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Sample records for adhesive tape test

  1. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  2. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  7. The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for discrimination and comparison of adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Min, Ji-Sook; Heo, Sangcheol; Park, Jongseo; Papesch, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    Forensic scientists are frequently requested to differentiate between, or compare, adhesive tapes from a suspect or a crime scene. The most common polymers used to back packaging tape are polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride. Much of the oriented polypropylene (OPP) needed to produce packaging tapes, regardless of the tape brand, is supplied by just a few polymer manufacturers. Consequently, the composition of the backing material varies little. Therefore, the discriminating power of classical methods (physical fit, tape dimensions, colour, morphology, FTIR, PyGC/MS, etc.) is limited. Analysis of stable isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied in the broad area of forensics and it has been reported that isotope analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of adhesive tapes. We have tested the usefulness of this method by distinguishing different South Korean adhesive tapes produced by just a few manufacturers in the small South Korean market. Korean adhesive tapes were collected and analysed for their isotope signatures. The glue of the tapes was separated from the backing material and these sub-samples were analysed for their H- and C-isotope composition. The result shows the possibility for discriminating most tape samples, even from the same brand. Variations within single rolls have also been investigated, where no variations in H- and C-isotope composition significantly exceeding the standard deviation were found. PMID:18438979

  8. The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for discrimination and comparison of adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Min, Ji-Sook; Heo, Sangcheol; Park, Jongseo; Papesch, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    Forensic scientists are frequently requested to differentiate between, or compare, adhesive tapes from a suspect or a crime scene. The most common polymers used to back packaging tape are polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride. Much of the oriented polypropylene (OPP) needed to produce packaging tapes, regardless of the tape brand, is supplied by just a few polymer manufacturers. Consequently, the composition of the backing material varies little. Therefore, the discriminating power of classical methods (physical fit, tape dimensions, colour, morphology, FTIR, PyGC/MS, etc.) is limited. Analysis of stable isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied in the broad area of forensics and it has been reported that isotope analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of adhesive tapes. We have tested the usefulness of this method by distinguishing different South Korean adhesive tapes produced by just a few manufacturers in the small South Korean market. Korean adhesive tapes were collected and analysed for their isotope signatures. The glue of the tapes was separated from the backing material and these sub-samples were analysed for their H- and C-isotope composition. The result shows the possibility for discriminating most tape samples, even from the same brand. Variations within single rolls have also been investigated, where no variations in H- and C-isotope composition significantly exceeding the standard deviation were found.

  9. Equilibrium states and stability of pre-tensioned adhesive tapes

    PubMed Central

    Putignano, Carmine; Afferrante, Luciano; Mangialardi, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the present paper we propose a generalization of the model developed in Afferrante, L.; Carbone, G.; Demelio, G.; Pugno, N. Tribol. Lett. 2013, 52, 439–447 to take into account the effect of the pre-tension in the tape. A detailed analysis of the peeling process shows the existence of two possible detachment regimes: one being stable and the other being unstable, depending on the initial configuration of the tape. In the stability region, as the peeling process advances, the peeling angle reaches a limiting value, which only depends on the geometry, on the elastic modulus of the tape and on the surface energy of adhesion. Vice versa, in the unstable region, depending on the initial conditions of the system, the tape can evolve towards a state of complete detachment or fail before reaching a state of equilibrium with complete adhesion. We find that the presence of pre-tension in the tape does not modify the stability behavior of the system, but significantly affects the pull-off force which can be sustained by the tape before complete detachment. Moreover, above a critical value of the pre-tension, which depends on the surface energy of adhesion, the tape will tend to spontaneously detach from the substrate. In this case, an external force is necessary to avoid spontaneous detachment and make the tape adhering to the substrate. PMID:25383283

  10. Comparison of Medical Adhesive Tapes in Patients at Risk of Facial Skin Trauma under Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Sui An; Chong, Shin Yuet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Adhesive tapes are used for taping eyelids closed and securing endotracheal tubes during general anesthesia. These tapes can cause facial skin injury. We compared the incidence of facial skin injury and patient satisfaction with different tapes used. Methods. A total of 60 adult patients at risk of skin trauma were randomized to use 3M™ Kind Removal Silicone Tape or standard acrylate tapes: 3M Durapore (endotracheal tube) and Medipore (eyelids). Patients were blinded to tape used. Postoperatively, a blinded recovery nurse assessed erythema, edema, and denudation of skin. Anesthesiologist in charge also assessed skin injury. On postoperative day 1, patients rated satisfaction with the condition of their skin over the eyelids and face on a 5-point Likert scale. Results. More patients had denudation of skin with standard tapes, 4 (13.3%) versus 0 with silicone tape (p = 0.026) and in anesthesiologist-evaluated skin injury 11 (37%) with standard versus 1 (3%) with silicone (p = 0.002). No significant differences were found in erythema and edema. Patient satisfaction score was higher with silicone tape: over eyelids: mean 3.83 (standard) versus 4.53 (silicone), Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001; over face: mean 3.87 (standard) versus 4.57 (silicone) (p < 0.001). Conclusion. Silicone tape use had less skin injury and greater patient satisfaction than standard acrylate tapes. PMID:27382368

  11. Paint and tape: collection and storage of microtraces of paint in adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, W R

    2000-11-01

    The collection and preservation of microtrace evidence with the aid of an adhesive tape is a method of choice in forensic science. This technique is rapid and easy and allows the concentration of microtraces on a carrier, which facilitates further investigations in the laboratory. Adhesive tapes are currently used to secure microtraces of fibers and glass, but hardly for traces of automotive paint and other lacquers for fear of interference with the analysis of binders. A collection of automotive paint consisting of original and repair lacquers collected by tape has been evaluated. After various times of storage within the tape, these samples were compared with untreated references by microscope FT-IR and microspectrophotometry (MSP). Another set of paints was collected in 1984, stored within the tape until 1995, and examined the same way. About 170 layers of lacquer with various types of binder were examined. With the exception of one clear lacquer no difference between treated samples and references was detected. This small difference observed could be correlated to the exposure to xylene (extractant) and was not caused by the storage within the adhesive tape. PMID:11110189

  12. Characterizing acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes favoring diverse biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhijji, Saleh Mohammed S.

    Strong, self-adhesive acrylic polymer-based tapes have been identified as FDA-approved medical device construction components that might also serve in diverse biological locations as artificial muscles, ligaments, or compressive support discs. After assuring that the tapes themselves were not cytotoxic, they were evaluated as possible low-tension muscle substitutes for eyelids, jaws, and other modest body re-closing needs, and well as for higher-tension applications as artificial ligaments. Self-adhesion of the tapes to representative biomaterials, before and after radio-frequency glow discharge treatment for surface energy modification, illustrated the conditions for maximum attachment strength to nonphysiologic substances. Attachment to bony host parts was challenging but apparently met by the application of acrylic-composite-to-dentin bonding systems that has shown good long-term experience in the mouth. Above all, the compression-relaxation properties of the tape materials were superior and their uses in potential Nucleus Pulposus applications for spinal disc repair were most completely explored. Tests included tape-disc performance longevity, both dry and wet, for over 5000 load-relaxation cycles, with no apparent changes in results for the most dense of the tapes evaluated. Direct abrasion was avoided by insertion of rigid polymeric layers. It is recommended that the compressive loading properties of acrylic tapes be further evaluated for spine repair applications.

  13. Digital tape unit test facility software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. T.

    1971-01-01

    Two computer programs are described which are used for the collection and analysis of data from the digital tape unit test facility (DTUTF). The data are the recorded results of skew tests made on magnetic digital tapes which are used on computers as input/output media. The results of each tape test are keypunched onto an 80 column computer card. The format of the card is checked and the card image is stored on a master summary tape via the DTUTF card checking and tape updating system. The master summary tape containing the results of all the tape tests is then used for analysis as input to the DTUTF histogram generating system which produces a histogram of skew vs. date for selected data, followed by some statistical analysis of the data.

  14. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples. PMID:27448236

  15. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples.

  16. Pressure Roller For Tape-Lift Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Eve

    1991-01-01

    Rolling device applies nearly constant, uniform pressure to surface. Simple tool exerts nearly constant pressure via compression of sheath by fixed amount. Pins hold wheels on cylinder and cylinder on tangs of handle. Cylinder and handle made of metal or plastic. Sheath press-fit or glued to cylinder. End pins attached to cylinder by adhesive or screw threads. Device intended for use in taking tape-lift samples of particulate contamination on surface.

  17. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  18. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  19. New developments for the investigation of hard X-rays emitted by peeling adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Krämer, D; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Lühmann, B; Keite-Telgenbüscher, K; Frahm, R

    2013-05-01

    We realized an advanced apparatus for the investigation of emitted X-rays produced by peeling adhesive tape rolls under vacuum conditions. Two stepper motors can unwind and rewind a tape roll, and an additional roller with an optical encoder provides measurement and control of the tape speed. This way reproducible and consecutive experiments are feasible without having to change the tape or break the vacuum. The dependence of the X-ray emission on tape speed, gas pressure, type of adhesive tape, and detector angle has been investigated. The resulting spectra are continuous and span an X-ray energy range of typically 2-60 keV with high intensity. Furthermore, the new apparatus allows the in situ metalization of adhesive tape rolls by a gold sputter source. A significantly increased X-ray emission was observed for adhesive tapes with a metal coating. Thin metal foils have been placed between the tape and the detector, different K- and L-absorption edges could be measured. A considerable enhancement of the emission was achieved under the influence of the magnetic field of an NdFeB permanent magnet. PMID:23742586

  20. Contact allergic reactions to diphenylthiourea and phenylisothiocyanate in PVC adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Fregert, S; Trulson, L; Zimerson, E

    1982-01-01

    28 patients reacting to a PVC adhesive tape used in routine patch testing gave positive reactions to diphenylthiourea (DPTU) and to phenylisothiocyanate (PITC) in low concentrations. DPTU is a heat stabilizer in the PVC and is partly decomposed to PITC. The two substances were found in another type of PVC. Thioureas giving isothiocyanates are also used in certain types of rubber. Isothiocyanates are present in plants, mainly of the Cruciferae family, and are also formed from thiuram sulfides and thiocarbamates. The connection between isothiocyanates derived from different sources should be investigated. PMID:6802568

  1. Rapid prototyping of robust and versatile microfluidic components using adhesive transfer tapes.

    PubMed

    Nath, Pulak; Fung, Derek; Kunde, Yuliya A; Zeytun, Ahmet; Branch, Brittany; Goddard, Greg

    2010-09-01

    A rapid prototyping technique of microfluidic devices is presented using adhesive transfer tapes. Lab on a chip systems can integrate multiple microfluidic functions in a single platform. Therefore, any rapid prototyping technique should be flexible and robust to accommodate different aspects of microfluidic integrations. In this work, the versatility of using adhesive transfer tapes for microfluidic applications is demonstrated by fabricating a wide range of platform. Prototypes demonstrating microfluidic mixing, dielectrophoretic trapping, complex microchannel networks and biologically relevant high temperature reactions were fabricated in less than 30 min. A novel ready to use world-to-chip interface was also developed using the same fabrication platform. All components (e.g. tapes, electrodes, acoustic sources or heaters) were obtained as finished products alleviating any chemical or clean-room specific processing. Only a 2D CAD software, a CO2 laser cutter and a seam roller was utilized to fabricate the devices. Adhesive transfer tapes provide additional flexibility compared to common double sided tapes as they do not contain any carrier material layer. Demonstrated ability to sustain in a wide range of dynamic physical processes (mechanical, electrical, or thermal) validates the robustness and the versatility of adhesive transfer tapes as an option for developing integrated lab on a chip systems. PMID:20593077

  2. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  3. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  8. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  9. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  10. Influence of viscoelastic nature on the intermittent peel-front dynamics of adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jagadish; Ananthakrishna, G

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the influence of viscoelastic nature of the adhesive on the intermittent peel front dynamics by extending a recently introduced model for peeling of an adhesive tape. As time and rate-dependent deformation of the adhesives are measured in stationary conditions, a crucial step in incorporating the viscoelastic effects applicable to unstable intermittent peel dynamics is the introduction of a dynamization scheme that eliminates the explicit time dependence in terms of dynamical variables. We find contrasting influences of viscoelastic contribution in different regions of tape mass, roller inertia, and pull velocity. As the model acoustic energy dissipated depends on the nature of the peel front and its dynamical evolution, the combined effect of the roller inertia and pull velocity makes the acoustic energy noisier for small tape mass and low-pull velocity while it is burstlike for low-tape mass, intermediate values of the roller inertia and high-pull velocity. The changes are quantified by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent and analyzing the statistical distributions of the amplitudes and durations of the model acoustic energy signals. Both single and two stage power-law distributions are observed. Scaling relations between the exponents are derived which show that the exponents corresponding to large values of event sizes and durations are completely determined by those for small values. The scaling relations are found to be satisfied in all cases studied. Interestingly, we find only five types of model acoustic emission signals among multitude of possibilities of the peel front configurations. PMID:20866711

  11. Degradation of the Adhesive Properties of MD-944 Diode Tape by Simulated Low Earth Orbit Environmental Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albyn, K.; Finckenor, M.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays utilize MD-944 diode tape with silicone pressure-sensitive adhesive to protect the underlying diodes and also provide a high-emittance surface. On-orbit, the silicone adhesive will be exposed and ultimately convert to a glass-like silicate due to atomic oxygen (AO). The current operational plan is to retract ISS solar array P6 and leave it stored under load for a long duration (6 mo or more). The exposed silicone adhesive must not cause the solar array to stick to itself or cause the solar array to fail during redeployment. The Environmental Effects Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, under direction from the ISS Program Office Environments Team, performed simulated space environment exposures with 5-eV AO, near ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation. The exposed diode tape samples were put under preload and then the resulting blocking force was measured using a tensile test machine. Test results indicate that high-energy AO, ultraviolet radiation, and electron ionizing radiation exposure all reduce the blocking force for a silicone-to-silicone bond. AO exposure produces the most significant reduction in blocking force

  12. Accuracy testing of electric groundwater-level measurement tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jelinski, Jim; Clayton, Christopher S.; Fulford, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy tests demonstrated that none of the electric-tape models tested consistently met the suggested USGS accuracy of ±0.01 ft. The test data show that the tape models in the study should give a water-level measurement that is accurate to roughly ±0.05 ft per 100 ft without additional calibration. To meet USGS accuracy guidelines, the electric-tape models tested will need to be individually calibrated. Specific conductance also plays a part in tape accuracy. The probes will not work in water with specific conductance values near zero, and the accuracy of one probe was unreliable in very high conductivity water (10,000 microsiemens per centimeter).

  13. Using hydrophilic adhesive tape for collection of evidence for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Richard C; Harris, Howard A

    2003-11-01

    Known exemplar samples of human DNA have traditionally been body fluids, such as blood, saliva, and semen. In each case, the presence of water is a risk for the bacterial growth, which may degrade the DNA evidence. In this study, the authors have developed a method that employed a hydrophilic adhesive tape (HAT) for collecting DNA evidence. The HAT method was used to remove surface cells from relatively hairless areas on the body. The area examined were ankle, arm, behind the ear, between fingers and back of the neck. The HAT was then dissolved in the extraction buffer. DNA typing was performed at vWA, THo1, F13A1, and FES loci using the short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. Our results show that the samples collected from ear give the best results with a success rate of 100%. All subjects tested by this method had known STR genotypes established from buccal swabs. The authors' results suggest that the HAT method can be used as a less invasive method for collecting biological evidence for forensic DNA analysis. In addition, this collection method should reduce the risk of DNA degradation due to the moisture, which is encountered using conventional collecting methods.

  14. Non-destructive sampling of rock-dwelling microbial communities using sterile adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Oliver, Anna E; Viles, Heather A; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Building stone provides a habitat for an array of microorganisms, many of which have been demonstrated to have a deleterious effect on the appearance and/or structural integrity of stone masonry. It is essential to understand the composition and structure of stone-dwelling (lithobiontic) microbial communities if successful stone conservation strategies are to be applied, particularly in the face of global environmental change. Ideally, the techniques used to sample such assemblages should be non-destructive due to the sensitive conservation status of many stone buildings. This paper quantitatively assesses the performance of sterile adhesive tape as a non-destructive sampling technique and compares the results of tape sampling with an alternative, destructive, sampling method. We used DNA fingerprinting (TRFLP) to characterise the algal, fungal and bacterial communities living on a stone slab. Our results demonstrate that tape sampling may be used to collect viable quantities of microbial DNA from environmental samples. This technique is ideally suited to the sampling of microbial biofilms, particularly when these communities are dominated by green algae. It provides a good approximation of total community diversity (i.e. the aggregate diversity of epilithic and endolithic communities). Tape sampling is straightforward, rapid and cost effective. When combined with molecular analytical techniques, this sampling method has the potential to make a major contribution to efforts to understand the structure of lithobiontic microbial communities and our ability to predict the response of such communities to future environmental change. PMID:23022426

  15. Time scales of the stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2015-01-01

    The stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape is characterized by bifurcations that have been experimentally well studied. In this work, we investigate the time scale in which the the stick–slips happen leading to the bifurcations. This is fundamental to understanding the triboluminescence and acoustic emissions associated with the bifurcations. We establish a relationship between the time scale of the bifurcations and the inherent mathematical structure of the peeling dynamics by studying a characteristic time quantity associated with the dynamics. PMID:25663802

  16. Calibration tests on magnetic tape lightning current detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, K. E.

    1980-04-01

    The low cost, passive, peak lightning current detector (LCD) invented at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center, uses magnetic audio recording tape to sense the magnitude of the peak magnetic field around a conductor carrying lightning currents. Test results show that the length of audio tape erased was linearly related to the peak simulated lightning currents in a round conductor. Accuracies of + or - 10% were shown for measurements made using a stopwatch readout technique to determine the amount of tape erased by the lightning current. The stopwatch technique is a simple, low cost means of obtaining LCD readouts and can be used in the field to obtain immediate results. Where more accurate data are desired, the tape is played and the output recorded on a strip chart, oscilloscope, or some other means so that measurements can be made on that recording. Conductor dimensions, tape holder dimensions, and tape formulation must also be considered to obtain a more accurate result. If the shape of the conductor is other than circular (i.e., angle, channel, H-beam), an analysis of the magnetic field is required to use an LCD, especially at low current levels.

  17. Calibration tests on magnetic tape lightning current detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The low cost, passive, peak lightning current detector (LCD) invented at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center, uses magnetic audio recording tape to sense the magnitude of the peak magnetic field around a conductor carrying lightning currents. Test results show that the length of audio tape erased was linearly related to the peak simulated lightning currents in a round conductor. Accuracies of + or - 10% were shown for measurements made using a stopwatch readout technique to determine the amount of tape erased by the lightning current. The stopwatch technique is a simple, low cost means of obtaining LCD readouts and can be used in the field to obtain immediate results. Where more accurate data are desired, the tape is played and the output recorded on a strip chart, oscilloscope, or some other means so that measurements can be made on that recording. Conductor dimensions, tape holder dimensions, and tape formulation must also be considered to obtain a more accurate result. If the shape of the conductor is other than circular (i.e., angle, channel, H-beam), an analysis of the magnetic field is required to use an LCD, especially at low current levels.

  18. Development and production of a flame retardant, general purpose, pressure sensitive adhesive tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P. B.; Doggett, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The specification results for the finished tape properties were as follows: (1) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on aluminum from 107 to 143 grams per centimeter (0.6 to 0.8 pounds per inch); (2) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on stainless steel from 71 to 107 grams per centimeter (0.4 to 0.6 pounds per inch); (3) unwind resistance of 536 to 714 grams per centimeter (3 to 4 pounds per inch); (4) tensile strength minimum of 7143 grams per centimeter (40 pounds per inch); (5) elongation from 5 to 10% at break; (6) tear strength, Elmendorf from 200 to 350 grams (0.44 to 0.77 pounds); and (7) tear strength, tongue from 363 to 408 grams (0.8 to 0.9) pounds).

  19. Analysis and testing of adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    An adhesive fracture mechanics approach is described with reference to the identification and design of the best tests for evaluating a given adhesive, the definition of the most meaningful fundamental parameters by which adhesives might be characterized, and the application of these parameters to the design of joints and to the prediction of their performance. Topics include standard adhesive test techniques, the theory of adhesive fracture, and adhesive fracture energy tests. Analytical methods and computer techniques for adhesive bonding, chemical and physical aspects of adhesive fracture, and specific applications and aspects of adhesive fracture mechanics are discussed.

  20. Combination of Adhesive-tape-based Sampling and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization for Rapid Detection of Salmonella on Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple approach for adhesive-tape-based sampling of tomato and other fresh produce surfaces, followed by on-tape fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella spp. Cell-charged tapes can also be placed face-down on selective agar for solid-phase enrichment prior to detection. Alternatively, low-volume liquid enrichments (liquid surface miniculture) can be performed on the surface of the tape in non-selective broth, followed by FISH and analysis via flow cytometry. To begin, sterile adhesive tape is brought into contact with fresh produce, gentle pressure is applied, and the tape is removed, physically extracting microbes present on these surfaces. Tapes are mounted sticky-side up onto glass microscope slides and the sampled cells are fixed with 10% formalin (30 min) and dehydrated using a graded ethanol series (50, 80, and 95%; 3 min each concentration). Next, cell-charged tapes are spotted with buffer containing a Salmonella-targeted DNA probe cocktail and hybridized for 15 - 30 min at 55°C, followed by a brief rinse in a washing buffer to remove unbound probe. Adherent, FISH-labeled cells are then counterstained with the DNA dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and results are viewed using fluorescence microscopy. For solid-phase enrichment, cell-charged tapes are placed face-down on a suitable selective agar surface and incubated to allow in situ growth of Salmonella microcolonies, followed by FISH and microscopy as described above. For liquid surface miniculture, cell-charged tapes are placed sticky side up and a silicone perfusion chamber is applied so that the tape and microscope slide form the bottom of a water-tight chamber into which a small volume (≤ 500 μL) of Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) is introduced. The inlet ports are sealed and the chambers are incubated at 35 - 37°C, allowing growth-based amplification of tape-extracted microbes. Following incubation, inlet ports

  1. Humidity effects on adhesion of nickel-zinc ferrite in elastic contact with magnetic tape and itself

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Kusaka, T.; Maeda, C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the adhesion of Ni-Zn ferrite and magnetic tape in elastic contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite hemispherical pin in moist nitrogen were studied. Adhesion was independent of normal load in dry, humid, and saturated nitrogen. Ferrites adhere to ferrites in a saturated atmosphere primarily from the surface tension effects of a thin film of water adsorbed on the ferrite surfaces. The surface tension of the water film calculated from the adhesion results was 48 times 0.00001 to 56 times 0.00001 N/cm; the accepted value for water is 72.7 x 0.00001 N/cm. The adhesion of ferrite-ferrite contacts increased gradually with increases in relative humidity to 80 percent, but rose rapidly above 80 percent. The adhesion at saturation was 30 times or more greater than that below 80 percent relative humidity. Although the adhesion of magnetic tape - ferrite contacts remained low below 40 percent relative humidity and the effect of humidity was small, the adhesion increased considerably with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The changes in adhesion of elastic contacts were reversible on humidifying and dehumidifying.

  2. Fatigue study and improve reliability of cantilever type micro piezoelectric energy harvesters reinforced with flexible adhesive conductive tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. K.; Hsieh, Y. C.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. J.; Wu, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    Cantilever type piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) is widely adopted in the design of vibration energy harvesters because of simple, effective and easy to fabricate. When the PEH is working under excitation of continuous vibration sources, like mounting on motors, reliability and durability is a major concern. The failure mode and fatigue issues will be important design considerations in field applications. Since the largest strain of a cantilever structure is located in the clamping position of fixed end, the location is therefore the weakest point of the structure and the hot zone of mechanical cracks. The failure mode due to fatigue under long time excitation of vibration sources is typically continuously developing small cracks on the piezoelectric PZT films till tearing the surface electrodes and caused open circuit to the output circuitry. Therefore, extending the lifetime with minimize the surface electrodes cracking becomes a key point for field applications. Previously, we focused on the output performance of PEH. At PowerMEMS 2014 [1], we presented a high performance PEH based on PZT thin films fabricated with a homemade PZT deposition equipment on stainless steel substrates. We confirmed that the stainless steel based PEH can generate better output power than silicon based devices under the same vibration excitation levels, and also the stainless based PEH can have longer lifetime when excited at higher vibration levels due to better mechanical strength. In this study, we tried to further reinforce the PEH with a conductive adhesive tape sticking on the surface electrode near the clamping position. We investigated the change of failure mode and mechanical behaviors, including the frequency bandwidth and non-linearity of the piezoelectric energy harvester. The PEH devices was mounted on a shaker for long time testing with vibration frequency set around 120Hz at 0.5g, 0.6g, and 0.7g acceleration vibration levels. The electrodes of the PEH device were

  3. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery.

  4. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy of human stratum corneum using a silver halide fiber probe of square cross-section and adhesive tape stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Küpper, L.; Butvina, L. N.

    2003-12-01

    Mid-infrared fiber probes allow an extended use of attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements for topical in vivo skin analysis, which were otherwise not possible with conventional sample compartment accessories. Evanescent wave spectroscopy using a flexible fiber-optic probe from silver halide fibers of square cross-section was employed for stratum corneum characterization and keratinocyte quantification on adhesive tapes. Such a method of quantifying the amount of keratin, which can be repetitively removed from the skin surface by adhesive tape application, is essential for the study of substances topically applied and penetrating into the horny layer. For calibration, the weight of keratinocytes was determined using an ultramicro-balance. Best results were obtained with difference spectroscopy and the evaluation of the amide I absorption band intensity (correlation coefficient r=0.983). Lowest amounts per cm 2 were reached for the range down to 5 μg/cm 2. The heterogeneity in the surface density of keratinocytes clinging to the tape was investigated by microscopy, and the thickness of some individual keratinocytes was tested by ATR-microspectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  5. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-10-09

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  6. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  7. Field spectrometer (S191H) preprocessor tape quality test program design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Program QA191H performs quality assurance tests on field spectrometer data recorded on 9-track magnetic tape. The quality testing involves the comparison of key housekeeping and data parameters with historic and predetermined tolerance limits. Samples of key parameters are processed during the calibration period and wavelength cal period, and the results are printed out and recorded on an historical file tape.

  8. Spectroscopic detection of exogenous materials in latent fingerprints treated with powders and lifted off with adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Banas, A; Banas, K; Breese, M B H; Loke, J; Lim, S K

    2014-07-01

    Fingerprint evidence offers great value to criminal investigations since it is an internationally recognized and established means of human identification. With recent advances in modern technology, scientists have started analyzing not only the ridge patterns of fingerprints but also substances which can be found within them. The aim of this work was to determine whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy could be used to detect contamination in a fingerprint which was dusted with powder (a technique already recognized as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints) and subsequently lifted off with adhesive tape. Explosive materials (pentaerythritol tetranitrate, C-4, TNT) and noncontrolled substances (sugar, aspirin) were used to prepare contaminated fingerprints on various substrates. Freshly deposited fingermarks with powders which were lifted off with adhesive tapes (provided by Singapore Police Force) were analyzed using a Bruker Hyperion 2000 microscope at the ISMI beamline (Singapore Synchrotron Light Source) with an attenuated total reflection objective. FTIR spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique which requires almost no sample preparation. Further, the fingerprint under analysis remains in pristine condition, allowing subsequent analysis if necessary. All analyzed substances were successfully distinguished using their FTIR spectra in powdered and lifted fingerprints. This method has the potential to significantly impact forensic science by greatly enhancing the information that can be obtained from the study of fingerprints.

  9. A technique to eliminate subgingival cement adhesion to implant abutments by using polytetrafluoroethylene tape.

    PubMed

    Hess, Timothy A

    2014-08-01

    Residual excess cement adhered subgingivally to an implant abutment has the potential to cause periimplant mucositis or periimplant disease. This article describes a procedure in which polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape is used to protect dental cements from adhering to the implant abutment. This technique ensures complete removal of cement from the implant abutment after seating of the crown. PMID:24529837

  10. Five year magnetic tape for unattended satellite tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benn, G. S. L.; Gutfreund, K.

    1972-01-01

    The development and fabrication of a quantity of long life magnetic tape with properties selected specifically for unattended operation in spacecraft tape recorders was studied. A detailed analytical consideration of various binder systems was undertaken. This included the chemical aspects of the binders, cohesion and adhesion effects, stability and the mechanical and physical properties. The ability to form free films of these polymers and their combination with various oxide loadings and other additives allowed a rapid selection of four polymer candidates for a five year magnetic tape. Samples were evaluated under actual running conditions which included physical, magnetic, and extensive life testing. These sample tapes withstood 50,000 bidirectional tape passes under fairly harsh operating conditions.

  11. Blister Test for Measurements of Adhesion and Adhesion Degradation of Organic Polymers on AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Troconis, Brendy Carolina

    A key parameter for the performance of corrosion protective coatings applied to metals is adhesion. Surface preparation prior to coating application is known to be critical, but there is a lack of understanding of what controls adhesion. Numerous techniques have been developed in the last decades to measure the adhesion strength of coatings to metals. Nonetheless, they are generally non-quantitative, non-reproducible, performed in dry conditions, or overestimate adhesion. In this study, a quantitative and reproducible technique, the Blister Test (BT), is used. The BT offers the ability to study the effects of a range of parameters, including the presence or absence of a wetting liquid, and simulates the stress situation in the coating/substrate interface. The effects of roughness and surface topography were studied by the BT and Optical Profilometry, using AA2024-T3 substrates coated with polyvinyl butyral (PVB). Random abrasion generated a surface with lower average roughness than aligned abrasion due to the continual cross abrasion of the grooves. The BT could discern the effects of different mechanical treatments. An adhesion strength indicator was defined and found to be a useful parameter. The effectiveness of standard adhesion techniques such as ASTM D4541 (Pull-off Test) and ASTM D3359 (Tape Test) was compared to the BT. Also, different attempts to measure adhesion and adhesion degradation of organic polymers to AA2024-T3 were tested. The pull-off test does not produce adhesive failure across the entire interface, while the tape test is a very qualitative technique and does not discern between the effects of different coating systems on the adhesion performance. The BT produces adhesive failure of the primer studied, is very reproducible, and is able to rank different coating systems. Therefore, it was found to be superior to the others. The approaches tested for adhesion degradation were not aggressive enough to have a measurable effect. The effects of

  12. Burnout Test of First- and Second-Generation HTS Tapes in Liquid-Nitrogen Bath Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. A.; Demko, J. A.; Duckworth, R. C.; Lue, J. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Pace, M. O.

    2004-06-01

    A series of BSCCO-2223 and YBCO tapes were subjected to burnout tests in a liquid-nitrogen bath to observe operational stability limits when different layers of dielectric tape are added to the sample surface. In this study, the BSCCO tapes were composed of a silver/alloy sheath with nickel/copper plating, while the YBCO tapes had a 50-μm layer of copper attached to the silver surface. After attaching the tapes to a thermally insulated G-10 holder, the stability of the tapes was found by applying current greater than the critical current and holding it constant for up to 1 min. If the sample voltage increased rapidly during this period, the tape was considered unstable at this current. This was repeated at different layers of Cryoflex™, and the results were compared to a numerical simulation of the energy balance equation. This simulation was also utilized to investigate the effect of the layers on the stability limit and estimate the thermal conductivity of the Cryoflex™.

  13. A beta test of linear tape-open (LTO) ultrium data storage technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cholia, Shreyas; Meyer, Nancy

    2001-10-31

    NERSC is participating in several HPSS (High Performance Storage System) research and development projects as part of the Probe testbed. One of these projects involved beta testing of the IBM 3584 UltraScalable Tape Library, which uses the new ultra-high-density Linear Tape-Open (LTO) Ultrium tape drives. Ultrium tape cartridges have a capacity of up to 300 GB of compressed data, greatly reducing the number of cartridges needed to store massive scientific datasets. NERSC's preliminary performance testing indicates that LTO Ultrium technology, with compatible products and media available from several vendors, may be a viable alternative for computer centers seeking higher-density archival storage media with a small footprint and relatively low cost per drive.

  14. In vitro quality testing of dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Oilo, G; Austrheim, E K

    1993-08-01

    A tensile and a shear bond strength test are compared, using two well-known and two more recently marketed dentin adhesive systems: Gluma (Bayer), Scotchbond 2 (3M), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M), and Syntac (Vivadent). The adhesives were used to bond composite resins to the buccal surface of human third molars. Specimens stored for 24 h before testing did not show significant differences between bond strength values obtained by either the tensile or the shear test method for any of the materials. The bond strength of thermocycled specimens did not differ for Gluma, was significantly lower for Scotchbond 2, and significantly higher for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Syntac. SEM observations showed increasing amounts of cohesive failure in resin with increasing bond strength values. Cohesive fractures in dentin were also observed. It is concluded that either the tensile or the shear test method can be used for quality testing of dentin adhesives. Thermocycling may provide interesting information about the quality of a bond.

  15. What's up with duct tape

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2005-03-01

    Recent research suggests that almost any tape can be made to work for a core-to-collar joint when perfectly applied. Given all the better choices available and all the problems that can and do occur in the field, we would not recommend that cloth-backed (natural) rubber-adhesive tapes be used, unless they can pass a suitable E2343 test. If visual degradation is an important factor, Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) and cloth-backed tapes should be avoided. While tapes that fail usually show visual degradation, the converse is not always true. We speculate, however, that visually degraded tapes are more likely to be susceptible to damage from vibration and other mechanical stresses. Conventional nylon straps are quite prone to fail at higher temperatures, but no systematic studies have yet been done across product classes. UL has proposed a new standard for straps, but the protocol for the current UL test does not, however, suggest that it would be a good indicator of durability. Products meeting the new UL standard for straps should be independently tested for the failure modes observed in the field and laboratory to determine if that test is a reasonable indicator of durability. Until a suitable test for strap durability exists, they recommend that only high temperature nylon or metal straps be used--especially in cases where tapes may be sensitive to mechanical stresses.

  16. Thermal Characterization of Epoxy Adhesive by Hotfire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.; Haddock, M. Reed; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes subscale solid-rocket motor hot-fire testing of epoxy adhesives in flame surface bondlines to evaluate heat-affected depth, char depth and ablation rate. Hot-fire testing is part of an adhesive down-selection program on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle to provide additional confidence in the down-selected adhesives. The current nozzle structural adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Prior to hot-fire testing, adhesives were tested for chemical, physical and mechanical properties, which resulted in the selection of two potential replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's TIGA 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. Hot-fire testing consisted of four forty-pound charge (FPC) motors fabricated in configurations that would allow side-by-side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives with the current RSRM adhesives. Results of the FPC motor testing show that: 1) the phenolic char depths on radial bondlines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used, 2) the replacement candidate adhesive char depths are equivalent to the char depths of the current adhesives, 3) the heat-affected depths of the candidate and current adhesives are equivalent, and 4) the ablation rates for both replacement adhesives were equivalent to the current adhesives.

  17. Bending fatigue tests on SiC-Al tapes under alternating stress at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a testing method for fatigue tests on SiC-Al tapes containing a small amount of SiC filaments under alternating stress is reported. The fatigue strength curves resulting for this composite are discussed. They permit an estimate of its behavior under continuous stress and in combination with various other matrices, especially metal matrices.

  18. The Value of Self-Test Items in Tape-Slide Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Hazel C.

    1976-01-01

    Two tape-slide sequences in general pathology were used in an experiment to assess the value of self-test items and to determine whether it is better to intersperse the self-test items in the program or place them all at the end of the sequence. A highly favorable attitude to the latter method is reported. (Author/LBH)

  19. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  20. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  1. Classroom Test Report: Compressed Speech Tapes--An Effective Teaching Tool for Increasing Rate and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jerry

    Compressed speech tapes--recordings of a voice reading a selection at the normal rate of approximately 150 words per minute that are speeded up to as much as 400 words a minute--can be used successfully with students to provide practice in improving reading rate and comprehension. In a field test conducted with 23 high school juniors and seniors…

  2. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  3. [Ankle sprains. Comparison of long-term results of functional treatment methods with adhesive tape and bandage ("brace") and stability measurement].

    PubMed

    Twellaar, M; Veldhuizen, J W; Verstappen, F T

    1993-09-01

    Both taping and bracing can be applied in the early functional treatment of ankle sprains. In this study the long-term (2.3 +/- 0.5 years) results of functional treatment with two types of bandages were compared. Out of 165 patients treated, 112 were available for interview, 60 of whom had been treated with adhesive, non-elastic tape and 52, with a confection brace. In 93 of these patients (47 in the tape group), the ankle was examined and stabilometry was performed. The distance (D) and area (A) covered by each patient's centre of gravity while he/she stood on one leg for 30 s were measured. The following symptoms were found on the total population: pain on movement in 5%, swelling in 8% and functional instability (recurrent sprain or a feeling of giving way) in 38%. Mechanical instability was found in 34%. Pain on palpation of the lateral ligaments was the only symptom whose frequency differed significantly (P < 0.05) between the tape group (47%) and the brace group (20%). Stabilometric measurements revealed no substantial difference between the tape group (D: 436 +/- 100 mm; A: 192 +/- 87 mm2) and the brace group (D: 459 +/- 111 mm; A: 206 +/- 92 mm2). Nor was any difference in stability observed between the injured and the non-injured ankle, between the stable and the unstable ankle, or between the unstable ankle with and without brace application. Stabilometry is thus not an appropriate means of quantifying the symptoms of ankle instability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Testing of machine wound second generation HTS tape Vacuum Pressure Impregnated coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaffield, D.; Lewis, C.; Eugene, J.; Ingles, M.; Peach, D.

    2014-05-01

    Delamination of second generation (2G) High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) tapes has previously been reported when using resin based insulation systems for wound coils. One proposed root cause is the differential thermal contraction between the coil former and the resin encapsulated coil turns resulting in the tape c-axis tensile stress being exceeded. Importantly, delamination results in unacceptable degradation of the superconductor critical current level. To mitigate the delamination risk and prove winding, jointing and Vacuum Pressure Impregnation (VPI) processes in the production of coils for superconducting rotating machines at GE Power Conversion two scaled trial coils have been wound and extensively tested. The coils are wound from 12mm wide 2G HTS tape supplied by AMSC onto stainless steel 'racetrack' coil formers. The coils are wound in two layers which include both in-line and layer-layer joints subject to in-process test. The resin insulation system chosen is VPI and oven cured. Tests included; insulation resistance, repeat quench and recovery of the superconductor, heat runs and measurement of n-value, before and after multiple thermal cycling between ambient and 35 Kelvin. No degradation of coil performance is evidenced.

  5. Mechanism Design and Testing of a Self-Deploying Structure Using Flexible Composite Tape Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Footdale, Joseph N.; Murphey, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed mechanical design of a novel deployable support structure that positions and tensions a membrane optic for space imagining applications is presented. This is a complex three-dimensional deployment using freely deploying rollable composite tape spring booms that become load bearing structural members at full deployment. The deployment tests successfully demonstrate a new architecture based on rolled and freely deployed composite tape spring members that achieve simultaneous deployment without mechanical synchronization. Proper design of the flexible component mounting interface and constraint systems, which were critical in achieving a functioning unit, are described. These flexible composite components have much potential for advancing the state of the art in deployable structures, but have yet to be widely adopted. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of implementing flexible composite components, including the design details on how to integrate with required traditional mechanisms.

  6. Method of and means for testing a tape record/playback system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, G. R.; Salter, W. E.; Weathers, G. D.; Gussow, S. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A tape record/playback system was tested by first deriving an analog test signal and a band-limited digital reference signal from a pseudo-noise sequence generator driven by a clock signal. It recorded the signals on respective tracks of the system during operation in a record mode. During the playback mode of operation of the system, a delayed analog reference signal without time base variations was reconstructed from the played back reference signal. It was compared with the played back test signal in order to obtain an error signal that was a measure of the performance of the system.

