Science.gov

Sample records for adhesive tape removal

  1. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  2. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  6. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  7. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  8. Comparison of Medical Adhesive Tapes in Patients at Risk of Facial Skin Trauma under Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Sui An; Chong, Shin Yuet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Adhesive tapes are used for taping eyelids closed and securing endotracheal tubes during general anesthesia. These tapes can cause facial skin injury. We compared the incidence of facial skin injury and patient satisfaction with different tapes used. Methods. A total of 60 adult patients at risk of skin trauma were randomized to use 3M™ Kind Removal Silicone Tape or standard acrylate tapes: 3M Durapore (endotracheal tube) and Medipore (eyelids). Patients were blinded to tape used. Postoperatively, a blinded recovery nurse assessed erythema, edema, and denudation of skin. Anesthesiologist in charge also assessed skin injury. On postoperative day 1, patients rated satisfaction with the condition of their skin over the eyelids and face on a 5-point Likert scale. Results. More patients had denudation of skin with standard tapes, 4 (13.3%) versus 0 with silicone tape (p = 0.026) and in anesthesiologist-evaluated skin injury 11 (37%) with standard versus 1 (3%) with silicone (p = 0.002). No significant differences were found in erythema and edema. Patient satisfaction score was higher with silicone tape: over eyelids: mean 3.83 (standard) versus 4.53 (silicone), Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001; over face: mean 3.87 (standard) versus 4.57 (silicone) (p < 0.001). Conclusion. Silicone tape use had less skin injury and greater patient satisfaction than standard acrylate tapes. PMID:27382368

  9. Equilibrium states and stability of pre-tensioned adhesive tapes

    PubMed Central

    Putignano, Carmine; Afferrante, Luciano; Mangialardi, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the present paper we propose a generalization of the model developed in Afferrante, L.; Carbone, G.; Demelio, G.; Pugno, N. Tribol. Lett. 2013, 52, 439–447 to take into account the effect of the pre-tension in the tape. A detailed analysis of the peeling process shows the existence of two possible detachment regimes: one being stable and the other being unstable, depending on the initial configuration of the tape. In the stability region, as the peeling process advances, the peeling angle reaches a limiting value, which only depends on the geometry, on the elastic modulus of the tape and on the surface energy of adhesion. Vice versa, in the unstable region, depending on the initial conditions of the system, the tape can evolve towards a state of complete detachment or fail before reaching a state of equilibrium with complete adhesion. We find that the presence of pre-tension in the tape does not modify the stability behavior of the system, but significantly affects the pull-off force which can be sustained by the tape before complete detachment. Moreover, above a critical value of the pre-tension, which depends on the surface energy of adhesion, the tape will tend to spontaneously detach from the substrate. In this case, an external force is necessary to avoid spontaneous detachment and make the tape adhering to the substrate. PMID:25383283

  10. Paint and tape: collection and storage of microtraces of paint in adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, W R

    2000-11-01

    The collection and preservation of microtrace evidence with the aid of an adhesive tape is a method of choice in forensic science. This technique is rapid and easy and allows the concentration of microtraces on a carrier, which facilitates further investigations in the laboratory. Adhesive tapes are currently used to secure microtraces of fibers and glass, but hardly for traces of automotive paint and other lacquers for fear of interference with the analysis of binders. A collection of automotive paint consisting of original and repair lacquers collected by tape has been evaluated. After various times of storage within the tape, these samples were compared with untreated references by microscope FT-IR and microspectrophotometry (MSP). Another set of paints was collected in 1984, stored within the tape until 1995, and examined the same way. About 170 layers of lacquer with various types of binder were examined. With the exception of one clear lacquer no difference between treated samples and references was detected. This small difference observed could be correlated to the exposure to xylene (extractant) and was not caused by the storage within the adhesive tape. PMID:11110189

  11. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples. PMID:27448236

  12. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples.

  13. 11. PAINTERS REMOVING MASKING TAPE, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM BOTTOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. PAINTERS REMOVING MASKING TAPE, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM BOTTOM FLOOR OF DRYDOCK NO. 5. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for discrimination and comparison of adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Min, Ji-Sook; Heo, Sangcheol; Park, Jongseo; Papesch, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    Forensic scientists are frequently requested to differentiate between, or compare, adhesive tapes from a suspect or a crime scene. The most common polymers used to back packaging tape are polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride. Much of the oriented polypropylene (OPP) needed to produce packaging tapes, regardless of the tape brand, is supplied by just a few polymer manufacturers. Consequently, the composition of the backing material varies little. Therefore, the discriminating power of classical methods (physical fit, tape dimensions, colour, morphology, FTIR, PyGC/MS, etc.) is limited. Analysis of stable isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied in the broad area of forensics and it has been reported that isotope analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of adhesive tapes. We have tested the usefulness of this method by distinguishing different South Korean adhesive tapes produced by just a few manufacturers in the small South Korean market. Korean adhesive tapes were collected and analysed for their isotope signatures. The glue of the tapes was separated from the backing material and these sub-samples were analysed for their H- and C-isotope composition. The result shows the possibility for discriminating most tape samples, even from the same brand. Variations within single rolls have also been investigated, where no variations in H- and C-isotope composition significantly exceeding the standard deviation were found. PMID:18438979

  15. The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for discrimination and comparison of adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Min, Ji-Sook; Heo, Sangcheol; Park, Jongseo; Papesch, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    Forensic scientists are frequently requested to differentiate between, or compare, adhesive tapes from a suspect or a crime scene. The most common polymers used to back packaging tape are polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride. Much of the oriented polypropylene (OPP) needed to produce packaging tapes, regardless of the tape brand, is supplied by just a few polymer manufacturers. Consequently, the composition of the backing material varies little. Therefore, the discriminating power of classical methods (physical fit, tape dimensions, colour, morphology, FTIR, PyGC/MS, etc.) is limited. Analysis of stable isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied in the broad area of forensics and it has been reported that isotope analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of adhesive tapes. We have tested the usefulness of this method by distinguishing different South Korean adhesive tapes produced by just a few manufacturers in the small South Korean market. Korean adhesive tapes were collected and analysed for their isotope signatures. The glue of the tapes was separated from the backing material and these sub-samples were analysed for their H- and C-isotope composition. The result shows the possibility for discriminating most tape samples, even from the same brand. Variations within single rolls have also been investigated, where no variations in H- and C-isotope composition significantly exceeding the standard deviation were found.

  16. Combination of Adhesive-tape-based Sampling and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization for Rapid Detection of Salmonella on Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple approach for adhesive-tape-based sampling of tomato and other fresh produce surfaces, followed by on-tape fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella spp. Cell-charged tapes can also be placed face-down on selective agar for solid-phase enrichment prior to detection. Alternatively, low-volume liquid enrichments (liquid surface miniculture) can be performed on the surface of the tape in non-selective broth, followed by FISH and analysis via flow cytometry. To begin, sterile adhesive tape is brought into contact with fresh produce, gentle pressure is applied, and the tape is removed, physically extracting microbes present on these surfaces. Tapes are mounted sticky-side up onto glass microscope slides and the sampled cells are fixed with 10% formalin (30 min) and dehydrated using a graded ethanol series (50, 80, and 95%; 3 min each concentration). Next, cell-charged tapes are spotted with buffer containing a Salmonella-targeted DNA probe cocktail and hybridized for 15 - 30 min at 55°C, followed by a brief rinse in a washing buffer to remove unbound probe. Adherent, FISH-labeled cells are then counterstained with the DNA dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and results are viewed using fluorescence microscopy. For solid-phase enrichment, cell-charged tapes are placed face-down on a suitable selective agar surface and incubated to allow in situ growth of Salmonella microcolonies, followed by FISH and microscopy as described above. For liquid surface miniculture, cell-charged tapes are placed sticky side up and a silicone perfusion chamber is applied so that the tape and microscope slide form the bottom of a water-tight chamber into which a small volume (≤ 500 μL) of Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) is introduced. The inlet ports are sealed and the chambers are incubated at 35 - 37°C, allowing growth-based amplification of tape-extracted microbes. Following incubation, inlet ports

  17. Penetration studies of topically applied substances: Optical determination of the amount of stratum corneum removed by tape stripping.

    PubMed

    Lademann, J; Ilgevicius, A; Zurbau, O; Liess, H D; Schanzer, S; Weigmann, H J; Antoniou, C; Pelchrzim, R V; Sterry, W

    2006-01-01

    Tape stripping is a standard measuring method for the investigation of the dermatopharmacokinetics of topically applied substances using adhesive films. These tape strips are successively applied and removed from the skin after application and penetration of topically applied substances. Thus, layers of corneocytes and some amount of topical applied substances are removed. The amount of substances and the amount of stratum corneum removed with a single tape strip has to be determined for the calculation of the penetration profile. The topically applied substances removed from the skin can be determined by classical analytical methods like high-pressure liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and spectroscopic measurements. The amount of corneocytes on the tape strips can be easily detected by their pseudoabsorption. In the present paper, an easy and cheap corneocyte density analyzer is presented that is based on a slide projector. Comparing the results of the measurements obtained by the corneocyte density analyzer and by uv-visible spectrometry, identical results were obtained.

  18. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  19. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  20. New developments for the investigation of hard X-rays emitted by peeling adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Krämer, D; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Lühmann, B; Keite-Telgenbüscher, K; Frahm, R

    2013-05-01

    We realized an advanced apparatus for the investigation of emitted X-rays produced by peeling adhesive tape rolls under vacuum conditions. Two stepper motors can unwind and rewind a tape roll, and an additional roller with an optical encoder provides measurement and control of the tape speed. This way reproducible and consecutive experiments are feasible without having to change the tape or break the vacuum. The dependence of the X-ray emission on tape speed, gas pressure, type of adhesive tape, and detector angle has been investigated. The resulting spectra are continuous and span an X-ray energy range of typically 2-60 keV with high intensity. Furthermore, the new apparatus allows the in situ metalization of adhesive tape rolls by a gold sputter source. A significantly increased X-ray emission was observed for adhesive tapes with a metal coating. Thin metal foils have been placed between the tape and the detector, different K- and L-absorption edges could be measured. A considerable enhancement of the emission was achieved under the influence of the magnetic field of an NdFeB permanent magnet. PMID:23742586

  1. Reducing pain during the removal of adhesive and adherent products.

    PubMed

    Denyer, Jacqueline

    Silicone Medical Adhesive Removers (SMARs) have proved a valuable addition to formularies. In the absence of SMARs, trauma following removal of adhesive dressings, ostomy products, retention tapes and monitoring equipment can lead to skin stripping or extension of existing wounds. Those at increased risk of skin stripping include groups such as older people, premature infants and neonates and those with skin fragility syndromes. Appeel® Sterile Sachet (CliniMed) is a sterile SMAR in liquid form supplied in a single-use sachet. The addition of this sterile product to the existing Appeel range of wipes and aerosols provides an adhesive remover suitable for use on broken skin. Unlike delivery from an aerosol, Appeel Sterile Sachet does not feel cold on application, a sensation which can be confused with pain. This article discusses the value of SMARs and in particular the advantages of using the single-use Appeel Sterile Sachet.

  2. Rapid prototyping of robust and versatile microfluidic components using adhesive transfer tapes.

    PubMed

    Nath, Pulak; Fung, Derek; Kunde, Yuliya A; Zeytun, Ahmet; Branch, Brittany; Goddard, Greg

    2010-09-01

    A rapid prototyping technique of microfluidic devices is presented using adhesive transfer tapes. Lab on a chip systems can integrate multiple microfluidic functions in a single platform. Therefore, any rapid prototyping technique should be flexible and robust to accommodate different aspects of microfluidic integrations. In this work, the versatility of using adhesive transfer tapes for microfluidic applications is demonstrated by fabricating a wide range of platform. Prototypes demonstrating microfluidic mixing, dielectrophoretic trapping, complex microchannel networks and biologically relevant high temperature reactions were fabricated in less than 30 min. A novel ready to use world-to-chip interface was also developed using the same fabrication platform. All components (e.g. tapes, electrodes, acoustic sources or heaters) were obtained as finished products alleviating any chemical or clean-room specific processing. Only a 2D CAD software, a CO2 laser cutter and a seam roller was utilized to fabricate the devices. Adhesive transfer tapes provide additional flexibility compared to common double sided tapes as they do not contain any carrier material layer. Demonstrated ability to sustain in a wide range of dynamic physical processes (mechanical, electrical, or thermal) validates the robustness and the versatility of adhesive transfer tapes as an option for developing integrated lab on a chip systems. PMID:20593077

  3. Characterizing acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes favoring diverse biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhijji, Saleh Mohammed S.

    Strong, self-adhesive acrylic polymer-based tapes have been identified as FDA-approved medical device construction components that might also serve in diverse biological locations as artificial muscles, ligaments, or compressive support discs. After assuring that the tapes themselves were not cytotoxic, they were evaluated as possible low-tension muscle substitutes for eyelids, jaws, and other modest body re-closing needs, and well as for higher-tension applications as artificial ligaments. Self-adhesion of the tapes to representative biomaterials, before and after radio-frequency glow discharge treatment for surface energy modification, illustrated the conditions for maximum attachment strength to nonphysiologic substances. Attachment to bony host parts was challenging but apparently met by the application of acrylic-composite-to-dentin bonding systems that has shown good long-term experience in the mouth. Above all, the compression-relaxation properties of the tape materials were superior and their uses in potential Nucleus Pulposus applications for spinal disc repair were most completely explored. Tests included tape-disc performance longevity, both dry and wet, for over 5000 load-relaxation cycles, with no apparent changes in results for the most dense of the tapes evaluated. Direct abrasion was avoided by insertion of rigid polymeric layers. It is recommended that the compressive loading properties of acrylic tapes be further evaluated for spine repair applications.

  4. Apparatus and method for loading and unloading multiple digital tape cassettes utilizing a removable magazine

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, C.W.

    1993-01-26

    An apparatus and method to automate the handling of multiple digital tape cassettes for processing by commercially available cassette tape readers and recorders. A removable magazine rack stores a plurality of tape cassettes, and cooperates with a shuttle device that automatically inserts and removes cassettes from the magazine to the reader and vice-versa. Photocells are used to identify and index to the desired tape cassette. The apparatus allows digital information stored on multiple cassettes to be processed without significant operator intervention.

  5. Apparatus and method for loading and unloading multiple digital tape cassettes utilizing a removable magazine

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, Carl W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus and method to automate the handling of multiple digital tape cassettes for processing by commercially available cassette tape readers and recorders. A removable magazine rack stores a plurality of tape cassettes, and cooperates with a shuttle device that automatically inserts and removes cassettes from the magazine to the reader and vice-versa. Photocells are used to identify and index to the desired tape cassette. The apparatus allows digital information stored on multiple cassettes to be processed without significant operator intervention.

  6. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  7. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  12. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  13. Influence of viscoelastic nature on the intermittent peel-front dynamics of adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jagadish; Ananthakrishna, G

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the influence of viscoelastic nature of the adhesive on the intermittent peel front dynamics by extending a recently introduced model for peeling of an adhesive tape. As time and rate-dependent deformation of the adhesives are measured in stationary conditions, a crucial step in incorporating the viscoelastic effects applicable to unstable intermittent peel dynamics is the introduction of a dynamization scheme that eliminates the explicit time dependence in terms of dynamical variables. We find contrasting influences of viscoelastic contribution in different regions of tape mass, roller inertia, and pull velocity. As the model acoustic energy dissipated depends on the nature of the peel front and its dynamical evolution, the combined effect of the roller inertia and pull velocity makes the acoustic energy noisier for small tape mass and low-pull velocity while it is burstlike for low-tape mass, intermediate values of the roller inertia and high-pull velocity. The changes are quantified by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent and analyzing the statistical distributions of the amplitudes and durations of the model acoustic energy signals. Both single and two stage power-law distributions are observed. Scaling relations between the exponents are derived which show that the exponents corresponding to large values of event sizes and durations are completely determined by those for small values. The scaling relations are found to be satisfied in all cases studied. Interestingly, we find only five types of model acoustic emission signals among multitude of possibilities of the peel front configurations. PMID:20866711

  14. Using hydrophilic adhesive tape for collection of evidence for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Richard C; Harris, Howard A

    2003-11-01

    Known exemplar samples of human DNA have traditionally been body fluids, such as blood, saliva, and semen. In each case, the presence of water is a risk for the bacterial growth, which may degrade the DNA evidence. In this study, the authors have developed a method that employed a hydrophilic adhesive tape (HAT) for collecting DNA evidence. The HAT method was used to remove surface cells from relatively hairless areas on the body. The area examined were ankle, arm, behind the ear, between fingers and back of the neck. The HAT was then dissolved in the extraction buffer. DNA typing was performed at vWA, THo1, F13A1, and FES loci using the short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. Our results show that the samples collected from ear give the best results with a success rate of 100%. All subjects tested by this method had known STR genotypes established from buccal swabs. The authors' results suggest that the HAT method can be used as a less invasive method for collecting biological evidence for forensic DNA analysis. In addition, this collection method should reduce the risk of DNA degradation due to the moisture, which is encountered using conventional collecting methods.

  15. A technique to eliminate subgingival cement adhesion to implant abutments by using polytetrafluoroethylene tape.

    PubMed

    Hess, Timothy A

    2014-08-01

    Residual excess cement adhered subgingivally to an implant abutment has the potential to cause periimplant mucositis or periimplant disease. This article describes a procedure in which polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape is used to protect dental cements from adhering to the implant abutment. This technique ensures complete removal of cement from the implant abutment after seating of the crown. PMID:24529837

  16. Quick-release medical tape

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Medical tape that provides secure fixation of life-sustaining and -monitoring devices with quick, easy, damage-free removal represents a longstanding unmet medical need in neonatal care. During removal of current medical tapes, crack propagation occurs at the adhesive–skin interface, which is also the interface responsible for device fixation. By designing quick-release medical tape to undergo crack propagation between the backing and adhesive layers, we decouple removal and device fixation, enabling dual functionality. We created an ordered adhesive/antiadhesive composite intermediary layer between the medical tape backing and adhesive for which we achieve tunable peel removal force, while maintaining high shear adhesion to secure medical devices. We elucidate the relationship between the spatial ordering of adhesive and antiadhesive regions to create a fully tunable system that achieves strong device fixation and quick, easy, damage-free device removal. We also described ways of neutralizing the residual adhesive on the skin and have observed that thick continuous films of adhesive are easier to remove than the thin islands associated with residual adhesive left by current medical tapes. PMID:23112196

  17. Non-destructive sampling of rock-dwelling microbial communities using sterile adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Oliver, Anna E; Viles, Heather A; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Building stone provides a habitat for an array of microorganisms, many of which have been demonstrated to have a deleterious effect on the appearance and/or structural integrity of stone masonry. It is essential to understand the composition and structure of stone-dwelling (lithobiontic) microbial communities if successful stone conservation strategies are to be applied, particularly in the face of global environmental change. Ideally, the techniques used to sample such assemblages should be non-destructive due to the sensitive conservation status of many stone buildings. This paper quantitatively assesses the performance of sterile adhesive tape as a non-destructive sampling technique and compares the results of tape sampling with an alternative, destructive, sampling method. We used DNA fingerprinting (TRFLP) to characterise the algal, fungal and bacterial communities living on a stone slab. Our results demonstrate that tape sampling may be used to collect viable quantities of microbial DNA from environmental samples. This technique is ideally suited to the sampling of microbial biofilms, particularly when these communities are dominated by green algae. It provides a good approximation of total community diversity (i.e. the aggregate diversity of epilithic and endolithic communities). Tape sampling is straightforward, rapid and cost effective. When combined with molecular analytical techniques, this sampling method has the potential to make a major contribution to efforts to understand the structure of lithobiontic microbial communities and our ability to predict the response of such communities to future environmental change. PMID:23022426

  18. 7 CFR 3201.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 3201.16 Section 3201.16... Designated Items § 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue,...

  19. 7 CFR 3201.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 3201.16 Section 3201.16... Designated Items § 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue,...

  20. 7 CFR 3201.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 3201.16 Section 3201.16... Designated Items § 3201.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue,...

  1. Time scales of the stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2015-01-01

    The stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape is characterized by bifurcations that have been experimentally well studied. In this work, we investigate the time scale in which the the stick–slips happen leading to the bifurcations. This is fundamental to understanding the triboluminescence and acoustic emissions associated with the bifurcations. We establish a relationship between the time scale of the bifurcations and the inherent mathematical structure of the peeling dynamics by studying a characteristic time quantity associated with the dynamics. PMID:25663802

  2. Contact allergic reactions to diphenylthiourea and phenylisothiocyanate in PVC adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Fregert, S; Trulson, L; Zimerson, E

    1982-01-01

    28 patients reacting to a PVC adhesive tape used in routine patch testing gave positive reactions to diphenylthiourea (DPTU) and to phenylisothiocyanate (PITC) in low concentrations. DPTU is a heat stabilizer in the PVC and is partly decomposed to PITC. The two substances were found in another type of PVC. Thioureas giving isothiocyanates are also used in certain types of rubber. Isothiocyanates are present in plants, mainly of the Cruciferae family, and are also formed from thiuram sulfides and thiocarbamates. The connection between isothiocyanates derived from different sources should be investigated. PMID:6802568

  3. Development and production of a flame retardant, general purpose, pressure sensitive adhesive tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P. B.; Doggett, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The specification results for the finished tape properties were as follows: (1) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on aluminum from 107 to 143 grams per centimeter (0.6 to 0.8 pounds per inch); (2) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on stainless steel from 71 to 107 grams per centimeter (0.4 to 0.6 pounds per inch); (3) unwind resistance of 536 to 714 grams per centimeter (3 to 4 pounds per inch); (4) tensile strength minimum of 7143 grams per centimeter (40 pounds per inch); (5) elongation from 5 to 10% at break; (6) tear strength, Elmendorf from 200 to 350 grams (0.44 to 0.77 pounds); and (7) tear strength, tongue from 363 to 408 grams (0.8 to 0.9) pounds).

  4. Removal of adhesive wound dressing and its effects on the stratum corneum of the skin: comparison of eight different adhesive wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Imai, Ryutaro; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Gondo, Masahide; Shibata, Dai; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, adhesive wound dressings have been increasingly applied postoperatively because of their ease of use as they can be kept in place without having to cut and apply surgical tapes and they can cover a wound securely. However, if a wound dressing strongly adheres to the wound, a large amount of stratum corneum is removed from the newly formed epithelium or healthy periwound skin. Various types of adhesives are used on adhesive wound dressings and the extent of skin damage depends on how much an adhesive sticks to the wound or skin surface. We quantitatively determined and compared the amount of stratum corneum removed by eight different wound dressings including polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive, silicone-based adhesive dressing, composite hydrocolloid and self-adhesive polyurethane foam in healthy volunteers. The results showed that wound dressings with silicone adhesive and self-adhesive polyurethane foam removed less stratum corneum, whereas composite hydrocolloid and polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive removed more stratum corneum.

  5. Comparison of gravimetric and spectroscopic approaches to quantify stratum corneum removed by tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, D; Yang, Q; Guy, R H; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-09-01

    Skin surface tape-stripping is an extensively used technique to examine the distribution profile, penetration and safety of various active compounds. It is also a widely accepted method to probe skin barrier properties and more specifically, those of the stratum corneum (SC). The amount of SC removed by tape-stripping is generally determined either gravimetrically or by extraction and measurement of SC proteins. A novel infra-red densitometry (IRD) technique has recently been introduced to measure SC protein content. In the present study, IRD was investigated as an alternative method to measure the mass of SC removed by tape-stripping. Tape-stripping experiments were conducted on human volunteers. The weight of the stratum corneum removed was assessed by the gravimetric approach and by IRD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured before and after each tape-strip. A linear correlation coefficient was obtained for the data from the gravimetric and IRD measurements (r(2)=0.65; n=240). IRD is therefore proposed as a rapid, non-destructive alternative to the gravimetric approach to estimate the amount of SC removed by tape-stripping in vivo. PMID:22713518

  6. Comparison of gravimetric and spectroscopic approaches to quantify stratum corneum removed by tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, D; Yang, Q; Guy, R H; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-09-01

    Skin surface tape-stripping is an extensively used technique to examine the distribution profile, penetration and safety of various active compounds. It is also a widely accepted method to probe skin barrier properties and more specifically, those of the stratum corneum (SC). The amount of SC removed by tape-stripping is generally determined either gravimetrically or by extraction and measurement of SC proteins. A novel infra-red densitometry (IRD) technique has recently been introduced to measure SC protein content. In the present study, IRD was investigated as an alternative method to measure the mass of SC removed by tape-stripping. Tape-stripping experiments were conducted on human volunteers. The weight of the stratum corneum removed was assessed by the gravimetric approach and by IRD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured before and after each tape-strip. A linear correlation coefficient was obtained for the data from the gravimetric and IRD measurements (r(2)=0.65; n=240). IRD is therefore proposed as a rapid, non-destructive alternative to the gravimetric approach to estimate the amount of SC removed by tape-stripping in vivo.

  7. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy of human stratum corneum using a silver halide fiber probe of square cross-section and adhesive tape stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Küpper, L.; Butvina, L. N.

    2003-12-01

    Mid-infrared fiber probes allow an extended use of attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements for topical in vivo skin analysis, which were otherwise not possible with conventional sample compartment accessories. Evanescent wave spectroscopy using a flexible fiber-optic probe from silver halide fibers of square cross-section was employed for stratum corneum characterization and keratinocyte quantification on adhesive tapes. Such a method of quantifying the amount of keratin, which can be repetitively removed from the skin surface by adhesive tape application, is essential for the study of substances topically applied and penetrating into the horny layer. For calibration, the weight of keratinocytes was determined using an ultramicro-balance. Best results were obtained with difference spectroscopy and the evaluation of the amide I absorption band intensity (correlation coefficient r=0.983). Lowest amounts per cm 2 were reached for the range down to 5 μg/cm 2. The heterogeneity in the surface density of keratinocytes clinging to the tape was investigated by microscopy, and the thickness of some individual keratinocytes was tested by ATR-microspectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  8. Humidity effects on adhesion of nickel-zinc ferrite in elastic contact with magnetic tape and itself

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Kusaka, T.; Maeda, C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the adhesion of Ni-Zn ferrite and magnetic tape in elastic contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite hemispherical pin in moist nitrogen were studied. Adhesion was independent of normal load in dry, humid, and saturated nitrogen. Ferrites adhere to ferrites in a saturated atmosphere primarily from the surface tension effects of a thin film of water adsorbed on the ferrite surfaces. The surface tension of the water film calculated from the adhesion results was 48 times 0.00001 to 56 times 0.00001 N/cm; the accepted value for water is 72.7 x 0.00001 N/cm. The adhesion of ferrite-ferrite contacts increased gradually with increases in relative humidity to 80 percent, but rose rapidly above 80 percent. The adhesion at saturation was 30 times or more greater than that below 80 percent relative humidity. Although the adhesion of magnetic tape - ferrite contacts remained low below 40 percent relative humidity and the effect of humidity was small, the adhesion increased considerably with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The changes in adhesion of elastic contacts were reversible on humidifying and dehumidifying.

  9. Technique for recovery of voice data from heat damaged magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, J. F.; Obrien, D. E., III (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method for conditioning, and thus enabling retrieval of intelligence from, magnetic tapes after damage from heat has caused the tape to wrinkle and curl severely thereby reducing tape width to less than one-half its original size. The damaged tape is superposed on a first piece of splicing tape with the oxide side of the magnetic tape in contact with the adhesive side of the splicing tape and then carefully smoothed by a special tool. A second piece of splicing tape is placed on the backing side of the magnetic tape then the resulting tape stack is trimmed to the original width of the magnetic tape. After the first piece of splicing tape is carefully removed from the oxide side of the damaged magnetic tape, the resulting magnetic tape is then ready to be placed into a recorder for playback.

  10. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery.

  11. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jack C.; Brown, Adam P.; Shin, John S.; Rogers, Kirsten M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endotracheal tube security is a critical safety issue. We compared the mobility of an in situ endotracheal tube secured with adhesive tape to the one secured with a new commercially available purpose-designed endotracheal tube-holder device (Haider Tube-Guard®). We also observed for the incidence of oropharyngeal or facial trauma associated with the 2 tube fixation methods. METHODS: Thirty adult patients undergoing general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade were prospectively enrolled. Immediately after intubation, a single study author positioned the endotracheal tube tip in the distal trachea using a bronchoscope. Anesthesiologists caring for patients secured the tube in their normal fashion (always with adhesive tape). A force transducer was used to apply linear force, increasing to 15 N or until the principal investigator deemed that the force be aborted for safety reasons. The displacement of the endotracheal tube was measured with the bronchoscope. Any tape was then removed and the endotracheal tube secured with the Haider Tube-Guard device. The linear force was reapplied and the displacement of the endotracheal tube measured. The Haider Tube-Guard device was left in place for the duration of the case. The patient’s face and oropharynx were examined for any evidence of trauma during surgery and in the recovery room. On discharge from the postanesthesia care unit, the patient answered a brief survey assessing for any subjective evidence of minor facial or oropharyngeal trauma. RESULTS: Under standardized tension, the endotracheal tube withdrew a mean distance of 3.4 cm when secured with adhesive tape versus 0.3 cm when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P <0.001). Ninety-seven percent of patients (29/30) experienced clinically significant endotracheal tube movement (>1 cm) when adhesive tape was used to secure the tube versus 3% (1/30) when the Haider Tube-Guard was used (P <0.001). Thirty percent of patients (9/30) were potentially deemed

  12. Degradation of the Adhesive Properties of MD-944 Diode Tape by Simulated Low Earth Orbit Environmental Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albyn, K.; Finckenor, M.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays utilize MD-944 diode tape with silicone pressure-sensitive adhesive to protect the underlying diodes and also provide a high-emittance surface. On-orbit, the silicone adhesive will be exposed and ultimately convert to a glass-like silicate due to atomic oxygen (AO). The current operational plan is to retract ISS solar array P6 and leave it stored under load for a long duration (6 mo or more). The exposed silicone adhesive must not cause the solar array to stick to itself or cause the solar array to fail during redeployment. The Environmental Effects Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, under direction from the ISS Program Office Environments Team, performed simulated space environment exposures with 5-eV AO, near ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation. The exposed diode tape samples were put under preload and then the resulting blocking force was measured using a tensile test machine. Test results indicate that high-energy AO, ultraviolet radiation, and electron ionizing radiation exposure all reduce the blocking force for a silicone-to-silicone bond. AO exposure produces the most significant reduction in blocking force

  13. Spectroscopic detection of exogenous materials in latent fingerprints treated with powders and lifted off with adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Banas, A; Banas, K; Breese, M B H; Loke, J; Lim, S K

    2014-07-01

    Fingerprint evidence offers great value to criminal investigations since it is an internationally recognized and established means of human identification. With recent advances in modern technology, scientists have started analyzing not only the ridge patterns of fingerprints but also substances which can be found within them. The aim of this work was to determine whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy could be used to detect contamination in a fingerprint which was dusted with powder (a technique already recognized as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints) and subsequently lifted off with adhesive tape. Explosive materials (pentaerythritol tetranitrate, C-4, TNT) and noncontrolled substances (sugar, aspirin) were used to prepare contaminated fingerprints on various substrates. Freshly deposited fingermarks with powders which were lifted off with adhesive tapes (provided by Singapore Police Force) were analyzed using a Bruker Hyperion 2000 microscope at the ISMI beamline (Singapore Synchrotron Light Source) with an attenuated total reflection objective. FTIR spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique which requires almost no sample preparation. Further, the fingerprint under analysis remains in pristine condition, allowing subsequent analysis if necessary. All analyzed substances were successfully distinguished using their FTIR spectra in powdered and lifted fingerprints. This method has the potential to significantly impact forensic science by greatly enhancing the information that can be obtained from the study of fingerprints.

  14. Fatigue study and improve reliability of cantilever type micro piezoelectric energy harvesters reinforced with flexible adhesive conductive tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. K.; Hsieh, Y. C.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. J.; Wu, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    Cantilever type piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) is widely adopted in the design of vibration energy harvesters because of simple, effective and easy to fabricate. When the PEH is working under excitation of continuous vibration sources, like mounting on motors, reliability and durability is a major concern. The failure mode and fatigue issues will be important design considerations in field applications. Since the largest strain of a cantilever structure is located in the clamping position of fixed end, the location is therefore the weakest point of the structure and the hot zone of mechanical cracks. The failure mode due to fatigue under long time excitation of vibration sources is typically continuously developing small cracks on the piezoelectric PZT films till tearing the surface electrodes and caused open circuit to the output circuitry. Therefore, extending the lifetime with minimize the surface electrodes cracking becomes a key point for field applications. Previously, we focused on the output performance of PEH. At PowerMEMS 2014 [1], we presented a high performance PEH based on PZT thin films fabricated with a homemade PZT deposition equipment on stainless steel substrates. We confirmed that the stainless steel based PEH can generate better output power than silicon based devices under the same vibration excitation levels, and also the stainless based PEH can have longer lifetime when excited at higher vibration levels due to better mechanical strength. In this study, we tried to further reinforce the PEH with a conductive adhesive tape sticking on the surface electrode near the clamping position. We investigated the change of failure mode and mechanical behaviors, including the frequency bandwidth and non-linearity of the piezoelectric energy harvester. The PEH devices was mounted on a shaker for long time testing with vibration frequency set around 120Hz at 0.5g, 0.6g, and 0.7g acceleration vibration levels. The electrodes of the PEH device were

  15. Interpretation of the human skin biotribological behaviour after tape stripping

    PubMed Central

    Pailler-Mattei, C.; Guerret-Piécourt, C.; Zahouani, H.; Nicoli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the modification of the human skin biotribological behaviour after tape stripping. The tape-stripping procedure consists in the sequential application and removal of adhesive tapes on the skin surface in order to remove stratum corneum (SC) layers, which electrically charges the skin surface. The skin electric charges generated by tape stripping highly change the skin friction behaviour by increasing the adhesion component of the skin friction coefficient. It has been proposed to rewrite the friction adhesion component as the sum of two terms: the first classical adhesion term depending on the intrinsic shear strength, τ0, and the second term depending on the electric shear strength, τelec. The experimental results allowed to estimate a numerical value of the electric shear strength τelec. Moreover, a plan capacitor model with a dielectric material inside was used to modelize the experimental system. This physical model permitted to evaluate the friction electric force and the electric shear strength values to calculate the skin friction coefficient after the tape stripping. The comparison between the experimental and the theoretical value of the skin friction coefficient after the tape stripping has shown the importance of the electric charges on skin biotribological behaviour. The static electric charges produced by tape stripping on the skin surface are probably able to highly modify the interaction of formulations with the skin surface and their spreading properties. This phenomenon, generally overlooked, should be taken into consideration as it could be involved in alteration of drug absorption. PMID:21227961

  16. Review of adhesive techniques used in removable prosthodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2012-09-01

    There are several benefits in using adhesive technique in removable prosthodontics as well as fixed prosthodontics. Previous studies have examined denture-base surface treatments that improve bond strength between a denture base resin and autopolymerizing repair resin. Dichloromethane and ethyl acetate are organic solvents that swell the denture base surface, thereby permitting diffusion of the acrylic resin. The optimal treatment duration is 5-10 s for dichloromethane and 120 s for ethyl acetate. It was reported that the bond durability of dichloromethane was superiorto that of ethyl acetate. Bonding between metal components and the denture base resin has an important role in the longevity of removable prostheses. The combination of metal conditioners and alumina air-abrasion is effective in fabricating and repairing removable dentures. Acidic monomers (4-META and MDP) are appropriate for base metal alloys, including Co-Cr alloy and titanium alloy, while thione monomers (MTU-6 and VBATDT) are suitable for noble metal alloys such as gold alloy and silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy. As an alternative to conventional restorations, resin-bonded restorations can provide precisely parallel guide planes with well-made rest seats. Careful consideration should be paid to stabilizing loosened teeth by fixing them with resin-bonded splints or fixed partial dentures. PMID:23047030

  17. Importance of a suitable working protocol for tape stripping experiments on porcine ear skin: Influence of lipophilic formulations and strip adhesion impairment.

    PubMed

    Nagelreiter, C; Mahrhauser, D; Wiatschka, K; Skipiol, S; Valenta, C

    2015-08-01

    The tape stripping method is a very important tool for dermopharmacokinetic experiments in vitro and the accurate measurement of the removed corneocytes is key for a reliable calculation of a drug's skin penetration behavior. Therefore, various methods to quantify the amount of corneocytes removed with each tape strip have been employed, ranging from gravimetric approaches to protein assays and recently near infrared densitometry (NIR) has become very widely used. As this method is based on a reduction of light intensity, interference of formulation components seems conceivable, as they could scatter light and change the results. In this study, NIR measurements were compared to a protein assay and in addition, the influence of highly lipophilic formulations on the results of tape stripping experiments was investigated as impairment of the adherence of strips has been reported. To this end, different tape stripping protocols were employed. The obtained results ensure suitability of the NIR method and moreover suggest a more pronounced influence on adherence with increasing lipophilicity in applied formulations. The results show that adaptation of the tape stripping protocol to the specifications of envisioned experiments is important for reliable results. Two protocols were found favorable and are presented in this work. PMID:26117191

  18. Importance of a suitable working protocol for tape stripping experiments on porcine ear skin: Influence of lipophilic formulations and strip adhesion impairment.

