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Sample records for adhesive thermal conductivity

  1. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, M.; Fu, M.; Irving, M.; Neher, C.; Shi, M.; Tolfa, K.; Tripathi, M.; Vinson, Y.; Wang, R.; Zheng, G.

    2017-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal performance and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported, along with initial radiation damage test results.

  2. Metalized nanotube tips improve through thickness thermal conductivity in adhesive joints.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Sihn, Sangwook; Roy, Ajit K; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2009-03-01

    The through-thickness thermal conductivity in conventional adhesive joints (of approximately 0.3 W/m-K) fails to meet the thermal load transfer requirement in numerous applications to enable lean manufacturing and improve system reliability to thermal load. Carbon nanotubes are known to possess extremely high thermal conductivity along the longitudinal axis. According to molecular dynamics simulations, the value can be as high as 3500 W/m-K at room temperature for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Meanwhile, the transverse thermal conductivity perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the MWCNTs is known to be relatively low, approximately 10-15 W/m-K. Existing studies of mixing the MWCNTs in polymers for adhesive joints only achieved minimal enhancement in the thermal conductivity and failed to satisfy the thermal property requirement for the adhesive joints. In order to properly utilize the superior axial thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs, vertically aligned MWCNTs have been used in this study and incorporated in the adhesive joint configuration. Analytical parametric study was conducted to identify critical parameters that affect the overall thermal conductivity of the joint and to provide guidelines for the process development. The process development involved growing the vertically aligned MWCNTs on silicon wafers. The aligned nanotube array was partially infused with epoxy adhesive. Selective reactive ion etching of the epoxy revealed the nanotube tips. In order to reduce the impedance mismatch and phonon scattering at the interface between the nanotube tips and the adherends, gold was thermally evaporated on the nanotube tips. The measured thermal conductivity of the adhesive joint device incorporating the MWCNTs was 262 W/m-K, which is significantly larger compared to that of less than 1 W/m-K without the MWCNTs.

  3. Enhancement of Thermal Conductance at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces Using Subnanometer Metal Adhesion Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Minyoung; Freedman, Justin P.; Liang, Hongliang Joe; Chow, Cheng-Ming; Sokalski, Vincent M.; Bain, James A.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the use of subnanometer adhesion layers significantly enhances the thermal interface conductance at metal-dielectric interfaces. A metal-dielectric interface between Au and sapphire (Al2O3) is considered using Cu (low optical loss) and Cr (high optical loss) as adhesion layers. To enable high throughput measurements, each adhesion layer is deposited as a wedge such that a continuous range of thicknesses could be sampled. Our measurements of thermal interface conductance at the metal-Al2O3 interface made using frequency-domain thermoreflectance show that a 1-nm-thick adhesion layer of Cu or Cr is sufficient to enhance the thermal interface conductance by more than a factor of 2 or 4, respectively, relative to the pure Au/Al2O3 interface. The enhancement agrees with the diffuse-mismatch-model-based predictions of accumulated thermal conductance versus adhesion-layer thickness assuming that it contributes phonons with wavelengths less than its thickness, while those with longer wavelengths transmit directly from the Au.

  4. Qualitative link between work of adhesion and thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Monachon, Christian Weber, Ludger; Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-03-28

    We report Time-Domain ThermoReflectance experiments measuring the Thermal Boundary Conductance (TBC) of interfaces between diamond and metal surfaces, based on samples consisting of [111]-oriented diamond substrates with hydrogen or with sp{sup 2} carbon surface terminations created using plasma treatments. In a concurrent theoretical study, we calculate the work of adhesion between Ni, Cu, and diamond interfaces with (111) surface orientation, with or without hydrogen termination of the diamond surface, using first-principles electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We find a positive correlation between the calculated work of adhesion and the measured conductance of these interfaces, suggesting that DFT could be used as a screening tool to identify metal/dielectric systems with high TBC. We also explain the negative effect of hydrogen on the thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces.

  5. Double-Wall Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoplatelets for Hybrid Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Messina, Elena; Leone, Nancy; Foti, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano; Riccucci, Cristina; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Di Maggio, Francesco; Cassata, Antonio; Gargano, Leonardo; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Fazio, Barbara; Maragò, Onofrio Maria; Robba, Benedetto; Vasi, Cirino; Ingo, Gabriel Maria; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe

    2016-09-07

    Improving the electrical and thermal properties of conductive adhesives is essential for the fabrication of compact microelectronic and optoelectronic power devices. Here we report on the addition of a commercially available conductive resin with double-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets that yields simultaneously improved thermal and electrical conductivity. Using isopropanol as a common solvent for the debundling of nanotubes, exfoliation of graphene, and dispersion of the carbon nanostructures in the epoxy resin, we obtain a nanostructured conducting adhesive with thermal conductivity of ∼12 W/mK and resistivity down to 30 μΩ cm at very small loadings (1% w/w for nanotubes and 0.01% w/w for graphene). The low filler content allows one to keep almost unchanged the glass-transition temperature, the viscosity, and the curing parameters. Die shear measurements show that the nanostructured resins fulfill the MIL-STD-883 requirements when bonding gold-metalized SMD components, even after repeated thermal cycling. The same procedure has been validated on a high-conductivity resin characterized by a higher viscosity, on which we have doubled the thermal conductivity and quadrupled the electrical conductivity. Graphene yields better performances with respect to nanotubes in terms of conductivity and filler quantity needed to improve the resin. We have finally applied the nanostructured resins to bond GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors in power-amplifier circuits. We observe a decrease of the GaN peak and average temperatures of, respectively, ∼30 °C and ∼10 °C, with respect to the pristine resin. The obtained results are important for the fabrication of advanced packaging materials in power electronic and microwave applications and fit the technological roadmap for CNTs, graphene, and hybrid systems.

  6. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Conductive Adhesive Film Under Hygrothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Lan; Chen, Xu; Gao, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical properties of anisotropic conductive adhesive film (ACF) were investigated experimentally under various environmental conditions. The temperature sweep test was conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on dynamical mechanical properties of the ACF. The ACF exhibited transitions to the glass state, viscoelastic state, and rubber state with increasing temperature, and its glass-transition temperature ( T g) was determined to be 149°C. The creep-recovery behaviors of the ACF were investigated, and it was found that the initial strains, instantaneous strains, and creep or recovery rates increased with increasing temperature. No obvious creep phenomenon was observed at low temperatures (≤0°C). The creep strain and creep rates at any time decreased with increasing hygrothermal aging time. The uniaxial tensile behaviors of the ACF were also investigated under hygrothermal aging and thermal cycling. The results show that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the ACF decrease with increasing hygrothermal aging time; however, they increase at first and then decrease with increasing thermal cycling time. T g decreases slightly for the ACF after hygrothermal aging; however, it increases after thermal cycling.

  8. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  9. Adhesion, Modulus and Thermal Conductivity of Porous Epoxy Film on Silicon Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2016-11-01

    An 8 μm epoxy film deposited on a 350 μm Si (100) Si wafer with a 0.4 μm Au transducer film deposited on top of the polymer film was used to evaluate the thermal conductivity, the modulus of the porous film, and the initiation of spalling upon laser beam irradiation on the back side of the Si wafer. The polymer films were characterized for pore microstructure using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The polymer films were characterized using transient thermo reflectance (TTR) with laser beams illuminating the Au layer. The TTR signal from the polymer film showed only the thermal component and was characteristic of variations associated with thermal conduction into the film. To induce spalling, the back side was illuminated with a Nd-YAG laser beam with a 532 nm wavelength, pulse energy density 1.8 J/cm2, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz for 10 s in conjunction with TTR measurements on the front side. The TTR signal from the polymer film subjected to laser beam incidence from the backside of the Si wafer showed both the thermal and the acoustic components. The acoustic component was used to detect the initial stages of spalling or delamination. The acoustic oscillations were modeled using a modified wave equation to determine the velocity of sound and the modulus of the film. The results were also used to determine the effect of porosity on the modulus of the polymer film. The TTR signal was found to be very sensitive to detection of delamination without complete separation of the film.

  10. Aligned Carbon Nanotube to Enhance Through Thickness Thermal Conductivity in Adhesive Joints (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    solid materials over a temperature range -180°C to 2000°C. The laser flash (or heat pulse ) technique consists of applying a short duration (< 1ms) heat... pulse to one face of a parallel sided sample and monitoring the [Figure 3. Schematic view of the assembled device] temperature rise on the...opposite face as a function of time. This temperature rise is measured with an infrared detector. A laser is used to provide the heat pulse . The thermal

  11. Stress evolution in a conductive adhesive during curing and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuhai

    2000-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using conductive adhesives, which are composites of polymers and conductive fillers, as replacements for solder in different types of microelectronic assemblies. However, conductive adhesives still suffer from several deficiencies, such as unstable electrical conductivity and inadequate adhesion. The reliability of the conductive adhesive joints is always one of the major considerations during their design and operation, and the curing and thermal stresses generated in polymers and composites during curing, cooling and thermal cycling play a very important role in determining reliability. Because of the mismatch in the mechanical properties between the conductive adhesive and the substrate, appreciable curing and thermal stress is generated during manufacturing, which may be detrimental to the reliability of conductive adhesive joints. In this dissertation, an interactive linear viscoelastic model which considers interaction between the initial gel network and the other networks that form during curing is proposed to simulate stress and volume shrinkage during the thermoset curing process, and an effective method for measuring volume shrinkage during the thermoset cure is developed. A systematic experimental study of the material properties of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix during the curing and cooling processes has been conducted. Based on these experimental data, stresses generated during several spatially homogeneous curing and cooling processes of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix are also calculated. It is found that the conductive adhesive possesses mechanical properties which are substantially different from those of the constituents, and that the conductive adhesive has a relaxation process which is similar to its matrix and generates appreciable curing and thermal stresses during curing and cooling. Finally, a processing procedure designed to provide desired residual stresses is discussed.

  12. Conducting a thermal conductivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    A physically transparent approximate theory of phonon decay rates is presented starting from a pair potential model of the interatomic forces in an insulator or semiconductor. The theory applies in the classical regime and relates the 3-phonon decay rate to the third derivative of the pair potential. Phonon dispersion relations do not need to be calculated, as sum rules relate all the needed quantities directly to the pair potential. The Brillouin zone averaged phonon lifetime turns out to involve a dimensionless measure of the anharmonicity multiplied by an effective density of states for 3-phonon decay. Results are given for rare gas and alkali halide crystals. For rare gases, the results are in good agreement with more elaborate perturbation calculations. Comparison to experimental data on phonon linewidths and thermal conductivity are made.

  13. Performance of thermal adhesives in forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling is critical for the life and performance of electronic equipment. In most cases cooling may be achieved by natural convection but forced convection may be necessary for high wattage applications. Use of conventional type heat sinks may not be feasible from the viewpoint of specific applications and the costs involved. In a heat sink, fins can be attached to the well by ultrasonic welding, by soldering, or with a number of industrially available thermal adhesives. In this paper, the author investigates the heat transfer characteristics of several adhesives and compares them with ultrasonic welding and theoretically calculated values. This experiment was conducted in an air flow chamber. Heat was generated by using heaters mounted on the well. Thermstrate foil, Uniset A401, and Aremco 571 adhesives were tested along with an ultrasonically welded sample. Ultrasonic welding performed far better than the adhesives and Thermstrate foil. This type of experiment can be adapted for a laboratory exercise in an upper level heat transfer course. It gives students an exposure to industrial applications that help them appreciate the importance of the course material.

  14. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  15. Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity of Transparent Adhesives by Photoacoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Yoshiaki; Minamide, Akiyuki; Nakada, Naotaka

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a method by which thermal diffusivity of transparent epoxy adhesive on a substrate can easily be measured from the frequency dependence of a photoacoustic (PA) signal. In order to eliminate the influence of the substrate, the phase difference between a PA signal of the adhesive on the substrate and a PA signal of only the substrate was measured. This method was tested for cases of thermally thin and thick graphite (high thermal conductivity) substrates and a polypropylene (low thermal conductivity) substrate. It has the advantage that the thermal diffusivity of a transparent adhesive on a substrate can be measured regardless of the thickness and the thermal properties of the substrate.

  16. Thermally conductive support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzl, Alfred (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A structure for supporting and at least transferring heat energy away from at least a first heat source interconnected thereto is disclosed. In one embodiment, the structure includes a deck member having a plurality of layers of thermally conductive fibers packed within a matrix material. Fibers of at least a first layer are orientable to transfer heat energy toward at least a first sidewall of the deck member, and fibers of at least a second layer are orientable about .+-.45.degree. relative to the fibers of the first layer to enhance the structural strength of the deck member. In another embodiment, fibers of at least a first layer of thermally conductive fibers of the deck member are orientable to transfer heat energy from a first heat source to a second, cooler heat source, both of which are interconnectable to the deck member, such that the first and second heat sources operate at substantially uniform temperatures. In this embodiment, fibers of at least a second layer of thermally conductive fibers are orientable about .+-.45.degree. relative to the fibers of the first layer to enhance the structural strength of the deck member. Fibers of at least a third layer of thermally conductive fibers are orientable substantially orthogonally relative to the fibers of the first layer to transfer heat energy away from at least the first heat source to at least a first sidewall of the deck member.

  17. Thermally conductive polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, N. R.; Jenkins, R. K.; Lister, J. L. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A thermally conductive polymer is provided having physical and chemical properties suited to use as a medium for potting electrical components. The polymer is prepared from hydroquinone, phenol, and formaldehyde, by conventional procedures employed for the preparation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. While the proportions of the monomers can be varied, a preferred polymer is formed from the monomers in a 1:1:2.4 molar or ratio of hydroquinone:phenol:formaldehyde.

  18. Thermal Contact Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The performance of cryogenic instruments is often a function of their operating temperature. Thus, designers of cryogenic instruments often are required to predict the operating temperature of each instrument they design. This requires accurate thermal models of cryogenic components which include the properties of the materials and assembly techniques used. When components are bolted or otherwise pressed together, a knowledge of the thermal performance of such joints are also needed. In some cases, the temperature drop across these joints represents a significant fraction of the total temperature difference between the instrument and its cooler. While extensive databases exist on the thermal properties of bulk materials, similar databases for pressed contacts do not. This has often lead to instrument designs that avoid pressed contacts or to the over-design of such joints at unnecessary expense. Although many people have made measurements of contact conductances at cryogenic temperatures, this data is often very narrow in scope and even more often it has not been published in an easily retrievable fashion, if published at all. This paper presents a summary of the limited pressed contact data available in the literature.

  19. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  20. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    After a Sect. 1.1 devoted to electrical conductivity and a section that deals with magnetic and dielectric losses ( 1.2 ), this chapter explores the theory of thermal conduction in solids. The examined categories of solids are: metals Sect. 1.3.2 , Dielectrics Sects. 1.3.3 and 1.3.4 and Nanocomposites Sect. 1.3.5 . In Sect. 1.3.6 the problem of thermal and electrical contact between materials is considered because contact resistance occurring at conductor joints in magnets or other high power applications can lead to undesirable electrical losses. At low temperature, thermal contact is also critical in the mounting of temperature sensors, where bad contacts can lead to erroneous results, in particular when superconductivity phenomena are involved.

  1. Thermal Conductance through Sapphire-Sapphire Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Tomaru, T.; Haruyama, T.; Shintomi, T.; Uchinyama, T.; Miyoki, S.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.