  7. Thread-Pull Test Of Curing Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Hardness (and degree of cure) of adhesive layer measured by pulling previously inserted thread out of layer. Strength of bond measured directly on assembly rather than on samples, which can be misleading.

  8. Kinesiology tape does not facilitate muscle performance: A deceptive controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Poon, K Y; Li, S M; Roper, M G; Wong, M K M; Wong, O; Cheung, R T H

    2015-02-01

    Kinesiology tape (KinTape) is a therapeutic tape without much understanding of its mechanism. KinTape claims to increase cutaneous stimulation, which facilitates motor unit firing, and consequently improves functional performance; however these, benefits could be due to placebo effects. This study investigated the true effects of KinTape by a deceptive, randomized, and controlled trial. Thirty healthy participants performed isokinetic testing of three taping conditions: true facilitative KinTape, sham KinTape, and no KinTape. The participants were blindfolded during the evaluation. Under the pretense of applying adhesive muscle sensors, KinTape was applied to their quadriceps in the first two conditions. Normalized peak torque, normalized total work, and time to peak torque were measured at two angular speeds (60°/s and 180°/s) and analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Participants were successfully deceived and they were ignorant about KinTape. No significant differences were found between normalized peak torque, normalized total work, and time to peak torque at 60°/s or 180°/s (p = 0.31-0.99) between three taping conditions. The results showed that KinTape did not facilitate muscle performance in generating higher peak torque, yielding a greater total work, or inducing an earlier onset of peak torque. These findings suggest that previously reported muscle facilitatory effects using KinTape may be attributed to placebo effects.

  9. Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-15

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

  10. Note: Effective anvil size for transverse delamination test of rare-earth-Ba₂Cu₃Oy coated conductor tapes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Gorospe, Alking B; Dedicatoria, Marlon J

    2015-10-01

    In coated conductor (CC) tapes used in magnet and coil applications, delamination due to excessive transverse tensile stresses is still one of the major issues that need considerations. Recently, several methods in evaluating the delamination strength of CC tapes are being used. In the case of anvil test, size of the anvils will be an important factor considering its applications (i.e., superconducting coil impregnation). In this study, delamination strength of CC tape was examined using different upper anvil sizes and their effects were discussed. Finally, reasonable sizes of upper anvil to be used were proposed considering the application conditions. PMID:26521009

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in the fabrication and adhesion testing of biomimetic dry adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2010-10-01

    In the past two years, there have been a large number of publications on the topic of biomimetic dry adhesives from modeling, fabrication and testing perspectives. We review and compare the most recent advances in fabrication and testing of these materials. While there is increased convergence and consensus as to what makes a good dry adhesive, the fabrication of these materials is still challenging, particularly for anisotropic or hierarchal designs. Although qualitative comparisons between different adhesive designs can be made, quantifying the exact performance and rating each design is significantly hampered by the lack of standardized testing methods. Manufacturing dry adhesives, which can reliably adhere to rough surfaces, show directional and self-cleaning behavior and are relatively simple to manufacture, is still very challenging—great strides by multiple research groups have however made these goals appear achievable within the next few years.

  12. Laboratory test for ice adhesion strength using commercial instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyu; Zhang, Wei; Siva, Adarsh; Tiea, Daniel; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2014-01-21

    A laboratory test method for evaluating ice adhesion has been developed employing a commercially available instrument normally used for dynamic mechanical analysis (TA RSA-III). This is the first laboratory ice adhesion test that does not require a custom-built apparatus. The upper grip range of ∼10 mm is an enabling feature that is essential for the test. The method involves removal of an ice cylinder from a polymer coating with a probe and the determination of peak removal force (Ps). To validate the test method, the strength of ice adhesion was determined for a prototypical glassy polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate). The distance of the probe from the PMMA surface has been identified as a critical variable for Ps. The new test provides a readily available platform for investigating fundamental surface characteristics affecting ice adhesion. In addition to the ice release test, PMMA coatings were characterized using DSC, DCA, and TM-AFM.

  13. Recent developments in processing HTS silver-clad Bi-2223 tapes, coils and test magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Haldar, P.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Motowidlo, L.R.; Balachandran, U.; Iwasa, Y.; Yunus, M.

    1993-10-01

    Considerable progress has been made in fabricating Bi-2223 high temperature superconductor (HTS) wires and tapes with high critical current densities that are attractive for electric power and high-field magnet applications. Powder-in-tube processed silver-clad Bi-2223 short tape samples, small coils and test magnets have been fabricated and measured at liquid nitrogen (77K), pumped liquid nitrogen (64 K), liquid neon (27K) and liquid helium (4.2K) temperatures. Optimization of thermo-mechanical process parameters have yielded J{sub c}`s in the superconducting core > 4.0 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 77K zero field and > 2.0 {times} 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2K, zero field. Long lengths (up to 70 m) of mono-core conductors were fabricated and tested to carry significant amounts of current (23 A, {approximately}15,000 A/cm{sup 2}) at liquid nitrogen temperature. Recent test magnets assembled from pancake wound coils were measured to generate magnetic fields as high as 2.6, 1.8 and 0.36 Tesla at 4.2K, 27K and 77K respectively. These results show promise towards practical utilization of HTS materials.

  14. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jack C.; Brown, Adam P.; Shin, John S.; Rogers, Kirsten M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endotracheal tube security is a critical safety issue. We compared the mobility of an in situ endotracheal tube secured with adhesive tape to the one secured with a new commercially available purpose-designed endotracheal tube-holder device (Haider Tube-Guard®). We also observed for the incidence of oropharyngeal or facial trauma associated with the 2 tube fixation methods. METHODS: Thirty adult patients undergoing general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade were prospectively enrolled. Immediately after intubation, a single study author positioned the endotracheal tube tip in the distal trachea using a bronchoscope. Anesthesiologists caring for patients secured the tube in their normal fashion (always with adhesive tape). A force transducer was used to apply linear force, increasing to 15 N or until the principal investigator deemed that the force be aborted for safety reasons. The displacement of the endotracheal tube was measured with the bronchoscope. Any tape was then removed and the endotracheal tube secured with the Haider Tube-Guard device. The linear force was reapplied and the displacement of the endotracheal tube measured. The Haider Tube-Guard device was left in place for the duration of the case. The patient’s face and oropharynx were examined for any evidence of trauma during surgery and in the recovery room. On discharge from the postanesthesia care unit, the patient answered a brief survey assessing for any subjective evidence of minor facial or oropharyngeal trauma. RESULTS: Under standardized tension, the endotracheal tube withdrew a mean distance of 3.4 cm when secured with adhesive tape versus 0.3 cm when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P <0.001). Ninety-seven percent of patients (29/30) experienced clinically significant endotracheal tube movement (>1 cm) when adhesive tape was used to secure the tube versus 3% (1/30) when the Haider Tube-Guard was used (P <0.001). Thirty percent of patients (9/30) were potentially deemed

  15. Robotic tape library system level testing at NSA: Present and planned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Michael F.

    1994-01-01

    In the present of declining Defense budgets, increased pressure has been placed on the DOD to utilize Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) solutions to incrementally solve a wide variety of our computer processing requirements. With the rapid growth in processing power, significant expansion of high performance networking, and the increased complexity of applications data sets, the requirement for high performance, large capacity, reliable and secure, and most of all affordable robotic tape storage libraries has greatly increased. Additionally, the migration to a heterogeneous, distributed computing environment has further complicated the problem. With today's open system compute servers approaching yesterday's supercomputer capabilities, the need for affordable, reliable secure Mass Storage Systems (MSS) has taken on an ever increasing importance to our processing center's ability to satisfy operational mission requirements. To that end, NSA has established an in-house capability to acquire, test, and evaluate COTS products. Its goal is to qualify a set of COTS MSS libraries, thereby achieving a modicum of standardization for robotic tape libraries which can satisfy our low, medium, and high performance file and volume serving requirements. In addition, NSA has established relations with other Government Agencies to complete this in-house effort and to maximize our research, testing, and evaluation work. While the preponderance of the effort is focused at the high end of the storage ladder, considerable effort will be extended this year and next at the server class or mid range storage systems.

  16. Identification of carbonates as additives in pressure-sensitive adhesive tape substrate with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its application in three explosive cases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jungang; Feng, Jimin; Zhang, Wen; Shi, Rongguang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive tape is often used to bind explosive devices. It can become important trace evidence in many cases. Three types of calcium carbonate (heavy, light, and active CaCO(3)), which were widely used as additives in pressure-sensitive tape substrate, were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in this study. A Spectrum GX 2000 system with a diamond anvil cell and a deuterated triglycine sulfate detector was employed for IR observation. Background was subtracted for every measurement, and triplicate tests were performed. Differences in positions of main peaks and the corresponding functional groups were investigated. Heavy CaCO(3) could be identified from the two absorptions near 873 and 855/cm, while light CaCO(3) only has one peak near 873/cm because of the low content of aragonite. Active CaCO(3) could be identified from the absorptions in the 2800-2900/cm region because of the existence of organic compounds. Tiny but indicative changes in the 878-853/cm region were found in the spectra of CaCO(3) with different content of aragonite and calcite. CaCO(3) in pressure-sensitive tape, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and thermal analysis, can be easily identified using FTIR. The findings were successfully applied to three specific explosive cases and would be helpful in finding the possible source of explosive devices in future cases. PMID:22724657

  17. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  18. The feasibility of bench tests for disposable ECG electrode adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Baker, C D; Schoenberg, A A; Booth, H E

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of recommending one standard bench test that adequately qualifies electrode adhesives for clinical use was examined by UBTL. Small strips, cut from whole, commercially available disposable ECG electrodes, were attached to three types of surfaces, and samples of each type of electrode were peel tested at 15 minutes, 8 hours, and 48 hours after attachment. A program was developed to average, display, and calculate peel strength parameters. Analysis of the data showed that (a) the peel strength of electrodes varied by more than a factor of 10 when measured on human skin, and by more than a factor of 3 when measured on bench test surfaces, and (b) the peel strength of the electrode adhesive strips did not correlate with intact electrode loss on ambulatory subjects. Therefore, UBTL could not recommend one bench test that would measure adhesion performance for all electrode types appropriate for inclusion in an AAMI ECG electrode standard.

  19. Quick-release medical tape

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Medical tape that provides secure fixation of life-sustaining and -monitoring devices with quick, easy, damage-free removal represents a longstanding unmet medical need in neonatal care. During removal of current medical tapes, crack propagation occurs at the adhesive–skin interface, which is also the interface responsible for device fixation. By designing quick-release medical tape to undergo crack propagation between the backing and adhesive layers, we decouple removal and device fixation, enabling dual functionality. We created an ordered adhesive/antiadhesive composite intermediary layer between the medical tape backing and adhesive for which we achieve tunable peel removal force, while maintaining high shear adhesion to secure medical devices. We elucidate the relationship between the spatial ordering of adhesive and antiadhesive regions to create a fully tunable system that achieves strong device fixation and quick, easy, damage-free device removal. We also described ways of neutralizing the residual adhesive on the skin and have observed that thick continuous films of adhesive are easier to remove than the thin islands associated with residual adhesive left by current medical tapes. PMID:23112196

  20. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  1. Groin dressing after cardiac catheterization. Comparison between light dressing with thin transparent tape (Tegaderm) and conventional tight/pressure dressing with an elastic adhesive bandage (Tensoplast).

    PubMed

    Boonbaichaiyapruck, S; Hutayanon, P; Chanthanamatta, P; Dumrongwatana, T; Intarayotha, N; Krisdee, V; Yamvong, S

    2001-12-01

    Post cardiac catheterization puncture site care is usually done with a tight pressure dressing by an elastic adhesive bandage (Tensoplast) due to the belief that it should prevent bleeding. The practice is uncomfortable to the patients. The authors compared a new way of dressing using light transparent tape (Tegaderm) to the conventional tight pressure one. 126 post coronary angiography patients were randomized to have their groins dressed either with Tensoplast or with Tegaderm. Patients ambulated 8 hours after the procedures. The groin was evaluated for pain, discomfort and bleeding complications. 49 per cent in the Tensoplast vs 26.9 per cent in the Tegaderm group experienced pain (p value of 0.01). 55.5 per cent in the Tensoplast group vs 11.1 per cent in the Tegaderm group reported discomfort. 4.7 per cent in the Tensoplast vs 1.6 per cent in the Tegaderm group developed bleeding or hematoma. Dressing of the puncture site after cardiac catheterization with Tegaderm was more comfortable than the conventional Tensoplast without any difference in bleeding complications.

  2. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  3. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  4. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  5. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  6. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet...

  7. A test of the adhesion approximation for gravitational clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei; Weinberg, David H.

    1993-01-01

    We quantitatively compare a particle implementation of the adhesion approximation to fully non-linear, numerical 'N-body' simulations. Our primary tool, cross-correlation of N-body simulations with the adhesion approximation, indicates good agreement, better than that found by the same test performed with the Zel-dovich approximation (hereafter ZA). However, the cross-correlation is not as good as that of the truncated Zel-dovich approximation (TZA), obtained by applying the Zel'dovich approximation after smoothing the initial density field with a Gaussian filter. We confirm that the adhesion approximation produces an excessively filamentary distribution. Relative to the N-body results, we also find that: (a) the power spectrum obtained from the adhesion approximation is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA, (b) the error in the phase angle of Fourier components is worse than that from TZA, and (c) the mass distribution function is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA. It appears that adhesion performs well statistically, but that TZA is more accurate dynamically, in the sense of moving mass to the right place.

  8. A test of the adhesion approximation for gravitational clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei F.; Weinberg, David H.

    1994-01-01

    We quantitatively compare a particle implementation of the adhesion approximation to fully nonlinear, numerical 'N-body' simulations. Our primary tool, cross-correlation of N-body simulations with the adhesion approximation, indicates good agreement, better than that found by the same test performed with the Zel'dovich approximation (hereafter ZA). However, the cross-correlation is not as good as that of the truncated Zel'dovich approximation (TZA), obtained by applying the Zel'dovich approximation after smoothing the initial density field with a Gaussian filter. We confirm that the adhesion approximation produces an excessively filamentary distribution. Relative to the N-body results, we also find that: (a) the power spectrum obtained from the adhesion approximation is more accurate that that from ZA to TZA, (b) the error in the phase angle of Fourier components is worse that that from TZA, and (c) the mass distribution function is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA. It appears that adhesion performs well statistically, but that TZA is more accurate dynamically, in the sense of moving mass to the right place.

  9. Adhesive Testing for the BTeV Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, C.M.; Kwan, Simon; Hicks, D.; Hahn, Eileen; Hoffman, Jay; Austin, Sharon; Jones, Renee; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The basic unit of the BTeV pixel detector is a multi-chip module which is comprised of a silicon sensor module bump-bonded to a number of readout chips. The pixel module will then be glued to a high intensity interconnect (HDI) cable using electrically conductive adhesive, and then onto a substrate using another kind of adhesive with reasonable thermal conductivity. This report is mostly addressed to the need of the latter--the substrate adhesive. The aim of this technical note is to summarize the testing efforts and results of this substrate adhesive covering a period since 2001 till the end of 2004. The substrate will serve two purposes: mechanical support and cooling of the modules. Stresses and strains will be generated when there is a thermal change on the substrate. In addition, since there are many kinds of materials, with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), being glued together to form the complete detector assembly, the substrate may get distorted due to the CTE mismatches. As stress is directly proportional to the material modulus, a significant amount of effort was concentrated in understanding the adhesive modulus. There are other constraints which need to be considered as well. For instance, the detector will be placed in a vacuum close to the beam, and it will be exposed to significant radiation during operation. As there are so many requirements on the adhesive, it is certainly not that easy to find one that meets all the demands. With a reasonable screening that the adhesive candidates being radiation hard and have low outgassing, searching for suitable adhesives was focused on those with low modulus. That is because (1) a mechanically reliable and fail-proof adhesive structure with low stress is needed, and (2) the leaking current characteristics of the modules will increase if mechanical stresses are too high. However, much of the technical information needed is usually not available from the vendor and therefore testing on our own

  10. Evaluation of non-specular reflecting silvered Teflon and filled adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, G.; Cox, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A non-specular silver-Teflon tape thermal control coating was tested to provide the data necessary to qualify it for use on the Space Shuttle Orbiter radiators. Effects of cure cycle temperature and pressure on optical and mechanical properties on the silver-Teflon tape were evaluated. The baseline Permacel P-223 adhesive, used with the specular silver-Teflon tape initially qualified for the Orbiter radiators, and four alternate metal-filled and unfilled adhesives were evaluated. Tests showed the cure process has no effect on the silver-Teflon optical properties, and that the baseline adhesive cure cycle gives best results. In addition the P-223 adhesive bond is more reproducible than the alternates, and the non-specular tape meets both the mechanical and the optical requirements of the Orbiter radiator coating specification. Existing Orbiter coating techniques were demonstrated to be effective in aplying the non-specular tape to a curved panel simulating the radiators. Author

  11. A Test for Characterizing Delamination Migration in Carbon/Epoxy Tape Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael W.; O'Brien, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    A new test method is presented for the purpose of investigating migration of a delamination between neighboring ply interfaces in fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix tape laminates. The test is a single cantilever beam configuration consisting of a cross-ply laminate with a polytetrafluoroethylene insert implanted at the mid-plane and spanning part way along the length of the specimen. The insert is located between a 0- degree ply (specimen length direction) and a stack of four 90-degree plies (specimen width direction). The specimen is clamped at both ends onto a rigid baseplate and is loaded on its upper surface via a piano hinge. Tests were conducted with the load-application point located on the intact portion of the specimen in order to initiate delamination growth onset followed by migration of the delamination to a neighboring 90/0 ply interface by kinking through the 90-degree ply stack. Varying this position was found to affect the distance relative to the load-application point at which migration initiated. In each specimen, migration initiated by a gradual transition of the delamination at the 0/90 interface into the 90-degree ply stack. In contrast, transition of the kinked crack into the 90/0 interface was sudden. Fractography of the specimens indicated that delamination prior to migration was generally mixed mode-I/II. Inspection of the kink surface revealed mode-I fracture. In general, use of this test allows for the observation of the growth of a delamination followed by migration of the delamination to another ply interface, and should thus provide a means for validating analyses aimed at simulating migration.

  12. Tests of the Performance of Coatings for Low Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Reich, Allen D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports studies of the performance of low-ice-adhesion coatings by NASA Lewis and BFGoodrich. Studies used impact ice accreted both in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) and in the BFGoodrich Icing Wind Tunnel (IWT) and static ice in a BFGoodrich bench-top parallel-plate shear rig. Early tests at NASA Lewis involved simple qualitative evaluations of the ease of removing impact ice from a surface. Coated surfaces were compared with uncoated ones. Some of the coatings were tested again with static ice at BFGoodrich to obtain quantitative measurements. Later, methods to establish the adhesion force on surfaces subjected to impact ice were explored at Lewis. This paper describes the various test programs and the results of testing some of the coatings looked at over the past 5 years. None of the coatings were found to be truly ice-phobic; however, the most effective coatings were found to reduce the adhesion of ice to about 1/2 that of an uncoated aluminum sample.

  13. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials. A review in 3 parts. Part 3: in vitro tests of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In the third part of this review of laboratory testing, methods of testing adhesive systems are evaluated. Test set-ups that are used to analyze the restorative material in combination with the adhesive system are presented. Currently, there is no standardized protocol available for the evaluation of adhesives. This complicates any direct comparisons of values between different testing institutes. Therefore, the statistically evaluated ranking of the different adhesives is more important than mean values. Depending on the testing institute, a correlation between bond strength measurements and clinical outcomes may exist. Qualitative analysis of adhesive/tooth interaction can help explain the functioning of a system, but the depth of penetration of the adhesive cannot predict bond strength. Indirect bond measurements or analyses of the interactions of adhesive and composite materials, such as dye penetration or marginal analysis, do not correlate or correlate only partially with clinical findings. Adhesive systems should be tested in vitro and compared to a well-known standard adhesive before they are used in the clinic. Water storage of specimens for several months before testing increases the predictability of the bonding performance of the tested adhesive.

  14. Accelerated aging studies and environmental stability of prototype tamper tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Bunk, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the results of accelerated aging experiments (weathering) conducted on prototype tamper tapes bonded to a variety of surface materials. The prototype tamper tapes were based on the patented Confirm{reg_sign} tamper-indicating technology developed and produced by 3M Company. Tamper tapes bonded to surfaces using pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and four rapid-set adhesives were evaluated. The configurations of the PSA-bonded tamper tapes were 1.27-cm-wide Confirm{reg_sign} 1700 windows with vinyl underlay and 2.54-cm-wide Confirm{reg_sign} 1700 windows with vinyl and polyester underlays. The configurations of the rapid-set adhesive-bonded tamper tapes were 2.54-cm-wide Confirm{reg_sign} (1700, 1500 with and without primer, and 1300) windows with vinyl underlay. Surfaces used for bonding included aluminum, steel, stainless steel, Kevlar{reg_sign}, brass, copper, fiberglass/resin with and without gel coat, polyurethane-painted steel, acrylonitrile:butadiene:styrene plastic, polyester fiberglass board, Lexan polycarbonate, and cedar wood. Weathering conditions included a QUV cabinet (ultraviolet light at 60{degrees}C, condensing humidity at 40{degrees}C), a thermal cycling cabinet (-18{degrees}C to 46{degrees}C), a Weather-O-Meter (Xenon lamp), and exposure outdoors in Daytona Beach, Florida. Environmental aging exposures lasted from 7 weeks to 5 months. After exposure, the tamper tapes were visually examined and tested for transfer resistance. Tamper tapes were also exposed to a variety of chemical liquids (including organic solvents, acids, bases, and oxidizing liquids) to determine chemical resistance and to sand to determine abrasion resistance.

  15. Tamper tape seals

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Undem, H.A.

    1994-07-01

    Tamper tapes are appealing for many applications due to their ease of use and relative robustness. Applications include seals for temporary area denial, protection of sensitive equipment, chain-of-custody audit trails, and inventory control practices. A next generation of adhesive tamper tapes is being developed that combines the best features of commercially available devices with additional state-of-the-art features in tamper indication, tamper-resistance, and counterfeit-resistance. The additional features are based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development (R&D) activities that were originally associated with preparations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). New features include rapid-set, chemical-cure adhesive systems that allow user-friendly application and layered levels of counterfeit-resistance based on unique {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} characteristics that can be accessed as desired.

  16. Adhesive bond cryogenic lens cell margin of safety test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, David M.; Hom, Craig L.; Holmes, Howard C.; Cannon-Morret, Joseph C.; Lindstrom, Obert F.; Irwin, J. Wes; Ryder, Leigh A.; Hix, Troy T.; Bonvallet, Jane A.; Hu, Hsin-Kuei S.; Chapman, Ira V.; Lomax, Curtis; Kvamme, E. Todd; Feller, Gregory S.; Haynes, Mark M.

    2011-09-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an optical prescription which employs four triplet lens cells. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at approximately 295K and the optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain an exceptional wavefront during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) was tasked to design and qualify the bonded cryogenic lens assemblies for room temperature launch, cryogenic operation, and thermal survival (25K) environments. The triplet lens cell designs incorporated coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) matched bond pad-to-optic interfaces, in concert with flexures to minimize bond line stress and induced optical distortion. A companion finite element study determined the bonded system's sensitivity to bond line thickness, adhesive modulus, and adhesive CTE. The design team used those results to tailor the bond line parameters, minimizing stress transmitted into the optic. The challenge for the Margin of Safety (MOS) team was to design and execute a test that verified all bond pad/adhesive/ optic substrate combinations had the required safety factor to generate confidence in a very low probability optic bond failure during the warm launch and cryogenic survival conditions. Because the survival temperature was specified to be 25K, merely dropping the test temperature to verify margin was not possible. A shear/moment loading device was conceived that simultaneously loaded the test coupons at 25K to verify margin. This paper covers the design/fab/SEM measurement/thermal conditioning of the MOS test articles, the thermal/structural analysis, the test apparatus, and the test execution/results.

  17. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  18. Rating underground pipeline tape and shrink sleeve coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Norsworthy, R.

    1999-11-01

    A rating system was developed for several coating types used for underground pipeline systems. Consideration included soil stress, adhesion, surface preparation, cathodic protection (CP) shielding, CP requirements, handling and construction, repair, field joint system, bends and other components, and the application process. Polyethylene- and polyvinyl chloride-backed tapes, woven polyolefin geotextile fabric (WGF)-backed tapes, hot-applied tapes, petrolatum- and wax-based tapes, and shrink sleeves were evaluated. WGF-backed tapes had the highest rating.

  19. Industrial Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Scotch Brand Tape 364 was developed for NASA by 3M Company to protect electrical instrumentation coils and fluid lines from rocket launch blast conditions. It is an aluminized glass cloth tape which can withstand very high temperatures, is easily applied to compound surfaces, has excellent solar energy reflectance, and does not present an electrostatic hazard. It has potential automotive, transportation, and building construction applications.

  20. An improved DNA test for bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tammen, I; Klippert, H; Kuczka, A; Treviranus, A; Pohlenz, J; Stöber, M; Simon, D; Harlizius, B

    1996-05-01

    A modified DNA test, based on the polymerase chain reaction, was developed for the monogenic recessive disease bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). The test was improved by the selection of new primers which facilitated the interpretation of the results. An easily scorable banding pattern makes the test useful in cattle breeding schemes and for clinical diagnosis. A total of 2381 samples was analysed over a period of three years. The carrier rate among young bulls at artificial insemination (AI) stations decreased from 11.6 per cent in 1993 to 9.9 per cent in the first five months of 1995. Continuous screening of young bulls before entering AI is still recommended unless both parents are proven to be genetically free of BLAD. The carrier rate among clinically suspect animals was not increased, and carriers are therefore not expected to be immunodeficient. Despite all efforts to eradicate the disease, calves with BLAD were still observed in 1995. PMID:8735510

  1. Importance of a suitable working protocol for tape stripping experiments on porcine ear skin: Influence of lipophilic formulations and strip adhesion impairment.

    PubMed

    Nagelreiter, C; Mahrhauser, D; Wiatschka, K; Skipiol, S; Valenta, C

    2015-08-01

    The tape stripping method is a very important tool for dermopharmacokinetic experiments in vitro and the accurate measurement of the removed corneocytes is key for a reliable calculation of a drug's skin penetration behavior. Therefore, various methods to quantify the amount of corneocytes removed with each tape strip have been employed, ranging from gravimetric approaches to protein assays and recently near infrared densitometry (NIR) has become very widely used. As this method is based on a reduction of light intensity, interference of formulation components seems conceivable, as they could scatter light and change the results. In this study, NIR measurements were compared to a protein assay and in addition, the influence of highly lipophilic formulations on the results of tape stripping experiments was investigated as impairment of the adherence of strips has been reported. To this end, different tape stripping protocols were employed. The obtained results ensure suitability of the NIR method and moreover suggest a more pronounced influence on adherence with increasing lipophilicity in applied formulations. The results show that adaptation of the tape stripping protocol to the specifications of envisioned experiments is important for reliable results. Two protocols were found favorable and are presented in this work. PMID:26117191

  2. Importance of a suitable working protocol for tape stripping experiments on porcine ear skin: Influence of lipophilic formulations and strip adhesion impairment.

    PubMed

    Nagelreiter, C; Mahrhauser, D; Wiatschka, K; Skipiol, S; Valenta, C

    2015-08-01

    The tape stripping method is a very important tool for dermopharmacokinetic experiments in vitro and the accurate measurement of the removed corneocytes is key for a reliable calculation of a drug's skin penetration behavior. Therefore, various methods to quantify the amount of corneocytes removed with each tape strip have been employed, ranging from gravimetric approaches to protein assays and recently near infrared densitometry (NIR) has become very widely used. As this method is based on a reduction of light intensity, interference of formulation components seems conceivable, as they could scatter light and change the results. In this study, NIR measurements were compared to a protein assay and in addition, the influence of highly lipophilic formulations on the results of tape stripping experiments was investigated as impairment of the adherence of strips has been reported. To this end, different tape stripping protocols were employed. The obtained results ensure suitability of the NIR method and moreover suggest a more pronounced influence on adherence with increasing lipophilicity in applied formulations. The results show that adaptation of the tape stripping protocol to the specifications of envisioned experiments is important for reliable results. Two protocols were found favorable and are presented in this work.

  3. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes during anvil tests for the evaluation of transverse delamination strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizon, John Ryan C.; Gorospe, Alking B.; Shin, Hyung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) based coated conductors (CCs) are now being used for electric device applications. For coil-based applications such as motors, generators and magnets, the CC tape needs to have robust mechanical strength along both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The CC tape in these coils is subjected to transverse tensile stresses during cool-down and operation, which results in delamination within and between constituent layers. In this study, in order to explain the behaviour observed in the evaluation of c-axis delamination strength in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes by anvil tests, numerical analysis of the mechanical stress distribution within the CC tape has been performed. The upper anvil size was varied in the analysis to understand the effect of anvil size on stress distribution within the multilayered CC tape, which is closely related to the delamination strength, delamination mode and delamination sites that were experimentally observed. The numerical simulation results showed that, when an anvil size covering the whole tape width was used, the REBCO coating film was subjected to the largest stress, which could result in low mechanical delamination and electromechanical delamination strengths. Meanwhile, when smaller-sized anvils were used, the copper stabilizer layer would experience the largest stress among all the constituent layers of the CC tape, which could result in higher mechanical and electromechanical delamination strengths, as well as high scattering of both of these delamination strengths. As a whole, the numerical simulation results could explain the damage evolution observed in CC tapes tested under transverse tensile stress, as well as the transverse tensile stress response of the critical current, Ic.

  4. Tape edge study in a linear tape drive with single-flanged guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldade, Anton V.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2004-05-01

    Improved tape guiding and tape dimensional stability are essential for magnetic tape linear recoding formats to take advantage of vastly increased track density and thereby achieve higher storage capacities. Tape guiding is dependent on numerous parameters, such as type of the guides and tape path geometry, quality of virgin tape edge, drive operating parameters (e.g., tape speed and tape tension), mechanical properties of the tape, and tape geometry (e.g., cupping and curvature). The objective of the present study is to evaluate guiding and tribological performance of single-flanged guides with porous air bearings in a linear tape drive. A comparison of guiding performance of the dual flanged stationary guides and single-flanged guides with porous air bearings is performed. The effect of tape path geometry, drive operating conditions (speed and tension) and tape edge quality of factory-slit tapes on tape guiding are evaluated during short-term tests. A lateral force measurement technique is used to measure the force exerted by the tape edge on the guide flange. A technique for the lateral tape motion measurement is used to study the effect of continuous sliding on tape guiding. Wear tests up to 5000 cycles are conducted and coefficient of friction and lateral tape motion are monitored to study the effect of drive operating conditions (speed and tension), edge quality of factory-slit tapes and tape thickness on tape guiding. Optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are employed to study and quantify the quality of tape edge.

  5. Magnetic evaluation of advanced metal-evaporated tape in an advanced linear tape drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Anthony D.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2007-01-01

    Demand for increased data storage has resulted in the development of various types of magnetic tapes. To achieve higher recording density, tape manufacturers are developing thin-film tapes, such as advanced metal-evaporated (AME) tape, for use in linear tape drives. In recent studies, these new AME tapes have demonstrated sustainable mechanical durability at low tensions suitable for use in linear tape drives. An evaluation of the magnetic performance of these AME tapes including the impact of tape cupping and initial edge quality was the goal of this study. Head output, dropouts, head-tape interface friction, and lateral tape motion (LTM) were monitored throughout testing. As track widths continue to narrow, LTM has become one of the critical limitations of magnetic performance. To more accurately measure LTM during drive development, a new method involving the output voltage of a head-read element that has been adjusted to be halfway off the recorded track on tape was implemented (LTM M). It is shown that positively cupped AME tapes will result in similar head output and fewer dropouts than the current MP tapes. The negatively cupped AME sample produced the lowest head output data and the highest amount of dropouts of all the tapes evaluated in this investigation. All the tapes evaluated demonstrated similar values of LTM when monitored at the center of the tape. When LTM was monitored at the lower edge of the tape, the positively cupped AME tape with the worst relative edge contour length resulted in the highest LTM M. As found in previous studies, AME tapes produced slightly lower values of coefficient of friction than the MP tapes. From this investigation, positively cupped AME tapes with good initial relative edge contour length are recommended for use in linear tape drives, similar to those used in this study.

  6. Magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Harriss

    1992-01-01

    The move to visualization and image processing in data systems is increasing the demand for larger and faster mass storage systems. The technology of choice is magnetic tape. This paper briefly reviews the technology past, present, and projected. A case is made for standards and the value of the standards to users.

  7. Multifilamentary niobium tin superconductor tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, P. H.; Coles, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    In the method proposed for fabricating multifilamentary Nb3Sn tape, filamentary superconducting paths are produced in standard commercial superconductor tape by chemical milling of separator slots through the Nb3Sn layer. The multifilament configuration features a matrix of ten 1.2 mm wide parallel helical superconducting paths along the length of the tape. The paths are spaced 0.4 mm apart. Tapes tested as small pancake coils demonstrated the integrity and continuity of the matrix, and showed that critical current was sustained in direct proportion to retained superconductor.

  8. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  9. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  10. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  11. Adhesion Testing of Firebricks from Launch Pad 39A Flame Trench after STS-124

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Curran, Jerome P.

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion testing was performed on the firebricks in the flame trench of Launch Complex 39A to determine the strength of the epoxy/firebrick bond to the backing concrete wall. The testing used an Elcometer 110 pneumatic adhesion tensile testing instrument (PATTI).

  12. Technique for recovery of voice data from heat damaged magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, J. F.; Obrien, D. E., III (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method for conditioning, and thus enabling retrieval of intelligence from, magnetic tapes after damage from heat has caused the tape to wrinkle and curl severely thereby reducing tape width to less than one-half its original size. The damaged tape is superposed on a first piece of splicing tape with the oxide side of the magnetic tape in contact with the adhesive side of the splicing tape and then carefully smoothed by a special tool. A second piece of splicing tape is placed on the backing side of the magnetic tape then the resulting tape stack is trimmed to the original width of the magnetic tape. After the first piece of splicing tape is carefully removed from the oxide side of the damaged magnetic tape, the resulting magnetic tape is then ready to be placed into a recorder for playback.

  13. A Study of Audio Tape: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reen, Noel K.

    1975-01-01

    To evaluate reel audio tape, tests were performed to identify: signal-to-noise ratio, total harmonic distortion, dynamic response, frequency response, biased and virgin tape noise, dropout susceptibility and oxide coating uniformity. (SCC)

  14. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Chapital, Dorselyn C

    2015-03-05

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environment-friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainability concerns. This work demonstrates the preparation and testing of the plant seed-based wood adhesives using cottonseed and soy meal as raw materials. In addition to untreated meals, water washed meals and protein isolates are prepared and tested. Adhesive slurries are prepared by mixing a freeze-dried meal product with deionized water (3:25 w/w) for 2 hr. Each adhesive preparation is applied to one end of 2 wood veneer strips using a brush. The tacky adhesive coated areas of the wood veneer strips are lapped and glued by hot-pressing. Adhesive strength is reported as the shear strength of the bonded wood specimen at break. Water resistance of the adhesives is measured by the change in shear strength of the bonded wood specimens at break after water soaking. This protocol allows one to assess plant seed-based agricultural products as suitable candidates for substitution of synthetic-based wood adhesives. Adjustments to the adhesive formulation with or without additives and bonding conditions could optimize their adhesive properties for various practical applications.

  15. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  16. An improved magnetic tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uber, P. W.

    1968-01-01

    Magnetic tape recorder employs a single capstan for simultaneously driving the supply and take-up reels in such a manner that the tape passing between the reels is kept under a predetermined constant tension. This recorder operates with little power and is sufficiently rugged to withstand the severe stresses encountered in high-altitude balloon flight tests.

  17. Carbon nanotube-based synthetic gecko tapes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2007-06-26

    We have developed a synthetic gecko tape by transferring micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays onto flexible polymer tape based on the hierarchical structure found on the foot of a gecko lizard. The gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm(2)) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micrometer-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak van der Waals interactions into high shear forces. We have demonstrated for the first time a macroscopic flexible patch that can be used repeatedly with peeling and adhesive properties better than the natural gecko foot. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  18. Pollution prevention in the magnetic tape industry: Waterborne coating formulations for video tape manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Fan, H.; Gogineni, N.; Jacobs, B.; Harrell, J.W.; Jefcoat, I.A.; Lane, A.M.; Nikles, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    A waterborne magnetic tape coating formulation was designed and used to prepare experimental magnetic tape samples in a pilot coating trial. The formulations contained a blend of a water-dispersed polyester and an ethylene/vinyl chloride copolymer emulsion, cross-linked with melamine-formaldehyde to give tensile properties (tensile strength 8.69 MPa Young`s modulus 245 MPa) that were comparable to a standard solvent-based binder composition. The pilot tape trial used existing processing equipment, including calendering and slitting. The tape had good magnetic properties and excellent adhesion between the pigmented magnetic layer and the base film, easily exceeding the 8 mm helical scan tape standard of 0.96 N peel force. An economic impact analysis for the case of sing the waterborne video tape coating process in a conventional tape manufacturing plant showed a significant decrease in costs for adopting the waterborne process.

  19. Adhesion scratch testing - A round-robin experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, A. J.; Valli, J.; Steinmann, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Six sets of samples, TiN coated by chemical or physical vapor deposition methods (CVD or PVD) onto cemented carbide or high-speed steel (HSS), and TiC coated by CVD onto cemented carbide have been scratch tested using three types of commercially available scratch adhesion tester. With exception of one cemented carbide set, the reproducibility of the critical loads for any given set with a given stylus is excellent, about + or - 5 percent, and is about + or - 20 percent for different styli. Any differences in critical loads recorded for any given sample set can be attributed to the condition of the stylus (clean, new, etc.), the instrument used, the stylus itself (friction coefficient, etc.), and the sample set itself. One CVD set showed remarkably large differences in critical loads for different styli, which is thought to be related to a mechanical interaction between stylus and coating which is enhanced by a plastic deformability in the film related to the coating microstructure. The critical load for TiN on HSS increases with coating thickness, and differences in frictional conditions led to a systematic variation in the critical loads depending on the stylus used.

  20. Tape/head interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Existing high energy tapes, high track density heads, and transport guidance techniques were evaluated and characterized to enable these technologies to be employed in future spacecraft recorders with high confidence. The results of these study efforts demonstrated tracking accuracy tape and head density that will support spacecraft recorders with data rates of a minimum of 150 Mbps and storage capacities ranging from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 11th bits. Seven high energy tapes of either .25 in width, 1.00 in width, or both, were tested. All tapes were tested at the same speed (30 ips) and the same packing density (33 KBI). The performance of all 1 in tapes was considered superior.

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) - comprehensive update (on magnetic tape). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test data are broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, as well as the submitting organization and reason for submission of the test data.

  2. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) test submissions database (TSCATS) - comprehensive update (on magnetic tape)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test data are broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects, and environmental fate. additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, the submitting organization, and reason for submission of the test data.

  3. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) test submissions database (tscats) - comprehensive update (on magnetic tape). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test data are broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, as well as the submitting organization and reason for submission of the test data.

  4. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) - comprehensive update (on magnetic tape). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test data are broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, as well as the submitting organization and reason for submission of the test data.

  5. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) test submissions database (TSCATS) - comprehensive update (on magnetic tape). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test data are broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects, and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, as well as the submitting organization and reason for submission of the test data.

