strategies were computer search of the database and review of reference lists of the related articles. Search words/terms were as follows: (digluconate chlorhexidine*) AND (dentin* OR adhesive system* OR bond strength*). Results: Bond strength reduction after CHX treatments varied among the studies, ranging 0-84.9%. In most of the studies, pretreatment CHX exhibited lower bond strength reduction than the control experimental groups. Researchers who previously investigated the effect of CHX on the bond strength of dental adhesive systems on dentin have reported contrary results, which may be attributed to different experimental methods, different designs of the experiments, and different materials investigated. Conclusions: Further investigations, in particular clinical studies, would be necessary to clarify the effect of CHX on the longevity of dentin bonds. PMID:26957786

  4. Innovative use of adhesive interface characteristics to nondestructively quantify the strength of bonded joints.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2010-05-01

    Advances in structural adhesives have permitted engineers to contemplate the use of bonded joints in areas that have long been dominated by mechanical fasteners and welds. Although strength, modulus, and toughness have been improved in modern adhesives, the typical concerns with using these polymers still exist. These include concerns over long-term durability and an inability to quantify bond strength (i.e., identify weak bonds) in adhesive joints. Bond deterioration in aging structures and bond strength in original construction are now critical issues that require more than simple flaw detection. Whether the structure involves metallic or composite materials, it is necessary to extend inspections beyond the detection of disbond flaws to include an assessment of the strength of the bond. Use of advanced nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods to measure the mechanical properties of a bonded joint and associated correlations with post-inspection failure tests have provided some clues regarding the key parameters involved in assessing bond strength. Recent advances in ultrasonic- and thermographic-based inspection methods have shown promise for measuring such properties. Specialized noise reduction and signal enhancement schemes have allowed thermographic interrogations to image the subtle differences between bond lines of various strengths. Similarly, specialized ultrasonic (UT) inspection techniques, including laser UT, guided waves, UT spectroscopy, and resonance methods, can be coupled with unique signal analysis algorithms to accurately characterize the properties of weak interfacial bonds. The generation of sufficient energy input levels to derive bond strength variations, the production of sufficient technique sensitivity to measure such minor response variations, and the difficulty in manufacturing repeatable weak bond specimens are all issues that exacerbate these investigations. The key to evaluating the bond strength lies in the ability to exploit the

  5. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P < 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences for CSEB subgroups with hydrated and dehydrated dentin samples between the three different curing modes (P > 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study. PMID:27041894

  6. Durability of polyimide adhesives and their bonded joints for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvatareddy, Hari

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and develop an understanding of durability of an adhesive bonded system, for application in a future high speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft structure. The system under study was comprised of Ti-6Al-4V metal adherends and a thermosetting polyimide adhesive, designated as FM-5, supplied by Cytec Engineered Materials, Inc. An approach based on fracture mechanics was employed to assess Ti-6Al-4V/FM-5 bond durability. Initially, wedge tests were utilized to find a durable surface pretreatment for the titanium adherends. Based on an extensive screening study, chromic acid anodization (CAA) was chosen as the standard pretreatment for this research project. Double cantilever beam specimens (DCB) were then made and aged at 150sp°C, 177sp°C, and 204sp°C in three different environments; ambient atmospheric air (14.7 psia), and reduced air pressures of 2 psia (13.8 KPa) and 0.2 psia (1.38 KPa). Joints were aged for up to 18 months (including several intermediate aging times) in the above environments. The strain energy release rate (G) of the adhesive joints was monitored as a function of exposure time in the different environments. A 40% drop in fracture toughness was noted over the 18 month period, with the greatest degradation observed in samples aged at 204sp°C in ambient atmospheric air pressure. The loss in adhesive bond performance with time was attributable to a combination of physical and chemical aging phenomena in the FM-5 resin, and possible degradation of the metal-adhesive interface(s). Several mechanical and material tests, performed on the bonded joints and neat FM-5 resin specimens, confirmed the above statement. It was also noted that physical aging could be "erased" by thermal rejuvenation, partially restoring the toughness of the FM-5 adhesive material. The FM-5 adhesive material displayed good chemical resistance towards organic solvents and other aircraft fluids such as jet fuel and hydraulic fluid. The

  7. Bonding to dentin: evaluation of three adhesive materials.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, H; Davila, J M; Gwinnett, A J

    1992-01-01

    Dye penetration was observed in all specimens. SEM demonstrated isolated areas with no gap formation, suggesting a partial bond with dentin. A correlation is evident from the results of both techniques. Since dye-penetration was found to be similar in all the specimens, it was difficult to assess the effect of thermocycling on the amount of dye penetration. The use of posterior composites should be considered as a short-term tested procedure. It should be utilized carefully, following the manufacturer's instructions, and monitored routinely. Undoubtedly, the utilization of posterior composite materials is a very technique-sensitive procedure. Comparing the results of this in vitro study with those previously reported suggests that little improvement has been made in the bonding of the materials tested. Development of new materials and improved techniques are necessary.

  8. Promotion of adhesive penetration and resin bond strength to dentin using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas (NT-APPs) have been shown to improve the bond strength of resin composites to demineralized dentin surfaces. Based on a wet-bonding philosophy, it is believed that a rewetting procedure is necessary after treatment with NT-APP because of its air-drying effect. This study investigated the effect of 'plasma-drying' on the bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin by comparison with the wet-bonding technique. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were acid-etched and divided into four groups according to the adhesion procedure: wet bonding, plasma-drying, plasma-drying/rewetting, and dry bonding. In plasma treatment groups, the demineralized dentin surfaces were treated with a plasma plume generated using a pencil-type low-power plasma torch. After the adhesion procedures, resin composite/dentin-bonded specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond-strength test. The hybrid layer formation was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The plasma-drying group presented significantly higher bond strength than the wet-bonding and dry-bonding groups. Micro-Raman spectral analysis indicated that plasma-drying improved the penetration and polymerization efficacy of the adhesive. Plasma-drying could be a promising method to control the moisture of demineralized dentin surfaces and improve the penetration of adhesive and the mechanical property of the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:26714586

  9. Non-classical adhesive-bonded joints in practical aerospace construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions are derived for adhesive-bonded joints of non-classical geometries. Particular attention is given to bonded doublers and to selective reinforcement by unidirectional composites. Non-dimensionalized charts are presented for the efficiency limit imposed on the skin as the result of the eccentricity in the load path through the doubler. It is desirable to employ a relativly large doubler to minimize the effective eccentricity in the load path. The transfer stresses associated with selective reinforcement of metal structures by advanced composites are analyzed. Reinforcement of bolt holes in composites by bonded metal doublers is covered quantitatively. Also included is the adhesive joint analysis for shear flow in a multi-cell torque box, in which the bond on one angle becomes more critical sooner than those on the others, thereby restricting the strength to less than the total of each maximum strength when acting alone. Adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness and thermal imbalances are included. A simple analysis/design technique of solution in terms of upper and lower bounds on an all-plastic adhesive analysis is introduced.

  10. Adhesively bonded steel and composites-durability in substitute ocean water

    SciTech Connect

    Aartun, L.; Dillard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Ocean water, marine life and certain oil-well fluids constitute a highly aggressive environment for most metals. In the offshore oil industry, the economic driving force to seek new materials points towards polymeric composites which offer reduction of weight and elimination of corrosion. However, a combined use of steel and composites creates a joining problem. Exposure to humid air and liquid water affects adhesive bonds in a negative manner, and adhesively bonded metal systems are even less durable in marine than in non-ocean environments. In marine environments and sea coast atmospheres, marine life and salts can contribute to the degradation process. On an operating oil rig, repair and replacements involving adhesive bonding are forced to be carried out under non-ideal conditions because of environmental regulations (affecting surface treatments) and safety requirements (affecting the curing method). The objective of this work is to develop environmentally friendly surface preparations and to study, the influence of salt water on the durability of adhesively bonded steel/composite systems.

  11. Thermal nondestructive testing (TNDT) of adhesively bonded composite reinforcements applied to concrete civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Douglas D.; Bohner, Richard

    1999-02-01

    Thermographic nondestructive testing was performed on composite reinforcements applied to two concrete civil structures. Information on the types of defects which occur in these structures and their locations has led to process improvements in the application of adhesively bonded laminated composites to steel reinforce concrete structures.

  12. Aircraft surface coatings study: Energy efficient transport program. [sprayed and adhesive bonded coatings for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Surface coating materials for application on transport type aircraft to reduce drag, were investigated. The investigation included two basic types of materials: spray on coatings and adhesively bonded films. A cost/benefits analysis was performed, and recommendations were made for future work toward the application of this technology.

  13. Adhesive bond failure monitoring with triboluminescent optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohag, Md Abu S.; Hammel, Emily C.; Olawale, David O.; Okoli, Okenwa O.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most severe damage modes in modern wind turbines is the failure of the adhesive joints in the trailing edge of the large composite blades. The geometrical shape of the blade and current manufacturing techniques make the trailing edge of the wind turbine blade more sensitive to damage. Failure to timely detect this damage type may result in catastrophic failures, expensive system downtime, and high repair costs. A novel sensing system called the In-situ Triboluminescent Optical Fiber (ITOF) sensor has been proposed for monitoring the initiation and propagation of disbonds in composite adhesive joints. The ITOF sensor combines the triboluminescent property of ZnS:Mn with the many desirable features of optical fiber to provide in-situ and distributed damage sensing in large composite structures like the wind blades. Unlike other sensor systems, the ITOF sensor does not require a power source at the sensing location or for transmitting damage-induced signals to the hub of the wind turbine. Composite parts will be fabricated and the ITOF integrated within the bondline to provide in-situ and real time damage sensing. Samples of the fabricated composite parts with integrated ITOF will be subjected to tensile and flexural loads, and the response from the integrated sensors will be monitored and analyzed to characterize the performance of the ITOF sensor as a debonding damage monitoring system. In addition, C-scan and optical microscopy will be employed to gain greater insights into the damage propagation behavior and the signals received from the ITOF sensors.

  14. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  15. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  16. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel.

    PubMed

    Abed Kahnemooyi, Mehdi; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghiazar, Fatemeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mhammadi Torkani, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A-D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultra-structural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at P<0.05. Results. The interaction between the adhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014), withsignificant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (P<0.01). There were significant differences in shear bond strength in terms of surface preparation techniques irrespective of the adhesive system (P<0.01). Conclusion. The results showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide decreased the shear bond strength values with both adhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems. PMID:25587382

  17. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Abed Kahnemooyi, Mehdi; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghiazar, Fatemeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mhammadi Torkani, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A-D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultra-structural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at P<0.05. Results. The interaction between the adhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014), withsignificant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (P<0.01). There were significant differences in shear bond strength in terms of surface preparation techniques irrespective of the adhesive system (P<0.01). Conclusion. The results showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide decreased the shear bond strength values with both adhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems. PMID:25587382

  18. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  19. Effect of tooth surface preparation on the bonding of self-etching primer adhesives.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, O A; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J; Palamara, J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the bonding effectiveness of four self-etching primer adhesives after various tooth preparation protocols. Enamel/dentin specimens were prepared from 84 permanent molars, divided into three enamel preparation groups (silicon carbide paper [SiC1; erbium, chromium:yttri-um, scandium, gallium, garnet [Er,Cr:YSGG] laser [EL] and diamond bur [DB]) and five dentin preparation groups (SiC, EL, DB, steel[SB], and ceramic burs [CBs]). In each group,specimens were equally divided into four sub-groups and were bonded using Clearfil SEBond (CSE, Kuraray), Xeno IV (XE, Dentsply),Tokuyama Bond Force (TK, Tokuyama) and Filtek Silorane System Adhesive (FS, 3MESPE), as well as a hybrid resin composite(Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, Kuraray) for CSE,XE, and TK, and Filtek Posterior Restorative(3M ESPE) for FS). After 24 hours of water storage at 370C, microshear bond strength(iSBS) testing was carried out. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA)-Tukey test at a=0.05 and bond failure modes assessed. Representative debonded specimens were prepared and examined under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). All adhesives exhibited no significant differences in 1SBS on enamel and dentin under the clinical cavity preparation protocols, except for TK on den-tin. SEM revealed areas of altered subsurface enamel/dentin following EL ablation.

  20. Clustering instability in adhesive contact between elastic solids via diffusive molecular bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jizeng; Gao, Huajian

    Motivated by experimental observations that cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion often involves formation of discrete patches of dense molecular bonds, we consider the plane strain problem of two elastic half-spaces, each covered with a layer of lipid membrane, joined together by mobile molecular bonds that diffuse along the interface under the combined action of a thin layer of glycocalyx repellers and an externally applied tensile stress. We show that, for a range of bond density values with or without the applied stress, the state of a uniform distribution of bonds is intrinsically unstable with respect to perturbations in bond density distribution. This instability is found to be primarily driven by elastic deformation energies in the bulk and the membrane. The change in free energy associated with a cosine perturbation in bond density distribution indicates that there exists a critical wavelength beyond which the perturbation becomes unstable and a fastest growing wavelength that tends to dominate as the instability grows. These length scales have typical values in the order of a micrometer, in agreement with the general characteristic size of bond clusters observed in cell adhesion.

  1. Effect of acid etching time and technique on interfacial characteristics of the adhesive-dentin bond using differential staining.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Spencer, Paulette

    2004-06-01

    Dentin bonding using the total-etch method has been claimed to be technique-sensitive. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of acid-etch variations on the dentin demineralization and interfacial structure of the adhesive-dentin bond using a differential staining technique. Single Bond adhesive with 35% phosphoric acid gel was used. The occlusal one-third of the crown was removed from 60 extracted, unerupted human third molars. Smear layers were created by abrading the dentin with 600 grit SiC under water for 30 s. The prepared teeth were randomly assigned to four groups according to etching time (Group 1, 10 s; Group 2, 15 s; Group 3, 30 s; Group 4, 60 s). In each group, the etching gel was: (i) applied and spread to the dentin surface and left to stand undisturbed; (ii) applied and gently agitated during etching; (iii) applied without using dispensing tips for the syringe and left for the same period as above. After rinsing, the etched dentin was then treated with the adhesive per manufacturers' instructions. 3-5 micro m thin sections of the adhesive/dentin (a/d) interface were cut with a microtome and stained with Goldner's trichrome. Stained, thin sections from each prepared tooth were imaged with light microscopy. The depth and extent of dentin demineralization, and the a/d interdiffusion zone were clearly visible by this differential staining microtechnique. The thickness of the interdiffusion zone increased as a function of etching time. However, the etchant gel application methods have a significant influence on dentin demineralization. Although agitating acid gel facilitates the penetration and etching into dentin, it should not be recommended, especially for longer etching time. These results indicated that the etching technique has a large effect on the profile of both dentin demineralization and interfacial structure.

  2. Effect of bond thickness on fracture and fatigue strength of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of composite to composite bonded joints was undertaken to study the effect of bond thickness on debond growth rate under cyclic loading and critical strain energy release rate under static loading. Double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 were tested under mode I loading. A different behavior of fracture and fatigue strength was observed with variation of bondline thickness.

  3. The bond strength of different tray adhesives on vinyl polysiloxane to two tray materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ashwini, B L; Manjunath, S; Mathew, K Xavier

    2014-03-01

    There has been no established chemical bonding between custom tray resin and the elastomeric impression materials without the use of manufacturer's recommended specific tray adhesive. The present study was aimed to compare the bond strength of the manufacturer recommended tray adhesives with the universal tray adhesives using the medium body consistency vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) material and custom tray made of autopolymerising resin and visible light cure (VLC) resin. A total 90 cubicle specimens of autopolymerising resin and 90 specimens of VLC resin were tested for its tensile bond strength. Effectiveness of universal tray adhesive was compared with manufactured tray adhesive. Each of these specimens was then subjected to tensile load in hounsefield universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 5 mm/min and the results were compared and evaluated using one way analysis of variance and post hoc Tuckey's test. Analysis of bond strength revealed that the universal tray adhesive showed better strength and was statiscally significant when compared to the manufacture supplied tray adhesive. Comparison between both the groups, VLC resin showed better bond strength as compared to autopolymerizing resin. Universal tray adhesive had better tensile bond strength than the manufacturers recommended tray adhesive with the medium body viscosity VPS impression material for both autopolymerising and VLC tray resin. PMID:24604995

  4. Locally measuring the adhesion of InP directly bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si.

    PubMed

    Pantzas, K; Le Bourhis, E; Patriarche, G; Troadec, D; Beaudoin, G; Itawi, A; Sagnes, I; Talneau, A

    2016-03-18

    A nano-scale analogue to the double cantilever experiment that combines instrumented nano-indentation and atomic force microscopy is used to precisely and locally measure the adhesion of InP bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si using oxide-free or oxide-mediated bonding. Surface-bonding energies of 0.548 and 0.628 J m(-2), respectively, are reported. These energies correspond in turn to 51% and 57% of the surface bonding energy measured in unpatterned regions on the same samples, i.e. the proportion of unetched Si surface in the patterned areas. The results show that bonding on patterned surfaces can be as robust as on unpatterned surfaces, provided care is taken with the post-patterning surface preparation process and, therefore, open the path towards innovative designs that include patterns embedded in the Si guiding layer of hybrid III-V/Si photonic integrated circuits. PMID:26878333

  5. Locally measuring the adhesion of InP directly bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantzas, K.; Le Bourhis, E.; Patriarche, G.; Troadec, D.; Beaudoin, G.; Itawi, A.; Sagnes, I.; Talneau, A.

    2016-03-01

    A nano-scale analogue to the double cantilever experiment that combines instrumented nano-indentation and atomic force microscopy is used to precisely and locally measure the adhesion of InP bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si using oxide-free or oxide-mediated bonding. Surface-bonding energies of 0.548 and 0.628 J m-2, respectively, are reported. These energies correspond in turn to 51% and 57% of the surface bonding energy measured in unpatterned regions on the same samples, i.e. the proportion of unetched Si surface in the patterned areas. The results show that bonding on patterned surfaces can be as robust as on unpatterned surfaces, provided care is taken with the post-patterning surface preparation process and, therefore, open the path towards innovative designs that include patterns embedded in the Si guiding layer of hybrid III-V/Si photonic integrated circuits.

  6. Numerical analysis of single particle impact in the context of Cold Spray: a new adhesion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profizi, P.; Combescure, A.; Ogawa, K.

    2016-03-01

    A new adhesion model for numerical simulation of single particle impact in the context of Cold Spray is introduced. As in other studies, cohesive forces are put between the particle and substrate to account for adhesion. In this study however, the forces are put only when a local physical criterion is met. The physical phenomenon most often attributed to Cold Spray adhesion is a shear stress instability. The Johnson-Cook material law is used with a shear damage softening law to enable strong localization at the interface without the need for an extremely fine mesh. This localization is then detected as a drop in local yield stress value by the algorithm, which then implements a local cohesive force. The evolution of this cohesive force is defined by an energy dissipative cohesive model, using a surface adhesion energy as a material parameter. Each cohesive link is broken once all its associated surface energy is dissipated. A criterion on the damage value is also used to break a cohesive bond prematurely, to account for the effect of erosion at higher speeds. This model is found to reproduce the Cold Spray-like adhesion behavior with observed critical and maximum speeds.