    PubMed

    Nagelreiter, C; Mahrhauser, D; Wiatschka, K; Skipiol, S; Valenta, C

    2015-08-01

    The tape stripping method is a very important tool for dermopharmacokinetic experiments in vitro and the accurate measurement of the removed corneocytes is key for a reliable calculation of a drug's skin penetration behavior. Therefore, various methods to quantify the amount of corneocytes removed with each tape strip have been employed, ranging from gravimetric approaches to protein assays and recently near infrared densitometry (NIR) has become very widely used. As this method is based on a reduction of light intensity, interference of formulation components seems conceivable, as they could scatter light and change the results. In this study, NIR measurements were compared to a protein assay and in addition, the influence of highly lipophilic formulations on the results of tape stripping experiments was investigated as impairment of the adherence of strips has been reported. To this end, different tape stripping protocols were employed. The obtained results ensure suitability of the NIR method and moreover suggest a more pronounced influence on adherence with increasing lipophilicity in applied formulations. The results show that adaptation of the tape stripping protocol to the specifications of envisioned experiments is important for reliable results. Two protocols were found favorable and are presented in this work.

  19. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  20. Adhesive bubble removal method and apparatus for fiber applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, John R. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An assembly for supporting a fiber optic termination or connector in a centrifuge and comprising a cylindrical body member having a top portion adapted to receive the ferrule body portion of a fiber optic termination or connector and a bottom portion for receiving a cylindrical piston/sealing unit. The piston portion of the piston/sealing unit includes a compressible tip which is adapted to a butt up against the outer end of the ferrule body portion of the fiber optic termination or connector. A cylindrical end cap fits over the upper end of the body member for holding the fiber optic termination in place on the body member and causing a seal to be formed between the termination or connector and the upper portion of the body member adjacent the compressible tip of the plunger. The parts, when fitted together, are placed in a centrifuge which is operated for a predetermined spin cycle, so as to cause any bubbles in the uncured liquid adhesive to be vented outwardly from the termination through the end cap. Subsequent removal of the fiber optic termination or connector from the centrifuge and assembly is bubble free and ready to be joined with an optical fiber which is inserted in the ferrule end of the termination or connector.

  1. Adhesive Bubble Removal Method and Apparatus for Fiber Optic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, John R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An assembly for supporting a fiber optic termination or connector in a centrifuge and comprising a cylindrical body member having a top portion adapted to receive the ferrule body portion of a fiber optic termination or connector and a bottom portion for receiving a cylindrical piston/sealing unit is presented. The piston portion of the piston/sealing unit includes a compressible tip which is adapted to a butt up against the outer end of the ferrule body portion of the fiber optic termination or connector. A cylindrical end cap fits over the upper end of the body member for holding the fiber optic termination in place on the body member and causing a seal to be formed between the termination or connector and the upper portion of the body member adjacent the compressible tip of the plunger. The parts, when fitted together, are placed in a centrifuge which is operated for a predetermined spin cycle, so as to cause any bubbles in the uncured liquid adhesive to be vented outwardly from the termination through the end cap. Subsequent removal of the fiber optic termination or connector from the centrifuge and assembly is "bubble free" and ready to be joined with an optical fiber which is inserted in the ferrule end of the termination or connector.

  2. [Ankle sprains. Comparison of long-term results of functional treatment methods with adhesive tape and bandage ("brace") and stability measurement].

    PubMed

    Twellaar, M; Veldhuizen, J W; Verstappen, F T

    1993-09-01

    Both taping and bracing can be applied in the early functional treatment of ankle sprains. In this study the long-term (2.3 +/- 0.5 years) results of functional treatment with two types of bandages were compared. Out of 165 patients treated, 112 were available for interview, 60 of whom had been treated with adhesive, non-elastic tape and 52, with a confection brace. In 93 of these patients (47 in the tape group), the ankle was examined and stabilometry was performed. The distance (D) and area (A) covered by each patient's centre of gravity while he/she stood on one leg for 30 s were measured. The following symptoms were found on the total population: pain on movement in 5%, swelling in 8% and functional instability (recurrent sprain or a feeling of giving way) in 38%. Mechanical instability was found in 34%. Pain on palpation of the lateral ligaments was the only symptom whose frequency differed significantly (P < 0.05) between the tape group (47%) and the brace group (20%). Stabilometric measurements revealed no substantial difference between the tape group (D: 436 +/- 100 mm; A: 192 +/- 87 mm2) and the brace group (D: 459 +/- 111 mm; A: 206 +/- 92 mm2). Nor was any difference in stability observed between the injured and the non-injured ankle, between the stable and the unstable ankle, or between the unstable ankle with and without brace application. Stabilometry is thus not an appropriate means of quantifying the symptoms of ankle instability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Effect of orthodontic debonding and residual adhesive removal on 3D enamel microroughness

    PubMed Central

    Tomkowski, Robert; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Stepien, Piotr; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Background Termination of fixed orthodontic treatment is associated with bracket debonding and residual adhesive removal. These procedures increase enamel roughness to a degree that should depend on the tool used. Enamel roughening may be associated with bacterial retention and staining. However, a very limited data exists on the alteration of 3D enamel roughness resulting from the use of different tools for orthodontic clean-up. Aims 1. To perform a precise assessment of 3D enamel surface roughness resulting from residual adhesive removal following orthodontic debonding molar tubes. 2. To compare enamel surfaces resulting from the use of tungsten carbide bur, a one-step polisher and finisher and Adhesive Residue Remover. Material and Methods Buccal surfaces of forty-five extracted human third molars were analysed using a confocal laser microscope at the magnification of 1080× and 3D roughness parameters were calculated. After 20 s etching, molar tubes were bonded, the teeth were stored in 0.9% saline solution for 24 hours and debonded. Residual adhesive was removed using in fifteen specimen each: a twelve-fluted tungsten carbide bur, a one-step finisher and polisher and Adhesive Residue Remover. Then, surface roughness analysis was repeated. Data normality was assessed using Shapiro–Wilk test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare between variables of normal distribution and for the latter—Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Sa (arithmetical mean height) was significantly different between the groups (p = 0, 01326); the smoothest and most repeatable surfaces were achieved using Adhesive Residue Remover. Similarly, Sq (root mean square height of the scale-limited surface) had the lowest and most homogenous values for Adhesive Residue Remover (p = 0, 01108). Sz (maximum height of the scale-limited surface) was statistically different between the groups (p = 0, 0327), however no statistically significant differences were found concerning Ssk (skewness of the

  4. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time. PMID:24630328

  5. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time.

  6. Effect of adhesive remnant removal on enamel topography after bracket debonding

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Larissa Adrian Meira; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Vedovello, Mario; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: At orthodontic treatment completion, knowledge about the effects of adhesive remnant removal on enamel is paramount. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the effect of different adhesive remnant removal methods on enamel topography (ESI) and surface roughness (Ra) after bracket debonding and polishing. METHODS: A total of 50 human premolars were selected and divided into five groups according to the method used for adhesive remnant removal: high speed tungsten carbide bur (TCB), Sof-Lex discs (SL), adhesive removing plier (PL), ultrasound (US) and Fiberglass burs (FB). Metal brackets were bonded with Transbond XT, stored at 37oC for 24 hours before debonding with adhesive removing plier. Subsequently, removal methods were carried out followed by polishing with pumice paste. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted with pre-bonding, post-debonding and post-polishing analyses. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with F test (ANOVA) and Tukey's (Ra) as well as with Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests (ESI) (P < 0.05). RESULTS: US Ra and ESI were significantly greater than TCB, SL, PL and FB. Polishing minimized Ra and ESI in the SL and FB groups. CONCLUSION: Adhesive remnant removal with SL and FB associated with polishing are recommended due to causing little damage to the enamel. PMID:25628087

  7. A model for quantitative evaluation of skin damage at adhesive wound dressing removal.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Imai, Ryutaro; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2013-06-01

    The removal of adhesive wound dressings from the wound surface involves a risk of damaging the intact stratum corneum and regenerating epithelium. Pain associated with the removal of wound dressings is a major issue for patients and medical personnel. Recently, wound dressings coated with a silicone adhesive have been developed to reduce such skin damage and pain on removal and they have received good evaluation in various clinical settings. However, there is neither a standard method to quantify whether or not the integrity of the stratum corneum and regenerating epithelium is retained or if both structures are damaged by the removal of wound dressings, nor are there standardised values with which to assess skin damage. We applied six different types of adhesive wound dressing on plain copy paper printed with black ink by a laser printer, removed the dressings, examined the adhesive-coated surface of the wound dressings using a high-power videoscope, and examined the stripped areas. Wound dressings coated with a silicone adhesive showed significantly less detachment of the stratum corneum and regenerating epithelium, followed by those coated with polyurethane, hydrocolloid, and acrylic adhesives. The assessment method utilised in this study revealed distinct differences between wound dressing types, but less variation in the evaluation outcome of each type. This assessment method may be useful for the evaluation of adhesive wound dressings, particularly during product development. However, further studies will be needed to examine the effectiveness of this assessment method in the clinical setting because the adherent properties of polyurethane and hydrocolloid adhesives may be altered by the absorption of water from the skin.

  8. Gecko adhesion: evolutionary nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Autumn, Kellar; Gravish, Nick

    2008-05-13

    If geckos had not evolved, it is possible that humans would never have invented adhesive nanostructures. Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1ms-1. Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive in requiring both strong attachment and easy rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). The gecko adhesive differs dramatically from conventional adhesives. Conventional PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective elastic modulus to that of PSAs. Setae are self-cleaning and maintain function for months during repeated use in dirty conditions. Setae are an anisotropic 'frictional adhesive' in that adhesion requires maintenance of a proximally directed shear load, enabling either a tough bond or spontaneous detachment. Gecko-like synthetic adhesives may become the glue of the future-and perhaps the screw of the future as well.

  9. Adhesion and removal of glass, silica and PSL particles from silicon dioxide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiangwei

    As circuit minimum feature size continues to shrink, surface cleanliness requirements become more stringent, making surface cleaning more challenging. To develop effective cleaning techniques, it is important to understand particle adhesion and removal mechanisms. Although many studies have been conducted in particle adhesion, the effects of humidity and aging, hydrogen and covalent bonds, and particle's submicron size on adhesion are not well understood. It is necessary to study and understand how the adhesion force changes with time under different conditions in order to develop effective cleaning techniques. The humidity and aging effects on the adhesion and removal of glass particles on flat panel display glass surface, silica particles on thermal oxide silicon wafers and PSL (Polystyrene Latex) particles on silicon wafers are investigated. The results show that silica particles' contact area increases dramatically in high humidity environment over time. This is due to the water reacting with the silica and forming a covalent bond. The results show that silica particles' adhesion force is found to depend on the aging time. After six weeks 95%RH aging, the adhesion force is larger than MP model (for plastic deformation) predicted adhesion force. This is due to the formation of hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds. Removal of glass particles on Flat Panel Display aged in a humid environment using megasonic cleaning is also investigated. The effect of temperature, cleaning time and megasonic power on particle removal is shown. The time and humidity effect on submicron PSL particles' adhesion is also investigated. The combined effect of time and humidity results in increased particle deformation and consequently the increased adhesion force. An empirical model is proposed to describe the relationship between the contact diameter, particle diameter and aging time. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data. The results suggest that a greater

  10. Rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems using a PDMS/polymer tape composite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkyu; Surapaneni, Rajesh; Gale, Bruce K

    2009-05-01

    Rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems using a combination of double-sided tape and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) is introduced. PDMS is typically difficult to bond using adhesive tapes due to its hydrophobic nature and low surface energy. For this reason, PDMS is not compatible with the xurography method, which uses a knife plotter and various adhesive coated polymer tapes. To solve these problems, a PDMS/tape composite was developed and demonstrated in microfluidic applications. The PDMS/tape composite was created by spinning it to make a thin layer of PDMS over double-sided tape. Then the PDMS/tape composite was patterned to create channels using xurography, and bonded to a PDMS slab. After removing the backing paper from the tape, a complete microfluidic system could be created by placing the construct onto nearly any substrate; including glass, plastic or metal-coated glass/silicon substrates. The bond strength was shown to be sufficient for the pressures that occur in typical microfluidic channels used for chemical or biological analysis. This method was demonstrated in three applications: standard microfluidic channels and reactors, a microfluidic system with an integrated membrane, and an electrochemical biosensor. The PDMS/tape composite rapid prototyping technique provides a fast and cost effective fabrication method and can provide easy integration of microfluidic channels with sensors and other components without the need for a cleanroom facility.

  11. Focal adhesion sites and the removal of substratum-bound fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Fibronectin was not removed from the substratum beneath focal adhesion sites when fibroblasts spread in serum-free medium on adsorbed fibronectin substrata, or when fibroblasts spread in serum-containing medium on covalently cross-linked fibronectin substrata. Under these conditions, there was colocalization between 140-kD fibronectin receptors and focal adhesion sites. It was concluded that removal of adsorbed fibronectin from beneath focal adhesion sites was a mechanical process that required serum. The effect of serum was nonspecific since serum could be replaced by equivalent concentrations of serum albumin, ovalbumin, or gamma globulins. Quantitative measurements indicated that the presence of proteins in the incubation medium weakens the interaction of fibronectin with the substratum, thereby allowing the adsorbed protein to be removed from the substratum at sites of high stress. After removing fibronectin from the substratum, cells reorganized this material into patches and fibrils beneath cells, and the reorganized fibronectin colocalized with fibronectin receptors. Some of the patches of fibronectin were phagocytosed. The fibronectin fibrils were observed to be in register with actin filament bundles and sometimes translocated to the upper cell surfaces. It is proposed that removal of fibronectin from beneath focal adhesion sites is an example of how cells can modify their extracellular matrices through contractile activity. PMID:2947902

  12. Removal of adhesive dusts from flue gas using corona discharges with spraying water.

    PubMed

    Xu, De-xuan; Zhao, Jian-wei; Ding, Yun-zheng; Ge, Wei-li

    2003-07-01

    Effective removal of adhesive and fine dusts from flue gas is very difficult. A new method of electrostatic precipitation of the corona discharges with spraying water (CDSW) was introduced. A new electrode configuration and the circulation spraying of water were employed in the method. The efficient electrostatic precipitation for adhesive and fine dusts can be accomplished without any drain water during a long operating period. The fundamental structure, discharge characteristics, mechanism of spraying and precipitation principle of the electrostatic precipitation using CDSW were described and analyzed. The V-I characteristics, spraying state, supplying water quantity, influence of temperature and clean of the electrodes were researched in series experiments. The treating effects of circulating spraying using the corona plasma at the same time of electrostatic precipitation were investigated. The fundamental theories and experimental data were proposed, in order to effectively remove the adhesive dusts from flue gas using CDSW in practice.

  13. Engineered nanoparticle adhesion and removal from tomato surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Sablani, Shyam S; Rasco, Barbara

    2013-10-23

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are being used in different industries due to their unique physicochemical properties. NPs may be toxic and could pose both public health and environmental contamination risks. In this study, two concentrations (50 and 500 μg mL(-1)) of titania (TiO2), silica (SiO2), and alumina (Al2O3) were applied to contaminate the surface of cherry tomato as a food model, followed by washing with deionized water (DI) to remove the NPs from the tomato surfaces. The NP surface charge and hydrodynamic diameter results showed that the isoelectric point (IEP) for alumina was at pH 9-9.6, for silica at pH <3, and for titania was at pH 6.5-6.8; in addition, the highest hydrodynamic size for all NPs was observed at the IEP. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) indicated that the highest NP concentration was observed on tomato surfaces contaminated at the higher concentration (500 μg mL(-1)) (P < 0.05). After the tomatoes had been washed with DI, alumina levels decreased significantly, whereas for titania and silica, no significant difference in NP concentration on tomato surface was observed following the washing treatment. This study shows that removal of NPs may be possible with a simple washing treatment but that removal of NPs is likely to be more effective when the moment ratio is >1, which can occur if the pH of the washing solution is significantly different from the IEP of NPs. PMID:24079610

  14. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  15. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  16. Chemical semi-IPN hydrogels for the removal of adhesives from canvas paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Joana; Bonelli, Nicole; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero

    2014-03-01

    Semi-interpenetrating (IPN) poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/polyvinylpyrrolidone hydrogels were synthesized and used for the removal of adhesives from the back of canvas paintings. The high water retention capability and the specific mechanical properties of these gels allow the safe cleaning of water-sensitive artifacts using water-based detergent systems. The cleaning action is limited to the contact area and layer-by-layer removal is achieved while avoiding water spreading and absorption within water-sensitive substrates, which could lead, for example, to paint detachment. The use of these chemical gels also avoids leaving residues over the treated surface because the gel network is formed by covalent bonds that provide high mechanical strength. In this contribution, the physicochemical characterization of semi-IPN chemical hydrogels is reported. The successful application of an o/w microemulsion confined in the hydrogel for the removal of adhesives from linen canvas is also illustrated.

  17. Effect of sulfur removal on Al2O3 scale adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of removing sulfur impurity on the adhesion of Al2O3 scale to NiCrAl was investigated in four experiments. It was found that removing sulfur to concentration less than 1 ppm per weight is sufficient to produce a very significant degree of alpha-Al2O3 scale adhesion to undoped NiCrAl alloys. Results of experiments show that repeated oxidation, and polishing after each oxidation cycle, of pure NiCrAl alloy lowered sulfur content from 10 to 2 ppm by weight (presumably by removing the segregated interfacial layer after each cycle); thinner samples became adherent after fewer oxidation-polishing cycles because of more limited supply of sulfur. It was found that spalling in subsequent cyclic oxidation tests was a direct function of the initial sulfur content. The transition between the adherent and nonadherent behavior was modeled in terms of sulfur flux, sulfur content, and sulfur segregation.

  18. Forensic utility of the carbon isotope ratio of PVC tape backings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Thompson, A. H.; Mehltretter, A. H.; McLaskey, V.; Parish, A.; Aranda, R.

    2008-12-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with PVC-backings (polyvinyl chloride, electrical tapes) derives from their use in construction of improvised explosive devices, drug packaging and in a variety of other illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics and chemical compositions of such tapes, traditional microscopic and chemical analysis of the tape backings and adhesives offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes from different manufacturers and products. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different tapes of the same product, we assessed the PVC-backings of 87 rolls of black electrical tape for their δ13C values. The adhesive on these tapes was physically removed with hexane, and plasticizers within the PVC tape backings were removed by three-20 minute extractions with chloroform. The δ13C values of the PVC tape backings ranged between -23.8 and -41.5 (‰ V-PDB). The carbon isotopic variation within a product (identical brand and product identification) is significant, based on five products with at least 3 rolls (ranges of 7.4‰ (n=3), 10.0‰ (n=6), 4.2‰ (n=16), 3.8‰ (n=6), and 11.5‰ (n=8), respectively). There was no measurable carbon isotope variation in regards to the following: a) along the length of a roll (4 samples from 1 roll); b) between the center and edge of a strip of tape (1 pair); c) between rolls assumed to be from the same lot of tape (2 pairs); d) between different rolls from the same batch of tape (same product purchased at the same time and place; 5 pairs); and e) between samples of a tape at room temperature, heated to 50° C and 80° C for 1 week. For each sample within the population of 87 tapes, carbon isotopes alone exclude 80 to 100% of the tapes as a potential match, with an average exclusion power of 92.5%, using a window of ± 0.4‰. Carbon isotope variations originate from variations in starting

  19. Groin dressing after cardiac catheterization. Comparison between light dressing with thin transparent tape (Tegaderm) and conventional tight/pressure dressing with an elastic adhesive bandage (Tensoplast).

    PubMed

    Boonbaichaiyapruck, S; Hutayanon, P; Chanthanamatta, P; Dumrongwatana, T; Intarayotha, N; Krisdee, V; Yamvong, S

    2001-12-01

    Post cardiac catheterization puncture site care is usually done with a tight pressure dressing by an elastic adhesive bandage (Tensoplast) due to the belief that it should prevent bleeding. The practice is uncomfortable to the patients. The authors compared a new way of dressing using light transparent tape (Tegaderm) to the conventional tight pressure one. 126 post coronary angiography patients were randomized to have their groins dressed either with Tensoplast or with Tegaderm. Patients ambulated 8 hours after the procedures. The groin was evaluated for pain, discomfort and bleeding complications. 49 per cent in the Tensoplast vs 26.9 per cent in the Tegaderm group experienced pain (p value of 0.01). 55.5 per cent in the Tensoplast group vs 11.1 per cent in the Tegaderm group reported discomfort. 4.7 per cent in the Tensoplast vs 1.6 per cent in the Tegaderm group developed bleeding or hematoma. Dressing of the puncture site after cardiac catheterization with Tegaderm was more comfortable than the conventional Tensoplast without any difference in bleeding complications.

  20. Tamper tape seals

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Undem, H.A.

    1994-07-01

    Tamper tapes are appealing for many applications due to their ease of use and relative robustness. Applications include seals for temporary area denial, protection of sensitive equipment, chain-of-custody audit trails, and inventory control practices. A next generation of adhesive tamper tapes is being developed that combines the best features of commercially available devices with additional state-of-the-art features in tamper indication, tamper-resistance, and counterfeit-resistance. The additional features are based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development (R&D) activities that were originally associated with preparations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). New features include rapid-set, chemical-cure adhesive systems that allow user-friendly application and layered levels of counterfeit-resistance based on unique {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} characteristics that can be accessed as desired.

  1. Five year magnetic tape for unattended satellite tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benn, G. S. L.; Gutfreund, K.

    1972-01-01

    The development and fabrication of a quantity of long life magnetic tape with properties selected specifically for unattended operation in spacecraft tape recorders was studied. A detailed analytical consideration of various binder systems was undertaken. This included the chemical aspects of the binders, cohesion and adhesion effects, stability and the mechanical and physical properties. The ability to form free films of these polymers and their combination with various oxide loadings and other additives allowed a rapid selection of four polymer candidates for a five year magnetic tape. Samples were evaluated under actual running conditions which included physical, magnetic, and extensive life testing. These sample tapes withstood 50,000 bidirectional tape passes under fairly harsh operating conditions.

  2. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  3. Rating underground pipeline tape and shrink sleeve coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Norsworthy, R.

    1999-11-01

    A rating system was developed for several coating types used for underground pipeline systems. Consideration included soil stress, adhesion, surface preparation, cathodic protection (CP) shielding, CP requirements, handling and construction, repair, field joint system, bends and other components, and the application process. Polyethylene- and polyvinyl chloride-backed tapes, woven polyolefin geotextile fabric (WGF)-backed tapes, hot-applied tapes, petrolatum- and wax-based tapes, and shrink sleeves were evaluated. WGF-backed tapes had the highest rating.

  4. Industrial Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Scotch Brand Tape 364 was developed for NASA by 3M Company to protect electrical instrumentation coils and fluid lines from rocket launch blast conditions. It is an aluminized glass cloth tape which can withstand very high temperatures, is easily applied to compound surfaces, has excellent solar energy reflectance, and does not present an electrostatic hazard. It has potential automotive, transportation, and building construction applications.

  5. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  6. Effect of orthodontic debonding and adhesive removal on the enamel - current knowledge and future perspectives - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Tomkowski, Robert; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    After orthodontic treatment, brackets are debonded and residual adhesive is removed, causing iatrogenic enamel damage. The aim of this study was to review the methods of orthodontic adhesive removal, find clear evidence, and provide a rationale for this procedure. A literature search was performed in PubMed, Dentistry and Oral Sciences, Scopus, Cochrane, Google, and Google Scholar using keywords: orthodontic adhesive removal, orthodontic debonding, orthodontic clean-up. Studies concerning human enamel roughness or loss from debonding and adhesive removal were considered. Forty-four full-text articles were analyzed and 3 were rejected after detailed reading; finally 41 papers were included. Fifteen qualitative studies, 13 studies based on indices of enamel surface, and 13 quantitative studies were found. No meta-analysis could be performed due to a lack of homogenous quantitative evidence. The most popular tools were tungsten carbide burs, which were faster and more effective than Sof-Lex discs, ultrasonic tools, hand instruments, rubbers, or composite burs. They remove a substantial layer of enamel and roughen its surface, but are less destructive than Arkansas stones, green stones, diamond burs, steel burs, and lasers. Multi-step Sof-Lex discs and pumice slurry are the most predictable enamel polishing tools. Arkansas stones, green stones, diamond burs, steel burs, and lasers should not be used for adhesive removal. The use of tungsten carbide bur requires multistep polishing. Further efforts should be made to find tools and methods for complete removal of adhesive remnants, minimizing enamel loss and achieving a smooth surface. PMID:25327612

  7. Evaluation of dry technology for removal of pellicle adhesive residue on advanced optical reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paracha, Shazad; Bekka, Samy; Eynon, Benjamin; Choi, Jaehyuck; Balooch, Mehdi; Varghese, Ivin; Hopkins, Tyler

    2013-09-01

    The fast pace of MOSFET scaling is accelerating the introduction of smaller technology nodes to extend CMOS beyond 20nm as required by Moore's law. To meet these stringent requirements, the industry is seeing an increase in the number of critical layers per reticle set as it move to lower technology nodes especially in a high volume manufacturing operation. These requirements are resulting in reticles with higher feature densities, smaller feature sizes and highly complex Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), built with using new absorber and pellicle materials. These rapid changes are leaving a gap in maintaining these reticles in a fab environment, for not only haze control but also the functionality of the reticle. The industry standard of using wet techniques (which uses aggressive chemicals, like SPM, and SC1) to repel reticles can result in damage to the sub-resolution assist features (SRAF's), create changes to CD uniformity and have potential for creating defects that require other means of removal or repair. Also, these wet cleaning methods in the fab environment can create source for haze growth. Haze can be controlled by: 1) Chemical free (dry) reticle cleaning, 2) In-line reticle inspection in fab, and 3) Manage the environment where reticles are stored. In this paper we will discuss a dry technique (chemical free) to remove pellicle adhesive residue from advanced optical reticles. Samsung Austin Semiconductors (SAS), jointly worked with Eco-Snow System (a division of RAVE N.P., Inc.) to evaluate the use of Dry Reactive Gas (DRG) technique to remove pellicle adhesive residue on reticles. This technique can significantly reduce the impact to the critical geometry in active array of the reticle, resulting in preserving the reticle performance level seen at wafer level. The paper will discuss results on the viability of this technique used on advanced reticles.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes

  9. Magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Harriss

    1992-01-01

    The move to visualization and image processing in data systems is increasing the demand for larger and faster mass storage systems. The technology of choice is magnetic tape. This paper briefly reviews the technology past, present, and projected. A case is made for standards and the value of the standards to users.

  10. Identification of carbonates as additives in pressure-sensitive adhesive tape substrate with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its application in three explosive cases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jungang; Feng, Jimin; Zhang, Wen; Shi, Rongguang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive tape is often used to bind explosive devices. It can become important trace evidence in many cases. Three types of calcium carbonate (heavy, light, and active CaCO(3)), which were widely used as additives in pressure-sensitive tape substrate, were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in this study. A Spectrum GX 2000 system with a diamond anvil cell and a deuterated triglycine sulfate detector was employed for IR observation. Background was subtracted for every measurement, and triplicate tests were performed. Differences in positions of main peaks and the corresponding functional groups were investigated. Heavy CaCO(3) could be identified from the two absorptions near 873 and 855/cm, while light CaCO(3) only has one peak near 873/cm because of the low content of aragonite. Active CaCO(3) could be identified from the absorptions in the 2800-2900/cm region because of the existence of organic compounds. Tiny but indicative changes in the 878-853/cm region were found in the spectra of CaCO(3) with different content of aragonite and calcite. CaCO(3) in pressure-sensitive tape, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and thermal analysis, can be easily identified using FTIR. The findings were successfully applied to three specific explosive cases and would be helpful in finding the possible source of explosive devices in future cases. PMID:22724657

  11. Carbon nanotube-based synthetic gecko tapes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2007-06-26

    We have developed a synthetic gecko tape by transferring micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays onto flexible polymer tape based on the hierarchical structure found on the foot of a gecko lizard. The gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm(2)) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micrometer-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak van der Waals interactions into high shear forces. We have demonstrated for the first time a macroscopic flexible patch that can be used repeatedly with peeling and adhesive properties better than the natural gecko foot. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  12. Pollution prevention in the magnetic tape industry: Waterborne coating formulations for video tape manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Fan, H.; Gogineni, N.; Jacobs, B.; Harrell, J.W.; Jefcoat, I.A.; Lane, A.M.; Nikles, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    A waterborne magnetic tape coating formulation was designed and used to prepare experimental magnetic tape samples in a pilot coating trial. The formulations contained a blend of a water-dispersed polyester and an ethylene/vinyl chloride copolymer emulsion, cross-linked with melamine-formaldehyde to give tensile properties (tensile strength 8.69 MPa Young`s modulus 245 MPa) that were comparable to a standard solvent-based binder composition. The pilot tape trial used existing processing equipment, including calendering and slitting. The tape had good magnetic properties and excellent adhesion between the pigmented magnetic layer and the base film, easily exceeding the 8 mm helical scan tape standard of 0.96 N peel force. An economic impact analysis for the case of sing the waterborne video tape coating process in a conventional tape manufacturing plant showed a significant decrease in costs for adopting the waterborne process.

  13. What's up with duct tape

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2005-03-01

    Recent research suggests that almost any tape can be made to work for a core-to-collar joint when perfectly applied. Given all the better choices available and all the problems that can and do occur in the field, we would not recommend that cloth-backed (natural) rubber-adhesive tapes be used, unless they can pass a suitable E2343 test. If visual degradation is an important factor, Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) and cloth-backed tapes should be avoided. While tapes that fail usually show visual degradation, the converse is not always true. We speculate, however, that visually degraded tapes are more likely to be susceptible to damage from vibration and other mechanical stresses. Conventional nylon straps are quite prone to fail at higher temperatures, but no systematic studies have yet been done across product classes. UL has proposed a new standard for straps, but the protocol for the current UL test does not, however, suggest that it would be a good indicator of durability. Products meeting the new UL standard for straps should be independently tested for the failure modes observed in the field and laboratory to determine if that test is a reasonable indicator of durability. Until a suitable test for strap durability exists, they recommend that only high temperature nylon or metal straps be used--especially in cases where tapes may be sensitive to mechanical stresses.

  14. Water soluble/dispersible and easy removable cationic adhesives and coating for paper recycling

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Yulin; Yan, Zegui

    2005-11-29

    The present invention is an adhesive or coating composition that is dispersible or dissolvable in water, making it useful in as a coating or adhesive in paper intended for recycling. The composition of the present invention is cationically charged thereby binding with the fibers of the paper slurry and thus, resulting in reduced deposition of adhesives on equipment during the recycling process. The presence of the composition of the present invention results in stronger interfiber bonding in products produced from the recycled fibers.

  15. French Tape Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Robert, Comp.

    This tape catalog is a complete list of all French-related titles appearing in the National Center for Audio Tapes 1974-76 catalog. Wherever possible, each tape is briefly described. Price and ordering information is included. (PMP)

  16. Tape transport mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; McDowell, William; Modjeski, Norbert S.; Keefe, Donald J.; Groer, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for transporting, in a stepwise manner, tape between a feed reel and takeup reel. An indexer moves across the normal path of the tape displacing it while the tape on the takeup reel side of the indexer is braked. After displacement, the takeup reel takes up the displaced tape while the tape on the feed reel side of the indexer is braked, providing stepwise tape transport in precise intervals determined by the amount of displacement caused by the indexer.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and application of water-soluble and easily removable cationic pressure-sensitive adhesives. Quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-30

    The Institute studied the adsorption of cationic pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) on wood fiber, and the buildup of PSA in a closed water system during paper recycling; the results are presented. Georgia Tech worked to develop an environmentally friendly polymerization process to synthesize a novel re-dispersible PSA by co-polymerizing an oil-soluble monomer (butyl acrylate) and a cationic monomer MAEPTAC; results are presented. At the University of Georgia at Athens the project focused on the synthesis of water-soluble and easily removable cationic polymer PSAs.

  18. Striped tape arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.; Katz, Randy H.

    1992-01-01

    A growing number of applications require high capacity, high throughput tertiary storage systems. How data striping ideas apply to arrays of magnetic tape drives is investigated. Data striping increases throughput and reduces response time for large accesses to a storage system. Striped magnetic tape systems are particularly appealing because many inexpensive magnetic tape drives have low bandwidth; striping may offer dramatic performance improvements for these systems. There are several important issues in designing striped tape systems: the choice of tape drives and robots, whether to stripe within or between robots, and the choice of the best scheme for distributing data on cartridges. One of the most troublesome problems in striped tape arrays is the synchronization of transfers across tape drives. Another issue is how improved devices will affect the desirability of striping in the future. The results of simulations comparing the performance of striped tape systems to non-striped systems are presented.

  19. Magnetic tape user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. B.; Lee, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    This User Guide provides a general introduction to the structure, use, and handling of magnetic tapes at Langley Research Center (LaRC). The topics covered are tape terminology, physical characteristics, error prevention and detection, and creating, using, and maintaining tapes. Supplementary documentation is referenced where it might be helpful. The documentation is included for the tape utility programs, BLOCK, UNBLOCK, and TAPEDMP, which are available at the Central Scientific Computing Complex at LaRC.

  20. Tape reading fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Commercially available roller type desk pad provides an efficient and orderly manner of handling rolled paper tapes for proofreading. The fixture, which is modified to accept Flex-O-Writer or similar tapes and roll them in either direction, reduces the chance of damaging or soiling the tapes through repeated handling.

  1. Cell adhesion, ammonia removal and granulation of autotrophic nitrifying sludge facilitated by N-acyl-homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Li, An-Jie; Hou, Bao-Lian; Li, Mei-Xi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, six N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules (C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL and 3-oxo-C10-HSL) were each dosed into a bioreactor and seeded using autotrophic nitrifying sludge (ANS). The effects of the AHLs on cell adhesion, nitrification and sludge granulation were investigated. The results indicated that the efficiencies of cell adhesion and ammonia removal both had a close correlation with the side chain length and β position substituent group of the AHLs. The best-performing AHL in terms of accelerating bacterial attached-growth was 3-oxo-C6-HSL, whereas C6-HSL outperformed the others in terms of the ammonia degradation rate. The addition of 3-oxo-C6-HSL or C6-HSL increased the biomass growth rate, microbial activity, extracellular proteins and nitrifying bacteria, which can accelerate the formation of nitrifying granules. Consequently, selecting AHL molecules that could improve bacteria in attached-growth mode and nitrification efficiency simultaneously will most likely facilitate the rapid granulation of nitrifying sludge.

  2. VLBA: Formatter to Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. E. E. R.

    Introduction; Why Magnetic Tape?; VLBI Recording Systems; The VLBA Data Format; Longitudinal Format; Transverse Track Format; Data and Non-Data Replacement; Track Width and Track Structure; The VLBA Formatter; Switch Board; Header Control Board; Transport Driver Board; Timing and Control Board; DataBuffer Board; Analysis Board; Magnetic Recording Fundamentals; Recording Losses; Wavelength Response; Head-to-Tape Contact and Tribology; The VLBA Recorder; The Tape Transport; The Headstack; The Headstack Positioner; Control Electronics; Signal Electronics and Eye Pattern; Characteristics and Limitations; Error Rate Versus Bit Density; Tape Thickness Interchange; Head Flying; Overwrite; Tracking Errors; Headlife and Humidity; Thin Tape and Edge Damage by Frictional Heating; Tape Reel and Shipping Canister; Future VLBI Recording Systems; Expansion Paths for the VLBA Formatter; Recorder Improvements; Thinner Tape; Higher Data Rates; Next Generation of Heads; Mark IV; Summary and Conclusions

  3. Pressure Sensitive Tape in the Manufacture of Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champneys, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ATK Launch Systems Inc. manufactures the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) for NASA's Space Shuttle program. They are used in pairs to launch the Space Shuttle. Pressure sensitive tape (PST) is used throughout the RSRM manufacturing process. A few PST functions are: 1) Secure labels; 2) Provide security seals; and 3) Protect tooling and flight hardware during various inert and live operations. Some of the PSTs used are: Cloth, Paper, Reinforced Teflon, Double face, Masking, and Vinyl. Factors given consideration for determining the type of tape to be used are: 1) Ability to hold fast; 2) Ability to release easily; 3) Ability to endure abuse; 4) Strength; and 5) Absence of adhesive residue after removal.

  4. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Vincent W.

    1994-01-01

    A device for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite.

  5. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  6. High density tape casting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is provided for casting thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be cast at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is cast against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry cast. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the casting surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before casting slurry against the chamber walls.

  7. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  8. Kinematics of Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes mathematics of the nonliner relationships between a constant-speed, capstan-driven magnetic tape transport mechanism and a constant-angular-velocity take-up reel. The relationship, derived from the sum of a partial, serves in recognition of a finite tape. Thickness can serve as an example of rotational kinematics. (Author/SK)

  9. Pressure Roller For Tape-Lift Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Eve

    1991-01-01

    Rolling device applies nearly constant, uniform pressure to surface. Simple tool exerts nearly constant pressure via compression of sheath by fixed amount. Pins hold wheels on cylinder and cylinder on tangs of handle. Cylinder and handle made of metal or plastic. Sheath press-fit or glued to cylinder. End pins attached to cylinder by adhesive or screw threads. Device intended for use in taking tape-lift samples of particulate contamination on surface.

  10. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Kim, Hyun Ho; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm(-2), so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1); the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) even after they were crumpled. PMID:26220874

  11. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Ho Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm-2, so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm2 V-1 s-1 the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm2 V-1 s-1 even after they were crumpled.

  12. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Ho Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm−2, so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm2 V−1 s−1; the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm2 V−1 s−1 even after they were crumpled. PMID:26220874

  13. 77 FR 13263 - Foreign-Trade Zone 109 - Watertown, NY; Amendment to Application; North American Tapes, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... number 48-2011 on July 15, 2011 (76 FR 43259, 7- 20-2011). The NAT facility (25 employees) is located... American Tapes, LLC (Textile Athletic Tape), Watertown, NY A request has been submitted to the Foreign... used to produce pressure-sensitive adhesive athletic tape with textile fabric backing material for...