    2003-07-01

    Thermal conductance on sapphire-sapphire bonded interface has been investigated. Two pieces of single crystal sapphire bar with square cross section were bonded together by adhesion free bonding. In two sections of the bar, thermal conductivity was measured between 5 K to 300K. One section contains a bonded interface and the other section measured a thermal conductivity of the sapphire as a reference. No significant thermal resistance due to bonded interface was found from this measurement. Obtained thermal conductivity reaches κ 1 × 104 [W/m·K] in temperature range of T = 20 ˜ 30 K which is a planned operating temperature of a cryogenic mirror of the Large scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave telescope. It looks promising for sapphire bonding technique to improve a heat transfer from a large cryogenic mirror to susp ension wires.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of soluble conducting polymers and conducting adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztemiz, Serhan

    With the demanding nature of the technology today, scientists are looking for new materials in order to decrease the cost, increase the efficiency of the use of the materials, and decrease time-consuming steps in order to increase the speed of production. New materials are being studied to decrease the weight of cars, planes and space vehicles; surface properties are being modified to decrease the drag coefficient; new technologies are being introduced for speeding up applications in production and assembly lines. In this research we address the needs of different technological applications from a conductivity perspective. In the first part of the thesis, the synthesis of soluble conducting polymers in order to make them more processable for potential electronic and photovoltaic applications is presented. Soluble conducting polymers of 3-hexylthiophene, 3-octylthiophene, 3-decylthiophene and 3-dodecylthiophene were synthesized electrochemically and thus, doped during synthesis. It was found that the conductivities; molecular weights and degrees of polymerization of the polymers strongly depend on the side chain's length. The substitution of alkyl side chains decreases the reactivity of the growing chain, and with an increasing side-chain length, all of these properties show a decrease. The hexyl substituent, being the shortest of the four side chains, causes the least distortion in the background, has the highest conjugation, and has the highest shift in the UV spectrum when it polymerizes. As the length of the side chain increases, the shift in the UV spectrum decreases, too. Decrease in the pi-stacking, conjugation and delocalization decreases the conductivity. This gives the material an opportunity to be used in photovoltaic applications. In the second part of the thesis, a conducting adhesive formulation that eliminates the need for heat or other expensive and rather bothersome application methods to activate the adhesive is investigated. Using the quick

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Lei L; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  4. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Lei L.; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-04-01

    In this article, a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system is introduced. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper, although it is important to various forms of today’s digital printing where heat is used for imaging, as well as for toner fusing. This motivated an investigation of the thermal conductivity of paper coating. This study demonstrates that the thermal conductivity is affected by the coating mass and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect toner gloss and density. As the coating mass increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the toner gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The toner gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  5. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  6. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  7. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  8. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor description (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard power or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increase upon being exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicates that if these coatings reach a temperature above

  9. Isotropical conductive adhesives filled with silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, G. Q.; Wu, H. P.; Tao, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, a solution-phase method was demonstrated to generate silver (Ag) nanowires with diameters in the range of 30~50nm and lengths of up to ~50μm, which was proceed by reducing silver nitrate with ethylene glycol in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Fundamental material characterizations including X-ray diffraction transmission electro microscopy (TEM) and scanning electro microscopy (SEM) were conducted on these Ag nanowires. A novel kind of isotropical conductive adhesives (ICA) was prepared by using these Ag nanowires as conductive filler. Electrical property including bulk resistivity and mechanical property including shear strength were investigated and compared with that of conventional ICA filled with micrometer-sized Ag particles or nanometer-sized Ag particles. The average diameter of these Ag particles is about 1μm and 100 nm respectively. The results shown that ICA filled Ag nanowires exhibited higher conductivity, higher shear strength and low percolation threshold value than traditional ICA. Possible conductive mechanism was discussed based on theory calculation.

  10. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  11. Thermal conductivity Measurements of Kaolite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H

    2003-02-21

    Testing was performed to determine the thermal conductivity of Kaolite 1600, which primarily consists of Portland cement and vermiculite. The material was made by Thermal Ceramics for refractory applications. Its combination of light weight, low density, low cost, and noncombustibility made it an attractive alternative to the materials currently used in ES-2 container for radioactive materials. Mechanical properties and energy absorption tests of the Kaolite have been conducted at the Y-12 complex. Heat transfer is also an important factor for the application of the material. The Kaolite samples are porous and trap moisture after extended storage. Thermal conductivity changes as a function of moisture content below 100 C. Thermal conductivity of the Kaolite at high temperatures (up to 700 C) are not available in the literature. There are no standard thermal conductivity values for Kaolite because each sample is somewhat different. Therefore, it is necessary to measure thermal conductivity of each type of Kaolite. Thermal conductivity measurements will help the modeling and calculation of temperatures of the ES-2 containers. This report focuses on the thermal conductivity testing effort at ORNL.

  12. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  13. High performance heat curing copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-Wang; Jiu, Jin-Ting; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, high performance electrically conductive adhesives were fabricated from a vinyl ester resin, a thermal initiator, silver coated copper powders, and pure silver powders, without using any other coupling agent, dispersing agent, and reducing agent. The heat cured copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives presented low bulk resistivity (e.g., 4.53 × 10-5 Ω·cm) due to the silver powders that had given high electrical conductivity to the adhesives, and high shear strength (e.g., 16.22 MPa) provided by the crosslinked structures of vinyl ester resin. These high performance copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives have lower cost than those filled by pure silver powders, which can be well used in the electronic packaging and can enlarge the application prospects of electrically conductive adhesives. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Thermal Conductances Of Metal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Scherkenbach, F. E.; Spivak, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of measurements of thermal conductances of aluminum and stainless-steel contacts at temperatures from 1.6 to 6.0 K. Measurement apparatus includes gearmotor assembly connected to rocker arm by music wire to load sample pair with forces up to 670 N. Heater placed above upper sample. Germanium resistance thermometers in upper and lower samples measured temperature difference across interface over range of heater powers from 0.1 to 10.0 mW. The thermal conductance calculated from temperature difference. Measurements provide data for prediction of thermal conductances of bolted joints in cryogenic infrared instruments.

  15. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-07-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  16. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  17. Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used extensively in modern gas turbine engines to thermally insulate air-cooled metallic components from the hot gases in the engine. These coatings typically consist of a zirconia-yttria ceramic that has been applied by either plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition. Future engines will rely even more heavily on TBCs and will require materials that have even higher temperature capability with improved insulation (i.e., lower thermal conductivity even after many hours at high temperature). This report discusses new TBCs that have been developed with these future requirements in mind. The Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is funding this effort, which has been conducted primarily at Glenn with contractor support (GE and Howmet) for physical vapor deposition. As stated, the new TBC not only had to be more insulating but the insulation had to persist even after many hours of exposure-that is, the new TBC had to have both lower conductivity and improved sintering resistance. A new type of test rig was developed for this task. This new test approach used a laser to deliver a known high heat flux in an essentially uniform pattern to the surface of the coating, thereby establishing a realistic thermal gradient across its thickness. This gradient was determined from surface and backside pyrometry; and since the heat flux and coating thickness are known, this permitted continuous monitoring of thermal conductivity. Thus, this laser rig allowed very efficient screening of candidate low-conductivity, sinter-resistant TBCs. The coating-design approach selected for these new low-conductivity TBCs was to identify oxide dopants that had the potential to promote the formation of relatively large and stable groupings of defects known as defect clusters. This approach was used because it was felt that such clusters would reduce conductivity while enhancing stability. The approach proved to be

  18. Thermal conductivity of graphene laminate.

    PubMed

    Malekpour, H; Chang, K-H; Chen, J-C; Lu, C-Y; Nika, D L; Novoselov, K S; Balandin, A A

    2014-09-10

    We have investigated thermal conductivity of graphene laminate films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrates. Two types of graphene laminate were studied, as deposited and compressed, in order to determine the physical parameters affecting the heat conduction the most. The measurements were performed using the optothermal Raman technique and a set of suspended samples with the graphene laminate thickness from 9 to 44 μm. The thermal conductivity of graphene laminate was found to be in the range from 40 to 90 W/mK at room temperature. It was found unexpectedly that the average size and the alignment of graphene flakes are more important parameters defining the heat conduction than the mass density of the graphene laminate. The thermal conductivity scales up linearly with the average graphene flake size in both uncompressed and compressed laminates. The compressed laminates have higher thermal conductivity for the same average flake size owing to better flake alignment. Coating plastic materials with thin graphene laminate films that have up to 600× higher thermal conductivity than plastics may have important practical implications.

  19. Thermal conductivity of carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.; Frost, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of several well-defined carbonate rocks were determined near 40??C. Values range from 1.2 W m-1 C-1 for a highly porous chalk to 5.1 W m-1 C-1 for a dolomite. The thermal conductivity of magnesite (5.0) is at the high end of the range, and that for Iceland Spar Calcite (3.2) is near the middle. The values for limestones decrease linearly with increasing porosity. Dolomites of comparable porosity have greater thermal conductivities than limestones. Water-sorbed samples have expected greater thermal conductivities than air-saturated (dry) samples of the same rock. An anomalously large increase in the thermal conductivity of a water-sorbed clayey dolomite over that of the same sample when dry is attributed to the clay fraction, which swells during water inhibition, causing more solid-to-solid contacts within the dolomite framework. Measurements were made with a Colora Thermoconductometer. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were made and tabulated. Porosity of the rocks was determined by mercury porosimetry and also from density measurements. The Iceland Spar Calcite and magnesite were included for reference. ?? 1973.

  20. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Rubble Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Rubble piles are a common feature of solar system bodies. They are composed of monolithic elements of ice or rock bound by gravity. Voids occupy a significant fraction of the volume of a rubble pile. They can exist up to pressure P≈ {ε }Yμ , where {ε }Y is the monolithic material's yield strain and μ its rigidity. At low P, contacts between neighboring elements are confined to a small fraction of their surface areas. As a result, the effective thermal conductivity of a rubble pile, {k}{con}≈ k{(P/({ε }Yμ ))}1/2, can be orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal conductivity of its monolithic elements, k. In a fluid-free environment, only radiation can transfer energy across voids. It contributes an additional component, {k}{rad}=16{\\ell }σ {T}3/3, to the total effective conductivity, {k}{eff}={k}{con}+{k}{rad}. Here ℓ, the inverse of the opacity per unit volume, is of the order of the size of the elements, and voids. An important distinction between {k}{con} and {k}{rad} is that the former is independent of the size of the elements, whereas the latter is proportional to it. Our expression for {k}{eff} provides a good fit to the depth dependence of thermal conductivity in the top 140 cm of the lunar regolith. It also offers a good starting point for detailed modeling of thermal inertias for asteroids and satellites. Measurement of the response of surface temperature to variable insolation is a valuable diagnostic of a regolith. There is an opportunity for careful experiments under controlled laboratory conditions to test models of thermal conductivity such as the one we outline.

  2. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  3. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  4. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K; Park, Hyun S; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-27

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  5. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries. PMID:27459901

  6. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  7. Scanning thermal-conductivity microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Grover, Ranjan

    2006-02-01

    This article describes a novel implementation of an atomic force microscope that can map thermal-conductivity features across a sample with a high spatial resolution. The microscope employs a single-sided, metal-coated cantilever, which acts as a bimetallic strip together with a heating laser whose beam is focused on the cantilever's free end, on the opposite side of its tip. Subtracting the topography obtained by the unheated and heated cantilevers yields a map of thermal conductivity across the surface of a sample. The article presents (a) the theory of operation of the microscope and (b) the experimental results obtained on a silicon sample with oxide features, showing good agreement between the two.

  8. High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chibante, L. P. Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Heat management with common textiles such as nylon and spandex is hindered by the poor thermal conductivity from the skin surface to cooling surfaces. This innovation showed marked improvement in thermal conductivity of the individual fibers and tubing, as well as components assembled from them. The problem is centered on improving the heat removal of the liquid-cooled ventilation garments (LCVGs) used by astronauts. The current design uses an extensive network of water-cooling tubes that introduces bulkiness and discomfort, and increases fatigue. Range of motion and ease of movement are affected as well. The current technology is the same as developed during the Apollo program of the 1960s. Tubing material is hand-threaded through a spandex/nylon mesh layer, in a series of loops throughout the torso and limbs such that there is close, form-fitting contact with the user. Usually, there is a nylon liner layer to improve comfort. Circulating water is chilled by an external heat exchanger (sublimator). The purpose of this innovation is to produce new LCVG components with improved thermal conductivity. This was addressed using nanocomposite engineering incorporating high-thermalconductivity nanoscale fillers in the fabric and tubing components. Specifically, carbon nanotubes were added using normal processing methods such as thermoplastic melt mixing (compounding twin screw extruder) and downstream processing (fiber spinning, tubing extrusion). Fibers were produced as yarns and woven into fabric cloths. The application of isotropic nanofillers can be modeled using a modified Nielsen Model for conductive fillers in a matrix based on Einstein s viscosity model. This is a drop-in technology with no additional equipment needed. The loading is limited by the ability to maintain adequate dispersion. Undispersed materials will plug filtering screens in processing equipment. Generally, the viscosity increases were acceptable, and allowed the filled polymers to still be

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY ANALYSIS OF GASES

    DOEpatents

    Clark, W.J.

    1949-06-01

    This patent describes apparatus for the quantitative analysis of a gaseous mixture at subatmospheric pressure by measurement of its thermal conductivity. A heated wire forms one leg of a bridge circuit, while the gas under test is passed about the wire at a constant rate. The bridge unbalance will be a measure of the change in composition of the gas, if compensation is made for the effect due to gas pressure change. The apparatus provides a voltage varying with fluctuations of pressure in series with the indicating device placed across the bridge, to counterbalance the voltage change caused by fluctuations in the pressure of the gaseous mixture.

  10. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Thermal Degradation in Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Mal, Ajit K.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by adhesive bonds in lap joints is well known. A good knowledge of the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds in lap joints is a prerequisite to the design and reliable prediction of the performance of these bonded structures. Furthermore, the lap joint may be subject to high-temperature environments in service. Early detection of the degree of thermal degradation in adhesive bonds is required under these circumstances. A variety of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques can be used to determine the thickness and the elastic moduli of adhesively bonded joints. In this paper we apply a previously developed technique based on the leaky Lamb wave (LLW) experiment to investigate the possibility of characterizing the thermal degradation of adhesive bonds in lap joints. The degradation of the adhesive bonds is determined through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  11. Radiative magnetized thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of plane-parallel magnetized thermal conduction fronts in the interstellar medium (ISM) was studied. Separating the coronal ISM phase and interstellar clouds, these fronts have been thought to be the site of the intermediate-temperature regions whose presence was inferred from O VI absorption-line studies. The front evolution was followed numerically, starting from the initial discontinuous temperature distribution between the hot and cold medium, and ending in the final cooling stage of the hot medium. It was found that, for the typical ISM pressure of 4000 K/cu cm and the hot medium temperature of 10 to the 6th K, the transition from evaporation to condensation in a nonmagnetized front occurs when the front thickness is 15 pc. This thickness is a factor of 5 smaller than previously estimated. The O VI column densities in both evaporative and condensation stages agree with observations if the initial hot medium temperature Th exceeds 750,000 K. Condensing conduction fronts give better agreement with observed O VI line profiles because of lower gas temperatures.

  12. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  13. The thermal conductivity of leaves.