  6. Tests to Determine the Adhesive Power of Passenger-Car Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foerster, B.

    1956-01-01

    The concept of the adhesive power of a tire with respect to the road involves several properties which result from the purpose of the tire; namely, connecting link between vehicle and road: (1) The tire must transfer the tractive and braking forces acting in the direction of travel (tractive and braking adhesion); (2) The tire is to prevent lateral deviations of the vehicle from the desired direction of travel (track adhesion). Moreover, the rubber tire provides part of the springing of the vehicle. Above all, it has to level out the minor road irregularities; thus it smoothes, as it were, the road and simultaneously reduces the noise of driving. The springing properties of the tire affect the adhesive power. The tests described below comprise a determination of the braking and track adhesion of individual tires. The adhesion of driven wheels has not been investigated so far.

  7. Effects of Patellar Taping on Brain Activity During Knee Joint Proprioception Tests Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    McKie, Shane; Richardson, Paul; Oldham, Jacqueline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patellar taping is a common treatment modality for physical therapists managing patellofemoral pain. However, the mechanisms of action remain unclear, with much debate as to whether its efficacy is due to a change in patellar alignment or an alteration in sensory input. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory input hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging when taping was applied to the knee joint during a proprioception task. Design This was an observational study with patellar taping intervention. Methods Eight male volunteers who were healthy and right-leg dominant participated in a motor block design study. Each participant performed 2 right knee extension repetitive movement tasks: one simple and one proprioceptive. These tasks were performed with and without patellar taping and were auditorally paced for 400 seconds at 72 beats/min (1.2 Hz). Results The proprioception task without patellar taping caused a positive blood oxygenation level–dependant (BOLD) response bilaterally in the medial supplementary motor area, the cingulate motor area, the basal ganglion, and the thalamus and medial primary sensory motor cortex. For the proprioception task with patellar taping, there was a decreased BOLD response in these regions. In the lateral primary sensory cortex, there was a negative BOLD response with less activity for the proprioception task with taping. Limitations This study may have been limited by the small sample size, a possible learning effect due to a nonrandom order of tasks, and use of a single-joint knee extension task. Conclusions This study demonstrated that patellar taping modulates brain activity in several areas of the brain during a proprioception knee movement task. PMID:22282771

  8. French Tape Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Robert, Comp.

    This tape catalog is a complete list of all French-related titles appearing in the National Center for Audio Tapes 1974-76 catalog. Wherever possible, each tape is briefly described. Price and ordering information is included. (PMP)

  9. Tape transport mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; McDowell, William; Modjeski, Norbert S.; Keefe, Donald J.; Groer, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for transporting, in a stepwise manner, tape between a feed reel and takeup reel. An indexer moves across the normal path of the tape displacing it while the tape on the takeup reel side of the indexer is braked. After displacement, the takeup reel takes up the displaced tape while the tape on the feed reel side of the indexer is braked, providing stepwise tape transport in precise intervals determined by the amount of displacement caused by the indexer.

  10. Fabrication and test of short helical solenoid model based on YBCO tape

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.; Lombardo, V.; Lopes, M.L.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2011-03-01

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) is a new technique proposed for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams. To achieve the optimal cooling rate, the high field section of HCC need to be developed, which suggests using High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). This paper updates the parameters of a YBCO based helical solenoid (HS) model, describes the fabrication of HS segments (double-pancake units) and the assembly of six-coil short HS model with two dummy cavity insertions. Three HS segments and the six-coil short model were tested. The results are presented and discussed.

  11. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-01

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  12. Effect of tape recording on perturbation measures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Lin, E; Hanson, D G

    1998-10-01

    Tape recorders have been shown to affect measures of voice perturbation. Few studies, however, have been conducted to quantitatively justify the use or exclusion of certain types of recorders in voice perturbation studies. This study used sinusoidal and triangular waves and synthesized vowels to compare perturbation measures extracted from directly digitized signals with those recorded and played back through various tape recorders, including 3 models of digital audio tape recorders, 2 models of analog audio cassette tape recorders, and 2 models of video tape recorders. Signal contamination for frequency perturbation values was found to be consistently minimal with digital recorders (percent jitter = 0.01%-0.02%), mildly increased with video recorders (0.05%-0.10%), moderately increased with a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.15%), and most prominent with a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.24%). Recorder effect on amplitude perturbation measures was lowest in digital recorders (percent shimmer = 0.09%-0.20%), mildly to moderately increased in video recorders and a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.25%-0.45%), and most prominent in a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.98%). The effect of cassette tape material, length of spooled tape, and duration of analysis were also tested and are discussed.

  13. FGGE/ERBM tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 FGGE/ERBM tape contains 27 ERB parameters which are extracted and reformatted from the Nimbus-7 ERB-MATRIX tape. There are four types of files on a FGGE/ERBM tape: a test file; tape-header file which describes the data set characteristics and the contents of the tape; a grid-descriptor file which contains the information of the ERB scanning channel target number and their associated latitude limits and longitude intervals; and one or more data files. A single end-of-file (EOF) tape mark is written after each file, and two EOF marks are written after the last data file on the tape.

  14. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  15. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  16. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    PubMed

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  17. Striped tape arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.; Katz, Randy H.

    1992-01-01

    A growing number of applications require high capacity, high throughput tertiary storage systems. How data striping ideas apply to arrays of magnetic tape drives is investigated. Data striping increases throughput and reduces response time for large accesses to a storage system. Striped magnetic tape systems are particularly appealing because many inexpensive magnetic tape drives have low bandwidth; striping may offer dramatic performance improvements for these systems. There are several important issues in designing striped tape systems: the choice of tape drives and robots, whether to stripe within or between robots, and the choice of the best scheme for distributing data on cartridges. One of the most troublesome problems in striped tape arrays is the synchronization of transfers across tape drives. Another issue is how improved devices will affect the desirability of striping in the future. The results of simulations comparing the performance of striped tape systems to non-striped systems are presented.

  18. Magnetic tape user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. B.; Lee, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    This User Guide provides a general introduction to the structure, use, and handling of magnetic tapes at Langley Research Center (LaRC). The topics covered are tape terminology, physical characteristics, error prevention and detection, and creating, using, and maintaining tapes. Supplementary documentation is referenced where it might be helpful. The documentation is included for the tape utility programs, BLOCK, UNBLOCK, and TAPEDMP, which are available at the Central Scientific Computing Complex at LaRC.

  19. Tape reading fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Commercially available roller type desk pad provides an efficient and orderly manner of handling rolled paper tapes for proofreading. The fixture, which is modified to accept Flex-O-Writer or similar tapes and roll them in either direction, reduces the chance of damaging or soiling the tapes through repeated handling.

  20. Adhesion characteristics of silver tracks screen-printed on polyimide with an environmental reliability test.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Seok; Myung, Woo-Ram; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2012-07-01

    Printable and flexible electronics are increasingly being used in numerous applications that are miniaturized, multi-functional and lightweight. Simultaneously, reliability issues of the printed and flexible electronic devices are getting more attention. The adhesion of screen-printed silver (Ag) tracks on a polyimide (PI) film was investigated after two kinds of the environmental reliability test: a constant-temperature storage test, and a steady-state temperature and humidity storage test. Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) was adopted on the PI film surface to improve the poor adhesion derived from the inherent hydrophobicity. The Ag tracks constructed via screen printing were sintered at 250 degrees C for 30 min in air using a box-type muffle furnace. Some samples were exposed under 85 degrees C and 85% relative humidity (RH) for various durations (24, 72, 168 and 500 h), and others were aged at 85 degrees C with same durations to compare the influence of moisture on the adhesion. The adhesion of the screen-printed Ag tracks was evaluated by a roll-type 90 degrees peel test. The peel strength of the screen-printed Ag tracks decreased by 76.74% and 69.88% after 500 h run of the 85 degrees C/85% RH test, and the aging test, respectively. The weakest adhesion was 4.98 gf/mm after the 500 h run of the 85 degrees C/85% RH test. To demonstrate these experimental results, the microstructural evolution and chemical bonding states of the interfacial surfaces were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), respectively. PMID:22966651

  1. Pinworm test

    MedlinePlus

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... to determine if there are eggs. The tape test may need to be done on 3 separate ...

  2. Interpretation of the human skin biotribological behaviour after tape stripping

    PubMed Central

    Pailler-Mattei, C.; Guerret-Piécourt, C.; Zahouani, H.; Nicoli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the modification of the human skin biotribological behaviour after tape stripping. The tape-stripping procedure consists in the sequential application and removal of adhesive tapes on the skin surface in order to remove stratum corneum (SC) layers, which electrically charges the skin surface. The skin electric charges generated by tape stripping highly change the skin friction behaviour by increasing the adhesion component of the skin friction coefficient. It has been proposed to rewrite the friction adhesion component as the sum of two terms: the first classical adhesion term depending on the intrinsic shear strength, τ0, and the second term depending on the electric shear strength, τelec. The experimental results allowed to estimate a numerical value of the electric shear strength τelec. Moreover, a plan capacitor model with a dielectric material inside was used to modelize the experimental system. This physical model permitted to evaluate the friction electric force and the electric shear strength values to calculate the skin friction coefficient after the tape stripping. The comparison between the experimental and the theoretical value of the skin friction coefficient after the tape stripping has shown the importance of the electric charges on skin biotribological behaviour. The static electric charges produced by tape stripping on the skin surface are probably able to highly modify the interaction of formulations with the skin surface and their spreading properties. This phenomenon, generally overlooked, should be taken into consideration as it could be involved in alteration of drug absorption. PMID:21227961

  3. Elastic therapeutic tape: do they have the same material properties?

    PubMed Central

    Boonkerd, Chuanpis; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Elastic therapeutic tape has been widely used for rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries. Tapes with different elastic properties serve different treatment purposes with inappropriate tension reducing tape effectiveness. Many tapes are available in the market, but studies on tape properties are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the material properties of elastic therapeutic tape. [Subjects and Methods] Brands of elastic therapeutic tape included KinesioTex®, ATex, Mueller, 3M, and ThaiTape. The Material Testing System Insight® 1 Electromechanical Testing Systems was used to apply a tensile force on elastic therapeutic tape. Ten specimens of each brand were tested. Stress, load, and Young’s modulus at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and maximum point were collected. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc testing was used to analyze tape parameters. [Results] Maximum elongation and Young’s modulus at all percentages were significantly different between brands. There were no differences in maximum load and maximum stress. [Conclusion] Mechanical properties are different for commercial elastic therapeutic tapes. Physiotherapists and other clinicians should be aware of mechanical tape properties to correctly apply kinesio tape. PMID:27190472

  4. Elastic therapeutic tape: do they have the same material properties?

    PubMed

    Boonkerd, Chuanpis; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Elastic therapeutic tape has been widely used for rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries. Tapes with different elastic properties serve different treatment purposes with inappropriate tension reducing tape effectiveness. Many tapes are available in the market, but studies on tape properties are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the material properties of elastic therapeutic tape. [Subjects and Methods] Brands of elastic therapeutic tape included KinesioTex(®), ATex, Mueller, 3M, and ThaiTape. The Material Testing System Insight(®) 1 Electromechanical Testing Systems was used to apply a tensile force on elastic therapeutic tape. Ten specimens of each brand were tested. Stress, load, and Young's modulus at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and maximum point were collected. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc testing was used to analyze tape parameters. [Results] Maximum elongation and Young's modulus at all percentages were significantly different between brands. There were no differences in maximum load and maximum stress. [Conclusion] Mechanical properties are different for commercial elastic therapeutic tapes. Physiotherapists and other clinicians should be aware of mechanical tape properties to correctly apply kinesio tape.

  5. Radial speckle interferometry combined with a microindentation test to analyze coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendela, L. P.; Viotti, M. R.; Albertazzi Gonçalves, A., Jr.; Kaufmann, G. H.

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a novel technique to investigate coating adhesion using a radial speckle interferometer and a microindentation test. The proposed technique is based on the measurement of the radial in-plane displacement field produced by a microindentation introduced on the coated surface of the specimen. The advantages and limitations of the proposed technique are shown.

  6. Adhesion determination of dental porcelain to zirconia using the Schwickerath test: strength vs. fracture energy approach.

    PubMed

    Kosyfaki, P; Swain, M V

    2014-11-01

    Two approaches to measure the fracture energy to delaminate four different porcelains from zirconia substrates are compared using Schwickerath adhesion strength test specimens. In all instances it was possible to stably extend the crack along or adjacent to the porcelain-zirconia interface. The fracture energy expended to delaminate the porcelain was found by determining the work of fracture upon loading to 12 N and then unloading. Additional tests were undertaken on specimens notched along the interface, which enabled the compliance of the cracked Schwickerath specimens to be calibrated. The strain energy and deflection of the Schwickerath specimen as a function of crack length were derived. On this basis a simple expression was determined for the strain energy release rate or interfacial fracture toughness from the minima in the force-displacement curves. Consequently two measures of the adhesion energy were determined, the work of fracture and the strain energy release rate. It was found that the ranking for the four porcelains bonded to zirconia differed depending upon the approach. The work of fracture was substantially different from the strain energy release rate for three of the porcelain-zirconia systems and appears to be directly related to the residual stresses present in the bonded structures. The relative merits of the strain energy release rate, work of fracture vs. the stress to initiate cracking in the case of the Schwickerath adhesion test, are discussed. The advantage of this test is that it enables three estimates of the adhesion for porcelain veneers bonded to zirconia.

  7. Thermal nondestructive testing (TNDT) of adhesively bonded composite reinforcements applied to concrete civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Douglas D.; Bohner, Richard

    1999-02-01

    Thermographic nondestructive testing was performed on composite reinforcements applied to two concrete civil structures. Information on the types of defects which occur in these structures and their locations has led to process improvements in the application of adhesively bonded laminated composites to steel reinforce concrete structures.

  8. A blister-test apparatus for studies on the adhesion of materials used for neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Juan; Boehler, Christian; Schuettler, Martin; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A blister test apparatus has been developed, which allows a quantitative adhesion analysis of thin-film metallizations on polymers manufactured in cleanroom conditions suitable for micromachining of neural electrode arrays. The device is capable of pressurizing metallic membranes at wafer level, monitoring the pressure and the height of the developing blister while detecting the moment of delamination, allowing the calculation of the adhesion energy between metal film and polymer. The machine is designed for quantitative long-term studies of materials used in neural microelectrode arrays.

  9. Permeability testing of composite material and adhesive bonds for the DC-XA composite feedline program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and Hysol EA 9394 epoxy adhesive bonded between composite/titanium were tested for permeability after various numbers of thermal cycles between 100 C and liquid nitrogen (-196 C). The specimens were quenched from the 100 C temperature into liquid nitrogen to induce thermal shock into the material. Results showed that the carbon/epoxy system was practically impermeable even after 12 thermal cycles. The EA 9394 adhesive bondline was more permeable than the carbon/epoxy, but vacuum mixing minimized the permeability and kept it within allowable limits. Thermal cycling had little effect on the permeability values of the bondline specimens.

  10. Evaluation of coating adhesion using a radial speckle interferometer combined with a micro-indentation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendela, Lucas P.; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a technique to investigate coating adhesion which combines a radial in-plane speckle interferometer and a micro-indentation test. The proposed technique is based on the measurement of the radial in-plane displacement field produced by a micro-indentation introduced on the coated surface of the specimen. Using steel specimens coated with a thin coating of epoxy paint and subjected to different adhesive conditions, it is demonstrated that digital speckle pattern interferometry can be successfully used to measure the small local deformations generated by a micro-indentation. An empirical model, which allows to quantify the adhesion of a given coated-substrate system by the proposed combined technique, is finally presented.

  11. VLBA: Formatter to Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. E. E. R.

    Introduction; Why Magnetic Tape?; VLBI Recording Systems; The VLBA Data Format; Longitudinal Format; Transverse Track Format; Data and Non-Data Replacement; Track Width and Track Structure; The VLBA Formatter; Switch Board; Header Control Board; Transport Driver Board; Timing and Control Board; DataBuffer Board; Analysis Board; Magnetic Recording Fundamentals; Recording Losses; Wavelength Response; Head-to-Tape Contact and Tribology; The VLBA Recorder; The Tape Transport; The Headstack; The Headstack Positioner; Control Electronics; Signal Electronics and Eye Pattern; Characteristics and Limitations; Error Rate Versus Bit Density; Tape Thickness Interchange; Head Flying; Overwrite; Tracking Errors; Headlife and Humidity; Thin Tape and Edge Damage by Frictional Heating; Tape Reel and Shipping Canister; Future VLBI Recording Systems; Expansion Paths for the VLBA Formatter; Recorder Improvements; Thinner Tape; Higher Data Rates; Next Generation of Heads; Mark IV; Summary and Conclusions

  12. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness. PMID:26428630

  13. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness.

  14. Dendrimer-Mediated Adhesion between Vapor-Deposited Au and Glass or Si Wafers.

    PubMed

    Baker, L A; Zamborini, F P; Sun, L; Crooks, R M

    1999-10-01

    Here, we report the use of amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as adhesion promoters between vapor-deposited Au films and Si-based substrates. This method is relatively simple, requiring only substrate cleaning, dipping, and rinsing. Proof of concept is illustrated by coating glass slides and single-crystal Si wafers with monolayers of PAMAM dendrimers and then evaporating adherent, 150-nm-thick Au films atop the dendritic adhesion promoter. Scanning tunneling microscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been used to assess the surface roughness and electrochemical stability of the Au films. The effectiveness of the dendrimer adhesion layer is demonstrated using standard adhesive-tape peel tests.

  15. Testing of sludge coating adhesiveness on fuel elements in 105-K west basin

    SciTech Connect

    Maassen, D.P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11

    This report summarizes the results from the first sludge adherence tests performed in the 105-K West Basin on N Reactor fuel. The outside surface of the outer fuel elements were brushed, using stainless steel wire brushes, to test the adhesiveness of various types of sludge coatings to the cladding`s surface. The majority of the sludge was removed by the wire brushes in this test but different types of sludge were more adhesive than others. Particularly, an orange rust-like sludge coating that was just slightly more adherent to the fuel`s cladding than the majority of the sludge coatings and a thick white vertical strip sludge coating that was much more difficult to remove. The test demonstrated that all of the sludge could be removed from the outer fuel elements` surfaces if the need arises.

  16. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  17. A Study of Audio Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reen, Noel K.

    1975-01-01

    This is part I of a report on a study comparing reel and cassette tapes for signal-to-noise ration, total harmonic distortion, dynamic response, frequency response, bias and virgin noise and oxide coating uniformity. Test equipment and procedures are described and results are discussed. Charts detail research findings. (CHK)

  18. Fracture testing and analysis of adhesively bonded joints for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Warren, C.D.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began a cooperative effort with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. This paper concentrates on the details of developing accurate fracture test methods for adhesively bonded joints in the automotive industry. The test methods being developed are highly standardized and automated so that industry suppliers will be able to pass on reliable data to automotive designers in a timely manner. Mode I fracture tests have been developed that are user friendly and automated for easy data acquisition, data analysis, test control and test repeatability. The development of this test is discussed. In addition, materials and manufacturing issues are addressed which are of particular importance when designing adhesive and composite material systems.

  19. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Vincent W.

    1994-01-01

    A device for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite.

  20. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  1. A New Testing Method to Evaluate Adhesion Strength of Ceramic Top Coat in TBCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Masakazu; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Masakazu; Fukanuma, Hirotaka

    A new testing method to evaluate adhesion strength of ceramic top coat has been proposed, employing a ring shape of TBC specimen specifically designed. It was shown by the experiments that a delamination behavior of the top coat was successfully reproduced in the proposed method, associating with a buckling mode; a similar mode frequently observed in actual gas turbine components. A method to quantitatively evaluate a resistance to delamination was also introduced, based on an energy release rate criterion. The experiments demonstrated that the testing method provided reasonable adhesion strength in terms of energy criterion, that almost agreed with the values measured by other researchers employing different type of testing method. It was also shown that the present method has many advantages, compared with the traditional methods.

  2. Tester automatically checks paper tape punch and reader after maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, L.; Mc Murchy, D. D.

    1967-01-01

    Device automatically bench tests paper tape punches and readers in a simulated operating environment following routine maintenance. The reader and punch operate back-to-back and the paper tape output feeds the reader. The tape leader is prepunched with an arbitrary pattern that is continuously reproduced during the check.

  3. Adhesion and chemical vapor testing of second surface silver/glass solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Second surface silvered glass mirrors supplied by four different commercial manufacturers were evaluated for silver-to-glass adhesion and resistance to chemical vapor attack. The mirrors were chemically silvered on identical substrates of low iron float glass. Experiments were performed in order to assess the viability of using adhesion and chemical attack as screening tests for predicting the relative long-term durability of solar mirrors. The results of these tests will be compared at a future time with the survivability of field mirrors deployed in stationary exposure racks at ten locations throughout the United States. The adhesion tests were performed using a commercially-available thin film tensile pull tester in which a stud bonded to the film is pulled and the yield load recorded. Numerous subtleties regarding the selection of the adhesive used to bond the study and the validity of the testing procedure are discussed. Several different methods of normalizing the results were attempted in an effort to reduce the scatter in the data. The same set of samples were exposed to salt spray, water, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and HNO/sub 3/ vapors and then ranked according to their performance. Visual comparison of tested samples did not yield consistent results; however, definite trends were observed favoring one of the manufacturers. Some SEM/EDX analysis was performed on these mirrors subject to accelerated degradation in order to compare them to mirrors subject to natural degradation. However, insufficient data has been collected to show that any of the tests performed will accurately predict the relative life expectancy of the mirrors in an outdoor environment.

  4. Coracoid pain test: a new clinical sign of shoulder adhesive capsulitis

    PubMed Central

    Gumina, S.; Vestri, A. R.; Postacchini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with adhesive capsulitis were clinically evaluated to establish whether pain elicited by pressure on the coracoid area may be considered a pathognomonic sign of this condition. The study group included 85 patients with primary adhesive capsulitis, 465 with rotator cuff tear, 48 with calcifying tendonitis, 16 with glenohumeral arthritis, 66 with acromioclavicular arthropathy and 150 asymptomatic subjects. The test was considered positive when pain on the coracoid region was more severe than 3 points (VAS scale) with respect to the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral subacromial area. The test was positive in 96.4% of patients with adhesive capsulitis and in 11.1%, 14.5%, 6.2% and 10.6% of patients with the other four conditions, respectively. A positive result was obtained in 3/150 normal subjects (2%). With respect to the other four diseases, the test had a sensitivity of 0.96 and a specificity ranging from 0.87 to 0.89. With respect to controls, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. The coracoid pain test could be considered as a pathognomonic sign in physical examination of patients with stiff and painful shoulder. PMID:19418052

  5. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  6. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  7. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  8. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  9. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  10. FGGE/SMMR-30 tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 FGGE/SMMR-30 tape which contains sea ice concentration data in 30 km resolution which are extracted and reformatted from Nimbus-7 SMMR PARM-30 tapes in accordance with the FGGE level II International Exchange Format Specification is outlined. There are three types of files on a FGGE/SMMR-30 tape. The first file on the tape is a test file. The second file on the tape is a tape header file. The remaining one or more files are data files. All files are terminated with a single end of file (EOP) tape mark. The last file is terminated with two EOF tape marks. All files are made up of one or more physical records. Each physical record contains 2960 bytes. Each data file contains all available values for a 6 hour synoptic time period.

  11. An Experimental Investigation of Damaged Arresting Gear Tapes for the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on damaged arresting gear tapes at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. The arrestment system uses five pairs of tapes to bring the test carriage to a halt. The procedure used to determine when to replace the tapes consists of a close evaluation of each of the 10 tapes after each run. During this evaluation, each tape is examined thoroughly and any damage observed on the tape is recorded. If the damaged tape does not pass the inspection, the tape is replaced with a new one. For the past 13 years, the most commonly seen damage types are edge fray damage and transverse damage. Tests were conducted to determine the maximum tensile strength of a damaged arresting gear tape specimen. The data indicate that tapes exhibiting transverse damage can withstand higher loads than tapes with edge fray damage.

  12. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  13. Kinematics of Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes mathematics of the nonliner relationships between a constant-speed, capstan-driven magnetic tape transport mechanism and a constant-angular-velocity take-up reel. The relationship, derived from the sum of a partial, serves in recognition of a finite tape. Thickness can serve as an example of rotational kinematics. (Author/SK)

  14. Adhesion failure behavior of sputtered calcium phosphate thin film coatings evaluated using microscratch testing.

    PubMed

    Toque, J A; Herliansyah, M K; Hamdi, M; Ide-Ektessabi, A; Sopyan, I

    2010-05-01

    It is generally accepted that calcium phosphate (CaP) is one of the most important biomaterials in implant coating applications mainly because of its excellent bioactivity. However, its relatively poor mechanical properties limits its application. This entails that a better understanding of the mechanical properties of a CaP coating is a must especially its behavior and the mechanisms involved when subjected to stresses which eventually lead to failure. The mechanical properties of the coating may be evaluated in terms of its adhesion strength. In this study, a radio frequency-magnetron (RF-MS) sputtering technique was used to deposit CaP thin films on 316L stainless steel (SS). The coatings were subjected to series of microscratch tests, taking careful note of its behavior as the load is applied. The adhesion behavior of the coatings showed varying responses. It was revealed that several coating process-related factors such as thickness, post-heat treatment and deposition parameters, to name a few, affect its scratching behavior. Scratch testing-related factors (i.e. loading rate, scratch speed, scratch load, etc.) were also shown to influence the mechanisms involved in the coating adhesion failure. Evaluation of the load-displacement graph combined with optical inspection of the scratch confirmed that several modes of failure occurred during the scratching process. These include trackside cracking, tensile cracking, radial cracking, buckling, delamination and combinations of one or more modes.

  15. Characterization Test Results On The Solar Cell Glassing Adhesive RTV-S690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, Emanuele; Riva, Stefano; Zanella, Pietro; Marin, Juan Manuel Fernandez; D'Accolti, Gianfelice

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this program is to achieve a Technological Rediness Level (TRL) 8 for the new coverglassing adhesive RTV-S690 produced by Wacker Chemie GmbH. TRL 8 corresponds to a coplete flight qualification through test and demonstration so, at the end, the material is ready to be used onboard future space PVA. The need of a full European alternative with respect to state of the art US adhesives is primarily due to International Traffic Army Regulation (ITAR) that more often than not imposes stringent limitations to the export of such items. Furthermore the currently used European adhesive, the RTV-S695, is becoming obsolete and will be replaced in short media terms by the above mention new product. The RTV-S690 qualification is achieved by means of a twofold program: at first the qualification at solar cell assembly level together with advanced characterization by means of testing of glass sandwiches and secondly the complete Photo Voltaic Assembly (PVA) qualification at coupon level. A description of the approach we followed is given in the present paper.

  16. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Kim, Hyun Ho; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm(-2), so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1); the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) even after they were crumpled. PMID:26220874

  17. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Ho Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm-2, so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm2 V-1 s-1 the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm2 V-1 s-1 even after they were crumpled.

  18. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Ho Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm−2, so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm2 V−1 s−1; the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm2 V−1 s−1 even after they were crumpled. PMID:26220874

  19. 77 FR 13263 - Foreign-Trade Zone 109 - Watertown, NY; Amendment to Application; North American Tapes, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... number 48-2011 on July 15, 2011 (76 FR 43259, 7- 20-2011). The NAT facility (25 employees) is located... American Tapes, LLC (Textile Athletic Tape), Watertown, NY A request has been submitted to the Foreign... used to produce pressure-sensitive adhesive athletic tape with textile fabric backing material for...

  20. Adhesion, cohesion, and friction estimated from combining cutting and peeling test results for thin noodle sheets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kao; Gunaratne, Anil; Collado, Lilia S; Corke, Harold; Lucas, Peter W

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the adhesive and cohesive fracture energies, and frictional characteristics of 7 types of cooked starch and flour sheets and combine these into a model framework for textural analysis. Cutting tests with wires of diameter 0.30 to 0.89 mm were performed with and without lubrication. Plots of the work done, normalized to the area cut by the wire, showed that this to be linearly related to wire diameter irrespective of lubrication. The oil had little impact on the intercept of these plots, giving cohesive fracture energy (Gc ) ranges for these foods between 6.8 and 32.5 J/m(2) . However, lubrication had a strong influence on the slope of the plots. From a comparison of the slopes for lubricated versus unlubricated tests, the kinetic coefficient of friction μkcould be calculated. Values for μk between 0.007 and 0.521 for different foods were obtained. Peeling tests were performed by lifting sheets vertically away from a fresh mica surface. The adhesive fracture energy Ga , varied from 2.5 to 4.8 J/m(2) . The results can be modeled by plotting the ratio of cohesive to adhesive fracture energy against the coefficient of friction. Thresholds in both axes suggest a physical basis for distinguishing textural perceptions. However, sensory testing with 12 subjects using the 7 food types could not establish whether this framework, however well-established physically, would apply to oral sensations. A much larger test would be required.

  1. Process Sensitivity, Performance, and Direct Verification Testing of Adhesive Locking Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Leatherwood, Michael D.; Montoya, Michael D.; Kato, Ken A.; Akers, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Phase I: The use of adhesive locking features or liquid locking compounds (LLCs) (e.g., Loctite) as a means of providing a secondary locking feature has been used on NASA programs since the Apollo program. In many cases Loctite was used as a last resort when (a) self-locking fasteners were no longer functioning per their respective drawing specification, (b) access was limited for removal & replacement, or (c) replacement could not be accomplished without severe impact to schedule. Long-term use of Loctite became inevitable in cases where removal and replacement of worn hardware was not cost effective and Loctite was assumed to be fully cured and working. The NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) and United Space Alliance (USA) recognized the need for more extensive testing of Loctite grades to better understand their capabilities and limitations as a secondary locking feature. These tests, identified as Phase I, were designed to identify processing sensitivities, to determine proper cure time, the correct primer to use on aerospace nutplate, insert and bolt materials such as A286 and MP35N, and the minimum amount of Loctite that is required to achieve optimum breakaway torque values. The .1900-32 was the fastener size tested, due to wide usage in the aerospace industry. Three different grades of Loctite were tested. Results indicate that, with proper controls, adhesive locking features can be successfully used in the repair of locking features and should be considered for design. Phase II: Threaded fastening systems used in aerospace programs typically have a requirement for a redundant locking feature. The primary locking method is the fastener preload and the traditional redundant locking feature is a self-locking mechanical device that may include deformed threads, non-metallic inserts, split beam features, or other methods that impede movement between threaded members. The self-locking resistance of traditional locking features can be directly verified

  2. Frictional adhesion: A new angle on gecko attachment.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Dittmore, A; Santos, D; Spenko, M; Cutkosky, M

    2006-09-01

    Directional arrays of branched microscopic setae constitute a dry adhesive on the toes of pad-bearing geckos, nature's supreme climbers. Geckos are easily and rapidly able to detach their toes as they climb. There are two known mechanisms of detachment: (1) on the microscale, the seta detaches when the shaft reaches a critical angle with the substrate, and (2) on the macroscale, geckos hyperextend their toes, apparently peeling like tape. This raises the question of how geckos prevent detachment while inverted on the ceiling, where body weight should cause toes to peel and setal angles to increase. Geckos use opposing feet and toes while inverted, possibly to maintain shear forces that prevent detachment of setae or peeling of toes. If detachment occurs by macroscale peeling of toes, the peel angle should monotonically decrease with applied force. In contrast, if adhesive force is limited by microscale detachment of setae at a critical angle, the toe detachment angle should be independent of applied force. We tested the hypothesis that adhesion is increased by shear force in isolated setal arrays and live gecko toes. We also tested the corollary hypotheses that (1) adhesion in toes and arrays is limited as on the microscale by a critical angle, or (2) on the macroscale by adhesive strength as predicted for adhesive tapes. We found that adhesion depended directly on shear force, and was independent of detachment angle. Therefore we reject the hypothesis that gecko toes peel like tape. The linear relation between adhesion and shear force is consistent with a critical angle of release in live gecko toes and isolated setal arrays, and also with our prior observations of single setae. We introduced a new model, frictional adhesion, for gecko pad attachment and compared it to existing models of adhesive contacts. In an analysis of clinging stability of a gecko on an inclined plane each adhesive model predicted a different force control strategy. The frictional adhesion

  3. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Tape for Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    2013-01-01

    For this effort, will concentrate on three applications: Vibration Gyroscope utilizes piezoelectric properties of the tape and Coriolis effect Accelerometer utilizes the piezoresistive property Strain Gauge utilizes piezoresistive property Accelerometer and Strain Gauge can also utilize piezoelectric effect Test piezoelectric properties using facilities at the Microfabrication Laboratory (AMRDEC) . Enhance piezoelectric effect using polyvinylidine fluoride and P(VDF ]TrFE) which is readily polarizable .Spray matrix solution while winding fiber; Sandwich of CNT tape and PVDF film (DOE .Two Level) . Construct and test prototype vibration gyroscope . Construct and test prototype accelerometer using cantilever design . Test strain sensitivity of CNT tape against industrial strain gauge . Embed CNT tape in composite samples as well as on surface and test to failure (4 ]point bend) A piezoelectric device exhibits an electrical response from a mechanical applied stress. . A piezoelectric device has both capacitance and resistance properties in which by applying an electric field from a waveform will exert a mechanical stress that can be monitored for a response. . The typical waveform applied is a sinusoidal waveform of a defined voltage for a defined period. The defined voltage is driven from 0 volts to the positive defined volts then back to 0 and driven to negative defined volts then back to 0. . Example. Vmax set to 10V and period set to 10 ms. . Voltage will start at zero, go to 10 volts, return to zero, go to ]10 volts and return to zero during 10 ms. . Applying this electrical field to a DUT, the capacitance response and resistance response can be observed. CNT tape is easier to manufacture and cheaper than micromachining silicon or other ceramic piezoelectric used in gyroscopes and accelerometers CNT tape properties can be modified during manufacture for specific application CNT tape has enhanced mechanical and thermal properties in addition to unique electrical

  4. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  5. Specification for IBM/IBM compatible 3480 tape cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1988-01-01

    This document establishes the same kinds of standards and controls that are currently in use for the procurement on new analog and digital magnetic tapes. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) currently maintains a Quality Products List (QPL) for all new analog and digital magnetic tapes purchased by NASA-GSFC. Extensive tests are conducted in the MTCF on an annual basis to determine the manufacturer's tape types to be added to or deleted from the current QPL. The MTCF currently maintains two specifications for magnetic tapes: NASA TM-79724 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new analog tapes; and NASA TM-80599 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new digital tapes. This specification will be used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new 3480 cartridges. The magnetic tapes used by GSFC, LaRC, ARC/Dryden, WFF, and the Network Tracking Stations are covered by the NASA-GSFC specifications. The 3480 cartridge was introduced approximately 3.5 years ago and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to digital magnetic tapes. Many users have already converted to the 3480 system and have more tape drives on order.

  6. Fabrication of a Dual Substrate Display to Test Roles of Cell Adhesion Proteins in Vesicle Targeting to Plasma Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Stephen J.; Nelson, W. James

    2009-01-01

    While much is known of the molecular machinery involved in protein sorting during exocytosis, less is known about the spatial regulation of exocytosis at the plasma membrane (PM). This study outlines a novel method, Dual Substrate Display, used to formally test the hypothesis that E-cadherin-mediated adhesion directs basolateral vesicle exocytosis to specific sites at the PM. We show that vesicles containing the basolateral marker protein VSV-G preferentially target to sites of adhesion to E-cadherin rather than collagen VI or a control peptide. These results support the hypothesis that E-cadherin adhesion initiates signaling at the PM resulting in targeted sites for exocytosis. PMID:17803993

  7. Use of nitrogen cryogun for separating duct tape and recovery of latent fingerprints with a powder suspension method.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James A; Crane, Jonathan Stuart

    2011-07-15

    Duct tape is sometimes recovered as physical evidence in crimes. The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of latent prints on the adhesive and non-adhesive surfaces of duct tape samples that were separated using three methods. Three hundred donor fingerprint impressions were deposited on duct tape. Sections of duct tape were affixed to sections of cardboard and a fingerprint placed on the non-adhesive surface of the tape. A second layer of duct tape was prepared and a fingerprint placed on the adhesive side of the tape and then the tape was affixed to the piece of tape on the cardboard. After a 24-h period, the samples were separated using gradual force, liquid nitrogen applied with a cryogun and an adhesive neutralizer to separate the layers of tape. The recovered fingerprints were processed with a fingerprint powder suspension method. The recovered fingerprint images were evaluated and rated as +1, +2, or +3. The liquid nitrogen spray separation method yielded the highest number of +3 prints.

  8. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time. PMID:24630328

  9. Raman identification of drug of abuse particles collected with colored and transparent tapes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Victor Molina; López-López, María; Atoche, Juan-Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for the analysis of drug particles collected with adhesive tapes. In this work, first, the spectra of thirty drugs of abuse, degradation products, metabolites, and common cutting agent standards were recorded and the Raman bands observed were summarized providing the forensic analyst useful information for the identification of drug evidence. Then, the collection of different drug particles by a fingerprint lifting tape commonly used to remove and store fingerprints and fibers, and a white and green packaging tape, followed by the subsequent identification of the drugs by confocal Raman spectroscopy was performed. The particles were analyzed on top of the tapes, trapped between glass slides and the tapes, trapped in the tape folded over itself in the case of the transparent tape, and after folding and unfolding the tape in the case of the colored tape. The results obtained by the different approaches show that both tapes did not compromise the drugs spectra. However, the use of transparent tape is preferred because this tape allows the previous visual detection of the particles. Finally, several drug and sugar particles were spread over a clean table and inside a pocket, and the particles were collected with transparent tape and then properly identified. Although good results were obtained in both cases, the amount of fibers and other substances present in the collection area made the previous detection of the particles difficult and increases the analysis time.

  10. Caught (Unfortunately) on Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Recording class sessions so students can view them online is becoming routine on many campuses. But all that taping can lead to "uh-oh moments," such as when a professor's joke about the college dean ends up on YouTube, or a private comment to a student after class is inadvertently broadcast. Some lecture bloopers caught on tape are funny (well,…

  11. Bond strength determination of hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates using the LAser Shock Adhesion Test (LASAT).

    PubMed

    Guipont, Vincent; Jeandin, Michel; Bansard, Sebastien; Khor, Khiam Aik; Nivard, Mariette; Berthe, Laurent; Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel

    2010-12-15

    An adhesion test procedure applied to plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings to measure the "LASAT threshold" (LAser Shock Adhesion test) is described. The good repeatability and minimal discrepancy of the laser-driven adhesion test data were ascertained for conventional plasma sprayed HA coatings. As a further demonstration, the procedure was applied to HA coatings with diverse characteristics on the ceramic/metal interface. Different preheating and grit blasting conditions and the presence of a thick plasma-sprayed Ti sublayer or a thin TiO(2) layer prepared by oxidation were investigated through LASAT. It was assessed that a rough surface can significantly improve the coating's bond strength. However, it was also demonstrated that a thin TiO(2) layer on a smooth Ti-6Al-4V substrate can have a major influence on adhesion as well. Preheating up to 270°C just prior to the first HA spraying pass had no effect on the adhesion strength. Further development of the procedure was done to achieve an in situ LASAT with in vitro conditions applied on HA coatings. To that end, different crystalline HA contents were soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). Beyond the demonstration of the capability of this laser-driven adhesion test devoted to HA coatings in dry or liquid environment, the present study provided empirical information on pertinent processing characteristics that could strengthen or weaken the HA/Ti-6Al-4V bond.