  7. Shear bond strengths and microleakage of four types of dentin adhesive materials.

    PubMed

    Ateyah, Nasrien Z; Elhejazi, Ahmed A

    2004-02-15

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the microleakage of composite resin (Z-100) and shear bond strength to bovine dentin using different types of adhesive systems (Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, One-Step, and Perma Quick) to compare and correlate microleakage to shear bond strength. For the microleakage aspect of the study, 20 class V were prepared (bovine incisors) with 90-degree cavosurface margins and were located at the cemento-enamel junction using a template. Each dentin bonding system was applied to five cavities following the manufacturer's instructions and restored with Z-100 composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye. All teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond saw, and each section was then inspected under a stereomacroscope. For the shear bond strength aspect of the study, 20 bovine incisors were centrally horizontally mounted in Teflon mold with cold cure acrylic resin. Flat labial dentin surfaces were prepared using different grit silicon carbide abrasive wheels. Five specimens were used for each of the bonding agent systems. Each specimen was bonded with restorative composite resin (Z-100) and applied to the treated dentinal surface through a split Teflon mold. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The bonds were stressed using shear forces at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min using an Instron Universal testing machine. Findings indicate none of the systems tested in this study were free from microleakage. Scotch bond multi-purpose achieved the best seal, with One-Step being second best, while All-Bond 2 and Perma Quick had the poorest seal. However, there were significant differences among the shear bond strengths of the four bonding systems tested. Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose has a higher bond strength to composite resin when compared to the other dentin adhesives. The study also concluded

  8. Quantifying Molecular-Level Cell Adhesion on Electroactive Conducting Polymers using Electrochemical-Single Cell Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongrui; Molino, Paul J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Higgins, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Single Cell Force Spectroscopy was combined with Electrochemical-AFM to quantify the adhesion between live single cells and conducting polymers whilst simultaneously applying a voltage to electrically switch the polymer from oxidized to reduced states. The cell-conducting polymer adhesion represents the non-specific interaction between cell surface glycocalyx molecules and polymer groups such as sulfonate and dodecylbenzene groups, which rearrange their orientation during electrical switching. Single cell adhesion significantly increases as the polymer is switched from an oxidized to fully reduced state, indicating stronger cell binding to sulfonate groups as opposed to hydrophobic groups. This increase in single cell adhesion is concomitant with an increase in surface hydrophilicity and uptake of cell media, driven by cation movement, into the polymer film during electrochemical reduction. Binding forces between the glycocalyx and polymer surface are indicative of molecular-level interactions and during electrical stimulation there is a decrease in both the binding force and stiffness of the adhesive bonds. The study provides insight into the effects of electrochemical switching on cell adhesion at the cell-conducting polymer interface and is more broadly applicable to elucidating the binding of cell adhesion molecules in the presence of electrical fields and directly at electrode interfaces. PMID:26335299

  9. Quantifying Molecular-Level Cell Adhesion on Electroactive Conducting Polymers using Electrochemical-Single Cell Force Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongrui; Molino, Paul J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Higgins, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Single Cell Force Spectroscopy was combined with Electrochemical-AFM to quantify the adhesion between live single cells and conducting polymers whilst simultaneously applying a voltage to electrically switch the polymer from oxidized to reduced states. The cell-conducting polymer adhesion represents the non-specific interaction between cell surface glycocalyx molecules and polymer groups such as sulfonate and dodecylbenzene groups, which rearrange their orientation during electrical switching. Single cell adhesion significantly increases as the polymer is switched from an oxidized to fully reduced state, indicating stronger cell binding to sulfonate groups as opposed to hydrophobic groups. This increase in single cell adhesion is concomitant with an increase in surface hydrophilicity and uptake of cell media, driven by cation movement, into the polymer film during electrochemical reduction. Binding forces between the glycocalyx and polymer surface are indicative of molecular-level interactions and during electrical stimulation there is a decrease in both the binding force and stiffness of the adhesive bonds. The study provides insight into the effects of electrochemical switching on cell adhesion at the cell-conducting polymer interface and is more broadly applicable to elucidating the binding of cell adhesion molecules in the presence of electrical fields and directly at electrode interfaces.

  10. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  11. [Biomechanical study of medical hard tissue adhesive bonding butterfly fracture fragment in middle part of fresh human tibia].

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Tu, Zhongqi; Pei, Fuxing; Chen, Mengshi; Liu, Lei

    2004-06-01

    A medical hard tissue adhesive, octyl-a-cyanoacrylate, was tested in 6 fresh human tibiae. A 90 degrees butter-fly fracture fragment was made in the middle part of tibia by bandsaw. The compressive stress, torsional stress and angular deflection were assessed before and after osteoectomy respectively. After adhesive bonding, the compressive stress, torsional stress and angular deflection were tested again. The butterfly fracture fagment decreased the bending strength, torsion strength, yielding strength of tibia bone. In torsion test, the torque of tibia before osteoectomy is greater than bonded tibia, the bonded tibia is greater than that of the unbonded tibia. In compression test, before adhesive bonding broken, the compressive curve slope of tibia before osteoectomy is greater than that of bonded tibia, the bonded tibia is greater than that of the unbonded tibia. In angular deflection test before adhesive bonding of broken,the curve slope of tibia before osteoectomy is not different from that of bonded tibia (P>0.05), the slope the bonded tibia is greater than the slope of unbonded tibia(P<0.05). The elastic modulus, rigidity coefficient and moment of area inertia show no statistical difference between the bonded tibia and intact tibia. The used of medical hard tissue adhesive to bond the fracture fragment could improve the bending strength, torsion strength, yielding strength of tibia bone. In operation, it can reduce the soft tissue injury when the fracture fragment is being fixed, and this will benefit bone healing.

  12. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). Material and Methods The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B–37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C–self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D–37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. Results After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. Conclusion The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer’s recommendation is the “gold standard” for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances. PMID:27688410

  13. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). Material and Methods The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B–37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C–self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D–37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. Results After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. Conclusion The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer’s recommendation is the “gold standard” for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances.

  14. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  15. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  16. Superplastic Forming/Adhesive Bonding of Aluminum (SPF/AB) Multi-Sheet Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor); Will, Jeff D.; Cotton, James D.

    2003-01-01

    A significant fraction of airframe structure consists of stiffened panels that are costly and difficult to fabricate. This program explored a potentially lower-cost processing route for producing such panels. The alternative process sought to apply concurrent superplastic forming and adhesive bonding of aluminum alloy sheets. Processing conditions were chosen to balance adequate superplasticity of the alloy with thermal stability of the adhesive. As a first objective, an air-quenchable, superplastic aluminum-lithium alloy and a low-volatile content, low-viscosity adhesive with compatible forming/curing cycles were identified. A four-sheet forming pack was assembled which consisted of a welded two-sheet core separated from the face sheets by a layer of adhesive. Despite some preliminary success, of over 30 forming trials none was completely successful. The main problem was inadequate superplasticity in the heat-affected zones of the rib welds, which generally fractured prior to completion of the forming cycle. The welds are a necessary component in producing internal ribs by the 'four-sheet' process. Other challenges, such as surface preparation and adhesive bonding, were adequately solved. But without the larger issue of tearing at the weld locations, complex panel fabrication by SPF/AB does not appear viable.

  17. Investigation of the impact of cleaning on the adhesive bond and the process implications

    SciTech Connect

    EMERSON,JOHN A.; GUESS,TOMMY R.; ADKINS,CAROL L. JONES; CURRO,JOHN G.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LOPEZ,EDWIN P.; LEMKE,PAUL A.

    2000-05-01

    While surface cleaning is the most common process step in DOE manufacturing operations, the link between a successful adhesive bond and the surface clean performed before adhesion is not well understood. An innovative approach that combines computer modeling expertise, fracture mechanics understanding, and cleaning experience to address how to achieve a good adhesive bond is discussed here to develop a capability that would result in reduced cleaning development time and testing, improved bonds, improved manufacturability, and even an understanding that leads to improved aging. A simulation modeling technique, polymer reference interaction site model applied near wall (Wall PRISM), provided the capability to include contaminants on the surface. Calculations determined an approximately 8% reduction in the work of adhesion for 1% by weight of ethanol contamination on the structure of a silicone adhesive near a surface. The demonstration of repeatable coatings and quantitative analysis of the surface for deposition of controlled amounts of contamination (hexadecane and mineral oil) was based on three deposition methods. The effect of the cleaning process used on interfacial toughness was determined. The measured interfacial toughness of samples with a Brulin cleaned sandblasted aluminum surface was found to be {approximately} 15% greater than that with a TCE cleaned aluminum surface. The sensitivity of measured fracture toughness to various test conditions determined that both interfacial toughness and interface corner toughness depended strongly on surface roughness. The work of adhesion value for silicone/silicone interface was determined by a contact mechanics technique known as the JKR method. Correlation with fracture data has allowed a better understanding between interfacial fracture parameters and surface energy.

  18. 26 CFR 301.7102-1 - Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds. 301.7102-1 Section 301.7102-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... of multiple bonds. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a person...

  19. Dentin bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschel, V. C.; Malta, D. A. M. P.; Monteiro, S., Jr.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of an adhesive system applied to dentin, followed by Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Twenty-two recently extracted third molars were divided into four groups (n  =  5). In the G1 and G2 groups, the adhesive system was applied conventionally, and in groups G3 and G4, the adhesive system was irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser (100 J cm‑2). The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C, those in groups G1 and G3 for 24 h, and those in groups G2 and G4 for 3 months. Two teeth from groups G1 and G3 were used for observation of the hybrid layer, using a confocal microscope (n  =  1). The teeth were submitted to a microtensile bond strength test. Analysis of the type of fracture was performed using a stereoscope (40×). The results for microtensile bond strength (MPa) and standard deviation (±SD) were: G1—31.68 (5.14); G2—37.88 (±5.04) G3—35.32 (±8.79) G4—31.53 (±9.01). There were no significant differences among the groups (p  >  0.05). Adhesive failure was predominant in all the groups. The Nd:YAG laser irradiation of the adhesives did not influence dentin bond strength during the periods of 24 h or 3 months of storage in distilled water.

  20. Adhesive Measurements of Polymer Bonded Explosive Constituents using the JKR Experimental Technique and Finite Element Modelling of Viscoelastic Adhesive Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Neil; Williamson, David; Lewis, Daniel; Glauser, Annette; Jardine, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown experimentally that under many circumstances the strength limiting factor of Polymer Bonded Explosives (PBXs) is the adhesion which exists between the filler crystals and the polymer matrix. Experimental measurements of the Work of Adhesion between different binders and glass have been conducted using the JKR experimental technique; a reversible axisymmetric fracture experiment in which the area of contact and the applied force are both measured during loading and unloading of the interface. The data taken with this technique show a rate dependence not described by the analytical JKR theory, which considers only elastic bodies, that arises from the viscoelastic properties of the bulk polymer. To understand and describe the effects of viscosity on the adhesive measurements a finite element model (ABAQUS) of the idealized geometry used in the JKR experiment has been constructed. It is intended to bridge the gap between the purely elastic analytical JKR theory and the viscoelastic experimental results. Together, the experimental data and the computational model are intended to inform the development, and validate the predictions of, microstructural models of PBX deformation and failure.

  1. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  2. Permeability testing of composite material and adhesive bonds for the DC-XA composite feedline program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and Hysol EA 9394 epoxy adhesive bonded between composite/titanium were tested for permeability after various numbers of thermal cycles between 100 C and liquid nitrogen (-196 C). The specimens were quenched from the 100 C temperature into liquid nitrogen to induce thermal shock into the material. Results showed that the carbon/epoxy system was practically impermeable even after 12 thermal cycles. The EA 9394 adhesive bondline was more permeable than the carbon/epoxy, but vacuum mixing minimized the permeability and kept it within allowable limits. Thermal cycling had little effect on the permeability values of the bondline specimens.

  3. Effect of EDTA Conditioning and Carbodiimide Pretreatment on the Bonding Performance of All-in-One Self-Etch Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shipra; Nagpal, Rajni; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Manuja, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated the effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning and carbodiimide (EDC) pretreatment on the shear bond strength of two all-in-one self-etch adhesives to dentin. Methods. Flat coronal dentin surfaces were prepared on one hundred and sixty extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into eight groups according to two different self-etch adhesives used [G-Bond and OptiBond-All-In-One] and four different surface pretreatments: (a) adhesive applied following manufacturer's instructions; (b) dentin conditioning with 24% EDTA gel prior to application of adhesive; (c) EDC pretreatment followed by application of adhesive; (d) application of EDC on EDTA conditioned dentin surface followed by application of adhesive. Composite restorations were placed in all the samples. Ten samples from each group were subjected to immediate and delayed (6-month storage in artificial saliva) shear bond strength evaluation. Data collected was subjected to statistical analysis using three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test at a significance level of p < 0.05.  Results and Conclusion. EDTA preconditioning as well as EDC pretreatment alone had no significant effect on the immediate and delayed bond strengths of either of the adhesives. However, EDC pretreatment on EDTA conditioned dentin surface resulted in preservation of resin-dentin bond strength of both adhesives with no significant fall over six months. PMID:26557850

  4. CO2 laser debonding of a ceramic bracket bonded with orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ayano; Namura, Yasuhiro; Isokawa, Keitaro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2015-02-01

    We have been studying an easy bracket debonding method using heating of an orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules. However, heating with a high-temperature heater brings obvious risks of burns around the oral cavity. Thus, we examined safer and more effective bracket debonding methods. The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine the reduction in debonding strength and the time taken using a bracket bonded with an orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules and a CO2 laser as the heating method while maintaining safety. Ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine permanent mandibular incisors using bonding materials containing various microcapsule contents (0, 30, and 40 wt%), and the bond strengths were measured after laser irradiation for 4, 5, and 6 s and compared with nonlaser-treated groups. Subsequently, the temperature in the pulp chamber during laser irradiation was measured. After laser irradiation for 5 or 6 s, the bond strengths of the adhesive containing 40 wt% microcapsules were significantly decreased to ∼0.40 - 0.48-fold (4.6-5.5 MPa) compared with the nonlaser groups. The mean temperature rise of the pulp chamber was 4.3 °C with laser irradiation for 6 s, which was less than that required to induce pulp damage. Based on these results, we conclude that the combined use of a CO2 laser and an orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules can be effective and safe for debonding ceramic brackets with less enamel damage or tooth pain. PMID:24220847

  5. An EMAT-based shear horizontal (SH) wave technique for adhesive bond inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, K.; Dhayalan, R.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Maxfield, Bruce; Peres, Patrick; Barnoncel, David

    2012-05-01

    The evaluation of adhesively bonded structures has been a challenge over the several decades that these structures have been used. Applications within the aerospace industry often call for particularly high performance adhesive bonds. Several techniques have been proposed for the detection of disbonds and cohesive weakness but a reliable NDE method for detecting interfacial weakness (also sometimes called a kissing bond) has been elusive. Different techniques, including ultrasonic, thermal imaging and shearographic methods, have been proposed; all have had some degree of success. In particular, ultrasonic methods, including those based upon shear and guided waves, have been explored for the assessment of interfacial bond quality. Since 3-D guided shear horizontal (SH) waves in plates have predominantly shear displacement at the plate surfaces, we conjectured that SH guided waves should be influenced by interfacial conditions when they propagate between adhesively bonded plates of comparable thickness. This paper describes a new technique based on SH guided waves that propagate within and through a lap joint. Through mechanisms we have yet to fully understand, the propagation of an SH wave through a lap joint gives rise to a reverberation signal that is due to one or more reflections of an SH guided wave mode within that lap joint. Based upon a combination of numerical simulations and measurements, this method shows promise for detecting and classifying interfacial bonds. It is also apparent from our measurements that the SH wave modes can discriminate between adhesive and cohesive bond weakness in both Aluminum-Epoxy-Aluminum and Composite-Epoxy-Composite lap joints. All measurements reported here used periodic permanent magnet (PPM) Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) to generate either or both of the two lowest order SH modes in the plates that comprise the lap joint. This exact configuration has been simulated using finite element (FE) models to

  6. Influence of Organic Acids from the Oral Biofilm on the Bond Strength of Self-Etch Adhesives to Dentin.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiane Mariote; Correa, Danielly de Sá; Miragaya, Luciana Meirelles; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin after storage in acids from oral biofilm. Three adhesive systems were used in the study: a two-step self-etch adhesive for use with a silorane-based resin composite (Filtek P90 adhesive system - P90), a two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond - CSE) and a one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One - AEO). The bond strength of these products was evaluated by bonding resin composite (Filtek Z350 for CSE and AEO; and Filtek P90 for P90) to 90 bovine dentin tooth fragments, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 h of water storage at 37 °C, the specimens were sectioned into beams (1 mm2) divided and stored in distilled water, lactic acid and propionic acid, for 7 and 30 days. After storage, the specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey´s test (α=0.05). CSE presented the highest microtensile bond strength after storage in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. The microtensile bond strength of all adhesive systems was lower after storage in lactic acid and propionic acid than after water storage. Significant difference was not found between storage times. PMID:26647935

  7. Effects of metal primers on bonding of adhesive resin cement to noble alloys for porcelain fusing.

    PubMed

    Okuya, Nobuhiro; Minami, Hiroyuki; Kurashige, Hisanori; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of metal primers on the bonding of adhesive resin to four pure metals (Au, Pd, Ag, Cu) and two noble alloys for porcelain fusing (high-gold and high-palladium content alloys). Bonding surface was polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and primed with one of the three metal primers (V-Primer, Metaltite, and M.L. Primer). Bonded specimens were fabricated by applying adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B) on the primed surface. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C for 2,000 cycles). The highest SBS values to each pure metal after thermocycling were 33.5 MPa for Au by M.L. Primer, 35.0 MPa for Ag by V-Primer, and 34.4 MPa for Cu by Metaltite. SBS to high-gold content alloy after thermocycling was 33.3 MPa by M.L. Primer. None of the primers was effective for pure Pd and high-palladium content alloy after thermocycling.

  8. Bonding between oxide ceramics and adhesive cement systems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papia, Evaggelia; Larsson, Christel; du Toit, Madeleine; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2014-02-01

    The following aims were set for this systematic literature review: (a) to make an inventory of existing methods to achieve bondable surfaces on oxide ceramics and (b) to evaluate which methods might provide sufficient bond strength. Current literature of in vitro studies regarding bond strength achieved using different surface treatments on oxide ceramics in combination with adhesive cement systems was selected from PubMed and systematically analyzed and completed with reference tracking. The total number of publications included for aim a was 127 studies, 23 of which were used for aim b. The surface treatments are divided into seven main groups: as-produced, grinding/polishing, airborne particle abrasion, surface coating, laser treatment, acid treatment, and primer treatment. There are large variations, making comparison of the studies difficult. An as-produced surface of oxide ceramic needs to be surface treated to achieve durable bond strength. Abrasive surface treatment and/or silica-coating treatment with the use of primer treatment can provide sufficient bond strength for bonding oxide ceramics. This conclusion, however, needs to be confirmed by clinical studies. There is no universal surface treatment. Consideration should be given to the specific materials to be cemented and to the adhesive cement system to be used.

  9. Bonding between oxide ceramics and adhesive cement systems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papia, Evaggelia; Larsson, Christel; du Toit, Madeleine; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2014-02-01

    The following aims were set for this systematic literature review: (a) to make an inventory of existing methods to achieve bondable surfaces on oxide ceramics and (b) to evaluate which methods might provide sufficient bond strength. Current literature of in vitro studies regarding bond strength achieved using different surface treatments on oxide ceramics in combination with adhesive cement systems was selected from PubMed and systematically analyzed and completed with reference tracking. The total number of publications included for aim a was 127 studies, 23 of which were used for aim b. The surface treatments are divided into seven main groups: as-produced, grinding/polishing, airborne particle abrasion, surface coating, laser treatment, acid treatment, and primer treatment. There are large variations, making comparison of the studies difficult. An as-produced surface of oxide ceramic needs to be surface treated to achieve durable bond strength. Abrasive surface treatment and/or silica-coating treatment with the use of primer treatment can provide sufficient bond strength for bonding oxide ceramics. This conclusion, however, needs to be confirmed by clinical studies. There is no universal surface treatment. Consideration should be given to the specific materials to be cemented and to the adhesive cement system to be used. PMID:24123837

  10. Development of an adhesively bonded beryllium propulsion structure for the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. H.; Layman, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    The design, testing, and fabrication of the support truss structure for the propulsion system of the Mariner 9 spacecraft are described. Support is provided by an 8.9-kg (19.5-lbm) truss assembly consisting of beryllium tubes adhesively bonded to magnesium end fittings. Beryllium was selected for the tubular struts in the truss because of its exceptionally high stiffness-to-weight ratio. Adhesive bonding, rather than riveting, was utilized to join the struts to the end fittings because of the low toughness (high notch sensitivity) of beryllium. Magnesium, used in the end fittings, resulted in a 50% weight saving over aluminum since geometric factors in the fitting design resulted in low stress areas where magnesium's lower density is a benefit.

  11. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  12. Research of Adhesion Bonds Between Gas-Thermal Coating and Pre-Modified Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Z.; Zaitsev, K.; Klimenov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Nature of adhesive bonds between gas-thermal nickel alloy coating and carbon steel base was examined using laser profilometry, optical metallography, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The steel surface was plastically pre-deformed by an ultrasonic tool. Proved that ultrasound pre-treatment modifies the steel surface. Increase of dislocation density and formation of sub micro-structure are base elements of surface modification. While using high-speed gas-flame, plasma and detonation modes of coatings, surface activation occurs and durable adhesion is formed. Ultrasonic pre-treatment of base material is effective when sprayed particles and base material interact through physical-chemical bond formation. Before applying high-speed gas flame and plasma sprayed coatings, authors recommend ultrasonic pretreatment, which creates periodic wavy topography with a stroke of 250 microns on the steel surface. Before applying detonation sprayed coatings, authors recommend ultrasound pretreatment that create modified surface with a uniform micro-topography.