  14. Kinesiology tape does not facilitate muscle performance: A deceptive controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Poon, K Y; Li, S M; Roper, M G; Wong, M K M; Wong, O; Cheung, R T H

    2015-02-01

    Kinesiology tape (KinTape) is a therapeutic tape without much understanding of its mechanism. KinTape claims to increase cutaneous stimulation, which facilitates motor unit firing, and consequently improves functional performance; however these, benefits could be due to placebo effects. This study investigated the true effects of KinTape by a deceptive, randomized, and controlled trial. Thirty healthy participants performed isokinetic testing of three taping conditions: true facilitative KinTape, sham KinTape, and no KinTape. The participants were blindfolded during the evaluation. Under the pretense of applying adhesive muscle sensors, KinTape was applied to their quadriceps in the first two conditions. Normalized peak torque, normalized total work, and time to peak torque were measured at two angular speeds (60°/s and 180°/s) and analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Participants were successfully deceived and they were ignorant about KinTape. No significant differences were found between normalized peak torque, normalized total work, and time to peak torque at 60°/s or 180°/s (p = 0.31-0.99) between three taping conditions. The results showed that KinTape did not facilitate muscle performance in generating higher peak torque, yielding a greater total work, or inducing an earlier onset of peak torque. These findings suggest that previously reported muscle facilitatory effects using KinTape may be attributed to placebo effects.

  15. Frictional and elastic energy in gecko adhesive detachment.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar

    2008-03-01

    Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1 m s(-1). Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive since it requires both strong attachment and easy, rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). We discovered that the energy required to detach adhering tokay gecko setae (W(d)) is modulated by the angle (theta) of a linear path of detachment. Gecko setae resist detachment when dragged towards the animal during detachment (theta = 30 degrees ) requiring W(d) = 5.0+/-0.86(s.e.) J m(-2) to detach, largely due to frictional losses. This external frictional loss is analogous to viscous internal frictional losses during detachment of pressure-sensitive adhesives. We found that, remarkably, setae possess a built-in release mechanism. Setae acted as springs when loaded in tension during attachment and returned elastic energy when detached along the optimal path (theta=130 degrees ), resulting in W(d) = -0.8+/-0.12 J m(-2). The release of elastic energy from the setal shaft probably causes spontaneous release, suggesting that curved shafts may enable easy detachment in natural, and synthetic, gecko adhesives.

  16. Use of nitrogen cryogun for separating duct tape and recovery of latent fingerprints with a powder suspension method.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James A; Crane, Jonathan Stuart

    2011-07-15

    Duct tape is sometimes recovered as physical evidence in crimes. The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of latent prints on the adhesive and non-adhesive surfaces of duct tape samples that were separated using three methods. Three hundred donor fingerprint impressions were deposited on duct tape. Sections of duct tape were affixed to sections of cardboard and a fingerprint placed on the non-adhesive surface of the tape. A second layer of duct tape was prepared and a fingerprint placed on the adhesive side of the tape and then the tape was affixed to the piece of tape on the cardboard. After a 24-h period, the samples were separated using gradual force, liquid nitrogen applied with a cryogun and an adhesive neutralizer to separate the layers of tape. The recovered fingerprints were processed with a fingerprint powder suspension method. The recovered fingerprint images were evaluated and rated as +1, +2, or +3. The liquid nitrogen spray separation method yielded the highest number of +3 prints.

  17. Caught (Unfortunately) on Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Recording class sessions so students can view them online is becoming routine on many campuses. But all that taping can lead to "uh-oh moments," such as when a professor's joke about the college dean ends up on YouTube, or a private comment to a student after class is inadvertently broadcast. Some lecture bloopers caught on tape are funny (well,…

  18. PHOTOELECTRIC CONTROL FOR TAPE POSITIONING

    DOEpatents

    Woody, J.W. Jr.

    1961-07-25

    A control system is described for producing control impulses which may be used to start, stop, and position a magnetic tape with respect to a transducer, and to locate discrete areas on the tape. Means are provided for positive identification of data blocks, exact positioning of the tape under the magnetic head, drive in either direction, accurate skip-over of imperfect regions of the tape, stopping the tape if equipment malfunction results in a failure to detect the block-identifying signals, and starting and stopping those parts of the tape between of the tape drive clutches.

  19. How to make sticky tapes stickier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponson, Laurent; Xia, Shuman; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; California Institute of Technology Team

    2011-03-01

    Thin film adhesives have become increasingly important in various applications such as packaging and coating, and we benefit daily of their adhesion properties by using various kinds of tapes. Despite the apparent simplicity of these systems, a certain number of questions remain open. In particular, important efforts have been deployed recently to understand the effect of the complex tridimensional and highly heterogeneous structure at the interface of some adhesives, such as the one encountered in nature like the geckos toes. Although inspired by these natural adhesives, we studied a much simpler system, and however largely unexplored: a thin film with spatially varying adhesion energy and elastic properties. We will show how these heterogeneities introduced at the microscale can generate quite unexpected macroscopic behaviors, and that one can this way design stronger adhesives with new properties. Beyond their practical interests, these systems involve long range elastic interactions and heterogeneities resulting in a rich and complex physics that will be illustrated through experimental examples and their theoretical interpretation.

  20. Atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy investigations and adhesion force measurements for elucidation of tungsten removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.J.; Cecchi, J.L.; Hetherington, D.L.

    1999-09-01

    We investigated various interactions between alumina and tungsten films that occur during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Atomic force microscopy surface topography measurements of post-CMP tungsten indicate that the roughness of the tungsten is independent of polish pressure and rotation rate. Pure mechanical abrasion is therefore an unlikely mechanism of material removal during CMP. Transmission electron microscopy images corroborate these results. The adhesion force between alumina and tungsten was measured in solution. The adhesive force increased with KIO{sub 3} concentration. Friction forces were measured in solution using lateral force microscopy. The friction force in buffered solutions was independent of KIO{sub 3} concentration. These results indicate that interactions other than purely mechanical interactions exist during CMP. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  1. Accelerated aging studies and environmental stability of prototype tamper tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Bunk, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the results of accelerated aging experiments (weathering) conducted on prototype tamper tapes bonded to a variety of surface materials. The prototype tamper tapes were based on the patented Confirm{reg_sign} tamper-indicating technology developed and produced by 3M Company. Tamper tapes bonded to surfaces using pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and four rapid-set adhesives were evaluated. The configurations of the PSA-bonded tamper tapes were 1.27-cm-wide Confirm{reg_sign} 1700 windows with vinyl underlay and 2.54-cm-wide Confirm{reg_sign} 1700 windows with vinyl and polyester underlays. The configurations of the rapid-set adhesive-bonded tamper tapes were 2.54-cm-wide Confirm{reg_sign} (1700, 1500 with and without primer, and 1300) windows with vinyl underlay. Surfaces used for bonding included aluminum, steel, stainless steel, Kevlar{reg_sign}, brass, copper, fiberglass/resin with and without gel coat, polyurethane-painted steel, acrylonitrile:butadiene:styrene plastic, polyester fiberglass board, Lexan polycarbonate, and cedar wood. Weathering conditions included a QUV cabinet (ultraviolet light at 60{degrees}C, condensing humidity at 40{degrees}C), a thermal cycling cabinet (-18{degrees}C to 46{degrees}C), a Weather-O-Meter (Xenon lamp), and exposure outdoors in Daytona Beach, Florida. Environmental aging exposures lasted from 7 weeks to 5 months. After exposure, the tamper tapes were visually examined and tested for transfer resistance. Tamper tapes were also exposed to a variety of chemical liquids (including organic solvents, acids, bases, and oxidizing liquids) to determine chemical resistance and to sand to determine abrasion resistance.

  2. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  3. Recording-tape position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoppet, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Device uses tachometer pulses from capstan and reset pulse from one reel to sense count of tach pulses per revolution of reel. Number of pulses is direct measurement of tape stack radius and is independent of tape speed or direction.

  4. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  5. New adhesive withstands temperature extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Seidenberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive, developed for high-temperature components aboard satellites, is useful at both high and low temperatures and exhibits low-vacuum volatility and low shrinkage. System uses polyfunctional epoxy with high aromatic content, low equivalent weight, and more compact polymer than conventional bisphenol A tape.

  6. Recovery of DNA from latent fingerprint tape lifts archived against matte acetate.

    PubMed

    Steadman, Shelly A; Hoofer, Steven R; Geering, Sarah C; King, Stephanie; Bennett, Marc A

    2015-05-01

    This study was driven by court order to examine methods to remove, extract, and STR-type potential DNA entrapped between latent fingerprint lifting tape and matte acetate that was collected from a 1977 crime scene. Results indicate that recovery of appreciable quantities of DNA is more challenging once adhesive is attached to matte acetate cards and even more difficult when fixed following black powder enhancement. STR amplification of extracts from entrapped fingermarks collected following the dusting/lifting procedure did not produce robust profiles, and extraneous peaks not expressed by print donors were detected for some samples. A hearing was set to argue whether there was DNA remaining to be tested, and if so, whether that DNA could be exculpatory in this postconviction matter. The studies herein provided the basis for the court's decision to not require the testing.

  7. Tape Placement Head for Applying Thermoplastic Tape to an Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, Ralph D. (Inventor); Funck, Steve B. (Inventor); Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor); Lamontia, Mark A. (Inventor); Johnson, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A tape placement head for applying thermoplastic tape to an object includes a heated feeder which guides the tape/tow to a heated zone. The heated zone has a line compactor having a single row of at least one movable heated member. An area compactor is located in the heated zone downstream from the line compactor. The area compactor includes a plurality of rows of movable feet which are extendable toward the tape/tow different distances with respect to each other to conform to the shape of the object. A shim is located between the heated compactors and the tape/tow. A chilled compactor is in a chilled zone downstream from the heated zone. The chilled zone includes a line chilled compactor and an area chilled compactor. A chilled shim is mounted between the chilled compactor and the tape/tow.

  8. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, Eric B.; Muller, Albert C.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  9. A terabyte linear tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A plan has been formulated and selected for a NASA Phase 2 SBIR award for using the VLBA tape recorder for recording general data. The VLBA tape recorder is a high-speed, high-density linear tape recorder developed for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) which is presently capable of recording at rates up to 2 Gbit/sec and holding up to 1 Terabyte of data on one tape, using a special interface and not employing error correction. A general-purpose interface and error correction will be added so that the recorder can be used in other high-speed, high-capacity applications.

  10. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  11. Multifilamentary niobium tin superconductor tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, P. H.; Coles, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    In the method proposed for fabricating multifilamentary Nb3Sn tape, filamentary superconducting paths are produced in standard commercial superconductor tape by chemical milling of separator slots through the Nb3Sn layer. The multifilament configuration features a matrix of ten 1.2 mm wide parallel helical superconducting paths along the length of the tape. The paths are spaced 0.4 mm apart. Tapes tested as small pancake coils demonstrated the integrity and continuity of the matrix, and showed that critical current was sustained in direct proportion to retained superconductor.

  12. [Recovery of blood traces with scenesafe FAST tape].

    PubMed

    Keller, Eva; Looser, Markus; Bieri, Hans-Peter; Kübler, Eric; Balitzki, Beate

    2012-01-01

    For complete and conclusive DNA profiling a sufficient amount of DNA must be available. For that, biological traces are recovered from crime scenes using special trace recovery material. The current method to collect biological traces for DNA analysis is to wipe them off with cotton swabs. However, for a few years the use of adhesive tapes has also been described for the recovery of evidence. In 2009, an adhesive tape was launched which was specially developed for the collection of biological traces. This product called Scenesafe FAST Tape (SSF) was investigated in this work to give recommendations for its use in evidence recovery. The results of this work show that the DNA can be extracted from the SSF very well. However, the tapes seem less suitable for direct use at the crime scene, as they are not flexible enough for adaptation to different crime scene conditions and the risk of contamination is higher than when collecting evidence with cotton swabs. Neither SSF nor cotton swabs are optimal for all requirements. The best method to recover biological evidence is still dependent on the surface material and the circumstances at the crime scene.

  13. An improved magnetic tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uber, P. W.

    1968-01-01

    Magnetic tape recorder employs a single capstan for simultaneously driving the supply and take-up reels in such a manner that the tape passing between the reels is kept under a predetermined constant tension. This recorder operates with little power and is sufficiently rugged to withstand the severe stresses encountered in high-altitude balloon flight tests.

  14. Centrally managed tapes at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Hell, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tapes at DESY are managed by the computer center and thus offer virtually unlimited storage space to the DESY computer center users. This paper describes the most recent version of the DESY tape management system, its predecessors having been in service for many years.

  15. ICI optical data storage tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Robert A.; Duffy, Joseph F.

    1991-01-01

    Optical data storage tape is now a commercial reality. The world's first successful development of a digital optical tape system is complete. This is based on the Creo 1003 optical tape recorder with ICI 1012 write-once optical tape media. Several other optical tape drive development programs are underway, including one using the IBM 3480 style cartridge at LaserTape Systems. In order to understand the significance and potential of this step change in recording technology, it is useful to review the historical progress of optical storage. This has been slow to encroach on magnetic storage, and has not made any serious dent on the world's mountains of paper and microfilm. Some of the reasons for this are the long time needed for applications developers, systems integrators, and end users to take advantage of the potential storage capacity; access time and data transfer rate have traditionally been too slow for high-performance applications; and optical disk media has been expensive compared with magnetic tape. ICI's strategy in response to these concerns was to concentrate its efforts on flexible optical media; in particular optical tape. The manufacturing achievements, media characteristics, and media lifetime of optical media are discussed.

  16. Sharpen Your Skills: Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Helen

    1984-01-01

    Three short articles provide tape recording instructions for braille transcribers and teachers of the visually handicapped, for transcribing instructional materials. The first article gives instructions for creating a "mini" table of contents, or index, to be inserted at the beginning of each tape. The second article provides instructions for…

  17. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  18. Tape/head interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Existing high energy tapes, high track density heads, and transport guidance techniques were evaluated and characterized to enable these technologies to be employed in future spacecraft recorders with high confidence. The results of these study efforts demonstrated tracking accuracy tape and head density that will support spacecraft recorders with data rates of a minimum of 150 Mbps and storage capacities ranging from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 11th bits. Seven high energy tapes of either .25 in width, 1.00 in width, or both, were tested. All tapes were tested at the same speed (30 ips) and the same packing density (33 KBI). The performance of all 1 in tapes was considered superior.

  19. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  20. Superconducting tape characterization under flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, A.; Suárez, P.; Cáceres, D.; Pérez, B.; Cordero, E.; Castaño, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electrotechnical applications of high temperature superconducting materials are limited by the difficulty of constructing classical windings with ceramic materials. While Bi-2223 tape may be a solution, it cannot be bent to radii less than a certain value since its superconducting capacity disappears. We describe an automated measurement system of the characteristics of this tape under flexion. It consists of a device that coils the tape over cylinders with different radii. At the same time, the parameters of its superconducting behaviour (e.g. resistance) are taken and processed. This system was developed at the “Benito Mahedero Laboratory of Superconducting Electrical Applications” in the University of Extremadura.

  1. String and Sticky Tape Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate the fundamentals of one dimensional kinematics such as Newton's third law of motion, and collision between bodies, using simple materials of marbles, strings, sticky tape, drinking straws, and rubber bands. (GA)

  2. Canadian Contemporary Issues on Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapter, Jean

    1974-01-01

    Four tapes with interviews with experts in the designated fields comprise the series: a) Canada's Foreign Relations, 1867-1919; b) Canada's Foreign Relations, 1919-1945; c) Canada and China, and d) Canadian Diplomacy and Foreign Policy. (JA)

  3. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  4. Tape Storage Optimization at BNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David; Lauret, Jérôme

    2011-12-01

    The BNL's RHIC and Atlas Computing Facility (RACF), is supporting the RHIC experiment as its Tier0 center and the Atlas/LHC as a Tier1 center. The RACF had to address the issue of efficient access to data stored to disk and tape storage. Randomly restoring files out of tapes destroys access performance to tape by causing too frequently, high latency and time consuming tape mount and dismount. BNL's mass storage system currently holds more than 16 PB of data on tapes, managed by HPSS. To restore files from HPSS, we make use of a scheduler software, called ERADAT. This scheduler system was originally based on a code from OakRidge National Lab, and then it was renamed to BNL Batch at 2005 after some major modifications and enhancements. The new BNL Batch, ERADAT, provides dynamic HPSS resource management, schedule jobs efficiently, enhanced visibility of real-time staging activities and advanced error handling, to maximize the tape staging performance. ERADAT is the interface between HPSS and other applications such as the DataCarousel, our home developed production system and dCache. Scalla/Xrootd MSS can also be interfaced with HPSS via DataCarousel. ERADAT has demonstrated great performance in BNL and other institute.

  5. Evaluation of non-specular reflecting silvered Teflon and filled adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, G.; Cox, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A non-specular silver-Teflon tape thermal control coating was tested to provide the data necessary to qualify it for use on the Space Shuttle Orbiter radiators. Effects of cure cycle temperature and pressure on optical and mechanical properties on the silver-Teflon tape were evaluated. The baseline Permacel P-223 adhesive, used with the specular silver-Teflon tape initially qualified for the Orbiter radiators, and four alternate metal-filled and unfilled adhesives were evaluated. Tests showed the cure process has no effect on the silver-Teflon optical properties, and that the baseline adhesive cure cycle gives best results. In addition the P-223 adhesive bond is more reproducible than the alternates, and the non-specular tape meets both the mechanical and the optical requirements of the Orbiter radiator coating specification. Existing Orbiter coating techniques were demonstrated to be effective in aplying the non-specular tape to a curved panel simulating the radiators. Author

  6. A new postoperative otoplasty dressing technique using cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Miriam; Foehn, Matthias; Wedler, Volker

    2010-04-01

    There are many techniques for cosmetic surgery of the ears and also many different procedures for postoperative treatment. The postoperative dressing is described as important for a successful outcome. We present our method of postoperative dressing in the form of liquid bonding. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives as liquid bonding agents are used for fixation of the pinna at the mastoid area. After 10-14 days the bonding can be easily removed. No huge dressings, tapes, or plasters are necessary. The patients are satisfied with the light dressing; they do not feel ashamed to appear in public. We have found this dressing technique to be simple and economical, especially because of the use of the bonding for skin closure before. It can be used after otoplasty with an anterior or a posterior approach.

  7. TAPE: A Biodegradable Hemostatic Glue Inspired by a Ubiquitous Compound in Plants for Surgical Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keumyeon; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Seonki

    2016-01-01

    This video describes the simplest protocol for preparing biodegradable surgical glue that has an effective hemostatic ability and greater water-resistant adhesion strength than commercial tissue adhesives. Medical adhesives have attracted great attention as potential alternative tools to sutures and staples due to their convenience in usage with minimal invasiveness. Although there are several protocols for developing tissue adhesives including those commercially available such as fibrin glues and cyanoacrylate-based materials, mostly they require a series of chemical syntheses of organic molecules, or complicated protein-purification methods, in the case of bio-driven materials (i.e., fibrin glue). Also, the development of surgical glues exhibiting high adhesive properties while maintaining biodegradability is still a challenge due to difficulties in achieving good performance in the wet environment of the body. We illustrate a new method to prepare a medical glue, known as TAPE, by the weight-based separation of a water-immiscible supramolecular aggregate formed after a physical mixing of a plant-derived, wet-resistant adhesive molecule, Tannic Acid (TA), and a well-known biopolymer, Poly(Ethylene) glycol (PEG). With our approach, TAPE shows high adhesion strength, which is 2.5-fold more than commercial fibrin glue in the presence of water. Furthermore, TAPE is biodegradable in physiological conditions and can be used as a potent hemostatic glue against tissue bleeding. We expect the widespread use of TAPE in a variety of medical settings and drug delivery applications, such as polymers for muco-adhesion, drug depots, and others. PMID:27341544

  8. Method for braze-joining spirally wound tapes to inner walls of heat exchanger tubes

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, Melton E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of fabricating heat exchanger tubes in which twisted tapes are utilized for promoting turbulence and heat transfer. The method of the present invention provides for the brazing of the tapes to the inner walls of the tubes for enhancing heat transfer between the fluid within the conduit and a fluid medium outside of the conduit by conduction through the tape. The braze joint of the present invention is coextensive with the tape over the entire length thereof within the conduit. The practice of the present invention is achieved by placing a filler wire of brazing metal along the tape at a location removed from the side walls and then heating the conduit and tape sufficiently to effect the displacement of the filler metal by wicking to the contact point between the tape and the conduit wall to form a braze joint coextensive with the length of the tape within the conduit. This arrangement provides maximum heat transfer and assures that the tape is in contact with the conduit over the entire common length thereof.

  9. Method for braze-joining spirally wound tapes to inner walls of heat exchanger tubes

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, M.E.

    1982-09-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of fabricating heat exchanger tubes in which twisted tapes are utilized for promoting turbulence and heat transfer. The method of the present invention provides for the brazing of the tapes to the inner walls of the tubes for enhancing heat transfer between the fluid within the conduit and a fluid medium outside of the conduit by conduction through the tape. The braze joint of the present invention is coextensive with the tape over the entire length thereof within the conduit. The practice of the present invention is achieved by placing a filler wire of brazing metal along the tape at a location removed from the side walls and then heating the conduit and tape sufficiently to effect the displacement of the filler metal by wicking to the contact point between the tape and the conduit wall to form a braze joint coextensive with the length of the tape within the conduit. This arrangement provides maximum heat transfer and assures that the tape is in contact with the conduit over the entire common length thereof.

  10. Fabrication of Yb-123 Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Athur, S.; Balachandran, U.; Salama, K.

    2000-11-15

    While Bi-2223 tapes have been the workhorses of the superconductor industry, their poor performance in applied magnetic fields restrict their use to below 30 K. Melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 PIT tapes offers a simple and scalable technique for fabricating long-length HTS conductors capable of being used at 77 K. Under reduced oxygen partial pressure, the peritectic temperature of Yb-123 is below the melting point of Ag, and this facilitates the adaptation of melt-texturing methods for fabricating these tapes. The effect of melt-processing temperature on current density was also explored; a temperature of 965 C yielded optimal critical current values. The critical current density achieved at 4.2 K was 20,000 A/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to a critical current of 52 A. Based on the above results, an optimal processing zone for melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes was determined. These results hold promise for melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes as an alternative to Bi-2223 PIT technology.

  11. Magnetic evaluation of advanced metal-evaporated tape in an advanced linear tape drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Anthony D.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2007-01-01

    Demand for increased data storage has resulted in the development of various types of magnetic tapes. To achieve higher recording density, tape manufacturers are developing thin-film tapes, such as advanced metal-evaporated (AME) tape, for use in linear tape drives. In recent studies, these new AME tapes have demonstrated sustainable mechanical durability at low tensions suitable for use in linear tape drives. An evaluation of the magnetic performance of these AME tapes including the impact of tape cupping and initial edge quality was the goal of this study. Head output, dropouts, head-tape interface friction, and lateral tape motion (LTM) were monitored throughout testing. As track widths continue to narrow, LTM has become one of the critical limitations of magnetic performance. To more accurately measure LTM during drive development, a new method involving the output voltage of a head-read element that has been adjusted to be halfway off the recorded track on tape was implemented (LTM M). It is shown that positively cupped AME tapes will result in similar head output and fewer dropouts than the current MP tapes. The negatively cupped AME sample produced the lowest head output data and the highest amount of dropouts of all the tapes evaluated in this investigation. All the tapes evaluated demonstrated similar values of LTM when monitored at the center of the tape. When LTM was monitored at the lower edge of the tape, the positively cupped AME tape with the worst relative edge contour length resulted in the highest LTM M. As found in previous studies, AME tapes produced slightly lower values of coefficient of friction than the MP tapes. From this investigation, positively cupped AME tapes with good initial relative edge contour length are recommended for use in linear tape drives, similar to those used in this study.

  12. Tape edge study in a linear tape drive with single-flanged guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldade, Anton V.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2004-05-01

    Improved tape guiding and tape dimensional stability are essential for magnetic tape linear recoding formats to take advantage of vastly increased track density and thereby achieve higher storage capacities. Tape guiding is dependent on numerous parameters, such as type of the guides and tape path geometry, quality of virgin tape edge, drive operating parameters (e.g., tape speed and tape tension), mechanical properties of the tape, and tape geometry (e.g., cupping and curvature). The objective of the present study is to evaluate guiding and tribological performance of single-flanged guides with porous air bearings in a linear tape drive. A comparison of guiding performance of the dual flanged stationary guides and single-flanged guides with porous air bearings is performed. The effect of tape path geometry, drive operating conditions (speed and tension) and tape edge quality of factory-slit tapes on tape guiding are evaluated during short-term tests. A lateral force measurement technique is used to measure the force exerted by the tape edge on the guide flange. A technique for the lateral tape motion measurement is used to study the effect of continuous sliding on tape guiding. Wear tests up to 5000 cycles are conducted and coefficient of friction and lateral tape motion are monitored to study the effect of drive operating conditions (speed and tension), edge quality of factory-slit tapes and tape thickness on tape guiding. Optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are employed to study and quantify the quality of tape edge.

  13. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    DOEpatents

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  14. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  15. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  16. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  17. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  18. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  19. A Study of Audio Tape: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reen, Noel K.

    1975-01-01

    To evaluate reel audio tape, tests were performed to identify: signal-to-noise ratio, total harmonic distortion, dynamic response, frequency response, biased and virgin tape noise, dropout susceptibility and oxide coating uniformity. (SCC)

  20. Sharpen Your Skills: Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Helen

    1983-01-01

    Three short articles provide tape recording instructions for braille transcribers and teachers of the visually handicapped, for transcribing instructional materials. The first article gives guidelines for transcribing special formats such as typing books. The second article tells how to give verbal instructions for diagraming sentences and other…

  1. A Study of Audio Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reen, Noel K.

    1975-01-01

    This is part I of a report on a study comparing reel and cassette tapes for signal-to-noise ration, total harmonic distortion, dynamic response, frequency response, bias and virgin noise and oxide coating uniformity. Test equipment and procedures are described and results are discussed. Charts detail research findings. (CHK)

  2. EROS to universal tape conversion processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, S. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The function of the EROS processor is to allow a user to select a specific area from a full frame LANDSAT image which is written on tape in the EROS format. The area of interest is read from the EROS formatted tape and converted to the JSC Universal format and written onto another tape. This tape can then be read by the IMDACS processing system and normal analysis can be performed.

  3. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females.

  4. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  5. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  6. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    1993-01-01

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  7. Seal for permitting transfer of tape from one pressure region to a region of substantially different pressure

    DOEpatents

    Carter, H. Kennon; Mlekodaj, Ronald L.

    1977-01-01

    A seal is provided for allowing a thin flexible tape to be pulled from a high vacuum region (less than 10.sup.-.sup.6 torr) into atmospheric pressure. The tape first passes through a slit in an elastomer and thence through a pool of vacuum pump fluid into a differentially pumped volume. A second slit in an elastomer is the final seal element prior to exit of the tape to atmospheric pressure. The vacuum seal is utilized in a system for the rapid removal of samples, implanted in the surface of the tape, from a vacuum system to atmospheric pressure.

  8. The effect of kinesio taping in forward bending of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping(®) technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping(®) influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility.

  9. Gecko-inspired carbon nanotube-based self-cleaning adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, P M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The design of reversible adhesives requires both stickiness and the ability to remain clean from dust and other contaminants. Inspired by gecko feet, we demonstrate the self-cleaning ability of carbon nanotube-based flexible gecko tapes.

  10. Effect of tape recording on perturbation measures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Lin, E; Hanson, D G

    1998-10-01

    Tape recorders have been shown to affect measures of voice perturbation. Few studies, however, have been conducted to quantitatively justify the use or exclusion of certain types of recorders in voice perturbation studies. This study used sinusoidal and triangular waves and synthesized vowels to compare perturbation measures extracted from directly digitized signals with those recorded and played back through various tape recorders, including 3 models of digital audio tape recorders, 2 models of analog audio cassette tape recorders, and 2 models of video tape recorders. Signal contamination for frequency perturbation values was found to be consistently minimal with digital recorders (percent jitter = 0.01%-0.02%), mildly increased with video recorders (0.05%-0.10%), moderately increased with a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.15%), and most prominent with a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.24%). Recorder effect on amplitude perturbation measures was lowest in digital recorders (percent shimmer = 0.09%-0.20%), mildly to moderately increased in video recorders and a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.25%-0.45%), and most prominent in a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.98%). The effect of cassette tape material, length of spooled tape, and duration of analysis were also tested and are discussed.

  11. 41 CFR 101-26.508 - Electronic data processing (EDP) tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate band).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... processing (EDP) tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate band). 101-26.508 Section 101-26.508... Programs § 101-26.508 Electronic data processing (EDP) tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate band). Procurement by Federal agencies of EDP tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate...

  12. Digital tape unit test facility software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. T.

    1971-01-01

    Two computer programs are described which are used for the collection and analysis of data from the digital tape unit test facility (DTUTF). The data are the recorded results of skew tests made on magnetic digital tapes which are used on computers as input/output media. The results of each tape test are keypunched onto an 80 column computer card. The format of the card is checked and the card image is stored on a master summary tape via the DTUTF card checking and tape updating system. The master summary tape containing the results of all the tape tests is then used for analysis as input to the DTUTF histogram generating system which produces a histogram of skew vs. date for selected data, followed by some statistical analysis of the data.

  13. The spectroscopic detection of drugs of abuse in fingerprints after development with powders and recovery with adhesive lifters.

    PubMed

    West, Matthew J; Went, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The application of powders to fingerprints has long been established as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints. Fingerprints developed in situ at a crime scene routinely undergo lifting with specialist tapes and are then stored in evidence bags to allow secure transit and also to preserve the chain of evidence. In a previous study we have shown that exogenous material within a fingerprint can be detected using Raman spectroscopy following development with powders and lifting with adhesive tapes. Other reports have detailed the use of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints including cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. This study involves the application of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints for fingerprints that had been treated with powders and also subsequently lifted with adhesive tapes. Samples of seized ecstasy, cocaine, ketamine and amphetamine were supplied by East Sussex Police and by the TICTAC unit at St. Georges Hospital Tooting. Contaminated fingerprints were deposited on clean glass slides. The application of aluminium or iron based powders to contaminated fingerprints did not interfere with the Raman spectra obtained for the contaminants. Contaminated fingerprints developed with powders and then lifted with lifting tapes were also examined. The combination of these two techniques did not interfere with the successful analysis. The lifting process was repeated using hinge lifters. As the hinge lifters exhibited strong Raman bands the spectroscopic analysis was more complex and an increase in the number of exposures to the detector allowed for improved clarification. Spectral subtraction was performed to remove peaks due to the hinge lifters using OMNIC software. Raman spectra of developed and lifted fingerprints recorded through evidence bags were obtained and it was found that the detection process was not compromised. Although the application of

  14. The spectroscopic detection of drugs of abuse in fingerprints after development with powders and recovery with adhesive lifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Matthew J.; Went, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The application of powders to fingerprints has long been established as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints. Fingerprints developed in situ at a crime scene routinely undergo lifting with specialist tapes and are then stored in evidence bags to allow secure transit and also to preserve the chain of evidence. In a previous study we have shown that exogenous material within a fingerprint can be detected using Raman spectroscopy following development with powders and lifting with adhesive tapes. Other reports have detailed the use of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints including cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. This study involves the application of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints for fingerprints that had been treated with powders and also subsequently lifted with adhesive tapes. Samples of seized ecstasy, cocaine, ketamine and amphetamine were supplied by East Sussex Police and by the TICTAC unit at St. Georges Hospital Tooting. Contaminated fingerprints were deposited on clean glass slides. The application of aluminium or iron based powders to contaminated fingerprints did not interfere with the Raman spectra obtained for the contaminants. Contaminated fingerprints developed with powders and then lifted with lifting tapes were also examined. The combination of these two techniques did not interfere with the successful analysis. The lifting process was repeated using hinge lifters. As the hinge lifters exhibited strong Raman bands the spectroscopic analysis was more complex and an increase in the number of exposures to the detector allowed for improved clarification. Spectral subtraction was performed to remove peaks due to the hinge lifters using OMNIC software. Raman spectra of developed and lifted fingerprints recorded through evidence bags were obtained and it was found that the detection process was not compromised. Although the application of

  15. Digital terrain tapes: user guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    DMATC's digital terrain tapes are a by-product of the agency's efforts to streamline the production of raised-relief maps. In the early 1960's DMATC developed the Digital Graphics Recorder (DGR) system that introduced new digitizing techniques and processing methods into the field of three-dimensional mapping. The DGR system consisted of an automatic digitizing table and a computer system that recorded a grid of terrain elevations from traces of the contour lines on standard topographic maps. A sequence of computer accuracy checks was performed and then the elevations of grid points not intersected by contour lines were interpolated. The DGR system produced computer magnetic tapes which controlled the carving of plaster forms used to mold raised-relief maps. It was realized almost immediately that this relatively simple tool for carving plaster molds had enormous potential for storing, manipulating, and selectively displaying (either graphically or numerically) a vast number of terrain elevations. As the demand for the digital terrain tapes increased, DMATC began developing increasingly advanced digitizing systems and now operates the Digital Topographic Data Collection System (DTDCS). With DTDCS, two types of data elevations as contour lines and points, and stream and ridge lines are sorted, matched, and resorted to obtain a grid of elevation values for every 0.01 inch on each map (approximately 200 feet on the ground). Undefined points on the grid are found by either linear or or planar interpolation.

  16. Light coupling in a Scotch tape waveguide via an integrated metal diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor

    2016-01-15

    We report on the first demonstration of a flexible optical waveguide interconnecting device made of a general purpose pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape embedding nanopatterned Al thin film diffractive grating couplers. The diffractive elements allow selected broadband light to be perpendicularly coupled/decoupled into/from a PSA tape waveguide in which they are integrated. Waveguide losses and coupling efficiency are evaluated. The versatility and low cost of the used materials make the presented configuration very promising for cost-effective, ready-to-use short-distance optical interconnections.

  17. A microtensile bond strength evaluation of a single-bottle adhesive to caries-affected dentin in conventional versus minimal invasive caries removal techniques: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Saraswathi V; Shashikiran, N D; Chaitra, N L; Syed, Ghousia

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: The current dental restorative concepts are characterized by an increased effort towards a less invasive treatment of carious lesions. Minimally invasive cavity preparation techniques are intended to preserve as much sound enamel and dentin as possible, during the treatment of carious lesions. The objective of this in vitro study is to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of single-etch adhesives (Adper Easy one) on caries-affected dentin, following three different caries removal techniques, namely, Carisolv, Conventional carbide bur at slow speed, and aqueous calcium hydroxide. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 teeth were divided into three groups and arranged with 10 samples in each group - round bur (Group A), Carisolv (Group B), Aqueous calcium hydroxide (Group C). Following caries excavation by using the three above -mentioned techniques, application of the bonding agent and composite buildup was done. Following sectioning of the samples with the help of a hard tissue microtome, Group A, B, and C were again trimmed into an hour-glass shape, maintaining a width of 1.2 mm in the center of an hour glass. These were debonded under a microtensile load at failure, using the Instron Universal Testing Machine. Results: There was a significantly lower microtensile bond strength in the group where the caries was removed by the round bur, as compared to the group where the caries was removed by using Carisolv and calcium hydroxide, which showed higher microtensile bond strength, that is, the significant pairing of Groups were Group A to Group B and Group A to Group C, exhibiting statistically significant difference with a P < 0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference between Group B and Group C. Interpretation and Conclusion: Carisolv and aqueous calcium hydroxide have proven to be good methods of caries removal for achieving a higher microtensile bond strength of the single-bottle self-etch adhesive on dentin. PMID

  18. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-01

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  19. Investigation of current transport normal and parallel to the tape plane in BSCCO/Ag tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Maley, M.P.; Cho, J.H.; Willis, J.O.; Bulaevskii, L.N.

    1995-07-01

    We have performed transport, resistivity and critical current measurements on Bi-2223/Ag and Bi-2212/Ag tapes with current directions both parallel and perpendicular to the tape plane in magnetic fields up to 7 T and 50tape normal (nominal c-axis in a textured tape) is metallic, scales with the inplane resistivity at all fields and is dramatically reduced from single crystal c-axis values. Similarly, the critical current along the tape normal exhibits magnetic field and field orientation dependences similar to those for current flow along the tape plane. These results indicate that current flow along CuO{sub 2} planes dominates current transport even along the tape normal in highly textured tapes.

  20. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  1. Patterned Taping: A High-Efficiency Soft Lithographic Method for Universal Thin Film Patterning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangyoon; Park, Sang Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Cho, Illhun; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Park, Soo Young

    2016-03-22

    As a universal lithographic technique for microscale/nanoscale film patterns, we develop a strategy for the use of soft lithographically patterned pressure-sensitive tape (patterned tape) as a pattern-transporting stamp material. Patterning was successfully implemented through the selective detachment and/or attachment of various thin films, including organic and metallic layers demanding no subsequent physical, thermal, or chemical treatment, as this incurs the risk of the deformation of the thin film and the deterioration of its functionalities. Its features of universal adhesion and flexibility enable pressure-sensitive tapes to form patterns on a variety of surfaces: organic, polymeric, and inorganic surfaces as well as flat, curved, uneven, and flexible substrates. Moreover, the proposed technique boasts the unique and distinct advantages of short operation time, supreme patterning yield, and multilayer stacking capability, which suggest considerable potential for their application to advanced optoelectronic device fabrication.

  2. Roles of Poly(propylene Glycol) During Solvent-Based Lamination of Ceramic Green Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppakarn, Nitinat; Ishida, Hatsuo; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Solvent lamination for alumina green tapes is readily accomplished using a mixture of ethanol, toluene and poly(propylene glycol). After lamination, the PPG is clearly present as a discrete film at the interface between the laminated tapes. This condition, however, does not generate delamination during firing. Systematic sets of experiments are undertaken to determine the role of PPG in the lamination process and, specifically, the mechanism by which it is redistributed during subsequent processing. PPG slowly diffuses through the organic binder film at room temperature. The PPG diffusion rapidly increases as temperature is increased to 80 C. The key to the efficiency of adhesives during green-tape lamination is mutual solubility of the nonvolatile component of the glue and the base polymeric binder.