    PubMed

    Hays, R L

    1975-01-01

    Thermal conductivities of fresh leaves, both unmodified and infiltrated with water, were measured. Samples were placed between silver plates of known and differing temperatures, and the time required to boil off a constant volume of liquid was measured. The species used are evergreens: Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (sclerophyllous) with isolateral leaf symmetry; and Peperomia obtusifolia A. Dietr. (succulent), Citrus limon Burm. f. (mesophyllous), Arbutus menziessii Pursh. (sclerophyllous), and Heteromeles arbutifolia M. Roem. (sclerophyllous), all with bilateral leaf symmetry. Mean values found were in the range of 0.268 to 0.573 W/m · °C for fresh leaves, and 0.540 to 0.548 W/m · °C for leaves infiltrated with water. An analysis of errors in the technique indicated that these values may be somewhat low. These results are several times higher than previously reported values. It is concluded that ordinary mesophytic and xerophytic leaves will not develop large gradients in temperature between the surfaces.

  14. Mechanical behavior of adhesive joints subjected to cyclic thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Humfeld, G.R.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stresses induced in bimaterial systems due to changing temperature has been the subject of much study since the publication of Timoshenko`s classic paper of 1925. An adhesive bond is one example of a bimaterial system in which thermal stress can play an important role. However, adhesives are viscoelastic in nature, and their mechanical behavior is dictated by the temperature- and time-dependence of their material properties; analytical solutions for elastic materials do not adequately describe their true behavior. The effect of the adhesive`s viscoelasticity on stress in an adhesive bond subjected to changing temperature is therefore of compelling interest and importance for the adhesives industry. The objective of this research is to develop an understanding of the viscoelastic effect in an adhesive bond subjected to cycling temperature, particularly when the temperature range spans a transition temperature of the adhesive. Numerical modeling of a simplified geometry was first undertaken to isolate the influence of viscoelasticity on the stress state from any particular specimen geometry effect. Finite element modeling was then undertaken to examine the mechanical behavior of the adhesive in a layered geometry. Both solution methods predicted development of residual tensile stresses in the adhesive. For the layered geometry this was found to correspond with residual tensile peel stresses, which are thought to be the cause of interfacial debonding.

  15. Thermal conductivity of deformed carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Mao-Ping; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of four types of deformed carbon nanotubes by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. It is reported that various deformations have different influences on the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes. For bending carbon nanotubes, the thermal conductivity is independent of the bending angle. However, the thermal conductivity increases lightly with xy-distortion and decreases rapidly with z-distortion. The thermal conductivity does not change with the screw ratio before the breaking of carbon nanotubes, but it decreases sharply after the critical screw ratio.

  16. Thermal Conductances of Pressed Copper Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes investigation of thermal conductivities of smooth copper contacts pressed together at liquid-helium temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for accurate thermal models for infrared detectors and other cryogenic instruments.

  17. Thermally Conductive-Silicone Composites with Thermally Reversible Cross-links.

    PubMed

    Wertz, J T; Kuczynski, J P; Boday, D J

    2016-06-08

    Thermally conductive-silicone composites that contain thermally reversible cross-links were prepared by blending diene- and dienophile-functionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with an aluminum oxide conductive filler. This class of thermally conductive-silicones are useful as thermal interface materials (TIMs) within Information Technology (IT) hardware applications to allow rework of valuable components. The composites were rendered reworkable via retro Diels-Alder cross-links when temperatures were elevated above 130 °C and required little mechanical force to remove, making them advantageous over other TIM materials. Results show high thermal conductivity (0.4 W/m·K) at low filler loadings (45 wt %) compared to other TIM solutions (>45 wt %). Additionally, the adhesion of the material was found to be ∼7 times greater at lower temperatures (25 °C) and ∼2 times greater at higher temperatures (120 °C) than commercially available TIMs.

  18. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Corrugated Insulating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Kato, Masayasu; Tomikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kaneko

    The effective thermal conductivity of corrugated insulating materials which are made by polypropylene or polycarbonate have been measured by employing steady state comparison method for several specimen having various thickness and specific weight. The thermal conductivity of them evaluated are also by using the thermal resistance models, and are compared with above measured values and raw materials' conductivity. The main results obtained in this paper are as follows: (1) In regard to the specimen in this paper, the effective thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, but the increasing rate of them is small. (2) There are considerable differences between the measured values and the predicted ones that are estimated by using the thermal resistance model in which heat flow by conduction only. This differences increase with increasing specimens' thickness. This difference become extinct by considering the coexistence heat flow of conduction and radiation in the air phase of specimen. (3) The thermal resistance of specimen increases linearly with increasing specimens' thickness.

  19. Thermal conductivity analysis of lanthanum doped manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mansuri, Irfan; Shaikh, M. W.; Khan, E.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2014-04-24

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of the doped manganites La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} is theoretically analyzed within the framework of Kubo formulae. The Hamiltonian consists of phonon, electron and magnon thermal conductivity contribution term. In this process we took defects, carrier, grain boundary, scattering process term and then calculate phonon, electron and magnon thermal conductivity.

  20. Thermal conductivity of Rene 41 honeycomb panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriugin, V.

    1980-12-01

    Effective thermal conductivities of Rene 41 panels suitable for advanced space transportation vehicle structures were determined analytically and experimentally for temperature ranges between 20.4K (423 F) and 1186K (1675 F). The cryogenic data were obtained using a cryostat whereas the high temperature data were measured using a heat flow meter and a comparative thermal conductivity instrument respectively. Comparisons were made between analysis and experimental data. Analytical methods appear to provide reasonable definition of the honeycomb panel effective thermal conductivities.

  1. Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyejin; Wood, Joshua D; Ryder, Christopher R; Hersam, Mark C; Cahill, David G

    2015-12-22

    The anisotropic thermal conductivity of passivated black phosphorus (BP), a reactive two-dimensional material with strong in-plane anisotropy, is ascertained. The room-temperature thermal conductivity for three crystalline axes of exfoliated BP is measured by time-domain thermo-reflectance. The thermal conductivity along the zigzag direction is ≈2.5 times higher than that of the armchair direction.

  2. Thermal treatments modulate bacterial adhesion to dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Hu, X L; Ho, B; Lim, C T; Hsu, C S

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of laser-induced heat on demineralization of enamel; however, no studies have investigated the link between heat/laser-induced changes in physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. In this study, we investigated the effects of thermal treatment on surface properties of enamel such as hydrophobicity and zeta potential. Bacterial adhesion to treated surfaces was characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and adhesion force was quantified by atomic force microscopy. The hydrophobicity of enamel increased after heating (p < 0.05), and the zeta potential of heated enamel became more negative than that of the control (p < 0.01). Streptococcus oralis and S. mitis were more hydrophilic than S. sanguis, with more negative zeta potential (all p < 0.01). S. mitis and S. oralis occupied significantly less area on enamel after being heated (p < 0.05). Heating reduced the adhesion force of both S. mitis and S. oralis to enamel with or without saliva coating. Reduction of adhesion force was statistically significant for S. mitis (p < 0.01), whereas that of S. oralis was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Heating did not affect the adhesion of S. sanguis with or without saliva coating. In conclusion, thermal treatment and photothermal/laser treatments may modulate the physicochemical properties of enamel, preventing the adhesion of some bacterial species.

  3. Thermal Conductivity Measurement using Thermoelectric Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiwiguna, T. A.; Kim, S. Y.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, thermoelectric module is used as a heater for thermal conductivity measurement of solid materials. Principle of temperature gradient is adopted in this measurement. Stainless steel is utilized as a reference material. Each temperatures are measured by t-type thermocouple and the thermal conductivity is then calculated. The result shows that the thermal conductivity of tested materials is 0.303 W/mK with maximum uncertainty of 3.79%. To assure the result of this measurement, the thermal conductivity of tested material is also measured by laser flash method. The difference result of both measurement is below 5%.

  4. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  5. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-02-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures.

  6. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-02-03

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures.

  7. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  8. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Jeffrey M; Marconnet, Amy M; Kim, Dong Rip; Rao, Pratap M; Panzer, Matthew A; Goodson, Kenneth E; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-10-06

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs.

  9. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, Jeffrey M.; Marconnet, Amy M.; Kim, Dong Rip; Rao, Pratap M.; Panzer, Matthew A.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-10-01

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs.

  10. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofryk, K.; Du, S.; Stanek, C. R.; Lashley, J. C.; Liu, X.-Y.; Schulze, R. K.; Smith, J. L.; Safarik, D. J.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Scott, B. L.; Andersson, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide has been studied for over half a century, as uranium dioxide is the fuel used in a majority of operating nuclear reactors and thermal conductivity controls the conversion of heat produced by fission events to electricity. Because uranium dioxide is a cubic compound and thermal conductivity is a second-rank tensor, it has always been assumed to be isotropic. We report thermal conductivity measurements on oriented uranium dioxide single crystals that show anisotropy from 4 K to above 300 K. Our results indicate that phonon-spin scattering is important for understanding the general thermal conductivity behaviour, and also explains the anisotropy by coupling to the applied temperature gradient and breaking cubic symmetry.

  11. The Electronic Thermal Conductivity of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yun; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-04-13

    Graphene, as a semimetal with the largest known thermal conductivity, is an ideal system to study the interplay between electronic and lattice contributions to thermal transport. While the total electrical and thermal conductivity have been extensively investigated, a detailed first-principles study of its electronic thermal conductivity is still missing. Here, we first characterize the electron-phonon intrinsic contribution to the electronic thermal resistivity of graphene as a function of doping using electronic and phonon dispersions and electron-phonon couplings calculated from first-principles at the level of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW). Then, we include extrinsic electron-impurity scattering using low-temperature experimental estimates. Under these conditions, we find that the in-plane electronic thermal conductivity κe of doped graphene is ∼300 W/mK at room temperature, independently of doping. This result is much larger than expected and comparable to the total thermal conductivity of typical metals, contributing ∼10% to the total thermal conductivity of bulk graphene. Notably, in samples whose physical or domain sizes are of the order of few micrometers or smaller, the relative contribution coming from the electronic thermal conductivity is more important than in the bulk limit, because lattice thermal conductivity is much more sensitive to sample or grain size at these scales. Last, when electron-impurity scattering effects are included we find that the electronic thermal conductivity is reduced by 30 to 70%. We also find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is broadly satisfied at low and high temperatures but with the largest deviations of 20-50% around room temperature.

  12. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  13. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  14. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a “conductivity-limiting” phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  15. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  16. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  17. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Chen, Gang; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  18. New method for measuring the thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Goldratt, E; Greenfield, A J

    1978-11-01

    A new experimental method is presented for measuring the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. The basic innovation lies in extracting from the measured temperature profile of a sample in vacuo, the thermal conductivity of each individual cross-sectional sample element. The estimated experimental error is +/-1%. Not only is high accuracy achieved, but also a self-checking procedure offers the possibility of avoiding systematic errors. Measurements on two samples of type 304 stainless steel are presented. Three independent sets of measurements give consistent values for the thermal conductivity to well within the estimated error of +/-1%.

  19. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  20. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  1. Carbon-nanotube/silver networks in nitrile butadiene rubber for highly conductive flexible adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rujun; Kwon, Seoyoung; Zheng, Qing; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2012-07-03

    An adhesive with high conductivity, flexibility, cyclability, oxidation resistance, and good adhesion is developed using microscale silver flakes, multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with nanoscale silver particles, and nitrile butadiene rubber. Light-emitting-diode chips are attached to the conductive, flexible adhesive pattern on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate as a visual demonstration. The brightness is invariant during bending tests.

  2. Conductive thermal modeling of Wyoming geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D.

    1981-05-01

    A summary of techniques used by the Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group in defining low-temperature hydrothermal resource areas is presented. Emphasis is placed on thermal modeling techniques appropriate to Wyoming's geologic setting. Thermal parameters discussed include oil-well bottom hole temperatures, heat flow, thermal conductivity, and measured temperature-depth profiles. Examples of the use of these techniques are from the regional study of the Bighorn Basin and two site specific studies within the Basin.

  3. Effect of aluminum anodizing in phosphoric acid electrolyte on adhesion strength and thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sulki; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Uoochang; Chung, Wonsub

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance of the anodized aluminum 6061 in phosphoric acid electrolyte to improve the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance for use in metal core printed circuit boards (MCPCB). The electrolyte temperature and applied voltage were altered to generate varied pore structures. The thickness, porosity and pore diameter of the anodized layer were measured. The pore morphologies were affected most by temperature, which was the driving force for ion transportation. The mechanism of adhesive bond was penetration of the epoxy into the pores. The optimal anodization conditions for maximum adhesive bond strength, 27 MPa, were 293 K and 100V. The maximum thermal conductivity of the epoxy-treated anodized layer was 1.6 W/m·K at 273 K. Compared with the epoxy-treated Al layer used for conventional MCPCBs, the epoxy-treated anodized layer showed advanced thermal performance due to a low difference of thermal resistance and high heat dissipation.

  4. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  5. Thermal Conductivity in Nanocrystalline Ceria Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; In-Wook Park; Aleksandr Chernatynskiy; Lingfeng He; Jianliang Lin; John J. Moore; David Swank; Thomas Lillo; Simon R. Phillpot; Anter El-Azab; David H. Hurley

    2014-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline ceria films grown by unbalanced magnetron sputtering is determined as a function of temperature using laser-based modulated thermoreflectance. The films exhibit significantly reduced conductivity compared with stoichiometric bulk CeO2. A variety of microstructure imaging techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the thermal conductivity is influenced by grain boundaries, dislocations, and oxygen vacancies. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity is analyzed using an analytical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The conclusion of this study is that oxygen vacancies pose a smaller impediment to thermal transport when they segregate along grain boundaries.

  6. Engineering thermal conductivity in polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Vahid; Coyle, Eleanor; Kieffer, John; Pipe, Kevin

    Weak inter-chain bonding in polymers is believed to be a bottleneck for both thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Most polymers have low thermal conductivity (~0.1 W/mK), hindering their performance in applications for which thermal management is critical (e.g., electronics packaging). In this work, we use computational methods to study how hydrogen bonding between polymer chains as well as water content can be used to engineer thermal transport in bulk polymers. We examine how changes in the number of hydrogen bonds, chain elongation, density, and vibrational density of states correlate with changes in thermal conductivity for polymer blends composed of different relative constituent fractions. We also consider the effects of bond strength, tacticity, and polymer chain mass. For certain blend fractions, we observe large increases in thermal conductivity, and we analyze these increases in terms of modifications to chain chemistry (e.g., inter-chain bonding) and chain morphology (e.g., chain alignment and radius of gyration). We observe that increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the system results in better packing as well as better chain alignment and elongation that contribute to enhanced thermal conductivity. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0010.

  7. High Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop a lowcost, high thermal conductivity carbon/carbon composite with a mesophase pitch -based matrix. A low...carbonization technique and heat treatment of the mesophase pitch was utilized to enhance composite properties by increasing the composite density...Three different fibers, T300 PAN-based, P55 pitch -based, and an experimental high thermal conductivity mesophase pitch -based, were incorporated as the

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina and Silica Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Julian G. Bernal

    This thesis studies the effects of the base fluid, particle type/size, and volumetric concentration on the thermal conductivity of Alumina and Silica nanofluids. The effects of base fluid were observed by preparing samples using ethylene glycol (EG), water, and mixtures of EG/water as the base fluid and Al2O3 (10 nm) nanoparticles. The particles type/size and volumetric concentration effects were tested by preparing samples of nanofluids using Al2O3 (10nm), Al2O3 (150nm), SiO2 (15 nm), and SiO2 (80 nm) nanoparticles and ionized water as base fluid at different volumetric concentrations. All samples were mixed using a sonicator for 30 minutes and a water circulator to maintain the sample at room temperature. The thermal conductivity was measured using a Thermtest Transient Plane Source TPS 500S. The effects of gravity, Brownian motion and thermophoresis were also studied. EG produced the highest thermal conductivity enhancement out of all base fluids tested. Smaller particle size produced a higher enhancement of thermal conductivity, while the volumetric concentration did not have a significant effect in the thermal conductivity enhancement. Finally, gravity, Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis effects played a role in the total enhancement of the thermal conductivity. The nanoparticles were observed to settle rapidly after sonication suggesting gravity effects may play a significant role.