  13. Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) Developed for Repairing Shuttle Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced in-space repair technologies for reinforced carbon/carbon composite (RCC) thermal protection system (TPS) structures are critically needed for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) efforts. These technologies are also critical for the repair and refurbishment of thermal protection system structures of future Crew Exploration Vehicles of space exploration programs. The Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) material developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated capabilities for repair of small cracks and damage in RCC leading-edge material. The concept consists of preparing an adhesive paste of desired ceramic in a polymer/phenolic resin matrix with appropriate additives, such as surfactants, and then applying the paste into the damaged or cracked area of the RCC composite components with caulking guns. The adhesive paste cures at 100 to 120 C and transforms into a high-temperature ceramic during simulated vehicle reentry testing conditions.

  14. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives. PMID:26293346

  15. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato S; Leão, Paulo A G C; Piazzetta, Maria H O; Monteiro, Alessandra M; Shiroma, Leandro Y; Gobbi, Angelo L; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-21

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  16. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  17. Structural model for covalent adhesion of the Streptococcus pyogenes pilus through a thioester bond.

    PubMed

    Linke-Winnebeck, Christian; Paterson, Neil G; Young, Paul G; Middleditch, Martin J; Greenwood, David R; Witte, Gregor; Baker, Edward N

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes produces pili that are essential for adhesion to host surface receptors. Cpa, the adhesin at the pilus tip, was recently shown to have a thioester-containing domain. The thioester bond is believed to be important in adhesion, implying a mechanism of covalent attachment analogous to that used by human complement factors. Here, we have characterized a second active thioester-containing domain on Cpa, the N-terminal domain of Cpa (CpaN). Expression of CpaN in Escherichia coli gave covalently linked dimers. These were shown by x-ray crystallography and mass spectrometry to comprise two CpaN molecules cross-linked by the polyamine spermidine following reaction with the thioester bonds. This cross-linked CpaN dimer provides a model for the covalent attachment of Cpa to target receptors and thus the streptococcal pilus to host cells. Similar thioester domains were identified in cell wall proteins of other Gram-positive pathogens, suggesting that thioester domains are more widely used and provide a mechanism of adhesion by covalent bonding to target molecules on host cells that mimics that used by the human complement system to eliminate pathogens.

  18. Fracture testing and analysis of adhesively bonded joints for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Warren, C.D.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began a cooperative effort with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. This paper concentrates on the details of developing accurate fracture test methods for adhesively bonded joints in the automotive industry. The test methods being developed are highly standardized and automated so that industry suppliers will be able to pass on reliable data to automotive designers in a timely manner. Mode I fracture tests have been developed that are user friendly and automated for easy data acquisition, data analysis, test control and test repeatability. The development of this test is discussed. In addition, materials and manufacturing issues are addressed which are of particular importance when designing adhesive and composite material systems.

  19. Effects of solvent volatilization time on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin using conventional or deproteinization bonding techniques

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Júnior, José Aginaldo; Carregosa Santana, Márcia Luciana; de Figueiredo, Fabricio Eneas Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study determined the effect of the air-stream application time and the bonding technique on the dentin bond strength of adhesives with different solvents. Furthermore, the content and volatilization rate of the solvents contained in the adhesives were also evaluated. Materials and Methods Three adhesive systems with different solvents (Stae, SDI, acetone; XP Bond, Dentsply De Trey, butanol; Ambar, FGM, ethanol) were evaluated. The concentrations and evaporation rates of each adhesive were measured using an analytical balance. After acid-etching and rinsing, medium occlusal dentin surfaces of human molars were kept moist (conventional) or were treated with 10% sodium hypochlorite for deproteinization. After applying adhesives over the dentin, slight air-stream was applied for 10, 30 or 60 sec. Composite cylinders were built up and submitted to shear testing. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results Stae showed the highest solvent content and Ambar the lowest. Acetone presented the highest evaporation rate, followed by butanol. Shear bond strengths were significantly affected only by the factors of 'adhesive' and 'bonding technique' (p < 0.05), while the factor 'duration of air-stream' was not significant. Deproteinization of dentin increased the bond strength (p < 0.05). Stae showed the lowest bond strength values (p < 0.05), while no significant difference was observed between XP Bond and Ambar. Conclusions Despite the differences in content and evaporation rate of the solvents, the duration of air-stream application did not affect the bond strength to dentin irrespective of the bonding technique. PMID:26295023

  20. Bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive to dentin surfaces treated with saliva, blood, and different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Nimet; Cebe, Fatma; Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cetin, Ali Riza; Cobanoglu, Nevin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive to dentin surfaces after treatment with 4 different hemostatic agents in the presence of saliva and blood. After testing, no significant differences were found between the mean bond strength of Clearfil SE (CSE) Bond resin adhesive to normal dentin and those of CSE to dentin treated with the hemostatic agents ViscoStat Clear, Astringedent, or Astringedent X (P > 0.05). However, the mean bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin treated with Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) was significantly greater than those of the other groups (P < 0.05). Thus, while 3 of the tested hemostatic agents did not have significant effects on the bond strength of composite resin to dentin, ABS increased the bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin. PMID:26147164

  1. Effect of saliva and blood contamination on the bond strength of self-etching adhesive system- An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Madhusudhana; Gogala, Dorasani; Mathew, Vinod B; Thangala, Venugopal; Deepthi, Mandava; Sasidhar, Nalluru

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to determine the effect of saliva and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive to enamel and dentin; and, to compare the difference in bond strength due to contamination beforeand after application of the self-etch adhesive. Materials and Methods: 40 human mandibular molars were wet ground on both buccal and lingual surfaces to prepare flat superficial enamel and dentin surfaces. They were randomly divided into two groups (n = 40) based on the substrate (enamel and dentin). Each group was further divided into five subgroups (n = 8) based on the type of contamination it was subjected to, and the step in the bonding sequence when the contamination occurred (before or after adhesive application). Fresh saliva and fresh human blood were applied either before or after the application of Xeno III® self-etching adhesive system (SES). Composite resin was applied as inverted, truncated cured cones that were subjected to shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test were used. Results: Statistically significant reduction in the bond strength was shown after both saliva and blood contamination before and after Xeno III® application (P< 0.05). Bond strength is significantly reduced after contamination with blood as compared to saliva. Conclusions: When self-etching adhesive systems are used, saliva and blood contamination significantly decrease the bond strength of the adhesive to enamel and dentin of the tooth. PMID:22876017

  2. The effect of antimicrobial agents on bond strength of orthodontic adhesives: a meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Altmann, A S P; Collares, F M; Leitune, V C B; Samuel, S M W

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial orthodontic adhesives aim to reduce white spot lesions' incidence in orthodontic patients, but they should not jeopardizing its properties. Systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the question whether the association of antimicrobial agents with orthodontic adhesives compromises its mechanical properties and whether there is a superior antimicrobial agent. PubMed and Scopus databases. In vitro studies comparing shear bond strength of conventional photo-activated orthodontic adhesives to antimicrobial photo-activated orthodontic adhesives were considered eligible. Search terms included the following: orthodontics, orthodontic, antimicrobial, antibacterial, bactericidal, adhesive, resin, resin composite, bonding agent, bonding system, and bond strength. The searches yielded 494 citations, which turned into 467 after duplicates were discarded. Titles and abstracts were read and 13 publications were selected for full-text reading. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. The global analysis showed no statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups. In the subgroup analysis, only the chlorhexidine subgroup showed a statistically significant difference, where the control groups had higher bond strength than the experimental groups. Many studies on in vitro orthodontic bond strength fail to report test conditions that could affect their outcomes. The pooled in vitro data suggest that adding an antimicrobial agent to an orthodontic adhesive system does not influence bond strength to enamel. It is not possible to state which antimicrobial agent is better to be associated.

  3. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  4. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  5. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  6. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  7. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  8. Adhesion bonding techniques for highly loaded parts of continuous carbon-fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF-PEEK/APC2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempe, G.; Krauss, H.

    It is shown that the adhesion technology is applicable to the bonding of continuous fiber reinforced thermplastics. The influences and conditions under which an enhancement of the bonding strength can be achieved are described. Attention is focused on the applicability of the adhesion method to continuous fiber reinforced PEEK, acknowledging that PEEK is very resistant to chemicals and thereby, a poor candidate for the technique.

  9. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate Treatment on Microtensile Bond Strength to Carious Affected Dentin Using Two Adhesive Strategies.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Farhadi, Farrokh; Norouzi, Marouf

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to carious affected dentin (CAD) using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and methods. The occlusal surface of 32 human molars with moderate occlusal caries was removed. Infected dentin was removed until reaching CAD and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups based on the Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) adhesive systems. Before composite resin bonding, each group was subdivided into three subgroups of ND, CAD and CPP-ACP-treated CAD (CAD-CPP) based on the dentin substrate. After dissecting samples to l-mm-thick cross-sections (each subgroup: n = 13), μTBS was measured at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and post-hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results. Bond strength of both adhesive systems to ND was significantly higher than that to CAD (P <0.001) and CAD/CPP (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the μTBS of SB to CAD and CAD-CPP (P > 0.05).μTBS of CSE to CAD-CPP was higher than that to CAD; however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Significant differences were found between SB and CSE systems only with CAD substrate (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Regardless of the adhesive system used, surface treatment of CAD with CPP-ACP did not have a significant effect on bond strength. However, bond strength to CAD was higher with SB rather than with CSE. PMID:25346832

  10. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate Treatment on Microtensile Bond Strength to Carious Affected Dentin Using Two Adhesive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Farhadi, Farrokh; Norouzi, Marouf

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to carious affected dentin (CAD) using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and methods. The occlusal surface of 32 human molars with moderate occlusal caries was removed. Infected dentin was removed until reaching CAD and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups based on the Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) adhesive systems. Before composite resin bonding, each group was subdivided into three subgroups of ND, CAD and CPP-ACP-treated CAD (CAD-CPP) based on the dentin substrate. After dissecting samples to l-mm-thick cross-sections (each subgroup: n = 13), μTBS was measured at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and post-hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results. Bond strength of both adhesive systems to ND was significantly higher than that to CAD (P <0.001) and CAD/CPP (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the μTBS of SB to CAD and CAD-CPP (P > 0.05).μTBS of CSE to CAD-CPP was higher than that to CAD; however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Significant differences were found between SB and CSE systems only with CAD substrate (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Regardless of the adhesive system used, surface treatment of CAD with CPP-ACP did not have a significant effect on bond strength. However, bond strength to CAD was higher with SB rather than with CSE. PMID:25346832

  11. Mixed-mode cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composite joints. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental-analytical investigation to characterize the cyclic failure mechanism of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint is conducted. The cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens of graphite/epoxy adherend bonded with EC-3445 adhesive are tested under combined mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, fatigue failure occurs in the form of cyclic debonding. The cyclic debond growth rates are measured. The finite element analysis is employed to compute the mode 1, mode 2, and total strain energy release rates (i.e., GI, GII, and GT). A wide range of mixed-mode loading, i.e., GI/GII ranging from 0.03 to 0.38, is obtained. The total strain energy release rate, G sub T, appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding in the tested composite bonded system.

  12. Bonding Analysis of Amino Resin Wood Adhesive with Pesticide Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Rajin, Mariani; Siambun, Nancy Julius

    Wood base industries are among the dominant players in Malaysia economic activities. In this research, by using Response Surface Method (RSM), studies of bonding between Disodium Tetraborate Decahydrate (DTD) pesticide and various formulation of wood adhesive i.e., Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF) resin is carried out. The RSM formulated twenty-five MUF formulations, consisting combination of different amount of formaldehyde, melamine, urea added in stage-1 and stage-2 of resin synthesis and DTD pesticide. The liquid products of resin are then hardened and tested using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red (FTIR) and visible spectrophotometer (VIS), to analyse the bonding of the resin and pesticide. The data from the FTIR and VIS analysis were then compiled and analysed using Response Surface Method. The results show that, different amount of the formaldehyde, melamine, urea and DTD pesticide, gives specific impact to the strength of MUF resin-pesticide bonding.

  13. Adhesive bonding and brazing of nanocrystalline diamond foil onto different substrate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodes, Matthias A.; Sailer, Stefan; Rosiwal, Stefan M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2013-10-01

    Diamond coatings are used in heavily stressed industrial applications to reduce friction and wear. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) is the favourable coating method, as it allows a coating of large surface areas with high homogeneity. Due to the high temperatures occurring in this CVD-process, the selection of substrate materials is limited. With the desire to coat light materials, steels and polymers a new approach has been developed. First, by using temperature-stable templates in the HFCVD and stripping off the diamond layer afterwards, a flexible, up to 150 μm thick and free standing nanocrystalline diamond foil (NCDF) can be produced. Afterwards, these NCDF can be applied on technical components through bonding and brazing, allowing any material as substrate. This two-step process offers the possibility to join a diamond layer on any desired surface. With a modified scratch test and Rockwell indentation testing the adhesion strength of NCDF on aluminium and steel is analysed. The results show that sufficient adhesion strength is reached both on steel and aluminium. The thermal stress in the substrates is very low and if failure occurs, cracks grow undercritically. Adhesion strength is even higher for the brazed samples, but here crack growth is critical, delaminating the diamond layer to some extent. In comparison to a sample directly coated with diamond, using a high-temperature CVD interlayer, the brazed as well as the adhesively bonded samples show very good performance, proving their competitiveness. A high support of the bonding layer could be identified as crucial, though in some cases a lower stiffness of the latter might be acceptable considering the possibility to completely avoid thermal stresses which occur during joining at higher temperatures.

  14. The effectiveness of an adhesively bonded composite patch repair as applied to a transport aircraft lower wing skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschau, J.J.; Coate, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Specimens were machined from lower wing skin extrusions of a transport aircraft, precracked under fatigue loading, repaired with a boron/epoxy patch, and subsequently fatigue tested under simulated flight loading conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of an adhesively bonded repair patch. Testing was performed at RT and -54{degrees}C for two configurations: one with the crack running up the integral stiffener (riser), the other running down the riser towards the outer skin surface. Cracks were initiated from a single 6.35 mm diameter hole located in the riser portion of the 7075-T6 wing skin material. Ultrasonic inspections were performed during fatigue loading to determine crack growth and damage underneath the patch. Limited results show the adhesively bonded patch was successful in stopping or greatly reducing any further crack growth. Under laboratory air conditions, no crack growth occurred following 30,000 equivalent flight hours, double the expected life of the patched structure. Similarly at -54{degrees}C, no crack growth was observed for a patched crack growing up the riser following 15,000 EFH. For the case of a crack growing down the riser at the lower test temperature, some crack growth was measured, though at a greatly reduced rate.

  15. Event Tracking Model of Adhesion Identifies Load-bearing Bonds in Rolling Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    POSPIESZALSKA, MARIA K.; ZARBOCK, ALEXANDER; PICKARD, JOHN E.; LEY, KLAUS

    2009-01-01

    Objectives P-selectin binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 mediates leukocyte rolling under conditions of inflammation and injury. The objectives were to develop an efficient, high temporal resolution model for direct simulation of leukocyte rolling, and then to conduct a study of load-bearing bonds using the model. Methods A stochastic π-calculus-driven Event Tracking Model of Adhesion was developed and compared with experimental data. Multiple simulations for each case were conducted to obtain high confidence numerical characteristics of leukocyte rolling. Results Leukocyte rolling and the underlying P-selectin—PSGL-1 bonds were studied under low wall shear rate (25-50 s-1) conditions from measured parameters of leukocyte rolling and bond properties. For the first time, the location, number, lifetime, history, and kinetics of load-bearing bonds and their influence on cell rolling are identified. Instantaneous cell displacements, translational and rotational velocities, and cell-endothelium distances are derived. The model explains the commonly observed “stop-start” type rolling behavior and reveals that a few load-bearing bonds are sufficient to support rolling while a large number of bonds dissociate before becoming load-bearing. Conclusions The presented model provides a method for precise and direct simulation of leukocyte rolling, and sets a foundation upon which further refinements can be introduced. PMID:19023690

  16. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  17. Bonding Effectiveness of Universal Adhesive to Intracoronal Bleached Dentin Treated with Sodium Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Thaís Fantinato; Moura, Luana Kelle Batista; Raucci, Walter; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Colucci, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of restorative protocol with sodium ascorbate on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a universal adhesive to intracoronal bleached dentin. One hundred-and-twenty bovine dentin fragments were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10), according to the bleaching procedure (unbleached and bleached) and restorative protocol (no treatment, 10% sodium ascorbate -10SA, 35% sodium ascorbate -35SA and two-step etch-and-rinse -ER or one-step self-etch -SE Scotchbond universal adhesive approaches). Four whitening sessions were performed using 35% hydrogen peroxide. The samples from control groups were kept in relative humidity at 37 °C. Immediately after bleaching procedures, the assigned antioxidant solution was applied on dentin and restorative procedures were performed following either the ER or the SE approach. After 24 h, the specimens were subjected to SBS test. Data (MPa) were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Lower SBS values were found for bleached specimens (8.54 MPa) compared with those unbleached (12.13 MPa) (p<0.05). The bond strength of the sodium ascorbate-treated groups was higher than those untreated, regardless of the strategy employed (p<0.05). Groups restored without sodium ascorbate showed lower bond strength values for both ER (8.32 MPa) and SE (8.28 MPa) adhesive strategies. The group treated with 10SA submitted to ER approach (10.14 MPa) was similar to untreated groups (p>0.05). It may be concluded that bond strength of composite resin to intracoronal dentin was affected by restorative protocol and reduced by bleaching. PMID:27224564

  18. The Outcome of Immediate or Delayed Application of a Single-Step Self-Etch Adhesive to Coronal Dentin Following the Application of Different Endodontic Irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Shehab-El Din Mohammed; El-Askary, Farid Sabry

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of immediate or delayed bonding of a single-step self-etch adhesive to coronal dentin after the application of different endodontic irrigants. Methods: Thirty five human molars were used. The coronal dentin was irrigated with either 0.9% physiologic saline (NS), 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) or 2.5% commercially used sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Composite cylinders were bonded with the coronal dentin using the Clearfil S3 bond, which was applied either immediately or after one week storage time following the irrigation procedures. Shear bond strength testing was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the resin/dentin interface was evaluated using SEM. Results: Irrigation with NS, CHX, or NaOCL followed by immediate adhesive application resulted in a reduction in the shear bond strength values recorded and this was statistically significant in comparison with the control group (P<.05). However, delaying the adhesive application resulted in a statistically significant (P<.05) improvement in the shear bond strength recorded in specimens irrigated with NS and CHX only. Conclusions: Delaying the bonding procedures for one week appeared to be beneficial in improving the shear bond strength of Clearfil S3 bond with coronal dentin especially when NS and CHX were used as endodontic irrigants. NaOCL proved to be an incompatible irrigating solution when used prior to the application of such adhesive. PMID:19421386

  19. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P < 0.05). Thermocycling significantly reduced μSBS in SBU (22.49 MPa ± 4.11) (P < 0.05), but not in NC (20.68 MPa ± 4.60) and PC (28.77 MPa ± 3.52) (P > 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  20. Role of chemical bonding in the adhesion of elastomers. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gent, A.N.

    1981-04-03

    A review is given of several studies of the effect of interfacial bonding upon the mechanical strength of an adhesive joint. In the first, polybutadiene layers were crosslinked by a free radical process whilst in contact with silane-treated glass. A direct proportionality was found between the minimum peel strength of the joint, as high temperatures and low rates of peeling, and the vinyl content of the silane treatment liquid. Covalent bonding between the diene polymer and vinyl groups on the treated glass was inferred. When radioactivity tagged silanes were employed, extensive combination with the glass substrates was demonstrated. Again, the greater the amount of vinyl silane found on the treated glass surface, the greater the mechanical strength of adhesion between the treated glass and a polybutadiene overlayer. In another series of experiments two partially crosslinked sheets of polybutadiene were pressed together before the crosslinking was taken to completion. The additional crosslinking was determined from measurements of the elastic properties and of the degree of equilibrium swelling by a compatible liquid. Again, the mechanical strength of adhesion between the two sheets under threshold conditions was found to be directly proportional to the inferred degree of interfacial interlinking.