  3. Patterned Taping: A High-Efficiency Soft Lithographic Method for Universal Thin Film Patterning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangyoon; Park, Sang Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Cho, Illhun; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Park, Soo Young

    2016-03-22

    As a universal lithographic technique for microscale/nanoscale film patterns, we develop a strategy for the use of soft lithographically patterned pressure-sensitive tape (patterned tape) as a pattern-transporting stamp material. Patterning was successfully implemented through the selective detachment and/or attachment of various thin films, including organic and metallic layers demanding no subsequent physical, thermal, or chemical treatment, as this incurs the risk of the deformation of the thin film and the deterioration of its functionalities. Its features of universal adhesion and flexibility enable pressure-sensitive tapes to form patterns on a variety of surfaces: organic, polymeric, and inorganic surfaces as well as flat, curved, uneven, and flexible substrates. Moreover, the proposed technique boasts the unique and distinct advantages of short operation time, supreme patterning yield, and multilayer stacking capability, which suggest considerable potential for their application to advanced optoelectronic device fabrication. PMID:26863506

  4. FGGE/ERBZ tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The FGGE/ERBZ tape contains 5 parameters which are extracted and reformatted from the Nimbus-7 ERB Zonal Means Tape. There are three types of files on a FGGE/ERBZ tape: a tape header file, and data files. Physical characteristics, gross format, and file specifications are given. A sample tape check/document printout (shipping letter) is included.

  5. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  6. Pocket-size manual tape reader device aids computer tape checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odle, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Pocket-size plastic manual tape reader device aids in reading, interpreting, and correcting binary and octal coded punched tapes. The coded information is more easily read if the color of the back plate contrasts sharply with that of the tape.

  7. Gecko-Inspired Carbon Nanotube-Based Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Goyal, Anubha; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Nature has developed hierarchical hairy structure on the wall-climbing gecko's foot, consisting of microscopic hairs called setae, which further split into hundreds of smaller structures called spatulas. In the last five years, numerous attempts to mimic gecko foot-hair using polymer soft molding and photolithography methods have been reported. However, most of these polymer-based synthetic gecko hairs fall short of the clinging ability of geckos. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) have shown strong adhesion at nanometer scale. Here, we present our work on developing CNT-based macroscopic flexible tape mimicking the hierarchical structure found on gecko's foot. The synthetic gecko tape is made by transferring aligned CNT array onto flexible polymer tape. The unpatterned CNT-gecko tape can support a shear force stress similar to gecko foot (10 N/cm^2). The supported shear stress increase by a factor of four, when we use micro-patterned CNT patches (50 to 500 μm). We find that both setae (replicated by CNT bundles) and spatulas (individual CNT) are necessary to achieve large macroscopic shear adhesion. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  8. Fabrication of Polyimide-Matrix/Carbon and Boron-Fiber Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    The term HYCARB denotes a hybrid composite of polyimide matrices reinforced with carbon and boron fibers. HYCARB and an improved process for fabricating dry HYCARB tapes have been invented in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, strong composite materials for aerospace vehicles. Like other composite tapes in this line of development, HYCARB tapes are intended to be used to build up laminated structures having possibly complex shapes by means of automated tow placement (ATP) - a process in which a computer-controlled multiaxis machine lays down prepreg tape or tows. The special significance of the present process for making dry HYCARB for ATP is that it contributes to the reduction of the overall cost of manufacturing boron-reinforced composite-material structures while making it possible to realize increased compression strengths. The present process for making HYCARB tapes incorporates a "wet to dry" process developed previously at Langley Research Center. In the "wet to dry" process, a flattened bundle of carbon fiber tows, pulled along a continuous production line between pairs of rollers, is impregnated with a solution of a poly(amide acid) in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), then most of the NMP is removed by evaporation in hot air. In the present case, the polyamide acid is, more specifically, that of LaRC. IAX (or equivalent) thermoplastic polyimide, and the fibers are, more specifically, Manganite IM7 (or equivalent) polyacrylonitrile- based carbon filaments that have a diameter of 5.2 m and are supplied in 12,000-filament tows. The present process stands in contrast to a prior process in which HYCARB tape was made by pressing boron fibers into the face of a wet carbon-fiber/ poly(amide acid) prepreg tape . that is, a prepreg tape from which the NMP solvent had not been removed. In the present process, one or more layer(s) of side-by-side boron fibers are pressed between dry prepreg tapes that have been prepared by the aforementioned gwet to dry h

  9. Design of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong attachment and easy-removal properties: a numerical analysis of peel-zone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Wan, Jin; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu; Tian, Yu

    2012-10-01

    Despite successful fabrication of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong adhesion forces, how to achieve an easy-removal property becomes a major concern that may restrict the wide applications of these bio-inspired surfaces. Research on how geckos detach rapidly has inspired the design of novel adhesive surfaces with strong and reversible adhesion capabilities, which relies on further fundamental understanding of the peeling mechanisms. Recent studies showed that the peel-zone plays an important role in the peeling off of adhesive tapes or fibrillar surfaces. In this study, a numerical method was developed to evaluate peel-zone deformation and the resulting mechanical behaviour due to the deformations of fibrillar surfaces detaching from a smooth rigid substrate. The effect of the geometrical parameters of pillars and the stiffness of backing layer on the peel-zone and peel strength, and the strong attachment and easy-removal properties have been analysed to establish a design map for bio-inspired fibrillar surfaces, which shows that the optimized strong attachment and easy-removal properties can vary by over three orders of magnitude. The adhesion and peeling design map established provides new insights into the design and development of novel gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces.

  10. TReqS: The Tape REQuest Scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Jonathan; Gómez Casanova, Andrés

    2011-12-01

    TReqS is a new layer in the storage infrastructure at CCIN2P3 controlling the read operations for data stored on tapes in HPSS (a HSM) by centralizing all requests. The development and deployment of TReqS at CCIN2P3 has brought major advances in data access services on several aspects. First, by sorting and scheduling tape mounts, we radically reduce the waiting time due to media movements in the tape library. Second, in a mutualised environment where tape drives are globally available to all users, TReqS ensures the fair share of the drives. Finaly, TReqS softens the impact of unpredictable grid jobs and transfers on the actual tape library and efficiently masks the data access complexity to the end user.

  11. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  12. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of surgical dressing without a disinfectant. The device is used to cover and protect wounds, to hold together the skin edges of a wound, to support an injured part of the body, or to secure objects to...

  13. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  14. Tape transfer sectioning of tissue microarrays introduces nonspecific immunohistochemical staining artifacts.

    PubMed

    Catchpoole, D; Mackie, N; McIver, S; Chetcuti, A; Henwood, A; Graf, N; Arbuckle, S

    2011-12-01

    Tissue microarrays place tens to hundreds of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue cores into a paraffin block in a systematic grid pattern that permits their simultaneous evaluation in a single section. The fragmented nature of the tissue cores often makes sectioning of tissue microarrays difficult so that the resulting disks of tissue lose their shape, fracture or fall out of the paraffin section altogether. We have evaluated an alternative sectioning protocol for stabilizing the tissue microarray surface by placing an adhesive tape "window" over the face of the paraffin block prior to sectioning. Once sectioned, the tape/sections are transferred directly onto coated microscope slides, thereby avoiding routine floating of sections on a water bath. After sectioning with either the tape transfer or standard protocols, slides were stained either using hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemistry using antibodies to S-100 protein and the tissue specific antigens, keratin (AE1/3) and the leukocyte common antigen CD45. We found that the tape method produced thicker sections that were darker and more densely packed with loss of tissue definition compared to sections prepared using water bath flotation. Quantitative image analysis of immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the tape method produced a higher incidence of nonspecific staining, which raised the potential for false positive staining.

  15. Mechanical stabilization of BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.G.; Grey, D.A.; Mantone, A.

    1996-12-31

    A system to provide mechanical stabilization to high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape by laminating 0.081 mm thick, spring hard, copper foil to both sides with lead-tin eutectic solder has been successfully optimized. This system has been applied as a method to create a strong, windable composite from pure silver BSCCO tapes with a minimum of critical current (I{sub c}) degradation. The {open_quotes}as received{close_quotes} conductor is evaluated for physical consistency of width and thickness over the 3000 meters that were later strengthened, insulated and wound into a demonstration coil. Electrical degradation in the strengthened tape as a result of lamination was found to average 24 percent with a range from 4 to 51 percent. This was less than the degradation that would have occurred in an unstrengthened tape during subsequent insulation and coil winding processes. Additional work was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the strengthened tapes. The copper can double the ultimate tensile strength of the pure silver tapes. Additionally, pure silver and dispersion strengthened silver matrix tapes are laminated with 0.025 mm thick copper and 304 stainless steel foil to investigate minimization of the cross sectional area of the strengthening component. The stainless steel can increase the UTS of the pure silver tapes sixfold. Metallography is used to examine the laminate and the conductor. Mechanical properties and critical currents of these tapes are also reported both before and after strengthening. The I{sub c} is also measured as a function of strain on the laminated tapes.

  16. Demonstration project cuts red tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Results from a demonstration project aimed at cutting red tape in federal grants for basic research at universities are "very encouraging" so far, according to Don I. Phillips, executive director of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. The roundtable is coordinating the experimental effort, with the participation of five major federal agencies as well as the Florida state university system and the University of Miami (a private institution in Coral Gables, Fla.).Under the project, special conditions apply to grants from the participating agencies to individual researchers at the participating universities: Investigators do not have to ask the agency's permission for changes in budget allocations, purchases of permanent equipment, or foreign travel. Grant money can be spent up to a year after the grant ends without a special request. Under this plan, researchers, with agency approval, can also ask to have their entire research program covered as a single administrative entity, rather than as several individual projects.

  17. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  18. Adhesive-based bonding technique for PDMS microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C Shea; Abate, Adam R

    2013-02-21

    We present a simple and inexpensive technique for bonding PDMS microfluidic devices. The technique uses only adhesive tape and an oven; plasma bonders and cleanroom facilities are not required. It also produces channels that are immediately hydrophobic, allowing formation of aqueous-in-oil emulsions.

  19. STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 3 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape'. This video, Part 3 of 4, shows footage from flight days 6 through 9 of STS-110. The spacecrew includes Michael J. Bloomfield, Commander Stephen N. Frick, Pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist; Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist; Ellen Ochoa, Mission Specialist; Lee M.E. Morin, Mission Specialist; Rex J. Walheim, Mission Specialist. On flight day 6, Ross and Morin conduct an EVA (extravehicular activity) to secure a tripod like strut to the S0 Truss of the International Space Station (ISS). They also move the drag link and keel pins from one face of the Truss to the other to free the rail on the truss for a railcar to move. Smith installs a camera onto the CANADARM robotic arm on flight day 7, and on flight day 8 the restraints are removed from the railcar connected to the S0 Truss in preparation for checkout. The checkout of the railcar is shown, including its inaugural run. Ross and Morin conduct another EVA on flight day 9 to complete the outfitting of the S0 Truss Structure. Notable footage includes views of Ross and Morin at work from the helmet-mounted camera on Ross' EVA suit, including close-ups of the pistol grip tool, CANADARM 2 onboard the ISS lit at sunrise, a 'diamond ring' effect formed by the Sun between the Earth's limb and the ISS, a brief shot of the Yucatan peninsula, and a end-to-end pan down the length of the ISS. The activities from other flights days can be seen on "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002137575), "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137573), and "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137517).

  20. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  1. High-Density-Tape Casting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Centrifuge packs solids from slurry into uniform, dense layer. New system produces tapes of nearly theoretical packing density. Centrifugal system used to cast thin tapes for capacitors, fuel cells, and filters. Cylindrical rotary casting chamber mounted on high-speed bearings and connected to motor. Liquid for vapor-pressure control and casting slurry introduced from syringes through rotary seal. During drying step, liquid and vapor vented through feed tubes or other openings. Laminated tapes produced by adding more syringes to cast additional layers of different materials.

  2. Kinesio Taping Fundamentals for the Equine Athlete.

    PubMed

    Molle, Sybille

    2016-04-01

    The Kinesio taping method was developed in Japan for use in humans in 1979. The use of complementary therapies is becoming common in equine athletes and the discovery of Kinesio taping potential brought it into the animal world. Kinesio taping can be used to treat a wide range of clinical conditions, from tendon injuries to neurologic disorders and from muscle contractures to postural insufficiencies. Its use in veterinary medicine is promising, but relies heavily on evidence-based clinical reports. Further scientific research is needed to fully understand the real effectiveness of application. PMID:26898963

  3. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  4. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  5. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  6. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  7. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  8. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  9. Video Tape and the Mentally Retarded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbord, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    Three uses of video tape recordings with the mentally retarded; discussed briefly are staff training or teacher education, parental involvement in the child's education, and therapeutic uses by psychiatrists and psychologists. (CB)

  10. User's guide and tape specification for ERB 7 DELMAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, P.; Penn, L.

    1985-01-01

    Guidance is provided to the DELMAT user in the areas of purpose, use and limitations of DELMAT tapes and software. The DELMAT tape specifications is also provided. The ERB-7, ERB MAT and tape characteristics applicable to the DELMAT tapes are also summarized.

  11. Educational Uses of Cartridge Tapes. Dissemination Document No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, S. Joseph

    Tape cartridges for use by special education teachers are analyzed according to design, effective use, and availability. Basic operating principles of cassette and continuous loop tape cartridges are described and illustrated. Advantages of tape cartridges are indicated, such as the following: the position is saved on tape during student timeouts,…

  12. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  13. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  14. Read/write head for a magnetic tape device having grooves for reducing tape floating

    DOEpatents

    Aoki, Kenji

    2005-08-09

    A read/write head for a magnetic tape includes an elongated chip assembly and a tape running surface formed in the longitudinal direction of the chip assembly. A pair of substantially spaced parallel read/write gap lines for supporting read/write elements extend longitudinally along the tape running surface of the chip assembly. Also, at least one groove is formed on the tape running surface on both sides of each of the read/write gap lines and extends substantially parallel to the read/write gap lines.

  15. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  16. Getting a charge out of transparent tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Randal

    2000-01-01

    When two pieces of transparent tape are placed on top of each other (sticky side to nonsticky side) and then separated, it is observed that one piece becomes negatively charged and the other positively charged. The sign of the charge on each piece depends on the brand of tape used. This phenomenon is frequently used to investigate the properties of charge and charged objects in introductory physics courses.

  17. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Tape for Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    2013-01-01

    For this effort, will concentrate on three applications: Vibration Gyroscope utilizes piezoelectric properties of the tape and Coriolis effect Accelerometer utilizes the piezoresistive property Strain Gauge utilizes piezoresistive property Accelerometer and Strain Gauge can also utilize piezoelectric effect Test piezoelectric properties using facilities at the Microfabrication Laboratory (AMRDEC) . Enhance piezoelectric effect using polyvinylidine fluoride and P(VDF ]TrFE) which is readily polarizable .Spray matrix solution while winding fiber; Sandwich of CNT tape and PVDF film (DOE .Two Level) . Construct and test prototype vibration gyroscope . Construct and test prototype accelerometer using cantilever design . Test strain sensitivity of CNT tape against industrial strain gauge . Embed CNT tape in composite samples as well as on surface and test to failure (4 ]point bend) A piezoelectric device exhibits an electrical response from a mechanical applied stress. . A piezoelectric device has both capacitance and resistance properties in which by applying an electric field from a waveform will exert a mechanical stress that can be monitored for a response. . The typical waveform applied is a sinusoidal waveform of a defined voltage for a defined period. The defined voltage is driven from 0 volts to the positive defined volts then back to 0 and driven to negative defined volts then back to 0. . Example. Vmax set to 10V and period set to 10 ms. . Voltage will start at zero, go to 10 volts, return to zero, go to ]10 volts and return to zero during 10 ms. . Applying this electrical field to a DUT, the capacitance response and resistance response can be observed. CNT tape is easier to manufacture and cheaper than micromachining silicon or other ceramic piezoelectric used in gyroscopes and accelerometers CNT tape properties can be modified during manufacture for specific application CNT tape has enhanced mechanical and thermal properties in addition to unique electrical

  18. FGGE/ERBM tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 FGGE/ERBM tape contains 27 ERB parameters which are extracted and reformatted from the Nimbus-7 ERB-MATRIX tape. There are four types of files on a FGGE/ERBM tape: a test file; tape-header file which describes the data set characteristics and the contents of the tape; a grid-descriptor file which contains the information of the ERB scanning channel target number and their associated latitude limits and longitude intervals; and one or more data files. A single end-of-file (EOF) tape mark is written after each file, and two EOF marks are written after the last data file on the tape.

  19. Magnetic tape recorder for long operating life in space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahm, E. J.; Hoffman, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    Magnetic tape recorders have long been used on satellites and spacecraft for onboard storage of large quantities of data. As satellites enter into commercial service, long operating life at high reliability becomes important. Also, the presently planned long-duration space flights to the outer planets require long-life tape recorders. Past satellite tape recorders have achieved a less than satisfactory performance record and the operating life of other spacecraft tape recorders has been relatively short and unpredictable. Most failures have resulted from malfunctions of the mechanical tape transport. Recent advances in electric motors and static memories have allowed the development of a new tape recorder which uses a very simple tape transport with few possible failure modes. It consists only of two brushless dc motors, two tape guides, and the recording heads. Relatively low tape tension, wide torque capability, and precise speed control facilitate design for mechanical reliability to match that of tape-recorder electronics.

  20. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  1. Strategy for robot motion and path planning in robot taping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qilong; Chen, I.-Ming; Lembono, Teguh Santoso; Landén, Simon Nelson; Malmgren, Victor

    2016-06-01

    Covering objects with masking tapes is a common process for surface protection in processes like spray painting, plasma spraying, shot peening, etc. Manual taping is tedious and takes a lot of effort of the workers. The taping process is a special process which requires correct surface covering strategy and proper attachment of the masking tape for an efficient surface protection. We have introduced an automatic robot taping system consisting of a robot manipulator, a rotating platform, a 3D scanner and specially designed taping end-effectors. This paper mainly talks about the surface covering strategies for different classes of geometries. The methods and corresponding taping tools are introduced for taping of following classes of surfaces: Cylindrical/extended surfaces, freeform surfaces with no grooves, surfaces with grooves, and rotational symmetrical surfaces. A collision avoidance algorithm is introduced for the robot taping manipulation. With further improvements on segmenting surfaces of taping parts and tape cutting mechanisms, such taping solution with the taping tool and the taping methodology can be combined as a very useful and practical taping package to assist humans in this tedious and time costly work.

  2. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  3. Krytox Lubrication Tape Study. [fluorinated lubricating oil for video tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of Krytox, a fluorinated oil, as a tape surface lubricant was studied for a wideband video tape recorder. In spite of the 5 to 1 head wear reduction credited to the surface lubricant, the resultant head life fell short of the 1500 hour goal.

  4. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm. PMID:27313372

  5. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm.

  6. The influence of Kinesiology Taping on the reduction of lymphoedema among women after mastectomy – preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Tymczak, Monika; Hałas, Ireneusz; Banaś, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Kinesiology Taping is a method that assists healing processes and improves the physical efficiency. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the influence of Kinesiology Taping on the lymphoedema reduction among women after mastectomy. Material and methods The subject of the research included 44 women underwent single mastectomy along with the removal of lymph nodes. The examination was carried out from the 4th of January to the 4th of February, 2013. The traditional taping method was implemented among 22 women, whereas the own taping method was used among the other 22 women. The therapy took 21 days, during which the tapes were applied three times every 7 days. The measurements were made before every application and at the end of the therapy. In the study, a questionnaire was used and it included questions concerning basic demographic, epidemiological data as well as the evaluation of the therapy effectiveness. The linear measurements of the upper limbs, the measurements of the range of joints’ motion in the upper limb were taken as well as grip strength was made. Results The reduction of the volume of lymphoedema of 55% was reported in the study group, whereas the oedema reduced by 27% in the clinical control one. Conclusions In the reduction of lymphoedema, the greater effectiveness of the own taping method in comparison to the traditional one was reported. Kinesiology Taping exerted an influence on the improvement of the upper limb's joints movability and the grip strength. PMID:24966797

  7. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  8. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  9. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  10. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  11. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  12. Comparison of particle sampling results from tape lifts and solvent rinses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egges, Joanne; Devaud, Genevieve; Rockwell, Christina M.; Matheson, Bruce A.

    2012-10-01

    Historical experience and previously published papers have shown that contamination sampling techniques influence the cleanliness results of spaceflight hardware. Programs rely on this data to show that derived or contractual requirements are met at delivery. Particle sampling using tape lifts and rinses was performed on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSAs) hardware. Sampling was performed on identical hardware with both sampling techniques. The hardware was sampled at comparable stages of assembly which provided hardware with similar levels of particulate contamination. Results from the two sampling techniques are compared. In one technique, sampling was performed by rinsing (with a hand-squeeze bottle with low pressure) followed by a tape lift; the other technique used a tape lift only. The relationship of particle size distribution, types of particles, level of particle contamination, and particle removal rate by sampling technique are examined. Comparison of the particle sampling results provides a basis for interpreting results depending on sampling techniques. Improving the contamination engineer's ability to interpret results is particularly useful when hardware configuration or surface finish dictate which sampling technique can be used. When one can choose the sampling technique, the results of this study can provide guidance on which technique is more appropriate depending on the circumstances. Results show that tape lifts remove more particles than low pressure rinses; furthermore that tape lift only is better than the combined operation of a rinse closely followed by a tape lift. Results also indicate that further work should be performed on different surface finishes, rinsing techniques, and particulate contamination levels.

  13. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  14. Cluster filtering/control of bending/torsional vibrations of a tape tether using smart-film sensors/actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Kunugi, Kouta; Trivailo, Pavel M.

    2016-06-01

    Tape tethers show great promise for application in space debris removal because they possess a large collecting area, which is crucial for the collection of electrons from a plasma environment in space. Tape tethers are therefore preferred over string tethers in electrodynamic tethered systems (EDTS), which operate based on the Lorentz force derived from the interaction between the electric current on the tether and the Earth's magnetic field. Vibrations of the tether may disturb the attitude of the mother satellite and the subsatellite, and are difficult to damp in space because the damping would be minimal owing to the almost zero drag force in space. Due to their relatively large width, tape tethers experience torsional deformation and therefore cannot be treated as a string tether. If torsional deformation of tape tethers is not avoided, the advantage of tape tethers as the materials for EDT systems will be deteriorated. Point-type sensors and actuators are usually used to sense and control vibrations. However, it is difficult to apply such sensors and actuators to tape tethers because of the substantial length of the tether as well as the need for a deployment mechanism, such as a reel. In order to overcome the difficulties related to vibrations, the use of smart-film sensors and actuators for sensing and controlling vibrations of tape tethers is considered in this study. In a previous study, we presented an application of smart film for sensing vibrations of tape tethers, but the actuation of tape tethers using smart-film actuators has not yet been reported. In the present paper, we mathematically derive suitable configurations of smart-film attachment to a tape tether for cluster filtering and actuation of bending and torsional vibrations of the tape tether, and carried out cluster actuation experiments. The experimental results reveal that the bending and torsional vibrations of a tape tether can be reduced by cluster actuation control based on direct

  15. Using magnetic tape technology for data migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Therrien, David; Cheung, Yim-Ling

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic tape and optical disk library units (jukeboxes) are satisfying the demand for high-capacity cost-effective storage. The choice between optical disk and magnetic tape technology must take into account the cost limitations as well as the performance and reliability requirements of the user environment. Library units require data management software in order to function in an automated and user-transparent way. The most common data management applications are backup and recovery, data migration, and archiving. The medium access patterns that these applications create will be described. Since the most user visible application is data migration, a queue simulator was developed to model its performance against a variety of library units. The major subject of this paper is the design and implementation of this simulator as well as some simulation results. The relative cost and reliability of magnetic tape versus optical disk library units is presented for completeness.

  16. Digital optical tape: Technology and standardization issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1996-01-01

    During the coming years, digital data storage technologies will continue an aggressive growth to satisfy the user's need for higher storage capacities, higher data transfer rates and long-term archival media properties. Digital optical tape is a promising technology to satisfy these user's needs. As any emerging data storage technology, the industry faces many technological and standardization challenges. The technological challenges are great, but feasible to overcome. Although it is too early to consider formal industry standards, the optical tape industry has decided to work together by initiating prestandardization efforts that may lead in the future to formal voluntary industry standards. This paper will discuss current industry optical tape drive developments and the types of standards that will be required for the technology. The status of current industry prestandardization efforts will also be discussed.

  17. Catalog of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Meteorological Tape Library

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    This report gives a complete inventory of the data tapes in the ORNL Meteorological Tape Library (OMTL). The attributes of each tape, including location of the weather station (city and state), station number, standard data format, dates covered, data set name(s), and job control language considerations (record format, record length, blocksize, tape label, and tape density), are listed for each tape. In addition, a description of some of the special characteristics of each of the available standard meteorological data formats is presented.

  18. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-10-09

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  19. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  20. Effects of Kinesio taping and Mcconnell taping on balance and walking speed of hemiplegia patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Kyu; Park, Young-Han; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the overlap effect of the PNF following the application of Kinesio taping and the McConnell taping, and also the impact of the taping application method on the balance and walking speed of the patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six patients who were diagnosed with hemiplegia due to stroke were selected as subjects of this study. They were randomly and evenly divided into experiment group 1 (Kinesio taping group), experiment group 2 (McConnell taping group), and the control group; each group had 12 patients. [Results] The Berg balance scale (BBS) was used to evaluate balance, and the ability in this study. A 10 m walking test (10MWT) was performed to measure the walking speed. Experiment group 1 showed a statistically significant improvement in balance and walking speed compared to experiment group 2, and the control group in week 4 and week 8. [Conclusion] Application of Kinesio taping had a more beneficial effect on the balance and walking speed than joint-fixation taping of the patients with stroke. PMID:27190448

  1. Textured substrate tape and devices thereof

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2006-08-08

    A method for forming a sharply biaxially textured substrate, such as a single crystal substrate, includes the steps of providing a deformed metal substrate, followed by heating above the secondary recrystallization temperature of the deformed substrate, and controlling the secondary recrystallization texture by either using thermal gradients and/or seeding. The seed is selected to shave a stable texture below a predetermined temperature. The sharply biaxially textured substrate can be formed as a tape having a length of 1 km, or more. Epitaxial articles can be formed from the tapes to include an epitaxial electromagnetically active layer. The electromagnetically active layer can be a superconducting layer.

  2. Tape-Drop Transient Model for In-Situ Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    Composite parts of nonuniform thickness can be fabricated by in-situ automated tape placement (ATP) if the tape can be started and stopped at interior points of the part instead of always at its edges. This technique is termed start/stop-on-the-part, or, alternatively, tape-add/tape-drop. The resulting thermal transients need to be managed in order to achieve net shape and maintain uniform interlaminar weld strength and crystallinity. Starting-on-the-part has been treated previously. This paper continues the study with a thermal analysis of stopping-on-the-part. The thermal source is switched off when the trailing end of the tape enters the nip region of the laydown/consolidation head. The thermal transient is determined by a Fourier-Laplace transform solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent thermal transport equation. This solution requires that the Peclet number Pe (the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transport) be independent of time and much greater than 1. Plotted isotherms show that the trailing tape-end cools more rapidly than the downstream portions of tape. This cooling can weaken the bond near the tape end; however the length of the affected region is found to be less than 2 mm. To achieve net shape, the consolidation head must continue to move after cut-off until the temperature on the weld interface decreases to the glass transition temperature. The time and elapsed distance for this condition to occur are computed for the Langley ATP robot applying PEEK/carbon fiber composite tape and for two upgrades in robot performance. The elapsed distance after cut-off ranges from about 1 mm for the present robot to about 1 cm for the second upgrade.

  3. Frictional adhesion: A new angle on gecko attachment.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Dittmore, A; Santos, D; Spenko, M; Cutkosky, M

    2006-09-01

    Directional arrays of branched microscopic setae constitute a dry adhesive on the toes of pad-bearing geckos, nature's supreme climbers. Geckos are easily and rapidly able to detach their toes as they climb. There are two known mechanisms of detachment: (1) on the microscale, the seta detaches when the shaft reaches a critical angle with the substrate, and (2) on the macroscale, geckos hyperextend their toes, apparently peeling like tape. This raises the question of how geckos prevent detachment while inverted on the ceiling, where body weight should cause toes to peel and setal angles to increase. Geckos use opposing feet and toes while inverted, possibly to maintain shear forces that prevent detachment of setae or peeling of toes. If detachment occurs by macroscale peeling of toes, the peel angle should monotonically decrease with applied force. In contrast, if adhesive force is limited by microscale detachment of setae at a critical angle, the toe detachment angle should be independent of applied force. We tested the hypothesis that adhesion is increased by shear force in isolated setal arrays and live gecko toes. We also tested the corollary hypotheses that (1) adhesion in toes and arrays is limited as on the microscale by a critical angle, or (2) on the macroscale by adhesive strength as predicted for adhesive tapes. We found that adhesion depended directly on shear force, and was independent of detachment angle. Therefore we reject the hypothesis that gecko toes peel like tape. The linear relation between adhesion and shear force is consistent with a critical angle of release in live gecko toes and isolated setal arrays, and also with our prior observations of single setae. We introduced a new model, frictional adhesion, for gecko pad attachment and compared it to existing models of adhesive contacts. In an analysis of clinging stability of a gecko on an inclined plane each adhesive model predicted a different force control strategy. The frictional adhesion

  4. Elastic therapeutic tape: do they have the same material properties?

    PubMed Central

    Boonkerd, Chuanpis; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Elastic therapeutic tape has been widely used for rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries. Tapes with different elastic properties serve different treatment purposes with inappropriate tension reducing tape effectiveness. Many tapes are available in the market, but studies on tape properties are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the material properties of elastic therapeutic tape. [Subjects and Methods] Brands of elastic therapeutic tape included KinesioTex®, ATex, Mueller, 3M, and ThaiTape. The Material Testing System Insight® 1 Electromechanical Testing Systems was used to apply a tensile force on elastic therapeutic tape. Ten specimens of each brand were tested. Stress, load, and Young’s modulus at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and maximum point were collected. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc testing was used to analyze tape parameters. [Results] Maximum elongation and Young’s modulus at all percentages were significantly different between brands. There were no differences in maximum load and maximum stress. [Conclusion] Mechanical properties are different for commercial elastic therapeutic tapes. Physiotherapists and other clinicians should be aware of mechanical tape properties to correctly apply kinesio tape. PMID:27190472

  5. Elastic therapeutic tape: do they have the same material properties?

    PubMed

    Boonkerd, Chuanpis; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Elastic therapeutic tape has been widely used for rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries. Tapes with different elastic properties serve different treatment purposes with inappropriate tension reducing tape effectiveness. Many tapes are available in the market, but studies on tape properties are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the material properties of elastic therapeutic tape. [Subjects and Methods] Brands of elastic therapeutic tape included KinesioTex(®), ATex, Mueller, 3M, and ThaiTape. The Material Testing System Insight(®) 1 Electromechanical Testing Systems was used to apply a tensile force on elastic therapeutic tape. Ten specimens of each brand were tested. Stress, load, and Young's modulus at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and maximum point were collected. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc testing was used to analyze tape parameters. [Results] Maximum elongation and Young's modulus at all percentages were significantly different between brands. There were no differences in maximum load and maximum stress. [Conclusion] Mechanical properties are different for commercial elastic therapeutic tapes. Physiotherapists and other clinicians should be aware of mechanical tape properties to correctly apply kinesio tape.

  6. The Effect of Kinesio Taping in Forward Bending of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping® technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping® influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility. PMID:25276018

  7. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzińska, Gabriela; Marczyński, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT-p < 0.001, KT-p < 0.001, and sham-p < 0.01). The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs. PMID:26491458

  8. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzińska, Gabriela; Marczyński, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT—p < 0.001, KT—p < 0.001, and sham—p < 0.01). The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs. PMID:26491458

  9. FGGE/SMMR-30 tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 FGGE/SMMR-30 tape which contains sea ice concentration data in 30 km resolution which are extracted and reformatted from Nimbus-7 SMMR PARM-30 tapes in accordance with the FGGE level II International Exchange Format Specification is outlined. There are three types of files on a FGGE/SMMR-30 tape. The first file on the tape is a test file. The second file on the tape is a tape header file. The remaining one or more files are data files. All files are terminated with a single end of file (EOP) tape mark. The last file is terminated with two EOF tape marks. All files are made up of one or more physical records. Each physical record contains 2960 bytes. Each data file contains all available values for a 6 hour synoptic time period.

  10. Dendrimer-Mediated Adhesion between Vapor-Deposited Au and Glass or Si Wafers.

    PubMed

    Baker, L A; Zamborini, F P; Sun, L; Crooks, R M

    1999-10-01

    Here, we report the use of amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as adhesion promoters between vapor-deposited Au films and Si-based substrates. This method is relatively simple, requiring only substrate cleaning, dipping, and rinsing. Proof of concept is illustrated by coating glass slides and single-crystal Si wafers with monolayers of PAMAM dendrimers and then evaporating adherent, 150-nm-thick Au films atop the dendritic adhesion promoter. Scanning tunneling microscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been used to assess the surface roughness and electrochemical stability of the Au films. The effectiveness of the dendrimer adhesion layer is demonstrated using standard adhesive-tape peel tests.

  11. Tape It Yourself: Videotapes for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebsworth, Miriam Eistein; Feknous, Barbara; Loyet, Dianne; Zimmerman, Spencer

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a series of videotapes of ESL classes for a pre-service teacher education program grounded in experiential learning theory. The videos included footage of ESL classrooms, and tapes edited and supplemented with interviews of ESL teachers. Our experience demonstrates that-with relatively low…

  12. Idea Bank: Duct Tape Note Twister

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Molly

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how she observed a middle school math teacher deliver a miserable class. She realized that she did the same thing to her music students. To engage her students, she developed "Note Twister," a music reading game using duct tape to form musical notes and the basic premise behind the game, "Twister." She finds…

  13. "Space slitter" for film or tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Device cuts film or tape into strips by guiding film in channel under cutting blades. Device is operated by lifting pressure bar to insert blades into film. Film is then pulled through blades. Cutter has potential uses in advertising, commercial art, and publishing fields.

  14. Analysis of particulates on tape lift samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moision, Robert M.; Chaney, John A.; Panetta, Chris J.; Liu, De-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Particle counts on tape lift samples taken from a hardware surface exceeded threshold requirements in six successive tests despite repeated cleaning of the surface. Subsequent analysis of the particle size distributions of the failed tests revealed that the handling and processing of the tape lift samples may have played a role in the test failures. In order to explore plausible causes for the observed size distribution anomalies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to perform chemical analysis on collected particulates. SEM/EDX identified Na and S containing particles on the hardware samples in a size range identified as being responsible for the test failures. ToF-SIMS was employed to further examine the Na and S containing particulates and identified the molecular signature of sodium alkylbenzene sulfonates, a common surfactant used in industrial detergent. The root cause investigation suggests that the tape lift test failures originated from detergent residue left behind on the glass slides used to mount and transport the tape following sampling and not from the hardware surface.

  15. Tape Lessons to Accompany Intermediate Nepali Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Manindra K.

    These tape lessons follow the sequence of the intermediate Nepali Reader. There are 12 lessons each containing various types of exercises designed to increase listening, speaking, and reading skills. Each lesson contains the following types of exercises: (1) listening comprehension; (2) question answering; (3) repetition; and (4) multiple choice…

  16. Distanced Data: Transcribing Other People's Research Tapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Susan A.; Powick, Kelly D.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we report on our qualitative study involving eight individuals hired to transcribe research tapes in university contexts. We consider issues of data analysis and data trustworthiness and the implications for both when transcription is assigned to someone other than the researcher. We explore the challenges transcribers faced…

  17. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  18. Multiprocessor system for Holter tape analysis (ECG)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, C.L.; Hubelbank, M.; Valvo, V.; Lane, B.

    1983-01-01

    Although techniques for recording and analyzing longterm ambulatory ECGS have been in existence for more than 20 years, the clinical usefulness and frequency of application of the technique continue to grow at an extraordinary rate. To meet the need for faster, more efficient processing of Holter tapes and the growing requirement that the analysis of the tape be quantitatively accurate, a new Holter analysis system has been developed. This system is built around two LSI11 microprocessors and a special purpose byte processor which incorporates an AMD 2903 bit slice chip. It includes 30 MB of mass storage and an impact printer with alphanumeric and graphic capabilities. In a test which included 55 separate readings of 34 12- or 24-hour tapes, correlations with hand counts of vpbs was greater than .99. The system processes either cassette or reel-to-reel tapes at 120* with simultaneous print/process capabilities, has a variety of user interactive displays to assure continuous operator validation, is remarkably nonfatiguing to operate, and automatically produces reports with tables, graphs, and sample ECG strips. 8 references.

  19. Melt processing of Yb-123 tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Athur, S. P.; Balachandran, U.; Salama, K.

    2000-02-17

    The innovation of a simple, scalable process for manufacturing long-length conductors of HTS is essential to potential commercial applications such as power cables, magnets, and transformers. In this paper the authors demonstrate that melt processing of Yb-123 tapes made by the PIT route is an alternative to the coated conductor and Bi-2223 PIT tape fabrication techniques. Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes were fabricated by groove rolling and subsequently, melt processed in different oxygen partial pressures in a zone-melting furnace with a gradient of 140 C/cm. The transition temperatures measured were found to be around 81 K undermost processing conditions. EPMA of the tapes processed under different conditions show the 123 phase to be Ba deficient and Cu and Yb rich. Critical current was measured at various temperatures from 77 K to 4.2 K. The J{sub c} increased with decrease in pO{sub 2}. The highest I{sub c} obtained was 52 A at 4.2 K.