  9. Thermal conductivity of coal ashes and slags

    SciTech Connect

    Steadman, E.N.; Benson, S.A.; Nowok, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Generally, heat in solids is conducted by the free electrons in metals and alloys at low temperatures, by thermal vibrations of atoms that are observed in the stoichiometric dielectrics, by the free electrons and holes as well as lattice vibrations at the sufficiently high temperatures recorded in semiconductors, and also by ions in amorphous materials at high temperatures. In our case, the linear variations of both thermal and electrical conductivities suggest also that ionization of point defects related to nonstoichiometry, impurities, and dopants plays some role in the thermal conductivity at intermediate and high temperatures. They create free carriers, such as electrons and holes, with concentrations that increase with temperature. The magnitude of this electronic component of thermal conductivity is very low, since {sigma}/k is about 10{sup {minus}6}. Also, there is reason to expect the existence of electrically charged ceramic particles in a liquid-phase sintering medium that may introduce free charges. The ionic component in heat transfer, related to the diffusion of alkali ions, does not play any major role in this range of temperature and can be neglected. This component may take place above some critical temperature, across the surface, or through the volume of the material and is strongly dependent on the glass structure. Figure 7 shows the effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity of Beulah coal ash. Thermal conductivity decreases with the increase of porosity.

  10. Thermal conductivity of coal ashes and slags

    SciTech Connect

    Steadman, E.N.; Benson, S.A.; Nowok, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Generally, heat in solids is conducted by the free electrons in metals and alloys at low temperatures, by thermal vibrations of atoms that are observed in the stoichiometric dielectrics, by the free electrons and holes as well as lattice vibrations at the sufficiently high temperatures recorded in semiconductors, and also by ions in amorphous materials at high temperatures. In our case, the linear variations of both thermal and electrical conductivities suggest also that ionization of point defects related to nonstoichiometry, impurities, and dopants plays some role in the thermal conductivity at intermediate and high temperatures. They create free carriers, such as electrons and holes, with concentrations that increase with temperature. The magnitude of this electronic component of thermal conductivity is very low, since [sigma]/k is about 10[sup [minus]6]. Also, there is reason to expect the existence of electrically charged ceramic particles in a liquid-phase sintering medium that may introduce free charges. The ionic component in heat transfer, related to the diffusion of alkali ions, does not play any major role in this range of temperature and can be neglected. This component may take place above some critical temperature, across the surface, or through the volume of the material and is strongly dependent on the glass structure. Figure 7 shows the effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity of Beulah coal ash. Thermal conductivity decreases with the increase of porosity.

  11. Use of conductive adhesive for MEMS interconnection in military fuze applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gakkestad, Jakob; Dalsjo, Per; Kristiansen, Helge; Johannessen, Rolf; Taklo, Maaike M. Visser

    2010-02-01

    A novel conductive adhesive has been used to interconnect MEMS test structures with different pad sizes directly to a PCB in a medium caliber ammunition fuze. The fuze environment is very demanding with a setback acceleration exceeding 60 000 g and a centripetal acceleration increasing radially with 9000 g/mm. The adhesive shows excellent mechanical and thermal properties. The mounted MEMS test structures have been subjected to rapid temperature cycling according to MIL-STD 883G method 1010.8 test condition B and performed well. The test structures with the largest pad sizes passed 100 temperature cycles and firing test where the test structures have been exposed to an acceleration of more than 60 000 g.

  12. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity by Means of Inverse Solution for One-Dimensional Heat Conduction (Anisotropic Thermal Properties of CFRP for FCEV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Masataka; Monde, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    For safe and fast fueling of hydrogen in a fuel cell electric vehicle at hydrogen fueling stations, an understanding of the heat transferred from the gas into the tank wall (carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) material) during hydrogen fueling is necessary. Its thermal properties are needed in estimating heat loss accurately during hydrogen fueling. The CFRP has anisotropic thermal properties, because it consists of an adhesive agent and layers of the CFRP which is wound with a carbon fiber. In this paper, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the tank wall material were measured by an inverse solution for one-dimensional unsteady heat conduction. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were 2.09 × 10^{-6}{ m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 3.06{ W}{\\cdot }{m}{\\cdot }^{-1}{K}^{-1} for the axial direction, while they were 6.03 × 10^{-7} {m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 0.93 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} for the radial direction. The thermal conductivity for the axial direction was about three times higher than that for the radial direction. The thermal diffusivity shows the same trend in both directions because the thermal capacity, ρ c, is independent of direction, where ρ is the density and c is the heat capacity.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  14. Thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyang; Ying, Hao; Chen, Xiangping; Nika, Denis L.; Cocemasov, Alexandr I.; Cai, Weiwei; Balandin, Alexander A.; Chen, Shanshan

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated experimentally the thermal conductivity of suspended twisted bilayer graphene. The measurements were performed using an optothermal Raman technique. It was found that the thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene is lower than that of monolayer graphene and the reference, Bernal stacked bilayer graphene in the entire temperature range examined (~300-700 K). This finding indicates that the heat carriers - phonons - in twisted bilayer graphene do not behave in the same manner as that observed in individual graphene layers. The decrease in the thermal conductivity found in twisted bilayer graphene was explained by the modification of the Brillouin zone due to plane rotation and the emergence of numerous folded phonon branches that enhance the phonon Umklapp and normal scattering. The results obtained are important for understanding thermal transport in two-dimensional systems.

  15. Lower-Conductivity Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) that have both initial and post-exposure thermal conductivities lower than those of yttria-stabilized zirconia TBCs have been developed. TBCs are thin ceramic layers, generally applied by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition, that are used to insulate air-cooled metallic components from hot gases in gas turbine and other heat engines. Heretofore, yttria-stabilized zirconia (nominally comprising 95.4 atomic percent ZrO2 + 4.6 atomic percent Y2O3) has been the TBC material of choice. The lower-thermal-conductivity TBCs are modified versions of yttria-stabilized zirconia, the modifications consisting primarily in the addition of other oxides that impart microstructural and defect properties that favor lower thermal conductivity.

  16. Thickness dependent thermal conductivity of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziade, Elbara; Yang, Jia; Brummer, Gordie; Nothern, Denis; Moustakas, Theodore; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    As the size of gallium nitride (GaN) transistors is reduced in order to reach higher operating frequencies, heat dissipation becomes the critical bottleneck in device performance and longevity. Despite the importance of characterizing the physics governing the thermal transport in thin GaN films, the literature is far from conclusive. In this letter, we report measurements of thermal conductivity in a GaN film with thickness ranging from 15-1000 nm grown on 4H-SiC without a transition layer. Additionally, we measure the thermal conductivity in the GaN film when it is 1 μm-thick in the temperature range of 300 < T < 600 K and use a phonon transport model to explain the thermal conductivity in this film.

  17. Stable, Thermally Conductive Fillers for Bolted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVesque, Raymond J., II; Jones, Cherie A.; Babel, Henry W.

    2003-01-01

    A commercial structural epoxy [Super Koropon (or equivalent)] has been found to be a suitable filler material for bolted joints that are required to have large thermal conductances. The contact area of such a joint can be less than 1 percent of the apparent joint area, the exact value depending on the roughnesses of the mating surfaces. By occupying the valleys between contact peaks, the filler widens the effective cross section for thermal conduction. In comparison with prior thermal joint-filler materials, the present epoxy offers advantages of stability, ease of application, and -- as a byproduct of its stability -- lasting protection against corrosion. Moreover, unlike silicone greases that have been used previously, this epoxy does not migrate to contaminate adjacent surfaces. Because this epoxy in its uncured state wets metal joint surfaces and has low viscosity, it readily flows to fill the gaps between the mating surfaces: these characteristics affect the overall thermal conductance of the joint more than does the bulk thermal conductivity of the epoxy, which is not exceptional. The thermal conductances of metal-to-metal joints containing this epoxy were found to range between 5 and 8 times those of unfilled joints.

  18. Predict thermal conductivities of pure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The programs presented for the TI-59 programmable calculator can determine the thermal conductivity of pure gases and gases at low pressures as well as the effect of pressure on conductivity. They are based on correlations by Eucken, Stiel-Thodos, Misic-Thodos, Roy-Thodos, and Redlich-Kwong.

  19. Thermal Conductivity Of Natural Type IIa Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan; Vining, Cronin; Zoltan, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Report describes application of flash diffusivity method to measure thermal conductivity of 8.04 x 8.84 x 2.35-mm specimen of natural, white, type-IIa diamond at temperatures between 500 and 1,250 K. Provides baseline for comparison to isotopically pure (12C) diamond. Results used as reference against which diamond films produced by chemical-vapor deposition at low pressures can be compared. High thermal conductivity of diamond exploited for wide variety of applications, and present results also used to estimate heat-conduction performances of diamond films in high-temperature applications.

  20. Tensile adhesion testing methodology for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thermally sprayed coatings consists of lamellae which are oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The lamellae separate and fracture by distinctive mechanisms which are reflected in the failure morphology, and these may be described as adhesive (between the coating and substrate), cohesive (within the coating), or mixed mode. There is a large variability in the failure stress for any nominally identical group of coatings. A lower bound for the fracture toughness of alumina coatings can be calculated as 0.2 MNm exp -3/2. The coating strength values may also be treated as belonging to the statistical distribution of the Weibull function. The Weibull modulus of the coating strength varied from 1.4 to 3.8. This analysis infers that the flaw size within coatings is highly variable and that the flaws are nonuniformly dispersed. The present work focuses on the question of whether tensile adhesion tests are an appropriate testing method for thermally sprayed materials.

  1. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  2. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modification of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.

  3. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modificationmore » of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.« less

  4. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of sodium orthophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Bashir M.; Lundén, Arnold

    2003-10-01

    The transient hot-disc method is used to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity simultaneously for polycrystalline sodium orthophosphate (Na3PO4) in the temperature range 300-800 K. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity showed a gradual decrease up to the transition temperature Tc = 598 K and then rose rapidly, reaching a peak at 617 K, followed by a decreasing tendency identified with lower peaks up to 800 K. These data were compared with previous thermal conductivity and diffusivity measurements of pure Li2SO4. In the pure Li2SO4 case, the possibility of linking the heat conduction to the paddle-wheel mechanism has been reported. However, in the present case, the link was not so obvious, in spite of the fact that, in other non-thermal studies, it has been well justified. Possible reasons are given to explain the lack of sensitivity in the thermal behaviour of Na3PO4 for it to be linked to this mechanism. These reasons where attributed to the detailed microstructure and to the effect of replacing the anions (PO4)3- by (SO4)2- and/or replacing the cations Na+ by Li+ in the two cases.

  5. Nanostructured conducting polymers for stiffness controlled cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Eric; Hama, Adel; Ismailova, Esma; Assaud, Loic; Malliaras, George; Hanbücken, Margrit; Owens, Roisin M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a facile and reproducible method, based on ultra thin porous alumina membranes, to produce cm2 ordered arrays of nano-pores and nano-pillars on any kind of substrates. In particular our method enables the fabrication of conducting polymers nano-structures, such as poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (PEDOT:PSS). Here, we demonstrate the potential interest of those templates with controlled cell adhesion studies. The triggering of the eventual fate of the cell (proliferation, death, differentiation or migration) is mediated through chemical cues from the adsorbed proteins and physical cues such as surface energy, stiffness and topography. Interestingly, as well as through material properties, stiffness modifications can be induced by nano-topography, the ability of nano-pillars to bend defining an effective stiffness. By controlling the diameter, length, depth and material of the nano-structures, one can possibly tune the effective stiffness of a (nano) structured substrate. First results indicate a possible change in the fate of living cells on such nano-patterned devices, whether they are made of conducting polymer (soft material) or silicon (hard material).

  6. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  8. Role of interfaces on thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liping

    Using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study the role of interfaces on the thermal transport properties, and their role in overall heat flow in nanoscale materials. For the simple monoatomic liquid-solid interface, our simulations reveal that the key factor controlling interfacial thermal resistance is the strength of the bonding between liquid and solid atoms. The functional dependence of the thermal resistance on the strength of the liquid-solid interactions exhibits two distinct regimes. Surprisingly, ordering of the liquid at the liquid-solid interface shows no effect on the thermal transport either normal to the surface or parallel to the surface. The results suggest that the experimentally observed large enhancement of thermal conductivity in suspension of solid nanosized particles (nanofluids) can not be explained by altered thermal transport properties of the layered liquid. For the heat flow between a carbon nanotube and octane liquid interface, our simulation demonstrates the key role played by the soft vibrational modes in the mechanism of the heat flow. The results also imply that the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube polymer composites and organic suspensions is limited by the interfacial thermal resistance and are consistent with recent experiments. We find that chemical functionalization of carbon nanotube reduces significantly the tube-matrix thermal boundary resistance, but at the same time decreases intrinsic tube conductivity. Interestingly, at high degrees of chemical functionalization, intrinsic tube conductivity becomes independent of the bond density, indicating important role of long-wavelength phonons in carbon nanotubes. Finally, we explore a different type of interfacial system: a bulk macromolecular liquid. In this case, the heat flow is controlled by the inter- and intra-chain thermal transport properties. Our simulations demonstrate that in order to significantly enhance the thermal conductivity of the liquid

  9. Thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of thin films in Li ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2016-09-01

    Laser physical vapor deposition is used to deposit thin films of lithium phosphorous oxynitride in nitrogen and lithium nickel manganese oxide in oxygen ambient on Si substrate. LIPON film is also deposited on LiNiMnO film that is deposited on Si. Graphene films consisting of graphene platelets are deposited on Si substrate from a suspension in isopropyl alcohol. Li-graphene films are obtained after Li adsorption by immersion in LiCl solution and further drying. Transient thermo reflectance signal is used to determine the cross-plane thermal conductivity of different layers and interface thermal conductance of the interfaces. The results show that LIPON film with lower thermal conductivity is a thermal barrier. The interface thermal conductance between LIPON and Au or Si is found to be very low. Thermal conductivity of LiNiMnO is found to be reasonably high so that it is not a barrier to thermal transport. Film with graphene platelets shows a higher value and Li adsorbed graphene film shows a much higher value of cross-plane thermal conductivity. The value of interface thermal conductance between graphene and Au or Si (100) substrate is also much lower. The implications of the results for the thermal transport in thin film Li batteries are discussed.

  10. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Rogers, Michael Ray; Judkins, Roddie R.

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  11. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Sandhya; Kumar, Raghuvesh; Kumar, Munish

    2017-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the size and shape effects on specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials. The formulation developed for specific heat is based on the basic concept of cohesive energy and melting temperature. The specific heat of Ag and Au nanoparticles is reported and the effect of size and shape has been studied. We observed that specific heat increases with the reduction of particle size having maximum shape effect for spherical nanoparticle. To provide a more critical test, we extended our model to study the thermal conductivity and used it for the study of Si, diamond, Cu, Ni, Ar, ZrO2, BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 nanomaterials. A significant reduction is found in the thermal conductivity for nanomaterials by decreasing the size. The model predictions are consistent with the available experimental and simulation results. This demonstrates the suitability of the model proposed in this paper.