  1. Durable bonds at the adhesive/dentin interface: an impossible mission or simply a moving target?

    PubMed Central

    SPENCER, Paulette; Jonggu PARK, Qiang YE; MISRA, Anil; BOHATY, Brenda S.; SINGH, Viraj; PARTHASARATHY, Ranga; SENE, Fábio; de Paiva GONÇALVES, Sérgio Eduardo; LAURENCE, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries and increased frequency of replacement as compared to dental amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and failure. The gingival margin of composite restora tions is particularly vulnerable to decay and at this margin, the adhesive and its seal to dentin provides the primary barrier between the prepared tooth and the environment. The intent of this article is to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:24855586

  2. Effect of EDTA and Phosphoric Acid Pretreatment on the Bonding Effectiveness of Self-Etch Adhesives to Ground Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ihab M.; Elkassas, Dina W.; Yousry, Mai M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study determined the effect of enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bond strength of strong, intermediary strong, and mild self-etching adhesive systems. Methods: Ninety sound human premolars were used. Resin composite cylinders were bonded to flat ground enamel surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=0.9–1.0), intermediary strong AdheSE (pH=1.6–1.7), and mild Frog (pH=2). Adhesive systems were applied either according to manufacturer instructions (control) or after pretreatment with either phosphoric acid or EDTA (n=10). After 24 hours, shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Ultra-morphological characterization of the surface topography and resin/enamel interfaces as well as representative fractured enamel specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Neither surface pretreatment statistically increased the mean shear bond strength values of either the strong or the intermediary strong self-etching adhesive systems. However, phosphoric acid pretreatment significantly increased the mean shear bond strength values of the mild self-etching adhesive system. SEM examination of enamel surface topography showed that phosphoric acid pretreatment deepened the same etching pattern of the strong and intermediary strong adhesive systems but converted the irregular etching pattern of the mild self-etching adhesive system to a regular etching pattern. SEM examination of the resin/enamel interface revealed that deepening of the etching pattern was consistent with increase in the length of resin tags. EDTA pretreatment had a negligible effect on ultra-morphological features. Conclusions: Use of phosphoric acid pretreatment can be beneficial with mild self-etching adhesive systems for bonding to enamel. PMID:20922162

  3. Temporary bond-debond process for manufacture of flexible electronics: Impact of adhesive and carrier properties on performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Jesmin; Ageno, Scott; Raupp, Gregory B.; Vogt, Bryan D.; Loy, Doug

    2010-12-01

    Manufacturing of microelectronics on flexible substrates is challenged by difficulties in maintaining alignment and conformity of the substrate through deposition, patterning, and etch processes. To address these difficulties, a temporary bond-debond method has been developed for effective automated handling of flexible substrate systems during electronics fabrication. The flexible substrate is temporarily bonded to a rigid carrier, which provides structural support and suppresses bending during processing. The photolithographic alignment of the bonded system is strongly dependent upon the viscoelastic properties of the bonding adhesive. An additional challenge is to control the stress developed during processing; these stresses evolve predominately through thermomechanical property mismatches between the carrier and flexible substrate. To investigate the role of the thermomechanical properties of the carrier and adhesive, the stress, and subsequent bowing of bonded systems (flexible substrate-adhesive-carrier) is examined systematically using different carriers and adhesives. Excellent registration of the flexible circuitry fabricated on the bonded system with low stress can be achieved by using a viscoelastic adhesive with a low loss factor (tan δ) and a carrier with high modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that is closely matched to the flexible substrate. This bond-debond process enables the high yield fabrication of flexible microelectronics on plastic substrates.

  4. An in vitro study of the bond strength of five adhesives used for vinyl polysiloxane impression materials and tray materials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surender; Gandhi, Udey Vir; Banerjee, Saurav

    2014-03-01

    Although stock trays often provide mechanical retention for elastomeric impression materials, manufacturers typically recommend the use of an adhesive, whether a stock or custom tray is used. The mention of the bond strength on the adhesive packaging is not available, therefore the clinician has no idea whatsoever of the ideal adhesive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of three vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) materials, one with a poly(methyl methacrylate) autopolymerizing (PMMA) specimen and another with a light-polymerizing tray material (VLC), using the adhesive recommended by the manufacturer of the impression material, and two universal adhesives. A total of ninety specimens (15 × 15 × 20 mm) were used, 45 specimens were made in PMMA and rest 45 was made in VLC. Five paint-on adhesives (Coltene, Caulk, 3M, universal Zhermack and universal GC) were applied. Three impression materials, Affinis, Reprosil, and 3M, were mixed and injected into a perforated poly vinyl chloride cylinder. Tray specimens were positioned against the open cylinder end in contact with the VPS material. Tensile strength tests were conducted until adhesive separation failure. Mean values and standard errors of the adhesive strength were recorded in MPa for each material combination. GC paint-on universal adhesive provided significantly higher adhesive strength values.

  5. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  6. Enamel-smear compromises bonding by mild self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mine, A; De Munck, J; Vivan Cardoso, M; Van Landuyt, K L; Poitevin, A; Kuboki, T; Yoshida, Y; Suzuki, K; Van Meerbeek, B

    2010-12-01

    In light of the increased popularity of less acidic, so-called 'ultra-mild' self-etch adhesives, adhesion to enamel is becoming more critical. It is hypothesized that this compromised enamel bonding should, to a certain extent, be attributed to interference of bur debris smeared across enamel during cavity preparation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the enamel smear layer differed not only in thickness, but also in crystal density and size, depending on the surface-preparation method used. Lab-demineralization of sections clearly disclosed that resin-infiltration of an ultra-mild self-etch adhesive progressed preferentially along micro-cracks that were abundantly present at and underneath the bur-cut enamel surface. The surface-preparation method significantly affected the nature of the smear layer and the interaction with the ultra-mild adhesive, being more uniform and dense for a lab-SiC-prepared surface vs. a clinically relevant bur-prepared surface.

  7. Plasma polymerized primer for rubber-to-metal bonding: Adhesion measurement and interphase characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.M.; Boerio, F.J.; Kim, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    Adhesion of rubber to steel is of considerable practical importance in many areas of technology. However, direct adhesion of natural rubber to most metals is very poor. As a result, metals are frequently plated with brass, to which rubber adheres very strongly, or else the metals are coated with proprietary primers and adhesives in order to obtain adhesion of rubber. Plasma processing has been attracting attention in many areas due to some of its unique features. During the process, the synthesis and deposition of plasma polymers can be accomplished at the same time, making plasma processing a very efficient method for polymer coating. Plasma processing also allows flexible combinations of reactor parameters which would provide a great deal of process control and versatility. Moreover, in plasma processing, there are no solvents involved and there are no solvent-disposal problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe results the authors have obtained in developing plasma polymerized primer films to enhance rubber-to-steel bonding. Preliminary durability test results are reported. Results obtained using a model rubber system to simulate reactions in the rubber/primer {open_quotes}interphase{close_quotes} are also described.

  8. Effect of bromelain enzyme for dentin deproteinization on bond strength of adhesive system

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Kirti; Basavanna, Revaplar Siddaveerappa; Shivanna, Vasundhara

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the deproteinizing effect of bromelain enzyme and compare it with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on shear bond strength before application of the adhesive system. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 extracted human premolars were divided into three groups, each one consisted of 10 teeth. The occlusal surface was wet ground to expose superficial dentin. In Group 1, teeth were etched; in Group 2, teeth were etched and deproteinized with bromelain enzyme; in Group 3, teeth were etched and deproteinized with 5% NaOCl. Upon completion of the adhesive procedures, resin composite was inserted into the plastic tube and light-polymerized. All specimens were stored at 37°C in water for 24 h, and the specimens were transferred to the universal testing machine, and then subjected to shear bond strength analysis at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test at a significance level of 0.05. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 12.0.1 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: The bond strength results were significantly influenced by the application of bromelain enzyme. Statistically significant differences were not demonstrated in control group and NaOCl-treated group. The highest bond strength was seen in bromelain enzyme-treated group. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it was concluded that removal of unsupported collagen fiber with bromelain enzyme after acid etching results in improved bond strength. PMID:26430297

  9. Laparoscopy for Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Single Adhesive Band

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Suk Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There are still concerns about the comparative outcomes of operative treatment (OT) and conservative (nonsurgical) treatment (CT) for small bowel obstruction (SBO), especially that caused by single adhesive bands. We performed a retrospective study to compare surgical with nonsurgical outcomes. Methods: A total of 62 patients were enrolled. The OT group underwent laparoscopy (n = 16), and the CT group (n = 46) did not. We compared early and late outcomes between the 2 groups. Results: Times to first flatus, oral intake, and defecation after treatment were shorter in the OT group (P = .030, .033, and .024), and the recurrence rate was lower in the OT group than in the CT group (6.2% vs 32.6%; P = .038). Time from discharge to first recurrence was longer in the OT group than in the CT group (172 vs 104.6 ± 26.5 days, P = .027). Conclusions: SBO related to a single adhesive band is not effectively treated by CT. However, laparoscopic OT provides notable success if the surgery is performed early. Therefore, it should be the preferred treatment. PMID:27647979

  10. Investigation of the adhesive bonding technology for the insulator structure of EAST neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jiang-Long Li, Jun; Hu, Chun-Dong; Xie, Ya-Hong; Jing, Hao

    2014-07-15

    A key issue on the development of EAST ion source was the junction design of insulator structure, which consists of three insulators and four supporting flanges of electrode grid. Because the ion source is installed on the vertical plane, the insulator structure has to withstand large bending and shear stress due to the gravity of whole ion source. Through a mechanical analysis, it was calculated that the maximum bending normal stress was 0.34 MPa and shear stress was 0.23 MPa on the insulator structure. Due to the advantages of simplicity and high strength, the adhesive bonding technology was applied to the junction of insulator structure. A tensile testing campaign of different junction designs between insulator and supporting flange was performed, and a junction design of stainless steel and fiber enhanced epoxy resin with epoxy adhesive was determined. The insulator structure based on the determined design can satisfy both the requirements of high-voltage holding and mechanical strength.

  11. Elasticity Solution of an Adhesively Bonded Cover Plate of Various Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksel, G. N.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The plane strain of adhesively bonded structures consisting of two different isotropic adherends is considered. By expressing the x-y components of the displacements in terms of Fourier integrals and using the corresponding boundary and continuity conditions, the integral equations for the general problem are obtained and solved numerically by applying Gauss-Chebyshev integration scheme. The shear and the normal stresses in the adhesive are calculated for various geometries and material properties for a stiffened plate under uniaxial tension. Numerical results involving the stress intensity factors and the strain energy release rate are presented. The closed-form expressions for the Fredholm kernels are provided to obtain the solution for an arbitrary geometry and material properties. For the general geometry, the contribution of the normal stress is quite significant, while for symmetric geometries, the shear stress is dominant, the normal stress vanishes if the adherends are of the same material and the same thickness.

  12. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre-reinforced polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The surfaces of the graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composites presently pretreated prior to bonding with polyimide adhesive contained variable amounts of a fluoropolymer, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lap shear strengths were determined for unaged samples and for those aged over 500- and 1000-hour periods at 177 and 232 C. Unaged sample lap strengths, which were the highest obtained, exhibited no variation with surface pretreatment, but a significant decrease is noted with increasing aging temperature. These thermally aged samples, however, had increased surface fluorine concentration, while a minimal concentration was found in unaged samples. SEM demonstrated a progressive shift from cohesive to adhesive failure for elevated temperature-aged composites.

  13. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  14. Bond performance of "Touch and Cure" adhesives on resin core systems.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Yoshitaka; Kakuda, Shinichi; Kawano, Shimpei; Katsumata, Aiichiro; Ting, Shihchun; Hoshika, Shuhei; Ikeda, Takatsumi; Tanaka, Toru; Carvalho, Ricardo Marinsde; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) of three resin core composites to dentin and to examine the bonded interface of the composites. One experimental TDK-03(TD) and, two commercial, DC core Automix One (DC) and Unifil core EM(UN) were used. Flat dentin surfaces of human molars were exposed using #600 SiC paper and bonded with the respective adhesive of each system. After bonding, the composites were built up on the surfaces and cured under two conditions: "light condition" or "dark condition". µTBSs (MPa) in the light condition were: TD; 60.02±17.08, DC; 38.21±13.70, and UN; 29.50±9.71; in the dark condition: TD; 54.62±17.11, DC; 8.40±4.81, and UN; 9.47±6.56. Dark curing negatively affected the bond strength of the two commercial resin-core materials. The experimental material was not affected by the curing conditions. PMID:27251993

  15. A self-diagnostic adhesive for monitoring bonded joints in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yitao; Li, Yu-hung; Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Bondline integrity is still one of the most critical concerns in the design of aircraft structures up to date. Due to the lack of confidence on the integrity of the bondline both during fabrication and service, the industry standards and regulations still require assembling the composite using conventional fasteners. Furthermore, current state-of-the-art non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are incapable of offering mature solutions on the issue of bondline integrity monitoring. Therefore, the objective of this work is the development of an intelligent adhesive film with integrated micro-sensors for monitoring the integrity of the bondline interface. The proposed method makes use of an electromechanical-impedance (EMI) based method, which is a rapidly evolving approach within the SHM family. Furthermore, an innovative screen-printing technique to fabricate piezoelectric ceramic sensors with minimal thickness has been developed at Stanford. The approach presented in this study is based on the use of (i) micro screen-printed piezoelectric sensors integrated into adhesive leaving a minimal footprint on the material, (ii) numerical and analytical modeling of the EMI spectrum of the adhesive bondline, (iii) novel diagnostic algorithms for monitoring the bondline integrity based on advanced signal processing techniques, and (iv) the experimental assessment via prototype adhesively bonded structures in static (varying loads) and dynamic (fatigue) environments. The proposed method will provide a huge confidence on the use of bonded joints for aerospace structures and lead to a paradigm change in their design by enabling enormous weight savings while maximizing the economic and performance efficiency.

  16. Analysis of bonding stress with high strength adhesive between the reflector and the mounts in space camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Yongming; Li, Yingcai; Qu, Youshan; Ding, Jiaoteng

    2010-05-01

    The bond stress is analyzed when the optics were attached to their mounts with high strength adhesive in space camera. The model was founded that a circular planar reflector supported by one, three, six or twelve adhesive points, which evenly distributed on different circles. The surface deformation of reflector is mainly caused by the shrinkage after solidity. The functional relation was deduced between the bonding force of the reflector and the characteristic dimension of the adhesive spot using piecewise function, and then analyzing the RMS error of no gravity assuming that the adhesive spot is fixed connect to the reflector using Nastran. The analytical RMS error was the aberration which added by solidification of adhesive. The calculation result is in good agreement with the experiment results. This analyzing method will be useful for the microstress clamping of high performance reflector system for application in space optical systems.

  17. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  18. Ultrasonic study of adhesive bond quality at a steel-to-rubber interface by using quadrature phase detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. C.; Yang, H.

    1989-01-01

    The quadrature phase detection technique was used to simultaneously monitor the phase and amplitude of a toneburst signal normally reflected from an adhesively bonded steel-to-rubber interface. The measured phase was found to show a positive shift for all bonded samples with respect to the disbonded state - the phase shift being larger for samples with weaker bonds, as manifested by smaller values of applied tensile loads at failure. A model calculation, which incorporates the concept of interfacial strength into the usual problem of wave propagation in multilayered media, was used to deduce a bond-quality parameter from an experimentally measured phase shift. This bond-quality parameter was found to be correlated with the tensile strength of the adhesive bonds at failure loads.

  19. Systems, Apparatuses, and Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, III, Stanley S. (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  20. Use of Hydration Inhibitors to Improve Bond Durability of Aluminum Adhesive Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Ahearn, J. S.; Matienzo, L. J.; Venables, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the mechanisms by which nitrilotris methylene phosphonic acid (NTMP) and related compounds are adsorbed onto oxidized aluminum surfaces to inhibit hydration and increase the durability of adhesive bonds formed with inhibitor-treated panels. P - O - Al bonds are identified as the basis of adsorption, and it is found that water initially adsorbed onto the etched aluminum surfaces is displaced by the NTMP. The hydration of the NTMP-treated surfaces occurs in three stages, namely the reverisble physisorption of water, the slow dissolution of NTMP followed by rapid hydration of the freshly exposed Al2O3 to AlOOH and further hydration of the surface to Al(OH)3. Five properties of an ideal inhibitor are identified.

  1. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment on Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Quality of Peel Ply Prepared Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Ashley C.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could modify peel ply prepared composite surfaces to create strong adhesive bonds. Two peel ply surface preparation composite systems previously shown to create weak bonds (low fracture energy and adhesion failure) that were potential candidates for plasma treatment were Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepared with Precision Fabrics Group, Inc. (PFG) 52006 nylon peel ply and Hexcel T300/F155 CFRP prepared with PFG 60001 polyester peel ply. It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could functionalize and/or remove peel ply remnants left on the CFRP surfaces upon peel ply removal. Surface characterization measurements and double cantilever beam (DCB) testing were used to determine the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on surface characteristics and bond quality of peel ply prepared CFRP composites. Previous research showed that Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 52006 peel ply and bonded with Cytec MetlBond 1515-3M structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies when tested in the DCB configuration. Previous research also showed that DCB samples made of Hexcel T300/F155 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 60001 peel ply and bonded with Henkel Hysol EA 9696 structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies. Recent research suggested that plasma treatment could be able to activate these "un-bondable" surfaces and result in good adhesive bonds. Nylon peel ply prepared 177 °C cure and polyester peel ply prepared 127 °C cure CFRP laminates were treated with atmospheric pressure plasma after peel ply removal prior to bonding. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was capable of significantly increasing fracture energies and changing failure modes. For Toray T800/3900-2 laminates prepared with PFG 52006 and bonded with

  2. AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES AND THEIR EFFECT ON COMPOSITE-ADHESIVE-DENTIN BONDING

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, J.M.; O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the bond strength and related properties of photo-polymerizable, remineralizing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) polymeric composite-adhesive systems to dentin after various periods of aqueous aging at 37 °C. An experimental ACP base and lining composite was made from a photo-activated resin comprising 2,2-bis[p-(2’-hydroxy-3’-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and zirconyl dimethacrylate (ZrDMA); designated BTHZ. An experimental orthodontic composite was formulated from a photo-activated resin comprising ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), TEGDMA, HEMA and methacryloxyethyl phthalate (MEP); designated ETHM. In both composite series three fillers were compared: 1) freshly precipitated zirconium-modified ACP freshly precipitated (as-prepared Zr-ACP), 2) milled Zr-ACP and 3) an ion-leachable fluoride glass. In addition to the shear bond strength (SBS), work to fracture and failure modes of the orthodontic composites were determined. The SBS of the base and lining ACP composites appeared unaffected by filler type or immersion time. In the orthodontic ACP composite series, milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over as-prepared ACP composites, and produced higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. After six months of aqueous exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin-primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. BTHZ and ETHM based ACP composites are potentially effective anti-demineralizing-remineralizing agents with possible clinical utility as protective base-liners and orthodontic cements, respectively. The analysis of the bond strength and failure modalities suggests that milled ACP composites may offer greater potential in clinical applications. PMID:19696914

  3. Adhesive force of a single gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autumn, Kellar; Liang, Yiching A.; Hsieh, S. Tonia; Zesch, Wolfgang; Chan, Wai Pang; Kenny, Thomas W.; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert J.

    2000-06-01

    Geckos are exceptional in their ability to climb rapidly up smooth vertical surfaces. Microscopy has shown that a gecko's foot has nearly five hundred thousand keratinous hairs or setae. Each 30-130µm long seta is only one-tenth the diameter of a human hair and contains hundreds of projections terminating in 0.2-0.5µm spatula-shaped structures. After nearly a century of anatomical description, here we report the first direct measurements of single setal force by using a two-dimensional micro-electro-mechanical systems force sensor and a wire as a force gauge. Measurements revealed that a seta is ten times more effective at adhesion than predicted from maximal estimates on whole animals. Adhesive force values support the hypothesis that individual seta operate by van der Waals forces. The gecko's peculiar behaviour of toe uncurling and peeling led us to discover two aspects of setal function which increase their effectiveness. A unique macroscopic orientation and preloading of the seta increased attachment force 600-fold above that of frictional measurements of the material. Suitably orientated setae reduced the forces necessary to peel the toe by simply detaching above a critical angle with the substratum.

  4. Adhesive force of a single gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Liang, Y A; Hsieh, S T; Zesch, W; Chan, W P; Kenny, T W; Fearing, R; Full, R J

    2000-06-01

    Geckos are exceptional in their ability to climb rapidly up smooth vertical surfaces. Microscopy has shown that a gecko's foot has nearly five hundred thousand keratinous hairs or setae. Each 30-130 microm long seta is only one-tenth the diameter of a human hair and contains hundreds of projections terminating in 0.2-0.5 microm spatula-shaped structures. After nearly a century of anatomical description, here we report the first direct measurements of single setal force by using a two-dimensional micro-electromechanical systems force sensor and a wire as a force gauge. Measurements revealed that a seta is ten times more effective at adhesion than predicted from maximal estimates on whole animals. Adhesive force values support the hypothesis that individual seta operate by van der Waals forces. The gecko's peculiar behaviour of toe uncurling and peeling led us to discover two aspects of setal function which increase their effectiveness. A unique macroscopic orientation and preloading of the seta increased attachment force 600-fold above that of frictional measurements of the material. Suitably orientated setae reduced the forces necessary to peel the toe by simply detaching above a critical angle with the substratum.