  20. A Tape-Lecture Course in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, P.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the possibility of using audio-tapes for self-study courses in technical colleges. This article presents: (1) description of the electrochemistry course taught; (2) results of the assessment of student reaction to the course; and (3) conclusions. (HM)

  1. Heat reflecting tape for thermoelectric converter

    DOEpatents

    Purdy, David L.

    1977-01-01

    Threads are interlaced with thermoelectric wires to provide a woven cloth in tape form, there being an intermediate layer of heat radiation reflecting material (e.g., aluminum foil) insulated electrically from said wires, which are of opposite thermoelectric polarity and connected as a plurality of thermocouples.

  2. Inconsistencies in tape read and tape write programs on the I-100 image analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocutt, W. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The tape read and write programs currently available on the 1-100 perform their intended functions of reading and writing tapes, but are difficult to use because they contain a number of inconsistencies. These inconsistencies can often be overcome by the use of work-around procedures and by trial and error, which is an inefficient use of expensive computer systems that should not be necessary.

  3. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section 870.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record...

  4. Tester automatically checks paper tape punch and reader after maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, L.; Mc Murchy, D. D.

    1967-01-01

    Device automatically bench tests paper tape punches and readers in a simulated operating environment following routine maintenance. The reader and punch operate back-to-back and the paper tape output feeds the reader. The tape leader is prepunched with an arbitrary pattern that is continuously reproduced during the check.

  5. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2800 Medical magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record...

  6. Full tape thickness feature conductors for EMI structures

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Knudson, Richard T.; Smith, Frank R.; Barner, Gregory

    2014-06-10

    Generally annular full tape thickness conductors are formed in single or multiple tape layers, and then stacked to produce an annular solid conductive wall for enclosing an electromagnetic isolation cavity. The conductors may be formed using punch and fill operations, or by flowing conductor-containing material onto the tape edge surfaces that define the interior sidewalls of the cavity.

  7. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  8. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  9. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  10. STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Tape 1 of 4. Part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This video gives an overview of the first four flight days of the STS-102 mission through a compilation of footage from each day. The crew of STS-102 (Commander James Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly, and Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards) and the Expedition 2 crew (Commander Yuriy Usachev and Flight Engineers James Voss and Susan Helms) are seen during the ceremonial breakfast, suitup, and as they board Discovery. The orbiter's launch is seen from several different viewpoints, and various in-flight activities are shown, such as the opening of Discovery's payload bay doors, Helms preparing for the 'H-Reflex Experiment: Effects of Microgravity on the Spine', the rendezvous and docking of Discovery with the International Space Station (ISS), and Helms and Voss preparing for and performing their spacewalks. The crew of STS-102 and both Expedition crews (E1 crew William Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko, and Sergei Krikalev) are seen in the Destiny Laboratory Module. Activities for flight day five can be seen on 'STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Part 1 of 2, Tape 2 of 2' (internal ID 2001096941). Flight days 6-14 activities can be seen on 'STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2, Tape 1 of 2' (internal ID 2001096943) and 'STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2, Tape 2 of 2' (internal ID 2001096940).

  11. The spectroscopic detection of exogenous material in fingerprints after development with powders and recovery with adhesive lifters.

    PubMed

    West, Matthew J; Went, Michael J

    2008-01-15

    The application of powders to fingerprints has long been established as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints. The powders adhere to the ridge pattern of the fingerprint only, thus allowing the image to be visualised. Fingerprints developed in situ at a crime scene routinely undergo lifting with specialist tapes to facilitate subsequent laboratory analysis. As with all recovered evidence these samples would be stored in evidence bags to allow secure transit from the scene to the laboratory and also to preserve the chain of evidence. In this paper, the application of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of exogenous material in latent fingerprints is reported for contaminated fingerprints that had been treated with powders and also subsequently lifted with adhesive tapes. A selection of over the counter (OTC) analgesics were used as samples for the analysis and contaminated fingerprints were deposited on clean glass slides. The application of aluminium or iron based powders to contaminated fingerprints did not interfere with the Raman spectra obtained for the contaminants. In most cases background fluorescence attributed to the sebaceous content of the latent fingerprint was reduced by the application of the powder thus reducing spectral interference. Contaminated fingerprints developed with powders and then lifted with lifting tapes were also examined. The combination of these two techniques did not interfere with the successful analysis of exogenous contaminants by Raman spectroscopy. The lifting process was repeated using hinge lifters. As the hinge lifters exhibited strong Raman bands the spectroscopic analysis was more complex and an increase in the number of exposures to the detector allowed for improved clarification. Raman spectra of developed and lifted fingerprints recorded through evidence bags were obtained and it was found that the detection process was not compromised in any way. Although the application of powders did not

  12. Infrared densitometry: a fast and non-destructive method for exact stratum corneum depth calculation for in vitro tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Hansen, S; Neumann, D; Kostka, K-H; Lehr, C-M; Muys, L; Schaefer, U F

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of drug penetration into the stratum corneum (SC) by tape-stripping requires an accurate measure of the amount of SC on each tape-strip in order to determine the depth inside the SC. This study applies infrared densitometry (IR-D) to in vitro tape-stripping using the novel Squame Scan(R) 850A. The device had recently been shown to provide accurate measurements of the SC depth for tape-stripping in vivo. Furthermore, the suitability of IR-D for determining the endpoint of tape-stripping, i.e. complete SC removal, was tested. The SC depth was computed from the IR-D data of sequential tape-strips and compared to the results of a protein assay as gold standard. IR-D provided accurate depth results both for freshly excised skin and for skin stored frozen for up to 3 months. In addition, the lower limit of quantification of IR-D indicates the complete removal of the SC (less than 5% of the total SC remaining) and can be used for adjusting the number of tapes applied in situ. Therefore, IR-D is an accurate, fast and non-destructive method for SC depth determination. PMID:20173360

  13. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  14. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-11-15

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions.

  15. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  16. A media maniac's guide to removable mass storage media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempster, Linda S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses at a high level, the many individual technologies available today in the removable storage arena including removable magnetic tapes, magnetic floppies, optical disks and optical tape. Tape recorders represented below discuss logitudinal, serpantine, logitudinal serpantine,and helical scan technologies. The magnetic floppies discussed will be used for personal electronic in-box applications.Optical disks still fill the role for dense long-term storage. The media capacities quoted are for native data. In some cases, 2 KB ASC2 pages or 50 KB document images will be referenced.

  17. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  18. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  19. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved. PMID:12776092

  20. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 5 through 7. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139357), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). On flight day 5, the transfer and installation of a Power and Data Grapple Fixture onto the P6 Truss during an EVA (extravehicular activity) is shown. The relocation of micrometeorite debris shields is also shown. Canadarm 2 is used to move the Mobile Base System near the Mobile Transporter on the ISS Destiny Module. The capture of the Mobile Base System takes place on flight day 6, along with a crew transfer ceremony on board the ISS. The video includes a view of the South Pacific just before dawn, and the Endeavour crew answers questions from the public.

  1. Software Computes Tape-Casting Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    2003-01-01

    Tcast2 is a FORTRAN computer program that accelerates the setup of a process in which a slurry containing metal particles and a polymeric binder is cast, to a thickness regulated by a doctor blade, onto fibers wound on a rotating drum to make a green precursor of a metal-matrix/fiber composite tape. Before Tcast2, setup parameters were determined by trial and error in time-consuming multiple iterations of the process. In Tcast2, the fiber architecture in the final composite is expressed in terms of the lateral distance between fibers and the thickness-wise distance between fibers in adjacent plies. The lateral distance is controlled via the manner of winding. The interply spacing is controlled via the characteristics of the slurry and the doctor-blade height. When a new combination of fibers and slurry is first cast and dried to a green tape, the shrinkage from the wet to the green condition and a few other key parameters of the green tape are measured. These parameters are provided as input to Tcast2, which uses them to compute the doctor-blade height and fiber spacings needed to obtain the desired fiber architecture and fiber volume fraction in the final composite.

  2. Current Distribution in Wide YBCO Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, M.; Granados, X.; Amorós, J.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.

    The need of a better mechanical behaviour and the stabilization of coated conductors for applications, as Magnets, cables or Fault Current Limiters, has motivated the lamination of tapes with stainless steel or copper alloys, increasing so the elastic modulus of the conductors and their mechanical performance. Some of the stainless steels used are magnetic, thus introducing some perturbations of the current flow when energizing the conductor. In order to detect these possible perturbations, the magnetic self field in the surface of the tape has been explored by Hall mapping technique at several current loads in a monotonically driven cyclic sequence. By increasing current steps when loading up, crossing the critical field threshold, and decreasing down to remanent state. Deviation from the expected magnetic map has been observed. In this work, we will report on the resulting measurements, and the current flow is calculated by solving the inverse problem for a 12 mm wide stainless steel reinforced Coated Conductor tape. We discuss on the likely origin of the observed perturbations.

  3. Transaction aware tape-infrastructure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaidis, Fotios; Kruse, Daniele Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Administrating a large scale, multi protocol, hierarchical tape infrastructure like the CERN Advanced STORage manager (CASTOR)[2], which stores now 100 PB (with an increasing step of 25 PB per year), requires an adequate monitoring system for quick spotting of malfunctions, easier debugging and on demand report generation. The main challenges for such system are: to cope with CASTOR's log format diversity and its information scattered among several log files, the need for long term information archival, the strict reliability requirements and the group based GUI visualization. For this purpose, we have designed, developed and deployed a centralized system consisting of four independent layers: the Log Transfer layer for collecting log lines from all tape servers to a single aggregation server, the Data Mining layer for combining log data into transaction context, the Storage layer for archiving the resulting transactions and finally the Web UI layer for accessing the information. Having flexibility, extensibility and maintainability in mind, each layer is designed to work as a message broker for the next layer, providing a clean and generic interface while ensuring consistency, redundancy and ultimately fault tolerance. This system unifies information previously dispersed over several monitoring tools into a single user interface, using Splunk, which also allows us to provide information visualization based on access control lists (ACL). Since its deployment, it has been successfully used by CASTOR tape operators for quick overview of transactions, performance evaluation, malfunction detection and from managers for report generation.

  4. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 3 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 6 and 7. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). Flight day 6 features a very complicated EVA (extravehicular activity) to service the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Astronauts Grunsfeld and Linnehan replace the HST's power control unit, disconnecting and reconnecting 36 tiny connectors. The procedure includes the HST's first ever power down. The cleanup of spilled water from the coollant system in Grunsfeld's suit is shown. The pistol grip tool, and two other space tools are also shown. On flight day 7, Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA. They replace the HST's FOC (Faint Object Camera) with the ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys). The video ends with crew members playing in the shuttle's cabin with a model of the HST.

  5. Kinesio taping in treatment and prevention of sports injuries: a meta-analysis of the evidence for its effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sean; Whatman, Chris; Hume, Patria A; Sheerin, Kelly

    2012-02-01

    Kinesio tape (KT) is an elastic therapeutic tape used for treating sports injuries and a variety of other disorders. Chiropractor, Dr Kenso Kase, developed KT taping techniques in the 1970s. It is claimed that KT supports injured muscles and joints and helps relieve pain by lifting the skin and allowing improved blood and lymph flow. The profile of KT rose after the tape was donated to 58 countries for use during the 2008 Olympic Games, and was seen on high-profile athletes. Practitioners are asking whether they should use KT over other elastic adhesive tapes. The aim of this review was to evaluate, using meta-analysis, the effectiveness of KT in the treatment and prevention of sports injuries. Electronic databases including SPORTDiscus, Scopus, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect and sports medicine websites were searched using keywords 'kinesio taping/tape'. From 97 articles, ten met the inclusion criteria (article reported data for effect of KT on a musculoskeletal outcome and had a control group) and were retained for meta-analyses. Magnitude-based inferences were used to assess clinical worth of positive outcomes reported in studies. Only two studies investigated sports-related injuries (shoulder impingement), and just one of these involved injured athletes. Studies attending to musculoskeletal outcomes in healthy participants were included on the basis that these outcomes may have implications for the prevention of sporting injuries. The efficacy of KT in pain relief was trivial given there were no clinically important results. There were inconsistent range-of-motion outcome results, with at least small beneficial results seen in two studies, but trivial results in two other studies across numerous joint measurements. There was a likely beneficial effect for proprioception regarding grip force sense error, but no positive outcome for ankle proprioception. Seven outcomes relating to strength were beneficial, although there were numerous trivial findings for quadriceps and

  6. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  7. Using nanostructured conductive carbon tape modified with bismuth as the disposable working electrode for stripping analysis in paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Zhang, Qing; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Xu, Jing-Juan; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2013-10-15

    Low cost disposable working electrodes are specifically desired for practical applications of electrochemical detection considering maturity of electrochemical stations and data collection protocols. In this paper double-sided conductive adhesive carbon tape with nanostructure was applied to fabricate disposable working electrodes. Being supported by indium tin oxide glass, the prepared carbon tape electrodes were coated with bismuth film for stripping analysis of heavy metal ions. By integrating the bismuth modified electrodes with paper-based analytical devices, we were able to differentiate Zn, Cd and Pb ions with the sample volume of around 15 μL. After the optimization of parameters, including modification of bismuth film and the area of the electrodes, etc., Pb ions could be measured in the linear range from 10 to 500 μg/L with the detection limit of 2 μg/L. Our experimental results revealed that the disposable modified electrodes could be used to quantify migrated lead from toys with the results agreed well with that using atomic absorption spectrometry. Although bismuth modification and stripping analysis could be influenced by the low conductivity of the carbon tape, the low cost disposable carbon tape electrodes take the advantages of large-scaled produced double-sided carbon tape, including its reproducible nanostructure and scaled-up fabrication process. In addition, the preparation of disposable electrodes avoids time-consuming pretreatment and experienced operation. This study implied that the carbon tape might be an alternative candidate for practical applications of electrochemical detection. PMID:24054585

  8. Specification for IBM/IBM compatible 3480 tape cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1988-01-01

    This document establishes the same kinds of standards and controls that are currently in use for the procurement on new analog and digital magnetic tapes. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) currently maintains a Quality Products List (QPL) for all new analog and digital magnetic tapes purchased by NASA-GSFC. Extensive tests are conducted in the MTCF on an annual basis to determine the manufacturer's tape types to be added to or deleted from the current QPL. The MTCF currently maintains two specifications for magnetic tapes: NASA TM-79724 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new analog tapes; and NASA TM-80599 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new digital tapes. This specification will be used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new 3480 cartridges. The magnetic tapes used by GSFC, LaRC, ARC/Dryden, WFF, and the Network Tracking Stations are covered by the NASA-GSFC specifications. The 3480 cartridge was introduced approximately 3.5 years ago and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to digital magnetic tapes. Many users have already converted to the 3480 system and have more tape drives on order.

  9. A Proposed Convention for Writing FITS Data Tapes: DRAFT 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSAT/ASCA/Xte Development Team

    Even with today's advances in networking, file system capacities and CD technology it is often necessary to transport and store scientific data sets on magnetic tape. The FITS data format standard contains guidelines on how to write FITS files to magnetic tape but does not address the problem of indexing or organizing tape files. Currently available magnetic tape media can store multiple gigabytes of information on a single tape, which translates into thousands of FITS files per tape. Thus, the lack of a standard tape indexing and organizing scheme can, in many instances, become a serious problem. Faced with the above dilemma, the Astrophysics Data Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a simple in-house convention for indexing the contents of FITS data tapes that allows software to quickly and easily inventory tape contents. This paper describes the convention used by our organization. We propose that this convention be adopted into the FITS standard as the way to index and organize the contents of magnetic tape media.

  10. Studies into the use of waterborne coating formulations for the preparation of magnetic tape (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrom, Stacy; Bray, Ashley; Cheng, Song; Elike, John; Fan, Hong; Lane, Alan M.; Nikles, David E.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research project is to replace the organic solvents used in modern tape manufacture with water, thereby eliminating the potential for solvent emissions. This has led to a search to identify tape components compatible with a waterborne coating process. The pigments were either cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3 or barium ferrite, with the majority of the research focused on cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3 formulations. A combination of sodium polyphosphate and Surfynol CT-136, a pigment grinding aid, were used as dispersing agents. The binders included commercial water-dispersed polyurethanes and a commercial ethylene-vinylchloride copolymer emulsion. A commercial waterborne melamine-formaldehyde was used as a cross-linking agent. Addition of the ethylene-vinylchloride copolymer to the polyurethane increased the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the unpigmented binder films. The melamine-formaldehyde cross-linker further enhanced the mechanical properties and increased the adhesion between the pigmented binder films and the polyester base film. In a 180° peel test, the adhesion easily exceeded the ITO specification for 8 mm helical scan magnetic tape.1 Rheological studies of the waterborne dispersions revealed that the viscosity was too low. Hydroxyethylcellulose, a water soluble polymer, was added as a thickener and this gave rise to a desirable thixotropic behavior in the dispersion. Waterborne dispersions were cast onto polyester base film, oriented in a 2000 G longitudinal magnetic field, and cured in a convection oven at 60 °C. Magnetic hysteresis loops showed a squareness of 0.875 and a switching field distribution of 0.324 for films containing cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3.

  11. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  12. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  13. A taping method for external transmitter attachment on aquatic snakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, G.D.; Smith, J.J.; Amarello, M.; Casazza, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Radio telemetry is extremely useful for studying habitat use and movements of free ranging snakes. Surgically implanting radio transmitters into the body cavity of snakes is standard practice in most studies (e.g., Reinert and Cundall 1982; Weatherhead and Blouin-Demers 2004), but this implanting method has its drawbacks. Surgery itself is risky for individual snakes because of the potential for infection or incomplete healing of the incision site. Also, transmitters that are small enough to be carried by small or slender snakes have a relatively short battery life and need to be removed or replaced often, thus requiring frequent surgeries. In rare or endangered snake species, the risk of using invasive implantation surgery may not be merited. External attachment methods are relatively non-invasive and allow removal and replacement of radio transmitters on smaller snakes. The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is a semi-aquatic snake endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California, USA, and is federally and state listed as threatened (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1999). Telemetry studies of the habitat use and movements of this species typically used surgically implanted radio transmitters, but this method is limited to larger snakes, primarily females, because of size requirements for surgery (> 250 g). To overcome difficulties and biases associated with radio telemetry of T. gigas, we developed and evaluated several alternative techniques to attach external radio transmitters using tape.

  14. Effects of Kinesio Taping versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chen, Fu-Chen; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life. PMID:26185517

  15. Effects of Kinesio Taping versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chen, Fu-Chen; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life. PMID:26185517

  16. Adhesion and friction in gecko toe attachment and detachment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Rosenberg, Kenny; Zhao, Boxin; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-12-19

    Geckos can run rapidly on walls and ceilings, requiring high friction forces (on walls) and adhesion forces (on ceilings), with typical step intervals of approximately 20 ms. The rapid switching between gecko foot attachment and detachment is analyzed theoretically based on a tape model that incorporates the adhesion and friction forces originating from the van der Waals forces between the submicron-sized spatulae and the substrate, which are controlled by the (macroscopic) actions of the gecko toes. The pulling force of a spatula along its shaft with an angle between theta 0 and 90 degrees to the substrate, has a "normal adhesion force" contribution, produced at the spatula-substrate bifurcation zone, and a "lateral friction force" contribution from the part of spatula still in contact with the substrate. High net friction and adhesion forces on the whole gecko are obtained by rolling down and gripping the toes inward to realize small pulling angles between the large number of spatulae in contact with the substrate. To detach, the high adhesion/friction is rapidly reduced to a very low value by rolling the toes upward and backward, which, mediated by the lever function of the setal shaft, peels the spatulae off perpendicularly from the substrates. By these mechanisms, both the adhesion and friction forces of geckos can be changed over three orders of magnitude, allowing for the swift attachment and detachment during gecko motion. The results have obvious implications for the fabrication of dry adhesives and robotic systems inspired by the gecko's locomotion mechanism.

  17. A gecko-inspired double-sided adhesive.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-12-21

    Geckos' outstanding abilities to adhere to various surfaces are widely credited to the large actual contact areas of the fibrillar and hierarchical structures on their feet. These special features regulate the essential structural compliance for every attachment and thus provide robust yet reversible adhesions. Inspired by gecko's feet and our commonly used double-faced tape, we have successfully fabricated a gecko-inspired double-sided dry adhesive by using porous anodic alumina template assisted nano-wetting on a stiff polymer. It was determined that the obtained 2-sided structure showed largely decreased effective stiffness compared with its 1-sided counterpart, which favored better compliance and interfacial integrity. We also demonstrated that the repeatable double-sided adhesive improved the macroscopic normal and shear adhesion capacities over the widely-studied 1-side structure by ~50% and ~85%, respectively. By using the synthetic double-sided adhesive, the usage of traditional pressure-sensitive/chemical adhesives could be well avoided. Besides, the double-sided nanostructures showed great potential in finding new interesting properties and practical applications for the synthetic dry adhesives.

  18. Study on Recovery Performance of High Tc Superconducting Tapes for Resistive Type Superconducting Fault Current Limiter Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kar, Soumen; Kulkarni, Sandeep; Dixit, Manglesh; Singh, Kuwar Pal; Gupta, Alok; Balasubramanyam, P. V.; Sarangi, S. K.; Rao, V. V.

    Recent advances in reliable production of long length high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes have resulted in commercial application of superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs) in electrical utility networks. SFCL gives excellent technical performance when compared to conventional fault current limiters. The fast self-recovery from normal state to superconducting state immediately after the fault removal is an essential criterion for resistive type SFCL operation. In this paper, results on AC over-current testing of 1st generation (1G) Bi2223 tapes and 2nd generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors operating at 77 K are reported. From these results, the recovery time is estimated for different available HTS tapes in the market. The current limiting tests have also been performed to study the effective current limitation. Further, the recovery characteristics after the current limitation are quantitatively discussed for repetitive faults for different time intervals in the range of 100 ms to few seconds.

  19. Star Catalogs on Punched Cards and Magnetic Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berbert, J. H.

    1961-01-01

    In connection with the calibration of the Minitrack satellite tracking stations, the Goddard Space Flight Center has had the contents of a number of star catalogs put on punched cards and magnetic tape. This report discusses the plate data reduction procedures, briefly describes the information on the punched cards and magnetic tape, and calls attention to other applications of the card and tape star catalogs. The Goddard Space Flight Center has offered to prepare duplicate catalogs for qualified organizations.

  20. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-07-09

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  1. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-07-24

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  2. Printed-Circuit Tape Measures For X-Ray Inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Known pattern impressed on x-ray image for reference. Tapes made by flexible-printed-circuit technology provides identification and position references for x-ray images of weld joints. Proposed tapes consist of etched copper patterns on flexible substrates. X-rays record pattern of tape on film beneath butt-welded panels. Pattern becomes convenient reference for analysis and digitization of x-ray image.

  3. Getting in Taped, Part I and Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundy, H. M.; Higgins, J.

    1971-01-01

    This article is in two parts: discussion of mathematical concepts involved in converting the reading from the tape-recorder counter which counts the turns of the run-off spool to that from the counter which counts turns of the take-up spool; calculating the length of tape run off when given the reading from the tape-recorder counter of the run-off…

  4. GSFC specification electronic data processing magnetic recording tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinari, D. F.; Perry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design requirements are given for magnetic oxide coated, electronic data processing tape, wound on reels. Magnetic recording tape types covered by this specification are intended for use on digital tape transports using the Non-Return-to-Zero-change-on-ones (NRZI) recording method for recording densities up to and including 800 characters per inch (cpi) and the Phase-Encoding (PE) recording method for a recording density of 1600 cpi.

  5. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 4 and 5. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The primary activities during these days were EVAs (extravehicular activities) to replace two solar arrays on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Footage from flight day 4 records an EVA by Grunsfeld and Linnehan, including their exit from Columbia's payload bay airlock, their stowing of the old HST starboard rigid array on the rigid array carrier in Columbia's payload bay, their attachment of the new array on HST, the installation of a new starboard diode box, and the unfolding of the new array. The pistol grip space tool used to fasten the old array in its new location is shown in use. The video also includes several shots of the HST with Earth in the background. On flight day 5 Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA to change the port side array and diode box on HST. This EVA is very similar to the one on flight day 4, and is covered similarly in the video. A hand operated ratchet is shown in use. In addition to a repeat of the previous tasks, the astronauts change HST's reaction wheel assembly, and because they are ahead of schedule, install installation and lubricate an instrument door on the telescope. The Earth views include a view of Egypt and Israel, with the Nile River, Red Sea, and Mediterranean Sea.

  6. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage of crew activities from flight days 8 through 12 of STS-109. The crew included: Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, Richard Linnehan, James Newman, Michael Massimino, Mission Speicalists. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476). The primary activity on flight day 8 was an EVA (extravehicular activity) by Grunsfeld and Linnehan to install a cryocooler and radiator for the NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer) on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Before returning to Columbia's airlock, the astronauts, with a cloudy background, hold onto the orbiter and offer their thoughts on the significance of their mission, the HST, and spaceflight. Footage from flight day 9 includes the grappling, unbearthing, and deployment of the HST from Columbia, and the crew coordinating and videotaping Columbia's departure. Flight day 10 was a relatively inactive day, and flight day 11 includes a checkout of Columbia's aerodynamic surfaces. Columbia landed on flight day 12, which is covered by footage of the crew members speaking during reentry, and their night landing, primarily shown through the orbiter's head-up display. The video includes numerous views of the HST, as well as views of the the Galapagos Islands, Madagascar, and Southern Africa with parts of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and part of the coast of Chile. The pistol grip space tool is shown in use, and the crew answers two messages from the public, including a message to Massimino from the Fire Department of New York.

  7. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 3. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The main activity recorded during flight day 1 is the liftoff of Columbia. Attention is given to suit-up, boarding, and pre-flight procedures. The pre-launch crew meal has no sound. The crew members often wave to the camera before liftoff. The jettisoning of the solid rocket boosters is shown, and the External Tank is seen as it falls to Earth, moving over African dunes in the background. There are liftoff replays, including one from inside the cockpit. The opening of the payload bay doors is seen from the rear of the shuttle's cockpit. The footage from flight day 2 shows the Flight Support System for bearthing the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Crew preparations for the bearthing are shown. Flight day 3 shows the tracking of and approach to the HST by Columbia, including orbital maneuvers, the capture of the HST, and its lowering onto the Flight Support System. Many views of the HST are shown, including one which reveals an ocean and cloud background as the HST retracts a solar array.

  8. Tape-cast sensors and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L.; Garzon, Fernando H.

    2009-08-18

    A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

  9. Electromechanical characterization of silver-clad BSCCO tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Salib, S.; Iyer, A. N.; Vipulanandan, C.; Salama, K.; Balachandran, U.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Houston

    1998-01-01

    During the fabrication of silver-clad BSCCO tapes they are subjected to stresses which could lead to degradation in their current transport property. In the present investigation, studies were made to evaluate the electromechanical characteristics of silver-clad BSCCO conductors. The tensile strain tolerance characteristics of the monofilament, multifilament and composite (15 and 30% of Ag powder by volume) tapes were evaluated at 77 K. The average irreversible strain of monofilament and composite tapes were 0.19 and 0.47%, respectively. No noticeable improvement in strain tolerance was observed with the multifilament tapes. Detailed phase and microstructural analysis have been conducted using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Reel-to-reel substrate tape polishing system

    DOEpatents

    Selvamanickam, Venkat; Gardner, Michael T.; Judd, Raymond D.; Weloth, Martin; Qiao, Yunfei

    2005-06-21

    Disclosed is a reel-to-reel single-pass mechanical polishing system (100) suitable for polishing long lengths of metal substrate tape (124) used in the manufacture of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) coated tape, including multiple instantiations of a polishing station (114) in combination with a subsequent rinsing station (116) arranged along the axis of the metal substrate tape (124) that is translating between a payout spool (110a) and a take-up spool (110b). The metal substrate tape obtains a surface smoothness that is suitable for the subsequent deposition of a buffer layer.

  11. Specification for wide channel bandwidth one-inch video tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1988-01-01

    Standards and controls are established for the procurement of wide channel bandwidth one inch video magnetic recording tapes for Very Long Base Interferometer (VLBI) system applications. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) currently maintains three specifications for the Quality Products List (QPL) and acceptance testing of magnetic tapes. NASA-TM-79724 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new analog tapes; NASA-TM-80599 is used for QPL and acceptance testing of new digital tapes; and NASA-TM-100702 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new IBM/IBM compatible 3480 magnetic tape cartridges. This specification will be used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new wide channel bandwidth one inch video magnetic recording tapes. The one inch video tapes used by the Jet Propulsion Lab., the Deep Space Network and the Haystack Observatory will be covered by this specification. These NASA stations will use the video tapes for their VLBI system applications. The VLBI system is used for the tracking of quasars and the support of interplanetary exploration.

  12. Contact Recording on Bidirectional Thin-Film Tape Head Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, George W.; Connolly, Derry; Czarnecki, W. Stanley

    A transversely slotted magnetic recording head for high density tape drives is characterized theoretically for geometry and experimentally for wear and durability under different environmental conditions, tape substrate thicknesses, recording head substrate materials, and wear resistant overcoat materials. The triple bump recording head structure, which allows read-after-write in both directions of tape motion, has transverse slots placed in the head to produce contact between the tape and the read/write gap locations. A through slot "video" style contour design is also presented and analyzed.

  13. Slide Tape. A Guide to the Production of Slide-Tape Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowatt, Robert W.

    Step by step instructions are provided for planning and executing a slide tape program, as well as diagrams of equipment for presenting such programs. Guidelines are given for ways to: (1) define a program's purpose and objectives, (2) complete a storyboard, (3) produce slides from transparencies and photographed artwork, (4) write on slides, (5)…

  14. Recording electrophysiological data on video tape: a superior and less costly alternative to conventional tape recorders.

    PubMed

    Chiang, R G; Knobloch, C A; Singleton, D M; Steel, C G; Davey, K G

    1985-10-01

    Electrical potentials recorded extracellularly from the sinus gland of the isopod, Oniscus asellus, were stored on video tape with the aid of a digital-audio (DA) processor and a video cassette recorder (VCR). The DA processor transforms the analog signal to digital pulses of equal amplitude and converts these pulses into a television signal for recording on video tape. In playback, the DA processor reconverts the pulses to an analog signal with negligible distortion. When viewed on the oscilloscope screen, electrical potentials reproduced by this method were indistinguishable from electrical potentials recorded 'live' from the sinus gland. However, electrical potentials recorded from the same sinus gland and reproduced by a conventional FM tape recorder were easily differentiated from the 'live' recording. The special effects inherent in the VCR (e.g. stop action, frame advance) also permitted detailed analysis of spontaneously occurring electrical potentials. Special effects were not possible with the FM tape recorder. The price, ease of operation and ability to produce extremely high quality recordings, makes the DA processor and VCR an exceptional system for storing electrophysiological data. PMID:4058060

  15. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  16. Micro/Nanostructured Films and Adhesives for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungkyu K; Kang, Sung Min; Yang, Sung Ho; Cho, Woo Kyung

    2015-12-01

    The advanced technologies available for micro/nanofabrication have opened new avenues for interdisciplinary approaches to solve the unmet medical needs of regenerative medicine and biomedical devices. This review highlights the recent developments in micro/nanostructured adhesives and films for biomedical applications, including waterproof seals for wounds or surgery sites, drug delivery, sensing human body signals, and optical imaging of human tissues. We describe in detail the fabrication processes required to prepare the adhesives and films, such as tape-based adhesives, nanofilms, and flexible and stretchable film-based electronic devices. We also discuss their biomedical functions, performance in vitro and in vivo, and the future research needed to improve the current systems.

  17. STPI/LARC: A 200 deg C polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; St.clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A copolyimide, STPI/LARC, was prepared from the reaction of 3,3'4'benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA), equimolar quantities of m-phenylenediamine and 4,4'-oxydianiline, and a small amount of phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight. The processability and adhesive properties of STPI/LARC were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. LARC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide, from the reaction of BTDA and 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone, had previously shown promise as a high temperature structural adhesive. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the two polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to a 72-hour water-boil and to aging at 204 C.

  18. Micro/Nanostructured Films and Adhesives for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungkyu K; Kang, Sung Min; Yang, Sung Ho; Cho, Woo Kyung

    2015-12-01

    The advanced technologies available for micro/nanofabrication have opened new avenues for interdisciplinary approaches to solve the unmet medical needs of regenerative medicine and biomedical devices. This review highlights the recent developments in micro/nanostructured adhesives and films for biomedical applications, including waterproof seals for wounds or surgery sites, drug delivery, sensing human body signals, and optical imaging of human tissues. We describe in detail the fabrication processes required to prepare the adhesives and films, such as tape-based adhesives, nanofilms, and flexible and stretchable film-based electronic devices. We also discuss their biomedical functions, performance in vitro and in vivo, and the future research needed to improve the current systems. PMID:26510305

  19. Prevailing Torque Locking Feature in Threaded Fasteners Using Anaerobic Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Alan; Hess, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from tests to assess the use of anaerobic adhesive for providing a prevailing torque locking feature in threaded fasteners. Test procedures are developed and tests are performed on three fastener materials, four anaerobic adhesives, and both unseated assembly conditions. Five to ten samples are tested for each combination. Tests for initial use, reuse without additional adhesive, and reuse with additional adhesive are performed for all samples. A 48-hour cure time was used for all initial use and reuse tests. Test data are presented as removal torque versus removal angle with the specification required prevailing torque range added for performance assessment. Percent specification pass rates for the all combinations of fastener material, adhesive, and assembly condition are tabulated and reveal use of anaerobic adhesive as a prevailing torque locking feature is viable. Although not every possible fastener material and anaerobic adhesive combination provides prevailing torque values within specification, any combination can be assessed using the test procedures presented. Reuse without additional anaerobic adhesive generally provides some prevailing torque, and in some cases within specification. Reuse with additional adhesive often provides comparable removal torque data as in initial use.

  20. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of Ag-clad Bi-2223 tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1999-04-20

    The powder-in-tube (PIT) technique was used to fabricate multifilament (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (Bi-2223) superconducting tapes. Transport current properties of these tapes were enhanced by increasing the packing density of the precursor powder and improving the mechanical deformation condition. A critical current (I{sub c}) of > 35 A in long lengths (> 200 m) tapes has been achieved. In measuring the dependence of critical current density on magnetic field and temperature for the optimally processed tapes, we found a J{sub c} of > 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 20 K in magnetic fields up to 3 T and parallel to the c-axis, which is of interest for use in refrigerator-cooled magnets. I{sub c} declined exponentially when an external field was applied perpendicular to the tape surface at 77 K. Mechanical stability was tested for tapes sheathed with pure Ag and Ag-Mg alloy. Tapes made with pure Ag sheathing can withstand a tensile stress of {approx}20 MPa with no detrimental effect on I{sub c} values. Mechanical performance was improved by using Ag-Mg alloy sheathing: values of transport critical current began to decrease at the tensile stress of {approx} 100 MPa. Transport current measurements on tapes wound on a mandrel of 3.81 cm (1.5 in.) diameter at 30{degree} to the longitudinal axis, showed a reduction of {approx} 10% in I{sub c} values for pure Ag-sheathed tapes and 5% reduction in I{sub c} values for Ag-Mg sheathed tapes, compared with the I{sub c} values of as-coiled tapes.

  2. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polystyrene. This technique together with various oxidation techniques that render surfaces suitable for cell culture generated high surface densities of hydroxyl groups. The importance of surface hydroxyl groups for the adhesion of baby hamster kidney cells or leukocytes was demonstrated by the inhibition of adhesion when these groups were blocked: blocking of carboxyl groups did not inhibit adhesion and may raise the adhesion of a surface. These results applied to cell adhesion in the presence and absence of serum. The relative unimportance of fibronectin for the adhesion and spreading of baby hamster kidney cells to hydroxyl-rich surfaces was concluded when cells spread on such surfaces after protein synthesis was inhibited with cycloheximide, fibronectin was removed by trypsinization, and trypsin activity was stopped with leupeptin. PMID:6355120

  3. Tape It! Using Audio Tapes as an Integral Part of a Multi-Media, Multi-Material Approach to Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Gail J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of audio tapes in the social studies classroom. Topics discussed include: using commercial learning aids, using the audio tape, taping directions, accommodating reading levels, recording current events, preparing students to use equipment, and using the tapes for evaluation. For journal availability, see SO 505 448. (Author/DB)

  4. The Effects of Patellar Taping on Knee Joint Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Michael J.; Selfe, James; Bagley, Pam J.; Oldham, Jacqueline A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of patellar taping on knee joint proprioception. Design and Setting: In a research unit, 3 proprioceptive tests were performed. For each of the tests, a standardized patellar taping technique was applied in random order. Subjects: Fifty-two healthy volunteers (27 women, 25 men; age, 23.2 ± 4.6 years; body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.7). Measurements: We measured active angle reproduction, passive angle reproduction, and threshold to detection of passive movement on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results: We found no significant differences between the tape and no-tape conditions in any of the 3 proprioceptive tests (P > .05). However, when the subjects' results for active angle reproduction and passive angle reproduction were graded as good (≤5°) and poor (>5°), taping was found to improve significantly those with poor proprioceptive ability (P < .01). Conclusions: Subjects with good proprioception did not benefit from patellar taping. However, in those healthy subjects with poor proprioceptive ability as measured by active and passive ankle reproduction, patellar taping provided proprioceptive enhancement. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of patellar taping on the proprioceptive status of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:12937439

  5. Surreptitious Taping: The Arguments for and the Ethics against.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Thomas W.