  12. Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Caged Structural Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, H.; Hida, K.; Kase, N.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    Thermal conductivity of Ca3Rh4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 were measured in magnetic fields to reveal superconducting state. From magnetic susceptibility χ(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) measurements, superconducting transition temperature Tc of Ca3Rh4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 is determined to be 8 and 5 K, respectively. Thermal conductivity κ(T) of Ca3Rh4Sn13 indicates that superconducting state is nodeless s-wave, because residual thermal conductivity κ0/T in zero magnetic field is very small. On the other hand, κ(T) of Sr3Ir4Sn13 in zero magnetic field suggests that superconductivity possesses nodal gap rather than full gap. Whether nodal superconducting gap exists or not still remains to be clarified, because there is a possibility that the achieving temperature is insufficient to discuss superconducting state.

  13. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Judkins, R.R.

    2000-07-18

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  14. The thermal conductivity of benzene and toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramires, M. L. V.; Vieira Dos Santos, F. J.; Mardolcar, U. V.; de Castro, C. A. Nieto

    1989-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquid toluene and benzene was measured in the temperature range 298 to 370 K, near the saturation line, using an absolute transient hot-wire technique. The measurements were made in a modified version of an existing instrument, equipped with a new automatic Wheatstone bridge, computer controlled. The bridge measures the time that the resistance of a 7- μm-diameter platinum wire takes to reach predetermined values, programmed by the computer. The computer can generate up to 1024 analog voltages, via a 12-bit D/A converter. The accuracy of the measurements with this new arrangement was assessed by measuring the thermal conductivity of a primary standard, toluene, at several temperatures and was found to be of the order of 0.3%. Benzene was chosen because it is under study as a possible secondary standard for liquid thermal conductivity by the Subcommittee on Transport Properties of IUPAC.

  15. Modulating thermal conduction by the axial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhao, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the symmetry of interparticle potential plays an important role in the one-dimensional thermal conduction problem. Here we demonstrate that, by introducing strain into the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β lattice, the interparticle potential can be converted from symmetric to asymmetric, which leads to a change of the asymptotic decaying behavior of the heat current autocorrelation function. More specifically, such a change in the symmetry of the potential induces a fast decaying stage, in which the heat current autocorrelation function decays faster than power-law manners or in a power-law manner but faster than ~t -1, in the transient stage. The duration of the fast decaying stage increases with increasing strain ratio and decreasing of the temperature. As a result, the thermal conductivity calculated following the Green-Kubo formula may show a truncation-time independent behavior, suggesting a system-size independent thermal conductivity.

  16. High Thermal Conductivity Graphite Electronic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, S. O.; Young, G. L.; Mellberg, W. J.; Wellman, A. F.; Cooney, J. E.

    1996-08-01

    This project will apply high thermal conductivity graphite to three major spacecraft electronic components: (1) the thermal plane of a printed wiring board, (2) the subassembly or tray that holds the board, and (3) the equipment panel that the tray mounts on. The complete heat transfer path from chip level heat source to radiative rejection on the exterior surface of the equipment panel will therefore be addressed. Thermal and structural requirements representative of current spacecraft will drive an optimized solution strategy. The project will be completed by fabricating the three prototypical test articles and measuring their performance in a representative space environment.

  17. Life cycle assessment of Japanese high-temperature conductive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Andrae, Anders S G; Itsubo, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Inaba, Atsushi

    2008-04-15

    The electrically conductive adhesives (ECA) are on the verge of a breakthrough as reliable interconnection materials for electronic components. As the ban of lead (Pb) in the electronics industry becomes a reality, the ECA's could be attractive overall alternatives to high melting point (HMP) Pb-based solder pastes. Environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to estimate trade-offs between the energy use and the potential toxicity of two future types of ECA's and one HMP Pb-based. The probability is around 90% that the overall CO2 emissions from an ECA based on a tin-bismuth alloy are lower than for a silver-epoxy based ECA, whereas the probability is about 80% that the cumulative energy demand would be lower. It is more uncertain whether the tin-bismuth ECA would contribute to less CO2, or consume less energy, than a HMP Pb-based solder paste. Moreover, for the impact categories contributing to the life-cycle impact assessment method based on end point modeling (LIME) damage category of human health, the tin-bismuth ECA shows a 25 times lower score, and a silver-epoxy based ECA shows an 11 times lower score than the HMP Pb-based solder paste. In order to save resources and decrease CO2 emissions it is recommended to increase the collection and recycling of printed board assemblies using silver-epoxy based ECA.

  18. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect

    PI: James S. Tulenko; Co-PI: Ronald H. Baney,

    2007-10-14

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the most common fuel material in commercial nuclear power reactors. UO2 has the advantages of a high melting point, good high-temperature stability, good chemical compatibility with cladding and coolant, and resistance to radiation. The main disadvantage of UO2 is its low thermal conductivity. During a reactor’s operation, because the thermal conductivity of UO2 is very low, for example, about 2.8 W/m-K at 1000 oC [1], there is a large temperature gradient in the UO2 fuel pellet, causing a very high centerline temperature, and introducing thermal stresses, which lead to extensive fuel pellet cracking. These cracks will add to the release of fission product gases after high burnup. The high fuel operating temperature also increases the rate of fission gas release and the fuel pellet swelling caused by fission gases bubbles. The amount of fission gas release and fuel swelling limits the life time of UO2 fuel in reactor. In addition, the high centerline temperature and large temperature gradient in the fuel pellet, leading to a large amount of stored heat, increase the Zircaloy cladding temperature in a lost of coolant accident (LOCA). The rate of Zircaloy-water reaction becomes significant at the temperature above 1200 oC [2]. The ZrO2 layer generated on the surface of the Zircaloy cladding will affect the heat conduction, and will cause a Zircaloy cladding rupture. The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of UO2, while not affecting the neutronic property of UO2 significantly. The concept to accomplish this goal is to incorporate another material with high thermal conductivity into the UO2 pellet. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a good candidate, because the thermal conductivity of single crystal SiC is 60 times higher than that of UO2 at room temperature and 30 times higher at 800 oC [3]. Silicon carbide also has the properties of low thermal neutron absorption cross section, high melting point, good chemical

  19. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  20. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  1. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; ...

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness formore » extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.« less

  2. Infrared Detector System with Controlled Thermal Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal infrared detector system includes a heat sink, a support member, a connection support member connecting the support member to the heat sink and including a heater unit is reviewed. An infrared detector element is mounted on the support member and a temperature signal representative of the infrared energy contacting the support member can then be derived by comparing the temperature of the support member and the heat sink. The temperature signal from a support member and a temperature signal from the connection support member can then be used to drive a heater unit mounted on the connection support member to thereby control the thermal conductance of the support member. Thus, the thermal conductance can be controlled so that it can be actively increased or decreased as desired.

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Delozier, D. M.; Working, D. c.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In efforts to improve the thermal conductivity of Ultem(TM) 1000, it was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nano-fillers were aligned. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and the mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction using the Nanoflash technique. The results of this study will be presented.

  4. Thermal and electrical contact conductance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, S. W.; Nilles, M.

    1985-01-01

    Prediction of electrical and thermal contact resistance for pressed, nominally flat contacts is complicated by the large number of variables which influence contact formation. This is reflected in experimental results as a wide variation in contact resistances, spanning up to six orders of magnitude. A series of experiments were performed to observe the effects of oxidation and surface roughness on contact resistance. Electrical contact resistance and thermal contact conductance from 4 to 290 K on OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Electrical contact resistance was measured with a 4-wire DC technique. Thermal contact conductance was determined by steady-state longitudinal heat flow. Corrections for the bulk contribution ot the overall measured resistance were made, with the remaining resistance due solely to the presence of the contact.

  5. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  6. Reducing Thermal Conduction In Acoustic Levitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G.; Leung, Emily W.; Bhat, Balakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic transducers containing piezoelectric driving elements made more resistant to heat by reduction of effective thermal-conductance cross sections of metal vibration-transmitting rods in them, according to proposal. Used to levitate small objects acoustically for noncontact processing in furnaces. Reductions in cross sections increase amplitudes of transmitted vibrations and reduce loss of heat from furnaces.

  7. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on consolidated Soil Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferlin, K.; Heimberg, M.; Thomas, N.

    2007-08-01

    Heat transport in porous media such as soils and regolith is significantly reduced compared to the properties of compact samples of the same material. The bottle neck for solid state heat transport is the contact area between adjacent grains. For "dry" and unconsolidated materials the contact areas and thus the thermal conductivity are extremely small. Sintering and cementation are two processes that can increase the cross section of interstitial bonds signifcantly. On Mars, cementation can be caused by condensation of water or carbon dioxide ice from the vapor phase, or from salts and minerals that fall out from aqueous solutions. We produced several artificially cemented samples, using small glass beads of uniform size as soil analog. The cementation is achieved by initially molten wax that is mixed with the glass beads while liqiud. The wax freezes preferably at the contact points between grains, thus minimizing surface energy, and consolidates the samples. The thermal conductivity of these samples is then measured in vacuum. We present the results of these measurements and compare them with theoretical models. The observed range of thermal conductivity values can explain some, but not all of the variations in thermal intertia that can be seen in TES remote sensing data.

  8. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Synthesized Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Luo, S.; Mosenfelder, J. L.; Liu, W.; Staneff, G. D.; Ahrens, T. J.; Chen, G.

    2002-12-01

    Direct thermal conductivity (k) measurement of mantle minerals is crucial to constrain the thermal profile of the Earth as well as geodynamic studies of the mantle (e.g., to determine the Rayleigh number). We have embarked on systematic multi-anvil syntheses of dense polycrystalline specimens of mantle phases of adequate size and zero porosity for precise thermal conductivity measurements by the 3ω method (\\textit{Cahill and Pohl, Phys. Rev. B, 1987}) under elevated temperatures (T). Coesite and stishovite (see \\textit{Luo et al., GRL, 2002}) as well as majorite and wadsleyite have been synthesized; ringwoodite and perovskite are scheduled. Preliminary thermal conductivity measurements at ambient pressure on coesite (120 - 300 K, 9.53 Wm-1K-1 at 300 K) are consistent with prior room temperature data (\\textit{Yukutake & Shimada, PEPI, 1978}), while our stishovite data at 300 K appear to be low (1.96 Wm-1K-1). Efforts are being made to extend the measurement to higher temperatures (e.g., above Debye temperature Θ D), thus allowing determination of k(T) relationship (say, k~ T-n); success will depend on the decomposition kinetics of these metastable phases. The pressure dependence of k of these synthesized samples can also be measured (\\textit{e.g., Osako et al., HPMPS-6, 2002; Xu et al., EOS, 2001}). Recent thermal conductivity measurement on LiF and Al2O_3 from shock wave loading (\\textit{Holland & Ahrens, 1998}) is consistent with the modeling on MgO and Al2O_3 (\\textit{Manga & Jeanloz, JGR, 1997}) with classical theories. Thus, k values at modest pressures and T (say, above Θ D) would allow extrapolation of k to appropriate mantle conditions.

  9. Thermal conductivity of graphene and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alofi, A.; Srivastava, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    The thermal conductivities of graphene and graphite are computed within the framework of Callaway's effective relaxation time theory. Analytical expressions derived by Nihira and Iwata for phonon dispersion relations and vibrational density of states are employed, based on the semicontinuum model proposed by Komatsu and Nagamiya. The conductivity of graphene is predicted to be higher than the in-plane conductivity of graphite for all temperatures. Incorporation of the 13C isotope can be expected to produce significant reduction in the conductivity of graphene in the temperature range 50-300 K. In the presence of tensile strain on graphene, the specific heat increases, but the conductivity can decrease or increase depending on the level of the purity and temperature of the sample.

  10. Biological properties of a thermally crosslinked gelatin film as a novel anti-adhesive material: Relationship between the biological properties and the extent of thermal crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Tanzawa, Ayumi; Miyamoto, Hiroe; Horii, Tsunehito; Tsuji, Misaki; Kawasumi, Akari; Tamura, Atsushi; Wang, Zhen; Abe, Rie; Tanaka, Shota; Yamanaka, Kouki; Matoba, Mari; Torii, Hiroko; Ozamoto, Yuki; Takamori, Hideki; Suzuki, Shuko; Morita, Shinichiro; Ikada, Yoshito; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2015-10-01

    In order to prevent postoperative adhesion and the related complications, a thermally crosslinked gelatin (TCG) film was developed and the basic biological properties were examined, paying special attention to the relationship between these properties and the extent of crosslinking of the film. The gelatin films crosslinked thermally for five different time periods (0, 1, 3, 8, and 14 hours) were developed and the following tests were performed. Regarding the material characterization of the films, the water content, the water solubility, and the enzymatic degradation for collagenase were found to be closely related to the duration of thermal crosslinking. In an in vitro study conducted to examine the cell growth of fibroblasts cultured on the films, the degree of cell growth, except no crosslinked film, was less than that observed in the control group, thus suggesting that such effects of the films on fibroblast cell growth may be related with their anti-adhesive effects. In in vivo tests, the films crosslinked for longer time periods (3, 8, and 14 hours) were retained for longer after being implanted into the abdominal cavity in rats and showed a significant anti-adhesive effect in the rat cecum adhesion models, indicating that the biodegradability and anti-adhesive effects of the TCG films depend on the duration of thermal crosslinking. In order to develop useful and effective anti-adhesive gelatin film, it is very important to optimize duration of the thermal crosslinking.

  11. Thermal effects in microfluidics with thermal conductivity spatially modulated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A heat transfer model on a microfluidic is resolved analytically. The model describes a fluid at rest between two parallel plates where each plate is maintained at a differentially specified temperature and the thermal conductivity of the microfluidic is spatially modulated. The heat transfer model in such micro-hydrostatic configuration is analytically resolved using the technique of the Laplace transform applying the Bromwich Integral and the Residue theorem. The temperature outline in the microfluidic is presented as an infinite series of Bessel functions. It is shown that the result for the thermal conductivity spatially modulated has as a particular case the solution when the thermal conductivity is spatially constant. All computations were performed using the computer algebra software Maple. It is claimed that the analytical obtained results are important for the design of nanoscale devices with applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, it is suggested some future research lines such as the study of the heat transfer model in a microfluidic resting between coaxial cylinders with radially modulated thermal conductivity in order to achieve future developments in this area.

  12. Thermal Boundary Conductance: A Materials Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachon, Christian; Weber, Ludger; Dames, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of materials pairs in atomically intimate contact is reviewed as a practical guide for materials scientists. First, analytical and computational models of TBC are reviewed. Five measurement methods are then compared in terms of their sensitivity to TBC: the 3ω method, frequency- and time-domain thermoreflectance, the cut-bar method, and a composite effective thermal conductivity method. The heart of the review surveys 30 years of TBC measurements around room temperature, highlighting the materials science factors experimentally proven to influence TBC. These factors include the bulk dispersion relations, acoustic contrast, and interfacial chemistry and bonding. The measured TBCs are compared across a wide range of materials systems by using the maximum transmission limit, which with an attenuated transmission coefficient proves to be a good guideline for most clean, strongly bonded interfaces. Finally, opportunities for future research are discussed.