  12. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives - effective securement technique for intravascular catheters: in vitro testing of safety and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Simonova, G; Rickard, C M; Dunster, K R; Smyth, D J; McMillan, D; Fraser, J F

    2012-05-01

    Partial or complete dislodgement of intravascular catheters remains a significant problem in hospitals despite current securement methods. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives (TA) are used to close skin wounds as an alternative to sutures. These adhesives have high mechanical strength and can remain in situ for several days. This study investigated in vitro use of TAs in securing intravascular catheters (IVC). We compared two adhesives for interaction with IVC material, comparing skin glues with current securement methods in terms of their ability to prevent IVC dislodgement and inhibit microbial growth. Two TAs (Dermabond, Ethicon Inc. and Histoacryl, B. Braun) and three removal agents (Remove™, paraffin and acetone) were tested for interaction with IVC material by use of tensile testing. TAs were also compared against two polyurethane (standard and bordered) dressings (Tegaderm™ 1624 and 1633, 3M Australia Pty Ltd) and an external stabilisation device (Statlock, Bard Medical, Covington) against control (unsecured IVCs) for ability to prevent pull-out of 16 G peripheral IVCs from newborn fresh porcine skin. Agar media containing pH-sensitive dye was used to assess antimicrobial properties of TAs and polyurethane dressings to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Neither TA weakened the IVCs (P >0.05). Of removal agents, only acetone was associated with a significant decrease in IVC strength (P <0.05). Both TAs and Statlock significantly increased the pull-out force (P <0.01). TA was quick and easy to apply to IVCs, with no irritation or skin damage noted on removal and no bacterial colony growth under either TA.

  13. PHOTOELECTRIC CONTROL FOR TAPE POSITIONING

    DOEpatents

    Woody, J.W. Jr.

    1961-07-25

    A control system is described for producing control impulses which may be used to start, stop, and position a magnetic tape with respect to a transducer, and to locate discrete areas on the tape. Means are provided for positive identification of data blocks, exact positioning of the tape under the magnetic head, drive in either direction, accurate skip-over of imperfect regions of the tape, stopping the tape if equipment malfunction results in a failure to detect the block-identifying signals, and starting and stopping those parts of the tape between of the tape drive clutches.

  14. Physical approach to adhesion testing using laser-driven shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, C.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.; Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M.

    2007-05-01

    This paper deals with an adhesion test of coatings using laser-driven shock waves. Physical aspects concerning laser-matter interaction, shock wave propagation and interface fracture strength are described. This comprehensive approach using two numerical codes (HUGO and SHYLAC) allows the determination of mechanisms responsible for coating debonding and a quantitative evaluation of fracture strength. From this description, a coating test protocol is also designed. To diagnose coating debonding, it is based on the analysis of experimental rear free surface velocity profiles measured by velocity interferometer system for any reflectors (VISAR). Ni electrolytic coating (70-90 µm) deposited on a Cu substrate (120-190 µm) is used for the experimental validation of the test. The fracture strength is 1.49 ± 0.01 GPa for a laser pulse duration of 10 ns at 1.064 µm.

  15. Flight Testing Surfaces Engineered for Mitigating Insect Adhesion on a Falcon HU-25C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, Michelle; Wohl, Chris J.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residue contamination on aircraft wings can decrease fuel efficiency in aircraft designed for natural laminar flow. Insect residues can cause a premature transition to turbulent flow, increasing fuel burn and making the aircraft less environmentally friendly. Surfaces, designed to minimize insect residue adhesion, were evaluated through flight testing on a Falcon HU-25C aircraft flown along the coast of Virginia and North Carolina. The surfaces were affixed to the wing leading edge and the aircraft remained at altitudes lower than 1000 feet throughout the flight to assure high insect density. The number of strikes on the engineered surfaces was compared to, and found to be lower than, untreated aluminum control surfaces flown concurrently. Optical profilometry was used to determine insect residue height and areal coverage. Differences in results between flight and laboratory tests suggest the importance of testing in realistic use environments to evaluate the effectiveness of engineered surface designs.

  16. On use of double cantilever beam for coatings and adhesion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troczynski, Tom; Camire, Jean

    1995-05-01

    The compliance model of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) for testing coatings and adhesion has been proposed and verified experimentally. The model is based on the assumption that the coating modifies the stiffness of a foundation of DCB onto which the beam is fixed, according to a simple series-spring law. The model includes multi-coated specimens, in particular the specimen with thermal sprayed ceramic coating, with an additional layer of epoxy adhesive for attachment of a symmetrical DCB arm. It was found, that the compliance of DCB specimens with a coating is significantly increased for a coating thickness larger than approximately 1% of the arm thickness, and a coating Young's modulus smaller than approximately 50% of the arm modulus. The model results, verified by experiment, have profound consequences on calculations of the strain energy release rate in fracture tests for coatings, brazed joints etc. The total compliance of the arm and coating assembly scales with the coating stiffness, and thus the model can be utilised for rigidity evaluation of a variety of coatings on standard substrates, e.g. paints or polymer coatings on metals.

  17. Optimization of the PCR test for the mutation causing bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mirck, M H; Von Bannisseht-Wijsmuller, T; Timmermans-Besselink, W J; Van Luijk, J H; Buntjer, J B; Lenstra, J A

    1995-07-01

    The recent emergence of the bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) demonstrated the risks of narrowing the genetic basis of a population. About 6% of the Holstein-Friesian cattle now descends from one bull who was a heterozygous BLAD carrier. Crossing his descendants resulted in the birth of homozygous BLAD calves with a life expectancy of < 1 year. The BLAD syndrome is caused by a point mutation in the gene coding for CD18, a subunit of the beta 2 integrins on the surface of leukocytes. By using a PCR-RFLP test, large numbers of cattle are now being screened in several countries to eradicate the mutant allele. We describe an optimization of the PCR primer set that has led to an improvement of the test. PMID:7580848

  18. Specification for wide channel bandwidth one-inch video tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1988-01-01

    Standards and controls are established for the procurement of wide channel bandwidth one inch video magnetic recording tapes for Very Long Base Interferometer (VLBI) system applications. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) currently maintains three specifications for the Quality Products List (QPL) and acceptance testing of magnetic tapes. NASA-TM-79724 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new analog tapes; NASA-TM-80599 is used for QPL and acceptance testing of new digital tapes; and NASA-TM-100702 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new IBM/IBM compatible 3480 magnetic tape cartridges. This specification will be used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new wide channel bandwidth one inch video magnetic recording tapes. The one inch video tapes used by the Jet Propulsion Lab., the Deep Space Network and the Haystack Observatory will be covered by this specification. These NASA stations will use the video tapes for their VLBI system applications. The VLBI system is used for the tracking of quasars and the support of interplanetary exploration.

  19. How to make sticky tapes stickier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponson, Laurent; Xia, Shuman; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; California Institute of Technology Team

    2011-03-01

    Thin film adhesives have become increasingly important in various applications such as packaging and coating, and we benefit daily of their adhesion properties by using various kinds of tapes. Despite the apparent simplicity of these systems, a certain number of questions remain open. In particular, important efforts have been deployed recently to understand the effect of the complex tridimensional and highly heterogeneous structure at the interface of some adhesives, such as the one encountered in nature like the geckos toes. Although inspired by these natural adhesives, we studied a much simpler system, and however largely unexplored: a thin film with spatially varying adhesion energy and elastic properties. We will show how these heterogeneities introduced at the microscale can generate quite unexpected macroscopic behaviors, and that one can this way design stronger adhesives with new properties. Beyond their practical interests, these systems involve long range elastic interactions and heterogeneities resulting in a rich and complex physics that will be illustrated through experimental examples and their theoretical interpretation.

  20. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  1. Determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of the smooth adhesive organs of Carausius morosus using tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, Michael; Backhaus, Stefan; Scholz, Ingo; Park, Daesung; Mayer, Joachim; Baumgartner, Werner

    2014-10-15

    Adhesive organs like arolia of insects allow these animals to climb on different substrates by creating high adhesion forces. According to the Dahlquist criterion, adhesive organs must be very soft, exhibiting an effective Young's modulus of below 100 kPa to adhere well to substrates. Such a low effective Young's modulus allows the adhesive organs to make almost direct contact with the substrate and results in van der Waals forces along with capillary forces. In previous studies, the effective Young's moduli of adhesive organs were determined using indentation tests, revealing their structure to be very soft. However, adhesive organs show a layered structure, thus the measured values comprise the effective Young's moduli of several layers of the adhesive organs. In this study, a new approach is illustrated to measure the Young's modulus of the outermost layer of the arolium, i.e. of the epicuticle, of the stick insect Carausius morosus. As a result of the epicuticle being supported by upright fibres, tensile tests allow the determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle with hardly influence from subjacent layers. In our tensile tests, arolia of stick insects adhering on a latex membrane were stretched by stretching the membrane while the elongation of the contact area between an arolium and the membrane was recorded. For analysis, mathematical models of the mechanical system were developed. When fed with the observed elongations, these models yield estimates for the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of approximately 100 MPa. Thus, in arolia, a very thin layer (~225 nm) of a rather stiff material, which is less susceptible to abrasion, makes contact with the substrates, whereas the inner fibrous structure of arolia is responsible for their softness.

  2. Determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of the smooth adhesive organs of Carausius morosus using tensile testing

    PubMed Central

    Bennemann, Michael; Backhaus, Stefan; Scholz, Ingo; Park, Daesung; Mayer, Joachim; Baumgartner, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive organs like arolia of insects allow these animals to climb on different substrates by creating high adhesion forces. According to the Dahlquist criterion, adhesive organs must be very soft, exhibiting an effective Young's modulus of below 100 kPa to adhere well to substrates. Such a low effective Young's modulus allows the adhesive organs to make almost direct contact with the substrate and results in van der Waals forces along with capillary forces. In previous studies, the effective Young's moduli of adhesive organs were determined using indentation tests, revealing their structure to be very soft. However, adhesive organs show a layered structure, thus the measured values comprise the effective Young's moduli of several layers of the adhesive organs. In this study, a new approach is illustrated to measure the Young's modulus of the outermost layer of the arolium, i.e. of the epicuticle, of the stick insect Carausius morosus. As a result of the epicuticle being supported by upright fibres, tensile tests allow the determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle with hardly influence from subjacent layers. In our tensile tests, arolia of stick insects adhering on a latex membrane were stretched by stretching the membrane while the elongation of the contact area between an arolium and the membrane was recorded. For analysis, mathematical models of the mechanical system were developed. When fed with the observed elongations, these models yield estimates for the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of approximately 100 MPa. Thus, in arolia, a very thin layer (~225 nm) of a rather stiff material, which is less susceptible to abrasion, makes contact with the substrates, whereas the inner fibrous structure of arolia is responsible for their softness. PMID:25214493

  3. Study on Interface Adhesion between Phase Change Material Film and SiO2 Layer by Nanoscratch Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xilin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Rao, Feng; Ren, Kun; Peng, Cheng; Guo, Xiaohui; Liu, Bo; Feng, Songlin

    2011-09-01

    Temperature dependent interfacial adhesion strength between phase change material film and a SiO2 layer was investigated employing Nano Indenter®. Phase change materials of Ge2Sb2Te5 and Si2Sb2Te6 were adopted for a comparative study. The decrease of adhesive strength with an increased annealing temperature can be deduced from the optical micrographs of the two cases. Critical load obtained from the nanoscratch tests was introduced to quantitative characterize the interfacial adhesion strength of the samples. Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometer were utilized to further analysis the adhesive properties of the interfaces. Results show that Si2Sb2Te6 has better adhesive performance than Ge2Sb2Te5 with SiO2 due to its higher activation energy and weaker thickness variation upon crystallization as well as its smaller crystal grain size in the crystalline state. Considering the adhesive strength with SiO2, Si2Sb2Te6 is a preferable candidate over Ge2Sb2Te5 for future high density phase change random access memory application.

  4. Effects of Kinesio taping and Mcconnell taping on balance and walking speed of hemiplegia patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Kyu; Park, Young-Han; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the overlap effect of the PNF following the application of Kinesio taping and the McConnell taping, and also the impact of the taping application method on the balance and walking speed of the patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six patients who were diagnosed with hemiplegia due to stroke were selected as subjects of this study. They were randomly and evenly divided into experiment group 1 (Kinesio taping group), experiment group 2 (McConnell taping group), and the control group; each group had 12 patients. [Results] The Berg balance scale (BBS) was used to evaluate balance, and the ability in this study. A 10 m walking test (10MWT) was performed to measure the walking speed. Experiment group 1 showed a statistically significant improvement in balance and walking speed compared to experiment group 2, and the control group in week 4 and week 8. [Conclusion] Application of Kinesio taping had a more beneficial effect on the balance and walking speed than joint-fixation taping of the patients with stroke. PMID:27190448

  5. Gecko adhesion: evolutionary nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Autumn, Kellar; Gravish, Nick

    2008-05-13

    If geckos had not evolved, it is possible that humans would never have invented adhesive nanostructures. Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1ms-1. Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive in requiring both strong attachment and easy rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). The gecko adhesive differs dramatically from conventional adhesives. Conventional PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective elastic modulus to that of PSAs. Setae are self-cleaning and maintain function for months during repeated use in dirty conditions. Setae are an anisotropic 'frictional adhesive' in that adhesion requires maintenance of a proximally directed shear load, enabling either a tough bond or spontaneous detachment. Gecko-like synthetic adhesives may become the glue of the future-and perhaps the screw of the future as well.

  6. EFFECT OF ATHLETIC TAPING AND KINESIOTAPING® ON MEASUREMENTS OF FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS WITH CHRONIC INVERSION ANKLE SPRAINS

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Nihan; Baltaci, Gul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic inversion ankle sprains are common in basketball players. The effect of taping on functional performance is disputed in the literature. Kinesiotaping® (KT®) is a new method that is being used as both a therapeutic and performance enhancement tool. To date, it appears that no study has investigated the effect of ankle KT® on functional performance. Purpose: To investigate the effects of different types of taping (KT® using Kinesio Tex®, athletic taping) on functional performance in athletes with chronic inversion sprains of the ankle. Study Design: Crossover Study Design Methods: Fifteen male basketball players with chronic inversion ankle sprains between the ages of 18 and 22 participated in this study. Functional performance tests (Hopping test by Amanda et al, Single Limb Hurdle Test, Standing Heel Rise test, Vertical Jump Test, The Star Excursion Balance Test [SEBT] and Kinesthetic Ability Trainer [KAT] Test) were used to quantify agility, endurance, balance, and coordination. These tests were conducted four times at one week intervals using varied conditions: placebo tape, without tape, standard athletic tape, and KT®. One-way ANOVA tests were used to examine difference in measurements between conditions. Bonferroni correction was applied to correct for repeated testing. Results: There were no significant differences among the results obtained using the four conditions for SEBT (anterior p=0.0699; anteromedial p=0.126; medial p=0.550; posteromedial p=0.587; posterior p=0.754; posterolateral p=0.907; lateral p=0.124; anterolateral p=0.963) and the KAT dynamic measurement (p=0.388). Faster performance times were measured with KT® and athletic tape in single limb hurdle test when compared to placebo and non-taped conditions (Athletic taping- placebo taping: p=0.03; athletic taping- non tape p=0.016;KT®- Placebo taping p=0.042; KT®-Non tape p=0.016). In standing heel rise test and vertical jump test, athletic taping led to decreased

  7. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected

  8. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  9. Recording-tape position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoppet, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Device uses tachometer pulses from capstan and reset pulse from one reel to sense count of tach pulses per revolution of reel. Number of pulses is direct measurement of tape stack radius and is independent of tape speed or direction.

  10. The effect of adhesive layer elasticity on the fracture mechanics of a blister test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model of a blister type specimen for evaluating adhesive bond strength was developed. Plate theory with shear deformation was used to model the deformation of the plate, and elastic deformation of the adhesive layer is taken into account. It is shown that the inclusion of the elastic deformation of the adhesive layer can have a significant influence in the energy balance calculations of fracture mechanics.

  11. Porcine E. coli: virulence-associated genes, resistance genes and adhesion and probiotic activity tested by a new screening method.

    PubMed

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars.

  12. Porcine E. coli: Virulence-Associated Genes, Resistance Genes and Adhesion and Probiotic Activity Tested by a New Screening Method

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K.; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H.; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars. PMID:23658605

  13. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  14. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  15. Shock adhesion test for composite bonded assembly using a high pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, E.; Berthe, L.; Buzaud, E.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    In a context of the rising use of composite assemblies in aeronautic or defense fields, the assessment of their strength is a key issue. The method developed in this study attempts to provide solutions. A shock adhesion test based on short compressive loads, obtained by a high pulsed power generator, is proposed as a proof test to ensure the quality of composite bonded assemblies. A calibrated load induces a local tensile stress able to damage the bond interface. The high pulsed power source is the GEnerateur de Pression Isentropique device (Isentropic Pressure Generator), used to generate the required stresses, with a 450 ns pulse duration to test assemblies above the mm thickness range. The understanding of the mechanisms of wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these multilayer assemblies are scientific challenges. The ability of the technique to induce a tensile stress able to disbond the laminates and the assemblies is demonstrated. This paper details the response of carbon epoxy laminates and their bonded assemblies to a shock loading near the damage threshold.

  16. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environmentally friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainable c...

  17. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls--Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    SciTech Connect

    Ould, Choumad; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Gachon, Yves; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-04

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer (''roll coating'', ''pick up'') may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  18. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls—Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ould, Choumad; Gachon, Yves; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-01

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer ("roll coating", "pick up") may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  19. Rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems using a PDMS/polymer tape composite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkyu; Surapaneni, Rajesh; Gale, Bruce K

    2009-05-01

    Rapid prototyping of microfluidic systems using a combination of double-sided tape and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) is introduced. PDMS is typically difficult to bond using adhesive tapes due to its hydrophobic nature and low surface energy. For this reason, PDMS is not compatible with the xurography method, which uses a knife plotter and various adhesive coated polymer tapes. To solve these problems, a PDMS/tape composite was developed and demonstrated in microfluidic applications. The PDMS/tape composite was created by spinning it to make a thin layer of PDMS over double-sided tape. Then the PDMS/tape composite was patterned to create channels using xurography, and bonded to a PDMS slab. After removing the backing paper from the tape, a complete microfluidic system could be created by placing the construct onto nearly any substrate; including glass, plastic or metal-coated glass/silicon substrates. The bond strength was shown to be sufficient for the pressures that occur in typical microfluidic channels used for chemical or biological analysis. This method was demonstrated in three applications: standard microfluidic channels and reactors, a microfluidic system with an integrated membrane, and an electrochemical biosensor. The PDMS/tape composite rapid prototyping technique provides a fast and cost effective fabrication method and can provide easy integration of microfluidic channels with sensors and other components without the need for a cleanroom facility.

  20. Analysis of particulates on tape lift samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moision, Robert M.; Chaney, John A.; Panetta, Chris J.; Liu, De-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Particle counts on tape lift samples taken from a hardware surface exceeded threshold requirements in six successive tests despite repeated cleaning of the surface. Subsequent analysis of the particle size distributions of the failed tests revealed that the handling and processing of the tape lift samples may have played a role in the test failures. In order to explore plausible causes for the observed size distribution anomalies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to perform chemical analysis on collected particulates. SEM/EDX identified Na and S containing particles on the hardware samples in a size range identified as being responsible for the test failures. ToF-SIMS was employed to further examine the Na and S containing particulates and identified the molecular signature of sodium alkylbenzene sulfonates, a common surfactant used in industrial detergent. The root cause investigation suggests that the tape lift test failures originated from detergent residue left behind on the glass slides used to mount and transport the tape following sampling and not from the hardware surface.

  1. Analyses of Interface Adhesion between Cu and SiCN Etch Stop Layers by Nanoindentation and Nanoscratch Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shou-Yi; Lee, Yu-Shuien

    2007-04-01

    The interface chemistry and adhesion strength between Cu and SiCN etch stop layers have been investigated to evaluate the reliability of interconnect structures. Analyses of the chemical compositions and bonding configurations reveal that the SiCN etch stop layer was mostly composed of Si to N and Si to C bonding, including Si-N, Si-CN2, and Si-C2N. At the Cu/SiCN interface, an oxide layer was observed, and SiCN-O and Cu-O bonding was detected. In nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests, Cu/SiCN interface delamination occurred around indents and along scratch tracks, and the adhesion energy between Cu and SiCN layers was accordingly measured and calculated. The adhesion energy of the Cu/SiCN interface was measured to be about 4.98 J/m2 in the nanoindentation test, while that measured using the nanoscratch test was lower, at about 0.98 J/m2. The “mode mixity” effect was responsible for the difference between the adhesion energies obtained using these two methods.

  2. Unrecorded wideband instrumentation reference tape feasibility study: Frequency response results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hust, D. R.

    1980-03-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine signal response variations when a variety of wideband instrumentation magnetic tapes is used on a cross section of recorder/reproducer systems. Data for the investigation were collected by transmitting a set of eight sample test tapes to participating data recording/reproducing facilities for the purpose of making data measurements. Data collected represent measurements made with 16 different recorder/reproducer systems at 11 different testing facilities located throughout the United States. The data-collection process involved approximately 2 years of testing. The originating/coordinating facility was the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California. The test results indicated the following: all of the sample test tapes exhibited bidirectional performance within the limits of measurement repeatability; overall system stability was better in the low-band regions than in the upper-band regions; and the overall relative frequency response of the sample test tapes did not change appreciably during the 2 year investigative period. The most significant result of the test measurements is that at least 90% of the frequency response values were within + or - 2.0 dB at all frequencies. Machine stability factors such as azimuth, equalizer, and gain changes had more effect on data variability than did magnetic tape or tape speed. The use of a reference tape system is recommended as a method to assure that relative frequency response variations will be less than or equal to + or - 2.0 dB.

  3. STPI/LARC: A 200 deg C polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; St.clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A copolyimide, STPI/LARC, was prepared from the reaction of 3,3'4'benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA), equimolar quantities of m-phenylenediamine and 4,4'-oxydianiline, and a small amount of phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight. The processability and adhesive properties of STPI/LARC were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. LARC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide, from the reaction of BTDA and 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone, had previously shown promise as a high temperature structural adhesive. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the two polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to a 72-hour water-boil and to aging at 204 C.

  4. Tests of the standard (30 hz) NCER FM multiplex telemetry system, augmented by two timing channels and a compensation reference signal, used to record multiplexed seismic network data on magnetic tape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1976-01-01

    The application of subtractive compensation to USGS seismic magnetic tape recording and playback systems was examined in a recent USGS Open-file report (1). It was found, for the standard (30 Hz) NCER multiplex system, that subtractive compensation utilizing a 4688 Hz reference signal multiplexed onto each data track was more effective than that utilizing a 3125 Hz reference signal recorded separately on a different track. Moreover, it was found that the portion of the spectrum between the uppermost data channel (3060 Hz + or - 125 Hz) and the compensation reference signal (4688 Hz) could be used to record an additional timing signal, with a center frequency of 3700 Hz and a broader playback bandwidth (ca 0 to 100 Hz) than that of the standard data channels. Accordingly, for the tests described in that report, the standard 8-datachannel multiplex system was augmented by one additional timing channel with a center frequency of 3700 Hz. The 3700 Hz discriminator used in those tests was not successfully set up to utilize subtractive compensation; so its output from a tape playback was quite noisy. Subsequently, further tests have been carried out on the application of subtractive compensation to a 4-channel broad-band multiplex system and to the standard multiplex system, both recorded on field tape recorders with relatively poor tape speed control (2), (3). In the course of these experiments, it was discovered that two separate timing channe1s, not just one, can be inserted between the uppermost data channel and the compensation reference signal, Furthermore, it was possible to adjust the discriminators used to playback these timing channels so that they profited significantly from subtractive compensation even though the playback bandwidth was 0 to 100 Hz (for short rise times of square wave timing signals). The advantages of recording two timing signals on each data track include: 1) one standard time signal to be used for critical timing, e.g. IRIG E, can be

  5. The Effects of Patellar Taping on Knee Joint Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Michael J.; Selfe, James; Bagley, Pam J.; Oldham, Jacqueline A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of patellar taping on knee joint proprioception. Design and Setting: In a research unit, 3 proprioceptive tests were performed. For each of the tests, a standardized patellar taping technique was applied in random order. Subjects: Fifty-two healthy volunteers (27 women, 25 men; age, 23.2 ± 4.6 years; body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.7). Measurements: We measured active angle reproduction, passive angle reproduction, and threshold to detection of passive movement on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results: We found no significant differences between the tape and no-tape conditions in any of the 3 proprioceptive tests (P > .05). However, when the subjects' results for active angle reproduction and passive angle reproduction were graded as good (≤5°) and poor (>5°), taping was found to improve significantly those with poor proprioceptive ability (P < .01). Conclusions: Subjects with good proprioception did not benefit from patellar taping. However, in those healthy subjects with poor proprioceptive ability as measured by active and passive ankle reproduction, patellar taping provided proprioceptive enhancement. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of patellar taping on the proprioceptive status of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:12937439

  6. The Effects of Patellar Taping on Knee Joint Proprioception.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Michael J; Selfe, James; Bagley, Pam J; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2002-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of patellar taping on knee joint proprioception. DESIGN AND SETTING: In a research unit, 3 proprioceptive tests were performed. For each of the tests, a standardized patellar taping technique was applied in random order. SUBJECTS: Fifty-two healthy volunteers (27 women, 25 men; age, 23.2 +/- 4.6 years; body mass index, 23.3 +/- 3.7). MEASUREMENTS: We measured active angle reproduction, passive angle reproduction, and threshold to detection of passive movement on an isokinetic dynamometer. RESULTS: We found no significant differences between the tape and no-tape conditions in any of the 3 proprioceptive tests (P >.05). However, when the subjects' results for active angle reproduction and passive angle reproduction were graded as good (5 degrees ), taping was found to improve significantly those with poor proprioceptive ability (P <.01). CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with good proprioception did not benefit from patellar taping. However, in those healthy subjects with poor proprioceptive ability as measured by active and passive ankle reproduction, patellar taping provided proprioceptive enhancement. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of patellar taping on the proprioceptive status of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  7. New adhesive withstands temperature extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Seidenberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive, developed for high-temperature components aboard satellites, is useful at both high and low temperatures and exhibits low-vacuum volatility and low shrinkage. System uses polyfunctional epoxy with high aromatic content, low equivalent weight, and more compact polymer than conventional bisphenol A tape.

  8. Tape Placement Head for Applying Thermoplastic Tape to an Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, Ralph D. (Inventor); Funck, Steve B. (Inventor); Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor); Lamontia, Mark A. (Inventor); Johnson, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A tape placement head for applying thermoplastic tape to an object includes a heated feeder which guides the tape/tow to a heated zone. The heated zone has a line compactor having a single row of at least one movable heated member. An area compactor is located in the heated zone downstream from the line compactor. The area compactor includes a plurality of rows of movable feet which are extendable toward the tape/tow different distances with respect to each other to conform to the shape of the object. A shim is located between the heated compactors and the tape/tow. A chilled compactor is in a chilled zone downstream from the heated zone. The chilled zone includes a line chilled compactor and an area chilled compactor. A chilled shim is mounted between the chilled compactor and the tape/tow.

  9. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  10. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  11. Forensic utility of the carbon isotope ratio of PVC tape backings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Thompson, A. H.; Mehltretter, A. H.; McLaskey, V.; Parish, A.; Aranda, R.

    2008-12-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with PVC-backings (polyvinyl chloride, electrical tapes) derives from their use in construction of improvised explosive devices, drug packaging and in a variety of other illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics and chemical compositions of such tapes, traditional microscopic and chemical analysis of the tape backings and adhesives offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes from different manufacturers and products. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different tapes of the same product, we assessed the PVC-backings of 87 rolls of black electrical tape for their δ13C values. The adhesive on these tapes was physically removed with hexane, and plasticizers within the PVC tape backings were removed by three-20 minute extractions with chloroform. The δ13C values of the PVC tape backings ranged between -23.8 and -41.5 (‰ V-PDB). The carbon isotopic variation within a product (identical brand and product identification) is significant, based on five products with at least 3 rolls (ranges of 7.4‰ (n=3), 10.0‰ (n=6), 4.2‰ (n=16), 3.8‰ (n=6), and 11.5‰ (n=8), respectively). There was no measurable carbon isotope variation in regards to the following: a) along the length of a roll (4 samples from 1 roll); b) between the center and edge of a strip of tape (1 pair); c) between rolls assumed to be from the same lot of tape (2 pairs); d) between different rolls from the same batch of tape (same product purchased at the same time and place; 5 pairs); and e) between samples of a tape at room temperature, heated to 50° C and 80° C for 1 week. For each sample within the population of 87 tapes, carbon isotopes alone exclude 80 to 100% of the tapes as a potential match, with an average exclusion power of 92.5%, using a window of ± 0.4‰. Carbon isotope variations originate from variations in starting

  12. Fabrication and characterization of Ag-clad Bi-2223 tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1999-04-20

    The powder-in-tube (PIT) technique was used to fabricate multifilament (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (Bi-2223) superconducting tapes. Transport current properties of these tapes were enhanced by increasing the packing density of the precursor powder and improving the mechanical deformation condition. A critical current (I{sub c}) of > 35 A in long lengths (> 200 m) tapes has been achieved. In measuring the dependence of critical current density on magnetic field and temperature for the optimally processed tapes, we found a J{sub c} of > 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 20 K in magnetic fields up to 3 T and parallel to the c-axis, which is of interest for use in refrigerator-cooled magnets. I{sub c} declined exponentially when an external field was applied perpendicular to the tape surface at 77 K. Mechanical stability was tested for tapes sheathed with pure Ag and Ag-Mg alloy. Tapes made with pure Ag sheathing can withstand a tensile stress of {approx}20 MPa with no detrimental effect on I{sub c} values. Mechanical performance was improved by using Ag-Mg alloy sheathing: values of transport critical current began to decrease at the tensile stress of {approx} 100 MPa. Transport current measurements on tapes wound on a mandrel of 3.81 cm (1.5 in.) diameter at 30{degree} to the longitudinal axis, showed a reduction of {approx} 10% in I{sub c} values for pure Ag-sheathed tapes and 5% reduction in I{sub c} values for Ag-Mg sheathed tapes, compared with the I{sub c} values of as-coiled tapes.

  13. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, Eric B.; Muller, Albert C.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  14. Adhesive-tape recovery combined with molecular and microscopic testing for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts on experimentally contaminated fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum suspended in water were applied to the surface of apples, cucumbers, peaches, and tomatoes at concentrations of 100, 50 or 10 oocysts within circles drawn with a permanent marker. Approximately 18 hr later, skin containing uncontaminated and contaminated circles from each prod...

  15. A terabyte linear tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A plan has been formulated and selected for a NASA Phase 2 SBIR award for using the VLBA tape recorder for recording general data. The VLBA tape recorder is a high-speed, high-density linear tape recorder developed for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) which is presently capable of recording at rates up to 2 Gbit/sec and holding up to 1 Terabyte of data on one tape, using a special interface and not employing error correction. A general-purpose interface and error correction will be added so that the recorder can be used in other high-speed, high-capacity applications.

  16. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  17. Atomic scale enhancement of the adhesion of beryllium films to carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1995-12-01

    We have used 200 keV carbon ions to enhance the adhesion of 240-nm thick Be films to polished, vitreous carbon substrates. Adhesion of the as-deposited films was below that necessary to pass the scotch-tape test. Carbon ion fluences less than 1.6x10{sup 14} C/cm{sup 2} were sufficient to ensure the passage of the tape test without affecting the optical properties of the films. Adhesion failure of the as-deposited film was attributed to an inner oxide layer between the Be and the carbon. Because this oxide ({approximately}5 nm of BeO) was not measurably changed by the irradiation process, these results are consistent with adhesion enhancement occurring on the atomic scale at the interface between the inner oxide and the carbon substrate. This conclusion was supported by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) data, and potential adhesion mechanisms are discussed with consideration of relative contributions from electronic and nuclear stopping.

  18. Failure stress criterion for adhesively bonded joint at different strain rates by using dynamic Arcan test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Ludovic; Bourel, Benjamin; Lauro, Franck; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Carrere, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the failure criterion evolution of assembly bonded with a strain rate dependent adhesive. A new modified ARCAN device is then designed to obtain the average stress at failure under different loading angles and for strain up to 350 s-1. Tests are performed on a hydraulic jack machine and a Digital Image Correlation measurement is used to control the opening and the sliding displacements of the two substrates.

  19. Studies into the use of waterborne coating formulations for the preparation of magnetic tape (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrom, Stacy; Bray, Ashley; Cheng, Song; Elike, John; Fan, Hong; Lane, Alan M.; Nikles, David E.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research project is to replace the organic solvents used in modern tape manufacture with water, thereby eliminating the potential for solvent emissions. This has led to a search to identify tape components compatible with a waterborne coating process. The pigments were either cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3 or barium ferrite, with the majority of the research focused on cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3 formulations. A combination of sodium polyphosphate and Surfynol CT-136, a pigment grinding aid, were used as dispersing agents. The binders included commercial water-dispersed polyurethanes and a commercial ethylene-vinylchloride copolymer emulsion. A commercial waterborne melamine-formaldehyde was used as a cross-linking agent. Addition of the ethylene-vinylchloride copolymer to the polyurethane increased the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the unpigmented binder films. The melamine-formaldehyde cross-linker further enhanced the mechanical properties and increased the adhesion between the pigmented binder films and the polyester base film. In a 180° peel test, the adhesion easily exceeded the ITO specification for 8 mm helical scan magnetic tape.1 Rheological studies of the waterborne dispersions revealed that the viscosity was too low. Hydroxyethylcellulose, a water soluble polymer, was added as a thickener and this gave rise to a desirable thixotropic behavior in the dispersion. Waterborne dispersions were cast onto polyester base film, oriented in a 2000 G longitudinal magnetic field, and cured in a convection oven at 60 °C. Magnetic hysteresis loops showed a squareness of 0.875 and a switching field distribution of 0.324 for films containing cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3.

  20. 46 CFR 164.007-4 - Testing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... further definition of the time-temperature curve, see Appendix I of the ASTM Standard E-119, “Fire Tests... discs shall be covered with an oven-dry asbestos pad 50 mm. × 50 mm, and 4 mm. thick. The disc and the pad may be fixed to the surface of the steel plate by pins, tape, or a suitable adhesive. The...

  1. 46 CFR 164.007-4 - Testing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... further definition of the time-temperature curve, see Appendix I of the ASTM Standard E-119, “Fire Tests... discs shall be covered with an oven-dry asbestos pad 50 mm. × 50 mm, and 4 mm. thick. The disc and the pad may be fixed to the surface of the steel plate by pins, tape, or a suitable adhesive. The...

  2. [Recovery of blood traces with scenesafe FAST tape].

    PubMed

    Keller, Eva; Looser, Markus; Bieri, Hans-Peter; Kübler, Eric; Balitzki, Beate

    2012-01-01

    For complete and conclusive DNA profiling a sufficient amount of DNA must be available. For that, biological traces are recovered from crime scenes using special trace recovery material. The current method to collect biological traces for DNA analysis is to wipe them off with cotton swabs. However, for a few years the use of adhesive tapes has also been described for the recovery of evidence. In 2009, an adhesive tape was launched which was specially developed for the collection of biological traces. This product called Scenesafe FAST Tape (SSF) was investigated in this work to give recommendations for its use in evidence recovery. The results of this work show that the DNA can be extracted from the SSF very well. However, the tapes seem less suitable for direct use at the crime scene, as they are not flexible enough for adaptation to different crime scene conditions and the risk of contamination is higher than when collecting evidence with cotton swabs. Neither SSF nor cotton swabs are optimal for all requirements. The best method to recover biological evidence is still dependent on the surface material and the circumstances at the crime scene.

  3. Testing the differential adhesion hypothesis across the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Grosser, Steffen; Ahrens, Dave; Thalheim, Tobias; Riedel, Stefanie; Kießling, Tobias R.; Oswald, Linda; Zink, Mareike; Manning, M. Lisa; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the mechanical properties of three epithelial/mesenchymal cell lines (MCF-10A, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-436) that exhibit a shift in E-, N- and P-cadherin levels characteristic of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition associated with processes such as metastasis, to quantify the role of cell cohesion in cell sorting and compartmentalization. We develop a unique set of methods to measure cell-cell adhesiveness, cell stiffness and cell shapes, and compare the results to predictions from cell sorting in mixtures of cell populations. We find that the final sorted state is extremely robust among all three cell lines independent of epithelial or mesenchymal state, suggesting that cell sorting may play an important role in organization and boundary formation in tumours. We find that surface densities of adhesive molecules do not correlate with measured cell-cell adhesion, but do correlate with cell shapes, cell stiffness and the rate at which cells sort, in accordance with an extended version of the differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH). Surprisingly, the DAH does not correctly predict the final sorted state. This suggests that these tissues are not behaving as immiscible fluids, and that dynamical effects such as directional motility, friction and jamming may play an important role in tissue compartmentalization across the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  4. Testing the differential adhesion hypothesis across the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol; Grosser, Steffen; Oswald, Linda; Manning, Lisa; Kas, Josef

    We analyze the properties of three epithelial/mesenchymal cell lines that exhibit a shift in cadherin levels characteristic of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with processes such as metastasis, to quantify the role of cell cohesion in cell sorting and compartmentalization. We develop a unique set of methods to measure cell-cell adhesiveness, cell stiffness and cell shapes, and compare the results to predictions from cell sorting in mixtures of cell populations. We find that the final sorted state is extremely robust among all three cell lines independent of epithelial or mesenchymal state, suggesting that cell sorting may play an important role in organization and boundary formation in tumours. We find that surface densities of adhesive molecules do not correlate with measured cell-cell adhesion, but do correlate with cell shapes, cell stiffness and the rate at which cells sort, in accordance with an extended differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH). Surprisingly, the DAH does not correctly predict the final sorted state. This suggests that these tissues are not behaving as immiscible fluids, and that dynamical effects such as directional motility, friction and jamming may play an important role in tissue compartmentalization across the EMT.

  5. Multiprocessor system for Holter tape analysis (ECG)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, C.L.; Hubelbank, M.; Valvo, V.; Lane, B.

    1983-01-01

    Although techniques for recording and analyzing longterm ambulatory ECGS have been in existence for more than 20 years, the clinical usefulness and frequency of application of the technique continue to grow at an extraordinary rate. To meet the need for faster, more efficient processing of Holter tapes and the growing requirement that the analysis of the tape be quantitatively accurate, a new Holter analysis system has been developed. This system is built around two LSI11 microprocessors and a special purpose byte processor which incorporates an AMD 2903 bit slice chip. It includes 30 MB of mass storage and an impact printer with alphanumeric and graphic capabilities. In a test which included 55 separate readings of 34 12- or 24-hour tapes, correlations with hand counts of vpbs was greater than .99. The system processes either cassette or reel-to-reel tapes at 120* with simultaneous print/process capabilities, has a variety of user interactive displays to assure continuous operator validation, is remarkably nonfatiguing to operate, and automatically produces reports with tables, graphs, and sample ECG strips. 8 references.

  6. Centrally managed tapes at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Hell, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tapes at DESY are managed by the computer center and thus offer virtually unlimited storage space to the DESY computer center users. This paper describes the most recent version of the DESY tape management system, its predecessors having been in service for many years.

  7. ICI optical data storage tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Robert A.; Duffy, Joseph F.

    1991-01-01

    Optical data storage tape is now a commercial reality. The world's first successful development of a digital optical tape system is complete. This is based on the Creo 1003 optical tape recorder with ICI 1012 write-once optical tape media. Several other optical tape drive development programs are underway, including one using the IBM 3480 style cartridge at LaserTape Systems. In order to understand the significance and potential of this step change in recording technology, it is useful to review the historical progress of optical storage. This has been slow to encroach on magnetic storage, and has not made any serious dent on the world's mountains of paper and microfilm. Some of the reasons for this are the long time needed for applications developers, systems integrators, and end users to take advantage of the potential storage capacity; access time and data transfer rate have traditionally been too slow for high-performance applications; and optical disk media has been expensive compared with magnetic tape. ICI's strategy in response to these concerns was to concentrate its efforts on flexible optical media; in particular optical tape. The manufacturing achievements, media characteristics, and media lifetime of optical media are discussed.