  5. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modern self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability. PMID:20690420

  6. Single-electron aerogen bonds: Do they exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    A novel type of σ-hole interaction is characterized between some noble gas containing molecules (KrOF2, KrO3, XeOF2 and XeO3) and methyl (CH3) or ethyl (C2H5) radical by means of ab initio calculations. This interaction is named as single-electron aerogen bond (SEAB), in view of the concepts of aerogen bond and single-electron bond interactions. The properties of SEABs are studied by molecular electrostatic potential, quantum theory of atom in molecules, natural bonding orbital and noncovalent interaction index analyses. The formation of an O⋯H interaction tends to increase the strength of the SEAB, when they coexist in a ternary complex.

  7. Special element approach for calculating the vibratory response of adhesively bonded and composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N. E.; Griffin, J. H.

    1994-02-01

    An approach is presented that may be used to calculate the natural frequencies and loss factors of composite sandwich beams or beams containing adhesively bonded joints. The approach uses special finite elements to represent either composite or joint elements and the modal strain energy method to calculate the loss factor for each vibratory mode of interest. The special element represents a section of the composite beam or the overlap joint as an element with four nodes. Its properties are calculated by using a generalization of the shape function concept from finite elements in which the shape function (displacement fields) in the special elements are determined by performing static stress analysis on the special element's substructure. The resulting special element has only a small number of degrees of freedom and, yet, accurately represents the geometrically complex substructure. Results obtained using this approach on sandwich beams compare well with an analytical solution published in the literature. In addition, it correlates reasonably well with data taken from tests on adhesively bonded beams.

  8. Depletion of water molecules during ethanol wet-bonding with etch and rinse dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Sharrock, Patrick; Delannée, Mathieu; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of demineralized dentin with ethanol has been proposed as a way to improve hydrophobic monomer penetration into otherwise water saturated collagen fibrils. The ethanol rinse is expected to preserve the fibrils from collapsing while optimizing resin constituent infiltration for better long term adhesion. The physico-chemical investigations of demineralized dentin confirmed objectively these working hypotheses. Namely, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the melting point of water molecules pointed to the presence of free and bound water states. Unfreezable water was the main type of water remaining following a rinsing step with absolute ethanol. Two different liquid water phases were also observed by Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid state Nuclear magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of ethanol treated specimens illustrated differences with the fully hydrated specimens concerning the polar carbonyl vibrations. Optical microscopy observations as well as scanning electron microscopy showed an improved dentin-adhesive interface with ethanol wet bonding. The results indicate that water can be confined to strongly bound structural molecules when excess water is removed with ethanol prior to adhesive application. This should preserve collagen from hydrolysis upon aging of the hybrid layer.

  9. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    DOE PAGES

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted formore » by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.« less

  10. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted for by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.

  11. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  12. ADHESION OF AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES BONDED TO DENTIN: A STUDY IN FAILURE MODALITY

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims As a bioactive filler capable of remineralizing tooth structures, the main disadvantage of as-made amorphous calcium phosphate (am-ACP) are its large agglomerates. The objective of this study was to mill ACP, and compare the adhesive strength to dentin, work to fracture, and failure modes of both groups to glass-filled composites and one commercial compomer after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months of exposure to simulated saliva solution (SLS). Flat dentin surfaces were acid-etched, primed, and photopolymerized. Composites were applied, photo-cured, and debonded in shear. The resin used in each composite was identical: ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloxyethyl phthalate. Fillers consisted of am-ACP and milled ACP (m-ACP), and a strontium-containing glass (Sr-glass) at respective mass fractions of (40, 60, and 75) %. Findings 90 % of the fracture surfaces in this study showed adhesive failure, with most of these occurring at the dentin/primer interface. 52 % of failures after 24 h immersion occurred at the primer/composite interface. After six months of SLS exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin/primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. Conclusions Milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over am-ACP composites and the compomer, and produced a higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. Evidence is provided which suggests that milled ACP composites may offer enhanced potential in clinical bonding applications. PMID:19107798

  13. Bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material with a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    1996-07-01

    Adhesive bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material (Olympus Castable Ceramics, OCC) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a silane primer in conjunction with an adhesive luting material. The primer contained a silane coupler and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), while the methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based luting agent was initiated with a tri-n-butylborane derivative (TBB) and contained 4-META (4-META/MMA-TBB resin). Ceramic specimens were sanded with No. 600 silicon carbide paper followed by blasting with alumina and/or etching with ammonium bifluoride. The specimens were bonded with various combinations and shear bond strengths were determined. Both priming and alumina blasting enhanced the bond between 4-META resin and OCC. Although etching with ammonium bifluoride roughened the ceramic surface, this procedure did not improve the bond strength. Electron probe microanalysis of the ceramic surface revealed a decrease in silicon and aluminium elements after etching with ammonium bifluoride.

  14. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  15. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  16. Influence of preheating the bonding agent of a conventional three-step adhesive system and the light activated resin cement on dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Holanda, Daniel Brandão Vilela; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    Aims: to evaluate the influence of preheating the bonding agent (Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive/3M ESPE) and the light-activated resin cement (RelyX Venner/3M ESPE) on dentin microtensile bond strength. Materials and Methods: The exposed flat dentin surface of 40 human third molars were randomly distributed into four groups for cementation (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) (n = 10): G1-bond and resin cement, both at room temperature (22°C), G2-bond preheated to 58°C and cement at room temperature (22°C), G3-bond at room temperature (22°C) and the cement preheated to 58°C, G4-bond preheated to 58°C and cement preheated to 58°C. Sticks of dentin/block set measuring approximately 1 mm2 were obtained and used for the microtensile bond strength test. All sticks had their failure mode classified. Statistical analysis used: Factorial analysis of variance was applied, 2 × 2 (bond × cement) (P < 0.05). Results: Preheating the bonding agent (P = 0.8411) or the cement (P = 0.7155), yielded no significant difference. The interaction bond × cement was not significant (P = 0.9389). Conclusions: Preheating the bond and/or the light-activated resin cement did not influence dentin bond strength or fracture failure mode. PMID:24347889

  17. The bond strength of adhesive resins to AH plus contaminated dentin cleaned by various gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Demirbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kansad; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2015-01-01

    The optimal bonding of adhesives to dentin requires the sealer to be completely removed from dentinal walls. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different cleaning procedures using gutta-percha solvents on bond strength of adhesive resins to AH Plus contaminated dentin (APCD). The pulp chamber dentin surfaces were contaminated with AH Plus and cleaned with five different techniques (dry cotton, chloroform, orange oil, eucalyptol, and ethanol). Then, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), and Tetric N Bond (TNB) (Ivoclar Vivadent) were applied and filled with a composite resin. The serial sticks (1 × 1 mm) were obtained and tested for microtensile bond strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for analysis of debonded surfaces. Ethanol exhibited the highest bond strength to APCD followed by dry cotton. There was no statistically significant difference between ethanol and dry cotton (p > 0.05). Eucalyptol showed the lowest bond strength to APCD and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in comparison with other groups. APCD reduced the bond strength of all adhesive resins. Dry cotton, ethanol, and chloroform were the most suitable techniques when used with CSE together, whereas ethanol was best with TNB.

  18. The bond strength of adhesive resins to AH plus contaminated dentin cleaned by various gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Demirbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kansad; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2015-01-01

    The optimal bonding of adhesives to dentin requires the sealer to be completely removed from dentinal walls. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different cleaning procedures using gutta-percha solvents on bond strength of adhesive resins to AH Plus contaminated dentin (APCD). The pulp chamber dentin surfaces were contaminated with AH Plus and cleaned with five different techniques (dry cotton, chloroform, orange oil, eucalyptol, and ethanol). Then, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), and Tetric N Bond (TNB) (Ivoclar Vivadent) were applied and filled with a composite resin. The serial sticks (1 × 1 mm) were obtained and tested for microtensile bond strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for analysis of debonded surfaces. Ethanol exhibited the highest bond strength to APCD followed by dry cotton. There was no statistically significant difference between ethanol and dry cotton (p > 0.05). Eucalyptol showed the lowest bond strength to APCD and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in comparison with other groups. APCD reduced the bond strength of all adhesive resins. Dry cotton, ethanol, and chloroform were the most suitable techniques when used with CSE together, whereas ethanol was best with TNB. PMID:25678408

  19. The fabrication of microfluidic structures by means of full-wafer adhesive bonding using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samel, Björn; Kamruzzaman Chowdhury, M.; Stemme, Göran

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we present the use of a PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) curing-agent as the intermediate layer for adhesive full-wafer bonding suitable for fabrication of microfluidic structures. The curing-agent of the two-component silicone rubber (Sylgard 184) is spin coated on a substrate, brought into contact with another PDMS layer and heat cured to create an irreversible seal which is as strong as or even stronger than plasma-assisted PDMS bonding. The maximum bond strength is measured to 800 kPa when bonding together PDMS and silicon. The applicability of the new PDMS adhesive bonding method is verified by means of fabricating microfluidic structures. Using this method allows for wafer-level bonding of PDMS to various materials such as PDMS, glass or silicon and more importantly to selectively bond different layers by using a patterned adhesive bonding technique. Moreover, precise alignment of the structural layers is facilitated since curing is initiated upon heat which is an advantage when fabricating multilayer microfluidic devices.

  20. Dentin bonding performance using Weibull statistics and evaluation of acid-base resistant zone formation of recently introduced adhesives.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rui; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Sato, Takaaki; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    Dentin bonding durability of recently introduced dental adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond 2 (SE2), Optibond XTR (XTR), and Scotchbond Universal (SBU) was investigated using Weibull analysis as well as analysis of the micromorphological features of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) created for the adhesives. The bonding procedures of SBU were divided into three subgroups: self-etch (SBS), phosphoric acid (PA) etching on moist (SBM) or dry dentin (SBD). All groups were thermocycled for 0, 5,000 and 10,000 cycles followed by microtensile bond strength testing. Acid-base challenge was undertaken before SEM and TEM observations of the adhesive interface. The etch-and-rinse method with SBU (SBM and SBD) created inferior interfaces on the dentin surface which resulted in reduced bond durability. ABRZ formation was detected with the self-etch adhesive systems; SE2, XTR and SBS. In the PA etching protocols of SBM and SBD, a thick hybrid layer but no ABRZ was detected, which might affect dentin bond durability. PMID:27335136

  1. Micro-tensile bond strength of self-etching primer adhesive systems to human coronal carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strengths of three self-etching primer adhesive systems to normal dentin (ND), caries-affected dentin (CAD) and caries-infected dentin (CID). Human extracted molars with caries were used, and flat dentin surfaces ground by 600-grit SiC paper were prepared. The surfaces were dyed using Caries-Detector solution, treated with Clearfil SE Bond, Mac-Bond II and UniFil Bond, and then covered with resin composites according to manufacturer's instructions. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, the teeth were serially sectioned into multiple slices. Each slice was distinguished into ND, CAD and CID groups by the degree of staining, and the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation was also performed. For statistical analysis, anova and Scheffe's test were used (P < 0.05). The bond strengths of the three adhesive systems to CAD and CID were significantly lower than those to ND. There was significant difference in the bond strength to ND between Clearfil SE Bond and UniFil Bond, but no significant differences to CAD and CID among the three adhesive systems. On SEM, the hybrid layers in CAD and CID showed more porous structures compared with ND. The results indicated that the bond strengths to CAD and CID were not affected by a variety of self-etching primer adhesive systems because of the porous hybrid layer formation in carious dentin.

  2. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Gobbato, Maurizio; Conte, Joel; Kosmatke, John; Oliver, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  3. Microwave Induced Direct Bonding of Single Crystal Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budraa, N. K.; Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.

    1999-01-01

    We have heated polished doped single-crystal silicon wafers in a single mode microwave cavity to temperatures where surface to surface bonding occurred. The absorption of microwaves and heating of the wafers is attributed to the inclusion of n-type or p-type impurities into these substrates. A cylindrical cavity TM (sub 010) standing wave mode was used to irradiate samples of various geometry's at positions of high magnetic field. This process was conducted in vacuum to exclude plasma effects. This initial study suggests that the inclusion of impurities in single crystal silicon significantly improved its microwave absorption (loss factor) to a point where heating silicon wafers directly can be accomplished in minimal time. Bonding of these substrates, however, occurs only at points of intimate surface to surface contact. The inclusion of a thin metallic layer on the surfaces enhances the bonding process.

  4. Microleakage of 3 single-bottle self-etch adhesives having different solvents.

    PubMed

    Cubukcu, Cigdem Elbek; Eden, Ece; Pamir, Tijen

    2013-08-01

    This study compared the microleakage from 3 single-bottle self-etch adhesives (SEAs) with a conventional etch and rinse (ER) system. Class V cavities were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces at the cementoenamel junction of 40 extracted human third molars. The cavities were allocated into 4 groups (n = 20). The groups were treated with either a combination of composite resin and 1 of 3 SEAs, or with a conventional ER system. Dye penetration of the samples was performed by placing them in a fresh solution of India ink for 48 hours. After rinsing and sectioning, the samples were placed under a light microscope and evaluated for microleakage along occlusal (enamel) and gingival (dentin) margins. The data were analyzed statistically. Microleakage scores of the adhesives exhibited significant differences (P < 0.05). All 3 single-bottle SEAs tested exhibited more microleakage than the ER system. There was no difference in terms of microleakage between the enamel and dentin margins in the SEA-bonded specimens (P > 0.05). The ER system was more successful in sealing enamel than dentin.

  5. Effects of adhesive thickness on the Lamb wave pitch-catch signal using bonded piezoelectric wafer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. M.; Huang, H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of adhesive layer on Lamb wave ultrasound pitch-catch signals that are excited and sensed by piezoelectric wafer transducers bonded on a slender structure. Analytical models were established to simulate the longitudinal and flexural vibrations of the structures separately and parametric studies of the bonding layer properties, i.e. the shear transfer parameter, adhesive thickness, and shear modulus, were performed. The parametric studies indicate that there exists an optimal adhesive layer thickness that generates maximum ultrasound pitch-catch signal for both wave modes. This prediction was subsequently validated by measurements. In addition, an improved match between the measured and simulated pitch-catch signals was achieved by adjusting the adhesive layer parameters.

  6. Dynamics of unbinding of cell adhesion molecules: Transition from catch to slip bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsegov, V.; Thirumalai, D.

    2005-02-01

    The unbinding dynamics of complexes involving cell-adhesion molecules depends on the specific ligands. Atomic force microscopy measurements have shown that for the specific P-selectin-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (sPSGL-1) the average bond lifetime t initially increases (catch bonds) at low (10 pN) constant force, f, and decreases when f > 10 pN (slip bonds). In contrast, for the complex with G1 anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody t monotonically decreases with f. To quantitatively map the energy landscape of such complexes we use a model that considers the possibility of redistribution of population from one force-free state to another force-stabilized bound state. The excellent agreement between theory and experiments allows us to extract energy landscape parameters by fitting the calculated curves to the lifetime measurements for both sPSGL-1 and G1. Surprisingly, the unbinding transition state for P-selectin-G1 complex is close (0.32 nm) to the bound state, implying that the interaction is brittle, i.e., once deformed, the complex fractures. In contrast, the unbinding transition state of the P-selectin-sPSGL-1 complex is far ( 1.5 nm) from the bound state, indicative of a compliant structure. Constant f energy landscape parameters are used to compute the distributions of unbinding times and unbinding forces as a function of the loading rate, rf. For a given rf, unbinding of sPSGL-1 occurs over a broader range of f with the most probable f being an order of magnitude less than for G1. The theory for cell adhesion complexes can be used to predict the outcomes of unbinding of other protein-protein complexes.

  7. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  8. A Comparison of the Detectability of Dry Contact Kissing Bonds in Adhesive Joints Using Longitudinal, Shear and High Power Ultrasonic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherhood, C. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Guild, F. J.

    2003-03-01

    This paper details a study on the detectability of dry contact kissing bonds in adhesive joints using three ultrasonic inspection techniques. Conventional normal incidence longitudinal and shear wave inspection were conducted on dry contact kissing bonds using a standard immersion transducer and an EMAT respectively. The detectability of the dry contact kissing bonds was assessed by calculating the reflection coefficient of the interface at varying loads for a number of surface roughnesses. A high power ultrasonic method was also employed to determine the non-linear behavior of the adhesive interface. The non-linearity of the interface was determined by the ratio of the amplitudes of the first harmonic and fundamental frequencies of the transmitted waveform. It was found that the high power technique showed the greatest sensitivity to kissing bonds at low contact pressures, however at high loads conventional longitudinal wave testing was more sensitive. It was also noted that a combination of two or more techniques could provide enhanced information about the kissing bond compared to a single technique alone.

  9. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  10. Diatomic molecules and metallic adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption - A single binding-energy relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Potential-energy relations involving a few parameters in simple analytic forms have been found to represent well the energetics of a wide variety of diatomic molecules. However, such two-atom potential functions are not appropriate for metals. It is well known that, in the case of metals, there exist strong volume-dependent forces which can never be expressed as pairwise interactions. The present investigation has the objective to show that, in spite of the observation concerning metals, a single binding-energy relation can be found which accurately describes diatomic molecules as well as adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption on metals. This universality reveals a commonality between the molecular and metallic bond.

  11. Shock adhesion test for composite bonded assembly using a high pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, E.; Berthe, L.; Buzaud, E.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    In a context of the rising use of composite assemblies in aeronautic or defense fields, the assessment of their strength is a key issue. The method developed in this study attempts to provide solutions. A shock adhesion test based on short compressive loads, obtained by a high pulsed power generator, is proposed as a proof test to ensure the quality of composite bonded assemblies. A calibrated load induces a local tensile stress able to damage the bond interface. The high pulsed power source is the GEnerateur de Pression Isentropique device (Isentropic Pressure Generator), used to generate the required stresses, with a 450 ns pulse duration to test assemblies above the mm thickness range. The understanding of the mechanisms of wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these multilayer assemblies are scientific challenges. The ability of the technique to induce a tensile stress able to disbond the laminates and the assemblies is demonstrated. This paper details the response of carbon epoxy laminates and their bonded assemblies to a shock loading near the damage threshold.

  12. Four-year water degradation of a resin-modified glass-ionomer adhesive bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Lambrechts, Paul

    2004-02-01

    Glass-ionomers are auto-adhesive to tooth tissue through combined micro-mechanical and chemical bonding. How much each of the two bonding components contributes to the actual bonding effectiveness is, however, not known and there is not much information available on long-term stability. The objective of this study was to assess the bonding effectiveness of a resin-modified glass-ionomer adhesive to dentin after 4 yr of water storage. Fuji Bond LC (GC) was applied without (i) and with pretreatment using (ii) a polyalkenoic acid conditioner and (iii) a 37.5% phosphoric acid etchant. The etchant was used to exclude any chemical interaction with hydroxyapatite. The micro-tensile bond strength ( microTBS) to dentin decreased significantly over the 4 yr period in all three experimental groups. After 24 h and 4 yr, the lowest micro TBS was recorded when dentin was not pretreated. The highest micro TBS was obtained following polyalkenoic acid pretreatment, although this was not significantly different from specimens that were pretreated using phosphoric acid. Pretreating dentin with phosphoric acid intensified micromechanical interlocking at the expense of chemical bonding potential to hydroxyapatite. Nevertheless, correlating the micro TBS data with failure analysis through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicated that combined micro-mechanical and chemical bonding involving pretreatment with the polyalkenoic acid conditioner yielded the most durable bond.

  13. Evaluation of Self-Etching Adhesive and Er:YAG Laser Conditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J.; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura E.; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia; Olea-Mejía, Oscar F.; Alcántara-Galena, María del Carmen Z.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength, the adhesive remnant index scores, and etch surface of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with self-etching primer and Er:YAG laser conditioning. One hundred and twenty bovine incisors were randomly divided into four groups. In Group I (Control), the teeth were conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In Group II the teeth were conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (5 sec); III and IV were irradiated with the Er:YAG 150 mJ (11.0 J/cm2), 150 mJ (19.1 J/cm2), respectively, at 7–12 Hz with water spray. After surface preparation, upper central incisor stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change Adhesive. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours and shear bond strengths were measured, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined. The conditioned surface was observed under a scanning electron microscope. One-way ANOVA and chi-square test were used. Group I showed the significantly highest values of bond strength with a mean value of 8.2 megapascals (MPa). The lesser amount of adhesive remnant was found in Group III. The results of this study suggest that Er:YAG laser irradiation could not be an option for enamel conditioning. PMID:24228014

  14. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Daina, Paola; Tamagnone, Alessandra; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP) with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh) were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT) and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit) systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs), Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs. PMID:23984339

  15. A trichromatic phosphor-free white light-emitting diode by using adhesive bonding scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuai, D. X.; Guo, X.; Guan, B. L.; Zhang, J. L.; Shen, G. D.