    Much discussion within media ethics has focused on the acceptability of surreptitious tape recording of news sources by media professionals. The most common legal and social arguments supporting secret taping assert that recorders "hear" and "remember" better, are expedient and practical, protect against libel suits, provide historical…

  6. Using a Taped Intervention to Improve Kindergarten Students' Number Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Katherine R.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Fuller, Emily J.; Greear, Corrine

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across students was used to evaluate the effects of a taped numbers (TN) intervention on the number-identification accuracy of 4 kindergarten students. During TN, students attempted to name the numbers 0 through 9 on randomized lists before each number was provided via a tape player 2 s later. All 4 students showed…

  7. Tape the Teacher: Easier Field Trips for Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lynne; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes a tape-guided field trip that has been used successfully with college biology students in the University of California Botanical Garden. This program enables large numbers of students to make individual biological observations in the field with the aid of a specially tailored, taped guide. (JR)

  8. The Effects of Patellar Taping on Knee Joint Proprioception.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Michael J; Selfe, James; Bagley, Pam J; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2002-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of patellar taping on knee joint proprioception. DESIGN AND SETTING: In a research unit, 3 proprioceptive tests were performed. For each of the tests, a standardized patellar taping technique was applied in random order. SUBJECTS: Fifty-two healthy volunteers (27 women, 25 men; age, 23.2 +/- 4.6 years; body mass index, 23.3 +/- 3.7). MEASUREMENTS: We measured active angle reproduction, passive angle reproduction, and threshold to detection of passive movement on an isokinetic dynamometer. RESULTS: We found no significant differences between the tape and no-tape conditions in any of the 3 proprioceptive tests (P >.05). However, when the subjects' results for active angle reproduction and passive angle reproduction were graded as good (5 degrees ), taping was found to improve significantly those with poor proprioceptive ability (P <.01). CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with good proprioception did not benefit from patellar taping. However, in those healthy subjects with poor proprioceptive ability as measured by active and passive ankle reproduction, patellar taping provided proprioceptive enhancement. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of patellar taping on the proprioceptive status of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  9. Low-cost tape system measures velocity of acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstein, R.

    1964-01-01

    By affixing perforated magnetic recording tape to the falling end of a body, acceleration and velocity were measured. The measurement was made by allowing the tape to pass between a light source and a photoelectric sensor. Data was obtained from a readout device.

  10. Tape-Drive Based Plasma Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Osterhoff, Jens; Evans, Eugene; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22

    We present experimental results on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used for a compact coupling of a laser beam into a staged laser driven electron accelerator. This novel kind of plasma mirror is suitable for high repetition rates and for high number of laser shots. In order to design a compact, staged laser plasma based accelerator or collider [1], the coupling of the laser beam into the different stages represents one of the key issues. To limit the spatial foot print and thus to realize a high overall acceleration gradient, a concept has to be found which realizes this in-coupling within a few centimeters (cf. Fig 1). The fluence of the laser pulse several centimeters away from the acceleration stage (focus) exceeds the damage threshold of any available mirror coating. Therefore, in reference [2] a plasma mirror was suggested for this purpose. We present experiments on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used to reflect the focused laser beam into the acceleration stage. Plasma mirrors composed of antireflection coated glass substrates are usually used to improve the temporal laser contrast of laser pulses by several orders of magnitudes [3,4]. This is particularly important for laser interaction with solid matter, such as ion acceleration [5,6] and high harmonic generation on surfaces [7]. Therefore, the laser pulse is weekly focused onto a substrate. The main pulse generates a plasma and is reflected at the critical surface, whereas the low intensity pre-pulse (mainly the Amplified Spontaneous Emission pedestal) will be transmitted through the substrate before the mirror has been triggered. Several publications [3,4] demonstrate a conservation of the spatial beam quality and a reflectivity of about 70 %. The drawback of this technique is the limited repetition rate since for every shot a fresh surface has to be provided. In the past years several novel approaches for high repetition rate plasma mirrors have been developed [2, 8

  11. Portable digital pressure indicator for calibrating magnetic tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Royce F.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a portable Digital Pressure Indicator (DPI) to be used for calibrating the pressure systems on Langley's magnetic tape recorders is described. High-speed magnetic tape recorders require pressure (0 to 20 psig) for providing an air cushion across the tape guides and a slight vacuum (30 inch H2O) for maintaining the proper number of tape loops in the advance and feed chamber. The DPI is a hand-held device that can be quickly coupled to a magnetic tape recorder and includes a two-position switch for selecting either measured pressure or vacuum, to be displayed digitally in engineering units (psig or inches H2O). The DPI is currently in use in Langley's Analysis and Computation Division.

  12. Investigating Delamination Migration in Composite Tape Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.

    2014-01-01

    A modification to a recently developed test specimen designed to investigate migration of a delamination between neighboring ply interfaces in tape laminates is presented. The specimen is a cross-ply laminated beam consisting of 40 plies with a polytetrafluoroethylene insert spanning part way along its length. The insert is located between a lower 0-degree ply (specimen length direction) and a stack of four 90-degree plies (specimen width direction). The modification involved a stacking sequence that promotes stable delamination growth prior to migration, and included a relocation of the insert from the specimen midplane to the interface between plies 14 and 15. Specimens were clamped at both ends onto a rigid baseplate and loaded on their upper surface via a piano hinge assembly, resulting in a predominantly flexural loading condition. Tests were conducted with the load-application point positioned at various locations along a specimen's span. This position affected the sequence of damage events during a test.

  13. Intercomputer transfer in full precision of arbitrary data on magnetic tape employing NASTRAN user tape format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A description is presented of two new utility programs which implement the transfer, in full precision, of arbitrary data (matrices or tables) between any of the three NASTRAN operative computers without the handling of large card decks. These computers include the CDC 6000 series, the IBM 360-370 series, and the Univac 1100 series. The data may be generated by NASTRAN or by another computer program if the NASTRAN user tape format is employed.

  14. Effect of 3 Different Applications of Kinesio Taping Denko® on Electromyographic Activity: Inhibition or Facilitation of the Quadriceps of Males During Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Júlio C.; Mezêncio, Bruno; Claudino, João G.; Soncin, Rafael; Miyashiro, Pedro L. Sampaio; Sousa, Eric P.; Borges, Eduardo; Zanetti, Vinícius; Phillip, Igor; Mochizuki, Luiz; Amadio, Alberto C.

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio taping consists of a technique which uses the application of an elastic adhesive tape. It has become a widely used rehabilitation modality for the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of the application of Kinesio Taping Denko® in three conditions (facilitation, inhibition, and placebo) on the electromyographic activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles on facilitating or inhibiting the muscle function and on the perceived exertion during the barbell back squat exercise in healthy male subjects. Methods: It was a randomized, single-blinded and controlled study in which 18 males (28.0 ± 6.7 years old; 85.8 ± 8.2 kg mass; 1.80 ± 0.07 m tall; 0.97 ± 0.04 m lower limb length) performed barbell back squat exercise with different conditions of Kinesio Taping Denko® applications: Facilitation, inhibition and placebo. Previous to the mentioned conditions, all individuals were assessed without applying kinesio Taping Denko® during the exercise. OMNI scale was used after each set for perceived exertion evaluation. No differences (p < 0.05) in the electromyographic activity of the biceps femoris, vastus lateralis and vastus medialis or OMNI scale were recorded under any conditions. The results show that the kinesio taping denko®may not alter the magnitude of the electromyography activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and biceps femoris during the squat exercise. Furthermore, the perceived exertion was not affected by the kinesio taping denko® application. Key points Researchers involved in collecting data in this study have no financial or personal interest in the outcome of results or the sponsor. The perceived exertion was not affected by the kinesiology taping application. Kinesiology taping application may not alter the magnitude of EMG activity of vastuslateralis, vastusmedialis, and biceps femoris during the barbell back squat exercise. Electromyographic activity of

  15. Tape transfer atomization patterning of liquid alloys for microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times. PMID:25673261

  16. Tape Transfer Atomization Patterning of Liquid Alloys for Microfluidic Stretchable Wireless Power Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times.

  17. High-Throughput Method of Whole-Brain Sectioning, Using the Tape-Transfer Technique

    PubMed Central

    Pinskiy, Vadim; Jones, Jamie; Tolpygo, Alexander S.; Franciotti, Neil; Weber, Kevin; Mitra, Partha P.

    2015-01-01

    Cryostat sectioning is a popular but labor-intensive method for preparing histological brain sections. We have developed a modification of the commercially available CryoJane tape collection method that significantly improves the ease of collection and the final quality of the tissue sections. The key modification involves an array of UVLEDs to achieve uniform polymerization of the glass slide and robust adhesion between the section and slide. This report presents system components and detailed procedural steps, and provides examples of end results; that is, 20μm mouse brain sections that have been successfully processed for routine Nissl, myelin staining, DAB histochemistry, and fluorescence. The method is also suitable for larger brains, such as rat and monkey. PMID:26181725

  18. Tape Transfer Atomization Patterning of Liquid Alloys for Microfluidic Stretchable Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times. PMID:25673261

  19. Reflectance characterization of tape-based plasma mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, B. H.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Specular reflections of relativistic laser pulses from an overdense plasma mirror (PM) were studied experimentally. The pointing stability of the PM and reflectance of the input laser were characterized. The solid material used for the PM was a VHS tape. This study was done for the magnetic and plastic sides of the VHS tape, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. The laser pulse fluence was varied by changing the focus position relative to the tape surface, which changed the spot size at the tape. The pointing fluctuations of the reflected pulses caused by the PM were ≃1 mrad. A peak reflectance of 82% was obtained from the plastic surface of the VHS tape when focusing s-polarized light 4 mm from the tape surface (the wavefront quality was confirmed to be conserved). An analytic model was developed to understand the physics of the interaction for each tape material and polarization. Fitting of our model parameters to the experimental results allowed an estimate of the key plasma parameters such as plasma expansion velocity, ionization intensity, and fraction of absorbed laser energy.

  20. Unrecorded wideband instrumentation reference tape feasibility study: Frequency response results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hust, D. R.

    1980-03-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine signal response variations when a variety of wideband instrumentation magnetic tapes is used on a cross section of recorder/reproducer systems. Data for the investigation were collected by transmitting a set of eight sample test tapes to participating data recording/reproducing facilities for the purpose of making data measurements. Data collected represent measurements made with 16 different recorder/reproducer systems at 11 different testing facilities located throughout the United States. The data-collection process involved approximately 2 years of testing. The originating/coordinating facility was the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California. The test results indicated the following: all of the sample test tapes exhibited bidirectional performance within the limits of measurement repeatability; overall system stability was better in the low-band regions than in the upper-band regions; and the overall relative frequency response of the sample test tapes did not change appreciably during the 2 year investigative period. The most significant result of the test measurements is that at least 90% of the frequency response values were within + or - 2.0 dB at all frequencies. Machine stability factors such as azimuth, equalizer, and gain changes had more effect on data variability than did magnetic tape or tape speed. The use of a reference tape system is recommended as a method to assure that relative frequency response variations will be less than or equal to + or - 2.0 dB.

  1. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  2. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  3. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample. PMID:22397643

  4. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  5. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Damaged Arresting Gear Tapes for the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on damaged arresting gear tapes at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. The arrestment system uses five pairs of tapes to bring the test carriage to a halt. The procedure used to determine when to replace the tapes consists of a close evaluation of each of the 10 tapes after each run. During this evaluation, each tape is examined thoroughly and any damage observed on the tape is recorded. If the damaged tape does not pass the inspection, the tape is replaced with a new one. For the past 13 years, the most commonly seen damage types are edge fray damage and transverse damage. Tests were conducted to determine the maximum tensile strength of a damaged arresting gear tape specimen. The data indicate that tapes exhibiting transverse damage can withstand higher loads than tapes with edge fray damage.

  7. Improving the Spacelab mass memory unit tape layout with a simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noneman, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A tape drive called the Mass Memory Unit (MMU) stores software used by Spacelab computers. MMU tape motion must be minimized during typical flight operations to avoid a loss of scientific data. A projection of the tape motion is needed for evaluation of candidate tape layouts. A computer simulation of the scheduled and unscheduled MMU tape accesses is developed for this purpose. This simulation permits evaluations of candidate tape layouts by tracking and summarizing tape movements. The factors that affect tape travel are investigated and a heuristic is developed to find a good tape layout. An improved tape layout for Spacelab I is selected after the evaluation of fourteen candidates. The simulation model will provide the ability to determine MMU layouts that substantially decrease the tape travel on future Spacelab flights.

  8. Freeze Tape Casting of Functionally Graded Porous Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Freeze tape casting is a means of making preforms of ceramic sheets that, upon subsequent completion of fabrication processing, can have anisotropic and/or functionally graded properties that notably include aligned and graded porosity. Freeze tape casting was developed to enable optimization of the microstructures of porous ceramic components for use as solid oxide electrodes in fuel cells: Through alignment and grading of pores, one can tailor surface areas and diffusion channels for flows of gas and liquid species involved in fuel-cell reactions. Freeze tape casting offers similar benefits for fabrication of optimally porous ceramics for use as catalysts, gas sensors, and filters.

  9. Augmented low-Dye tape alters foot mobility and neuromotor control of gait in individuals with and without exercise related leg pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Augmented low-Dye (ALD) tape is frequently used in the management of lower limb musculoskeletal pain and injury, yet our knowledge of its effect is incomplete, especially in regard to its neuromotor effects. Methods We measured electromyographic (EMG) activity of twelve lower limb muscles, three-dimensional kinematics of the ankle, knee, hip and pelvis, foot posture and foot mobility to determine the physiological effect of ALD tape. Fourteen females with exercise related leg pain and 14 matched asymptomatic females walked on a treadmill under three conditions: pre-tape, tape and post-tape. A series of repeated measure analysis of variance procedures were performed to investigate differences in EMG, kinematic, foot posture and mobility measurements. Results Application of ALD tape produced reductions in recruitment of tibialis anterior (7.3%) and tibialis posterior (6.9%). Large reductions in midfoot mobility (0.45 to 0.63 cm) and increases in arch height (0.58 cm), as well as moderate changes in ankle motion in the sagittal (2.0 to 5.3°) and transverse planes (4.0 to 4.3°) were observed. Reduced muscle activation (<3.0%) and increased motion (<1.7°) was observed at more proximal segments (knee, hip, pelvis) but were of smaller magnitude than at the foot and ankle. Changes in foot posture, foot mobility, ankle kinematics and leg muscle activity did not persist following the removal of ALD tape, but at more proximal segments small changes (<2.2°, <5.4% maximum) continued to be observed following the removal of tape. There were no differences between groups. Conclusions This study provides evidence that ALD tape influences muscle recruitment, movement patterns, foot posture and foot mobility. These effects occur in individuals with and without pain, and are dissipated up the kinetic chain. ALD tape should be considered in the management of individuals where increased arch height, reduced foot mobility, reduced ankle abduction and plantar flexion or

  10. Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength.

    PubMed

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2016-09-01

    Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces were small, but strongly exceeded them when shear forces were large, resulting in an approximately linear increase of adhesion with friction. Adhesion sharply increased at peel angles less than ca 30°, allowing a rapid switch between attachment and detachment. The departure from classic peeling theory coincided with the appearance of pad sliding, which dramatically increased the peel force via a combination of two mechanisms. First, partial sliding pre-stretched the pads, so that they were effectively stiffer upon detachment and peeled increasingly like inextensible tape. Second, pad sliding reduces the thickness of the fluid layer in the contact zone, thereby increasing the stress levels required for peeling. In combination, these effects can explain the coupling between adhesion and friction that is fundamental to adhesion control across all climbing animals. Our results highlight that control of adhesion is not solely achieved by direction-dependence and morphological anisotropy, suggesting promising new routes for the development of controllable bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27605165

  11. Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces were small, but strongly exceeded them when shear forces were large, resulting in an approximately linear increase of adhesion with friction. Adhesion sharply increased at peel angles less than ca 30°, allowing a rapid switch between attachment and detachment. The departure from classic peeling theory coincided with the appearance of pad sliding, which dramatically increased the peel force via a combination of two mechanisms. First, partial sliding pre-stretched the pads, so that they were effectively stiffer upon detachment and peeled increasingly like inextensible tape. Second, pad sliding reduces the thickness of the fluid layer in the contact zone, thereby increasing the stress levels required for peeling. In combination, these effects can explain the coupling between adhesion and friction that is fundamental to adhesion control across all climbing animals. Our results highlight that control of adhesion is not solely achieved by direction-dependence and morphological anisotropy, suggesting promising new routes for the development of controllable bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27605165

  12. Neuron adhesion and strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Aracely; Jian, Kuihuan; Ko, Gladys; Liang, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the neuron/material adhesion is important for neuron stimulation and growth. The current challenges remain in the lack of precision of measuring techniques and understanding the behavior of neuron. Here, we report a fluid shear method to investigate adhesion at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface. In this study, the adhesion of 12-day-old chick embryo-retina neurons cultured on poly-D-lysine coated glass coverslips was measured via parallel disk rotational flow. The shear stress experienced by the cells increases with the disk radius. There is a critical point along the radius (Rc) where the stress experienced by the neurons equals their adhesion. The measured Rc can be used to calculate the neuron adhesion. Our results demonstrate that neurons adhered to the poly-D-lysine had a strain hardening effect. The adhesive shear stress of the neuron-material increased with applied shear (τa). When the τa reached or exceeded the value of 40 dyn/cm2, the adhesion remained constant at approximately 30 dyn/cm2. The present work allowed us not only to quantify the adhesive strength and force but also to evaluate the value of strain hardening at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface.

  13. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  14. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  15. Staying sticky: contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mengüç, Yigit; Röhrig, Michael; Abusomwan, Uyiosa; Hölscher, Hendrik; Sitti, Metin

    2014-05-01

    The exceptionally adhesive foot of the gecko remains clean in dirty environments by shedding contaminants with each step. Synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives have achieved similar attachment strengths to the gecko on smooth surfaces, but the process of contact self-cleaning has yet to be effectively demonstrated. Here, we present the first gecko-inspired adhesive that has matched both the attachment strength and the contact self-cleaning performance of the gecko's foot on a smooth surface. Contact self-cleaning experiments were performed with three different sizes of mushroom-shaped elastomer microfibres and five different sizes of spherical silica contaminants. Using a load-drag-unload dry contact cleaning process similar to the loads acting on the gecko foot during locomotion, our fully contaminated synthetic gecko adhesives could recover lost adhesion at a rate comparable to that of the gecko. We observed that the relative size of contaminants to the characteristic size of the microfibres in the synthetic adhesive strongly determined how and to what degree the adhesive recovered from contamination. Our approximate model and experimental results show that the dominant mechanism of contact self-cleaning is particle rolling during the drag process. Embedding of particles between adjacent fibres was observed for particles with diameter smaller than the fibre tips, and further studied as a temporary cleaning mechanism. By incorporating contact self-cleaning capabilities, real-world applications of synthetic gecko adhesives, such as reusable tapes, clothing closures and medical adhesives, would become feasible.

  16. Shuttle-Data-Tape XML Translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2005-01-01

    JSDTImport is a computer program for translating native Shuttle Data Tape (SDT) files from American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format into databases in other formats. JSDTImport solves the problem of organizing the SDT content, affording flexibility to enable users to choose how to store the information in a database to better support client and server applications. JSDTImport can be dynamically configured by use of a simple Extensible Markup Language (XML) file. JSDTImport uses this XML file to define how each record and field will be parsed, its layout and definition, and how the resulting database will be structured. JSDTImport also includes a client application programming interface (API) layer that provides abstraction for the data-querying process. The API enables a user to specify the search criteria to apply in gathering all the data relevant to a query. The API can be used to organize the SDT content and translate into a native XML database. The XML format is structured into efficient sections, enabling excellent query performance by use of the XPath query language. Optionally, the content can be translated into a Structured Query Language (SQL) database for fast, reliable SQL queries on standard database server computers.

  17. 13 point video tape quality guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    Until high definition television (ATV) arrives, in the U.S. we must still contend with the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video standard (or PAL or SECAM-depending on your country). NTSC, a 40-year old standard designed for transmission of color video camera images over a small bandwidth, is not well suited for the sharp, full-color images that todays computers are capable of producing. PAL and SECAM also suffers from many of NTSC`s problems, but to varying degrees. Video professionals, when working with computer graphic (CG) images, use two monitors: a computer monitor for producing CGs and an NTSC monitor to view how a CG will look on video. More often than not, the NTSC image will differ significantly from the CG image, and outputting it to NTSC as an artist works enables the him or her to see the images as others will see it. Below are thirteen guidelines designed to increase the quality of computer graphics recorded onto video tape. Viewing your work in NTSC and attempting to follow the below tips will enable you to create higher quality videos. No video is perfect, so don`t expect to abide by every guideline every time.

  18. Adhesives in larynx repair.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M B; Lyons, G D; Webster, D; Wheeler, V R

    1989-04-01

    Guinea pig laryngeal fractures were used as a model to compare the ease of application and effectiveness of the fibrinogen-adhesive system with the ease of application and effectiveness of cyanoacrylate glue and control fractures stinted with contralateral gelatin film. Seven fibrin adhesive-treated and two cyanoacrylate glue-treated guinea pigs were perfused after 60 and 35 days, respectively. The larynges were serial sectioned, and the wound sites were compared. The fibrinogen adhesive system was easier to dispense than cyanoacrylate glue, did not require a completely dry surface, and stabilized within 3 minutes. Cartilage segment alignment with focal, complete fracture healing and symmetrical chondrocyte proliferation were seen in fibrogen adhesive-stinted larynges. In the cyanoacrylate glue-treated larynges, there was no alignment and minimal, asymmetrical chondrocyte proliferation. Gelatin film-stinted controls exhibited similar features. Thus, fibrogen adhesive was easier to apply and more effectively bound laryngeal fractures than cyanoacrylate glue or gelatin film.

  19. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  20. Creating and Using Video Tapes for Cartographic Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Sona K.; Gersmehl, Philip J.

    1986-01-01

    Offers nine suggestions for video tape production and instructional use in a student laboratory for a cartography course. Briefly discusses costs and benefits, including more time for instructors to focus on specific techniques and individual questions. (TRS)

  1. STS-34 mission highlights resource tape, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-11-01

    This video tape contains important visual events including launch Galileo/IUS deployment, onboard crew activities, and landing. Also included is air-to-ground transmission between the crew and Mission Control.

  2. Accuracy testing of electric groundwater-level measurement tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jelinski, Jim; Clayton, Christopher S.; Fulford, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy tests demonstrated that none of the electric-tape models tested consistently met the suggested USGS accuracy of ±0.01 ft. The test data show that the tape models in the study should give a water-level measurement that is accurate to roughly ±0.05 ft per 100 ft without additional calibration. To meet USGS accuracy guidelines, the electric-tape models tested will need to be individually calibrated. Specific conductance also plays a part in tape accuracy. The probes will not work in water with specific conductance values near zero, and the accuracy of one probe was unreliable in very high conductivity water (10,000 microsiemens per centimeter).

  3. Blister Test for Measurements of Adhesion and Adhesion Degradation of Organic Polymers on AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Troconis, Brendy Carolina

    A key parameter for the performance of corrosion protective coatings applied to metals is adhesion. Surface preparation prior to coating application is known to be critical, but there is a lack of understanding of what controls adhesion. Numerous techniques have been developed in the last decades to measure the adhesion strength of coatings to metals. Nonetheless, they are generally non-quantitative, non-reproducible, performed in dry conditions, or overestimate adhesion. In this study, a quantitative and reproducible technique, the Blister Test (BT), is used. The BT offers the ability to study the effects of a range of parameters, including the presence or absence of a wetting liquid, and simulates the stress situation in the coating/substrate interface. The effects of roughness and surface topography were studied by the BT and Optical Profilometry, using AA2024-T3 substrates coated with polyvinyl butyral (PVB). Random abrasion generated a surface with lower average roughness than aligned abrasion due to the continual cross abrasion of the grooves. The BT could discern the effects of different mechanical treatments. An adhesion strength indicator was defined and found to be a useful parameter. The effectiveness of standard adhesion techniques such as ASTM D4541 (Pull-off Test) and ASTM D3359 (Tape Test) was compared to the BT. Also, different attempts to measure adhesion and adhesion degradation of organic polymers to AA2024-T3 were tested. The pull-off test does not produce adhesive failure across the entire interface, while the tape test is a very qualitative technique and does not discern between the effects of different coating systems on the adhesion performance. The BT produces adhesive failure of the primer studied, is very reproducible, and is able to rank different coating systems. Therefore, it was found to be superior to the others. The approaches tested for adhesion degradation were not aggressive enough to have a measurable effect. The effects of

  4. DICOM implementation on online tape library storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komo, Darmadi; Dai, Hailei L.; Elghammer, David; Levine, Betty A.; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-07-01

    The main purpose of this project is to implement a Digital Image and Communications (DICOM) compliant online tape library system over the Internet. Once finished, the system will be used to store medical exams generated from U.S. ARMY Mobile ARMY Surgical Hospital (MASH) in Tuzla, Bosnia. A modified UC Davis implementation of DICOM storage class is used for this project. DICOM storage class user and provider are implemented as the system's interface to the Internet. The DICOM software provides flexible configuration options such as types of modalities and trusted remote DICOM hosts. Metadata is extracted from each exam and indexed in a relational database for query and retrieve purposes. The medical images are stored inside the Wolfcreek-9360 tape library system from StorageTek Corporation. The tape library system has nearline access to more than 1000 tapes. Each tape has a capacity of 800 megabytes making the total nearline tape access of around 1 terabyte. The tape library uses the Application Storage Manager (ASM) which provides cost-effective file management, storage, archival, and retrieval services. ASM automatically and transparently copies files from expensive magnetic disk to less expensive nearline tape library, and restores the files back when they are needed. The ASM also provides a crash recovery tool, which enable an entire file system restore in a short time. A graphical user interface (GUI) function is used to view the contents of the storage systems. This GUI also allows user to retrieve the stored exams and send the exams to anywhere on the Internet using DICOM protocols. With the integration of different components of the system, we have implemented a high capacity online tape library storage system that is flexible and easy to use. Using tape as an alternative storage media as opposed to the magnetic disk has the great potential of cost savings in terms of dollars per megabyte of storage. As this system matures, the Hospital Information Systems

  5. Gait Kinematics After Taping in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Lisa; Dicharry, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan; Wilder, Robert; Hertel, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Context: Chronic ankle instability is characterized by repetitive lateral ankle sprains. Prophylactic ankle taping is a common intervention used to reduce the risk of ankle sprains. However, little research has been conducted to evaluate the effect ankle taping has on gait kinematics. Objective: To investigate the effect of taping on ankle and knee kinematics during walking and jogging in participants with chronic ankle instability. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Participants: A total of 15 individuals (8 men, 7 women; age = 26.9 ± 6.8 years, height = 171.7 ± 6.3 cm, mass = 73.5 ± 10.7 kg) with self-reported chronic ankle instability volunteered. They had an average of 5.3 ± 3.1 incidences of ankle sprain. Intervention(s): Participants walked and jogged in shoes on a treadmill while untaped and taped. The tape technique was a traditional preventive taping procedure. Conditions were randomized. Main Outcome Measure(s): Frontal-plane and sagittal-plane ankle and sagittal-plane knee kinematics were recorded throughout the entire gait cycle. Group means and 90% confidence intervals were calculated, plotted, and inspected for percentages of the gait cycle in which the confidence intervals did not overlap. Results: During walking, participants were less plantar flexed from 64% to 69% of the gait cycle (mean difference = 5.73° ± 0.54°) and less inverted from 51% to 61% (mean difference = 4.34° ± 0.65°) and 76% to 81% (mean difference = 5.55° ± 0.54°) of the gait cycle when taped. During jogging, participants were less dorsiflexed from 12% to 21% (mean difference = 4.91° ± 0.18°) and less inverted from 47% to 58% (mean difference = 6.52° ± 0.12°) of the gait cycle when taped. No sagittal-plane knee kinematic differences were found. Conclusions: In those with chronic ankle instability, taping resulted in a more neutral ankle position during walking and jogging in shoes on a treadmill. This change in

  6. Generation and physical characteristics of the ERTS MSS system corrected computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The generation and format are discussed of the ERTS system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes. The discussion includes spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, data transmission, and conversion of data to computer compatible tapes at the NASA Data Processing Facility. Geometeric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tapes are also included.

  7. Generation and physical characteristics of the LANDSAT-1, -2 and -3 MSS computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1977-01-01

    The generation and format of the LANDSAT 1, 2, and 3 system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes are discussed. Included in the discussion are the spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, the transmission of data, and the conversion of the data to computer compatible tapes. Also included in the discussion are geometric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tape.

  8. Nickel plating connector ends on tape processed slapper detonator cables

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, R.J.

    1989-02-28

    A nickel spot plater has been built as an addition to the other reel-to-reel processing equipment in the Tape Process Laboratory at Mound. This plater, like most of the equipment in the Tape Process Laboratory, is a prototype built to meet Mound's product requirements. This Plating System enables Mound to selectively plate specific areas (connector ends) on a flexible printed circuit cable. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH ADRIVE CONTROL ROD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CABLES AND TAPES ASSOCIATED WITH A-DRIVE CONTROL ROD SYSTEM, AT LEVEL +15’, DIRECTLY ABOVE PDP CONTROL ROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE CABLES FROM THE PDP ROOM GO THROUGH THE CONCRETE WALL, MAKE A RIGHT ANGLE TURN DOWNWARD, AND DESCEND INTO THE PDP CONTROL ROOM AS VERTICAL TAPES - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  10. FGGE/SBUV tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The FGGE/SBUV Level 2C data set consists of 12 9-track data tapes, each of which contains total ozone and ozone profile data for one calendar month grouped in files containing the data in a 6 hour synoptic time block. The data flow and quality checks in the production of this data set are described as well as the format of the data tapes and the accompanying shipping documents.

  11. Progress Toward Demonstrating a High Performance Optical Tape Recording Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the technology developments achieved during the first year of a program to develop a high performance digital optical tape recording device using a solid state, diode pumped, frequency doubled green laser source. The goal is to demonstrate, within two years, useful read/write data transfer rates to at least 100 megabytes per second and a user capacity of up to one terabyte per cartridge implemented in a system using a '3480' style mono-reel tape cartridge.

  12. The effect of Kinesio Taping on handgrip strength.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Pereira, Kelice Cristina; Protássio, Carina Celedonio; Lucas, Lorrane Barbosa; Matheus, Joao Paulo C

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to evaluate the change in muscle function induced by a Kinesio Tape application with no or moderate tension, to the dominant and non-dominant arms. [Subjects and Methods] This research was a quantitative study, in which 75 women participated. The subjects, aged 18-30 years, were divided into 3 groups, Kinesio, Kinesio without Tension, and Control, and they were assessed before the taping intervention and after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of taping. [Results] The Kinesio group subjects demonstrated an increase in handgrip strength after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of tape application compared to control. A statistically significant increase in strength was observed in the Kinesio group comparison to the Control after 24 hours and 48 hours for the right hand, and after 48 hours for the left hand. Improvement in the Kinesio group compared to the Kinesio without Tension was observed only after 24 hours of taping application, and only in the right hand. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping method augmented the handgrip strength of healthy women, and the increase in grip strength was maintained for 48 hours after its application; the dominant hand demonstrated the greatest strength values.

  13. Kinesio Taping effects on knee extension force among soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Maysa V. G. B.; Vieira, Edgar R.; Brunt, Denis; Goethel, Márcio F.; Gonçalves, Mauro; Quemelo, Paulo R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping (KT) is widely used, however the effects of KT on muscle activation and force are contradictory. Objective: To evaluate the effects of KT on knee extension force in soccer players. Method: This is a clinical trial study design. Thirty-four subjects performed two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of the lower limbs pre, immediately post, and 24 hours after tape application on the lower limbs. Both lower limbs were taped, using K-Tape and 3M Micropore tape randomly on the right and left thighs of the participants. Isometric knee extension force was measured for dominant side using a strain gauge. The following variables were assessed: peak force, time to peak force, rate of force development until peak force, time to peak rate of force development, and 200 ms pulse. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the variables assessed between KT and Micropore conditions (F=0.645, p=0.666) or among testing sessions (pre, post, and 24h after) (F=0.528, p=0.868), and there was no statistical significance (F=0.271, p=0.986) for interaction between tape conditions and testing session. Conclusion: KT did not affect the force-related measures assessed immediately and 24 hours after the KT application compared with Micropore application, during maximal isometric voluntary knee extension. PMID:25789557

  14. The effect of Kinesio Taping on handgrip strength

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Pereira, Kelice Cristina; Protássio, Carina Celedonio; Lucas, Lorrane Barbosa; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to evaluate the change in muscle function induced by a Kinesio Tape application with no or moderate tension, to the dominant and non-dominant arms. [Subjects and Methods] This research was a quantitative study, in which 75 women participated. The subjects, aged 18–30 years, were divided into 3 groups, Kinesio, Kinesio without Tension, and Control, and they were assessed before the taping intervention and after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of taping. [Results] The Kinesio group subjects demonstrated an increase in handgrip strength after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of tape application compared to control. A statistically significant increase in strength was observed in the Kinesio group comparison to the Control after 24 hours and 48 hours for the right hand, and after 48 hours for the left hand. Improvement in the Kinesio group compared to the Kinesio without Tension was observed only after 24 hours of taping application, and only in the right hand. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping method augmented the handgrip strength of healthy women, and the increase in grip strength was maintained for 48 hours after its application; the dominant hand demonstrated the greatest strength values. PMID:25931682

  15. Calibration tests on magnetic tape lightning current detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, K. E.

    1980-04-01

    The low cost, passive, peak lightning current detector (LCD) invented at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center, uses magnetic audio recording tape to sense the magnitude of the peak magnetic field around a conductor carrying lightning currents. Test results show that the length of audio tape erased was linearly related to the peak simulated lightning currents in a round conductor. Accuracies of + or - 10% were shown for measurements made using a stopwatch readout technique to determine the amount of tape erased by the lightning current. The stopwatch technique is a simple, low cost means of obtaining LCD readouts and can be used in the field to obtain immediate results. Where more accurate data are desired, the tape is played and the output recorded on a strip chart, oscilloscope, or some other means so that measurements can be made on that recording. Conductor dimensions, tape holder dimensions, and tape formulation must also be considered to obtain a more accurate result. If the shape of the conductor is other than circular (i.e., angle, channel, H-beam), an analysis of the magnetic field is required to use an LCD, especially at low current levels.

  16. Calibration tests on magnetic tape lightning current detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The low cost, passive, peak lightning current detector (LCD) invented at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center, uses magnetic audio recording tape to sense the magnitude of the peak magnetic field around a conductor carrying lightning currents. Test results show that the length of audio tape erased was linearly related to the peak simulated lightning currents in a round conductor. Accuracies of + or - 10% were shown for measurements made using a stopwatch readout technique to determine the amount of tape erased by the lightning current. The stopwatch technique is a simple, low cost means of obtaining LCD readouts and can be used in the field to obtain immediate results. Where more accurate data are desired, the tape is played and the output recorded on a strip chart, oscilloscope, or some other means so that measurements can be made on that recording. Conductor dimensions, tape holder dimensions, and tape formulation must also be considered to obtain a more accurate result. If the shape of the conductor is other than circular (i.e., angle, channel, H-beam), an analysis of the magnetic field is required to use an LCD, especially at low current levels.

  17. Clinical status of ten dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Verschueren, M; Gladys, S; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory testing of dentin adhesive systems still requires corroboration by long-term clinical trials for their ultimate clinical effectiveness to be validated. The objective of this clinical investigation was to evaluate, retrospectively, the clinical effectiveness of earlier-investigated dentin adhesive systems (Scotchbond, Gluma, Clearfil New Bond, Scotchbond 2, Tenure, and Tripton), and to compare their clinical results with those obtained with four modern total-etch adhesive systems (Bayer exp. 1 and 2, Clearfil Liner Bond System, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). In total, 1177 Class V cervical lesions in the teeth of 346 patients were restored following two cavity designs: In Group A, enamel was neither beveled nor intentionally etched, as per ADA guidelines; in Group B, adjacent enamel was beveled and conditioned. Clinical retention rates definitely indicated the improved clinical efficacy of the newest dentin adhesives over the earlier systems. With regard to adhesion strategy, adhesive systems that removed the smear layer and concurrently demineralized the dentin surface layer performed clinically better than systems that modified the disorderly layer of smear debris without complete removal. Hybridization by resin interdiffusion into the exposed dentinal collagen layer, combined with attachment of resin tags into the opened dentin tubules, appeared to be essential for reliable dentin bonding but might be insufficient by itself. The additional formation of an elastic bonding area as a polymerization shrinkage absorber and the use of a microfine restorative composite apparently guaranteed an efficient clinical result. The perfect one-year retention recorded for Clearfil Liner Bond System and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose must be confirmed at later recalls. PMID:7983255

  18. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  19. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  20. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  1. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  2. Evaluation of adhesive materials used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H. W.; Keough, B. K.; Pippin, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The adhesive and adhesive-like materials flown on LDEF included epoxies and silicones (including lap shear specimens), conformal coatings, potting compounds, and several tapes and transfer films. With the exception of the lap shear specimens, these materials were used in the fabrication and assembly of the experiments such as bonding thermal control surfaces to other hardware and holding individual specimens in place, similar to applications on other spacecraft. Typically, the adhesives were not exposed to solar radiation or atomic oxygen. Only one adhesive system was used in a structural application. This report documents all results of the Materials and Systems SIG investigation into the effect of long term low Earth orbit (LEO) exposure of these materials. Results of this investigation show that if the material was shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69 month exposure to LEO had, in most cases, minimal effect on the material.