  13. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Full Heusler Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangang; Amsler, Maximilian; Xia, Yi; Naghavi, S Shahab; Hegde, Vinay I; Hao, Shiqiang; Goedecker, Stefan; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds; Wolverton, Chris

    2016-07-22

    Semiconducting half and, to a lesser extent, full Heusler compounds are promising thermoelectric materials due to their compelling electronic properties with large power factors. However, intrinsically high thermal conductivity resulting in a limited thermoelectric efficiency has so far impeded their widespread use in practical applications. Here, we report the computational discovery of a class of hitherto unknown stable semiconducting full Heusler compounds with ten valence electrons (X_{2}YZ, X=Ca, Sr, and Ba; Y=Au and Hg; Z=Sn, Pb, As, Sb, and Bi) through high-throughput ab initio screening. These new compounds exhibit ultralow lattice thermal conductivity κ_{L} close to the theoretical minimum due to strong anharmonic rattling of the heavy noble metals, while preserving high power factors, thus resulting in excellent phonon-glass electron-crystal materials.

  14. Fluctuations of thermal conductivity and morphological stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Compositional fluctuations of the binary alloy result in the corresponding fluctuations of the thermal conductivity of the material. During crystal growth, these fluctuations can significantly modify the local temperature fields at the liquid-solid interface. This, in turn, will affect the morphological stability of the growing interface. In this work, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of the solid phase has been included into the Mullins-Sekerka formalism. A significant effect on the onset of the instability of planar interface has been predicted. It has been found, in particular, that for binary systems with the segregation coefficient above unity a flat interface is always unstable. The shape of the interface fluctuation should have a single harmonic character with a well defined wavelength.

  15. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Full Heusler Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiangang; Amsler, Maximilian; Xia, Yi; Naghavi, S. Shahab; Hegde, Vinay I.; Hao, Shiqiang; Goedecker, Stefan; OzoliĆš, Vidvuds; Wolverton, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Semiconducting half and, to a lesser extent, full Heusler compounds are promising thermoelectric materials due to their compelling electronic properties with large power factors. However, intrinsically high thermal conductivity resulting in a limited thermoelectric efficiency has so far impeded their widespread use in practical applications. Here, we report the computational discovery of a class of hitherto unknown stable semiconducting full Heusler compounds with ten valence electrons (X2Y Z , X =Ca , Sr, and Ba; Y =Au and Hg; Z =Sn , Pb, As, Sb, and Bi) through high-throughput ab initio screening. These new compounds exhibit ultralow lattice thermal conductivity κL close to the theoretical minimum due to strong anharmonic rattling of the heavy noble metals, while preserving high power factors, thus resulting in excellent phonon-glass electron-crystal materials.

  16. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of UHTC: Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Murry, Daw; Squire, Thomas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  18. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  19. Workshop on thin film thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Albert; Balzaretti, Naira M.; Guenther, Arthur H.

    1998-04-01

    On a subject of considerable import to the laser-induced damage community, a two day workshop on the topic, Thin Film Thermal Conductivity Measurement was held as part of the 13th Symposium on Thermophysical Properties at the University of Colorado in Boulder CO, June 25 and 26, 1997. The Workshop consisted of 4 sessions of 17 oral presentations and two discussion sessions. Two related subjects of interest were covered; 1) methods and problems associated with measuring thermal conductivity ((kappa) ) of thin films, and 2) measuring and (kappa) of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond. On the subject of thin film (kappa) measurement, several recently developed imaginative techniques were reviewed. However, several authors disagreed on how much (kappa) in a film differs from (kappa) in a bulk material of the same nominal composition. A subject of controversy was the definition of an interface. In the first discussion session, several questions were addressed, a principal one being, how do we know that the values of (kappa) we obtain are correct and is there a role for standards in thin film (kappa) measurement. The second discussion session was devoted to a round-robin interlaboratory comparison of (kappa) measurements on a set of CVD diamond specimens and several other specimens of lower thermal conductivity. Large interlaboratory differences obtained in an earlier round robin had been attributed to specimen inhomogeneity. Unfortunately, large differences were also observed in the second round robin even though the specimens were more homogenous. There was good consistency among the DC measurements, however, the AC measurements showed much greater variability. There was positive feedback from most of the attenders regarding the Workshop with nearly all respondents recommending another Workshop in three or fewer years. There was general recognition that thin film thermal conductivity measurements are important for predicting the resistance of optical coating

  20. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  1. Design principles of interfacial thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    We explore fundamental principles to design the thermal conductance across solid interfaces by changing the composition and disorder of an intermediate matching layer. In absence of phonon-phonon interactions, the layer addition involves two competing effects that influence the conductance. The layer can act as an impedance matching 'bridge' to increase the mode-averaged phonon transmission. However, it also reduces the relevant modes that conserve their momenta transverse to the interface, so that the net result depends on features such as the overlap of conserving modes and the dispersivity of the transverse subbands. Moving into the interacting anharmonic regime, we find that the added layer aids conductance when the decreased resistances at the contact-layer boundaries compensate for the layer resistance. In fact, we show that the maximum conductance corresponds to an exact matching of the two separate contact-layer resistances. For instance, if we vary just the atomic mass across layers, then maximum conductance happens when the intervening layer mass is the geometric mean of the contact masses. We conjecture that the best interfacial layer is one that is compositionally graded into many geometric means - in other words, an exponential variation in thermal impedance.

  2. Evaluation of New Thermally Conductive Geopolymer in Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, Matěj; Uhlík, Jan; Nosek, Jaroslav; Lachman, Vladimír; Hladký, Radim; Franěk, Jan; Brož, Milan

    This paper describes an evaluation of a newly developed thermally conductive geopolymer (TCG), consisting of a mixture of sodium silicate and carbon micro-particles. The TCG is intended to be used as a component of high temperature energy storage (HTTES) to improve its thermal diffusivity. Energy storage is crucial for both ecological and economical sustainability. HTTES plays a vital role in solar energy technologies and in waste heat recovery. The most advanced HTTES technologies are based on phase change materials or molten salts, but suffer with economic and technological limitations. Rock or concrete HTTES are cheaper, but they have low thermal conductivity without incorporation of TCG. It was observed that TCG is stable up to 400 °C. The thermal conductivity was measured in range of 20-23 W m-1 K-1. The effect of TCG was tested by heating a granite block with an artificial fissure. One half of the fissure was filled with TCG and the other with ballotini. 28 thermometers, 5 dilatometers and strain sensors were installed on the block. The heat transport experiment was evaluated with COMSOL Multiphysics software.

  3. Analytical estimation of skeleton thermal conductivity of a geopolymer foam from thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henon, J.; Alzina, A.; Absi, J.; Smith, D. S.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    The geopolymers are alumino-silicate binders. The addition of a high pores volume fraction, gives them a thermal insulation character desired in the building industry. In this work, potassium geopolymer foams were prepared at room temperature (< 70 ∘C) by a process of in situ gas release. The porosity distribution shows a multiscale character. However, the thermal conductivity measurements gave values from 0.35 to 0.12 Wm-1.K-1 for a pore volume fraction values between 65 and 85%. In the aim to predict the thermal properties of these foams and focus on the relationship "thermal-conductivity/microstructure", knowledge of the thermal conductivity of their solid skeleton (λ s ) is paramount. However, there is rare work on the determination of this value depending on the initial composition. By the formulation used, the foaming agent contributes to the final network, and it is not possible to obtain a dense material designate to make a direct measurement of λ s . The objective of this work is to use inverse analytical methods to identify the value of λ s . Measurements of thermal conductivity by the fluxmetre technique were performed. The obtained value of the solid skeleton thermal conductivity by the inverse numerical technique is situated in a framework between 0.95 and 1.35 Wm-1.K-1 and is in agreement with one issue from the literature.

  4. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  5. Thermal conductivities of thin, sputtered optical films

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Pawlewicz, W.T.

    1991-05-01

    The normal component of the thin film thermal conductivity has been measured for the first time for several advanced sputtered optical materials. Included are data for single layers of boron nitride (BN), aluminum nitride (AIN), silicon aluminum nitride (Si-Al-N), silicon aluminum oxynitride (Si-Al-O-N), silicon carbide (SiC), and for dielectric-enhanced metal reflectors of the form Al(SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}){sup n} and Al(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AIN){sup n}. Sputtered films of more conventional materials like SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Ti, and Si have also been measured. The data show that thin film thermal conductivities are typically 10 to 100 times lower than conductivities for the same materials in bulk form. Structural disorder in the amorphous or very fine-grained films appears to account for most of the conductivity difference. Conclusive evidence for a film/substrate interface contribution is presented.

  6. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    It is generally observed that the thermal conductivity of LWR MOX fuel is lower than that of pure UO2. For MOX, the degradation is usually only interpreted as an effect of the substitution of U atoms by Pu. This hypothesis is however in contradiction with the observations of Duriez and Philiponneau showing that the thermal conductivity of MOX is independent of the Pu content in the ranges 3-15 and 15-30 wt.% PuO2 respectively. Attributing this degradation to Pu only implies that stoichiometric heterogeneous MOX can be obtained, while we show that any heterogeneity in the plutonium distribution in the sample introduces a variation in the local stoichiometry which in turn has a strong impact on the thermal conductivity. A model quantifying this effect is obtained and a new set of experimental results for homogeneous and heterogeneous MOX fuels is presented and used to validate the proposed model. In irradiated fuels, this effect is predicted to disappear early during irradiation. The 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu samples have a similar thermal conductivity. Comparison of the results for this homogeneous microstructure with MIMAS (heterogeneous) fuel of the same composition showed no difference for the Pu contents of 3, 5.9, 6, 7.87 and 10 wt.%. A small increase of the thermal conductivity was obtained for 15 wt.% Pu. This increase is of about 6% when compared to the average of the values obtained for 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu. For comparison purposes, Duriez also measured the thermal conductivity of FBR MOX with 21.4 wt.% Pu with O/M = 1.982 and a density close to 95% TD and found a value in good agreement with the estimation obtained using the formula of Philipponneau [8] for FBR MOX, and significantly lower than his results corresponding to the range 3-15 wt.% Pu. This difference in thermal conductivity is of about 20%, i.e. higher than the measurement uncertainties.Thus, a significant difference was observed between FBR and PWR MOX fuels, but was not explained. This difference

  7. Treating Fibrous Insulation to Reduce Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Alfred; Tarkanian, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A chemical treatment reduces the convective and radiative contributions to the effective thermal conductivity of porous fibrous thermal-insulation tile. The net effect of the treatment is to coat the surfaces of fibers with a mixture of transition-metal oxides (TMOs) without filling the pores. The TMO coats reduce the cross-sectional areas available for convection while absorbing and scattering thermal radiation in the pores, thereby rendering the tile largely opaque to thermal radiation. The treatment involves a sol-gel process: A solution containing a mixture of transition-metal-oxide-precursor salts plus a gelling agent (e.g., tetraethylorthosilicate) is partially cured, then, before it visibly gels, is used to impregnate the tile. The solution in the tile is gelled, then dried, and then the tile is fired to convert the precursor salts to the desired mixed TMO phases. The amounts of the various TMOs ultimately incorporated into the tile can be tailored via the concentrations of salts in the solution, and the impregnation depth can be tailored via the viscosity of the solution and/or the volume of the solution relative to that of the tile. The amounts of the TMOs determine the absorption and scattering spectra.

  8. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  9. Estimating stomatal conductance with thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, I; Grant, O M; Tagliavia, C P P; Chaves, M M; Jones, H G

    2006-08-01

    Most thermal methods for the study of drought responses in plant leaves are based on the calculation of 'stress indices'. This paper proposes and compares three main extensions of these for the direct estimation of absolute values of stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs) using infrared thermography (IRT). All methods use the measured leaf temperature and two environmental variables (air temperature and boundary layer resistance) as input. Additional variables required, depending on the method, are the temperatures of wet and dry reference surfaces, net radiation and relative humidity. The methods were compared using measured gs data from a vineyard in Southern Portugal. The errors in thermal estimates of conductance were of the same order as the measurement errors using a porometer. Observed variability was also compared with theoretical estimates of errors in estimated gs determined on the basis of the errors in the input variables (leaf temperature, boundary layer resistance, net radiation) and the partial derivatives of the energy balance equations used for the gs calculations. The full energy balance approach requires accurate estimates of net radiation absorbed, which may not be readily available in field conditions, so alternatives using reference surfaces are shown to have advantages. A new approach using a dry reference leaf is particularly robust and recommended for those studies where the specific advantages of thermal imagery, including its non-contact nature and its ability to sample large numbers of leaves, are most apparent. Although the results suggest that estimates of the absolute magnitude of gs are somewhat subjective, depending on the skill of the experimenter at selecting evenly exposed leaves, relative treatment differences in conductance are sensitively detected by different experimenters.

  10. Electronic thermal conductivity of suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, K. Rizwana Sankeshwar, N. S.

    2014-04-24

    Electronic thermal conductivity, κ{sub e}, of suspended graphene is studied for 20K 100K, becoming dominant for T > 250K. Good agreement with recent experimental data is obtained.

  11. Measuring Contact Thermal Conductances at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Brooks, Walter; Spivak, Alan L.; Marks, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Instrument measures thermal conductance of pressed contacts in liquid helium. Makes measurements automatically as function of force on pairs of brass samples having various surface finishes. Developed as part of effort to determine heat-transfer characteristics of bolted joints on cryogenically cooled focal planes in infrared equipment. Cylindrical chamber hangs from cover plate in bath of liquid helium. Inside chamber rocker arm applies controlled force to samples. Upper sample made slightly wider than lower one so two samples remain in complete contact even under slight lateral misalignment.

  12. Surfactant-Free Synthesis of Copper Particles for Electrically Conductive Adhesive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Ngee; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    In this study, a simple one-step microwave-assisted method was developed to synthesize Cu and Cu-Ag particles for application in electrically conductive adhesive (ECA). The particle size of the obtained Cu particles was about 1 μm to 3 μm, whereas Cu-Ag particles were in the range of 0.1 μm to 1.0 μm. ECA samples were cured at 175°C for 1 h. Results revealed that the as-cured ECAs showed significant differences in electrical resistivity. The resistivity of Cu-filled ECA was on the order of 10-5 Ω cm, which was lower than the Cu-Ag-filled ECAs with resistivity on the order of 10-3 Ω cm. The thermal stability of the ECAs was studied under high-temperature exposure at 125°C for 1000 h. Results showed that Cu-filled ECA was thermally stable for 1000 h of aging, whereas Cu-Ag-filled ECAs were thermally stable for aging time above 100 h.