    2009-11-01

    A trichromatic phosphor-free white light-emitting diode (LED) has been implemented by using adhesive bonding scheme. The device has been operated as a three-terminal device with independent electrical control of an AlGaInPbased red LED chip and a GaN-based dual-wavelength (blue and green) LED chip. As 25mA and 60mA was injected into the red and blue-green LED chips at room temperature respectively, white light emission could be observed with CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.3330,0.3241), correlated color temperature Tc=5467K and optical power Φe=2.223mW. The electroluminescence measurements also show that the emitted white light is composed of blue, green and red lights, centered at around 452nm, 517nm and 632nm. The fabrication and the electrical and optical performances of such white LED were described.

  16. Effect of different adhesive strategies on microtensile bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing blocks bonded to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Teich, Sorin; Porto, Thiago Soares

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of ceramic and composite computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks bonded to dentin using different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 crowns of sound freshly extracted human molars were sectioned horizontally 3 mm above the cementoenamel junction to produce flat dentin surfaces. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks, size 14, were sectioned into slices of 3 mm thick. Before bonding, CAD/CAM block surfaces were treated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Groups were created based on the adhesive strategy used: Group 1 (GI) - conventional resin cement + total-etch adhesive system, Group 2 (GII) - conventional resin cement + self-etch adhesive system, and Group 3 (GIII) - self-adhesive resin cement with no adhesive. Bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24h at 37΀C, and then sectioned with a slow-speed diamond saw to obtain 1 mm × 1 mm × 6 mm microsticks. Microtensile testing was then conducted using a microtensile tester. μTBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post hoc (Tukey) test at the 5% significance level. Results: Mean values and standard deviations of μTBS (MPa) were 17.68 (±2.71) for GI/ceramic; 17.62 (±3.99) for GI/composite; 13.61 (±6.92) for GII/composite; 12.22 (±4.24) for GII/ceramic; 7.47 (±2.29) for GIII/composite; and 6.48 (±3.10) for GIII/ceramic; ANOVA indicated significant differences among the adhesive modality and block interaction (P < 0.05), and no significant differences among blocks only, except between GI and GII/ceramic. Bond strength of GIII was consistently lower (P < 0.05) than GI and GII groups, regardless the block used. Conclusion: Cementation of CAD/CAM restorations, either composite or ceramic, can be significantly affected by different adhesive strategies used. PMID:27076825

  17. Analysis of micro-shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems with dentine: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vijay Kumar; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Singh, Balendra Pratap; Chandra, Anil; Bharti, Ramesh; Yadav, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Success or failure of a composite restoration largely depends on its bonding to enamel/dentine. Several better adhesive systems have been developed during the last few years due to rapid advancement in the technology. Recent self-etched adhesives have fewer clinical steps and are less technique sensitive. Methods Ninety extracted human permanent molars were collected, grounded and finished to prepare flat dentine-bonding surfaces on their occlusal surface. All specimens were divided into three groups (n = 30) on the basis of three adhesive systems Adper Easy Bond (AE), Beautibond (BB) and Xeno IV (XE). These adhesive systems were applied on prepared mid-dentine-bonding surface. A restorative resin was added with the help of a transparent tube of 2 mm height and 1.7 mm internal diameter and cured. Fifteen specimens in each group were loaded to failure in an Instron Universal Testing Machine after storage for 24 h at 37 °C to check micro-shear bond strength. Another fifteen specimens from each group were thermocycled 500 times at 5 °C and 55 °C with dwell time of 1 min in each bath followed by loading to failure. The data obtained was analyzed with SPSS version 21 at significance level of <05. Results After 24 h, micro-shear bond strength of BB was higher (26.04 MPa) than XE (23.69 MPa) and AE (21.50 MPa). After thermocycling, micro-shear bond strength decreased significantly in BB (P = .001) and XE (P = .03). Conclusion The micro-shear bond strength of BB was highest among three groups, which decreased after thermocycling. PMID:26605144

  18. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  19. Comparison of two all-in-one adhesives bonded to non-carious cervical lesions--results at 3 years.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of S(3) Bond (Kuraray Corp., Japan) and G-Bond (GC Corp., Japan) all-in-one bonding agents, over 3 years in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Ethics Committee approval was obtained, and 60 restorations were placed in 11 patients aged 45-84 years (mean 60.5 years), using either Clearfil ST resin composite (Kuraray) and S(3) Bond or Gradia resin composite (GC) and G-Bond alternately, without phosphoric acid etch on the uncut enamel margins. Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and 3 years, and photographs were taken for assessment of colour match and marginal discoloration. One patient was not available at 3 years, resulting in 54 restorations being available for evaluation. One restoration of S(3)/Clearfil ST was lost at 2 years, giving retention rates of 97% for S(3) and 100% for G-Bond. At 3 years, six restorations for S(3)/Clearfil ST showed slight marginal discoloration and one restoration pronounced marginal staining. For G-Bond/Gradia at 3 years, 11 restorations exhibited slight marginal staining and one restoration pronounced marginal staining. Most restorations were bonded to sclerotic dentin. Statistical analysis of marginal staining showed no significant difference between the two restoration groups. The degree of marginal staining was almost identical for both materials and tended to be in larger restorations. Both S(3) and G-Bond all-in-one bonding systems appear to be good adhesives for the restoration of NCCL for the length of the current study. Restoration of NCCLs with the newer all-in-one adhesives appears to be a viable alternative technique to more complicated adhesive materials. PMID:21789590

  20. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  1. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {100} single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, W. B.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Emes, J. H.; Loretto, D.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two {100} Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900Å/surface to 300Å/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500Å/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300Å/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200Å/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150Å across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  2. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Lima, Felipe Coelho; Saboia, Vicente de Paula Aragão; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza; Neves, Aline de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M) to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8) according to the filling material, (1) AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH)/Gutta-Percha cone; (2) Epiphany SE (Pentron)/Resilon cone; (3) RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in bond strength between AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p > 0.05). Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials. PMID:25383347

  3. Effect of placement agitation and placement time on the shear bond strength of 3 self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Lina Maria; Sergent, Robert S; Burgess, John O; Mercante, D E

    2006-01-01

    This study measured the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 self-etching bonding agents to enamel and dentin with and without agitation at 3 different application times. The null hypotheses tested were that agitation and application time have no effect on bond strength. Occlusal surfaces of 180 recently extracted caries-free human molars were wet ground with 600 grit wet-dry silica carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat enamel surface. The teeth were divided into 18 groups of 10 teeth. Three self-etching bonding agents, Clearfil SE BOND (Kuraray America), Xeno III (Dentsply) and AdheSE (Ivoclar-Vivadent) were applied using application times of 10, 20 or 30 seconds with or without agitation, thinned with a gentle stream of air and cured for 10 seconds, according to manufacturers' directions. Z100 (3M ESPE) composite, A2 shade, was placed over the cured adhesive and cured for 40 seconds. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature until testing. The samples were tested in shear to failure with a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed. After enamel shear bond strength testing, the teeth were again ground with 400 and 600-grit wet-dry SiC paper to obtain a flat dentin surface. The protocol used for preparing the enamel bond test samples was repeated, and the teeth were stored until testing in distilled water at room temperature. The samples were again tested in shear at a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed. Values were converted to MPa and data analyzed for intergroup differences using ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. Agitation did not improve enamel SBS for any of the materials tested, but there was a significant difference in enamel SBS among materials: Clearfil SE Bond shear bond strength was greater than Xeno III, which was greater than AdheSE. At 10 seconds application time on dentin, agitation improved the Clearfil SE Bond SBS and, at 20 seconds application time on dentin, agitation significantly improved SBS to dentin for all systems tested. Agitation had no affect

  4. Influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Taranjeet Kaur; Asrani, Hemant; Banga, Harpreet; Jain, Aditi; Rawlani, Sudhir S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty caries-free human premolars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each and bonding was done using seventh-generation bonding agents Adper Easy One (3M ESPE) and Xeno V (Dentsply). Following the bonding procedure, resin composite was bonded to the surfaces using a plastic mould. The prepared specimen with composite cylinders attached were placed in 37°C distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) with 0 h universal testing machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test. Results: Statistical significant difference between the Groups I, II and III in which Adper Easy One was used and similarly for Groups IV, V, and VI in which Xeno V was used. When an intergroup comparison was made using unpaired t-test Group II and Group V showed the nonsignificant difference. Conclusion: Salivary contamination significantly affects the SBS of both the seventh generation dentin bonding agents. However, 2-hydroxyethyl methacryate based adhesive has higher bond strength. PMID:26752841

  5. Dry adhesive bonding of nanoporous inorganic membranes to microfluidic devices using the OSTE(+) dual-cure polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharil, Farizah; Forsberg, Fredrik; Liu, Yitong; Bettotti, Paolo; Kumar, Neeraj; Niklaus, Frank; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Gylfason, Kristinn B.

    2013-02-01

    We present two transfer bonding schemes for incorporating fragile nanoporous inorganic membranes into microdevices. Such membranes are finding increasing use in microfluidics, due to their precisely controllable nanostructure. Both schemes rely on a novel dual-cure dry adhesive bonding method, enabled by a new polymer formulation: OSTE(+), which can form bonds at room temperature. OSTE(+) is a novel dual-cure ternary monomer system containing epoxy. After the first cure, the OSTE(+) is soft and suitable for bonding, while during the second cure it stiffens and obtains a Young’s modulus of 1.2 GPa. The ability of the epoxy to react with almost any dry surface provides a very versatile fabrication method. We demonstrate the transfer bonding of porous silicon and porous alumina membranes to polymeric microfluidic chips molded into OSTE(+), and of porous alumina membranes to microstructured silicon wafers, by using the OSTE(+) as a thin bonding layer. We discuss the OSTE(+) dual-cure mechanism, describe the device fabrication and evaluate the bond strength and membrane flow properties after bonding. The membranes bonded to OSTE(+) chips delaminate at 520 kPa, and the membranes bonded to silicon delaminate at 750 kPa, well above typical maximum pressures applied to microfluidic circuits. Furthermore, no change in the membrane flow resistance was observed after bonding.

  6. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Total- and Self-etching Adhesive Systems after Application of Chlorhexidine to Dentin Contaminated with a Hemostatic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Farhadpour, Hajar

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Hemostatic agents may influence the bond strength of different bonding agents. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on bond strength values and their combination effect has not been reported yet. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on shear bond strength (SBS) of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Method In this experimental study, the occlusal enamel of each sixty caries-free mandibular molars was removed and their midcoronal dentin was exposed. The specimens were then mounted in auto-polymerizing resin 1mm apical to CEJ. Then, the specimens were divided into 6 groups (n=10) based on contamination with a hemostatic agent (H), application of chlorhexidine (CHX) and the adhesive system used; and then were classified as Group 1: Adper Single Bond (ASB); Group 2: H+ASB; Group 3: H+0.2% CHX+ASB; Group 4: Clearfil SE Bond (CSB); Group 5: H+CSB; Group 6: H+0.2% CHX+CSB. Then, composite resin rods (4×2 mm) were built up on the dentin surfaces and after thermocycling, the SBS (MPa) was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences between bond strength values of group 1 (ASB) and group 2 (H+ASB) (p< 0.001) and group 1 (ASB) and group 3 (H+CHX+ASB) (p< 0.001). Similarly, significant differences were seen between group 4 (CSB) and group 5 (H+CSB) (p< 0.001) and between group 4 (CSB) and group 6 (H+CHX+CSB) (p< 0.001). Conclusion Contamination with hemostatic agent reduced the SBS of both total- and self-etching adhesive systems. In addition, application of chlorhexidine after the removal of hemostatic agent had a negative effect on SBS of total- and self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:26331146

  7. Bond strength determination of hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates using the LAser Shock Adhesion Test (LASAT).

    PubMed

    Guipont, Vincent; Jeandin, Michel; Bansard, Sebastien; Khor, Khiam Aik; Nivard, Mariette; Berthe, Laurent; Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel

    2010-12-15

    An adhesion test procedure applied to plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings to measure the "LASAT threshold" (LAser Shock Adhesion test) is described. The good repeatability and minimal discrepancy of the laser-driven adhesion test data were ascertained for conventional plasma sprayed HA coatings. As a further demonstration, the procedure was applied to HA coatings with diverse characteristics on the ceramic/metal interface. Different preheating and grit blasting conditions and the presence of a thick plasma-sprayed Ti sublayer or a thin TiO(2) layer prepared by oxidation were investigated through LASAT. It was assessed that a rough surface can significantly improve the coating's bond strength. However, it was also demonstrated that a thin TiO(2) layer on a smooth Ti-6Al-4V substrate can have a major influence on adhesion as well. Preheating up to 270°C just prior to the first HA spraying pass had no effect on the adhesion strength. Further development of the procedure was done to achieve an in situ LASAT with in vitro conditions applied on HA coatings. To that end, different crystalline HA contents were soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). Beyond the demonstration of the capability of this laser-driven adhesion test devoted to HA coatings in dry or liquid environment, the present study provided empirical information on pertinent processing characteristics that could strengthen or weaken the HA/Ti-6Al-4V bond.

  8. Effect of pretreatment with calcium-containing desensitizer on the dentine bonding of mild self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dandan; Liu, Siying; Huang, Cui; Du, Xijin; Yang, Hongye; Wang, Yake; Deng, Donglai

    2013-06-01

    Desensitizing agents are frequently applied to sensitive teeth and may affect subsequent resin bonding. The current study aimed to evaluate the bonding performance of two self-etch adhesives containing functional monomers to dentine pretreated with three new calcium-containing desensitizers. No desensitizer was applied in the control group. Groups 1, 2, and 3 were treated with an arginine-calcium carbonate-containing polishing paste, a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP)-containing paste, and an experimental hydroxyapatite paste, respectively. G-Bond and Clearfil S(3) Bond were used for bonding after desensitizer treatments. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was tested (n = 20 beams per group) and failure mode distribution was analyzed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the occlusion of dentinal tubules. The mean (±SD) μTBS values, expressed in MPa, of groups 1, 2, and 3 and the control group were, respectively, 30.81 (7.79), 44.41 (8.02), 31.49 (6.13), and 41.40 (8.67) for G-Bond and 39.63 (9.59), 32.55 (7.86), 37.50 (8.60), 27.90 (6.52) for S3 Bond. Most failures were recorded as adhesive failure (69.375%), instead of cohesive failure or mixed failure. The dentinal tubules were seldom plugged in group 2, but were mostly occluded in groups 1 and 3. Two-way anova indicated that desensitizer application in association with a compatible adhesive system should be used when endeavoring to control hypersensitivity without adverse interference in bonding. PMID:23659244

  9. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites.

    PubMed

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C&B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R(a) and R(y) values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  10. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  11. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  12. Effect of biological contamination on dentine bond strength of adhesive resins.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, J H; Botha, F S; van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of saliva (S) and blood (B) contamination on the dentine bond strength of two single-component dentine bonding systems. The occlusal thirds of 120 recently extracted, human molars were removed with a low speed saw and subsequently embedded in Bencor rings by means of self-curing, acrylic resin. The occlusal surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicone carbide paper in a polishing machine to expose superficial dentine and to create a smear layer. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10). All the dentine surfaces were etched with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds rinsed with water, air-dried for 3 seconds, leaving the surfaces visibly moist. For the control groups (C) the etched dentine surfaces were treated with either, Scotchbond 1 (SB1, 3M) or Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply) according to the manufacturer's instructions. In the contaminated groups, the saliva or blood was applied by means of a disposable brush, left undisturbed for 1 minute, and the excess then thinned by air spray. The dentine bonding systems were then applied, also according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z250 and TPH) and Compomer (F2000 and Dyract AP (D-AP)) stubs were packed and cured incrementally to the corresponding pretreated dentine surfaces. All specimens were stored for 24 hours under water at 37 degrees C. The bonds were then stressed to failure with a Zwick testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured samples were examined in a Scanning Electron Microscope. The data were statistically analysed (Student-t test). The mean SBS (MPa) were. SB1 with Z250: C = 19.1 +/- 4.4; S = 17.3 +/- 3.5; B = 2.6 +/- 0.9; SB1 with F2000: C = 11.8 +/- 3.3; S = 9.7 +/- 1.8; B = 4.7 +/- 1.6. PBNT with TPH: C = 9.2 +/- 3.2; S = 6.5 +/- 3.0; B = 4.3 +/- 1.5; PBNT with D-AP: C = 10.2 +/- 3.6; S = 9.3 +/- 2.9 and B = 7.3 +/- 2.5. There was no statistical significant difference in shear bond

  13. Durability of Ti-6Al-4V/LaRC-PETI-5 adhesive bonded system for HSCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parvatareddy, H.; Pasricha, A.; Dillard, D.A.; Dillard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Structural adhesive joints are being widely used and studied as alternatives to conventional fasteners in the aerospace, automotive, and other industries. Adhesive bonding offers advantages such as lower weight and lower manufacturing costs. Furthermore, high performance adhesives which are currently being synthesized (e.g. epoxies, phenolics, acrylics, thermoplastic polyimides) offer other useful properties such as higher modulus, higher toughness, and stability at high temperatures. In the present study, the durability of the Ti-6Al-4V/LaRC PETI-5 adhesive bonded system is being evaluated utilizing double cantilever beam (DCB) fracture specimens. These DCB tests have been used extensively to study adhesive joints. The current study is part of a comprehensive study to develop a durable material system for application in the proposed mach 2.4 high speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft. According to the design criteria, the material system to be used on the aircraft should be durable for over 60,000 hours of flight encountering temperatures during flight in the range of 177{degrees}C. Physical aging and chemical aging of the adhesive material are some of the important issues which have to be evaluated and taken into consideration for predicting the bond durability. In order to simulate the service environment conditions of the HSCT, the Ti-6Al-4V/LaRC PETI-5 bonds were aged in one of three temperatures; 150, 177, and 204{degrees}C, at one of three different environments; atmospheric air, and reduced air pressures of 2 psi air (13.8 KPa) and 0.2 psi air (1.38 KPa).

  14. Distribution of calcium ions at the interface between resin bonding materials and tooth dentin. Use of commercially available adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Hanaizumi, Y; Maeda, T; Takano, Y

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that calcium ions play a key role in chemical (chelate) binding between the adhesive resin and dentin surface. However, no data is available concerning how calcium ions are distributed at the binding sites. The aim of this study is to demonstrate calcium ions at the resin-dentin interface by means of X-ray microanalysis and calcium ion-sensitive histochemical staining. The dentin surface in human teeth was ground by use of 240 grit silicon carbide abrasive paper under running water and treated with the dentin-primer and adhesive resin in Clearfil Liner Bond System or IMPERVA Bond System according to the manufacturer's instructions. After removing dentin matrix and isolating adhesive resin by the KOH-digestion method, one half of the samples were processed for scanning electron microscopy. The rest were embedded in Epon 812 and processed either for glyoxal bis (2-hydroxyanil) (GBHA) staining or transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed Ca-phosphate deposits at the bottom of the resin-impregnated layer. The adhesive resin above the resin-impregnated layer was amorphous and showed no precipitates of Ca-phosphate. GBHA displayed intense calcium reactions throughout the resin-impregnated layer and also moderate ones in the 10 microns (Clearfil Liner Bond System) or 30 microns (IMPERVA Bonding System) thick boundary zone of the adhesive resin as well as in the resin tags. These data are the first to offer a distinct localization of calcium ions within the adhesive resin at the dentin-resin interface.

  15. Effect of three adhesive primers on the bond strengths of four light-activated opaque resins to noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kamada, K; Taira, Y; Atsuta, M

    2001-02-01

    The effect of commercial adhesive primers for noble metals on the bond strength of light-activated opaque resin has not been determined. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesive primers on the shear bond strengths of each of the four light-activated opaque resins to silver--palladium--copper--gold (Ag--Pd--Cu--Au) alloy. The adhesive primers Alloy Primer (AP), Metal Primer II (MPII) and Metaltite(MT) were used. Four commercial light-activated opaque resins (Axis (AX), Cesead II (CEII), Dentacolor(DE) and Solidex (SO) were used to bond a light-activated resin-veneered composite to Ag--Pd--Cu--Au alloy. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then immersed alternatively in water baths at 4 and 60 degrees C for 1 min each for up to 20,000 thermal cycles before shear mode testing at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). All the primers examined improved the shear bond strength between opaque resin and Ag--Pd--Cu--Au alloy compared with non-primed specimens prior to thermal cycling. After 20,000 thermal cycles, the bond strengths of combined use of AP and DE and that of MT and each of AX, CE or DE were significantly greater than any other groups. Significant difference was observed between the bond strengths at thermal cycles 0 and 20,000, with the combined use of MT and DE. With the combination of appropriate adhesive metal primers and light-activated opaque resins, complicated surface preparations of metal frameworks of resin-veneered prostheses that are composed of casting Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy may be negligible.