  3. Obituary: Gerald Frederick Tape, 1915-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Robert E.

    2007-12-01

    Gerald Frederick Tape, a distinguished science statesman and administrator, died on November 20, 2005. Jerry, as he was known to all, took on many diverse and important responsibilities throughout his life and dealt with them with quiet authority and grace. This was the hallmark of his life. The Board of Trustees of Associated Universities, Inc., which he served for many years, expressed this in its condolences, writing "Jerry personified integrity, thoroughness and dedication. His sensitivity for the views of others, his sincerity, his personal commitment, his calm approach and his unfailing good humor were all greatly admired and respected." Jerry was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan on May 29, 1915 but grew up in Milan, a nearby country farm community, and in Ypsilanti where his father was Principal of Michigan State Normal College, which later became Eastern Michigan University (EMU). It was there that he first became interested in physics. It was there also that he met and courted Josephine Waffen, who later would become his wife for more than sixty-six years and fill their lives with three loving sons, Walter, James, and Thomas. Upon graduation from EMU, Jerry was awarded a scholarship that took him to the University of Michigan where he earned a Ph.D. in Physics, researching the decay modes of the radioisotopes of iodine. In the Fall of 1939, during the waning days of the Great Depression, he was offered an Instructorship in the Physics Department of Cornell University, a promising start for a fruitful academic career. He brought his bride Jo to Ithaca and joined the cyclotron group under Robert Bacher and Willy Higginbotham while devising a laboratory course in nuclear techniques for graduate students. Bacher and Higginbotham soon left Cornell to join a new wartime laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and many other colleagues were "drafted" for war work. Bacher persuaded Jerry to join him at the MIT Radiation Laboratory in February

  4. Atomic scale enhancement of the adhesion of beryllium films to carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1995-12-01

    We have used 200 keV carbon ions to enhance the adhesion of 240-nm thick Be films to polished, vitreous carbon substrates. Adhesion of the as-deposited films was below that necessary to pass the scotch-tape test. Carbon ion fluences less than 1.6x10{sup 14} C/cm{sup 2} were sufficient to ensure the passage of the tape test without affecting the optical properties of the films. Adhesion failure of the as-deposited film was attributed to an inner oxide layer between the Be and the carbon. Because this oxide ({approximately}5 nm of BeO) was not measurably changed by the irradiation process, these results are consistent with adhesion enhancement occurring on the atomic scale at the interface between the inner oxide and the carbon substrate. This conclusion was supported by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) data, and potential adhesion mechanisms are discussed with consideration of relative contributions from electronic and nuclear stopping.

  5. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    containers where the content can be easily seen without interference and where wording or symbols can be read through the container. You see this increasingly with pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and toiletries, even bottled beer. Achieving transparency is one thing but this property must be combined with all the physical properties required of the pressure sensitive adhesive. First there is the question of permanence, re-positionability and removability and the degree to which these features are required. Secondly many complications arise from the range of materials to which the adhesive must be anchored and the range to which it will be applied and must bond. Obviously these surfaces vary from those with the highest surface energy (polycarbonate for example) to those apolar surfaces engineered for minimum attraction (PTFE -- 'Teflon' for example).

  6. Kinesio Tape and Shoulder-Joint Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Aarseth, Lindsay M.; Suprak, David N.; Chalmers, Gordon R.; Lyon, Lonnie; Dahlquist, Dylan T.

    2015-01-01

    Context Joint position sense (JPS) is a key neuromuscular factor for developing and maintaining control of muscles around a joint. It is important when performing specialized tasks, especially at the shoulder. No researchers have studied how Kinesio Tape (KT) application affects JPS. Objective To investigate the effects of KT application and no tape on shoulder JPS at increasing shoulder elevations in athletes. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 27 healthy athletes who did not participate in overhead sports (age = 20.44 ± 1.05 years, height = 175.02 ± 11.67 cm, mass = 70.74 ± 9.65 kg) with no previous pathologic shoulder conditions volunteered for the study. All participants were from 1 university. Intervention(s) Shoulder JPS was assessed at increasing elevations with and without KT application. Participants attempted to actively replicate 3 target positions with and without the KT and without visual guidance. Main Outcome Measure(s) We examined absolute and variable repositioning errors at increasing shoulder-elevation levels with and without KT application. Results Data revealed an interaction between tape and position for absolute error (F2,52 = 4.07, P = .02); simple effects revealed an increase in error, with KT demonstrating a 2.65° increase in error at 90° of elevation compared with no tape (t26 = 2.65, P = .01). The effect size was medium (ω2 = .135). Variable error showed no interaction of tape and position (F2,52 = .709, P = .50). Further analysis of simple effects was not needed. However, we still calculated the effect size and observed small effect sizes for tape (ω2 = .002), position (ω2 = .072), and tape by position (ω2 = .027). Conclusions At 90° of elevation, shoulder JPS was impaired by the application of KT. PMID:26090707

  7. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  8. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  9. Laboratory test for ice adhesion strength using commercial instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyu; Zhang, Wei; Siva, Adarsh; Tiea, Daniel; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2014-01-21

    A laboratory test method for evaluating ice adhesion has been developed employing a commercially available instrument normally used for dynamic mechanical analysis (TA RSA-III). This is the first laboratory ice adhesion test that does not require a custom-built apparatus. The upper grip range of ∼10 mm is an enabling feature that is essential for the test. The method involves removal of an ice cylinder from a polymer coating with a probe and the determination of peak removal force (Ps). To validate the test method, the strength of ice adhesion was determined for a prototypical glassy polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate). The distance of the probe from the PMMA surface has been identified as a critical variable for Ps. The new test provides a readily available platform for investigating fundamental surface characteristics affecting ice adhesion. In addition to the ice release test, PMMA coatings were characterized using DSC, DCA, and TM-AFM.

  10. Nondestructive Biological Evidence Collection with Alternative Swabs and Adhesive Lifters.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Dane T; Mealy, Jamia L; Lane, J Nicholas; Parsons, M Neal; Bathrick, Abigail S; Slack, Donia P

    2016-03-01

    In forensic science, biological material is typically collected from evidence via wet/dry double swabbing with cotton swabs, which is effective but can visibly damage an item's surface. When an item's appearance must be maintained, dry swabbing and tape-lifting may be employed as collection techniques that are visually nondestructive to substrates' surfaces. This study examined the efficacy of alternative swab matrices and adhesive lifters when collecting blood and fingerprints from glass, painted drywall, 100% cotton, and copy paper. Data were evaluated by determining the percent profile and quality score for each STR profile generated. Hydraflock(®) swabs, BVDA Gellifters(®) , and Scenesafe FAST™ tape performed as well as or better than cotton swabs when collecting fingerprints from painted drywall and 100% cotton. Collection success was also dependent on the type of biological material sampled and the substrate on which it was deposited. These results demonstrated that alternative swabs and adhesive lifters can be effective for nondestructive DNA collection from various substrates. PMID:27404622

  11. Nondestructive Biological Evidence Collection with Alternative Swabs and Adhesive Lifters.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Dane T; Mealy, Jamia L; Lane, J Nicholas; Parsons, M Neal; Bathrick, Abigail S; Slack, Donia P

    2016-03-01

    In forensic science, biological material is typically collected from evidence via wet/dry double swabbing with cotton swabs, which is effective but can visibly damage an item's surface. When an item's appearance must be maintained, dry swabbing and tape-lifting may be employed as collection techniques that are visually nondestructive to substrates' surfaces. This study examined the efficacy of alternative swab matrices and adhesive lifters when collecting blood and fingerprints from glass, painted drywall, 100% cotton, and copy paper. Data were evaluated by determining the percent profile and quality score for each STR profile generated. Hydraflock(®) swabs, BVDA Gellifters(®) , and Scenesafe FAST™ tape performed as well as or better than cotton swabs when collecting fingerprints from painted drywall and 100% cotton. Collection success was also dependent on the type of biological material sampled and the substrate on which it was deposited. These results demonstrated that alternative swabs and adhesive lifters can be effective for nondestructive DNA collection from various substrates.

  12. The NT digital micro tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toshikazu; Alstad, John; Younker, Mike

    The description of an audio recorder may at first glance seem out of place in a conference which has been dedicated to the discussion of the technology and requirements of mass data storage. However, there are several advanced features of the NT system which will be of interest to the mass storage technologist. Moreover, there are a sufficient number of data storage formats in current use which have evolved from their audio counterparts to recommend a close attention to major innovative introductions of audio storage formats. While the existing analog micro-cassette recorder has been (and will continue to be) adequate for various uses, there are significant benefits to be gained through the application of digital technology. The elimination of background tape hiss and the availability of two relatively wide band channels (for stereo recording), for example, would greatly enhance listenability and speech intelligibility. And with the use of advanced high-density recording and LSI circuit technologies, a digital micro recorder can realize unprecedented compactness with excellent energy efficiency. This is what was accomplished with the NT-1 Digital Micro Recorder. Its remarkably compact size contributes to its portability. The high-density NT format enables up to two hours of low-noise digital stereo recording on a cassette the size of a postage stamp. Its highly energy-efficient mechanical and electrical design results in low power consumption; the unit can be operated up to 7 hours (for continuous recording) on a single AA alkaline battery. Advanced user conveniences include a multifunction LCD readout. The unit's compactness and energy-efficiency, in particular, are attributes that cannot be matched by existing analog and digital audio formats. The size, performance, and features of the NT format are of benefit primarily to those who desire improved portability and audio quality in a personal memo product. The NT Recorder is the result of over ten years of

  13. Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2003-11-29

    An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

  14. Application of Kinesio Taping method for newborn swallowing difficultly

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Lin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Ke-Vin; Lin, Hong-Yi; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Preterm infants are at an increased risk of sucking problems, swallowing difficulty, and poor nourishment. During the neonatal period, the neurobehavioral organization of a preterm baby is poor compared with that of appropriate gestational age infants. Kinesio Taping has been widely used for edema control, joint protection, and proprioception training. With the help of augmentation of the sensory input for muscle facilitation and inhibition through tapping, the coordination of the target muscle groups can be improved. Until now, no research is available on the use of Kinesio Taping for the swallowing difficulty of infant. Methods: We reported a preterm infant suffering from brain edema at birth and swallowing difficultly until 40 weeks. The swallowing reflex was delayed. Moreover, lip closure and rooting reflex combined with the dysfunction grade of jaw movement were poor. We performed KT methods on the baby under the theory of the direction of the tape for facilitate or inhibit the muscle. Result: After the Kinesio Taping treatment, the sucking function was improved with good lip closure.One week later, the baby was discharged without the use of an oral gastric tube. Conclusion: Kinesio Taping contributed significantly to the improvement of impaired sucking and swallowing and could be implemented as a regular rehabilitative approach for infants suffering from these difficulties. PMID:27495080

  15. Materials for Heated Head Automated Thermoplastic Tape Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is currently pursuing multiple paths to develop out of autoclave (OOA) polymeric composite materials and processes. Polymeric composite materials development includes the synthesis of new and/or modified thermosetting and thermoplastic matrix resins designed for specific OOA processes. OOA processes currently under investigation include vacuum bag only (VBO) prepreg/composite fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and heated head automated thermoplastic tape placement (HHATP). This paper will discuss the NASA Langley HHATP facility and capabilities and recent work on characterizing thermoplastic tape quality and requirements for quality part production. Samples of three distinct versions of APC-2 (AS4/PEEK) thermoplastic dry tape were obtained from two materials vendors, TENCATE, Inc. and CYTEC Engineered Materials** (standard grade and an experimental batch). Random specimens were taken from each of these samples and subjected to photo-microscopy and surface profilometry. The CYTEC standard grade of APC-2 tape had the most voids and splits and the highest surface roughness and/or waviness. Since the APC-2 tape is composed of a thermoplastic matrix, it offers the flexibility of reprocessing to improve quality, and thereby improve final quality of HHATP laminates. Discussions will also include potential research areas and future work that is required to advance the state of the art in the HHATP process for composite fabrication.

  16. Induction Bonding of Prepreg Tape and Titanium Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messier, Bernadette C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid structural laminates made of titanium foil and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite offer a potential for improved performance in aircraft structural applications. To obtain information needed for the automated fabrication of hybrid laminates, a series of bench scale tests were conducted of the magnetic induction bonding of titanium foil and thermoplastic prepreg tape. Foil and prepreg specimens were placed in the gap of a toroid magnet mounted in a bench press. Several magnet power supplies were used to study power at levels from 0.5 to 1.75 kW and frequencies from 50 to 120 kHz. Sol-gel surface-treated titanium foil, 0.0125 cm thick, and PIXA/IM7 prepreg tape were used in several lay-up configurations. Data were obtained on wedge peel bond strength, heating rate, and temperature ramp over a range of magnet power levels and frequencies at different "power-on" times for several magnet gap dimensions. These data will be utilized in assessing the potential for automated processing. Peel strengths of foil-tape bonds depended on the maximum temperature reached during heating and on the applied pressure. Maximum peel strengths were achieved at 1.25kW and 8OkHz. Induction heating of the foil appears to be capable of good bonding up to 10 plies of tape. Heat transfer calculations indicate that a 20-40 C temperature difference exists across the tape thickness during heat-up.

  17. Gecko-Inspired, Controlled Adhesion and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menguc, Yigit

    might replace VelcroRTMand zippers in clothing, and might become a critical component in sports gear, e.g. soccer goal keeper and rock climber gloves. The reversible, controllable nature of the adhesion, as well as its incredible bonding strength, suggests more impressive possibilities for gecko-inspired adhesives: perhaps it might act as a fastener for temporary or emergency construction. We might yet see rolls of single-sided and double-sided gecko-tape sold in hardware stores, not as a replacement for duct tape, but as a replacement for nails, staples and screws. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2006-05-01

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90{sup o} or 180{sup o} and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are << 1 N/mm. This is far below the normal Instron mechanical testing unit Instron mechanical testing unit; glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  19. Interfacial adhesion in rayon/nylon sheath/core composite fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Weiying.

    1991-01-01

    The fibers with enhanced adhesion were produced using a wire coating type process. One objective was to determine an effective coupling agent and the most-appropriate application conditions for maximum interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon bicomponent fibers. The second objective was to characterize the interfacial adhesion between the core fiber and the rayon skin. After removal of the spin finish by water washing, the nylon core fibers were pretreated with fumaric acid (FA) as an adhesion promoter and then were coated with viscose rayon. The results indicated that the interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon composite fibers was significantly improved under the application conditions of 1.0% with 36 second pretreatment time, 1.5% with 18 second pretreatment, and 2% with 9 second pretreatment time. A fiber pull adhesion test method was developed to test the interfacial adhesion. This method effectively determined the adhesion between the core and the skin.

  20. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  1. A New Tracking Method for Helical Scanning Optical Tape Recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahara, Tatsuya; Kamatani, Yoshiteru; Nakao, Takashi; Kumai, Satoshi; Ozue, Tadashi

    1993-11-01

    Using a new tracking method, high track density recording on an optical tape has been achieved with a helical-scanning optical tape recorder (HS-OTR). In this recorder, the tape is wrapped around a drum, which has a high numerical-aperture objective lens of 0.50, without contact with the rotating part by means of air pressure. In the optical design, moving parts, both focus and tracking actuators, light source and reproducing optics are placed outside the rotary drum. With this system, a high carrier-to-noise-ratio of 51 dB for 1 μm mark length has been achieved. Using the tracking method, which includes a starting point servo loop, written marks have been reproduced track by track with a 2 μm pitch.

  2. Experimental Investigations of Woven Textile Tape as Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaian, T.; Naveen, V. S.; Muthukumar, N.; Thilagavathi, G.

    2015-10-01

    In this article, a strain sensitive textile based elastomeric tape sensor has been developed and process parameters for sensor development are optimized. Polyester yarns are used as base threads and rubber threads are used as elastomer for the sensor development. The sensor has been developed with the help of narrow width tape loom by introducing the silver coated nylon yarn in the middle of the tape structure. The influence of weave structure, number of conductive threads and rubber thread tension on sensor development has been optimized by using the Box-Behnken method and the results are analyzed using the Design expert software. From the results, it is found that six numbers of conductive threads in a plain weave structure with rubber thread tension of 750 g is suitable for the sensor to give high gauge factor of 1.626.

  3. Critical Current Measurements in Commercial Tapes, Coils, and Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, D. U.; Soulen, R. J., Jr.; Fuller-Mora, W. W.; Francavilla, T. L.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured a number of tapes, coils, and magnets produced by commercial vendors and determined their properties as functions of magnetic field and temperature. The tapes were measured at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in magnetic fields to 20 tesla and at temperatures of 4.2 K, 27 K, 65 K, and 77 K. For the tapes we report critical currents and current-voltage characteristics. Six inch diameter coils were measured at NRL in zero magnetic field. Critical currents, current-voltage characteristics, and reliability studies are reported for the coils. Larger 10 inch diameter coils, which are to be used in a 200 hp superconducting motor, were also measured and results will be presented. The talk will also review the status of the most recent tests of the superconducting motor.

  4. High current density electropolishing in the preparation of highly smooth substrate tapes for coated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Kreiskott, Sascha; Matias, Vladimir; Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2009-03-31

    A continuous process of forming a highly smooth surface on a metallic tape by passing a metallic tape having an initial roughness through an acid bath contained within a polishing section of an electropolishing unit over a pre-selected period of time, and, passing a mean surface current density of at least 0.18 amperes per square centimeter through the metallic tape during the period of time the metallic tape is in the acid bath whereby the roughness of the metallic tape is reduced. Such a highly smooth metallic tape can serve as a base substrate in subsequent formation of a superconductive coated conductor.

  5. Mirror-touch and ticker tape experiences in synesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Charlotte A.; Hupé, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in the field of synesthesia is whether it is associated with other cognitive phenomena. The current study examined synesthesia's connections with phenomenal traits of mirror-touch and ticker tape experiences, as well as the representation of the three phenomena in the population, across gender and domain of work/study. Mirror-touch is the automatic, involuntary experience of tactile sensation on one's own body when others are being touched. For example, seeing another person's arm being stroked can evoke physical touch sensation on one's own arm. Ticker tape is the automatic visualization of spoken words or thoughts, such as a teleprompter. For example, when spoken to, a ticker taper might see mentally the spoken words displayed in front of his face or as coming out of the speaker's mouth. To explore synesthesia's associations with these phenomena, a diverse group (n = 3743) was systematically recruited from eight universities and one public museum in France to complete an online screening. Of the 1017 eligible respondents, synesthetes (across all subtypes) reported higher rates of mirror-touch and ticker tape than non-synesthetes, suggesting that synesthesia is associated with these phenomenal traits. However, effect sizes were small and we could not rule out that response bias influenced these associations. Mirror-touch and ticker tape were independent. No differences were found across gender or domain of work and study in prevalence of synesthesia, mirror-touch or ticker tape. The prevalence of ticker tape, unknown so far, was estimated at about 7%, an intermediate rate between estimates of grapheme-color (2–4%) and sequence-space synesthesia (9–14%). Within synesthesia, grapheme-personification, also called ordinal-linguistic personification (OLP) was the most common subtype and was estimated around 12%. Co-occurences of the different types of synesthesia were higher than chance, though at the level of small effect sizes. PMID

  6. Mirror-touch and ticker tape experiences in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chun, Charlotte A; Hupé, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in the field of synesthesia is whether it is associated with other cognitive phenomena. The current study examined synesthesia's connections with phenomenal traits of mirror-touch and ticker tape experiences, as well as the representation of the three phenomena in the population, across gender and domain of work/study. Mirror-touch is the automatic, involuntary experience of tactile sensation on one's own body when others are being touched. For example, seeing another person's arm being stroked can evoke physical touch sensation on one's own arm. Ticker tape is the automatic visualization of spoken words or thoughts, such as a teleprompter. For example, when spoken to, a ticker taper might see mentally the spoken words displayed in front of his face or as coming out of the speaker's mouth. To explore synesthesia's associations with these phenomena, a diverse group (n = 3743) was systematically recruited from eight universities and one public museum in France to complete an online screening. Of the 1017 eligible respondents, synesthetes (across all subtypes) reported higher rates of mirror-touch and ticker tape than non-synesthetes, suggesting that synesthesia is associated with these phenomenal traits. However, effect sizes were small and we could not rule out that response bias influenced these associations. Mirror-touch and ticker tape were independent. No differences were found across gender or domain of work and study in prevalence of synesthesia, mirror-touch or ticker tape. The prevalence of ticker tape, unknown so far, was estimated at about 7%, an intermediate rate between estimates of grapheme-color (2-4%) and sequence-space synesthesia (9-14%). Within synesthesia, grapheme-personification, also called ordinal-linguistic personification (OLP) was the most common subtype and was estimated around 12%. Co-occurences of the different types of synesthesia were higher than chance, though at the level of small effect sizes.

  7. Obituary: Gerald Frederick Tape, 1915-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Robert E.

    2007-12-01

    Gerald Frederick Tape, a distinguished science statesman and administrator, died on November 20, 2005. Jerry, as he was known to all, took on many diverse and important responsibilities throughout his life and dealt with them with quiet authority and grace. This was the hallmark of his life. The Board of Trustees of Associated Universities, Inc., which he served for many years, expressed this in its condolences, writing "Jerry personified integrity, thoroughness and dedication. His sensitivity for the views of others, his sincerity, his personal commitment, his calm approach and his unfailing good humor were all greatly admired and respected." Jerry was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan on May 29, 1915 but grew up in Milan, a nearby country farm community, and in Ypsilanti where his father was Principal of Michigan State Normal College, which later became Eastern Michigan University (EMU). It was there that he first became interested in physics. It was there also that he met and courted Josephine Waffen, who later would become his wife for more than sixty-six years and fill their lives with three loving sons, Walter, James, and Thomas. Upon graduation from EMU, Jerry was awarded a scholarship that took him to the University of Michigan where he earned a Ph.D. in Physics, researching the decay modes of the radioisotopes of iodine. In the Fall of 1939, during the waning days of the Great Depression, he was offered an Instructorship in the Physics Department of Cornell University, a promising start for a fruitful academic career. He brought his bride Jo to Ithaca and joined the cyclotron group under Robert Bacher and Willy Higginbotham while devising a laboratory course in nuclear techniques for graduate students. Bacher and Higginbotham soon left Cornell to join a new wartime laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and many other colleagues were "drafted" for war work. Bacher persuaded Jerry to join him at the MIT Radiation Laboratory in February

  8. Graphite composite tape in beam-pumped oil wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, H.N.; Tanner, C.J.

    1984-09-01

    A continuous, reelable graphite composite tape is being developed as an alternative to jointed sucker rods for use in beam pumped oil wells. Four units have been tested in wells. The composite tape is composed of graphite fibers, glass fabric, Kevlar fibers and vinylester resin. Graphite fibers have a high modulus of elasticity and provide the longitudinal stiffness needed to operate the downhole pump, while allowing a thin cross section flexible enough to be wound onto small diameter reels. This advanced graphite composite is the first practical, lightweight, reelable alternative to jointed sucker rods.

  9. The new CERN tape software - getting ready for total performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, E.; Murray, S.; Kruse, D. F.; Kotlyar, V.; Côme, D.

    2015-12-01

    CASTOR (the CERN Advanced STORage system) is used to store the custodial copy of all of the physics data collected from the CERN experiments, both past and present. CASTOR is a hierarchical storage management system that has a disk-based front-end and a tape-based back-end. The software responsible for controlling the tape back-end has been redesigned and redeveloped over the last year and was put in production at the beginning of 2015. This paper summarises the motives behind the redesign, describes in detail the redevelopment work and concludes with the short and long-term benefits.

  10. USING A TAPED INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE KINDERGARTEN STUDENTS' NUMBER IDENTIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Katherine R; Skinner, Christopher H; Fuller, Emily J; Greear, Corrine

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across students was used to evaluate the effects of a taped numbers (TN) intervention on the number-identification accuracy of 4 kindergarten students. During TN, students attempted to name the numbers 0 through 9 on randomized lists before each number was provided via a tape player 2 s later. All 4 students showed immediate increases and reached 100% in number-identification accuracy. One student reached 100% accuracy after TN was supplemented with performance feedback, reinforcement, and overcorrection. PMID:22844152

  11. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  12. Removing Bonded Integrated Circuits From Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Small resistance heater makes it easier, faster, and cheaper to remove integrated circuit from hybrid-circuit board, package, or other substrate for rework. Heater, located directly in polymeric bond interface or on substrate under integrated-circuit chip, energized when necessary to remove chip. Heat generated softens adhesive or solder that bonds chip to substrate. Chip then lifted easily from substrate.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Graded Impedance Gas Gun Impactors from Tape Cast Metal Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L P; Nguyen, J H

    2005-11-21

    Fabrication of compositionally graded structures for use as light-gas gun impactors has been demonstrated using a tape casting technique. Mixtures of metal powders in the Mg-Cu system were cast into a series of tapes with uniform compositions ranging from 100% Mg to 100% Cu. The individual compositions were fabricated into monolithic pellets for characterization by laminating multiple layers together, thermally removing the organics, and hot-pressing to near-full density. The pellets were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of density and sound wave velocity. The density and acoustic impedance were observed to vary monotonically (and nearly linearly) with composition. Graded structures were fabricated by stacking layers of different compositions in a sequence calculated to yield a desired acoustic impedance profile. The measured physical properties of the graded structures compare favorably with those predicted from the monolithic-pellet characteristics. Fabrication of graded impactors by this technique is of significant interest for providing improved control of the pressure profile in gas gun experiments.

  14. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength. PMID:22208188

  15. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  16. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  17. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  18. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  19. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  20. Non-equilibrium Silk Fibroin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Tuna; Kojic, Nikola; Leisk, Gary G.; Lo, Tim J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Regenerated silkworm silk solutions formed metastable, soft-solid-like materials (e-gels) under weak electric fields, displaying interesting mechanical characteristics such as dynamic adhesion and strain stiffening. Raman spectroscopy, in situ electric field dynamic oscillatory rheology and polarized optical microscopy indicated that silk fibroin electrogelation involved intermolecular self-assembly of silk molecules into amorphous, micron-scale, micellar structures and the formation of relatively long lifetime, intermicellar entanglement crosslinks. Overall, the electrogelation process did not require significant intramolecular β-strand or intermolecular β-sheet formation, unlike silk hydrogels. The kinetics of e-gel formation could be tuned by changing the field strength and assembly conditions, such as silk concentration and solution pH, while e-gel stiffness was partially reversible by removal of the applied field. Transient adhesion testing indicated that the adhesive characteristics of e-gels could at least partially be attributed to a local increase in proton concentration around the positive electrode due to the applied field and surface effects. A working model of electrogelation was described en route to understanding the origins of the adhesive characteristics. PMID:20026216

  1. 48 CFR 908.7116 - Electronic data processing tape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in accordance with FPMR 41 CFR 101-26.508. (b) Acquisitions of electronic data processing tape by authorized contractors shall be in accordance with FPMR 41 CFR 101-26.508-1. However, if adequate... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic data...

  2. 48 CFR 908.7116 - Electronic data processing tape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in accordance with FPMR 41 CFR 101-26.508. (b) Acquisitions of electronic data processing tape by authorized contractors shall be in accordance with FPMR 41 CFR 101-26.508-1. However, if adequate... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic data...

  3. 75 FR 8114 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ..., 2009, the Commission established a schedule for the conduct of the review (74 FR 43155, August 26, 2009... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy AGENCY: United States International Trade...

  4. Astronaut Rich Clifford inserts tape into payload high data recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On the Space Shuttle Endeavour's aft flight deck, Astronaut Michael R. (Rich) Clifford, mission specialist, inserts a tape in the payload high rate recorder. Three of these state-of-the-art recorders captured four times the amount of data that could be radioed to the ground.

  5. Corrosion of metal particle and metal evaporated tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speliotis, Dennis E.

    Very high coercivity metal particle (MP) and metal evaporated (ME) tapes are being used in 8mm video and digital audio tape applications, and more recently in digital data recording applications. In view of the inherent susceptibility of such media to environmental corrosion, a number of recent studies have addressed their long term stability and archivability. These studies have used an accelerated corrosion test based either on elevated temperature-humidity or polluting gas atmospheres known as Battelle tests. A comparison of the Battelle test results performed at different laboratories reveals a large variation from one location to another, presumably due to incorrect replication of the Battelle condition. Furthermore, when the Battelle tests are performed on enclosed cartridges, it is quite possible that diffusion limits the penetration of the extremely low concentration polluting gaseous species to the inner layers of the tapes during the short time of the accelerated test, whereas in real life these diffusion limitations may not apply. To avoid this uncertainty, the corrosion behavior of commercial 8mm MP and ME tapes when cassettes without their external plastic cases were exposed to 50 deg C and 80 percent RH for 7.5 weeks is investigated.

  6. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, TH.; Heeb, B.; Gauckler, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 microns. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains was parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6 deg. At 77 K/0T a critical current density of 15, 000 A/sq cm was reached in films of the dimension 1 cm x 2 cm x 20 microns (1 micron V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4 K/0T the highest value was 350,000 A/sq cm (1 nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  7. Extendable nickel complex tapes that reach NIR absorptions.

    PubMed

    Audi, Hassib; Chen, Zhongrui; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; D'Aléo, Anthony; Canard, Gabriel; Jacquemin, Denis; Siri, Olivier

    2014-12-14

    Stepwise synthesis of linear nickel complex oligomer tapes with no need for solid-phase support has been achieved. The control of the length in flat arrays allows a fine-tuning of the absorption properties from the UV to the NIR region.

  8. 16 CFR 1632.7 - Tape edge substitution procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tape edge substitution procedure. 1632.7 Section 1632.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF MATTRESSES AND MATTRESS PADS (FF 4-72, AMENDED) The Standard § 1632.7...

  9. STS-46 Special Events Resource Tape, Part 1 of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Footage shows the inflight interviews of the crew of the STS-46 Atlantis Orbiter. An Italian VIP call and press conference (both spoken in Italian) are seen, and Mission Specialist Franklin R. Chang-Diaz participates in a Costa Rican VIP call (spoken in Spanish). See also 'STS-46 Special Events Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2'.

  10. An Important Adjunct for Counselors: Video Taped Role Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Michael P.

    1971-01-01

    Through effective use of video tape students can become better prepared for the interview, more confident and poised, and better able to relate more effectively with people. The work described in this article is related to the content of a recent CPS workshop reported in this issue. (Author)

  11. Kodak phase-change media for optical tape applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Preuss, Donald R.; Olin, George R.; Vazan, Fridrich; Pan, Kee-Chuan; Raychaudhuri, Pranab. K.

    1993-01-01

    The SbInSn phase-change write-once optical medium developed by Eastman Kodak Company is particularly suitable for development into the next generation optical tape media. Its performance for optical recording has already been demonstrated in some of the highest performance optical disk systems. Some of the key performance features are presented.

  12. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section 870.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2800...

  13. A new tape product for optical data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. L.; Woodard, F. E.; Pace, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A new tape product has been developed for optical data storage. Laser data recording is based on hole or pit formation in a low melting metallic alloy system. The media structure, sputter deposition process, and media characteristics, including write sensitivity, error rates, wear resistance, and archival storage are discussed.

  14. Contact Analog/Compressed Symbology Heading Tape Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Atencio, Adolph; Turpin, Terry; Dowell, Susan

    2002-01-01

    A simulation assessed the performance, handling qualities and workload associated with a contact-analog, world-referenced heading tape as implemented on the Comanche Helmet Integrated Display Sight System (HIDSS) when compared with a screen-fixed, compressed heading tape. Six pilots, four active duty Army Aviators and two civilians flew three ADS-33 maneuvers and a traffic pattern in the Ames Vertical Motion Simulation facility. Small, but statistically significant advantages were found for the compressed symbology for handling qualities, workload, and some of the performance measures. It should be noted however that the level of performance and handling qualities for both symbology sets fell within the acceptable tolerance levels. Both symbology sets yield satisfactory handling qualities and performance in velocity stabilization mode and adequate handling qualities in the automatic flight control mode. Pilot comments about the contact analog symbology highlighted the lack of useful rate of change information in the heading tape and "blurring" due to the rapid movement of the heading tape. These issues warrant further study. Care must be taken in interpreting the operational significance of these results. The symbology sets yielded categorically similar data, i.e., acceptable handling qualities and adequate performance, so while the results point to the need for further study, their operational significance has yet to be determined.

  15. The Taped Monologue as Narrative Technique for Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Keith

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I describe how an EFL teacher engaged in a process of reflective practice. As she looked back on her teaching career, she explored the critical incidents, principles, and practices that have informed her present teaching identity. I focus on how a taped monologue narrative technique was used, and on the rationale, practice, and…

  16. Influence of technology on magnetic tape storage device characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gniewek, John J.; Vogel, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    There are available today many data storage devices that serve the diverse application requirements of the consumer, professional entertainment, and computer data processing industries. Storage technologies include semiconductors, several varieties of optical disk, optical tape, magnetic disk, and many varieties of magnetic tape. In some cases, devices are developed with specific characteristics to meet specification requirements. In other cases, an existing storage device is modified and adapted to a different application. For magnetic tape storage devices, examples of the former case are 3480/3490 and QIC device types developed for the high end and low end segments of the data processing industry respectively, VHS, Beta, and 8 mm formats developed for consumer video applications, and D-1, D-2, D-3 formats developed for professional video applications. Examples of modified and adapted devices include 4 mm, 8 mm, 12.7 mm and 19 mm computer data storage devices derived from consumer and professional audio and video applications. With the conversion of the consumer and professional entertainment industries from analog to digital storage and signal processing, there have been increasing references to the 'convergence' of the computer data processing and entertainment industry technologies. There has yet to be seen, however, any evidence of convergence of data storage device types. There are several reasons for this. The diversity of application requirements results in varying degrees of importance for each of the tape storage characteristics.

  17. Corrosion of metal particle and metal evaporated tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speliotis, Dennis E.

    1991-01-01

    Very high coercivity metal particle (MP) and metal evaporated (ME) tapes are being used in 8mm video and digital audio tape applications, and more recently in digital data recording applications. In view of the inherent susceptibility of such media to environmental corrosion, a number of recent studies have addressed their long term stability and archivability. These studies have used an accelerated corrosion test based either on elevated temperature-humidity or polluting gas atmospheres known as Battelle tests. A comparison of the Battelle test results performed at different laboratories reveals a large variation from one location to another, presumably due to incorrect replication of the Battelle condition. Furthermore, when the Battelle tests are performed on enclosed cartridges, it is quite possible that diffusion limits the penetration of the extremely low concentration polluting gaseous species to the inner layers of the tapes during the short time of the accelerated test, whereas in real life these diffusion limitations may not apply. To avoid this uncertainty, the corrosion behavior of commercial 8mm MP and ME tapes when cassettes without their external plastic cases were exposed to 50 deg C and 80 percent RH for 7.5 weeks is investigated.

  18. Flexible storage medium for write-once optical tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strandjord, Andrew J. G.; Webb, Steven P.; Perettie, Donald J.; Cipriano, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    A write-once data storage media was developed which is suitable for optical tape applications. The media is manufactured using a continuous film process to deposit a ternary alloy of tin, bismuth, and copper. This laser sensitive layer is sputter deposited onto commercial plastic web as a single-layer thin film. A second layer is sequentially deposited on top of the alloy to enhance the media performance and act as an abrasion resistant hard overcoat. The media was observed to have laser write sensitivities of less than 2.0 njoules/bit, carrier-to-noise levels of greater than 50dB's, modulation depths of approximately 100 percent, read-margins of greater than 35, uniform grain sizes of less than 200 Angstroms, and a media lifetime that exceeds 10 years. Prototype tape media was produced for use in the CREO drive system. The active and overcoat materials are first sputter deposited onto three mil PET film in a single pass through the vacuum coating system, and then converted down into multiple reels of 35mm x 880m tape. One mil PET film was also coated in this manner and then slit and packaged into 3480 tape cartridges.

  19. Experimental research on tape spring supported space inflatable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew J.; Walker, Scott J. I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental research that continues the development of inflatable hybrid structures for space applications. Inflatables provide a concept with much scope for further incorporation into the structures of future spacecraft. They offer considerable savings in mass and stowed volume for spacecraft, providing possible reductions in satellite costs. Existing boom configurations make use of inflatables including solar arrays and the NGST sunshield. However these typically soft systems could be improved by incorporating tape springs as structural stiffeners along the length of the boom, creating hybrid structures. This research builds on previous experimental work undertaken at the University of Southampton looking at cantilever inflatable and hybrid booms. The focus of this research is to identify the structural performance improvement of adding tape springs to cantilever inflatable booms. This is achieved by tip deflection testing to determine the bending moment and rigidity performances of these structures allowing a comparison between the two technologies. Several hybrid booms are created and tested in various orientations to identify the optimal tape spring effectiveness. It was found that adding a pair of tape springs will increase stiffness of the hybrid structure by up to 4.9 times for an increase of 2.4 times the boom mass.

  20. STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 2 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape'. This video, Part 2 of 4, shows footage from flight days 3 through 5 of STS-110. The flight crew includes Michael J. Bloomfield, Commander; Stephen N. Frick, Pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist; Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist; Ellen Ochoa, Mission Specialist; Lee M.E. Morin, Mission Specialist; Rex J. Walheim, Mission Specialist. The coverage from flight day 3 includes docking replays of Atlantis and the International Space Station (ISS), and postdocking procedures, as well as intermingling of the flight crew with the Expedition 4 crew (Yury I. Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel W. Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl E. Walz, Flight Engineer) of the ISS. Flight day 4 includes an EVA (extravehicular activity) in which Walheim and Smith lift the S0 Truss from the payload bay, and temporarily clamp it onto the Destiny laboratory. On flight day 5 a suite of spaceborne experiments (not shown) arrives at Destiny, including protein crystal growth and wheat plant growth experiments. Notable footage includes Hawaii, New Zealand, and sunrise on Atlantis. An unknown object steaks across the field of view during the video, with the Earth in the background. The activities of the other flight days can be seen on 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 1 of 4' (internal ID 2002137575), 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 3 of 4' (internal ID 2002137574), and 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 4 of 4' (internal ID 2002137517).