  8. Sharpen Your Skills: Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Helen

    1984-01-01

    Three short articles provide tape recording instructions for braille transcribers and teachers of the visually handicapped, for transcribing instructional materials. The first article gives instructions for creating a "mini" table of contents, or index, to be inserted at the beginning of each tape. The second article provides instructions for…

  9. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  10. A test method for determining adhesion forces and Hamaker constants of cementitious materials using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang Kejin; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2011-11-15

    A method for determining Hamaker constant of cementitious materials is presented. The method involved sample preparation, measurement of adhesion force between the tested material and a silicon nitride probe using atomic force microscopy in dry air and in water, and calculating the Hamaker constant using appropriate contact mechanics models. The work of adhesion and Hamaker constant were computed from the pull-off forces using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjagin-Muller-Toropov models. Reference materials with known Hamaker constants (mica, silica, calcite) and commercially available cementitious materials (Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS)) were studied. The Hamaker constants of the reference materials obtained are consistent with those published by previous researchers. The results indicate that PC has a higher Hamaker constant than GGBFS. The Hamaker constant of PC in water is close to the previously predicted value C{sub 3}S, which is attributed to short hydration time ({<=} 45 min) used in this study.

  11. In vivo and in vitro studies on soft denture materials: microbial adhesion and tests for antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Okita, N; Orstavik, D; Orstavik, J; Ostby, K

    1991-07-01

    The microbiological properties of four tissue conditioners, one soft liner, and one acrylic resin were studied. The tissue conditioners showed no or negligible antimicrobial effects toward salivary microorganisms by two different in vitro tests. In in vitro adhesion experiments, more Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhered to the tissue conditioners and the soft liner in comparison with conventional acrylic resin used for denture-base fabrication. No difference in bacterial adhesion was found among the tissue conditioners. The microbial colonization of two tissue conditioners lined on maxillary dentures in three volunteers was followed for 14 days. No difference among the materials was found, but a tendency for subject-dependence in plaque formation on the materials was noted.

  12. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2006-05-01

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90{sup o} or 180{sup o} and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are << 1 N/mm. This is far below the normal Instron mechanical testing unit Instron mechanical testing unit; glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  13. Longevity of duct tape in residential air distribution systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D joints

    SciTech Connect

    Abushakra, Bass

    2002-05-30

    The aging tests conducted so far showed that duct tape tends to degrade in its performance as the joint it is applied to requires a geometrical description of a higher number of space dimensions (1-D, 2-D, 3-D). One-dimensional joints are the easiest to seal with duct tape, and thus the least to experience failure. Two-dimensional joints, such as the flexible duct core-to-collar joints tested in this study, are less likely to fail than three-dimensional collar-to-plenum joints, as the shrinkage could have a positive effect in tightening the joint. Three-dimensional joints are the toughest to seal and the most likely to experience failure. The 2-D flexible duct core-to-collar joints passed the six-month period of the aging test in terms of leakage, but with the exception of the foil-butyl tape, showed degradation in terms hardening, brittleness, partial peeling, shrinkage, wrinkling, delamination of the tape layers, flaking, cracking, bubbling, oozing and discoloration. The baking test results showed that the failure in the duct tape joints could be attributed to the type of combination of the duct tape and the material it is applied to, as the duct tape behaves differently with different substrates. Overall, the foil-butyl tape (Tape 4) had the best results, while the film tape (Tape 3) showed the most deterioration. The conventional duct tapes tested (Tape 1 and Tape 2) were between these two extremes, with Tape 2 performing better than Tape 1. Lastly, we found that plastic straps became discolored and brittle during the tests, and a couple of straps broke completely. Therefore, we recommend that clamping the duct-taped flexible core-to-collar joints should be done with metallic adjustable straps.

  14. Recovery of DNA from latent fingerprint tape lifts archived against matte acetate.

    PubMed

    Steadman, Shelly A; Hoofer, Steven R; Geering, Sarah C; King, Stephanie; Bennett, Marc A

    2015-05-01

    This study was driven by court order to examine methods to remove, extract, and STR-type potential DNA entrapped between latent fingerprint lifting tape and matte acetate that was collected from a 1977 crime scene. Results indicate that recovery of appreciable quantities of DNA is more challenging once adhesive is attached to matte acetate cards and even more difficult when fixed following black powder enhancement. STR amplification of extracts from entrapped fingermarks collected following the dusting/lifting procedure did not produce robust profiles, and extraneous peaks not expressed by print donors were detected for some samples. A hearing was set to argue whether there was DNA remaining to be tested, and if so, whether that DNA could be exculpatory in this postconviction matter. The studies herein provided the basis for the court's decision to not require the testing.

  15. Superconducting tape characterization under flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, A.; Suárez, P.; Cáceres, D.; Pérez, B.; Cordero, E.; Castaño, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electrotechnical applications of high temperature superconducting materials are limited by the difficulty of constructing classical windings with ceramic materials. While Bi-2223 tape may be a solution, it cannot be bent to radii less than a certain value since its superconducting capacity disappears. We describe an automated measurement system of the characteristics of this tape under flexion. It consists of a device that coils the tape over cylinders with different radii. At the same time, the parameters of its superconducting behaviour (e.g. resistance) are taken and processed. This system was developed at the “Benito Mahedero Laboratory of Superconducting Electrical Applications” in the University of Extremadura.

  16. Development of a new test for the easy characterization of the adhesion at the interface of bilayer tablets: proof-of-concept study by experimental design.

    PubMed

    Busignies, Virginie; Mazel, Vincent; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2014-12-30

    Although, adhesion at the interface of bilayer tablets is critical for their design it is difficult to characterize this adhesion between layers. In view of this, a new test with an easy implementation was proposed for the characterization of the interface of bilayer tablets. This work is presented as a proof-of-concept study to investigate the reliability of this new test with regard to the effects of some critical process parameters (e.g., compaction pressure applied on each layer) and material attributes (e.g., elasticity of the layered materials) on the interfacial adhesion of bilayer tablets. This was investigated using a design of experiment approach and the results obtained were in good accordance with those obtained with other tests and thus, confirms the potential of such a method for the measurement of the interfacial adhesion of bilayer tablets.

  17. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  18. Effect of the Kinesio tape to muscle activity and vertical jump performance in healthy inactive people

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elastic taping applied on the triceps surae has been commonly used to improve the performance of lower extremities. However, little objective evidence has been documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elastic taping on the triceps surae during a maximal vertical jump. It was hypothesized that elastic taping to the triceps surae would increase muscle activity and cause positive effect to jump height. Methods Thirty-one healthy adults (19 males and 12 females with mean age, body weight and height for 25.3 ± 3.8 years old, 64.1 ± 6.2 kg, and 169.4 ± 7.3 cm, respectively) were recruited. All participants performed vertical jump tests prior to (without taping) and during elastic taping. Two elastic tapes, Kinesio tape and Mplacebo tape from two different manufacturers, were applied to the participants, respectively. Results The results showed that the vertical ground reaction force increased when Kinesio tape was applied even when the height of jump remained about constant. However, the height of the jump decreased, and there was no difference on the vertical ground reaction force in Mplacebo taping group. Although the EMG activity of medial gastrocnemius tended to increase in Kinesio taping group, we did not see differences in EMG activity for the medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and soleus muscles in either group. Conclusions Based on the varied effects of Kinesio tape and Mplacebo tape, different intervention technique was suggested for specific purpose during vertical jump movement. Mplacebo tape was demanded for the benefits of stabilization, protection, and the restriction of motion at the ankle joint. On the other hand, the findings may implicate benefits for medial gastrocnemius muscle strength and push-off force when using Kinesio tape. PMID:21831321

  19. String and Sticky Tape Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate the fundamentals of one dimensional kinematics such as Newton's third law of motion, and collision between bodies, using simple materials of marbles, strings, sticky tape, drinking straws, and rubber bands. (GA)

  20. Canadian Contemporary Issues on Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapter, Jean

    1974-01-01

    Four tapes with interviews with experts in the designated fields comprise the series: a) Canada's Foreign Relations, 1867-1919; b) Canada's Foreign Relations, 1919-1945; c) Canada and China, and d) Canadian Diplomacy and Foreign Policy. (JA)

  1. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  2. Tape Storage Optimization at BNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David; Lauret, Jérôme

    2011-12-01

    The BNL's RHIC and Atlas Computing Facility (RACF), is supporting the RHIC experiment as its Tier0 center and the Atlas/LHC as a Tier1 center. The RACF had to address the issue of efficient access to data stored to disk and tape storage. Randomly restoring files out of tapes destroys access performance to tape by causing too frequently, high latency and time consuming tape mount and dismount. BNL's mass storage system currently holds more than 16 PB of data on tapes, managed by HPSS. To restore files from HPSS, we make use of a scheduler software, called ERADAT. This scheduler system was originally based on a code from OakRidge National Lab, and then it was renamed to BNL Batch at 2005 after some major modifications and enhancements. The new BNL Batch, ERADAT, provides dynamic HPSS resource management, schedule jobs efficiently, enhanced visibility of real-time staging activities and advanced error handling, to maximize the tape staging performance. ERADAT is the interface between HPSS and other applications such as the DataCarousel, our home developed production system and dCache. Scalla/Xrootd MSS can also be interfaced with HPSS via DataCarousel. ERADAT has demonstrated great performance in BNL and other institute.

  3. Kinesio Taping effects on knee extension force among soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Maysa V. G. B.; Vieira, Edgar R.; Brunt, Denis; Goethel, Márcio F.; Gonçalves, Mauro; Quemelo, Paulo R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping (KT) is widely used, however the effects of KT on muscle activation and force are contradictory. Objective: To evaluate the effects of KT on knee extension force in soccer players. Method: This is a clinical trial study design. Thirty-four subjects performed two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of the lower limbs pre, immediately post, and 24 hours after tape application on the lower limbs. Both lower limbs were taped, using K-Tape and 3M Micropore tape randomly on the right and left thighs of the participants. Isometric knee extension force was measured for dominant side using a strain gauge. The following variables were assessed: peak force, time to peak force, rate of force development until peak force, time to peak rate of force development, and 200 ms pulse. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the variables assessed between KT and Micropore conditions (F=0.645, p=0.666) or among testing sessions (pre, post, and 24h after) (F=0.528, p=0.868), and there was no statistical significance (F=0.271, p=0.986) for interaction between tape conditions and testing session. Conclusion: KT did not affect the force-related measures assessed immediately and 24 hours after the KT application compared with Micropore application, during maximal isometric voluntary knee extension. PMID:25789557

  4. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  5. Recording and wear characteristics of 4 and 8 mm helical scan tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, Klaus J.; Speliotis, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    Performance data of media on helical scan tape systems (4 and 8 mm) is presented and various types of media are compared. All measurements were performed on a standard MediaLogic model ML4500 Tape Evaluator System with a Flash Converter option for time based measurements. The 8 mm tapes are tested on an Exabyte 8200 drive and 4 mm tapes on an Archive Python drive; in both cases, the head transformer is directly connected to a Media Logic Read/Write circuit and test electronics. The drive functions only as a tape transport and its data recover circuits are not used. Signal to Noise, PW 50, Peak Shift and Wear Test data is used to compare the performance of MP (metal particle), BaFe, and metal evaporate (ME). ME tape is the clear winner in magnetic performance but its susceptibility to wear and corrosion, make it less than ideal for data storage.

  6. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  7. Performance measurements and operational characteristics of the Storage Tek ACS 4400 tape library with the Cray Y-MP EL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Gary; Ranade, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    With over 5000 units sold, the Storage Tek Automated Cartridge System (ACS) 4400 tape library is currently the most popular large automated tape library. Based on 3480/90 tape technology, the library is used as the migration device ('nearline' storage) in high-performance mass storage systems. In its maximum configuration, one ACS 4400 tape library houses sixteen 3480/3490 tape drives and is capable of holding approximately 6000 cartridge tapes. The maximum storage capacity of one library using 3480 tapes is 1.2 TB and the advertised aggregate I/O rate is about 24 MB/s. This paper reports on an extensive set of tests designed to accurately assess the performance capabilities and operational characteristics of one STK ACS 4400 tape library holding approximately 5200 cartridge tapes and configured with eight 3480 tape drives. A Cray Y-MP EL2-256 was configured as its host machine. More than 40,000 tape jobs were run in a variety of conditions to gather data in the areas of channel speed characteristics, robotics motion, time taped mounts, and timed tape reads and writes.

  8. TAPE: A Biodegradable Hemostatic Glue Inspired by a Ubiquitous Compound in Plants for Surgical Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keumyeon; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Seonki

    2016-01-01

    This video describes the simplest protocol for preparing biodegradable surgical glue that has an effective hemostatic ability and greater water-resistant adhesion strength than commercial tissue adhesives. Medical adhesives have attracted great attention as potential alternative tools to sutures and staples due to their convenience in usage with minimal invasiveness. Although there are several protocols for developing tissue adhesives including those commercially available such as fibrin glues and cyanoacrylate-based materials, mostly they require a series of chemical syntheses of organic molecules, or complicated protein-purification methods, in the case of bio-driven materials (i.e., fibrin glue). Also, the development of surgical glues exhibiting high adhesive properties while maintaining biodegradability is still a challenge due to difficulties in achieving good performance in the wet environment of the body. We illustrate a new method to prepare a medical glue, known as TAPE, by the weight-based separation of a water-immiscible supramolecular aggregate formed after a physical mixing of a plant-derived, wet-resistant adhesive molecule, Tannic Acid (TA), and a well-known biopolymer, Poly(Ethylene) glycol (PEG). With our approach, TAPE shows high adhesion strength, which is 2.5-fold more than commercial fibrin glue in the presence of water. Furthermore, TAPE is biodegradable in physiological conditions and can be used as a potent hemostatic glue against tissue bleeding. We expect the widespread use of TAPE in a variety of medical settings and drug delivery applications, such as polymers for muco-adhesion, drug depots, and others. PMID:27341544

  9. Fabrication of Yb-123 Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Athur, S.; Balachandran, U.; Salama, K.

    2000-11-15

    While Bi-2223 tapes have been the workhorses of the superconductor industry, their poor performance in applied magnetic fields restrict their use to below 30 K. Melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 PIT tapes offers a simple and scalable technique for fabricating long-length HTS conductors capable of being used at 77 K. Under reduced oxygen partial pressure, the peritectic temperature of Yb-123 is below the melting point of Ag, and this facilitates the adaptation of melt-texturing methods for fabricating these tapes. The effect of melt-processing temperature on current density was also explored; a temperature of 965 C yielded optimal critical current values. The critical current density achieved at 4.2 K was 20,000 A/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to a critical current of 52 A. Based on the above results, an optimal processing zone for melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes was determined. These results hold promise for melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes as an alternative to Bi-2223 PIT technology.

  10. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1: testing for a role in insect immunity, behaviour and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Peuß, Robert; Wensing, Kristina U; Woestmann, Luisa; Eggert, Hendrik; Milutinović, Barbara; Sroka, Marlene G U; Scharsack, Jörn P; Kurtz, Joachim; Armitage, Sophie A O

    2016-04-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 (Dscam1) has wide-reaching and vital neuronal functions although the role it plays in insect and crustacean immunity is less well understood. In this study, we combine different approaches to understand the roles that Dscam1 plays in fitness-related contexts in two model insect species. Contrary to our expectations, we found no short-term modulation of Dscam1 gene expression after haemocoelic or oral bacterial exposure in Tribolium castaneum, or after haemocoelic bacterial exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated Dscam1 knockdown and subsequent bacterial exposure did not reduce T. castaneum survival. However, Dscam1 knockdown in larvae resulted in adult locomotion defects, as well as dramatically reduced fecundity in males and females. We suggest that Dscam1 does not always play a straightforward role in immunity, but strongly influences behaviour and fecundity. This study takes a step towards understanding more about the role of this intriguing gene from different phenotypic perspectives. PMID:27152227

  11. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1: testing for a role in insect immunity, behaviour and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Wensing, Kristina U.; Eggert, Hendrik; Scharsack, Jörn P.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 (Dscam1) has wide-reaching and vital neuronal functions although the role it plays in insect and crustacean immunity is less well understood. In this study, we combine different approaches to understand the roles that Dscam1 plays in fitness-related contexts in two model insect species. Contrary to our expectations, we found no short-term modulation of Dscam1 gene expression after haemocoelic or oral bacterial exposure in Tribolium castaneum, or after haemocoelic bacterial exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated Dscam1 knockdown and subsequent bacterial exposure did not reduce T. castaneum survival. However, Dscam1 knockdown in larvae resulted in adult locomotion defects, as well as dramatically reduced fecundity in males and females. We suggest that Dscam1 does not always play a straightforward role in immunity, but strongly influences behaviour and fecundity. This study takes a step towards understanding more about the role of this intriguing gene from different phenotypic perspectives. PMID:27152227

  12. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    DOEpatents

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  13. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  14. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  15. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  16. Influence of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. PMID:24259905

  17. Influence of Walking with Talus Taping on the Ankle Dorsiflexion Passive Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. PMID:24259905

  18. Sharpen Your Skills: Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Helen

    1983-01-01

    Three short articles provide tape recording instructions for braille transcribers and teachers of the visually handicapped, for transcribing instructional materials. The first article gives guidelines for transcribing special formats such as typing books. The second article tells how to give verbal instructions for diagraming sentences and other…

  19. EROS to universal tape conversion processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, S. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The function of the EROS processor is to allow a user to select a specific area from a full frame LANDSAT image which is written on tape in the EROS format. The area of interest is read from the EROS formatted tape and converted to the JSC Universal format and written onto another tape. This tape can then be read by the IMDACS processing system and normal analysis can be performed.

  20. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  1. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample. PMID:22397643

  2. Effect of different adhesion strategies on fiber post cementation: Push-out test and scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Letícia Oliveria; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Costa, Leonardo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphoric acid etching and the dentin pre-treatment with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 48 human incisors were selected, post spaces were prepared and assigned to four groups: G1-37% phosphoric acid (15 s); G2-5.25% NaOCl (2 min) +37% phosphoric acid (15 s); G3-37% phosphoric acid (60 s); and G4-5.25% NaOCl (2 min) +37% phosphoric acid (60 s). Fiber post cementation was performed with two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system/dual-cured resin cement according to the manufacturer's recommendation. After 24 h, each root was sectioned transversally into three slices (cervical, middle and apical) and the bond strength of each section was determined using a push-out bond strength test. Morphology analysis of the bonded interface was evaluated using a scanning electron microscopy. Push-out strength data (MPa) were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Tukey-Kramer (α = 0.05). Results: Considering the NaOCl pre-treatment, no statistically significant differences were observed among groups; however, when the phosphoric acid was applied during 60 s in the apical portion without NaOCl pre-treatment, the bond strength was statistically significant increased. Conclusion: The NaOCl pre-treatment did not improve the bond strength of adhesive luting cement to root canal dentin. The findings suggest that the use of 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s may have a beneficial effect on bond strength in the apical root third. PMID:24403786

  3. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  4. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  5. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    1993-01-01

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  6. The Application of Short-Term Video-Tape Therapy for the Treatment of Test Anxiety of College Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suinn, Richard M.

    The purposes of the project were to demonstrate the use of desensitization therapy over a short term to treat test-taking anxiety, and to test the hypothesis that such short-term treatment is effective in dealing with anxiety in mathematics courses and thus enhances and facilitates learning in these courses. The research was designed to utilize…

  7. Rate and Temperature Dependence of Adhesion Measured by a Jkr Method on Synthetically Modified Acrylic Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garif, Yev; Gerberich, William; Macosko, Christopher; Pocius, Alphonsus

    2003-03-01

    The goal of this study is to model mechanisms of interfacial separation in soft polymers based on experimental results obtained from normal mechanical contacts (JKR test). For the JKR test, cylindrically shaped samples of acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were synthesized in capillary tubes in presence of a cross-linking agent in order to obtain an elastic PSA-like network (PSA-LN). Surface characteristics of individual samples were altered by co-polymerizing small amounts of polar side-groups such as acrylic acid (AA), dimethylaminoethylacrylate (DMAEA), and acrylonitrile (AN). The measurement was conducted in a ventilated chamber at three different temperatures (0, 25, and 50 degrees Celcius) and zero humidity with a sub-micron-per-second range of contact rates. Within this range, measured adhesion exhibits a transition from nearly rate-independent behavior to power law behavior at higher rates. Power law index matches that from the peel test data of similarly synthesized adhesive tapes. Accordingly, the transition is linked to the characteristic length scale of the process zone at the interface, as opposed to the bulk, ahead of the slowly advancing crack tip.

  8. Quantitative characterization of the interfacial adhesion of Ni thin film on steel substrate: A compression-induced buckling delamination test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Zhou, Y. C.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.

    2015-01-01

    A compression-induced buckling delamination test is employed to quantitatively characterize the interfacial adhesion of Ni thin film on steel substrate. It is shown that buckles initiate from edge flaws and surface morphologies exhibit symmetric, half-penny shapes. Taking the elastoplasticity of film and substrate into account, a three-dimensional finite element model for an edge flaw with the finite size is established to simulate the evolution of energy release rates and phase angles in the process of interfacial buckling-driven delamination. The results show that delamination propagates along both the straight side and curved front. The mode II delamination plays a dominant role in the process with a straight side whilst the curved front experiences almost the pure mode I. Based on the results of finite element analysis, a numerical model is developed to evaluate the interfacial energy release rate, which is in the range of 250-315 J/m2 with the corresponding phase angle from -41° to -66°. These results are in agreement with the available values determined by other testing methods, which confirms the effectiveness of the numerical model.

  9. Gecko-inspired carbon nanotube-based self-cleaning adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, P M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The design of reversible adhesives requires both stickiness and the ability to remain clean from dust and other contaminants. Inspired by gecko feet, we demonstrate the self-cleaning ability of carbon nanotube-based flexible gecko tapes.

  10. Induction Bonding of Prepreg Tape and Titanium Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messier, Bernadette C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid structural laminates made of titanium foil and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite offer a potential for improved performance in aircraft structural applications. To obtain information needed for the automated fabrication of hybrid laminates, a series of bench scale tests were conducted of the magnetic induction bonding of titanium foil and thermoplastic prepreg tape. Foil and prepreg specimens were placed in the gap of a toroid magnet mounted in a bench press. Several magnet power supplies were used to study power at levels from 0.5 to 1.75 kW and frequencies from 50 to 120 kHz. Sol-gel surface-treated titanium foil, 0.0125 cm thick, and PIXA/IM7 prepreg tape were used in several lay-up configurations. Data were obtained on wedge peel bond strength, heating rate, and temperature ramp over a range of magnet power levels and frequencies at different "power-on" times for several magnet gap dimensions. These data will be utilized in assessing the potential for automated processing. Peel strengths of foil-tape bonds depended on the maximum temperature reached during heating and on the applied pressure. Maximum peel strengths were achieved at 1.25kW and 8OkHz. Induction heating of the foil appears to be capable of good bonding up to 10 plies of tape. Heat transfer calculations indicate that a 20-40 C temperature difference exists across the tape thickness during heat-up.

  11. 41 CFR 101-26.508 - Electronic data processing (EDP) tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate band).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... processing (EDP) tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate band). 101-26.508 Section 101-26.508... Programs § 101-26.508 Electronic data processing (EDP) tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate band). Procurement by Federal agencies of EDP tape and instrumentation tape (wide and intermediate...

  12. Corrosion of metal particle and metal evaporated tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speliotis, Dennis E.

    Very high coercivity metal particle (MP) and metal evaporated (ME) tapes are being used in 8mm video and digital audio tape applications, and more recently in digital data recording applications. In view of the inherent susceptibility of such media to environmental corrosion, a number of recent studies have addressed their long term stability and archivability. These studies have used an accelerated corrosion test based either on elevated temperature-humidity or polluting gas atmospheres known as Battelle tests. A comparison of the Battelle test results performed at different laboratories reveals a large variation from one location to another, presumably due to incorrect replication of the Battelle condition. Furthermore, when the Battelle tests are performed on enclosed cartridges, it is quite possible that diffusion limits the penetration of the extremely low concentration polluting gaseous species to the inner layers of the tapes during the short time of the accelerated test, whereas in real life these diffusion limitations may not apply. To avoid this uncertainty, the corrosion behavior of commercial 8mm MP and ME tapes when cassettes without their external plastic cases were exposed to 50 deg C and 80 percent RH for 7.5 weeks is investigated.

  13. Corrosion of metal particle and metal evaporated tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speliotis, Dennis E.

    1991-01-01

    Very high coercivity metal particle (MP) and metal evaporated (ME) tapes are being used in 8mm video and digital audio tape applications, and more recently in digital data recording applications. In view of the inherent susceptibility of such media to environmental corrosion, a number of recent studies have addressed their long term stability and archivability. These studies have used an accelerated corrosion test based either on elevated temperature-humidity or polluting gas atmospheres known as Battelle tests. A comparison of the Battelle test results performed at different laboratories reveals a large variation from one location to another, presumably due to incorrect replication of the Battelle condition. Furthermore, when the Battelle tests are performed on enclosed cartridges, it is quite possible that diffusion limits the penetration of the extremely low concentration polluting gaseous species to the inner layers of the tapes during the short time of the accelerated test, whereas in real life these diffusion limitations may not apply. To avoid this uncertainty, the corrosion behavior of commercial 8mm MP and ME tapes when cassettes without their external plastic cases were exposed to 50 deg C and 80 percent RH for 7.5 weeks is investigated.

  14. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  15. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  16. Lightning protection guidelines and test data for adhesively bonded aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryzby, J. E.; Plumer, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The highly competitive marketplace and increasing cost of energy has motivated manufacturers of general aviation aircraft to utilize composite materials and metal-to-metal bonding in place of conventional fasteners and rivets to reduce weight, obtain smoother outside surfaces and reduce drag. The purpose of this program is protection of these new structures from hazardous lightning effects. The program began with a survey of advance-technology materials and fabrication methods under consideration for future designs. Sub-element specimens were subjected to simulated lightning voltages and currents. Measurements of bond line voltages, electrical sparking, and mechanical strength degradation were made to comprise a data base of electrical properties for new technology materials and basic structural configurations. The second hase of the program involved tests on full scale wing structures which contained integral fuel tanks and which were representative of examples of new technology structures and fuel systems. The purpose of these tests was to provide a comparison between full scale structural measurements and those obtained from the sub-element specimens.

  17. Copiers and Duplicators for Audio Tape Cassettes: Criteria for Selection, Laboratory Test Findings, Manufacturers' Data Reports. EPIE Report: Number 84e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Products Information Exchange Inst., Stony Brook, NY.

    Because needs for cassette duplication equipment differ, the user must match his requirements to the capabilities of manufactured products, and the essential product characteristics. To help educators in choosing cassette duplicators, EPIE has gathered data from manufacturers and tested 11 units. The first section of the report explains the…

  18. High density tape casting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is provided for casting thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be cast at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is cast against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry cast. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the casting surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before casting slurry against the chamber walls.

  19. Investigating Delamination Migration in Composite Tape Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.

    2014-01-01

    A modification to a recently developed test specimen designed to investigate migration of a delamination between neighboring ply interfaces in tape laminates is presented. The specimen is a cross-ply laminated beam consisting of 40 plies with a polytetrafluoroethylene insert spanning part way along its length. The insert is located between a lower 0-degree ply (specimen length direction) and a stack of four 90-degree plies (specimen width direction). The modification involved a stacking sequence that promotes stable delamination growth prior to migration, and included a relocation of the insert from the specimen midplane to the interface between plies 14 and 15. Specimens were clamped at both ends onto a rigid baseplate and loaded on their upper surface via a piano hinge assembly, resulting in a predominantly flexural loading condition. Tests were conducted with the load-application point positioned at various locations along a specimen's span. This position affected the sequence of damage events during a test.

  20. Graphite composite tape in beam-pumped oil wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, H.N.; Tanner, C.J.

    1984-09-01

    A continuous, reelable graphite composite tape is being developed as an alternative to jointed sucker rods for use in beam pumped oil wells. Four units have been tested in wells. The composite tape is composed of graphite fibers, glass fabric, Kevlar fibers and vinylester resin. Graphite fibers have a high modulus of elasticity and provide the longitudinal stiffness needed to operate the downhole pump, while allowing a thin cross section flexible enough to be wound onto small diameter reels. This advanced graphite composite is the first practical, lightweight, reelable alternative to jointed sucker rods.

  1. Critical Current Measurements in Commercial Tapes, Coils, and Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, D. U.; Soulen, R. J., Jr.; Fuller-Mora, W. W.; Francavilla, T. L.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured a number of tapes, coils, and magnets produced by commercial vendors and determined their properties as functions of magnetic field and temperature. The tapes were measured at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in magnetic fields to 20 tesla and at temperatures of 4.2 K, 27 K, 65 K, and 77 K. For the tapes we report critical currents and current-voltage characteristics. Six inch diameter coils were measured at NRL in zero magnetic field. Critical currents, current-voltage characteristics, and reliability studies are reported for the coils. Larger 10 inch diameter coils, which are to be used in a 200 hp superconducting motor, were also measured and results will be presented. The talk will also review the status of the most recent tests of the superconducting motor.

  2. Digital terrain tapes: user guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    DMATC's digital terrain tapes are a by-product of the agency's efforts to streamline the production of raised-relief maps. In the early 1960's DMATC developed the Digital Graphics Recorder (DGR) system that introduced new digitizing techniques and processing methods into the field of three-dimensional mapping. The DGR system consisted of an automatic digitizing table and a computer system that recorded a grid of terrain elevations from traces of the contour lines on standard topographic maps. A sequence of computer accuracy checks was performed and then the elevations of grid points not intersected by contour lines were interpolated. The DGR system produced computer magnetic tapes which controlled the carving of plaster forms used to mold raised-relief maps. It was realized almost immediately that this relatively simple tool for carving plaster molds had enormous potential for storing, manipulating, and selectively displaying (either graphically or numerically) a vast number of terrain elevations. As the demand for the digital terrain tapes increased, DMATC began developing increasingly advanced digitizing systems and now operates the Digital Topographic Data Collection System (DTDCS). With DTDCS, two types of data elevations as contour lines and points, and stream and ridge lines are sorted, matched, and resorted to obtain a grid of elevation values for every 0.01 inch on each map (approximately 200 feet on the ground). Undefined points on the grid are found by either linear or or planar interpolation.

  3. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  4. The Ergogenic Effect of Elastic Therapeutic Tape on Stride and Step Length in Fatigued Runners

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John; Sorrels, Kenneth; Coats, Jesse; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Moskop, JoAnn; Ueckert, Kate; Glass, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if elastic therapeutic tape placed on anterior lower limbs would affect stride and step length in fatigued runners’ gait. Methods Forty-two healthy participants were equally divided into a kinesiology tape group (Rocktape) and a no-tape control group. Participants in both groups underwent a baseline running gait test at 6 mph without tape. After this, participants engaged in an exhaustive lower body fatigue protocol until they reached maximal volitional exhaustion. Participants were then randomized to 1 of 2 interventions: (1) Experimental group, which had kinesiology tape placed under tension on the anterior aspect of their lower limbs bilaterally from the upper thigh to just below the patella, or (2) Control group, which did not receive taping. All participants then engaged in a similar 6-mph running gait postanalysis. Participant’s gait was analyzed for 90 seconds during each test iteration. Researchers used a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance considering fatigue (prefatigue, postfatigue) and group (tape, no-tape) as subject factors. Results After the fatigue protocol, the no-tape group demonstrated a significant decrease in step length of 14.2 mm (P = .041) and stride length of 29.4 mm (P = .043). The kinesiology tape group did not demonstrate a significant decline in these gait parameters. Conclusions In this preliminary study, placing elastic therapeutic tape over the anterior lower limbs demonstrated short-term preservation of runner step length and stride length in a fatigued state. PMID:25435835

  5. Light coupling in a Scotch tape waveguide via an integrated metal diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor

    2016-01-15

    We report on the first demonstration of a flexible optical waveguide interconnecting device made of a general purpose pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape embedding nanopatterned Al thin film diffractive grating couplers. The diffractive elements allow selected broadband light to be perpendicularly coupled/decoupled into/from a PSA tape waveguide in which they are integrated. Waveguide losses and coupling efficiency are evaluated. The versatility and low cost of the used materials make the presented configuration very promising for cost-effective, ready-to-use short-distance optical interconnections.

  6. What best protects the inverted weightbearing ankle against further inversion? Evertor muscle strength compares favorably with shoe height, athletic tape, and three orthoses.

    PubMed

    Ashton-Miller, J A; Ottaviani, R A; Hutchinson, C; Wojtys, E M

    1996-01-01

    We measured the maximal isometric eversion moment developed under full weightbearing in 20 healthy adult men (age, 24.4 +/- 3.4 years; mean +/- SD) with their ankles in 15 degrees of inversion. Tests were performed at both 0 degree and 32 degrees of ankle plantar flexion in low- and in three-quarter-top shoes with and without adhesive athletic tape or one of three proprietary ankle orthoses. At 0 degree of ankle plantar flexion, the mean maximal voluntary resistance of the unprotected ankle to an inversion moment was 50 +/- 8 N-m; this increased by an average of 12% (or 6 N-m) when the subject wore a three-quarter-top basketball shoe. The maximal voluntary resistances to inversion moments developed with the ankles further protected by athletic tape or any of three orthoses were not significantly different. Biomechanical calculations suggest that at 15 degrees of inversion the fully active ankle evertor muscles isometrically developed a moment up to six times larger than that developed when an athlete wears a three-quarter-top shoe alone and more than three times larger than that developed passively when the athlete has tape or an orthosis worn inside a three-quarter-top shoe. We conclude that fully activated and strong ankle evertor muscles are the best protection for a near-maximally inverted ankle at footstrike.

  7. A Comparative Study of Audio and Video Taping Techniques as Teaching Tools for Self Discovery in the Basic Speech Course (Voice and Diction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Beverly Claire Ketcik

    Sixty college students were simultaneously audio- and video-taped to test the hypotheses that (1) the student who uses video tape for self-analysis in a basic speech skills course will show greater improvement in performing basic skills than will the student who uses audio tape for self-analysis; and (2) there will be a correlation among…

  8. Investigation of current transport normal and parallel to the tape plane in BSCCO/Ag tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Maley, M.P.; Cho, J.H.; Willis, J.O.; Bulaevskii, L.N.

    1995-07-01

    We have performed transport, resistivity and critical current measurements on Bi-2223/Ag and Bi-2212/Ag tapes with current directions both parallel and perpendicular to the tape plane in magnetic fields up to 7 T and 50tape normal (nominal c-axis in a textured tape) is metallic, scales with the inplane resistivity at all fields and is dramatically reduced from single crystal c-axis values. Similarly, the critical current along the tape normal exhibits magnetic field and field orientation dependences similar to those for current flow along the tape plane. These results indicate that current flow along CuO{sub 2} planes dominates current transport even along the tape normal in highly textured tapes.

  9. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  10. Experimental research on tape spring supported space inflatable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew J.; Walker, Scott J. I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental research that continues the development of inflatable hybrid structures for space applications. Inflatables provide a concept with much scope for further incorporation into the structures of future spacecraft. They offer considerable savings in mass and stowed volume for spacecraft, providing possible reductions in satellite costs. Existing boom configurations make use of inflatables including solar arrays and the NGST sunshield. However these typically soft systems could be improved by incorporating tape springs as structural stiffeners along the length of the boom, creating hybrid structures. This research builds on previous experimental work undertaken at the University of Southampton looking at cantilever inflatable and hybrid booms. The focus of this research is to identify the structural performance improvement of adding tape springs to cantilever inflatable booms. This is achieved by tip deflection testing to determine the bending moment and rigidity performances of these structures allowing a comparison between the two technologies. Several hybrid booms are created and tested in various orientations to identify the optimal tape spring effectiveness. It was found that adding a pair of tape springs will increase stiffness of the hybrid structure by up to 4.9 times for an increase of 2.4 times the boom mass.

  11. Patterned Taping: A High-Efficiency Soft Lithographic Method for Universal Thin Film Patterning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangyoon; Park, Sang Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Cho, Illhun; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Park, Soo Young

    2016-03-22

    As a universal lithographic technique for microscale/nanoscale film patterns, we develop a strategy for the use of soft lithographically patterned pressure-sensitive tape (patterned tape) as a pattern-transporting stamp material. Patterning was successfully implemented through the selective detachment and/or attachment of various thin films, including organic and metallic layers demanding no subsequent physical, thermal, or chemical treatment, as this incurs the risk of the deformation of the thin film and the deterioration of its functionalities. Its features of universal adhesion and flexibility enable pressure-sensitive tapes to form patterns on a variety of surfaces: organic, polymeric, and inorganic surfaces as well as flat, curved, uneven, and flexible substrates. Moreover, the proposed technique boasts the unique and distinct advantages of short operation time, supreme patterning yield, and multilayer stacking capability, which suggest considerable potential for their application to advanced optoelectronic device fabrication.

  12. Roles of Poly(propylene Glycol) During Solvent-Based Lamination of Ceramic Green Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppakarn, Nitinat; Ishida, Hatsuo; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Solvent lamination for alumina green tapes is readily accomplished using a mixture of ethanol, toluene and poly(propylene glycol). After lamination, the PPG is clearly present as a discrete film at the interface between the laminated tapes. This condition, however, does not generate delamination during firing. Systematic sets of experiments are undertaken to determine the role of PPG in the lamination process and, specifically, the mechanism by which it is redistributed during subsequent processing. PPG slowly diffuses through the organic binder film at room temperature. The PPG diffusion rapidly increases as temperature is increased to 80 C. The key to the efficiency of adhesives during green-tape lamination is mutual solubility of the nonvolatile component of the glue and the base polymeric binder.

  13. Patterned Taping: A High-Efficiency Soft Lithographic Method for Universal Thin Film Patterning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangyoon; Park, Sang Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Cho, Illhun; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Park, Soo Young

    2016-03-22

    As a universal lithographic technique for microscale/nanoscale film patterns, we develop a strategy for the use of soft lithographically patterned pressure-sensitive tape (patterned tape) as a pattern-transporting stamp material. Patterning was successfully implemented through the selective detachment and/or attachment of various thin films, including organic and metallic layers demanding no subsequent physical, thermal, or chemical treatment, as this incurs the risk of the deformation of the thin film and the deterioration of its functionalities. Its features of universal adhesion and flexibility enable pressure-sensitive tapes to form patterns on a variety of surfaces: organic, polymeric, and inorganic surfaces as well as flat, curved, uneven, and flexible substrates. Moreover, the proposed technique boasts the unique and distinct advantages of short operation time, supreme patterning yield, and multilayer stacking capability, which suggest considerable potential for their application to advanced optoelectronic device fabrication. PMID:26863506

  14. FGGE/ERBZ tape specification and shipping letter description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Lo, H.

    1983-01-01

    The FGGE/ERBZ tape contains 5 parameters which are extracted and reformatted from the Nimbus-7 ERB Zonal Means Tape. There are three types of files on a FGGE/ERBZ tape: a tape header file, and data files. Physical characteristics, gross format, and file specifications are given. A sample tape check/document printout (shipping letter) is included.

  15. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  16. Pocket-size manual tape reader device aids computer tape checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odle, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Pocket-size plastic manual tape reader device aids in reading, interpreting, and correcting binary and octal coded punched tapes. The coded information is more easily read if the color of the back plate contrasts sharply with that of the tape.