  16. Effect of green tea extract on bonding durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    CARVALHO, Carolina; FERNANDES, Fernando Pelegrim; FREITAS, Valeria da Penha; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; TURSSI, Cecilia Pedroso; AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Green tea extract has been advocated as a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor; however, its effect on bond durability to caries-affected dentin has never been reported. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two MMP inhibitors (2% chlorhexidine and 2% green tea extract), applied after acid etching, on bond durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel was removed from third molars to expose the dentin surface, and the molars were submitted to a caries induction protocol for 15 days. After removal of infected dentin, specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds) and randomly divided into three groups, according to the type of dentin pretreatment (n=10): NT: no treatment; GT: 2% green tea extract; CLX: 2% chlorhexidine. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and composite resin restorations were built on the dentin. After 24 hours, at 37°C, the resin-tooth blocks were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface in the form of sticks (0.8 mm2 of adhesive area) and randomly subdivided into two groups according to when they were to be submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing: immediately or 6 months after storage in distilled water. Data were reported in MPa and submitted to two-way ANOVA for completely randomized blocks, followed by Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results After 24 hours, there was no significant difference in the μTBS of the groups. After 6 months, the GT group had significantly higher μTBS values. Conclusion It was concluded that the application of 2% green tea extract was able to increase bond durability of the etch-and-rinse system to dentin. Neither the application of chlorhexidine nor non-treatment (NT - control) had any effect on bond strength after water storage. PMID:27383701

  17. Rapid Reversible Photoswitching of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Holz, Michelle; Suana, Kristine Grace; Li, Qian; Lamprecht, Constanze; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and reversible photoswitching of cell adhesion is achieved by c(RGDfK)-azobenzenes embedded in a poly(ethylene glycol) background on surfaces. The light-induced cis-trans-isomerization of the azobenzene enables switching of cell adhesion on the surface. Reversibility of switching over several consecutive switching cycles is demonstrated by single-cell force spectroscopy. PMID:26685922

  18. IPNs from Cyclodextrin:Chitosan Antioxidants: Bonding, Bio-Adhesion, Antioxidant Capacity and Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Perchyonok, V. Tamara; Grobler, Sias R.; Zhang, Shengmiao

    2014-01-01

    IPNs are unique “alloys” of cross-linked polymers in which at least one network is synthesized and/or cross-linked in the presence of the other. IPNs are also known as entanglements of polymer networks that are ideally held together only by permanent topological interactions. The objectives of this study are to evaluate novel chitosan-based functional drug delivery systems that can be successfully incorporated into “dual action bioactive tooth restorative materials”. These materials should be capable of inducing an improved wound healing prototype. The novel hydrogels will be investigated with respect to the antioxidant capacity of conventional antioxidants, such as resveratrol, β-carotene and propolis, as a designer drug delivery system, with the use of SEM imaging for the characterization of the surfaces, bio-adhesive property, antioxidant capacity, free radical defence, antioxidant, active ingredient stability and reactive features of novel materials. The additional benefit of the site-specific “functional restorative material” for use in dressings to deliver antibiotics to wound sites can provide tissue compatibility and reduced interference with wound healing. The materials were tested using an effective in vitro free radical generation model as functional additive prototypes for further development of “dual function restorative wound healing materials”. We quantified the effects of functional designer biomaterials on the dentin bond strength of a composite and evaluated the bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the two separate “in vitro” systems. The added benefits of the chitosan/vitamin C/cyclodextrin (CD) host:guest complex-treated hydrogels involved a positive influence on the tetracycline release, increased dentin bond strength, as well as a demonstrated in vitro “built-in” free radical defence mechanism and, therefore, acting as a “proof of concept” for functional multi-dimensional restorative wound healing materials

  19. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s‑1 and 20 µm s‑1.

  20. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s-1 and 20 µm s-1.

  1. Effect of reactive adhesives on the tensile bond strength of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials to methyl methacrylate tray material.

    PubMed

    Ona, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    The effect of new adhesives on the bond strength of elastomeric impression materials to acrylic trays was evaluated. Two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (Fusion and Imprinsis) with reactive adhesives and one (Examix) with a conventional adhesive were tested. Flat, double-sided plates of auto-polymerizing methyl methacrylate (10 x 10 x 2.5 mm) were prepared with one of the adhesives. Five specimens were prepared by injecting each impression material into a 2-mm gap between the two plates. Tensile tests were conducted until separation failure occurred. The mean bond strengths of Fusion (1.0 MPa) and Imprinsis (0.8 MPa) were significantly greater than that of Examix (0.2 MPa). On the contrary, one of five Fusion showed adhesive failure mode while all the Imprinsis exhibited mixed failure. The conflicting results were presumably attributed to the mean tear strength of Fusion (0.8 N/mm) being higher than that of Imprinsis (0.5 N/mm).

  2. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P<.001). DMSO did not affect immediate bonding of the two cements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P<.001), while in DMSO-treated groups, no difference in P-OBS was observed after aging (P>.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  3. In vitro evaluation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate effect on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shoul, Maryam Azizi; Sattari, Hasti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is applied for remineralization of early caries lesions or tooth sensitivity conditions and may affect subsequent resin bonding. This in vitro study investigated the effect of CPP-ACP on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molar teeth were selected and randomly divided into three groups and six subgroups. Buccal or lingual surfaces of teeth were prepared to create a flat enamel surface. Adhesives used were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE One F. In three subgroups, before applying adhesives, enamel surfaces were treated with Tooth Mousse CPP-ACP for one hour, rinsed and stored in 37°C temperature with 100% humidity. This procedure was repeated for 5 days and then adhesives were applied and Tetric N-Ceram composite was adhered to the enamel. This procedure was also fulfilled for the other three subgroups without CPP-ACP treatment. After 24 hour water storage, samples were tested for shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: In comparison between applied and non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there was no significant decrease in the shear bond strength to enamel only in Tetric N-Bond (P > 0.05). In non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there were statistically significant differences among all subgroups. Tetric N-Bond had the highest and AdheSE One F had the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusion: CPP-ACP application reduces the shear bond strength of AdheSE and AdheSE One F to enamel but not Tetric N-Bond. PMID:25878683

  4. Effect of acid etching time and technique on bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André L; Silva, João L; Almeida, Thauanna G; Veloso, Francielle B; Ribeiro, Sandra M; Andrade, Tiago D; Vilas-Boas, Bruna V; Martins, Marisa C; Menezes, Murilo S

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acid etching time and technique on bond strength of a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin and enamel. Thirty human third molars were mesio-distally sectioned, parallel to the long axis of each tooth, in two halves. Buccal/lingual surfaces were abraded to obtain both flat exposed enamel and dentine. The etchant was applied with and without the use of dispensing tips provided by manufacturer. When the tip was not used, the etchant was agitated (active) over the substrate or left undisturbed (passive). The etchings were done for 15 or 30s. After rinsing the acid, the adhesive XP Bond (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) was applied and light-cured. Resin composite cylinders were built up on dentin and enamel substrates. A shear load was applied to the samples at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were statistically analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). There was no difference between the etching techniques in bonding to enamel. Application with the tip or active without the tip promoted higher bond strength to dentin than passive application. Extending the etching time reduced the bond strength to dentin and did not alter the values for enamel. The passive application without tips produced the lowest bond strength when the etchant was applied for 15s. All techniques demonstrated similar values for application during 30s. The acid etching time and technique significantly influence the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin. PMID:22010410

  5. Can ultrasound application influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin?

    PubMed

    da Silva, Diego F F; Marcondes, Maurem L; de Souza, Niélli C; Daudt, Bruna Gomes; Burnett-Júnior, Luiz H; Spohr, Ana M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of ultrasound application on the bond strength of self-adhesives resin cements to dentin. Twenty-four third molars were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 6/group): G1 - RelyX Unicem; G2 - Maxcem Elite; G3 - RelyX Unicem and ultrasound application; G4 - Marcem Elite and ultrasound application. Composite resin blocks were luted to flat dentin with a load of 500 g for 2 min, followed by light polymerization in G1 and G2. In G3 and G4, the ultrasound device was applied for 20 s on the composite resin block, followed by 500 g load for 1 min and 40 s, and light polymerization. After storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, six tooth/resin sets were cut parallel to the long axis of the tooth, in the x and y directions, with a cross section area of -0.80 mm2. Twenty-four specimens were obtained for each group and submitted to microtensile bond strength (microTBS) testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. According to two-way ANOVA, resin cement (p = 0.000) and cementation method (p = 0.002) were significant. Interaction was not significant (p = 0.676). According to Student's-t test (alpha = 0.05), the microTBS mean with ultrasound application (13.74 MPa) was statistically higher than without it (10.57 MPa). The microTBS mean of RelyX Unicem (13.95 MPa) was statistically higher than Maxcem Elite (10.36 MPa). The ultrasound application increased the microTBS of the RelyX Unicem and Maxcem Elite to dentin.

  6. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Aircraft Fluid Exposure on T800H/3900-2 Composites Bonded with AF-555M Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Lowther, Sharon E.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Connell, John W.; Blasini, Sheila Roman

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites and structural adhesives have found increased usage on commercial and military aircraft in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance has not been well established. In this study, single lap shear specimens (SLS) were fabricated by secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminates. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of the SLS specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually using an optical microscope for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C (180 F) and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The effect of this exposure on lap shear strength and failure modes to date is reported. In addition, the effects of water, saline water, deicing fluid, JP-5 jet fuel and hydraulic fluid on both the composite material and the adhesive bonds were investigated. The up to date results on the effects of these exposures will be discussed.

  7. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  8. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  9. Loading Analysis of Composite Wind Turbine Blade for Fatigue Life Prediction of Adhesively Bonded Root Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi-Majd, Davood; Azimzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays wind energy is widely used as a non-polluting cost-effective renewable energy resource. During the lifetime of a composite wind turbine which is about 20 years, the rotor blades are subjected to different cyclic loads such as aerodynamics, centrifugal and gravitational forces. These loading conditions, cause to fatigue failure of the blade at the adhesively bonded root joint, where the highest bending moments will occur and consequently, is the most critical zone of the blade. So it is important to estimate the fatigue life of the root joint. The cohesive zone model is one of the best methods for prediction of initiation and propagation of debonding at the root joint. The advantage of this method is the possibility of modeling the debonding without any requirement to the remeshing. However in order to use this approach, it is necessary to analyze the cyclic loading condition at the root joint. For this purpose after implementing a cohesive interface element in the Ansys finite element software, one blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine with 46 m rotor diameter was modelled in full scale. Then after applying loads on the blade under different condition of the blade in a full rotation, the critical condition of the blade is obtained based on the delamination index and also the load ratio on the root joint in fatigue cycles is calculated. These data are the inputs for fatigue damage growth analysis of the root joint by using CZM approach that will be investigated in future work.

  10. Tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems to primary dentin treated by Er:YAG laser and conventional high-speed drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Barbara A.; Navarro, Ricardo S.; Silvestre, Fellipe D.; Pinheiro, Sergio L.; Freitas, Patricia M.; Imparato, Jose Carlos P.; Oda, Margareth

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of different adhesive systems to primary tooth dentin prepared by high-speed drill and Er:YAG laser (2.94μm). Buccal surfaces of 38 primary canines were ground and flattened with sand paper disks (#120-600 grit) and distributed into five groups (n=15): G1: diamond bur in high-speed drill (HD)+ 35% phosphoric acid (PA)+Single Bond (SB); G2: HD+self-etching One Up Bond F (OUB);G3: Er:YAG laser (KaVo 3- LELO-FOUSP)(4Hz, 80mJ, 25,72J/cm2) (L)+PA+SB, G4: L+SB, G5: L+OUB. The inverted truncated cone samples built with Z-100 composite resin after storage in water (37°C/24h) were submitted to tensile bond strength test on Mini Instron 4442 (0.5mm/min, 500N). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test (p<0.05). The mean (MPa) were: G1-3.18(+/-1.24) G2-1.79(+/-0.73) G3-3.17(+/-0.44) G4-8.29(+/-1.86) G5-7.11(+/-2.07). The data analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test showed that Laser associated with PA+SB, SB or OUB lead to increased bonding values when compared to HD+PA+SB and HD+OUB (p=0.000), L+SB showed higher values than L+PA+SB and L+OUB (p=0.0311). Er:YAG laser radiation promoted significant increase of bond strength of different adhesive systems evaluated in the dentin of primary teeth.

  11. Observation of deformation and damage at the tip of a crack in adhesive bonds loaded in shear and assessment of a criterion for fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Herzl

    1994-02-01

    The evolution of damage at the tip of a crack in adhesive bonds deforming in shear was monitored in real time using a high-magnification video camera. Brittle and ductile epoxy resins were evaluated, with the bond thickness, t, being an experimental variable. An extensive zone of plastic deformation was developed ahead of the crack tip, prior to fracture. In the case of the brittle adhesive, for relatively thick bonds, tensile microcracks formed within that zone. Increased loading caused the microcracks to grow from the interlayer to the metal/matrix interface, which led to a complete bond separation following the interlinking of interface cracks emanating from adjacent microcracks. In contrast, for the ductile adhesive, the crack always grew from the tip. Strain gradients tended to develop there when the bond thickness was large. The adhesive shear strain was determined from fine lines scratched on the specimen edge. For both adhesives, the critical average crack tip shear strain rapidly decreased with increasing t. This effect was attributed to the changing sensitivity of the bond to the presence of flaws; thicker bonds can accommodate larger microcracks or microvoids, which cause greater stress concentration. For a given bond thickness, the critical crack tip shear strain agreed well with the ultimate shear strain of the unflawed adhesive, gamma(sub f), previously determined by means of the napkin ring shear test. This suggests that the ultimate shear strain is a key material property, controlling crack growth.

  12. TNF-α increases endothelial progenitor cell adhesion to the endothelium by increasing bond expression and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Anthony R.; Prisco, Michael R.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a rare population of cells that participate in angiogenesis. To effectively use EPCs for regenerative therapy, the mechanisms by which they participate in tissue repair must be elucidated. This study focused on the process by which activated EPCs bind to a target tissue. It has been demonstrated that EPCs can bind to endothelial cells (ECs) through the tumore necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-regulated vascular cell adhesion molecule 1/very-late antigen 4 (VLA4) interaction. VLA4 can bind in a high or low affinity state, a process that is difficult to experimentally isolate from bond expression upregulation. To separate these processes, a new parallel plate flow chamber was built, a detachment assay was developed, and a mathematical model was created that was designed to analyze the detachment assay results. The mathematical model was developed to predict the relative expression of EPC/EC bonds made for a given bond affinity distribution. EPCs treated with TNF-α/vehicle were allowed to bind to TNF-α/vehicle-treated ECs in vitro. Bound cells were subjected to laminar flow, and the cellular adherence was quantified as a function of shear stress. Experimental data were fit to the mathematical model using changes in bond expression or affinity as the only free parameter. It was found that TNF-α treatment of ECs increased adhesion through bond upregulation, whereas TNF-α treatment of EPCs increased adhesion by increasing bond affinity. These data suggest that injured tissue could potentially increase recruitment of EPCs for tissue regeneration via the secretion of TNF-α. PMID:25539711

  13. Effect of three adhesive primers for a noble metal on the shear bond strengths of three resin cements.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kamada, K; Sawase, T; Atsuta, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durability and shear bond strengths of the different combinations of three adhesive primers and three resin cements to a silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy. The adhesive primers Alloy Primer (AP), Metal PrimerII (MPII) and Metaltite (MT), and the resin cements BistiteII (BRII), Panavia Fluoro Cement (PFC) and Super-Bond C&B (SB) were used. Two sizes of casting alloy disks were either non-primed or primed and cemented with each of the three resin cements. The specimens were stored in a 37 degrees C water bath for 24 h and then immersed alternately in 4 and 60 degrees C water baths for 1 min each for up to 100,000 thermal cycles. Shear mode testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min was then performed. The application of MPII or MT was effective for improving the shear bond strength between each of the three resin cements and the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy compared with non-primed specimens. However, when primed with MPII or MT and cemented with SB, the bond strength at 100,000 thermal cycles was significantly lower than that at thermal cycle 0. When primed with AP, the specimens cemented with BRII or PFC showed lower bond strength than non-primed specimens and failed at the metal-resin cement interface at 100,000 thermal cycles. On the other hand, AP was effective in enhancing the shear bond strength of SB to the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. The five combined uses of an adhesive metal primer and resin cement (combinations of MPII or MT and BRII or PFC and AP and SB) are applicable to the cementation of prosthodontic restorations without complicated surface modification of the noble alloy.

  14. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  15. Influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Miho; Rikuta, Akitomo; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    The influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives was investigated. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of test liquids placed on composites that had been immersed in different concentrations of methyl mercaptan (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 M). To determine the repair bond strength, self-etch adhesives were applied to the aged composite, and then newly added composites were condensed. Ten samples of each specimen were subjected to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm min(-1). Samples were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Although the dispersion force of the composites remained relatively constant, their polar force increased slightly as the concentration of methyl mercaptan increased. The hydrogen-bonding forces were significantly higher after immersion in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan, leading to higher surface-free energies. However, the repair bond strengths for the repair restorations prepared from composites immersed in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan were significantly lower than for those immersed in 0.01 and 0.10 M methyl mercaptan. Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that the repair bond strengths of both the aged and newly added composites were affected by immersion in methyl mercaptan solutions.

  16. Failure stress criterion for adhesively bonded joint at different strain rates by using dynamic Arcan test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Ludovic; Bourel, Benjamin; Lauro, Franck; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Carrere, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the failure criterion evolution of assembly bonded with a strain rate dependent adhesive. A new modified ARCAN device is then designed to obtain the average stress at failure under different loading angles and for strain up to 350 s-1. Tests are performed on a hydraulic jack machine and a Digital Image Correlation measurement is used to control the opening and the sliding displacements of the two substrates.

  17. Root filling bond strength using reciprocating file-matched single-cones with different sealers.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carla Cristina Camilo; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Silva-Sousa, Yara Terezinha; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-05-20

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of root canal fillings to root dentin using the reciprocating file-matched single-cone or lateral compaction techniques with resin-based and calcium-silicate-based sealers. Maxillary canine roots were prepared and filled using one of the following approaches: Reciproc R40 file and R40 single cone, WaveOne Large file and Large single cone, or ProTaper up to F4 file with lateral compaction. The root filling was performed using AH Plus, Epiphany SE or MTA Fillapex (n = 10). Three 1-mm-thick slices were obtained from each third of each root. Two slices were subjected to a push-out test, and the other slices were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the dentin-sealer interface. Data (in MPa) from the push-out tests were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated at ×25 magnification. The single-cone techniques resulted in lower BS values than the lateral compaction technique. For lateral compaction, AH Plus and Epiphany SE showed the highest and lowest BS values, respectively. Slight differences were observed between sealers when the single-cone techniques were used. A tendency to reduce the BS toward the apical third was observed. Adhesive failures were predominant for all experimental conditions. A closer adaption of the filling material on the root dentin was observed for the AH Plus and lateral compaction techniques. The Reciproc and WaveOne techniques were associated with lower BS values than the lateral compaction technique. However, the effect of the root canal filling technique appears to be sealer-dependent.

  18. Effect of hydrofluoric acid etching on shear bond strength of an indirect resin composite to an adhesive cement.

    PubMed

    Hori, Sayaka; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Matsumura, Hideo; Tanaka, Takuo

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 1% hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatment on the bonding of an adhesive cement (Panavia F 2.0) to an indirect resin composite (Estenia C&B). Pairs of composite disks (10 and 8 mm in diameter by 3 mm thickness) were prepared. Adhesive surfaces were pretreated with either airborne particle abrasion or HF etching before being soaked for 30 seconds, five minutes or 10 minutes, with or without application of silane coupling agent. Adhesive specimens were fabricated by cementing a pair of treated disks. Shear bond strength was determined before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling (4 and 60 degrees C). All data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (a=0.05). Bond strength achieved with five minutes of HF etching (18.3+/-1.1 MPa) was significantly higher (P=0.0025) than that obtained with airborne particle abrasion followed by application of silane coupling agent (14.3+/-1.8 MPa) after thermocycling.