  13. Sintering Behavior and Effect of Silver Nanowires on the Electrical Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Xiong, N N; Wang, Y H; Zhao, Y Z; Li, J Z

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of silver nanowires with a 160 nm average diameter ranging from 30 to 90 µm length and a 450 nm average diameter up to 100 µm length were successfully synthesized by a polyol process with FeCl3 and Na₂S as reaction inhibitor, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the morphologies and sintering behaviors of both of silver nanowires are impacted by glutaric acid and sintering temperature. The isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs) filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires as hybrid fillers were fabricated and the electrical properties were investigated based on the fraction of the silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers and the curing temperature, etc. The in situ monitoring the variation in electrical resistance of the ICAs explores that silver nanowires have influence on the curing behavior of the ICAs. Silver nanowires synthesized with Na2S as reaction inhibitor and treated with glutaric acid can significantly improve the electrical conductivity of the ICAs in the case of the low loading of silver fillers in the appropriate proportion range of the weight ratio of micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires, primarily as a result of connecting effect. When the loading of silver fillers in the ICAs is high, the electrical conductivity is also enhanced slightly in the case of the proper fraction of silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers. The effect of the curing temperature on the electrical conductivity relates to the fraction of silver nanowires and the total loading of silver fillers. The electrical conductivity of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires synthesized with FeCl₃ as reaction inhibitor is greatly damaged, indicating that the size of silver nanowires also is one of main factor to impact the electrical conductivity of the ICAs doped with silver nanowires. The electrical property of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver

  14. Multifunctional Lattices with Low Thermal Expansion and Low Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hang; Liu, Lu; Pasini, Damiano

    Systems in space are vulnerable to large temperature changes when travelling into and out of the Earth's shadow. Variations in temperature can lead to undesired geometric changes in susceptible applications requiring very fine precision. In addition, temperature-sensitive electronic equipment hosted in a satellite needs adequate thermal-control to guarantee a moderate ambient temperature. To address these specifications, materials with low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and low coefficient of thermal conductivity (CTC) over a wide range of temperatures are often sought, especially for bearing components in satellites. Besides low CTE and low CTC, these materials should also provide desirable stiffness, strength and extraordinarily low mass. This work presents ultralightweight bi-material lattices with tunable CTE and CTC, besides high stiffness and strength. We show that the compensation of the thermal expansion and joint rotation at the lattice joints can be used as an effective strategy to tailor thermomechanical performance. Proof-of-concept lattices are fabricated from Al and Ti alloy sheets via a simple snap-fit technique and vacuum brazing, and their CTE and CTC are assessed via a combination of experiments and theory. Corresponding Author.

  15. Predicting the thermal conductivity of crystalline nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingo, Natalio; Yang, Liu; Li, D.; Majumdar, A.

    2003-03-01

    We present quantitative calculations of the lattice thermal conductivity vs. temperature of Si nanowires, yielding good agreement with experimental measurements by Li et al.[1]. Our calculation method is predictive, since no experimental data from the nanowires are needed as input for the theoretical curves. The formalism is based on a transmission function approach, and makes use of the full phonon dispersion relations of the material [2]. Using the same method we also calculate curves for Ge nanowires, for which experiments have not yet been performed. In the talk we will explain the formalism of our Full Dispersions Transmission Function approach (FDTF). The traditional methods of Callaway and Holland [3] will also be discussed and compared with our FDTF method. Predictions with the latter method are considerably better than those using the traditional methods. In principle, the FDTF approach can be employed to calculate lattice thermal conductivity curves for nanowires of different materials. It may therefore constitute a very useful piece in the theoretical modeling of new thermoelectric materials based on nanowires. [1] D. Li et al., submitted. [2] N. Mingo et al., to be submitted. [3] M. Asen-Palmer et al., Phys. Rev. B 56, 9431 (1997).

  16. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin, randomly oriented composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.

    1997-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thicknesses. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relative low thermal conductivity. The results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between the filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  17. Thermal Characterization of Epoxy Adhesive by Hotfire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.; Haddock, M. Reed; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes subscale solid-rocket motor hot-fire testing of epoxy adhesives in flame surface bondlines to evaluate heat-affected depth, char depth and ablation rate. Hot-fire testing is part of an adhesive down-selection program on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle to provide additional confidence in the down-selected adhesives. The current nozzle structural adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Prior to hot-fire testing, adhesives were tested for chemical, physical and mechanical properties, which resulted in the selection of two potential replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's TIGA 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. Hot-fire testing consisted of four forty-pound charge (FPC) motors fabricated in configurations that would allow side-by-side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives with the current RSRM adhesives. Results of the FPC motor testing show that: 1) the phenolic char depths on radial bondlines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used, 2) the replacement candidate adhesive char depths are equivalent to the char depths of the current adhesives, 3) the heat-affected depths of the candidate and current adhesives are equivalent, and 4) the ablation rates for both replacement adhesives were equivalent to the current adhesives.

  18. Thermally conductive porous element-based recuperators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Jian Hua (Inventor); Chow, Louis C (Inventor); Lin, Yeong-Ren (Inventor); Wu, Wei (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes at least one hot fluid flow channel comprising a first plurality of open cell porous elements having first gaps there between for flowing a hot fluid in a flow direction and at least one cold fluid flow channel comprising a second plurality of open cell porous elements having second gaps therebetween for flowing a cold fluid in a countercurrent flow direction relative to the flow direction. The thermal conductivity of the porous elements is at least 10 W/mK. A separation member is interposed between the hot and cold flow channels for isolating flow paths associated these flow channels. The first and second plurality of porous elements at least partially overlap one another to form a plurality of heat transfer pairs which transfer heat from respective ones of the first porous elements to respective ones of the second porous elements through the separation member.

  19. Efficient Reformulation of HOTFGM: Heat Conduction with Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Yi; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) have become one of the major research topics in the mechanics of materials community during the past fifteen years. FGMs are heterogeneous materials, characterized by spatially variable microstructure, and thus spatially variable macroscopic properties, introduced to enhance material or structural performance. The spatially variable material properties make FGMs challenging to analyze. The review of the various techniques employed to analyze the thermodynamical response of FGMs reveals two distinct and fundamentally different computational strategies, called uncoupled macromechanical and coupled micromechanical approaches by some investigators. The uncoupled macromechanical approaches ignore the effect of microstructural gradation by employing specific spatial variations of material properties, which are either assumed or obtained by local homogenization, thereby resulting in erroneous results under certain circumstances. In contrast, the coupled approaches explicitly account for the micro-macrostructural interaction, albeit at a significantly higher computational cost. The higher-order theory for functionally graded materials (HOTFGM) developed by Aboudi et al. is representative of the coupled approach. However, despite its demonstrated utility in applications where micro-macrostructural coupling effects are important, the theory's full potential is yet to be realized because the original formulation of HOTFGM is computationally intensive. This, in turn, limits the size of problems that can be solved due to the large number of equations required to mimic realistic material microstructures. Therefore, a basis for an efficient reformulation of HOTFGM, referred to as user-friendly formulation, is developed herein, and subsequently employed in the construction of the efficient reformulation using the local/global conductivity matrix approach. In order to extend HOTFGM's range of applicability, spatially variable thermal

  20. Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small Samples Having Very Low Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air. As with other approaches, care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test sample is essentially one-dimensional. However, unlike other approaches, no attempt is made to use heated guards to block the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. It is argued that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when sample dimensions are small, it may be preferable to simply measure and correct for the heat that flows from the heater disc to directions other than into the sample. Experimental measurements taken in a prototype apparatus, combined with extensive computational modeling of the heat transfer in the apparatus, show that sufficiently accurate measurements can be obtained to allow determination of the thermal conductivity of low thermal conductivity materials. Suggestions are made for further improvements in the method based on results from regression analyses of the generated data.

  1. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  2. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suzhi; Ding, Xiangdong; Ren, Jie; Moya, Xavier; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity κ of ferroic twinned thin films can be reversibly controlled by strain. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations reveal that thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of twin boundaries perpendicular to the direction of heat flow. Our demonstration of large and reversible changes in thermal conductivity driven by strain may inspire the design of controllable thermal switches for thermal logic gates and all-solid-state cooling devices. PMID:25224749

  3. Investigation of a Biocompatible Polyurethane-Based Isotropically Conductive Adhesive for UHF RFID Tag Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Gao, Bo; Ma, Yuhui; Wong, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    As a candidate dispersant for silver-based isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs), polyurethane (PU) is an environmentally benign material that can withstand a high deformation rate and that exhibits excellent reliability. In this work we investigated methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO) blocked isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and MEKO blocked hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as dispersant materials, and we characterize the electrical conductivity, mechanical properties, and reliability of these PU-based ICAs with silver-flake filler content ranging from 30 wt.% to 75 wt.%. Results of temperature-humidity testing (THT) at 85°C and 85% relative humidity (RH) and thermal cycling testing (TCT) at -40°C to 125°C show that these ICAs have excellent reliability. Our experimental results suggest that the MEKO blocked PU dispersants are suitable for preparing ultralow-cost, flexible, high-performance ICAs for printing antennas for ultrahigh-frequency radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags. These tags can potentially be used for identifying washable items and food packaging.

  4. Flexible Touch Sensors Made of Two Layers of Printed Conductive Flexible Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sungwon; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Jiyeon; Ma, Rujun; Baik, Seunghyun; Moon, Hyungpil

    2016-09-16

    Touch sensors are crucial in controlling robotic manipulation when a robot interacts with environmental objects. In this study, multilayer flexible touch sensors in the form of an array were developed. The sensors use ink-type conductive flexible adhesives as electrodes which were printed on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films in a parallel equidistance stripe pattern. Between the two printed layers, a double-sided adhesive film was used to combine each layer and was perforated at the junctions of the top and bottom electrodes with different-sized circles. These holes represent switching mechanisms between the top and bottom electrodes, and their sizes make the sensor respond to different levels of external pressure. We showed the durability of the fabricated sensor with 1 mm diameter holes by repeated experiments of exerting normal pressure ranging from 0 to 159.15 kPa for 1000 cycles. In case of 1 mm diameter holes, the state of each sensor node was reliably determined by the threshold pressures of 127.3 kPa for increasing pressure and 111.4 kPa for decreasing pressure. On the other hand, decreasing the hole size from 3 to 0.5 mm caused an increase in the threshold pressure from 1.41 to 214 kPa. The relation between the hole size and the threshold pressure was analyzed by a mechanical model. The sensor performance was also verified on curved surfaces up to 60 mm radius of curvatures. Additionally, we fabricated a sensor with three levels of sensitivity with a conventional method which was a thermal evaporation to show the extendibility of the idea.

  5. Flexible Touch Sensors Made of Two Layers of Printed Conductive Flexible Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sungwon; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Jiyeon; Ma, Rujun; Baik, Seunghyun; Moon, Hyungpil

    2016-01-01

    Touch sensors are crucial in controlling robotic manipulation when a robot interacts with environmental objects. In this study, multilayer flexible touch sensors in the form of an array were developed. The sensors use ink-type conductive flexible adhesives as electrodes which were printed on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films in a parallel equidistance stripe pattern. Between the two printed layers, a double-sided adhesive film was used to combine each layer and was perforated at the junctions of the top and bottom electrodes with different-sized circles. These holes represent switching mechanisms between the top and bottom electrodes, and their sizes make the sensor respond to different levels of external pressure. We showed the durability of the fabricated sensor with 1 mm diameter holes by repeated experiments of exerting normal pressure ranging from 0 to 159.15 kPa for 1000 cycles. In case of 1 mm diameter holes, the state of each sensor node was reliably determined by the threshold pressures of 127.3 kPa for increasing pressure and 111.4 kPa for decreasing pressure. On the other hand, decreasing the hole size from 3 to 0.5 mm caused an increase in the threshold pressure from 1.41 to 214 kPa. The relation between the hole size and the threshold pressure was analyzed by a mechanical model. The sensor performance was also verified on curved surfaces up to 60 mm radius of curvatures. Additionally, we fabricated a sensor with three levels of sensitivity with a conventional method which was a thermal evaporation to show the extendibility of the idea. PMID:27649205

  6. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  7. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pötschke, Markus; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-03-21

    We developed a multiscale approach to explore the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, the grain size effect on the thermal conductivity of ultra-fine grained polycrystalline graphene sheets is investigated. Our results reveal that the ultra-fine grained graphene structures have thermal conductivity one order of magnitude smaller than that of pristine graphene. Based on the information provided by the EMD simulations, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline graphene sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Using the developed multiscale approach, we also investigated the effects of grain size distribution and thermal conductivity of grains on the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene. The proposed multiscale approach on the basis of molecular dynamics and finite element methods could be used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene and other 2D structures.

  8. Size effects in thermal conduction by phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Philip B.

    2014-08-01

    Heat transport in nanoscale systems is both hard to measure microscopically, and hard to interpret. Ballistic and diffusive heat flow coexist, adding confusion. This paper looks at a very simple case: a nanoscale crystal repeated periodically. This is a popular model for simulation of bulk heat transport using classical molecular dynamics (MD), and is related to transient thermal grating experiments. Nanoscale effects are seen in perhaps their simplest form. The model is solved by an extension of standard quasiparticle gas theory of bulk solids. Both structure and heat flow are constrained by periodic boundary conditions. Diffusive transport is fully included, while ballistic transport by phonons of a long mean free path is diminished in a specific way. Heat current J (x) and temperature gradient ∇T (x') have a nonlocal relationship, via κ (x-x'), over a distance |x-x'| determined by phonon mean free paths. In MD modeling of bulk conductivity, finite computer resources limit system size. Long mean free paths, comparable to the scale of heating and cooling, cause undesired finite-size effects that have to be removed by extrapolation. The present model allows this extrapolation to be quantified. Calculations based on the Peierls-Boltzmann equation, using a generalized Debye model, show that extrapolation involves fractional powers of 1/L. It is also argued that heating and cooling should be distributed sinusoidally [ė∝cos(2πx/L)] to improve convergence of numerics.

  9. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 ..mu..m dia solid Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, the same Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//center dot/7 w/o Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and partially stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 ..mu..m and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 ..mu..m. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Thermal conductivity of disordered porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Nanostructuring bulk materials is a promising approach for engineering high-efficiency thermoelectric devices thanks to its ability to decoupling the thermal and electrical transport. Among different approaches, porous Silicon has been attracting much attention due to its ability of strongly suppressing heat transport. Recent experimental works show that classical size effects of phonons can be further enhanced by having staggered pores, as opposed to the aligned pores case. Motivated by these results, we solve the phonon Boltzmann Transport Equation to compute heat transport across an arbitrary pores arrangement. The model has been discretized by means of the Discontinuous Galerkin method, which allows complex simulation domains. We focus on triangular, circle and square pores where the orientation is allowed to change stochastically. In order to compute the ZT, the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficients are computed by means of diffusive theory. Our main finding is that pore disorder can play a crucial rule in optimizing thermoelectric materials. Indeed, in the special case of triangular pores we predict an increasing in ZT of up to ten times the value found for the aligned case.

  11. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  12. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  13. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    PubMed

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  14. Mean-field versus microconvection effects in nanofluid thermal conduction.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Jacob; Williams, Wesley C; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; Yip, Sidney; Rusconi, Roberto; Piazza, Roberto

    2007-08-31

    Transient hot-wire data on thermal conductivity of suspensions of silica and perfluorinated particles show agreement with the mean-field theory of Maxwell but not with the recently postulated microconvection mechanism. The influence of interfacial thermal resistance, convective effects at microscales, and the possibility of thermal conductivity enhancements beyond the Maxwell limit are discussed.

  15. Micromachined hot-wire thermal conductivity probe for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ming; Panchawagh, Hrishikesh V; Podhajsky, Ronald J; Mahajan, Roop L

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, numerical simulation, and experimental validation of a micromachined probe that measures thermal conductivity of biological tissues. The probe consists of a pair of resistive line heating elements and resistance temperature detector sensors, which were fabricated by using planar photolithography on a glass substrate. The numerical analysis revealed that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity can be determined by the temperature response induced by the uniform heat flux in the heating elements. After calibrating the probe using a material (agar gel) of known thermal conductivity, the probe was deployed to calculate the thermal conductivity of Crisco. The measured value is in agreement with that determined by the macro-hot-wire probe method to within 3%. Finally, the micro thermal probe was used to investigate the change of thermal conductivity of pig liver before and after RF ablation treatment. The results show an increase in thermal conductivity of liver after the RF ablation.