  17. TAPECERT- A TAPE CERTIFICATION UTILITY FOR DEC VAX/VMS COMPUTERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullner, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    A tape certification program tests the useability of magnetic tape at different densities by writing test patterns and re-reading them. The ability to certify tapes is important in environments that do large amounts of tape processing. TAPECERT is a VAX utility for tape certification in use at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Multi-Mission Image Processing Laboratory which handles data from projects such as Voyager and Galileo. TAPECERT allows the user to select the tape density, the test pattern to use, the number of allowed retries, and whether to allow extended inter-record gaps to skip past bad spots on the tape. The program displays system error messages (parity errors, for instance) and record count information, with totals every 1000 blocks. TAPECERT is designed such that command procedures can be set up with defaults for different types of certification runs. TAPECERT is written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer operating under VMS level 3.7 and level 4.2. TAPECERT utilizes standard VMS system services and run-time library routines. This program was developed in 1985.

  18. Penetration studies of topically applied substances: Optical determination of the amount of stratum corneum removed by tape stripping.

    PubMed

    Lademann, J; Ilgevicius, A; Zurbau, O; Liess, H D; Schanzer, S; Weigmann, H J; Antoniou, C; Pelchrzim, R V; Sterry, W

    2006-01-01

    Tape stripping is a standard measuring method for the investigation of the dermatopharmacokinetics of topically applied substances using adhesive films. These tape strips are successively applied and removed from the skin after application and penetration of topically applied substances. Thus, layers of corneocytes and some amount of topical applied substances are removed. The amount of substances and the amount of stratum corneum removed with a single tape strip has to be determined for the calculation of the penetration profile. The topically applied substances removed from the skin can be determined by classical analytical methods like high-pressure liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and spectroscopic measurements. The amount of corneocytes on the tape strips can be easily detected by their pseudoabsorption. In the present paper, an easy and cheap corneocyte density analyzer is presented that is based on a slide projector. Comparing the results of the measurements obtained by the corneocyte density analyzer and by uv-visible spectrometry, identical results were obtained.

  19. Experiments and FE modeling of stress-strain state in ReBCO tape under tensile, torsional and transverse load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, K.; Yagotintsev, K. A.; Zhou, C.; Gao, P.; Kosse, J.; Otten, S. J.; Wessel, W. A. J.; Haugan, T. J.; van der Laan, D. C.; Nijhuis, A.

    2015-05-01

    For high current superconductors in high magnet fields with currents in the order of 50 kA, single ReBCO coated conductors must be assembled in a cable. The geometry of such a cable is mostly such that combined torsion, axial and transverse loading states are anticipated in the tapes and tape joints. The resulting strain distribution, caused by different thermal contraction and electromagnetic forces, will affect the critical current of the tapes. Tape performance when subjected to torsion, tensile and transverse loading is the key to understanding limitations for the composite cable performance. The individual tape material components can be deformed, not only elastically but also plastically under these loads. A set of experimental setups, as well as a convenient and accurate method of stress-strain state modeling based on the finite element method have been developed. Systematic measurements on single ReBCO tapes are carried out combining axial tension and torsion as well as transverse loading. Then the behavior of a single tape subjected to the various applied loads is simulated in the model. This paper presents the results of experimental tests and detailed FE modeling of the 3D stress-strain state in a single ReBCO tape under different loads, taking into account the temperature dependence and the elastic-plastic properties of the tape materials, starting from the initial tape processing conditions during its manufacture up to magnet operating conditions. Furthermore a comparison of the simulations with experiments is presented with special attention for the critical force, the threshold where the tape performance becomes irreversibly degraded. We verified the influence of tape surface profile non-uniformity and copper stabilizer thickness on the critical force. The FE models appear to describe the tape experiments adequately and can thus be used as a solid basis for optimization of various cabling concepts.

  20. Gecko-Inspired Carbon Nanotube-Based Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Goyal, Anubha; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Nature has developed hierarchical hairy structure on the wall-climbing gecko's foot, consisting of microscopic hairs called setae, which further split into hundreds of smaller structures called spatulas. In the last five years, numerous attempts to mimic gecko foot-hair using polymer soft molding and photolithography methods have been reported. However, most of these polymer-based synthetic gecko hairs fall short of the clinging ability of geckos. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) have shown strong adhesion at nanometer scale. Here, we present our work on developing CNT-based macroscopic flexible tape mimicking the hierarchical structure found on gecko's foot. The synthetic gecko tape is made by transferring aligned CNT array onto flexible polymer tape. The unpatterned CNT-gecko tape can support a shear force stress similar to gecko foot (10 N/cm^2). The supported shear stress increase by a factor of four, when we use micro-patterned CNT patches (50 to 500 μm). We find that both setae (replicated by CNT bundles) and spatulas (individual CNT) are necessary to achieve large macroscopic shear adhesion. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  1. TReqS: The Tape REQuest Scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Jonathan; Gómez Casanova, Andrés

    2011-12-01

    TReqS is a new layer in the storage infrastructure at CCIN2P3 controlling the read operations for data stored on tapes in HPSS (a HSM) by centralizing all requests. The development and deployment of TReqS at CCIN2P3 has brought major advances in data access services on several aspects. First, by sorting and scheduling tape mounts, we radically reduce the waiting time due to media movements in the tape library. Second, in a mutualised environment where tape drives are globally available to all users, TReqS ensures the fair share of the drives. Finaly, TReqS softens the impact of unpredictable grid jobs and transfers on the actual tape library and efficiently masks the data access complexity to the end user.

  2. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of surgical dressing without a disinfectant. The device is used to cover and protect wounds, to hold together the skin edges of a wound, to support an injured part of the body, or to secure objects to...

  4. Adhesion of novel high-performance polymers to carbon fibers: Fiber surface treatment, characterization, and microbond single fiber pull-out test. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Heisey, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    The adhesion of carbon fibers to several high performance polymers, including a phosphorus-containing bismaleimite, a cyanate ester resin, and a pyridine-containing thermoplastic, was evaluated using the microbond single fiber pull-out test. The objective was to determine the chemical and mechanical properties of the fiber and the polymer which affect the fiber/polymer adhesion in a given composite system. Fiber/matrix adhesion is of interest since the degree of adhesion and the nature of the fiber/matrix interphase has a major influence on the mechanical properties of a composite. The surface chemical composition, topography, tensile strength, and surface energy of untreated AU-4 and commercially surface treated AS-4 carbon fibers were evaluated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), single fiber tensile tests, and dynamic contact angle analysis. The commercial surface treatment which converted the AU-4 to the AS-4 fiber oxidized the carbon fiber surface. The surface of the AS-4 carbon fiber was further modified using air, oxygen, ammonia, and ethylene plasmas. The AS-4 fiber tow was also characterized following exposure to the aqueous poly(amic acid) solution used to disperse the matrix powder during aqueous suspension prepregging of thermoplastic matrix composites. The air and oxygen plasma treatments significantly oxidized and roughened the surface of the AS-4 carbon fibers. In addition, the air and oxygen plasma increased the polar component of the AS-4 fiber surface energy. The ammonia plasma increased the concentration of nitrogen on the fiber surface, without significantly altering the fiber topography (at a magnification of 50,000X). The atomic oxygen present in the air and oxygen plasma treatments is capable of reacting with both the edge and basal planes in the carbon fiber structure. As a result, the oxygen-containing plasmas progressively ablated the organic material in the carbon fiber surface.

  5. Tape transfer sectioning of tissue microarrays introduces nonspecific immunohistochemical staining artifacts.

    PubMed

    Catchpoole, D; Mackie, N; McIver, S; Chetcuti, A; Henwood, A; Graf, N; Arbuckle, S

    2011-12-01

    Tissue microarrays place tens to hundreds of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue cores into a paraffin block in a systematic grid pattern that permits their simultaneous evaluation in a single section. The fragmented nature of the tissue cores often makes sectioning of tissue microarrays difficult so that the resulting disks of tissue lose their shape, fracture or fall out of the paraffin section altogether. We have evaluated an alternative sectioning protocol for stabilizing the tissue microarray surface by placing an adhesive tape "window" over the face of the paraffin block prior to sectioning. Once sectioned, the tape/sections are transferred directly onto coated microscope slides, thereby avoiding routine floating of sections on a water bath. After sectioning with either the tape transfer or standard protocols, slides were stained either using hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemistry using antibodies to S-100 protein and the tissue specific antigens, keratin (AE1/3) and the leukocyte common antigen CD45. We found that the tape method produced thicker sections that were darker and more densely packed with loss of tissue definition compared to sections prepared using water bath flotation. Quantitative image analysis of immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the tape method produced a higher incidence of nonspecific staining, which raised the potential for false positive staining.

  6. Mechanical stabilization of BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.G.; Grey, D.A.; Mantone, A.

    1996-12-31

    A system to provide mechanical stabilization to high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape by laminating 0.081 mm thick, spring hard, copper foil to both sides with lead-tin eutectic solder has been successfully optimized. This system has been applied as a method to create a strong, windable composite from pure silver BSCCO tapes with a minimum of critical current (I{sub c}) degradation. The {open_quotes}as received{close_quotes} conductor is evaluated for physical consistency of width and thickness over the 3000 meters that were later strengthened, insulated and wound into a demonstration coil. Electrical degradation in the strengthened tape as a result of lamination was found to average 24 percent with a range from 4 to 51 percent. This was less than the degradation that would have occurred in an unstrengthened tape during subsequent insulation and coil winding processes. Additional work was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the strengthened tapes. The copper can double the ultimate tensile strength of the pure silver tapes. Additionally, pure silver and dispersion strengthened silver matrix tapes are laminated with 0.025 mm thick copper and 304 stainless steel foil to investigate minimization of the cross sectional area of the strengthening component. The stainless steel can increase the UTS of the pure silver tapes sixfold. Metallography is used to examine the laminate and the conductor. Mechanical properties and critical currents of these tapes are also reported both before and after strengthening. The I{sub c} is also measured as a function of strain on the laminated tapes.

  7. Demonstration project cuts red tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Results from a demonstration project aimed at cutting red tape in federal grants for basic research at universities are "very encouraging" so far, according to Don I. Phillips, executive director of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. The roundtable is coordinating the experimental effort, with the participation of five major federal agencies as well as the Florida state university system and the University of Miami (a private institution in Coral Gables, Fla.).Under the project, special conditions apply to grants from the participating agencies to individual researchers at the participating universities: Investigators do not have to ask the agency's permission for changes in budget allocations, purchases of permanent equipment, or foreign travel. Grant money can be spent up to a year after the grant ends without a special request. Under this plan, researchers, with agency approval, can also ask to have their entire research program covered as a single administrative entity, rather than as several individual projects.

  8. Goddard Space Flight Center specification for Helical-Scan 8-millimeter (mm) magnetic digital data tape cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1992-01-01

    The same kind of standard and controls are established that are currently in use for the procurement of new analog, digital, and IBM/IBM compatible 3480 tape cartridges, and 1 in wide channel video magnetic tapes. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) maintains a Qualified Products List (QPL) for the procurement of new magnetic media and uses the following specifications for the QPL and Acceptance Tests: (1) NASA TM-79724 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new analog magnetic tapes; (2) NASA TM-80599 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new digital magnetic tapes; (3) NASA TM-100702 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new IBM/IBM compatible 3840 magnetic tape cartridges; and (4) NASA TM-100712 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new 1 in wide channel video magnetic tapes. This document will be used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new Helical Scan 8 mm digital data tape cartridges.

  9. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females.

  10. Adhesive-based bonding technique for PDMS microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C Shea; Abate, Adam R

    2013-02-21

    We present a simple and inexpensive technique for bonding PDMS microfluidic devices. The technique uses only adhesive tape and an oven; plasma bonders and cleanroom facilities are not required. It also produces channels that are immediately hydrophobic, allowing formation of aqueous-in-oil emulsions.

  11. Compilation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for 2024 and 7075 aluminum, Ti-6Al-4V titanium, and 300M steel. Volume 1: Description of data and data storage on magnetic tape. Volume 2: Data tape (7-track magnetic tape)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. C.; Reynolds, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Fatigue, fatigue-crack-propagation, and fracture data compiled and stored on magnetic tape are documented. Data for 202 and 7075 aluminum alloys, Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, and 300M steel are included in the compilation. Approximately 4,500 fatigue, 6,500 fatigue-crack-propagation, and 1,500 fracture data points are stored on magnetic tape. Descriptions of the data, an index to the data on the magnetic tape, information on data storage format on the tape, a listing of all data source references, and abstracts of other pertinent test information from each data source reference are included.

  12. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  13. The effect of kinesio taping in forward bending of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping(®) technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping(®) influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility.

  14. Modular glass chip system measuring the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal cells--application and drug testing with sodium valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Koester, Philipp Julian; Buehler, Sebastian Moritz; Stubbe, Marco; Tautorat, Carsten; Niendorf, Mathias; Baumann, Werner; Gimsa, Jan

    2010-06-21

    We developed a modular neurochip system by combining a small (16x16 mm2) glass neurochip (GNC) with a homemade head stage and commercial data acquisition hardware and software. The system is designed for the detection of the electric activity of cultivated nerve or muscle cells by a 52-microelectrode array (MEA). In parallel, cell adhesion can be registered from the electric impedance of an interdigitated electrode structure (IDES). The GNC was tested with various cell lines and primary cells. It is fully autoclavable and re-useable. Murine embryonic primary cells were used as a model system to correlate the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal networks in a drug test with sodium valproic acid. The test showed the advantage of the parallel IDES and MEA measurements, i.e. the parallel detection of cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects. Toxic exposure of the cells during neuronal network formation allows for the characterization of developmental neurotoxic effects even at drug concentrations below the EC50-value for acute neurotoxic effects. At high drug concentrations, the degree of cytotoxic damage can still be assessed from the IDES data in the event that no electric activity develops. The GNC provides optimal cell culture conditions for up to months in combination with full microscopic observability. The 4'' glass wafer technology allows for a high precision of the GNC structures and an economic production of our new system that can be applied in general and developmental toxicity tests as well as in the search for neuro-active compounds.

  15. High-Density-Tape Casting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Centrifuge packs solids from slurry into uniform, dense layer. New system produces tapes of nearly theoretical packing density. Centrifugal system used to cast thin tapes for capacitors, fuel cells, and filters. Cylindrical rotary casting chamber mounted on high-speed bearings and connected to motor. Liquid for vapor-pressure control and casting slurry introduced from syringes through rotary seal. During drying step, liquid and vapor vented through feed tubes or other openings. Laminated tapes produced by adding more syringes to cast additional layers of different materials.

  16. Kinesio Taping Fundamentals for the Equine Athlete.

    PubMed

    Molle, Sybille

    2016-04-01

    The Kinesio taping method was developed in Japan for use in humans in 1979. The use of complementary therapies is becoming common in equine athletes and the discovery of Kinesio taping potential brought it into the animal world. Kinesio taping can be used to treat a wide range of clinical conditions, from tendon injuries to neurologic disorders and from muscle contractures to postural insufficiencies. Its use in veterinary medicine is promising, but relies heavily on evidence-based clinical reports. Further scientific research is needed to fully understand the real effectiveness of application. PMID:26898963

  17. Evaluation of 230 kV HPFF pipe-type cable with wrinkled and creased insulating tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Seman, G.W.; Katz, C.; Pancholi, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    Severe collapse wrinkles and circumferential creases were discovered in the cellulose paper insulating tapes of a newly installed IIPFF pipe-type cable during splicing and terminating. An evaluation program was developed to assess the electrical and mechanical integrity of the cable having wrinkled and creased insulating tapes. The test results indicated that the cable would perform satisfactorily in service.

  18. Immediate Effects of Kinesiology Taping of Quadriceps on Motor Performance after Muscle Fatigued Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ick Keun; Kim, You Lim; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this cross-sectional single-blind study was to investigate the immediate effects of Kinesiology taping of quadriceps on motor performance after muscle fatigued induction. Design. Randomized controlled cross-sectional design. Subjects. Forty-five subjects participated in this study. Participants were divided into three groups: Kinesiology taping group, placebo taping group, and nontaping group. Methods. Subjects performed short-term exercise for muscle fatigued induction, followed by the application of each intervention. Peak torque test, one-leg single hop test, active joint position sense test, and one-leg static balance test were carried out before and after the intervention. Results. Peak torque and single-leg hopping distance were significantly increased when Kinesiology taping was applied (p < 0.05). But there were no significant effects on active joint position sense and single-leg static balance. Conclusions. We proved that Kinesiology taping is effective in restoring muscle power reduced after muscle fatigued induction. Therefore, we suggest that Kinesiology taping is beneficial for fatigued muscles. PMID:26246835

  19. Immediate Effects of Kinesiology Taping of Quadriceps on Motor Performance after Muscle Fatigued Induction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ick Keun; Kim, You Lim; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this cross-sectional single-blind study was to investigate the immediate effects of Kinesiology taping of quadriceps on motor performance after muscle fatigued induction. Design. Randomized controlled cross-sectional design. Subjects. Forty-five subjects participated in this study. Participants were divided into three groups: Kinesiology taping group, placebo taping group, and nontaping group. Methods. Subjects performed short-term exercise for muscle fatigued induction, followed by the application of each intervention. Peak torque test, one-leg single hop test, active joint position sense test, and one-leg static balance test were carried out before and after the intervention. Results. Peak torque and single-leg hopping distance were significantly increased when Kinesiology taping was applied (p < 0.05). But there were no significant effects on active joint position sense and single-leg static balance. Conclusions. We proved that Kinesiology taping is effective in restoring muscle power reduced after muscle fatigued induction. Therefore, we suggest that Kinesiology taping is beneficial for fatigued muscles.

  20. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  1. Micromechanical testing of the dentin hybrid zone formed by all-in-one adhesive system in sound human dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koytchev, E.; Datcheva, M.; Iankov, R.

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the spatial variations in mechanical behavior of the dentin hybrid layer formed by a single step (one bottle) dentin adhesive system. Objective. The objectives were to: (1) evaluate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid zone formed by a single sep dentin adhesive system using nanoindentation technique, (2) compare the indentation moduli (EIT) and indentation hardness (HIT) of human dentin and the hybrid zone, and (3) assess the importance of specimen hydration on the nanoindentation response. Methods. Specimens of human dentin, treated with commercial single step resin adhesive and restored with composite material were evaluated using a nanoindenter in a load-displacement control mode. The load and displacement responses were used to perform nanoindentation characterization of dentin and the hybrid layer and estimate EIT and HIT, using Oliver & Pharr approximation method. Results. In hydrated state, EIT for dentin and hybrid layer were 18.214 ± 1.30 GPa and 12.535 ± 0.19 GPa respectively. For HIT, also in hydrated state, the values in dentin and hybrid layer were 0.56 ± 0.06 GPa and 0.36 ± 0.005 GPa respectively. Viscoelastic deformation of the dentin hybrid zone exceeded that occuring in regions of uniform dentin tissue. The load displacement curves of the two zones were also estimated and analyzed. They generally follow the same pattern without any noticeable pop-ins or irregularities. Significance. The microstructure and hydration play critical roles on the mechanical behavior of the hybrid layer and nanoindentation provides a potent measurment tool for identifying the spatial variations.

  2. Positively-charged reduced graphene oxide as an adhesion promoter for preparing a highly-stable silver nanowire film.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qijun; Lee, Seong Jun; Kang, Hyungseok; Gim, Yuseong; Park, Ho Seok; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-21

    An ultrathin conductive adhesion promoter using positively charged reduced graphene oxide (rGO-NH3(+)) has been demonstrated for preparing highly stable silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes (AgNW TCEs). The adhesion promoter rGO-NH3(+), spray coated between the substrate and AgNWs, significantly enhances the chemical and mechanical stabilities of the AgNW TCEs. Besides, the ultrathin thickness of the rGO-NH3(+) ensures excellent optical transparency and mechanical flexibility for TCEs. The AgNW films prepared using the adhesion promoter are extremely stable under harsh conditions, including ultrasonication in a variety of solvents, 3M Scotch tape detachment test, mechanical bending up to 0.3% strain, or fatigue over 1000 cycles. The greatly enhanced adhesion force is attributed to the ionic interactions between the positively charged protonated amine groups in rGO-NH3(+) and the negatively charged hydroxo- and oxo-groups on the AgNWs. The positively charged GO-NH3(+) and commercial polycationic polymer (poly allylamine hydrochloride) are also prepared as adhesion promoters for comparison with rGO-NH3(+). Notably, the closely packed hexagonal atomic structure of rGO offers better barrier properties to water permeation and demonstrates promising utility in durable waterproof electronics. This work offers a simple method to prepare high-quality TCEs and is believed to have great potential application in flexible waterproof electronics. PMID:25807039

  3. Effect Of Molecular Weight On Adhesive Properties Of The Phenylethynyl-Terminated Polyimide LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    Future civilian aircraft will require the use of advanced adhesive systems with high temperature capabilities. One such material has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, a phenylethynyl-terminated polyimide given the designation LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5. Recent work has shown the advantages of similar phenylethynyl-terminated polyimides as films, moldings, adhesives, and composite matrix resins. Phenylethynyl-terminated oligomers provide greater processing windows than materials which incorporate simple ethynyl endcaps. Since these low molecular weight, low melt viscosity oligomers thermally cure without the evolution of volatile by-products, they provide an excellent means of producing polymers with high glass transition temperatures, excellent solvent resistance, and high mechanical properties. Three different versions of LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5 with theoretical number average molecular weights (M(sub n)s) of 250, 5000, and 10000 g/mol were synthesized in this work. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements were performed on the dry powder form of these materials to establish cure conditions which result in high glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)s). Lap shear specimens were prepared from adhesive tape made from each material and with the thermal cure conditions determined from the DSC data. The tensile shear data established processing conditions which provided the best adhesive strengths. Further testing was performed to establish the properties of LARC(sup TM)-PETI-5 as an adhesive material and to determine its solvent resistance.

  4. Video Tape and the Mentally Retarded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbord, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    Three uses of video tape recordings with the mentally retarded; discussed briefly are staff training or teacher education, parental involvement in the child's education, and therapeutic uses by psychiatrists and psychologists. (CB)

  5. User's guide and tape specification for ERB 7 DELMAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, P.; Penn, L.

    1985-01-01

    Guidance is provided to the DELMAT user in the areas of purpose, use and limitations of DELMAT tapes and software. The DELMAT tape specifications is also provided. The ERB-7, ERB MAT and tape characteristics applicable to the DELMAT tapes are also summarized.

  6. Educational Uses of Cartridge Tapes. Dissemination Document No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, S. Joseph

    Tape cartridges for use by special education teachers are analyzed according to design, effective use, and availability. Basic operating principles of cassette and continuous loop tape cartridges are described and illustrated. Advantages of tape cartridges are indicated, such as the following: the position is saved on tape during student timeouts,…

  7. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  8. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  9. Read/write head for a magnetic tape device having grooves for reducing tape floating

    DOEpatents

    Aoki, Kenji

    2005-08-09

    A read/write head for a magnetic tape includes an elongated chip assembly and a tape running surface formed in the longitudinal direction of the chip assembly. A pair of substantially spaced parallel read/write gap lines for supporting read/write elements extend longitudinally along the tape running surface of the chip assembly. Also, at least one groove is formed on the tape running surface on both sides of each of the read/write gap lines and extends substantially parallel to the read/write gap lines.

  10. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  11. Getting a charge out of transparent tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Randal

    2000-01-01

    When two pieces of transparent tape are placed on top of each other (sticky side to nonsticky side) and then separated, it is observed that one piece becomes negatively charged and the other positively charged. The sign of the charge on each piece depends on the brand of tape used. This phenomenon is frequently used to investigate the properties of charge and charged objects in introductory physics courses.

  12. Cyclic deformation and nano-contact adhesion of MEMS nano-bridges by in-situ TEM nanomechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, A. J.; Bobji, M. S.; Bunyan, R. J. T.; Inkson, B. J.

    2010-07-01

    MEMS nano-bridges fabricated by FIB have been deformed in-situ in the TEM. The polysilicon bridges show high levels of flexibility but also, at increased indentation depths, residual plastic deformation after fully unloading the bridges. Here, a significant number of cycles were applied to the centre of a bridge by a W-probe. This resulted in the formation of an adhesive contact with the W-probe. On unloading the nano-bridge regained its original shape and then deformed upwards, adhered to the W-probe. A significant high tensile force of -17μN was required to sever the nano-contact. Analysis of the W-probe and polysilicon nano-bridge indicate that carbon migration along the W-probe and local contact heating due to the associated fatigue cycles were responsible for the adhesive bond, with initial carbon contamination layer on the W-probe of 2nm, thickening during the loading cycles to 25nm.

  13. Magnetic tape recorder for long operating life in space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahm, E. J.; Hoffman, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    Magnetic tape recorders have long been used on satellites and spacecraft for onboard storage of large quantities of data. As satellites enter into commercial service, long operating life at high reliability becomes important. Also, the presently planned long-duration space flights to the outer planets require long-life tape recorders. Past satellite tape recorders have achieved a less than satisfactory performance record and the operating life of other spacecraft tape recorders has been relatively short and unpredictable. Most failures have resulted from malfunctions of the mechanical tape transport. Recent advances in electric motors and static memories have allowed the development of a new tape recorder which uses a very simple tape transport with few possible failure modes. It consists only of two brushless dc motors, two tape guides, and the recording heads. Relatively low tape tension, wide torque capability, and precise speed control facilitate design for mechanical reliability to match that of tape-recorder electronics.

  14. Simulated Space Environment Effects on the Blocking Force of Silicone Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeder, Paul; Mikatarian, Ron; Koontz, Steve; Albyn, Keith; Finckenor, Miria

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays utilize MD-944 diode tape to protect the underlying diodes in the solar array panel circuit and also provide thermal conditioning and mechanical support. The diode tape consists of silicone pressure sensitive adhesive (Dow Coming QC-7725) with a protective Kapton over-layer. On-orbit, the Kapton over-layer will erode under exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) and the underlying exposed silicone adhesive will ultimately convert, under additional AO exposure, to a glass like silicate. The current operational plan is to retract ISS solar array P6 and leave it stored under load for a long duration (6 months or more) during ISS assembly. With the Kapton over-layer eroded away, the exposed silicone adhesive must not cause the solar array to stick to itself or cause the solar array to fail during redeployment. Previous testing by Lockheed-Martin Space Systems (LMSS) characterized silicone blocking following exposure to low energy atomic oxygen (AO) in an asher facility, but this is believed to be conservative. An additional series of tests was performed by the Environmental Effects Group at MSFC under direction from the ISS Program Office Environments Team. This test series included high energy AO (5 eV), near ultraviolet (NUV) radiation and ionizing radiation, singly and in combination. Additional samples were exposed to thermal energy AO (<0.1 ev) for comparison to the LMSS tests. Diode tape samples were exposed to each environment constituent individually, put under preload for seven days and then the resulting blocking force was measured using a tensile machine. Additional samples were exposed to AO, NUV and electrons in series and then put under long term (three to ten months) preload to determine the effect of preload duration on the resulting blocking force of the silicone-to-silicone bond. Test results indicate that high energy AO, ultraviolet radiation and electron ionizing radiation exposure all reduce the blocking

  15. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted. PMID:23777376

  16. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  17. Fabrication of Polyimide-Matrix/Carbon and Boron-Fiber Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    process. The multilayer tape is then heated to imidize the matrix material and remove most of the remaining solvent, and is pressed to consolidate the multiple layers into a dense tape. For tests, specimens of HYCARB tapes and laminated composite panels made from HYCARB tape were prepared as follows: HYCARB tapes were fabricated as described above. Each panel was made by laying down ten layers of tape, containing, variously, one, two, or three boron-fiber plies and the remainder carbon- fiber-only plies (see figure). Each panel was made by laying down ten layers of tape. Each panel was then cured by heating to a temperature of 225 C for 15 minutes, then pressing at 200 psi (A1.4 MPa) while heating to 371 C, holding at 371 C for 1 hour, then continuing to hold pressure during cooling. Control specimens that were otherwise identical except that they did not contain boron fibers also were prepared. In room-temperature flexural tests, the HYCARB specimens performed comparably to the control specimens; in room-temperature, open-hole compression tests, the HYCARB specimens performed slightly better, by amounts that increased with boron content.

  18. Strategy for robot motion and path planning in robot taping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qilong; Chen, I.-Ming; Lembono, Teguh Santoso; Landén, Simon Nelson; Malmgren, Victor

    2016-06-01

    Covering objects with masking tapes is a common process for surface protection in processes like spray painting, plasma spraying, shot peening, etc. Manual taping is tedious and takes a lot of effort of the workers. The taping process is a special process which requires correct surface covering strategy and proper attachment of the masking tape for an efficient surface protection. We have introduced an automatic robot taping system consisting of a robot manipulator, a rotating platform, a 3D scanner and specially designed taping end-effectors. This paper mainly talks about the surface covering strategies for different classes of geometries. The methods and corresponding taping tools are introduced for taping of following classes of surfaces: Cylindrical/extended surfaces, freeform surfaces with no grooves, surfaces with grooves, and rotational symmetrical surfaces. A collision avoidance algorithm is introduced for the robot taping manipulation. With further improvements on segmenting surfaces of taping parts and tape cutting mechanisms, such taping solution with the taping tool and the taping methodology can be combined as a very useful and practical taping package to assist humans in this tedious and time costly work.

  19. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  20. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  1. Stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (approximately 10.8 N/cm(2)) and shear adhesion (approximately 14.7 N/cm(2)) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of approximately 3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of approximately 0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  2. Krytox Lubrication Tape Study. [fluorinated lubricating oil for video tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of Krytox, a fluorinated oil, as a tape surface lubricant was studied for a wideband video tape recorder. In spite of the 5 to 1 head wear reduction credited to the surface lubricant, the resultant head life fell short of the 1500 hour goal.

  3. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm. PMID:27313372

  4. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm.

  5. STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 4 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape'. This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage from flight days 10 through 12 of STS-110. The spacecrew includes Michael J. Bloomfield, Commander; Stephen N. Frick, Pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist; Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist; Ellen Ochoa, Mission Specialist; Lee M.E. Morin, Mission Specialist; Rex J. Walheim, Mission Specialist. Flight day 10 includes an exchange of farewells with the Expedition 4 crew (Yury I. Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel W. Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl E. Walz, Flight Engineer) of the International Space Station (ISS), and undocking. The video includes many views of the ISS as Atlantis departs, including cloud cover and the Earth's limb as backgrounds. There is also a view of Atlantis with its payload bay open. On flight day 11, in preparation for landing, the crew conducts a checkout of flight controls and a test firing. A spaceborne wheat plant experiment onboard the ISS is briefly shown. Flight day 12 includes closing the payload bay, suit-up, and landing. Kennedy Space Center is seen from the air, and the video shows landing replays, as well as a heads-up display view of the landing. Earth views include clear views of Western Sahara, Morocco, Mauritania, and Algeria, with the Atlantic Ocean, a cloud obstructed view of Newfoundland and the Atlantic, Pacific Ocean sun glint, and an excellent view of the Chicago area and Lake Michigan at night. The activities from other flights days can be seen on "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002137575), "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137573), and "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002137574).

  6. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  7. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations.

  8. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  9. Effects of gluteal kinesio-taping on performance with respect to fatigue in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Strutzenberger, Gerda; Moore, Joseph; Griffiths, Hywel; Schwameder, Hermann; Irwin, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio-tape(®) has been suggested to increase blood circulation and lymph flow and might influence the muscle's ability to maintain strength during fatigue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of gluteal Kinesio-tape(®) on lower limb muscle strength in non-fatigued and fatigued conditions. A total of 10 male rugby union players performed 20-m sprint and vertical jump tests before and after a rugby-specific fatigue protocol. The 20-m sprint time was collected using light gates (SMARTSPEED). A 9-camera motion analysis system (VICON, 100 Hz) and a force plate (Kistler, 1000 Hz) measured the kinematics and kinetics during a counter movement jump and drop-jump. The effect of tape and fatigue on jump height, maximal vertical ground reaction force, reactivity strength index as well as lower limb joint work were analysed via a two-way analysis of variance. The fatigue protocol resulted in significantly decreased performance of sprint time, jump heights and alterations in joint work. No statistical differences were found between the taped and un-taped conditions in non-fatigued and fatigued situation as well as in the interaction with fatigue. Therefore, taping the gluteal muscle does not influence the leg explosive strength after fatiguing in healthy rugby players. PMID:25647686

  10. Evaluation of a strengthening and insulation system for high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.; Mantone, A.; Herd, K.; Laskaris, T.

    1995-12-31

    Recent advances in BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape quality and length have led to demonstration programs for coil performance. The conductors in these coils need to be insulated without damage to the superconducting properties. A paper insulation process developed at the General Electric Company (GE) for low temperature superconducting Nb{sub 3}Sn tape has been modified to provide the same insulation system to high temperature (HTS) superconducting tapes, such as BSCCO-2223. In this paper, we report on the insulation process and its effect on the tape performance. Several long lengths of conductor have been tested, unwound, insulated and retested to examine any degradation issues. Additionally, it is known that HTS materials are inherently weak in relation to the winding and handling stresses in a manufacturing environment. A system to provide mechanical stabilization to Nb{sub 3}Sn tape through a lamination process has been successfully applied to high temperature superconductors as a method to build a strong, windable composite. The system is described and mechanical and electrical properties of the strengthened tapes are discussed.

  11. Effects of gluteal kinesio-taping on performance with respect to fatigue in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Strutzenberger, Gerda; Moore, Joseph; Griffiths, Hywel; Schwameder, Hermann; Irwin, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio-tape(®) has been suggested to increase blood circulation and lymph flow and might influence the muscle's ability to maintain strength during fatigue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of gluteal Kinesio-tape(®) on lower limb muscle strength in non-fatigued and fatigued conditions. A total of 10 male rugby union players performed 20-m sprint and vertical jump tests before and after a rugby-specific fatigue protocol. The 20-m sprint time was collected using light gates (SMARTSPEED). A 9-camera motion analysis system (VICON, 100 Hz) and a force plate (Kistler, 1000 Hz) measured the kinematics and kinetics during a counter movement jump and drop-jump. The effect of tape and fatigue on jump height, maximal vertical ground reaction force, reactivity strength index as well as lower limb joint work were analysed via a two-way analysis of variance. The fatigue protocol resulted in significantly decreased performance of sprint time, jump heights and alterations in joint work. No statistical differences were found between the taped and un-taped conditions in non-fatigued and fatigued situation as well as in the interaction with fatigue. Therefore, taping the gluteal muscle does not influence the leg explosive strength after fatiguing in healthy rugby players.

  12. Pressure Sensitive Tape in the Manufacture of Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champneys, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ATK Launch Systems Inc. manufactures the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) for NASA's Space Shuttle program. They are used in pairs to launch the Space Shuttle. Pressure sensitive tape (PST) is used throughout the RSRM manufacturing process. A few PST functions are: 1) Secure labels; 2) Provide security seals; and 3) Protect tooling and flight hardware during various inert and live operations. Some of the PSTs used are: Cloth, Paper, Reinforced Teflon, Double face, Masking, and Vinyl. Factors given consideration for determining the type of tape to be used are: 1) Ability to hold fast; 2) Ability to release easily; 3) Ability to endure abuse; 4) Strength; and 5) Absence of adhesive residue after removal.

  13. Using magnetic tape technology for data migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Therrien, David; Cheung, Yim-Ling

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic tape and optical disk library units (jukeboxes) are satisfying the demand for high-capacity cost-effective storage. The choice between optical disk and magnetic tape technology must take into account the cost limitations as well as the performance and reliability requirements of the user environment. Library units require data management software in order to function in an automated and user-transparent way. The most common data management applications are backup and recovery, data migration, and archiving. The medium access patterns that these applications create will be described. Since the most user visible application is data migration, a queue simulator was developed to model its performance against a variety of library units. The major subject of this paper is the design and implementation of this simulator as well as some simulation results. The relative cost and reliability of magnetic tape versus optical disk library units is presented for completeness.

  14. Digital optical tape: Technology and standardization issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1996-01-01

    During the coming years, digital data storage technologies will continue an aggressive growth to satisfy the user's need for higher storage capacities, higher data transfer rates and long-term archival media properties. Digital optical tape is a promising technology to satisfy these user's needs. As any emerging data storage technology, the industry faces many technological and standardization challenges. The technological challenges are great, but feasible to overcome. Although it is too early to consider formal industry standards, the optical tape industry has decided to work together by initiating prestandardization efforts that may lead in the future to formal voluntary industry standards. This paper will discuss current industry optical tape drive developments and the types of standards that will be required for the technology. The status of current industry prestandardization efforts will also be discussed.

  15. Catalog of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Meteorological Tape Library

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    This report gives a complete inventory of the data tapes in the ORNL Meteorological Tape Library (OMTL). The attributes of each tape, including location of the weather station (city and state), station number, standard data format, dates covered, data set name(s), and job control language considerations (record format, record length, blocksize, tape label, and tape density), are listed for each tape. In addition, a description of some of the special characteristics of each of the available standard meteorological data formats is presented.

  16. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  17. Investigation of package sealing using organic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic study was performed to evaluate the suitability of adhesives for sealing hybrid packages. Selected adhesives were screened on the basis of their ability to seal gold-plated Kovar butterfly-type packages that retain their seal integrity after individual exposures to increasingly severe temperature-humidity environments. Tests were also run using thermal shock, temperature cycling, mechanical shock and temperature aging. The four best adhesives were determined and further tested in a 60 C/98% RH environment and continuously monitored in regard to moisture content. Results are given, however, none of the tested adhesives passed all the tests.

  18. Identification of a null allele in genetic tests for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency in Pakistani Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, Fozia; Malik, Naveed A; Qureshi, Javed A; Raadsma, Herman W; Tammen, Imke

    2012-12-01

    Two clinically healthy mature Pakistani Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle were genotyped as homozygous affected for the lethal immunodeficiency disorder bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) using previously described PCR-RFLP based DNA tests which was confirmed by sequencing. Sequencing of Bos taurus and B. indicus × B. taurus genomic DNA surrounding the disease causing mutation (c.383A > G) in the ITGB2 gene identified numerous variations in exonic and intronic regions within and between species, including substantial variation in primer annealing sites for three PCR-RFLP tests for one of the B. indicus allelic variants. These variations in the primer annealing sites resulted in a null allele in the DNA tests causing the misdiagnosis of some heterozygous B. taurus × B. indicus cattle to be classified as homozygous affected. New primers were designed and a modified test was developed which simultaneously identified the disease mutation and the Pakistani B. indicus allelic variant associated with the null allele in the previous test. PMID:22374219

  19. Textured substrate tape and devices thereof

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2006-08-08

    A method for forming a sharply biaxially textured substrate, such as a single crystal substrate, includes the steps of providing a deformed metal substrate, followed by heating above the secondary recrystallization temperature of the deformed substrate, and controlling the secondary recrystallization texture by either using thermal gradients and/or seeding. The seed is selected to shave a stable texture below a predetermined temperature. The sharply biaxially textured substrate can be formed as a tape having a length of 1 km, or more. Epitaxial articles can be formed from the tapes to include an epitaxial electromagnetically active layer. The electromagnetically active layer can be a superconducting layer.

  20. Surface modification of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering and correlation with cell adhesion and proliferation in in vitro tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rossokha, I.; Donkov, N.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The effect was analyzed of surface treatment by argon ions on the surface properties of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. The structural parameters of the as-deposited coatings were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction profiles and X-ray photoelectron spectra were also acquired. The total surface free energy (SFE), the polar, dispersion parts and fractional polarities, were estimated by the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaeble method. The adhesive and proliferative potentials of bone marrow cells were evaluated for both Ta2O5 coatings and Ta2O5 coatings deposited by simultaneous bombardment by argon ions in in vitro tests.