  19. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  20. Bond strength of Epiphany™ Sealer combined with different adhesive systems photo-activated with LED and QTH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, A. M. P.; Bandéca, M. C.; Borges, A. H.; Nadalin, M. R.; Thomé, L. H. C.

    2009-08-01

    The Epiphany™ Sealer is a new dual-curing resin-based sealer and has been introduced as an alternative to gutta-percha and traditional root canal sealers. The canal filling is claimed to create a seal with the dentinal tubules within the root canal system producing a ‘monoblock’ effect between the sealer and dentinal tubules. Therefore, considering the possibility to incorporate the others adhesive systems, it is important to study the bond strength of the resulting cement. Forty-eight root mandibular canines were sectioned 8-mm below CEJ. The dentine discs were prepared using a tapered diamond bur and irrigated with 1% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. Previous the application Epiphany™ Sealer, the Epiphany™ Primer, AdheSE, and One Up Bond F were applied to the root canal walls. The LED and QTH (Quartz Tungsten Halogen) were used to photo-activation during 45 s with power density of 400 and 720 mW/cm2, respectively. The specimens were performed on a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until bond failure occurred. The force was recorded and the debonding values were used to calculate Push-out bond strength. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences ( P < 0.05) to Epiphany™ Sealer/Epiphany™ Primer/QTH and EpiphanyTM Sealer/AdheSE/QTH, which had the highest mean values of bond strength. The efficiency of resin-based filling materials are dependent the type of light curing unit used including the power density, the polymerization characteristics of these resin-based filling materials, depending on the primer/adhesive used.

  1. Towards force spectroscopy of single tip-link bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussa, Mounir A.; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P.; Corey, David P.

    2015-12-01

    Inner-ear mechanotransduction relies on tip links, fine protein filaments made of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 that convey tension to mechanosensitive channels at the tips of hair-cell stereocilia. The tip-link cadherins are thought to form a heterotetrameric complex, with two cadherin-23 molecules forming the upper part of the filament and two protocadherin-15 molecules forming the lower end. The interaction between cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 is mediated by their N-terminal tips. Missense mutations that modify the interaction interface impair binding and lead to deafness. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that the tip-link bond is mechanically strong enough to withstand forces in hair cells, but its experimentally determined strength is unknown. We have developed molecular tools to facilitate single-molecule force spectroscopy on the tip link bond. Self-assembling DNA nanoswitches are functionalized with the interacting tips of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 using the enzyme sortase under conditions that preserve protein function. These tip link nanoswitches are designed to provide a signature force-extension profile. This molecular signature should allow us to identify single-molecule rupture events in pulling experiments.

  2. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  3. Fracture Analysis of Double-Side Adhesively Bonded Composite Repairs to Cracked Aluminium Plate Using Line Spring Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yong; Su, Weiguo

    2016-06-01

    A line spring model is developed for analyzing the fracture problem of cracked metallic plate repaired with the double-sided adhesively bonded composite patch. The restraining action of the bonded patch is modeled as continuous distributed linear springs bridging the crack faces provided that the cracked plate is subjected to extensional load. The effective spring constant is determined from 1-D bonded joint theory. The hyper-singular integral equation (HSIE), which can be solved using the second kind Chebyshev polynomial expansion method, is applied to determine the crack opening displacements (COD) and the crack tip stress intensity factors (SIF) of the repaired cracked plate. The numerical result of SIF for the crack-tip correlates very well with the finite element (FE) computations based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). The present analysis approaches and mathematical techniques are critical to the successful design, analysis and implementation of crack patching.

  4. Effect of air-drying dentin surfaces on dentin bond strength of a solvent-free one-step adhesive.

    PubMed

    Takai, Tomoyuki; Hosaka, Keiichi; Kambara, Keisuke; Thitthaweerat, Suppason; Matsui, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of air-drying dentin surfaces on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a solvent-free onestep adhesive (Bond 1 SF). Twelve human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper. Before applying bonding agent, the dentin surface was rinsed with distilled water and blot-dried with tissue paper, followed by air-drying for 0, 3, 30, and 60 s using with a dental air syringe. After applying and curing Bond 1 SF, resin composite was incrementally built up. Specimens were then stored in distilled water for 24 h and then μTBSs were measured at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Higher μTBS were observed when the dentin surface was air-dried for 3 s (33.2±6.8MPa)>0 s (26.7±4.5MPa)>30 s (22.6±5.5MPa)=60 s (20.4±5.0MPa). The results suggested that prolonged air-drying of the dentin surface removed water and decreased the bond strengths of Bond 1 SF. PMID:22864208

  5. Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy study of physicochemical interaction between human dentin and etch-&-rinse adhesives in a simulated moist bond technique.

    PubMed

    Ubaldini, Adriana L M; Baesso, Mauro L; Sehn, Elizandra; Sato, Francielle; Benetti, Ana R; Pascotto, Renata C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide the physicochemical interactions at the interfaces between two commercial etch-&-rinse adhesives and human dentin in a simulated moist bond technique. Six dentin specimens were divided into two groups (n=3) according to the use of two different adhesive systems: (a) 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydrate (4-META), and (b) HEMA. The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy was performed before and after dentin treatment with 37% phosphoric acid, with adhesive systems and also for the adhesive systems alone. Acid-conditioning resulted in a decalcification pattern. Adhesive treated spectra subtraction suggested the occurrence of chemical bonding to dentin expressed through modifications of the OH stretching peak (3340 cm(-1)) and symmetric CH stretching (2900 cm(-1)) for both adhesives spectra; a decrease of orthophosphate absorption band (1040 to 970 cm(-1)) for adhesive A and a better resolved complex band formation (1270 to 970 cm(-1)) for adhesive B were observed. These results suggested the occurrence of chemical bonding between sound human dentin and etch-&-rinse adhesives through a clinical typical condition.

  6. Beta-1 integrin-mediated adhesion may be initiated by multiple incomplete bonds, thus accounting for the functional importance of receptor clustering.

    PubMed

    Vitte, Joana; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Eymeric, Philippe; Bongrand, Pierre; Pierres, Anne

    2004-06-01

    The regulation of cell integrin receptors involves modulation of membrane expression, shift between different affinity states, and topographical redistribution on the cell membrane. Here we attempted to assess quantitatively the functional importance of receptor clustering. We studied beta-1 integrin-mediated attachment of THP-1 cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces under low shear flow. Cells displayed multiple binding events with a half-life of the order of 1 s. The duration of binding events after the first second after arrest was quantitatively accounted for by a model assuming the existence of a short-time intermediate binding state with 3.6 s(-1) dissociation rate and 1.3 s(-1) transition frequency toward a more stable state. Cell binding to surfaces coated with lower fibronectin densities was concluded to be mediated by single molecular interactions, whereas multiple bonds were formed <1 s after contact with higher fibronectin surface densities. Cell treatment with microfilament inhibitors or a neutral antiintegrin antibody decreased bond number without changing aforementioned kinetic parameters whereas a function enhancing antibody increased the rate of bond formation and/or the lifetime of intermediate state. Receptor aggregation was induced by treating cells with neutral antiintegrin antibody and antiimmunoglobulin antibodies. A semiquantitative confocal microscopy study suggested that this treatment increased between 40% and 100% the average number of integrin receptors located in a volume of approximately 0.045 microm(3) surrounding each integrin. This aggregation induced up to 2.7-fold increase of the average number of bonds. Flow cytometric analysis of fluorescent ligand binding showed that THP-1 cells displayed low-affinity beta-1 integrins with a dissociation constant in the micromolar range. It is concluded that the initial step of cell adhesion was mediated by multiple incomplete bonds rather than a single equilibrium-state ligand receptor

  7. Bond Strength of a Novel One Bottle Multi-mode Adhesive to Human Dentin After Six Months of Storage

    PubMed Central

    Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Somacal, Deise Caren; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Júnior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of Scotchbond Universal to dentin using the etch-and-rinse or the self-etch technique after 24 h and 6 months of storage. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained in 24 third molars. The teeth were divided into four groups: G1 – Scotchbond Universal applied in the etch-and-rinse mode; G2 – Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode; G3 – Scotchbond Multi-Purpose; G4 – Clearfil SE Bond. A block of composite was built on the adhesive area. The tooth/resin sets were cut parallel to the long axis to obtain 40 beams (~0.8 mm2) for each group. Twenty specimens were immediately submitted to the µTBS test, and the remaining 20 were stored in water for 6 months. Failures and the adhesive interface were analyzed by SEM. Results: According to two-way ANOVA, the interaction between adhesive and storage time was significant (p=0.015).The µTBS (MPa) means were the following: 24 h – G1 (39.37±10.82), G2 (31.02±13.76), G3 (35.09±14.03) and G4 (35.84±11.06); 6 months – G1 (36.99±8.78), G2 (40.58±8.07), G3 (32.44±6.07) and G4 (41.75±8.25). Most failures were mixed. Evidence of hybrid layer and numerous resin tags were noted for Scotchbond Universal applied with the etch-and-rinse mode and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose. A thinner hybrid layer and fewer resin tags were noted for Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Clearfil SE Bond. Conclusion: The results indicate that the µTBS for Scotchbond Universal is comparable to the gold-standard adhesives. Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Clearfil SE Bond revealed higher bond stability compared to the etch-and-rinse mode. PMID:27347230

  8. Shear Strength at 75 F to 500 F of Fourteen Adhesives Used to Bond a Glass-fabric-reinforced Phenolic Resin Laminate to Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John R

    1956-01-01

    Fourteen adhesives used to bond a glass-fabric-reinforced phenolic resin laminate to steel were tested in order to determine their shear strengths at temperatures from 75 F to 500 F. Fabrication methods were varied to evaluate the effect of placing cloth between the facing surfaces to maintain a uniform bond-line thickness. One glass-fabric supported phenolic adhesive was found to have a shear strength of 3,400 psi at 300 F and over 1,000 psi at 500 F. Strength and fabrication data are tabulated for all adhesives tested.

  9. Studying Molecular Interactions at the Single Bond Level with a Laminar Flow Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, many investigators developed new methodologies allowing to study ligand-receptor interactions with unprecedented accuracy, up to the single bond level. Reported results include information on bond mechanical properties, association behaviour of surface-attached molecules, and dissection of energy landscapes and reaction pathways. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the potential and limitations of laminar flow chambers operated at low shear rates. This includes a brief review of basic principles, practical tips and problems associated with data interpretation. It is concluded that flow chambers are ideally suited to analyze weak interactions between a number of biomolecules, including the main families of adhesion receptors such as selectins, integrins, cadherins and members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The sensitivity of the method is limited by the quality of surfaces and efficiency of the studied ligand-receptor couple rather than the hardware. Analyzing interactions with a resolution of a piconewton and a few milliseconds shows that ligand-receptor complexes may experience a number of intermediate binding states, making it necessary to examine the definition of association and dissociation rates. Finally, it is emphasized that association rates measured on surface-bound molecules are highly dependent on parameters unrelated to binding surfaces. PMID:21151952

  10. Further Investigation Into the Use of Laser Surface Preparation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Crow, Allison; Zetterberg, Anna; Hopkins, John; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Belcher, Tony; Blohowiak, Kay Y.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires robust materials and processing methodologies before it can be incorporated in primary structures for aerospace applications. Surface preparation is widely recognized as one of the key steps to producing robust and predictable bonds. This report documents an ongoing investigation of a surface preparation technique based on Nd:YAG laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and/or abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface that can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-immersion, manual abrasion, and grit blast process steps which are expensive, hazardous, environmentally unfriendly, and less precise. In addition, laser ablation is amenable to process automation, which can improve reproducibility to meet quality standards for surface preparation. An update on work involving adhesive property testing, surface characterization, surface stability, and the effect of laser surface treatment on fatigue behavior is presented. Based on the tests conducted, laser surface treatment is a viable replacement for the immersion chemical surface treatment processes. Testing also showed that the fatigue behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is comparable for surfaces treated with either laser ablation or chemical surface treatment.

  11. Properties Data for Adhesion and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum: Sapphire-Aluminum, Single-Crystal Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pohlchuck, Bobby; Whitle, Neville C.; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Adams, Jim

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and surface chemistry of single-crystal aluminum in contact with single-crystal sapphire (alumina). Pull-off force (adhesion) measurements were conducted under loads of 0. I to I mN in a vacuum of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) at room temperature. An Auger electron spectroscopy analyzer incorporated directly into an adhesion-measuring vacuum system was primarily used to define the chemical nature of the surfaces before and after adhesion measurements. The surfaces were cleaned by argon ion sputtering. With a clean aluminum-clean -sapphire couple the mean value and standard deviation of pull-off forces required to separate the surfaces were 3015 and 298 micro-N, respectively. With a contaminated aluminum-clean sapphire couple these values were 231 and 241 micro-N. The presence of a contaminant film on the aluminum surface reduced adhesion by a factor of 13. Therefore, surfaces cleanliness, particularly aluminum cleanliness, played an important role in the adhesion of the aluminum-sapphire couples. Pressures on the order of 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) maintained a clean aluminum surface for only a short time (less then 1 hr) but maintained a clean sapphire surface, once it was achieved, for a much longer time.

  12. A practical guide to quantify cell adhesion using single-cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Jens; Legate, Kyle R; Schubert, Rajib; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Werner, Carsten; Müller, Daniel J; Benoit, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of cellular interactions with the extracellular environment is necessary to gain an understanding of how cells regulate adhesion in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and how changes in cell adhesion contribute to diseases. We provide a practical guide to quantify the adhesive strength of living animal cells to various substrates using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). We describe how to control cell state and attachment to the AFM cantilever, how to functionalize supports for SCFS measurements, how to conduct cell adhesion measurements, and how to analyze and interpret the recorded SCFS data. This guide is intended to assist newcomers in the field to perform AFM-based SCFS measurements. PMID:23396062

  13. A practical guide to quantify cell adhesion using single-cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Jens; Legate, Kyle R; Schubert, Rajib; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Werner, Carsten; Müller, Daniel J; Benoit, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of cellular interactions with the extracellular environment is necessary to gain an understanding of how cells regulate adhesion in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and how changes in cell adhesion contribute to diseases. We provide a practical guide to quantify the adhesive strength of living animal cells to various substrates using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). We describe how to control cell state and attachment to the AFM cantilever, how to functionalize supports for SCFS measurements, how to conduct cell adhesion measurements, and how to analyze and interpret the recorded SCFS data. This guide is intended to assist newcomers in the field to perform AFM-based SCFS measurements.

  14. In vitro bond strength of two adhesives to enamel and dentin under normal and contaminated conditions.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Powers, J M; McGuckin, R S

    1993-09-01

    In vitro bond strengths of human enamel and dentin treated with five contaminants were measured with air, water and damp conditions as controls. Two commercial bonding agents (a lower-viscosity, solvent-containing type, AB, and a higher-viscosity, hydrophilic monomer type, SB) and their composites were applied to tooth structure under two conditions (contaminated and re-etched). Samples were debonded in tension after 24 h using an inverted, truncated cone test. Among the controls, the highest bond strengths were obtained with damp conditions for AB (24 MPa) and damp conditions or air for SB (22 MPa) with small differences between enamel and dentin. Most contaminants lowered the bond strength. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation resulted in bond strengths similar to controls. Bond strengths to tooth structure with the bonding agents tested may be less sensitive to common forms of contamination than typically assumed.

  15. Shearography for Non-destructive Inspection with applications to BAT Mask Tile Adhesive Bonding and Specular Surface Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of shearography techniques for non-destructive evaluation in two unique application areas is examined. In the first application, shearography is used to evaluate the quality of adhesive bonds holding lead tiles to the B.4T gamma ray mask for the NASA Swift program. Using a vibration excitation, the more poorly bonded tiles are readily identifiable in the shearography image. A quantitative analysis is presented that compares the shearography results with a destructive pull test measuring the force at bond failure. The second application is to evaluate the bonding between the skin and core of a honeycomb structure with a specular (mirror-like) surface. In standard shearography techniques, the object under test must have a diffuse surface to generate the speckle patterns in laser light, which are then sheared. A novel configuration using the specular surface as a mirror to image speckles from a diffuser is presented, opening up the use of shearography to a new class of objects that could not have been examined with the traditional approach. This new technique readily identifies large scale bond failures in the panel, demonstrating the validity of this approach.

  16. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin.

  17. Effect of Interfacial Roughness of Bond Coat on the Residual Adhesion Strength of a Plasma Sprayed TBC System after Thermal Cycle Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Ohno, Naoyuki

    The effect of the bond coat on residual adhesion strength after thermal cycle fatigue was investigated in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC). This study used CoNiCrAlY powder with two different particle sizes for spraying bond coat material to examine the effect of interface roughness between the bond coat and top coat. In addition, the bond coat was sprayed on either by a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) or a low pressure plasma spray (LPPS). The residual adhesion strength of the TBC top coat was evaluated as a function of the number of thermal cycles by the modified 4-point bending test. In addition, SEM observations of thermal fatigue cracking morphologies and measurements of the residual stress in the ceramic top coat were carried out. The experimental results indicated that, after thermal cycle fatigue, microcracks were generated in the ceramic top coat; however, they were moderated in a rough interface TBC compared to a smooth interface TBC. In addition, the bond coat sprayed by the HVOF method showed a higher resistance to microcracking than the coat sprayed using the LPPS. Residual stress in the ceramic top coat is almost zero at 0 thermal cycles. After thermal cycle fatigue, it becomes compressional stress; however, it is independent of the bond coat. There was little difference in the adhesion strength by bond coat in as-sprayed conditions. On the other hand, the specimen with a rough interface exhibited higher residual adhesion strength after thermal cycle fatigue compared with the specimens with a relatively smooth interface. In addition, if the bond coat is sprayed by HVOF, the residual adhesion strength increases. It was revealed that the difference in residual adhesion strength by bond coat is related to the distribution morphology of thermal fatigue microcracks.

  18. Modified Phenylethynyl Containing Imides for Secondary Bonding: Non-Autoclave, Low Temperature Processable Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Technical Monitor); Chang, Alice C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a program to develop structural adhesives for high performance aerospace applications, research continued on the development of modified phenylethynyl containing imides, LaRC(trademark)MPEIs. In previous reports, the polymer properties were controlled by varying the molecular weight, the amount of branching, and the phenylethynyl content and by blending with low molecular weight materials. This research involves changing the flexibility in the copolyimide backbone of the branched, phenylethynyl terminated adhesives. These adhesives exhibit excellent processability at pressures as low as 15 psi and temperatures as low as 288 C. The Ti/Ti lap shear specimens are processable in an autoclave or a temperature programmable oven under a vacuum bag at 288-300 C without external pressure. The cured polymers exhibit high mechanical properties and excellent solvent resistance. The chemistry and properties of these adhesives are presented.

  19. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm−1 and amide II at 1550 cm−1, which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding. PMID:25267936

  20. Evaluating the shear bond strength of enamel and dentin with or without etching: A comparative study between dimethacrylate-based and silorane-based adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Nasseh, Atefeh; Rahmanpour, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Background Silorane-based composites and their specific self-etch adhesive were introduced to conquest the polymerization shrinkage of methacrylate-based composites. It has been shown that additional etching of enamel and dentin can improve the bond strength of self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives but this claim is not apparent about silorane-based adhesives. Our objective was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of enamel and dentin between silorane-based adhesive resin and a methacrylate-based resin with or without additional etching. Material and Methods 40 sound human premolars were prepared and divided into two groups: 1- Filtek P60 composite and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive; 2- Filtek P90 composite and Silorane adhesive. Each group divided into two subgroups: with or without additional etching. For additional etching, 37% acid phosphoric was applied before bonding procedure. A cylinder of the composite was bonded to the surface. After 24 hours storage and 500 thermo cycling between 5-55°C, shear bond strength was assessed with the cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Then, bonded surfaces were observed under stereomicroscope to determine the failure mode. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Fischer exact test. Results Shear bond strength of Filtek P60 composite was significantly higher than Filtek P90 composite both in enamel and dentin surfaces (P<0.05). However, additional etching had no significant effect on shear bond strength in enamel or dentin for each of the composites (P>0.05). There was no interaction between composite type and additional etching (P>0.05). Failure pattern was mainly adhesive and no significant correlation was found between failure and composite type or additional etching (P>0.05). Conclusions Shear bond strength of methacrylate-based composite was significantly higher than silorane-based composite both in enamel and dentin surfaces and additional etching had no significant effect on shear bond strength in enamel or dentin for

  1. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively) were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc.), using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002). The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003). The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique. PMID:27200275