  1. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B.

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  2. Privacy: The Reporter, the Telephone, and the Tape Recorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sam G.; Wiessler, Joel M.

    Federal and state law provides, for the most part, little specific guidance to persons tape recording their own telephone calls for their own record-keeping purposes. In a specific case, a Pennsylvania newsman was prosecuted in 1972 on charges of wiretapping his own telephone conversations without notice to the other parties in the calls. A review…

  3. Extendable nickel complex tapes that reach NIR absorptions.

    PubMed

    Audi, Hassib; Chen, Zhongrui; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; D'Aléo, Anthony; Canard, Gabriel; Jacquemin, Denis; Siri, Olivier

    2014-12-14

    Stepwise synthesis of linear nickel complex oligomer tapes with no need for solid-phase support has been achieved. The control of the length in flat arrays allows a fine-tuning of the absorption properties from the UV to the NIR region. PMID:25348258

  4. 16 CFR 1632.7 - Tape edge substitution procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tape edge substitution procedure. 1632.7 Section 1632.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF MATTRESSES AND MATTRESS PADS (FF 4-72, AMENDED) The Standard § 1632.7...

  5. Removable cleanable antireflection shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    A replaceable anti-reflection shield for the glare surface beneath the windscreen an aircraft is described which comprises a flexible panel of light absorbing material, such as black cloth, velvet, canvas or plastic, of size and configuration corresponding to that of the glare surface for placement on and conformance to the contour of the glare surface beneath the windscreen, and peripheral attaching means such as adhesive strips, snaps. Velcro strips, suction cups, or similar devices, on the flexible panel for detachably securing the peripheral edges of the panel to the glare surface. Whereby the panel is easily removed for cleaning or replacement.

  6. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  7. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  8. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  9. Playback Station #2 for Cal Net and 5-day-recorder tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1978-01-01

    A second system (Playback Station #2) has been set up to play back Cal Net 1" tapes and 5-day-recorder 1/2" tapes. As with the first playback system (Playback Station #1) the tapes are played back on a Bell and Howell VR3700B tape deck and the records are written out on a 16-channel direct-writing Siemens "0scillomink." Separate reproduce heads, tape guides, and tape tension sensor rollers are required for playing back 111 tapes and 1/2" tapes, but changing these tape deck components is a simple task that requires only a few minutes. The discriminators, patch panels, selector switches, filters, time code translators, and signal conditioning circuits for the time code translators and for the tape-speed-compensation signal are all mounted in an equipment rack that stands beside the playback tape deck. Changing playback speeds (15/16 ips or 3 3/4 ips) or changing from Cal Net tapes to 5-day-recorder tapes requires only flipping a few switches and/or changing a few patch cables on the patch panel (in addition to changing the reproduce heads, etc., to change from 1" tape to 1/2" tape). For the Cal Net tapes, the system provides for playback of 9 data channels (680 Hz thru 3060 Hz plus 400 Hz) and 3 time signals (IRIG-E, IRIG-C, and WWVB) at both 15/16 ips (x1 speed) and 3 3/4 ips (x4 speed). Available modes of compensation (using either a 4688 Hz reference or a 3125 Hz reference) are subtractive, capstan, capstan plus subtractive, or no compensation.

  10. Generation and physical characteristics of the Landsat 1 and 2 MSS computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    The generation and format is discussed of the Landsat 1 and 2 system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes. Included in the discussion are the spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, the transmission of data, and the conversion of the data to computer compatible tapes at the NASA Data Processing Facility. Geometric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tape are also described.

  11. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  12. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  13. Films, Preimpregnated Tapes and Composites Made from Polyimide "Salt-Like" Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High quality films, preimpregnated tape (prepegs), and composites have been fabricated from polyimide precursor 'saltlike' solutions. These salt-like solutions have a low viscosity (5,000 to 10,000 cp) and a high solids content (50-65% by weight) and can be coated onto reinforcing fiber to produce prepegs with excellent tack and drape at 12-15% residual solvent (approximately 4-6% water from thermal imidization reaction). The processing of these types of prepegs significantly overcomes solvent removal problems and allows excellent fiber wet out. In addition, the physical characteristics of the polyimide precursor salt-like solutions permits processing into high-performance materials through the use of standard prepregging and composite fabrication equipment. The resultant composites are of high quality.

  14. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  15. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females

    PubMed Central

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  16. The Effects of Audio Tapes on Graduate Student Performance and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Robert; Bekiroglu, Haluk

    1978-01-01

    This is an analysis of the use of audio tapes in an introductory operations research course for off-campus MBA students. The tapes seemed to improve the exam scores of those students who used them. Students who used the tapes more extensively seemed to enjoy a greater advantage. (Author/IRT)

  17. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females.

    PubMed

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  18. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females.

    PubMed

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition.

  19. The effectiveness of kinesio taping for athletes with medial elbow epicondylar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-Y; Cheng, S-C; Lin, C-C; Chou, K-Y; Gan, S-M; Wang, C-H

    2013-11-01

    Kinesio taping has also been used for athletes with Medial Elbow Epicondylar Tendinopathy (MET) as an additional treatment method. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness of Kinesio tape on maximal grip strength and absolute and related force sense in athletes with MET when applied to the medial forearm. 27 male athletes who voluntarily participated in this study were divided into a healthy group (n=17) and a MET group (n=10). All subjects were assessed for the maximal grip strength and grip force sense (absolute and related force sense) under 3 taping conditions: 1) without taping; 2) with placebo Kinesio taping; and 3) with Kinesio taping. No significant interaction was found between groups and taping condition in maximal grip force and related force sense error, except for absolute force sense error (p=0.04). Both groups with absolute force sense measurements had significantly decreased errors in the placebo Kinesio taping and Kinesio taping conditions. Both taping may enhance discrimination of magnitude of grip force control (absolute force sense) in both groups when applied to the forearm. However, Kinesio taping did not change maximal grip strength in either group. The effects of Kinesio taping on other muscle functions remain to be studied.

  20. Report of the Tape Recorder Action Plan Committee, 21 March 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A NASA/AF Tape Recorder Action Plan Committee was formed in January 1972 to investigate tape recorder problems and to recommend an action plan to NASA management. The committee collected data on tape recorder failure history, pinpointed problem areas, discussed needed technical and management changes, and proposed an action plan for the recommended approaches.

  1. Effect of the Kinesio tape to muscle activity and vertical jump performance in healthy inactive people

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elastic taping applied on the triceps surae has been commonly used to improve the performance of lower extremities. However, little objective evidence has been documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elastic taping on the triceps surae during a maximal vertical jump. It was hypothesized that elastic taping to the triceps surae would increase muscle activity and cause positive effect to jump height. Methods Thirty-one healthy adults (19 males and 12 females with mean age, body weight and height for 25.3 ± 3.8 years old, 64.1 ± 6.2 kg, and 169.4 ± 7.3 cm, respectively) were recruited. All participants performed vertical jump tests prior to (without taping) and during elastic taping. Two elastic tapes, Kinesio tape and Mplacebo tape from two different manufacturers, were applied to the participants, respectively. Results The results showed that the vertical ground reaction force increased when Kinesio tape was applied even when the height of jump remained about constant. However, the height of the jump decreased, and there was no difference on the vertical ground reaction force in Mplacebo taping group. Although the EMG activity of medial gastrocnemius tended to increase in Kinesio taping group, we did not see differences in EMG activity for the medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and soleus muscles in either group. Conclusions Based on the varied effects of Kinesio tape and Mplacebo tape, different intervention technique was suggested for specific purpose during vertical jump movement. Mplacebo tape was demanded for the benefits of stabilization, protection, and the restriction of motion at the ankle joint. On the other hand, the findings may implicate benefits for medial gastrocnemius muscle strength and push-off force when using Kinesio tape. PMID:21831321

  2. Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Wang, Haiyan

    2009-09-22

    A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

  3. High-definition tape-to-film transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helt, Francois

    1992-08-01

    With the collaboration of Thomson Broadcast Ex Machina has developed a full digital tape-to-film transfer process. This system accepts as input any European Analog or Digital formats: 1 inch B. T. S. 4xDl. . . It is based on a fully computerized image processing and is fully automated from the loading of the Dl tapes to the 35mm negative output. This process includes spatial and temporal filtering to get full scan 35 mmimage quality. As the input format is 50 fields per second (non-square pixels) and the output format is 24 frames per second (square pixels) the key point was to obtain a good spatial resolution without dynamic artefacts like excessive blur moving images or patterns at vertical edges. Steps of the process are as follows: - Digital copy on four 4:2:2 tapes as necessary - Transfer on computer network - Adaptive filtering by software - Gamma correction and output on 35mmfilm recorder. The processing speed has been improved by controlling four processes in parallel. High Definition tape to film transfer is available right now. The transfer capacity is 30 minutes per week since the end of last year. 1 - PRESENTATION OF THE PROJECT With the collaboration of THOMSON Broadcast Ex Machina has developed a fully digital High Definition tape-to-film transfer process. This sytem is designed to permit transfer on 35mm film of productions made with the European High Definition Standard. As a computer graphics production company Ex Machina has been producing sequences on various media including digital video high definition video 35 mm film and has finished recently a 3 mn film on 70 mm IMAX format. Two ongoing projects use this same standard with one having been designed for stereoscopic projection. Building on this expertise Ex Machina proposed to realize a tape to film transfer system for the European Economic Interest Grouping (EIIG) Vision 1250 in co-operation with another european organisation Eureka 95. For the development of such a system the company

  4. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  5. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  6. Rate and Temperature Dependence of Adhesion Measured by a Jkr Method on Synthetically Modified Acrylic Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garif, Yev; Gerberich, William; Macosko, Christopher; Pocius, Alphonsus

    2003-03-01

    The goal of this study is to model mechanisms of interfacial separation in soft polymers based on experimental results obtained from normal mechanical contacts (JKR test). For the JKR test, cylindrically shaped samples of acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were synthesized in capillary tubes in presence of a cross-linking agent in order to obtain an elastic PSA-like network (PSA-LN). Surface characteristics of individual samples were altered by co-polymerizing small amounts of polar side-groups such as acrylic acid (AA), dimethylaminoethylacrylate (DMAEA), and acrylonitrile (AN). The measurement was conducted in a ventilated chamber at three different temperatures (0, 25, and 50 degrees Celcius) and zero humidity with a sub-micron-per-second range of contact rates. Within this range, measured adhesion exhibits a transition from nearly rate-independent behavior to power law behavior at higher rates. Power law index matches that from the peel test data of similarly synthesized adhesive tapes. Accordingly, the transition is linked to the characteristic length scale of the process zone at the interface, as opposed to the bulk, ahead of the slowly advancing crack tip.

  7. Gun facilitates adhesive bonding of studs to surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. K.; Simpson, W. G.

    1969-01-01

    Gun facilitates adhesive bonding of thermoplastic-backed studs to smooth, hard surfaces. Such studs can be used for mounting loads where defacement with drilled holes cannot be tolerated. These studs can be easily removed by softening the plastic bonding with heat from the gun.

  8. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  9. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  10. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  11. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  12. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  13. The effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yoel; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinesio taping is a therapeutic method used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits, but there is limited evidence of the effects of trunk kinesio taping in neurologic patients. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in persons after a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five post-stroke patients were included in this study. Kinesio tape was applied to four trunk muscles. Before and after the taping, in all subjects, the balance ability was measured using the Wii Balance Board, and gait function was assessed using the GAITRite system. [Results] The difference in gait function before and after trunk taping was not statistically significant. However, a variability of balance ability showed statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] These results suggest that taping may be a helpful method during rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. Its application to the trunk muscles is especially useful for improving balance ability.

  14. Assessment of critical factors affecting the performance of trapped field magnets using thin film superconductor tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, Kavita; Li, Xiao-Fen; Majkic, Goran; Masson, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Trapped field magnets have been investigated using Zr-added (Gd,Y)Ba-Cu-O thin film superconductor tapes. Trapped field profiles were examined both experimentally and by simulation over a temperature range of 30 to 77 K. A good match is found between experimental and simulation trapped field data at 77 K and 65 K, but higher trapped field values were obtained experimentally at lower temperatures. Trapped field values up to 1.55 T were measured in an 11 mm thick stack of 55 μm thick superconductor tapes arranged in a crisscross fashion with three tapes per layer. A substantial increase in the trapped field values was found by simulation, in tape stacks made with 20 μm thick tapes. Using such thin tapes, trapped field values of nearly 2 T is predicted in ∼ 13 mm thick tape stacks at 77 K.

  15. The effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yoel; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinesio taping is a therapeutic method used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits, but there is limited evidence of the effects of trunk kinesio taping in neurologic patients. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in persons after a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five post-stroke patients were included in this study. Kinesio tape was applied to four trunk muscles. Before and after the taping, in all subjects, the balance ability was measured using the Wii Balance Board, and gait function was assessed using the GAITRite system. [Results] The difference in gait function before and after trunk taping was not statistically significant. However, a variability of balance ability showed statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] These results suggest that taping may be a helpful method during rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. Its application to the trunk muscles is especially useful for improving balance ability. PMID:27630439

  16. The effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yoel; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] Kinesio taping is a therapeutic method used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits, but there is limited evidence of the effects of trunk kinesio taping in neurologic patients. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of trunk kinesio taping on balance ability and gait function in persons after a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five post-stroke patients were included in this study. Kinesio tape was applied to four trunk muscles. Before and after the taping, in all subjects, the balance ability was measured using the Wii Balance Board, and gait function was assessed using the GAITRite system. [Results] The difference in gait function before and after trunk taping was not statistically significant. However, a variability of balance ability showed statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] These results suggest that taping may be a helpful method during rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. Its application to the trunk muscles is especially useful for improving balance ability.

  17. Analysis of Adhesion Molecules and Basement Membrane Contributions to Synaptic Adhesion at the Drosophila Embryonic NMJ

    PubMed Central

    Koper, Andre; Schenck, Annette; Prokop, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Synapse formation and maintenance crucially underlie brain function in health and disease. Both processes are believed to depend on cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Many different classes of CAMs localise to synapses, including cadherins, protocadherins, neuroligins, neurexins, integrins, and immunoglobulin adhesion proteins, and further contributions come from the extracellular matrix and its receptors. Most of these factors have been scrutinised by loss-of-function analyses in animal models. However, which adhesion factors establish the essential physical links across synaptic clefts and allow the assembly of synaptic machineries at the contact site in vivo is still unclear. To investigate these key questions, we have used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of Drosophila embryos as a genetically amenable model synapse. Our ultrastructural analyses of NMJs lacking different classes of CAMs revealed that loss of all neurexins, all classical cadherins or all glutamate receptors, as well as combinations between these or with a Laminin deficiency, failed to reveal structural phenotypes. These results are compatible with a view that these CAMs might have no structural role at this model synapse. However, we consider it far more likely that they operate in a redundant or well buffered context. We propose a model based on a multi-adaptor principle to explain this phenomenon. Furthermore, we report a new CAM-independent adhesion mechanism that involves the basement membranes (BM) covering neuromuscular terminals. Thus, motorneuronal terminals show strong partial detachment of the junction when BM-to-cell surface attachment is impaired by removing Laminin A, or when BMs lose their structural integrity upon loss of type IV collagens. We conclude that BMs are essential to tie embryonic motorneuronal terminals to the muscle surface, lending CAM-independent structural support to their adhesion. Therefore, future developmental studies of these synaptic junctions in Drosophila need

  18. An Improvement in Thermal Modelling of Automated Tape Placement Process

    SciTech Connect

    Barasinski, Anaies; Leygue, Adrien; Poitou, Arnaud; Soccard, Eric

    2011-01-17

    The thermoplastic tape placement process offers the possibility of manufacturing large laminated composite parts with all kinds of geometries (double curved i.e.). This process is based on the fusion bonding of a thermoplastic tape on a substrate. It has received a growing interest during last years because of its non autoclave abilities.In order to control and optimize the quality of the manufactured part, we need to predict the temperature field throughout the processing of the laminate. In this work, we focus on a thermal modeling of this process which takes in account the imperfect bonding existing between the different layers of the substrate by introducing thermal contact resistance in the model. This study is leaning on experimental results which inform us that the value of the thermal resistance evolves with temperature and pressure applied on the material.

  19. Development of an alternating flat to tubular Kevlar parachute tape

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.; Koch, R.

    1989-01-01

    An alternating flat to tubular Kevlar tape was developed to replace braided suspension lines and woven tape radials on the new crew escape module parachute system for the F-111 aircraft. Weaves were developed which had high strength efficiency and low weight throughout the flat, tubular, and transition sections. A tubular section strength of 535 lbs at a weight of 0.044 oz/yd was achieved. This reduces suspension line weight by 8% compared with that of the most efficient braid which has a strength of 470 lbs and weighs 0.048 oz/yd. Length measuring procedures for production control and inspection were developed. Using these procedures it was possible to produce alternating weave fabric with less than 1% variation in length in the tubular sections. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. TM digital image products for applications. [computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Gunther, F. J.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D.

    1984-01-01

    The image characteristics of digital data generated by LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper (TM) are discussed. Digital data from the TM resides in tape files at various stages of image processing. Within each image data file, the image lines are blocked by a factor of either 5 for a computer compatible tape CCT-BT, or 4 for a CCT-AT and CCT-PT; in each format, the image file has a different format. Nominal geometric corrections which provide proper geodetic relationships between different parts of the image are available only for the CCT-PT. It is concluded that detector 3 of band 5 on the TM does not respond; this channel of data needs replacement. The empty bin phenomenon in CCT-AT images results from integer truncations of mixed-mode arithmetric operations.

  1. An Improvement in Thermal Modelling of Automated Tape Placement Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasinski, Anaïs; Leygue, Adrien; Soccard, Eric; Poitou, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The thermoplastic tape placement process offers the possibility of manufacturing large laminated composite parts with all kinds of geometries (double curved i.e.). This process is based on the fusion bonding of a thermoplastic tape on a substrate. It has received a growing interest during last years because of its non autoclave abilities. In order to control and optimize the quality of the manufactured part, we need to predict the temperature field throughout the processing of the laminate. In this work, we focus on a thermal modeling of this process which takes in account the imperfect bonding existing between the different layers of the substrate by introducing thermal contact resistance in the model. This study is leaning on experimental results which inform us that the value of the thermal resistance evolves with temperature and pressure applied on the material.

  2. Nimbus-7 ERB Solar Analysis Tape (ESAT) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Eugene; Hickey, John R.; Kyle, H. Lee; Alton, Bradley M.; Vallette, Brenda J.

    1988-01-01

    Seven years and five months of Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) solar data are available on a single ERB Solar Analysis Tape (ESAT). The period covered is November 16, 1978 through March 31, 1986. The Nimbus-7 satellite performs approximately 14 orbits per day and the ERB solar telescope observes the sun once per orbit as the satellite crosses the southern terminator. The solar data were carefully calibrated and screened. Orbital and daily mean values are given for the total solar irradiance plus other spectral intervals (10 solar channels in all). In addition, selected solar activity indicators are included on the ESAT. The ESAT User's Guide is an update of the previous ESAT User's Guide (NASA TM 86143) and includes more detailed information on the solar data calibration, screening procedures, updated solar data plots, and applications to solar variability. Details of the tape format, including source code to access ESAT, are included.

  3. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  4. Kinesiology taping as an adjunct for pain management in cancer?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rebanks, Jonathan; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2016-07-14

    We present the case of a 46-year-old woman who developed severe pain described as 'tearing' and 'searing' in the left side of the mid-trapezius region near the thoracic 8 vertebra (T8). The patient had undergone surgery for T8 fracture which had resulted from metastasis (secondary breast cancer). A community nurse referred the patient for physiotherapy assessment and treatment for her musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms that had affected her mobility and functional activities. The patient was treated with soft tissue therapy with the addition of kinesiology taping on follow-up visits. Kinesiology tape was applied over her left side trapezius region and left shoulder. The patient reported significant reductions in pain severity and felt greater control and stability over her left shoulder region, which resulted in better function and overall quality of life measures. She did not report any adverse effects.

  5. What best protects the inverted weightbearing ankle against further inversion? Evertor muscle strength compares favorably with shoe height, athletic tape, and three orthoses.

    PubMed

    Ashton-Miller, J A; Ottaviani, R A; Hutchinson, C; Wojtys, E M

    1996-01-01

    We measured the maximal isometric eversion moment developed under full weightbearing in 20 healthy adult men (age, 24.4 +/- 3.4 years; mean +/- SD) with their ankles in 15 degrees of inversion. Tests were performed at both 0 degree and 32 degrees of ankle plantar flexion in low- and in three-quarter-top shoes with and without adhesive athletic tape or one of three proprietary ankle orthoses. At 0 degree of ankle plantar flexion, the mean maximal voluntary resistance of the unprotected ankle to an inversion moment was 50 +/- 8 N-m; this increased by an average of 12% (or 6 N-m) when the subject wore a three-quarter-top basketball shoe. The maximal voluntary resistances to inversion moments developed with the ankles further protected by athletic tape or any of three orthoses were not significantly different. Biomechanical calculations suggest that at 15 degrees of inversion the fully active ankle evertor muscles isometrically developed a moment up to six times larger than that developed when an athlete wears a three-quarter-top shoe alone and more than three times larger than that developed passively when the athlete has tape or an orthosis worn inside a three-quarter-top shoe. We conclude that fully activated and strong ankle evertor muscles are the best protection for a near-maximally inverted ankle at footstrike.

  6. What would be conserved if "the tape were played twice"?

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, W; Buss, L W

    1994-01-01

    We develop an abstract chemistry, implemented in a lambda-calculus-based modeling platform, and argue that the following features are generic to this particular abstraction of chemistry; hence, they would be expected to reappear if "the tape were run twice": (i) hypercycles of self-reproducing objects arise; (ii) if self-replication is inhibited, self-maintaining organizations arise; and (iii) self-maintaining organizations, once established, can combine into higher-order self-maintaining organizations. PMID:8290596

  7. STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 4 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape'. This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage from flight days 10 through 12 of STS-110. The spacecrew includes Michael J. Bloomfield, Commander; Stephen N. Frick, Pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist; Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist; Ellen Ochoa, Mission Specialist; Lee M.E. Morin, Mission Specialist; Rex J. Walheim, Mission Specialist. Flight day 10 includes an exchange of farewells with the Expedition 4 crew (Yury I. Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel W. Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl E. Walz, Flight Engineer) of the International Space Station (ISS), and undocking. The video includes many views of the ISS as Atlantis departs, including cloud cover and the Earth's limb as backgrounds. There is also a view of Atlantis with its payload bay open. On flight day 11, in preparation for landing, the crew conducts a checkout of flight controls and a test firing. A spaceborne wheat plant experiment onboard the ISS is briefly shown. Flight day 12 includes closing the payload bay, suit-up, and landing. Kennedy Space Center is seen from the air, and the video shows landing replays, as well as a heads-up display view of the landing. Earth views include clear views of Western Sahara, Morocco, Mauritania, and Algeria, with the Atlantic Ocean, a cloud obstructed view of Newfoundland and the Atlantic, Pacific Ocean sun glint, and an excellent view of the Chicago area and Lake Michigan at night. The activities from other flights days can be seen on "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002137575), "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137573), and "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002137574).

  8. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  9. Visualization of Flows in Packed Beds of Twisted Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Peloso, D.; Athavale, M. M.; Mullen, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    A videotape presentation of the flow field in a packed bed of 48 twisted tapes which can be simulated by very thin virtual cylinders has been assembled. The indices of refraction of the oil and the Lucite twisted tapes were closely matched, and the flow was seeded with magnesium oxide particles. Planar laser light projected the flow field in two dimensions both along and transverse to the flow axis. The flow field was three dimensional and complex to describe, yet the most prominent finding was flow threads. It appeared that axial flow spiraled along either within the confines of a virtual cylindrical boundary or within the exterior region, between the tangency points, of the virtual cylinders. Random packing and bed voids created vortices and disrupted the laminar flow but minimized the entrance effects. The flow-pressure drops in the packed bed fell below the Ergun model for porous-media flows. Single-twisted-tape results of Smithberg and Landis (1964) were used to guide the analysis. In appendix A the results of several investigators are scaled to the Ergun model. Further investigations including different geometric configurations, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) gridding, and analysis are required.

  10. The Accuracy of Broselow Tape Weight Estimate among Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    AlGarni, Abdullaziz; AlGamdi, Fasial; Jawish, Mona; Wani, Tariq Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the accuracy of the Broselow Tape (BT) versions 2007 and 2011 in estimating weight among pediatric population. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Fahad Medical City and six schools across Riyadh province on 1–143-month-old children. BT 2007 and 2011 estimated weights were recorded. Both tapes via the child's height produce an estimated weight, which was compared with the actual weight. Results. A total of 3537 children were recruited. The height (cm) of the subjects was 97.7 ± 24.1 and the actual weight (kg) was 16.07 ± 8.9, whereas the estimated weight determined by BT 2007 was 15.87 ± 7.56 and by BT 2011 was 16.38 ± 7.95. Across all the five age groups, correlation between actual weight and BT 2007 ranged between 0.702 and 0.788, while correlation between actual weight and BT 2011 ranged between 0.698 and 0.788. Correlation between BT 2007 and BT 2011 across all the five age groups ranged from 0.979 to 0.989. Accuracy of both the tape versions was adversely affected when age was >95 months and body weight was >26 kilograms. Conclusions. Our study showed that BT 2007 and 2011 provided accurate estimation of the body weight based on measured body height. However, 2011 version provided more precise estimate for weight. PMID:27668258

  11. Flow Visualizations in a Packed Bed of Twisted Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A videotape presentation of the flow field in a packed bed of 48 twisted tapes which can be simulated by very thin virtual cylinders has been assembled. The indices of refraction of the oil and the Lucite twisted tapes were closely matched, and the flow was seeded with magnesium oxide particles. Planar laser light projected the flow field in two dimensions both along and transverse to the flow axis. The flow field was three dimensional and complex to describe, yet the most prominent finding was flow threads. It appeared that axial flow spiraled along either within the confines of a virtual cylindrical boundary or within the exterior region, between the tangency points, of the virtual cylinders. Random packing and bed voids created vortices and disrupted the laminar flow but minimized the entrance effects. The flow-pressure drops in the packed bed fell below the Ergun model for porous-media flows. Single-twisted-tape results of Smithberg and Landis (1964) were used to guide the analysis. In appendix A the results of several investigators are scaled to the Ergun model. Further investigations including different geometric configurations, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) gridding, and analysis are required.

  12. The Accuracy of Broselow Tape Weight Estimate among Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    AlGarni, Abdullaziz; AlGamdi, Fasial; Jawish, Mona; Wani, Tariq Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the accuracy of the Broselow Tape (BT) versions 2007 and 2011 in estimating weight among pediatric population. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Fahad Medical City and six schools across Riyadh province on 1–143-month-old children. BT 2007 and 2011 estimated weights were recorded. Both tapes via the child's height produce an estimated weight, which was compared with the actual weight. Results. A total of 3537 children were recruited. The height (cm) of the subjects was 97.7 ± 24.1 and the actual weight (kg) was 16.07 ± 8.9, whereas the estimated weight determined by BT 2007 was 15.87 ± 7.56 and by BT 2011 was 16.38 ± 7.95. Across all the five age groups, correlation between actual weight and BT 2007 ranged between 0.702 and 0.788, while correlation between actual weight and BT 2011 ranged between 0.698 and 0.788. Correlation between BT 2007 and BT 2011 across all the five age groups ranged from 0.979 to 0.989. Accuracy of both the tape versions was adversely affected when age was >95 months and body weight was >26 kilograms. Conclusions. Our study showed that BT 2007 and 2011 provided accurate estimation of the body weight based on measured body height. However, 2011 version provided more precise estimate for weight.

  13. STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 1 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows footage from flight days 1 and 2, and part of day 3, of STS-110. The spacecrew includes Michael J. Bloomfield, Commander; Stephen N. Frick, Pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist; Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist; Ellen Ochoa, Mission Specialist; Lee M.E. Morin, Mission Specialist; Rex J. Walheim, Mission Specialist. They are shown at their pre-launch meal, introducing themselves and talking about their roles on the coming flight. The launch of Atlantis is shown, with replays. On flight day 2, the crew conducts a checkout of the CANADARM robotic arm. Flight day 3 includes Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS), firing its thrusters to reach it. The approach and docking are shown. Other notable footage includes CANADARM with the Earth's limb in the background, Atlantis moving over a cloud cover background, sunlight from behind the Earth's limb, showing the "diamond ring" effect, sunrise upon Atlantis, and the docking hatches of the two spacecraft during approach. The activities from other flights days can be seen on "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137573), "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002137574), and "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137517).

  14. Sticking like sticky tape: tree frogs use friction forces to enhance attachment on overhanging surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Endlein, Thomas; Ji, Aihong; Samuel, Diana; Yao, Ning; Wang, Zhongyuan; Barnes, W. Jon P.; Federle, Walter; Kappl, Michael; Dai, Zhendong

    2013-01-01

    To live and clamber about in an arboreal habitat, tree frogs have evolved adhesive pads on their toes. In addition, they often have long and slender legs to facilitate not only long jumps, but also to bridge gaps between leaves when climbing. Both adhesive pads and long limbs are used in conjunction, as we will show in this study. Previous research has shown that tree frogs change from a crouched posture (where the limbs are close to the body) to a sprawled posture with extended limbs when clinging on to steeper inclines such as vertical or overhanging slopes. We investigated this change in posture in White's tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by challenging the frogs to cling onto a tiltable platform. The platform consisted of an array of 24 three-dimensional force transducers, which allowed us to measure the ground reaction forces of the frogs during a tilt. Starting from a crouched resting position, the normal forces on the forelimbs changed sign and became increasingly negative with increasing slope angle of the platform. At about 106°±12°, tilt of the platform the frogs reacted by extending one or two of their limbs outwards. At a steeper angle (131°±11°), the frogs spread out all their limbs sideways, with the hindlimbs stretched out to their maximum reach. Although the extension was strongest in the lateral direction, limbs were significantly extended in the fore–aft direction as well. With the extension of the limbs, the lateral forces increased relative to the normal forces. The large contribution of the in-plane forces helped to keep the angle between the force vector and the platform small. The Kendall theory for the peeling of adhesive tape predicts that smaller peel angles lead to higher attachment forces. We compare our data with the predictions of the Kendall model and discuss possible implications of the sliding of the pads on the surface. The forces were indeed much larger for smaller angles and thus can be explained by peeling theory. PMID

  15. Sticking like sticky tape: tree frogs use friction forces to enhance attachment on overhanging surfaces.

    PubMed

    Endlein, Thomas; Ji, Aihong; Samuel, Diana; Yao, Ning; Wang, Zhongyuan; Barnes, W Jon P; Federle, Walter; Kappl, Michael; Dai, Zhendong

    2013-03-01

    To live and clamber about in an arboreal habitat, tree frogs have evolved adhesive pads on their toes. In addition, they often have long and slender legs to facilitate not only long jumps, but also to bridge gaps between leaves when climbing. Both adhesive pads and long limbs are used in conjunction, as we will show in this study. Previous research has shown that tree frogs change from a crouched posture (where the limbs are close to the body) to a sprawled posture with extended limbs when clinging on to steeper inclines such as vertical or overhanging slopes. We investigated this change in posture in White's tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by challenging the frogs to cling onto a tiltable platform. The platform consisted of an array of 24 three-dimensional force transducers, which allowed us to measure the ground reaction forces of the frogs during a tilt. Starting from a crouched resting position, the normal forces on the forelimbs changed sign and became increasingly negative with increasing slope angle of the platform. At about 106° ± 12°, tilt of the platform the frogs reacted by extending one or two of their limbs outwards. At a steeper angle (131° ± 11°), the frogs spread out all their limbs sideways, with the hindlimbs stretched out to their maximum reach. Although the extension was strongest in the lateral direction, limbs were significantly extended in the fore-aft direction as well. With the extension of the limbs, the lateral forces increased relative to the normal forces. The large contribution of the in-plane forces helped to keep the angle between the force vector and the platform small. The Kendall theory for the peeling of adhesive tape predicts that smaller peel angles lead to higher attachment forces. We compare our data with the predictions of the Kendall model and discuss possible implications of the sliding of the pads on the surface. The forces were indeed much larger for smaller angles and thus can be explained by peeling theory.

  16. Enhanced environmental performance of fiber optic gyroscope by an adhesive potting technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ding, Nengwen; Li, Zhifeng; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    An adhesive potting technology for fiber coils of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is proposed. The fiber coil is immersed in liquid adhesive with superior mechanical properties. The internal air is first removed completely by vacuum pumping, and the adhesive is then evenly pressed into the fiber coil under pressure. The potted fiber core is prepared by ladder-type temperature curing and a stress-release process. With this potting technology, the vibration performance of an FOG is greatly improved and, at the same time, will not lead to degradation of its temperature performance. Using this potting technique of adhesive impregnation, the adaptability of FOGs will be enhanced.

  17. Butylcyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for columellar incision closure.

    PubMed

    Ozturan, O; Miman, M C; Aktas, D; Oncel, S

    2001-07-01

    Cosmetic outcome of the columellar incision closure in external rhinoplasty patients has been a subject of discussion. This study was conducted to assess whether tissue adhesives provide an alternative option for sutureless closure of columellar skin incisions for cases utilizing open technique rhinoplastic surgery. One hundred and one patients undergoing external rhinoplasty were randomized to either topical application of butylcyanoacrylate or polypropylene sutures for columellar skin closure. The majority of tension on the wound edges was taken up using 5-0 chromic catgut. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated by two otolaryngologists independently using visual analogue and Hollander wound evaluation scales in a blinded manner. There was no statistically significant difference in cosmesis between the surgeons' evaluation scores for either type or repair of the columellar incision. Since the tissue adhesive forms its own protective barrier, post-operative care is simplified. Closure with adhesives eliminates the need for post-operative suture removal requiring an extra visit that should lead to more efficient use of physician and patient time. Butylcyanoacrylate performs cosmetically as well as standard suture closure of columellar skin incision used for external rhinoplasty.

  18. Intravesical Tension-Free Vaginal Tape Removal: Is There a Single Solution?

    PubMed Central

    Zakri, Rhana H.; Patel, Amit K.; John, Babbin S.; Shrotri, Nitin C.

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects 10–20% of women in the general population. Surgery for stress incontinence has been performed on women for over a century, but with the advent of new urogynaecological sling procedures for its management, urological surgeons are having to deal with an increasing number of patients presenting with associated complications. With no clarity on the full range of possible complications or certain consensus on their optimal management, the ideal treatment remains a decision for the individual surgeon. In view of this, we felt it of common interest to review the literature for the history of sling procedures, present commonly arising complications, and seek to answer the question in the title. PMID:22084797

  19. Digital Linear Tape (DLT) technology and product family overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lignos, Demetrios

    1994-01-01

    The demand that began a couple of years ago for increased data storage capacity continues. Peripheral Strategies (a Santa Barbara, California, Storage Market Research Firm) projects the amount of data stored on the average enterprise network will grow by 50 percent to 100 percent per year. Furthermore, Peripheral Strategies says that a typical mid-range workstation system containing 30GB to 50GB of storage today will grow at the rate of 50 percent per year. Dan Friedlander, a Boulder, Colorado-based consultant specializing in PC-LAN backup, says, 'The average NetWare LAN is about 8GB, but there are many that have 30GB to 300GB.....' The substantial growth of storage requirements has created various tape technologies that seek to satisfy the needs of today's and, especially, the next generations's systems and applications. There are five leading tape technologies in the market today: QIC (Quarter Inch Cartridge), IBM 3480/90, 8mm, DAT (Digital Audio Tape) and DLT (Digital Linear Tape). Product performance specifications and user needs have combined to classify these technologies into low-end, mid-range, and high-end systems applications. Although the manufacturers may try to position their products differently, product specifications and market requirements have determined that QIC and DAT are primarily low-end systems products while 8mm and DLT are competing for mid-range systems applications and the high-end systems space, where IBM compatibility is not required. The 3480/90 products seem to be used primarily in the IBM market, for interchangeability purposes. There are advantages and disadvantages for each of the tape technologies in the market today. We believe that DLT technology offers a significant number of very important features and specifications that make it extremely attractive for most current as well as emerging new applications, such as Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM). This paper will demonstrate why we think that the DLT technology and family

  20. Urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures: A surgical management case series

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Fotios; Jarlshammar, Björn; Larsson, Per-Göran

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and the surgical management of urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures. METHODS: This study encompasses a retrospective review of nine patients presented with urethral complications after midurethral sling procedures. The patients underwent the procedures during a period from 1999 to 2012 in three different regional hospitals in the southwest part of Sweden. The time from sling placement to diagnosis, the risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, surgical management, and functional outcome are presented. The presenting symptoms were described as either early onset (< 12 mo) or late onset (> 12 mo) according to when they were first reported. RESULTS: Eight cases of urethral erosion and one case of bladder-neck erosion were detected. The mean interval for diagnoses of the erosions ranged from 3 mo to 11 years. The most common presenting symptoms included de novo urgency with or without incontinence (7/9 patients), urinary retention/voiding dysfunction (4/9 patients), urethritis (4/9 patients), relapse of stress-incontinence (3/9 patients), recurrent urinary tract infections (5/9 patients), and hematuria (1/9 patient). In most cases, voiding dysfunction and urethritis occurred early after the operation. The surgical management applied in most cases was transurethral resection of the intraurethral part of the mesh. The removal of the intraurethral mesh resulted in improvement or complete cure of urgency symptoms in 5/7 patients with urgency. Four patients were reoperated with a new stress-incontinence surgery, one with laparoscopic Burch, and three with retropubic tension-free vaginal tape procedures. CONCLUSION: Urethral complications should be suspected in the case of de novo urgency and relapse of stress-incontinence. Transurethral excision of the intraurethral mesh is the recommended treatment. PMID:26167464