  1. Tape-Drop Transient Model for In-Situ Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    Composite parts of nonuniform thickness can be fabricated by in-situ automated tape placement (ATP) if the tape can be started and stopped at interior points of the part instead of always at its edges. This technique is termed start/stop-on-the-part, or, alternatively, tape-add/tape-drop. The resulting thermal transients need to be managed in order to achieve net shape and maintain uniform interlaminar weld strength and crystallinity. Starting-on-the-part has been treated previously. This paper continues the study with a thermal analysis of stopping-on-the-part. The thermal source is switched off when the trailing end of the tape enters the nip region of the laydown/consolidation head. The thermal transient is determined by a Fourier-Laplace transform solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent thermal transport equation. This solution requires that the Peclet number Pe (the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transport) be independent of time and much greater than 1. Plotted isotherms show that the trailing tape-end cools more rapidly than the downstream portions of tape. This cooling can weaken the bond near the tape end; however the length of the affected region is found to be less than 2 mm. To achieve net shape, the consolidation head must continue to move after cut-off until the temperature on the weld interface decreases to the glass transition temperature. The time and elapsed distance for this condition to occur are computed for the Langley ATP robot applying PEEK/carbon fiber composite tape and for two upgrades in robot performance. The elapsed distance after cut-off ranges from about 1 mm for the present robot to about 1 cm for the second upgrade.

  2. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  3. Arch-Taping Techniques for Altering Navicular Height and Plantar Pressures During Activity

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Tim; Simon, Janet; Docherty, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    Context Arch tapings have been used to support the arch by increasing navicular height. Few researchers have studied navicular height and plantar pressures after physical activity. Objective To determine if taping techniques effectively support the arch during exercise. Design Crossover study. Setting Athletic training research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twenty-five individuals (13 men, 12 women; age = 20.0 ± 1.0 years, height = 172.3 ± 6.6 cm, mass = 70.1 ± 10.2 kg) with a navicular drop of more than 8 mm (12.9 ± 3.3 mm) volunteered. Intervention(s) All individuals participated in 3 days of testing, with 1 day for each tape condition: no tape, low dye, and navicular sling. On each testing day, navicular height and plantar pressures were measured at 5 intervals: baseline; posttape; and after 5, 10, and 15 minutes of running. The order of tape condition was counterbalanced. Main Outcome Measure(s) The dependent variables were navicular height in millimeters and plantar pressures in kilopascals. Plantar pressures were divided into 5 regions: medial forefoot, lateral forefoot, lateral midfoot, lateral rearfoot, and medial rearfoot. Separate repeated-measures analyses of variance were conducted for each dependent variable. Results Navicular height was higher immediately after application of the navicular-sling condition (P = .004) but was reduced after 5 minutes of treadmill running (P = .12). We observed no differences from baseline to posttape for navicular height for the low-dye (P = .30) and no-tape conditions (P = .25). Both the low-dye and navicular-sling conditions increased plantar pressures in the lateral midfoot region compared with the no-tape condition. The low-dye condition created decreased pressure in the medial and lateral forefoot regions compared with the no-tape condition. All changes were identified immediately after application and were maintained during running. No changes were noted in plantar pressures for the no-tape

  4. Design and fabrication of an integrated bonding system for tape processing of slapper detonator cables

    SciTech Connect

    Schurman, W.R.

    1986-08-15

    A unique bonding system was designed and built as an addition to the other reel-to-reel processing equipment in the Tape Process Laboratory at Mound. This bonder supports an in-house flexible circuit manufacturing capability which has been established by Mound's Tape Processing Group. This bonder, like most of the equipment in the Tape Process Laboratory, was designed and built to Mound's specifications. This bonding system integrates into one machine all operations necessary to prepare, bond, and test the joint between a flexible printed circuit cable and an etched (copper/Kapton) bridge. Design specifications were established for all operations (cable cleaning, assembly, bonding, resistance testing, vacuum stress test, and closed circuit TV inspection). The design concepts used for the design of the Integrated Bonding System provided for the bonding of different detonator cables and bridge designs with minimal tooling changes. 16 figs.

  5. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzińska, Gabriela; Marczyński, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT-p < 0.001, KT-p < 0.001, and sham-p < 0.01). The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs. PMID:26491458

  6. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzińska, Gabriela; Marczyński, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT—p < 0.001, KT—p < 0.001, and sham—p < 0.01). The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs. PMID:26491458

  7. High Voltage Breakdown, Partial Discharge and Aging in Lapped Tape Insulated Cold Dielectric Model Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Pace, M. O.; Ellis, A. R.; Muller, A. C.

    2004-06-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables generally follow either of two generic designs, cold dielectric and warm dielectric. In the cold dielectric design, lapped tape insulation and liquid nitrogen are used in combination to provide the electrical insulation between the conductor and the ground shield of an HTS cable. Lapped tape insulated model cables have been tested at high voltage, including AC breakdown, negative impulse breakdown, partial discharge, and long term aging under AC stress. Tapes tested include Cryoflex™ (a proprietary tape developed by Southwire) and PPLP® (a commercial semi synthetic tape). Two high voltage cryostats have been built for short and long term aging studies that permit testing of model cables under the combined conditions of high electric stress, cryogenic temperature and elevated pressures up to 15 bar. For the aging studies, a log-log plot of electric stress versus time-to-breakdown has yielded an estimate of cable lifetime. Since aging at cryogenic temperatures is not expected to have a thermal cause, dielectric wear in HTS cables reduces to partial discharge as the primary aging mechanism. Phase and amplitude resolved partial discharge data of model cables in liquid nitrogen will be presented.

  8. Prophylactic ankle bracing vs. taping: effects on functional performance in female basketball players.

    PubMed

    MacKean, L C; Bell, G; Burnham, R S

    1995-08-01

    Ankle support devices are commonly used for prevention and treatment of ankle injury, but the effect of these on sport performance has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different ankle support devices on four basketball-related performance tests. Eleven female basketball players underwent four performance tests (vertical jump, jump shot, sprint drill, and submaximal treadmill run) while wearing five different types of ankle support on both ankles (no support, tape, Swede-O-Universal, Active Ankle, and Aircast). Ankle support effect on overall performance was assessed using Friedman's analysis of variance (ANOVA) by ranks and on specific performance parameters using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures. Overall performance was impaired by ankle support. The Active Ankle brace impaired performance the least out of the support devices. Vertical jump was less with ankle tape as compared with no tape (p < .05), whereas jump shot accuracy was better with tape as compared with the Swede-O-Universal (p < .05). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and energy expenditure were higher with the Aircast as compared with tape (p < .05). It was concluded that the use of ankle support by female basketball players does adversely affect basketball-related performance tests, and the prophylactic benefit of bracing needs to be weighed against performance impairment.

  9. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  10. Immediate Effects of Lumbopelvic Manipulation and Lateral Gluteal Kinesio Taping on Unilateral Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph; Westrick, Richard; Diebal, Angela; Marks, Christopher; Gerber, J. Parry

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the immediate effects of Kinesio taping directed to the hip and manipulation directed to the lumbopelvic region in individuals with unilateral patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Background: PFPS affects up to 25% of the general population. Despite the high prevalence, this condition is not clearly understood, as evidenced by the numerous proposed causes and recommended treatments. Notwithstanding, recent evidence suggests that treatments directed at the hip or spine may lead to beneficial results. Methods: A convenience sample of 18 participants (12 men and 6 women, 19.5 ± 1.15 years old) with unilateral PFPS was recruited. Participants were randomized by sex to 1 of 3 groups: Kinesio taping, manipulation, and control taping. The main outcome measures included the Y-balance test, squatting range of motion (ROM), and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Results: Compared with the lumbopelvic manipulation and control groups, those in the Kinesio taping group performed significantly better on the Y-balance test (F = 5.59, P = 0.02) and with squatting ROM (F = 3.93, P = 0.04). The Kinesio taping and lumbopelvic groups were also significantly better than the control (sham) group with double-leg squatting ROM performance 3 days later. Conclusion: Kinesio taping may facilitate gluteus medius activation and improve postural stability and a double-leg squat. Clinical Relevance: The improvement in affected limb reach and double-leg squatting ROM highlights the potential for Kinesio taping to improve gluteus medius activation. Lumbopelvic manipulation may also immediately improve rehabilitation programs for PFPS. PMID:24427391

  11. Critical current degradation behaviour of GdBCO CC tapes in pure torsion and combined tension-torsion modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorospe, Alking; Bautista, Zhierwinjay; Shin, Hyung-Seop

    2016-10-01

    Coated conductor (CC) tapes utilized in high-current-density superconducting cables are commonly subjected to different loading modes, primarily torsion and tension especially in the case of twisted stacked-tape cable. Torsion load can occur due to twisting along the length or when winding the CC tapes around a former, while tension load can occur due to pre-tension when coiled and as a hoop stress when the coil is energized. In this study, electromechanical properties of single CC tapes under torsion load were investigated using a new test apparatus. The results could provide basic information for cable designers to fully characterize stacked cables. Copper-electroplated and brass-laminated CC tapes fabricated with different deposition techniques were subjected to pure torsion and combined tension-torsion loading. The critical current, I c degradation behaviours of CC tapes under torsional deformation were examined. Also, the effect of further external lamination on the I c degradation behaviour of the CC tapes under such loading conditions was investigated. In the case of the combined tension-torsion test, short samples were subjected to twist pitches of 200 mm and 100 mm. Critical parameters including reversible axial stress and strain in such twist pitch conditions were also investigated.

  12. The Mulligan ankle taping does not affect balance performance in healthy subjects: a prospective, randomized blinded trial

    PubMed Central

    de-la-Morena, Jose Maria Delfa; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel Maria; Molina-Rueda, Francisco; Ramiro-González, Maria; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of Mulligan fibular taping on static and dynamic postural balance in healthy subjects using computerized dynamic posturography (CDP). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four volunteers (26 males and 18 females) aged 21 ±2 years participated in the study. The Mulligan tape was applied by a specialist in this technique. The placebo group received a treatment with a similar tape but with several cuts to avoid the fibular repositioning effect produced by Mulligan tape. Main outcome measures: The Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and the Motor Control Test (MCT) were performed by each subject at baseline and after the interventions. Outcome measures included equilibrium and strategy scores from each trial and condition of the SOT, and speed of reaction (latency period) from the MCT. [Results] Mulligan ankle taping did not have an impact on postural control during static and dynamic balance in subjects with healthy ankles when compared with placebo taping. [Conclusion] There was no difference in, equilibrium and strategy (SOT) and speed of reaction (MCT) in any of the subjects in this study. Therefore, this study suggests that Mulligan ankle taping does not have an impact on balance in healthy subjects. PMID:26157271

  13. Tape It Yourself: Videotapes for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebsworth, Miriam Eistein; Feknous, Barbara; Loyet, Dianne; Zimmerman, Spencer

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a series of videotapes of ESL classes for a pre-service teacher education program grounded in experiential learning theory. The videos included footage of ESL classrooms, and tapes edited and supplemented with interviews of ESL teachers. Our experience demonstrates that-with relatively low…

  14. Idea Bank: Duct Tape Note Twister

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Molly

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how she observed a middle school math teacher deliver a miserable class. She realized that she did the same thing to her music students. To engage her students, she developed "Note Twister," a music reading game using duct tape to form musical notes and the basic premise behind the game, "Twister." She finds…

  15. "Space slitter" for film or tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Device cuts film or tape into strips by guiding film in channel under cutting blades. Device is operated by lifting pressure bar to insert blades into film. Film is then pulled through blades. Cutter has potential uses in advertising, commercial art, and publishing fields.

  16. Tape Lessons to Accompany Intermediate Nepali Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Manindra K.

    These tape lessons follow the sequence of the intermediate Nepali Reader. There are 12 lessons each containing various types of exercises designed to increase listening, speaking, and reading skills. Each lesson contains the following types of exercises: (1) listening comprehension; (2) question answering; (3) repetition; and (4) multiple choice…

  17. Distanced Data: Transcribing Other People's Research Tapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Susan A.; Powick, Kelly D.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we report on our qualitative study involving eight individuals hired to transcribe research tapes in university contexts. We consider issues of data analysis and data trustworthiness and the implications for both when transcription is assigned to someone other than the researcher. We explore the challenges transcribers faced…

  18. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  19. Melt processing of Yb-123 tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Athur, S. P.; Balachandran, U.; Salama, K.

    2000-02-17

    The innovation of a simple, scalable process for manufacturing long-length conductors of HTS is essential to potential commercial applications such as power cables, magnets, and transformers. In this paper the authors demonstrate that melt processing of Yb-123 tapes made by the PIT route is an alternative to the coated conductor and Bi-2223 PIT tape fabrication techniques. Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes were fabricated by groove rolling and subsequently, melt processed in different oxygen partial pressures in a zone-melting furnace with a gradient of 140 C/cm. The transition temperatures measured were found to be around 81 K undermost processing conditions. EPMA of the tapes processed under different conditions show the 123 phase to be Ba deficient and Cu and Yb rich. Critical current was measured at various temperatures from 77 K to 4.2 K. The J{sub c} increased with decrease in pO{sub 2}. The highest I{sub c} obtained was 52 A at 4.2 K.

  20. A Tape-Lecture Course in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, P.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the possibility of using audio-tapes for self-study courses in technical colleges. This article presents: (1) description of the electrochemistry course taught; (2) results of the assessment of student reaction to the course; and (3) conclusions. (HM)

  1. Heat reflecting tape for thermoelectric converter

    DOEpatents

    Purdy, David L.

    1977-01-01

    Threads are interlaced with thermoelectric wires to provide a woven cloth in tape form, there being an intermediate layer of heat radiation reflecting material (e.g., aluminum foil) insulated electrically from said wires, which are of opposite thermoelectric polarity and connected as a plurality of thermocouples.

  2. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  3. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone.

  4. Inconsistencies in tape read and tape write programs on the I-100 image analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocutt, W. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The tape read and write programs currently available on the 1-100 perform their intended functions of reading and writing tapes, but are difficult to use because they contain a number of inconsistencies. These inconsistencies can often be overcome by the use of work-around procedures and by trial and error, which is an inefficient use of expensive computer systems that should not be necessary.

  5. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section 870.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2800 Medical magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record...

  7. Full tape thickness feature conductors for EMI structures

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Knudson, Richard T.; Smith, Frank R.; Barner, Gregory

    2014-06-10

    Generally annular full tape thickness conductors are formed in single or multiple tape layers, and then stacked to produce an annular solid conductive wall for enclosing an electromagnetic isolation cavity. The conductors may be formed using punch and fill operations, or by flowing conductor-containing material onto the tape edge surfaces that define the interior sidewalls of the cavity.

  8. STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Tape 1 of 4. Part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This video gives an overview of the first four flight days of the STS-102 mission through a compilation of footage from each day. The crew of STS-102 (Commander James Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly, and Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards) and the Expedition 2 crew (Commander Yuriy Usachev and Flight Engineers James Voss and Susan Helms) are seen during the ceremonial breakfast, suitup, and as they board Discovery. The orbiter's launch is seen from several different viewpoints, and various in-flight activities are shown, such as the opening of Discovery's payload bay doors, Helms preparing for the 'H-Reflex Experiment: Effects of Microgravity on the Spine', the rendezvous and docking of Discovery with the International Space Station (ISS), and Helms and Voss preparing for and performing their spacewalks. The crew of STS-102 and both Expedition crews (E1 crew William Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko, and Sergei Krikalev) are seen in the Destiny Laboratory Module. Activities for flight day five can be seen on 'STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Part 1 of 2, Tape 2 of 2' (internal ID 2001096941). Flight days 6-14 activities can be seen on 'STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2, Tape 1 of 2' (internal ID 2001096943) and 'STS-102 Mission Highlight Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2, Tape 2 of 2' (internal ID 2001096940).

  9. A batch fabricated biomimetic dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northen, Michael T.; Turner, Kimberly L.

    2005-08-01

    The fine hair adhesive system found in nature is capable of reversibly adhering to just about any surface. This dry adhesive, best demonstrated in the pad of the gecko, makes use of a multilevel conformal structure to greatly increase inelastic surface contact, enhancing short range interactions and producing significant amounts of attractive forces. Recent work has attempted to reproduce and test the terminal submicrometre 'hairs' of the system. Here we report the first batch fabricated multi-scale conformal system to mimic nature's dry adhesive. The approach makes use of massively parallel MEMS processing technology to produce 20-150 µm platforms, supported by single slender pillars, and coated with ~2 µm long, ~200 nm diameter, organic looking polymer nanorods, or 'organorods'. To characterize the structures a new mesoscale nanoindenter adhesion test technique has been developed. Experiments indicate significantly improved adhesion with the multiscale system. Additional processing caused a hydrophilic to hydrophobic transformation of the surface and testing indicated further improvement in adhesion.

  10. Taping patients with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome: the design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder problems are a common complaint of the musculoskeletal system. Physical therapists treat these patients with different modalities such as exercise, massage, and shoulder taping. Although different techniques have been described, the effectiveness of taping has not yet been established. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of usual physical therapy care in combination with a particular tape technique for subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder compared to usual physical therapy care without this tape technique in a primary healthcare setting. Methods and design An economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) as assessed by physical therapists will be recruited. Eligible patients will be randomized to either the intervention group (usual care in combination with the particular tape technique) or the control group (usual care without this tape technique). In both groups, usual care will consist of individualized physical therapy care. The primary outcomes will be shoulder-specific function (the Simple Shoulder Test) and pain severity (11-point numerical rating scale). The economic evaluation will be performed using a societal perspective. All relevant costs will be registered using cost diaries. Utilities (Quality Adjusted Life Years) will be measured using the EuroQol. The data will be collected at baseline, and 4, 12, and 26 weeks follow-up. Discussion This pragmatic study will provide information about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of taping in patients presenting with clinical signs of SAIS. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2575 PMID:21849055

  11. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  12. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  13. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials, a review in 3 parts. Part 1: Approval requirements and standardized testing of composite materials according to ISO specifications.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this three-part review on the relevance of laboratory testing of composites and adhesives deals with approval requirements for composite materials. We compare the in vivo and in vitro literature data and discuss the relevance of in vitro analyses. The standardized ISO protocols are presented, with a focus on the evaluation of physical parameters. These tests all have a standardized protocol that describes the entire test set-up. The tests analyse flexural strength, depth of cure, susceptibility to ambient light, color stability, water sorption and solubility, and radiopacity. Some tests have a clinical correlation. A high flexural strength, for instance, decreases the risk of fractures of the marginal ridge in posterior restorations and incisal edge build-ups of restored anterior teeth. Other tests do not have a clinical correlation or the threshold values are too low, which results in an approval of materials that show inferior clinical properties (e.g., radiopacity). It is advantageous to know the test set-ups and the ideal threshold values to correctly interpret the material data. Overall, however, laboratory assessment alone cannot ensure the clinical success of a product.

  14. Design guidelines for hybrid microcircuits; organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were studied to acquire an adequate information base to generate a guideline document for the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specific areas covered include: (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives; (2) effects of long term aging at 150C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives; (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics; (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive; (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters; (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives; and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  15. Comanche Helmet-Mounted Display Heading-Tape Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turpin, Terry; Dowell, Susan; Atencio, Adolph

    2006-01-01

    The Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AMRDEC) conducted a simulation to assess the performance associated with a Contact Analog, world-referenced heading tape as implemented on the Comanche Helmet Integrated Display Sight System (HIDSS) when compared with a Compressed heading tape similar to that specified by the former Military Standard (MIL-STD) 1295. Six experienced pilots flew three modified Aeronautical Design Standards (ADS)-33 maneuvers (Hover Turn, Bob-up, Transient Turn) and a precision traffic pattern in the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Analysis of the pilot objective performance data and subjective handling qualities ratings (HQRs) showed the following: Compressed symbology in the Velocity Stabilization (VelStab) flight mode generally produced the most precise performances over Contact Analog symbology with respect to the heading, altitude, position, and time criteria specified for the maneuvers tested. VelStab outperformed the Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) on all maneuvers achieving desired performance on most maneuvers for both symbol sets. Performance in the AFCS mode was generally desirable to adequate for heading and altitude and did not meet adequate standards for hover position and time for the Hover Turn and Bob-up maneuvers. VelStab and AFCS performance were nearly the same for the Transient Turn. Pilot comments concerning the Contact Analog heading-tape implementation were generally unfavorable in spite of the achieved levels of performance. HQRs showed Compressed symbology in the VelStab flight mode produced the lowest mean HQR, encompassing mixed ratings of satisfactory handling and needing improvement. All other symbology/flight-mode combinations yielded higher HQRs, which characterized opinions that deficiencies in aircraft handling due to HMD symbology would need improvement. Contact Analog heading tape and other symbology require improvement, especially when operating in the AFCS mode. NASA-TLX rated Compressed symbology

  16. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    DOE PAGES

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasmamore » facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.« less

  17. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasma facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.

  18. Evaluation of a metering, mixing, and dispensing system for mixing polysulfide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Kurt B.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate whether a metered mixing system can mix PR-1221 polysulfide adhesive as well as or better than batch-mixed adhesive; also, to evaluate the quality of meter-mixed PR-1860 and PS-875 polysulfide adhesives. These adhesives are candidate replacements for PR-1221 which will not be manufactured in the future. The following material properties were evaluated: peel strength, specific gravity and adhesive components of mixed adhesives, Shore A hardness, tensile adhesion strength, and flow rate. Finally, a visual test called the butterfly test was performed to observe for bubbles and unmixed adhesive. The results of these tests are reported and discussed.

  19. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  20. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  1. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved. PMID:12776092

  2. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 5 through 7. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139357), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). On flight day 5, the transfer and installation of a Power and Data Grapple Fixture onto the P6 Truss during an EVA (extravehicular activity) is shown. The relocation of micrometeorite debris shields is also shown. Canadarm 2 is used to move the Mobile Base System near the Mobile Transporter on the ISS Destiny Module. The capture of the Mobile Base System takes place on flight day 6, along with a crew transfer ceremony on board the ISS. The video includes a view of the South Pacific just before dawn, and the Endeavour crew answers questions from the public.

  3. Software Computes Tape-Casting Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    2003-01-01

    Tcast2 is a FORTRAN computer program that accelerates the setup of a process in which a slurry containing metal particles and a polymeric binder is cast, to a thickness regulated by a doctor blade, onto fibers wound on a rotating drum to make a green precursor of a metal-matrix/fiber composite tape. Before Tcast2, setup parameters were determined by trial and error in time-consuming multiple iterations of the process. In Tcast2, the fiber architecture in the final composite is expressed in terms of the lateral distance between fibers and the thickness-wise distance between fibers in adjacent plies. The lateral distance is controlled via the manner of winding. The interply spacing is controlled via the characteristics of the slurry and the doctor-blade height. When a new combination of fibers and slurry is first cast and dried to a green tape, the shrinkage from the wet to the green condition and a few other key parameters of the green tape are measured. These parameters are provided as input to Tcast2, which uses them to compute the doctor-blade height and fiber spacings needed to obtain the desired fiber architecture and fiber volume fraction in the final composite.

  4. Current Distribution in Wide YBCO Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, M.; Granados, X.; Amorós, J.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.

    The need of a better mechanical behaviour and the stabilization of coated conductors for applications, as Magnets, cables or Fault Current Limiters, has motivated the lamination of tapes with stainless steel or copper alloys, increasing so the elastic modulus of the conductors and their mechanical performance. Some of the stainless steels used are magnetic, thus introducing some perturbations of the current flow when energizing the conductor. In order to detect these possible perturbations, the magnetic self field in the surface of the tape has been explored by Hall mapping technique at several current loads in a monotonically driven cyclic sequence. By increasing current steps when loading up, crossing the critical field threshold, and decreasing down to remanent state. Deviation from the expected magnetic map has been observed. In this work, we will report on the resulting measurements, and the current flow is calculated by solving the inverse problem for a 12 mm wide stainless steel reinforced Coated Conductor tape. We discuss on the likely origin of the observed perturbations.

  5. Transaction aware tape-infrastructure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaidis, Fotios; Kruse, Daniele Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Administrating a large scale, multi protocol, hierarchical tape infrastructure like the CERN Advanced STORage manager (CASTOR)[2], which stores now 100 PB (with an increasing step of 25 PB per year), requires an adequate monitoring system for quick spotting of malfunctions, easier debugging and on demand report generation. The main challenges for such system are: to cope with CASTOR's log format diversity and its information scattered among several log files, the need for long term information archival, the strict reliability requirements and the group based GUI visualization. For this purpose, we have designed, developed and deployed a centralized system consisting of four independent layers: the Log Transfer layer for collecting log lines from all tape servers to a single aggregation server, the Data Mining layer for combining log data into transaction context, the Storage layer for archiving the resulting transactions and finally the Web UI layer for accessing the information. Having flexibility, extensibility and maintainability in mind, each layer is designed to work as a message broker for the next layer, providing a clean and generic interface while ensuring consistency, redundancy and ultimately fault tolerance. This system unifies information previously dispersed over several monitoring tools into a single user interface, using Splunk, which also allows us to provide information visualization based on access control lists (ACL). Since its deployment, it has been successfully used by CASTOR tape operators for quick overview of transactions, performance evaluation, malfunction detection and from managers for report generation.

  6. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 3 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 6 and 7. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). Flight day 6 features a very complicated EVA (extravehicular activity) to service the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Astronauts Grunsfeld and Linnehan replace the HST's power control unit, disconnecting and reconnecting 36 tiny connectors. The procedure includes the HST's first ever power down. The cleanup of spilled water from the coollant system in Grunsfeld's suit is shown. The pistol grip tool, and two other space tools are also shown. On flight day 7, Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA. They replace the HST's FOC (Faint Object Camera) with the ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys). The video ends with crew members playing in the shuttle's cabin with a model of the HST.

  7. Implication of complex vertebral malformation and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency DNA-based testing on disease frequency in the Holstein population.

    PubMed

    Schütz, E; Scharfenstein, M; Brenig, B

    2008-12-01

    Two inherited lethal disorders, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and complex vertebral malformation (CVM), play a major role in breeding of Holstein cattle. Both inherited diseases are based on single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been known for 12 and 7 yr, respectively. A total of 25,753 cattle were genotyped for BLAD (18,200 tests) and CVM (14,493 tests) in our laboratory since the beginning of the genotyping programs for these diseases. Based on founder effects, the CVM mutation is thought to be linked to milk production. The BLAD was genotyped using RFLP until 2001; then a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay on a LightCycler was used, as for CVM genotyping. By using single nucleotide polymorphism-aided breeding, the allelic frequency of the BLAD and CVM mutations in the active sire population was reduced from 9.4% in 1997 to 0.3% in 2007 (BLAD) and from 8.3% in 2002 to 2.3% in 2007 (CVM), with calculated half-life of the mutant allele of 2.1 yr for BLAD and 3.6 yr for CVM. An observed increase of BLAD frequency in 1999 could be attributed to the massive use of a BLAD-positive sire tested falsely negative in another laboratory. These data show that marker-assisted selection is capable of substantially reducing the frequency of a mutation within a period of not more than 5 yr. The different selection strategies against the lethal recessive allele in CVM and BLAD are reflected in the different reduction rates of the specific allele frequencies. PMID:19038961

  8. Kinesio taping in treatment and prevention of sports injuries: a meta-analysis of the evidence for its effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sean; Whatman, Chris; Hume, Patria A; Sheerin, Kelly

    2012-02-01

    Kinesio tape (KT) is an elastic therapeutic tape used for treating sports injuries and a variety of other disorders. Chiropractor, Dr Kenso Kase, developed KT taping techniques in the 1970s. It is claimed that KT supports injured muscles and joints and helps relieve pain by lifting the skin and allowing improved blood and lymph flow. The profile of KT rose after the tape was donated to 58 countries for use during the 2008 Olympic Games, and was seen on high-profile athletes. Practitioners are asking whether they should use KT over other elastic adhesive tapes. The aim of this review was to evaluate, using meta-analysis, the effectiveness of KT in the treatment and prevention of sports injuries. Electronic databases including SPORTDiscus, Scopus, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect and sports medicine websites were searched using keywords 'kinesio taping/tape'. From 97 articles, ten met the inclusion criteria (article reported data for effect of KT on a musculoskeletal outcome and had a control group) and were retained for meta-analyses. Magnitude-based inferences were used to assess clinical worth of positive outcomes reported in studies. Only two studies investigated sports-related injuries (shoulder impingement), and just one of these involved injured athletes. Studies attending to musculoskeletal outcomes in healthy participants were included on the basis that these outcomes may have implications for the prevention of sporting injuries. The efficacy of KT in pain relief was trivial given there were no clinically important results. There were inconsistent range-of-motion outcome results, with at least small beneficial results seen in two studies, but trivial results in two other studies across numerous joint measurements. There was a likely beneficial effect for proprioception regarding grip force sense error, but no positive outcome for ankle proprioception. Seven outcomes relating to strength were beneficial, although there were numerous trivial findings for quadriceps and

  9. ORRC/SAIL interface control document for SAIL OFT data tapes, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The formats for all orbital flight tests magnetic tape recordings produced in the Johnson Space Center Shuttle Avionics Laboratories which are required to be processed in the orbiter data reduction complex or by the mission control center network interference processor are described.

  10. Using nanostructured conductive carbon tape modified with bismuth as the disposable working electrode for stripping analysis in paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Zhang, Qing; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Xu, Jing-Juan; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2013-10-15

    Low cost disposable working electrodes are specifically desired for practical applications of electrochemical detection considering maturity of electrochemical stations and data collection protocols. In this paper double-sided conductive adhesive carbon tape with nanostructure was applied to fabricate disposable working electrodes. Being supported by indium tin oxide glass, the prepared carbon tape electrodes were coated with bismuth film for stripping analysis of heavy metal ions. By integrating the bismuth modified electrodes with paper-based analytical devices, we were able to differentiate Zn, Cd and Pb ions with the sample volume of around 15 μL. After the optimization of parameters, including modification of bismuth film and the area of the electrodes, etc., Pb ions could be measured in the linear range from 10 to 500 μg/L with the detection limit of 2 μg/L. Our experimental results revealed that the disposable modified electrodes could be used to quantify migrated lead from toys with the results agreed well with that using atomic absorption spectrometry. Although bismuth modification and stripping analysis could be influenced by the low conductivity of the carbon tape, the low cost disposable carbon tape electrodes take the advantages of large-scaled produced double-sided carbon tape, including its reproducible nanostructure and scaled-up fabrication process. In addition, the preparation of disposable electrodes avoids time-consuming pretreatment and experienced operation. This study implied that the carbon tape might be an alternative candidate for practical applications of electrochemical detection. PMID:24054585

  11. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  12. Mechanical properties of Hysol EA-9394 structural adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D.; Stavig, M.E.

    1995-02-01

    Dextor`s Hysol EA-9394 is a room temperature curable paste adhesive representative of the adhesives used in wind turbine blade joints. A mechanical testing program has been performed to characterize this adhesive. Tension, compression stress relaxation, flexural, butt tensile, and fracture toughness test results are reported.

  13. Software for Improved Extraction of Data From Tape Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chiu-Fu

    2002-01-01

    A computer program has been written to replace the original software of Racal Storeplex Delta tape recorders, which are still used at Stennis Space Center but have been discontinued by the manufacturer. Whereas the original software could be activated by a command-line interface only, the present software offers the option of a command-line or graphical user interface. The present software also offers the option of batch-file operation (activation by a file that contains command lines for operations performed consecutively). The present software is also more reliable than was the original software: The original software was plagued by several deficiencies that made it difficult to execute, modify, and test. In addition, when using the original software to extract data that had been recorded within specified intervals of time, the resolution with which one could control starting and stopping times was no finer than about a second (or, in some cases, several seconds). In contrast, the present software is capable of controlling playback times to within 1/100 second of times specified by the user, assuming that the tape-recorder clock is accurate to within 1/100 second.

  14. [Adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms].

    PubMed

    Gafiţanu, E; Matei, I; Mungiu, O C; Pavelescu, M; Mîndreci, I; Apostol, I; Ionescu, G

    1989-01-01

    The adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms aimed to local action release the drug substance in view of a dermatological, traumatological, antirheumatic, cosmetic action. Two such preparations were obtained and their stability, consistency and pH were determined. The "in vitro" tests of their bioavailability revealed the dynamics of calcium ions release according to the associations of each preparation. The bioavailability determined by evaluating the pharmacological response demonstrated the antiinflammatory action obtained by the association of calcium ions with the components extracted from poplar muds. The therapeutical efficiency of the studied preparations has proved in the treatment of some sport injuries.

  15. A Proposed Convention for Writing FITS Data Tapes: DRAFT 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSAT/ASCA/Xte Development Team

    Even with today's advances in networking, file system capacities and CD technology it is often necessary to transport and store scientific data sets on magnetic tape. The FITS data format standard contains guidelines on how to write FITS files to magnetic tape but does not address the problem of indexing or organizing tape files. Currently available magnetic tape media can store multiple gigabytes of information on a single tape, which translates into thousands of FITS files per tape. Thus, the lack of a standard tape indexing and organizing scheme can, in many instances, become a serious problem. Faced with the above dilemma, the Astrophysics Data Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a simple in-house convention for indexing the contents of FITS data tapes that allows software to quickly and easily inventory tape contents. This paper describes the convention used by our organization. We propose that this convention be adopted into the FITS standard as the way to index and organize the contents of magnetic tape media.

  16. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  17. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  18. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  19. Bi-2212/Ag tape conductor and coil development

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, G.W.; Leung, E.M.; Zhou, R.; Salazar, K.V.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents recent progress by Los Alamos National Laboratory/Superconductivity Technology Center (LANL/STC) and Lockheed Martin Corporation/Advanced Development Operations (LMQADO) Energy and Power Systems group to jointly develop and test high temperature superconductor coils for practical applications such as motors, generators, magnetic bearings, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), MAGLEV trains, or electrical inductors. Critical currents of 105 A/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in a Bi-2212/Ag tape conductor using a patented Ag addition process to improve core morphology and uniformity. Results of testing to measure key conductor parameters are presented along with design and analysis details of a general-purpose multi-layer HTS coil.

  20. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  1. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  2. Wet adhesion of buckypaper produced from oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on soft animal tissue.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Andrea; Carru, Giovanna A; D'Ilario, Lucio; Caprioli, Fabrizio; Chiaretti, Massimo; Crisante, Fernanda; Francolini, Iolanda; Piozzi, Antonella

    2013-05-22

    Buckypaper (BP) is the general definition of a macroscopic assembly of entangled carbon nanotubes. In this paper, a new property of a BP film produced from oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes was investigated. In particular, BP shows to be able to promptly and strongly adhere to animal internal soft and wet tissues, as evaluated by peeling and shear tests. BP adhesion strength is higher than that recorded for a commercial prosthetic fabric (sealed to the tissue by fibrin glue) and comparable with that of other reported optimized nanopatterned surfaces. In order to give an interpretation of the observed behavior, the BP composition, morphology, porosity, water wettability, and mechanical properties were analyzed by AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, wicking tests, contact angle, and stress-strain measurements. Although further investigations are needed to assess the biocompatibility and safety of the BP film used in this work, the obtained results pave the way for a possible future use of buckypaper as adhesive tape in abdominal prosthetic surgery. This would allow the substitution of conventional sealants or the reduction in the use of perforating fixation.

  3. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  4. Positively-charged reduced graphene oxide as an adhesion promoter for preparing a highly-stable silver nanowire film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qijun; Lee, Seong Jun; Kang, Hyungseok; Gim, Yuseong; Park, Ho Seok; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-01

    An ultrathin conductive adhesion promoter using positively charged reduced graphene oxide (rGO-NH3+) has been demonstrated for preparing highly stable silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes (AgNW TCEs). The adhesion promoter rGO-NH3+, spray coated between the substrate and AgNWs, significantly enhances the chemical and mechanical stabilities of the AgNW TCEs. Besides, the ultrathin thickness of the rGO-NH3+ ensures excellent optical transparency and mechanical flexibility for TCEs. The AgNW films prepared using the adhesion promoter are extremely stable under harsh conditions, including ultrasonication in a variety of solvents, 3M Scotch tape detachment test, mechanical bending up to 0.3% strain, or fatigue over 1000 cycles. The greatly enhanced adhesion force is attributed to the ionic interactions between the positively charged protonated amine groups in rGO-NH3+ and the negatively charged hydroxo- and oxo-groups on the AgNWs. The positively charged GO-NH3+ and commercial polycationic polymer (poly allylamine hydrochloride) are also prepared as adhesion promoters for comparison with rGO-NH3+. Notably, the closely packed hexagonal atomic structure of rGO offers better barrier properties to water permeation and demonstrates promising utility in durable waterproof electronics. This work offers a simple method to prepare high-quality TCEs and is believed to have great potential application in flexible waterproof electronics.An ultrathin conductive adhesion promoter using positively charged reduced graphene oxide (rGO-NH3+) has been demonstrated for preparing highly stable silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes (AgNW TCEs). The adhesion promoter rGO-NH3+, spray coated between the substrate and AgNWs, significantly enhances the chemical and mechanical stabilities of the AgNW TCEs. Besides, the ultrathin thickness of the rGO-NH3+ ensures excellent optical transparency and mechanical flexibility for TCEs. The AgNW films prepared using the adhesion

  5. Effects of Kinesio Taping versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chen, Fu-Chen; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life. PMID:26185517

  6. Effects of Kinesio Taping versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chen, Fu-Chen; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life. PMID:26185517

  7. Adhesion and friction in gecko toe attachment and detachment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Rosenberg, Kenny; Zhao, Boxin; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-12-19

    Geckos can run rapidly on walls and ceilings, requiring high friction forces (on walls) and adhesion forces (on ceilings), with typical step intervals of approximately 20 ms. The rapid switching between gecko foot attachment and detachment is analyzed theoretically based on a tape model that incorporates the adhesion and friction forces originating from the van der Waals forces between the submicron-sized spatulae and the substrate, which are controlled by the (macroscopic) actions of the gecko toes. The pulling force of a spatula along its shaft with an angle between theta 0 and 90 degrees to the substrate, has a "normal adhesion force" contribution, produced at the spatula-substrate bifurcation zone, and a "lateral friction force" contribution from the part of spatula still in contact with the substrate. High net friction and adhesion forces on the whole gecko are obtained by rolling down and gripping the toes inward to realize small pulling angles between the large number of spatulae in contact with the substrate. To detach, the high adhesion/friction is rapidly reduced to a very low value by rolling the toes upward and backward, which, mediated by the lever function of the setal shaft, peels the spatulae off perpendicularly from the substrates. By these mechanisms, both the adhesion and friction forces of geckos can be changed over three orders of magnitude, allowing for the swift attachment and detachment during gecko motion. The results have obvious implications for the fabrication of dry adhesives and robotic systems inspired by the gecko's locomotion mechanism.

  8. A gecko-inspired double-sided adhesive.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-12-21

    Geckos' outstanding abilities to adhere to various surfaces are widely credited to the large actual contact areas of the fibrillar and hierarchical structures on their feet. These special features regulate the essential structural compliance for every attachment and thus provide robust yet reversible adhesions. Inspired by gecko's feet and our commonly used double-faced tape, we have successfully fabricated a gecko-inspired double-sided dry adhesive by using porous anodic alumina template assisted nano-wetting on a stiff polymer. It was determined that the obtained 2-sided structure showed largely decreased effective stiffness compared with its 1-sided counterpart, which favored better compliance and interfacial integrity. We also demonstrated that the repeatable double-sided adhesive improved the macroscopic normal and shear adhesion capacities over the widely-studied 1-side structure by ~50% and ~85%, respectively. By using the synthetic double-sided adhesive, the usage of traditional pressure-sensitive/chemical adhesives could be well avoided. Besides, the double-sided nanostructures showed great potential in finding new interesting properties and practical applications for the synthetic dry adhesives.

  9. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  10. Influences of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer and thermal performance characteristics in laminar and turbulent tube flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eiamsa-ard, Smith; Seemawute, Panida; Wongcharee, Khwanchit

    2010-09-15

    Effects of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor characteristics in a round tube were investigated. Nine different peripherally-cut twisted tapes with constant twist ratio (y/W = 3.0) and different three tape depth ratios (DR = d/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33), each with three different tape width ratios (WR = w/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33) were tested. Besides, one typical twisted tape was also tested for comparison. The measurement of heat transfer rate was conducted under uniform heat flux condition while that of friction factor was performed under isothermal condition. Tests were performed with Reynolds number in a range from 1000 to 20,000, using water as a working fluid. The experimental results revealed that both heat transfer rate and friction factor in the tube equipped with the peripherally-cut twisted tapes were significantly higher than those in the tube fitted with the typical twisted tape and plain tube, especially in the laminar flow regime. The higher turbulence intensity of fluid in the vicinity of the tube wall generated by the peripherally-cut twisted tape compared to that induced by the typical twisted tape is referred as the main reason for achieved results. The obtained results also demonstrated that as the depth ratio increased and width ratio decreased, the heat transfer enhancement increased. Over the range investigated, the peripherally-cut twisted tape enhanced heat transfer rates in term of Nusselt numbers up to 2.6 times (turbulent regime) and 12.8 times (laminar regime) of that in the plain tube. These corresponded to the maximum performance factors of 1.29 (turbulent regime) and 4.88 (laminar regime). (author)

  11. Star Catalogs on Punched Cards and Magnetic Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berbert, J. H.

    1961-01-01

    In connection with the calibration of the Minitrack satellite tracking stations, the Goddard Space Flight Center has had the contents of a number of star catalogs put on punched cards and magnetic tape. This report discusses the plate data reduction procedures, briefly describes the information on the punched cards and magnetic tape, and calls attention to other applications of the card and tape star catalogs. The Goddard Space Flight Center has offered to prepare duplicate catalogs for qualified organizations.

  12. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-07-09

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  13. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-07-24

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  14. Printed-Circuit Tape Measures For X-Ray Inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Known pattern impressed on x-ray image for reference. Tapes made by flexible-printed-circuit technology provides identification and position references for x-ray images of weld joints. Proposed tapes consist of etched copper patterns on flexible substrates. X-rays record pattern of tape on film beneath butt-welded panels. Pattern becomes convenient reference for analysis and digitization of x-ray image.

  15. Getting in Taped, Part I and Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundy, H. M.; Higgins, J.

    1971-01-01

    This article is in two parts: discussion of mathematical concepts involved in converting the reading from the tape-recorder counter which counts the turns of the run-off spool to that from the counter which counts turns of the take-up spool; calculating the length of tape run off when given the reading from the tape-recorder counter of the run-off…

  16. GSFC specification electronic data processing magnetic recording tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinari, D. F.; Perry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design requirements are given for magnetic oxide coated, electronic data processing tape, wound on reels. Magnetic recording tape types covered by this specification are intended for use on digital tape transports using the Non-Return-to-Zero-change-on-ones (NRZI) recording method for recording densities up to and including 800 characters per inch (cpi) and the Phase-Encoding (PE) recording method for a recording density of 1600 cpi.

  17. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 4 and 5. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The primary activities during these days were EVAs (extravehicular activities) to replace two solar arrays on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Footage from flight day 4 records an EVA by Grunsfeld and Linnehan, including their exit from Columbia's payload bay airlock, their stowing of the old HST starboard rigid array on the rigid array carrier in Columbia's payload bay, their attachment of the new array on HST, the installation of a new starboard diode box, and the unfolding of the new array. The pistol grip space tool used to fasten the old array in its new location is shown in use. The video also includes several shots of the HST with Earth in the background. On flight day 5 Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA to change the port side array and diode box on HST. This EVA is very similar to the one on flight day 4, and is covered similarly in the video. A hand operated ratchet is shown in use. In addition to a repeat of the previous tasks, the astronauts change HST's reaction wheel assembly, and because they are ahead of schedule, install installation and lubricate an instrument door on the telescope. The Earth views include a view of Egypt and Israel, with the Nile River, Red Sea, and Mediterranean Sea.

  18. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage of crew activities from flight days 8 through 12 of STS-109. The crew included: Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, Richard Linnehan, James Newman, Michael Massimino, Mission Speicalists. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476). The primary activity on flight day 8 was an EVA (extravehicular activity) by Grunsfeld and Linnehan to install a cryocooler and radiator for the NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer) on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Before returning to Columbia's airlock, the astronauts, with a cloudy background, hold onto the orbiter and offer their thoughts on the significance of their mission, the HST, and spaceflight. Footage from flight day 9 includes the grappling, unbearthing, and deployment of the HST from Columbia, and the crew coordinating and videotaping Columbia's departure. Flight day 10 was a relatively inactive day, and flight day 11 includes a checkout of Columbia's aerodynamic surfaces. Columbia landed on flight day 12, which is covered by footage of the crew members speaking during reentry, and their night landing, primarily shown through the orbiter's head-up display. The video includes numerous views of the HST, as well as views of the the Galapagos Islands, Madagascar, and Southern Africa with parts of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and part of the coast of Chile. The pistol grip space tool is shown in use, and the crew answers two messages from the public, including a message to Massimino from the Fire Department of New York.

  19. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 3. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The main activity recorded during flight day 1 is the liftoff of Columbia. Attention is given to suit-up, boarding, and pre-flight procedures. The pre-launch crew meal has no sound. The crew members often wave to the camera before liftoff. The jettisoning of the solid rocket boosters is shown, and the External Tank is seen as it falls to Earth, moving over African dunes in the background. There are liftoff replays, including one from inside the cockpit. The opening of the payload bay doors is seen from the rear of the shuttle's cockpit. The footage from flight day 2 shows the Flight Support System for bearthing the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Crew preparations for the bearthing are shown. Flight day 3 shows the tracking of and approach to the HST by Columbia, including orbital maneuvers, the capture of the HST, and its lowering onto the Flight Support System. Many views of the HST are shown, including one which reveals an ocean and cloud background as the HST retracts a solar array.

  20. Evaluation of the micro-shear bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin with and without adhesive area limitation.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Niu, Guangliang; Du, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding ability of four representative dentin-adhesive systems by applying the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) test method and to evaluate the influence of adhesive area limitation on the bond strength. Two different adhesive application methods were used in the μ-SBS test (with and without adhesives area limitation), and four representative adhesive systems were used in this study. Each dentin surface was treated with one of the four representative adhesive systems, and with twenty samples per group (n=20), each of the four groups underwent a μ-SBS test. The results showed that the bond strength was significantly influenced by the adhesive application method (p<0.05), the adhesive type (p<0.05) and the interaction between the two factors (p<0.05). With regard to the four representative dentin-adhesive systems, 3-E&R has a much better bond quality compared to the other adhesive systems. Furthermore, the micro-shear bond strength test method of restricting the area of both the adhesive and the resin is more reliable for evaluating the bonding property of adhesives to dentin, and it is also adequate for comparing the different adhesives systems. PMID:26406058

  1. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  2. Tape-cast sensors and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L.; Garzon, Fernando H.

    2009-08-18

    A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

  3. Electromechanical characterization of silver-clad BSCCO tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Salib, S.; Iyer, A. N.; Vipulanandan, C.; Salama, K.; Balachandran, U.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Houston

    1998-01-01

    During the fabrication of silver-clad BSCCO tapes they are subjected to stresses which could lead to degradation in their current transport property. In the present investigation, studies were made to evaluate the electromechanical characteristics of silver-clad BSCCO conductors. The tensile strain tolerance characteristics of the monofilament, multifilament and composite (15 and 30% of Ag powder by volume) tapes were evaluated at 77 K. The average irreversible strain of monofilament and composite tapes were 0.19 and 0.47%, respectively. No noticeable improvement in strain tolerance was observed with the multifilament tapes. Detailed phase and microstructural analysis have been conducted using scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Reel-to-reel substrate tape polishing system

    DOEpatents

    Selvamanickam, Venkat; Gardner, Michael T.; Judd, Raymond D.; Weloth, Martin; Qiao, Yunfei

    2005-06-21

    Disclosed is a reel-to-reel single-pass mechanical polishing system (100) suitable for polishing long lengths of metal substrate tape (124) used in the manufacture of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) coated tape, including multiple instantiations of a polishing station (114) in combination with a subsequent rinsing station (116) arranged along the axis of the metal substrate tape (124) that is translating between a payout spool (110a) and a take-up spool (110b). The metal substrate tape obtains a surface smoothness that is suitable for the subsequent deposition of a buffer layer.

  5. Contact Recording on Bidirectional Thin-Film Tape Head Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, George W.; Connolly, Derry; Czarnecki, W. Stanley

    A transversely slotted magnetic recording head for high density tape drives is characterized theoretically for geometry and experimentally for wear and durability under different environmental conditions, tape substrate thicknesses, recording head substrate materials, and wear resistant overcoat materials. The triple bump recording head structure, which allows read-after-write in both directions of tape motion, has transverse slots placed in the head to produce contact between the tape and the read/write gap locations. A through slot "video" style contour design is also presented and analyzed.

  6. Slide Tape. A Guide to the Production of Slide-Tape Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowatt, Robert W.

    Step by step instructions are provided for planning and executing a slide tape program, as well as diagrams of equipment for presenting such programs. Guidelines are given for ways to: (1) define a program's purpose and objectives, (2) complete a storyboard, (3) produce slides from transparencies and photographed artwork, (4) write on slides, (5)…

  7. Recording electrophysiological data on video tape: a superior and less costly alternative to conventional tape recorders.

    PubMed

    Chiang, R G; Knobloch, C A; Singleton, D M; Steel, C G; Davey, K G

    1985-10-01

    Electrical potentials recorded extracellularly from the sinus gland of the isopod, Oniscus asellus, were stored on video tape with the aid of a digital-audio (DA) processor and a video cassette recorder (VCR). The DA processor transforms the analog signal to digital pulses of equal amplitude and converts these pulses into a television signal for recording on video tape. In playback, the DA processor reconverts the pulses to an analog signal with negligible distortion. When viewed on the oscilloscope screen, electrical potentials reproduced by this method were indistinguishable from electrical potentials recorded 'live' from the sinus gland. However, electrical potentials recorded from the same sinus gland and reproduced by a conventional FM tape recorder were easily differentiated from the 'live' recording. The special effects inherent in the VCR (e.g. stop action, frame advance) also permitted detailed analysis of spontaneously occurring electrical potentials. Special effects were not possible with the FM tape recorder. The price, ease of operation and ability to produce extremely high quality recordings, makes the DA processor and VCR an exceptional system for storing electrophysiological data. PMID:4058060

  8. The effect of non-elastic taping on balance and gait function in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Chan-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the influence of exercise on balance ability and gait function in stroke patients after applying non-elastic tape, which can stabilize muscles and joints, to the lower extremities of the affected side. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 patients diagnosed with stroke. They were divided into an experimental group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 15). The experimental group performed mat and treadmill exercises three times a week for six weeks with non-elastic tape applied to the lower extremities of the affected side. The control group performed the same exercises but without taping. [Results] The intervention significantly improved Berg balance scale scores and timed up and go (TUG) test scores as well as reduced stance duration and stride duration in the experimental group. In the control group, statistically significant improvements were observed in TUG test scores. [Conclusion] Although some differences did not reach the level of statistical significance, the application of non-elastic tape stabilized the joints of the lower extremities, thereby increasing balance and reducing stance duration and one step duration, which resulted in a reduction of overall gait duration. PMID:26504310

  9. The Effect of Kinesio Taping in Forward Bending of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping® technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping® influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility. PMID:25276018

  10. A COMPARISON OF TWO TAPING TECHNIQUES (KINESIO AND MCCONNELL) AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN DURING FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Jenie; Dmochowska, Katarzyna; Scariah, Shiju; Varughese, Jincy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior knee pain is a clinical syndrome characterized by pain experienced perceived over the anterior aspect of the knee that can be aggravated by functional activities such as stair climbing and squatting. Two taping techniques commonly used for anterior knee pain in the clinic include the McConnell Taping Technique (MT) and the Kinesio Taping® Method (KT®). Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of KT® and the MT versus no tape in subjects with anterior knee pain during a squat lift and stair climbing. Design: Pretest‐ posttest design. Participants: A total of 20 subjects (15 female, 5 male) with unilateral anterior knee pain were recruited. The mean age of the subjects was 24 (+/–3) years, with a mean weight of 160 (+/–28) pounds. Methods: Each participant was tested during two functional activities; a squat lift with a weighted box (10% of his/her body weight, plus the weight [8.5 pounds] of the box) and stair climbing under three conditions: 1) no tape, 2) MT and 3) KT®. Pain levels were assessed (verbally) using the 0‐10 Numeric Pain Intensity Scale. Results: The median (interquartile range [IQR]) pain during squat lift was 2 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1) for KT®, and 0.5 (2) for McConnell, with no significant differences between the groups. During the stair activity the median (IQR) pain was 1.5 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1.75) for KT®, and 1 (1.75) for MT with a significant difference (p=0.024) between the groups. Further analysis determined that the only a significant difference was (p=0.034) between the no tape and the KT® conditions. Conclusion: The results of this study found that both the KT® and the MT may be effective in reducing pain during stair climbing activities. Level of Evidence: Level 2, Prospective Cohort study PMID:23593548

  11. Removal of adhesive wound dressing and its effects on the stratum corneum of the skin: comparison of eight different adhesive wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Imai, Ryutaro; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Gondo, Masahide; Shibata, Dai; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, adhesive wound dressings have been increasingly applied postoperatively because of their ease of use as they can be kept in place without having to cut and apply surgical tapes and they can cover a wound securely. However, if a wound dressing strongly adheres to the wound, a large amount of stratum corneum is removed from the newly formed epithelium or healthy periwound skin. Various types of adhesives are used on adhesive wound dressings and the extent of skin damage depends on how much an adhesive sticks to the wound or skin surface. We quantitatively determined and compared the amount of stratum corneum removed by eight different wound dressings including polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive, silicone-based adhesive dressing, composite hydrocolloid and self-adhesive polyurethane foam in healthy volunteers. The results showed that wound dressings with silicone adhesive and self-adhesive polyurethane foam removed less stratum corneum, whereas composite hydrocolloid and polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive removed more stratum corneum.

  12. Hierarchical pore structure of calcium phosphate scaffolds by a combination of gel-casting and multiple tape-casting methods.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Werner, J; Vallet-Regí, M

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work was to design hierarchical pore structure scaffolds with potential applications in bone tissue regeneration. For that purpose, a bioceramic material such as biphasic calcium phosphate, which consists of a mixture of hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate, was selected. Multilayer pieces (MLP) with hierarchical pore structure were developed employing a new technique that combines gel casting and adding porogens, using multiple tape-casting methods. Pieces with functionally graded porosity were fabricated using porogens with different sizes. The porogens used were Porlat K85 and Porlat K86 with diameters <150 microm and 150-300 microm, respectively. Two types of sintered tapes, with different porosity, no cracking and enough interconnection size were selected. MLP with hierarchical pore structure were designed by the multiple tape-casting method. Interconnected pores whose sizes increase from interior tapes (1.6-3.6 microm) towards exterior tapes (20-51.5 microm) and interpenetration between tapes were achieved. Delamination or cracking were not observed after heat treatment. The flexural strength of pieces was investigated by the three-point bending test. This new combination of methods offers the possibility of manufacturing scaffolds with interconnected pore sizes ranging from 1.6 to 51.5 microm.

  13. Kinesio Taping in Young Healthy Subjects Does Not Affect Postural Reflex Reactions and Anticipatory Postural Adjustments of the Trunk: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Voglar, Matej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic Kinesio Taping method is used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. Kinesio Taping might have some small clinically important beneficial effects on range of motion and strength but findings about the effects on proprioception and muscle activation are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to test if Kinesio Taping influences anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex reactions. To test the hypothesis twelve healthy young participants were recruited in randomized, participants blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study. In the experimental condition the tape was applied over the paravertebral muscles and in placebo condition sham application of the tape was done transversally over the lumbar region. Timing of anticipatory postural adjustments to fast voluntary arms movement and postural reflex reactions to sudden loading over the hands were measured by means of superficial electromyography before and one hour after each tape application. Results showed no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo taping conditions for any of the analyzed muscles in anticipatory postural adaptations (F1,11 < 0.23, p > 0.64, η2 < 0.04) or postural reflex reactions (F1,11 < 4.16, p > 0.07, η2 < 0.49). Anticipatory postural adjustments of erector spinae and multifidus muscles were initiated significantly earlier after application of taping (regardless of technique) compared to pre-taping (F1,11 = 5.02, p = 0.046, η2 = 0.31 and F1,11 = 6.18, p = 0.030, η2 = 0.36 for erector spinae and multifidus, respectively). Taping application over lumbar region has potential beneficial effects on timing of anticipatory postural adjustments regardless of application technique but no effect on postural reflex reactions in young pain free participants. Further research in patients with low back pain would be encouraged. Key Points Application of Kinesio Taping does not affect postural reflex reactions in young healthy population. Earlier

  14. Kinesio taping in young healthy subjects does not affect postural reflex reactions and anticipatory postural adjustments of the trunk: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Matej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-09-01

    Therapeutic Kinesio Taping method is used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. Kinesio Taping might have some small clinically important beneficial effects on range of motion and strength but findings about the effects on proprioception and muscle activation are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to test if Kinesio Taping influences anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex reactions. To test the hypothesis twelve healthy young participants were recruited in randomized, participants blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study. In the experimental condition the tape was applied over the paravertebral muscles and in placebo condition sham application of the tape was done transversally over the lumbar region. Timing of anticipatory postural adjustments to fast voluntary arms movement and postural reflex reactions to sudden loading over the hands were measured by means of superficial electromyography before and one hour after each tape application. Results showed no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo taping conditions for any of the analyzed muscles in anticipatory postural adaptations (F1,11 < 0.23, p > 0.64, η2 < 0.04) or postural reflex reactions (F1,11 < 4.16, p > 0.07, η(2) < 0.49). Anticipatory postural adjustments of erector spinae and multifidus muscles were initiated significantly earlier after application of taping (regardless of technique) compared to pre-taping (F1,11 = 5.02, p = 0.046, η(2) = 0.31 and F1,11 = 6.18, p = 0.030, η(2) = 0.36 for erector spinae and multifidus, respectively). Taping application over lumbar region has potential beneficial effects on timing of anticipatory postural adjustments regardless of application technique but no effect on postural reflex reactions in young pain free participants. Further research in patients with low back pain would be encouraged. Key PointsApplication of Kinesio Taping does not affect postural reflex reactions in young healthy population

  15. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  16. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  17. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  18. Evaluation of ceramic papers and tapes for use as separators in thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, Frederick William; Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Ceramic tapes and papers were evaluated for potential use as separators in high-temperature thermal batteries. The bulk of the tests involved fiberglass tape and borosilicate filter discs. Quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) materials were also examined to a limited extent. In addition, custom-prepared MgO-coated ceramic discs from Inventek Inc. were evaluated as separators. The tapes and paper discs were impregnated with LiCl-KCl eutectic or LiCl-LiBr-LiF electrolytes using three different techniques. Test discs were punched from the tapes and papers, impregnated with electrolyte and evaluated as separators in Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} single cells at 400 or 500 C at a steady-state current of 63 or 125 mA/cm{sup 2}. The performance of single cells containing these discs generally improved with increased electrolyte loading for most of the materials in the case of the LiCl-KCl eutectic. Better results were obtained with the paper filter discs than with the tapes. The best results with the paper discs were obtained with Whatman GF/A filter discs. Active lives for cells with these separators were about 85% of standard cells with pressed-powder separators. Good results were obtained in one battery test with the eutectic electrolyte. Mixed results were obtained with the LiCl-LiBr-LiF electrolyte under similar conditions. Higher loadings of electrolyte did not always translate into improved cell performance. Self-discharge reactions are believed responsible. The best overall results were obtained with the Inventek separators. Based on the results of this study, more work in this technology area is merited.

  19. Micro/Nanostructured Films and Adhesives for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungkyu K; Kang, Sung Min; Yang, Sung Ho; Cho, Woo Kyung

    2015-12-01

    The advanced technologies available for micro/nanofabrication have opened new avenues for interdisciplinary approaches to solve the unmet medical needs of regenerative medicine and biomedical devices. This review highlights the recent developments in micro/nanostructured adhesives and films for biomedical applications, including waterproof seals for wounds or surgery sites, drug delivery, sensing human body signals, and optical imaging of human tissues. We describe in detail the fabrication processes required to prepare the adhesives and films, such as tape-based adhesives, nanofilms, and flexible and stretchable film-based electronic devices. We also discuss their biomedical functions, performance in vitro and in vivo, and the future research needed to improve the current systems.

  20. Reducing pain during the removal of adhesive and adherent products.

    PubMed

    Denyer, Jacqueline

    Silicone Medical Adhesive Removers (SMARs) have proved a valuable addition to formularies. In the absence of SMARs, trauma following removal of adhesive dressings, ostomy products, retention tapes and monitoring equipment can lead to skin stripping or extension of existing wounds. Those at increased risk of skin stripping include groups such as older people, premature infants and neonates and those with skin fragility syndromes. Appeel® Sterile Sachet (CliniMed) is a sterile SMAR in liquid form supplied in a single-use sachet. The addition of this sterile product to the existing Appeel range of wipes and aerosols provides an adhesive remover suitable for use on broken skin. Unlike delivery from an aerosol, Appeel Sterile Sachet does not feel cold on application, a sensation which can be confused with pain. This article discusses the value of SMARs and in particular the advantages of using the single-use Appeel Sterile Sachet.

  1. Micro/Nanostructured Films and Adhesives for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungkyu K; Kang, Sung Min; Yang, Sung Ho; Cho, Woo Kyung

    2015-12-01

    The advanced technologies available for micro/nanofabrication have opened new avenues for interdisciplinary approaches to solve the unmet medical needs of regenerative medicine and biomedical devices. This review highlights the recent developments in micro/nanostructured adhesives and films for biomedical applications, including waterproof seals for wounds or surgery sites, drug delivery, sensing human body signals, and optical imaging of human tissues. We describe in detail the fabrication processes required to prepare the adhesives and films, such as tape-based adhesives, nanofilms, and flexible and stretchable film-based electronic devices. We also discuss their biomedical functions, performance in vitro and in vivo, and the future research needed to improve the current systems. PMID:26510305

  2. Annealing-free and strongly adhesive silver nanowire networks with long-term reliability by introduction of a nonconductive and biocompatible polymer binder.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunxia; Deng, Dunying; Cheng, Yuanrong; Kong, Lingqiang; Xiao, Fei

    2014-05-01

    As a promising candidate to replace the brittle and expensive transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) conductor, the use of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks still involves issues such as high-temperature post-treatments and poor substrate adhesion for industrial application. Here a room-temperature soldering and one-step solution method is developed to achieve high-performance Ag nanowire transparent conductive films (TCFs). A nonconductive binder is prepared from poly(dopamine) and alginic acid which contains abundant catechol and carboxylic acid functional groups. The drying of the binder on the Ag nanowire percolation networks induces tighter contact among the nanowires and strong adhesion to the substrate, simultaneously enhancing the electrical and mechanical properties without a high-temperature annealing process. As a result, a highly conductive and bendable AgNW film is demonstrated on a low-cost polyethylene glycol terephthalate (PET) substrate, showing an 89% optical transmittance at λ = 550 nm and a sheet resistance of 16.3 Ohm sq(-1). Its optical and electrical performances are superior to those obtained from the reported indium tin oxide (ITO) films. Moreover, the AgNW film exhibits strong adhesion to the substrate, maintaining its conductivity after 100 tape tests, and it still resists the tape test even after exposure to solvent for several hours. Most importantly, the film shows good reliability during long-term 85 °C/85% RH (relative humidity) aging, which has been rarely investigated although it is a critical requirement for industrial application. The advanced and wide-ranging features of the prepared AgNW film greatly contribute to its use as a transparent electrode in multifunctional flexible electronic devices.

  3. Annealing-free and strongly adhesive silver nanowire networks with long-term reliability by introduction of a nonconductive and biocompatible polymer binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yunxia; Deng, Dunying; Cheng, Yuanrong; Kong, Lingqiang; Xiao, Fei

    2014-04-01

    As a promising candidate to replace the brittle and expensive transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) conductor, the use of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks still involves issues such as high-temperature post-treatments and poor substrate adhesion for industrial application. Here a room-temperature soldering and one-step solution method is developed to achieve high-performance Ag nanowire transparent conductive films (TCFs). A nonconductive binder is prepared from poly(dopamine) and alginic acid which contains abundant catechol and carboxylic acid functional groups. The drying of the binder on the Ag nanowire percolation networks induces tighter contact among the nanowires and strong adhesion to the substrate, simultaneously enhancing the electrical and mechanical properties without a high-temperature annealing process. As a result, a highly conductive and bendable AgNW film is demonstrated on a low-cost polyethylene glycol terephthalate (PET) substrate, showing an 89% optical transmittance at λ = 550 nm and a sheet resistance of 16.3 Ohm sq-1. Its optical and electrical performances are superior to those obtained from the reported indium tin oxide (ITO) films. Moreover, the AgNW film exhibits strong adhesion to the substrate, maintaining its conductivity after 100 tape tests, and it still resists the tape test even after exposure to solvent for several hours. Most importantly, the film shows good reliability during long-term 85 °C/85% RH (relative humidity) aging, which has been rarely investigated although it is a critical requirement for industrial application. The advanced and wide-ranging features of the prepared AgNW film greatly contribute to its use as a transparent electrode in multifunctional flexible electronic devices.

  4. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  5. Use of high L.E.T. radiation to improve adhesion of metals to polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    MgK alpha X-rays (1254 eV) and 2 keV electrons irradiate the surface of polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE). The damage is confined to a few tenths of a micron below the surface, and the doses exceed 10 to the eight power rad. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of the irradiated surfaces and mass spectroscopy of the gaseous products of irradiation indicate that the damaged layer is crosslinked or branched PTFE. After either type of irradiation, the surface has enhanced affinity for metals and a lower contact angle with hexadecane. Tape pull tests show that evaporated Ni and Au films adhere better to the irradiated surface. XPS shows the Ni interacts chemically with PTFE forming NiF2 and possibly NiC. However, the gold adhesion and contact angle results indicate that the interaction is, at least in part, chemically nonspecific. Decreased contact angles on FEP Teflon crystallized against gold were attributed to either the presence of a polar oxygen layer or increased physical forces due to greater density. In the case of irradiated PTFE, no oxygen on the surface was observed. The crosslinked structure might, however, have a greater density, thus accounting for the observed increase in adhesion and wettability.

  6. Analysis of particulate contamination on tape lift samples from the VETA optical surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germani, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    Particulate contamination analysis was carried out on samples taken from the Verification Engineering Test Article (VETA) x-ray detection system. A total of eighteen tape lift samples were taken from the VETA optical surfaces. Initially, the samples were tested using a scanning electron microscope. Additionally, particle composition was determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Results are presented in terms of particle loading per sample.

  7. Tape It! Using Audio Tapes as an Integral Part of a Multi-Media, Multi-Material Approach to Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Gail J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of audio tapes in the social studies classroom. Topics discussed include: using commercial learning aids, using the audio tape, taping directions, accommodating reading levels, recording current events, preparing students to use equipment, and using the tapes for evaluation. For journal availability, see SO 505 448. (Author/DB)

  8. Analysis of transient state in HTS tapes under ripple DC load current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepien, M.; Grzesik, B.

    2014-05-01

    The paper concerns the analysis of transient state (quench transition) in HTS tapes loaded with the current having DC component together with a ripple component. Two shapes of the ripple were taken into account: sinusoidal and triangular. Very often HTS tape connected to a power electronic current supply (i.e. superconducting coil for SMES) that delivers DC current with ripples and it needs to be examined under such conditions. Additionally, measurements of electrical (and thermal) parameters under such ripple excitation is useful to tape characterization in broad range of load currents. The results presented in the paper were obtained using test bench which contains programmable DC supply and National Instruments data acquisition system. Voltage drops and load currents were measured vs. time. Analysis of measured parameters as a function of the current was used to tape description with quench dynamics taken into account. Results of measurements were also used to comparison with the results of numerical modelling based on FEM. Presented provisional results show possibility to use results of measurements in transient state to prepare inverse models of superconductors and their detailed numerical modelling.

  9. Kinesio-Taping Application and Corticospinal Excitability at the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Francois; Karam, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    Context Physiotherapists and athletic trainers often use Kinesio Taping (KT) to prevent and treat musculoskeletal injuries in athletes, yet evidence about its effects on neuromuscular performance is conflicting. Objective To investigate the influence of a KT application directed at the ankle joint on measures of corticospinal excitability with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twelve healthy young women (age = 23.1 ± 1.9 years; range, 19–26 years). Intervention(s) Participants were tested under no-tape and KT conditions according to a random sequence order. The KT was applied to the skin overlying the dorsiflexor and plantar-flexor muscles of the ankle. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed changes in the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials elicited at rest and during movement and changes in the silent period and background muscle activity during movement. Results Taping conditions had no effect on motor-evoked potential amplitude at rest or during movement or on the silent-period duration and background muscle activity. Conclusions Our results concur with other recent reports, showing KT applications have little influence at the neuromuscular level. Alterations in sensory feedback ascribed to elastic taping are likely insufficient to modulate corticospinal excitability in a functionally meaningful manner. PMID:26090708

  10. Latent fingerprints analysis using tape-lift, Raman microscopy, and multivariate data analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Effendi

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the use of combined techniques, i.e. Raman spectral mapping, tape-lift, and multivariate data analysis, to extract chemical information of latent fingerprint and/or trace amounts of materials deposited in fingerprints. The tape-lift method was employed to lift trace particles, extrinsic materials, or sebum deposited on the finger of an individual after recent handling of such materials. The analysis of the tape-lifted materials was performed by Raman spectral mapping at a specific area. The collected mixture Raman spectra containing signals from lifting media and lifted materials was then deconvoluted using a powerful multivariate technique, namely band-target entropy minimization (BTEM). Three cases, i.e. a sebum-rich fingerprint after touching the forehead, a drug model comprising ibuprofen, L-arginine, and sodium bicarbonate, and an additive model comprising sucrose and aspartame were investigated. BTEM could recover all pure component spectra of both lifting media and tape-lifted materials. As such, all these test substances can be correctly identified using their unique pure Raman spectral signatures. In addition, the spatial distributions of all these identified components could also be determined. These combined three techniques hold promise as a new tool in forensic applications.

  11. Fabrication Of Carbon-Boron Reinforced Dry Polymer Matrix Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation aerospace vehicles will require specialized hybrid material forms for component structure fabrication. For this reason, high temperature composite prepregs in both dry and wet forms are being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In an attempt to improve compressive properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites, a hybrid carbon-boron tape was developed and used to fabricate composite laminates which were subsequently cut into flexural and compression specimens and tested. The hybrid material, given the designation HYCARB, was fabricated by modifying a previously developed process for the manufacture of dry polymer matrix composite (PMC) tape at LaRC. In this work, boron fibers were processed with IM7/LaRC(TradeMark)IAX poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg to form a dry hybrid tape for Automated Tow Placement (ATP). Boron fibers were encapsulated between two (2) layers of reduced volatile, low fiber areal weight poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg. The hybrid prepreg was then fully imidized and consolidated into a dry tape suitable for ATP. The fabrication of a hybrid boron material form for tow placement aids in the reduction of the overall manufacturing cost of boron reinforced composites, while realizing the improved compression strengths. Composite specimens were press-molded from the hybrid material and exhibited excellent mechanical properties.

  12. Mechanism for the uniaxial strain dependence of the critical current in practical REBCO tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Kozo; Machiya, Shutaro; Hampshire, Damian P.

    2016-06-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of uniaxial strain on the critical current of practical REBCO tapes (REBa2Cu3O7-d , RE = Y and Gd) fabricated by Superpower and SuNAM, two types of critical current measurements were carried out. In the first, the tape sample was attached directly to a universal testing machine and pulled under a tensile load. In the second, the tape was soldered to a Cu-Be springboard and then attached to the testing machine and then pushed or pulled in order to apply both tensile and compressive strains to the tape sample. An inverse parabolic behaviour was observed for the uniaxial strain dependence of the critical current of both tapes. Using synchrotron radiation, the local strain exerted on the REBCO layer was measured at room temperature under the conditions used for the two techniques for making I c measurements. On the basis of these room temperature data, the local strain exerted on the REBCO layer at 77 K was numerically evaluated. A one-dimensional chain model for current flow in the REBCO material with fractional lengths of A-domains and B-domains oriented along the uniaxial strain direction is proposed. The model can explain the parabolic strain behaviour of the critical current and shows that the strain at which the peak in I c occurs, is not only determined by pre-compression or pre-tension on the superconductor at the operating temperature, but also by the ratio of the fractional amounts of the two domains.

  13. Mechanism for the uniaxial strain dependence of the critical current in practical REBCO tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Kozo; Machiya, Shutaro; Hampshire, Damian P.

    2016-06-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of uniaxial strain on the critical current of practical REBCO tapes (REBa2Cu3O7‑d , RE = Y and Gd) fabricated by Superpower and SuNAM, two types of critical current measurements were carried out. In the first, the tape sample was attached directly to a universal testing machine and pulled under a tensile load. In the second, the tape was soldered to a Cu–Be springboard and then attached to the testing machine and then pushed or pulled in order to apply both tensile and compressive strains to the tape sample. An inverse parabolic behaviour was observed for the uniaxial strain dependence of the critical current of both tapes. Using synchrotron radiation, the local strain exerted on the REBCO layer was measured at room temperature under the conditions used for the two techniques for making I c measurements. On the basis of these room temperature data, the local strain exerted on the REBCO layer at 77 K was numerically evaluated. A one-dimensional chain model for current flow in the REBCO material with fractional lengths of A-domains and B-domains oriented along the uniaxial strain direction is proposed. The model can explain the parabolic strain behaviour of the critical current and shows that the strain at which the peak in I c occurs, is not only determined by pre-compression or pre-tension on the superconductor at the operating temperature, but also by the ratio of the fractional amounts of the two domains.

  14. Kinesio Taping and the Circulation and Endurance Ratio of the Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Stedge, Hannah L.; Kroskie, Ryan M.; Docherty, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    Context Kinesio Tex tape is a therapeutic tape that is applied with the Kinesio-taping (KT) method and is theorized to increase circulation and subsequently improve muscle function. However, little research has been conducted to determine how KT affects performance. Objective To determine the effect of KT on muscular endurance ratio, blood flow, circumference, and volume of the gastrocnemius muscle. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Sixty-one healthy, active people (23 men, 38 women; age = 19.99 ± 8.01 years, height = 169.42 ± 23.62 cm, mass = 71.53 ± 36.77 kg) volunteered to participate. They were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups: treatment KT, sham KT, and control. Intervention(s) Tape was applied based on group assignment. The treatment KT group received the ankle-tape technique as described in the KT manual. The sham KT group received 1 strip of Kinesio Tex tape around the circumference of the proximal gastrocnemius muscle. The control group did not receive tape application. Main Outcome Measure(s) The dependent variables were blood flow in blood perfusion units, volume of water displacement in milliliters, circumference of the gastrocnemius muscle in centimeters, and endurance ratio in joules measured before, 24 hours after, and 72 hours after the intervention. Separate repeated-measures analyses of variance were conducted for each dependent variable. Results We found no group-by-test day interaction for endurance ratios (F4,116 = 1.99, P = .10). Blood flow, circumference, and volume measurements also yielded no differences among groups (F2,58 range, 0.02–0.51; P > .05) or test days (F2,116 range, 0.05–2.33; P > .05). Conclusions We found KT does not enhance anaerobic muscle function measured by endurance ratio. The KT also did not affect circulation or volume of the gastrocnemius muscle in a healthy population. PMID:23182011

  15. Surreptitious Taping: The Arguments for and the Ethics against.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Thomas W.

    Much discussion within media ethics has focused on the acceptability of surreptitious tape recording of news sources by media professionals. The most common legal and social arguments supporting secret taping assert that recorders "hear" and "remember" better, are expedient and practical, protect against libel suits, provide historical…

  16. Using a Taped Intervention to Improve Kindergarten Students' Number Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Katherine R.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Fuller, Emily J.; Greear, Corrine

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across students was used to evaluate the effects of a taped numbers (TN) intervention on the number-identification accuracy of 4 kindergarten students. During TN, students attempted to name the numbers 0 through 9 on randomized lists before each number was provided via a tape player 2 s later. All 4 students showed…

  17. Tape the Teacher: Easier Field Trips for Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lynne; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes a tape-guided field trip that has been used successfully with college biology students in the University of California Botanical Garden. This program enables large numbers of students to make individual biological observations in the field with the aid of a specially tailored, taped guide. (JR)

  18. Low-cost tape system measures velocity of acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstein, R.

    1964-01-01

    By affixing perforated magnetic recording tape to the falling end of a body, acceleration and velocity were measured. The measurement was made by allowing the tape to pass between a light source and a photoelectric sensor. Data was obtained from a readout device.

  19. Tape-Drive Based Plasma Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Osterhoff, Jens; Evans, Eugene; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22

    We present experimental results on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used for a compact coupling of a laser beam into a staged laser driven electron accelerator. This novel kind of plasma mirror is suitable for high repetition rates and for high number of laser shots. In order to design a compact, staged laser plasma based accelerator or collider [1], the coupling of the laser beam into the different stages represents one of the key issues. To limit the spatial foot print and thus to realize a high overall acceleration gradient, a concept has to be found which realizes this in-coupling within a few centimeters (cf. Fig 1). The fluence of the laser pulse several centimeters away from the acceleration stage (focus) exceeds the damage threshold of any available mirror coating. Therefore, in reference [2] a plasma mirror was suggested for this purpose. We present experiments on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used to reflect the focused laser beam into the acceleration stage. Plasma mirrors composed of antireflection coated glass substrates are usually used to improve the temporal laser contrast of laser pulses by several orders of magnitudes [3,4]. This is particularly important for laser interaction with solid matter, such as ion acceleration [5,6] and high harmonic generation on surfaces [7]. Therefore, the laser pulse is weekly focused onto a substrate. The main pulse generates a plasma and is reflected at the critical surface, whereas the low intensity pre-pulse (mainly the Amplified Spontaneous Emission pedestal) will be transmitted through the substrate before the mirror has been triggered. Several publications [3,4] demonstrate a conservation of the spatial beam quality and a reflectivity of about 70 %. The drawback of this technique is the limited repetition rate since for every shot a fresh surface has to be provided. In the past years several novel approaches for high repetition rate plasma mirrors have been developed [2, 8

  20. Portable digital pressure indicator for calibrating magnetic tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Royce F.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a portable Digital Pressure Indicator (DPI) to be used for calibrating the pressure systems on Langley's magnetic tape recorders is described. High-speed magnetic tape recorders require pressure (0 to 20 psig) for providing an air cushion across the tape guides and a slight vacuum (30 inch H2O) for maintaining the proper number of tape loops in the advance and feed chamber. The DPI is a hand-held device that can be quickly coupled to a magnetic tape recorder and includes a two-position switch for selecting either measured pressure or vacuum, to be displayed digitally in engineering units (psig or inches H2O). The DPI is currently in use in Langley's Analysis and Computation Division.