  16. Development of electrically conductive-superoleophobic micropillars for reducing surface adhesion of oil at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zihe; Wang, Tianchang; Zhou, Yikang; Zhao, Boxin

    2016-12-01

    Electrically conductive and superoleophobic micropillars have been developed through the construction of biomimetic micropillars using Ag-filled epoxy composites and the incorporation of FDTS on the micropillar surface. These micropillars are found to be superoleophobic with an oil contact angle of 140°, demonstrating excellent self-cleaning properties. The conductivity of micropillars allows for the Joule-heating effect to actively reduce the adhesion and even unfreeze the frozen oil droplets by passing electrical current. Electrical resistance of the composite micropillars was modulated by two orders of magnitudes by varying the contents of Ag flakes from 45 wt% to 65 wt%. The effectiveness of conductive micropillars for surface un-freezing was investigated by applying DC current to decrease the adhesion strength of frozen oil droplets on surfaces. The results showed a pronounced reduction of frozen oil adhesion force by 60% when the resistance increased from 7.5 Ω to 877 Ω after applying DC current for 2 min. By continuously applying DC current for 3 min, the frozen oil adhesion decreased to 0.05 N, reaching zero when the surface was heated up to -10 °C after applying DC current for 5 min. In contrast, when the droplet was heated up to -5 °C by hot air, there is still a substantial force of adhesion. The research findings demonstrate the use of constructing conductive-superoleophobic composite micropillars at surface for eliminating the frozen oil from surfaces at low temperatures.

  17. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  18. Rolling silver nanowire electrodes: simultaneously addressing adhesion, roughness, and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Tate C; Al-Rafia, S M Ibrahim; Buriak, Jillian M

    2013-12-11

    Silver nanowire mesh electrodes represent a possible mass-manufacturable route toward transparent and flexible electrodes for plastic-based electronics such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and others. Here we describe a route that is based upon spray-coated silver nanowire meshes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets that are treated with a straightforward combination of heat and pressure to generate electrodes that have low sheet resistance, good optical transmission, that are topologically flat, and adhere well to the PET substrate. The silver nanowire meshes were prepared by spray-coating a solution of silver nanowires onto PET, in air at slightly elevated temperatures. The as-prepared silver nanowire electrodes are highly resistive due to the poor contact between the individual silver nanowires. Light pressure applied with a stainless steel rod, rolled over the as-sprayed silver nanowire meshes on PET with a speed of 10 cm s(-1) and a pressure of 50 psi, results in silver nanowire mesh arrays with sheet resistances of less than 20 Ω/□. Bending of these rolled nanowire meshes on PET with different radii of curvature, from 50 to 0.625 mm, showed no degradation of the conductivity of the electrodes, as shown by the constant sheet resistance before and after bending. Repeated bending (100 times) around a rod with a radius of curvature of 1 mm also showed no increase in the sheet resistance, demonstrating good adherence and no signs of delamination of the nanowire mesh array. The diffuse and direct transmittance of the silver nanowires (both rolled and as-sprayed) was measured for wavelengths from 350 to 1200 nm, and the diffuse transmission was similar to that of the PET substrate; the direct transmission decreases by about 7-8%. The silver nanowires were then incorporated into OPV devices with the following architecture: transparent electrode/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PC61BM/LiF/Al. While slightly lower in efficiency than the

  19. Thermal conductivity measurements in unsaturated hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng; Cha, Jong-Ho; Rosenbaum, Eilis J.; Zhang, Wu; Seol, Yongkoo

    2015-08-01

    Current database on the thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sediments remains limited and has not been able to capture their consequential changes during gas production where vigorous phase changes occur in this unsaturated system. This study uses the transient plane source (TPS) technique to measure the thermal conductivity of methane hydrate-bearing sediments with various hydrate/water/gas saturations. We propose a simplified method to obtain thermal properties from single-sided TPS signatures. Results reveal that both volume fraction and distribution of the pore constituents govern the thermal conductivity of unsaturated specimens. Thermal conductivity hysteresis is observed due to water redistribution and fabric change caused by hydrate formation and dissociation. Measured thermal conductivity increases evidently when hydrate saturation Sh > 30-40%, shifting upward from the geometric mean model prediction to a Pythagorean mixing model. These observations envisage a significant drop in sediment thermal conductivity when residual hydrate/water saturation falls below ~40%, hindering further gas production.

  20. Reconstruction of thermal property distributions of tissue phantoms from temperature measurements--thermal conductivity, thermal capacity and thermal diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Yanagimura, Hiroyuki

    2007-05-21

    We report robust noninvasive techniques for reconstructing the thermal properties of living tissues, such as thermal conductivity, thermal capacity and thermal diffusivity, for the diagnosis, monitoring and planning of thermal treatments. Internal temperature distributions can be measured using ultrasonic imaging or magnetic resonance imaging. Provided that the reference thermal properties are given in the region of interest as initial conditions, by solving bioheat transfer equations as simultaneous first-order partial differential equations having temperature distributions as inhomogeneous coefficients, we can determine thermal property distributions. A novel regularized numerical solution is also presented to realize useful, unique, stable reconstructions of the thermal property distributions. To verify the feasibility of the numerical solution, simulations and ultrasonic phantom experiments are conducted. The reconstruction of perfusion by blood flow and thermal source/sink by this approach is also addressed.

  1. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine-Functionalized Graphene as a Conductive Adhesion Promoter and Protective Layer for Silver Nanowire Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jinlei; Liu, Haihui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xingxiang

    2016-05-31

    For the scalable fabrication of transparent electrodes and optoelectronic devices, excellent adhesion between the conductive films and the substrates is essential. In this work, a novel mussel-inspired polydopamine-functionalized graphene/silver nanowire hybrid nanomaterial for transparent electrodes was fabricated in a facile manner. Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized and reduced by polydopamine while remaining stable in water without precipitation. It is shown that the polydopamine-functionalized GO (PFGO) film adhered to the substrate much more easily and more uniformly than the GO film. The PFGO film had a sheet resistance of ∼3.46 × 10(8) Ω/sq and a transparency of 78.2%, with excellent thermal and chemical stability; these characteristics are appropriate for antistatic coatings. Further reduced PFGO (RPFGO) as a conductive adhesion promoter and protective layer for the Ag nanowire (AgNW) significantly enhanced the adhesion force between AgNW networks and the substrate. The RPFGO-AgNW electrode was found to have a sheet resistance of 63 Ω/sq and a transparency of 70.5%. Moreover, the long-term stability of the RPFGO-AgNW electrode was greatly enhanced via the effective protection of the AgNW by RPFGO. These solution-processed antistatic coatings and electrodes have tremendous potential in the applications of optoelectronic devices as a result of their low production cost and facile processing.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Functional Citrus Tree Wood 1

    PubMed Central

    Turrell, F. M.; Austin, S. W.; McNee, Dan; Park, W. J.

    1967-01-01

    Thermal conductivity coefficients have been determined for longitudinal and transverse flow in 4 varieties of fresh Citrus wood using steady state-methods. Equations were developed from which thermal conductivity could be rapidly estimated from moisture content or electrical conductivity. The heat balance of large and small tree trunks on a freezing night has been calculated on the basis of the coefficients. PMID:16656610

  3. Final Report: Thermal Conductance of Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cahil, David, G.; Braun, Paul, V.

    2006-05-31

    Research supported by this grant has significantly advanced fundamental understanding of the thermal conductance of solid-liquid interfaces, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanoscale composite materials. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between carbon nanotubes and a surrounding matrix of organic molecules is exceptionally small and this small value of the interface conductance limits the enhancement in thermal conductivity that can be achieved by loading a fluid or a polymer with nanotubes. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between metal nanoparticles coated with hydrophilic surfactants and water is relatively high and surprisingly independent of the details of the chemical structure of the surfactant. • We extended our experimental methods to enable studies of planar interfaces between surfactant-coated metals and water where the chemical functionalization can be varied between strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic. The thermal conductance of hydrophobic interfaces establishes an upper-limit of 0.25 nm on the thickness of the vapor-layer that is often proposed to exist at hydrophobic interfaces. • Our high-precision measurements of fluid suspensions show that the thermal conductivity of fluids is not significantly enhanced by loading with a small volume fraction of spherical nanoparticles. These experimental results directly contradict some of the anomalous results in the recent literature and also rule-out proposed mechanisms for the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids that are based on modification of the fluid thermal conductivity by the coupling of fluid motion and the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles.

  4. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials. PMID:27767030

  5. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites irradiated at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the thermal conductivity degradation of new, high thermal conductivity graphites and to compare these results to more standard graphites irradiated at low temperatures. Several graphites and graphite composites (C/C`s) have been irradiated near 150{degree}C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The materials ranged in unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m-K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m-K for unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14 % of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The effect of post irradiation annealing on the thermal conductivity was also studied.

  6. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G

    2016-10-21

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials.

  7. Measurement of thermal conductivity of materials down to 4.5 K for development of cryosorption pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ravi; Behera, Upendra; Kasthurirengan, S.; Shivaprakash, N. C.; Udgata, S. S.; Gangradey, R.

    2017-02-01

    Cryosorption pumps belong to the class of entrapment or capture vacuum pumps and they retain the gas molecules by sorption and / or by condensation on its internal surfaces. An important aspect in their development is the proper adhesion of the activated carbon granules onto the metallic panel and their cooling to the lowest possible temperature by using high thermal conductivity adhesives for adhering the activated carbons. Hence, the thermal conductivity data of the select adhesives and activated carbons down to 4.5 K are quite essential, but they are not available in open literature. Towards this, an experimental setup has been developed to measure the thermal conductivities of samples with high or low thermal conductivities from 300 K to 4.5 K, with liquid helium using a Janis SuperVariTemp cryostat. This paper presents the details of the experimental setup and the results of our studies on (i) standard samples and (ii) epoxy based adhesives samples. The above studies will enable to make the right choice of adhesives for the development of cryosorption pumps.

  8. Thermal conductivity of Rene 41 honeycomb panels. [space transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deriugin, V.

    1980-01-01

    Effective thermal conductivities of Rene 41 panels suitable for advanced space transportation vehicle structures were determined analytically and experimentally for temperature ranges between 20.4K (423 F) and 1186K (1675 F). The cryogenic data were obtained using a cryostat whereas the high temperature data were measured using a heat flow meter and a comparative thermal conductivity instrument respectively. Comparisons were made between analysis and experimental data. Analytical methods appear to provide reasonable definition of the honeycomb panel effective thermal conductivities.

  9. Modeling of thermal conductivity in high performing thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzikraniotis, E.; Kyratsi, Th.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    The enhanced TE-performance in Mg2Si-Mg2Sn based pseudo-binaries is presented, which is attributed to low thermal conductivity. Sn-Si alloying, reduces the lattice thermal conductivity due to mass fluctuation. Furthermore, miscibility gap in the Sn-Si substitution causes the formation of composites, with Si-rich and Sn-rich phases, which span from mm to nm scale, and these nano-inclusions reduce further lattice thermal conductivity.

  10. Thermophysical Properties of Polymer Materials with High Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. M.; Gefle, O. S.; Dneprovskii, S. N.; Amitov, E. T.

    2015-06-01

    Results of studies on the main thermophysical properties of new thermally conductive polymer materials are presented. It is shown that modification of polymer dielectrics by micron-sized fillers allows thermally conductive materials with thermal conductivity not less than 2 W/(m K) to be produced, which makes it possible to use such materials as cooling elements of various electrical engineering and semiconductor equipment and devices.

  11. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Rong Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2014-02-24

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

  12. Thermal conductivity of cast iron: Models and analysis of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsing, Johan; Grimvall, Göran

    1991-08-01

    Cast iron can be viewed as a composite material. We use effective medium and other theories for the overall conductivity of a composite, expressed in the conductivities, the volume fractions, and the morphology of the constituent phases, to model the thermal conductivity of grey and white cast iron and some iron alloys. The electronic and the vibrational contributions to the conductivities of the microconstituents (alloyed ferrite, cementite, pearlite, graphite) are discussed, with consideration of the various scattering mechanisms. Our model gives a good account of measured thermal conductivities at 300 K. It is easily extended to describe the thermal conductivity of other materials characterized by having several constituent phases of varying chemical composition.

  13. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF CARBON DIOXIDE AT ONE ATMOSPHERE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, VISCOSITY, HIGH TEMPERATURE, GASES, NITROGEN COMPOUNDS, OXYGEN, LAMINAR FLOW, TEST EQUIPMENT, DIFFUSION, PRESSURE, DENSITY, MEASUREMENT, WATER, CYLINDRICAL BODIES, THEORY.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2003-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of the composites, determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique, increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from simple rule of mixtures.

  15. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-21

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  16. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina.

    PubMed

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-09

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m(-1)·K(-1), which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  17. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m‑1·K‑1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  18. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m−1·K−1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties. PMID:27934930

  19. Thermal conductivity modeling in variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling effective thermal conductivity under variably saturated conditions is essential to study heat transfer in natural sediments, soils, and rocks. The effective thermal conductivity in completely dry and fully saturated porous media is an integrated quantity representing the complex behavior of two conducting phases, i.e., pore fluid (either air or water) and solid matrix. Under partially saturated conditions, however, the effective thermal conductivity becomes even more complicated since three phases (air, water, and solid matrix) conduct heat simultaneously. In this study, we invoke an upscaling treatment called percolation-based effective-medium approximation to model the effective thermal conductivity in fully and partially saturated porous media. Our theoretical porosity- and saturation-dependent models contain endmember properties, such as air, solid matrix, and saturating fluid thermal conductivities, a percolation exponent t, and a percolation threshold. Comparing our theory with 216 porosity-dependent thermal conductivity measurements and 25 saturation-dependent thermal conductivity datasets indicate excellent match between theory and experiments. Our results show that the effective thermal conductivity under fully and partially saturated conditions follows nonuniversal behavior. This means the value of t changes from medium to medium and depends not only on topological and geometrical properties of the medium but also characteristics of the saturating fluid.

  20. Transient adhesion and conductance phenomena in initial nanoscale mechanical contacts between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2013-11-29

    We report on transient adhesion and conductance phenomena associated with tip wetting in mechanical contacts produced by the indentation of a clean W(111) tip into a Au(111) surface. A combination of atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy was used to carry out indentation and to image residual impressions in ultra-high vacuum. The ∼7 nm radii tips used in these experiments were prepared and characterized by field ion microscopy in the same instrument. The very first indentations of the tungsten tips show larger conductance and pull-off adhesive forces than subsequent indentations. After ∼30 indentations to a depth of ∼1.7 nm, the maximum conductance and adhesion forces reach steady state values approximately 12 ×  and 6 ×  smaller than their initial value. Indentation of W(111) tips into Cu(100) was also performed to investigate the universality of tip wetting phenomena with a different substrate. We propose a model from contact mechanics considerations which quantitatively reproduces the observed decay rate of the conductance and adhesion drops with a 1/e decay constant of 9-14 indentation cycles. The results show that the surface composition of an indenting tip plays an important role in defining the mechanical and electrical properties of indentation contacts.

  1. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, A.; Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P.

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  2. Thermal conductance of nanoscale Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziade, Elbara; Goni, Miguel; Sato, Toshiyuki; Czubarow, Pawel; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal transport across organic-inorganic interfaces is fundamental to understanding heat transfer in polymer-based composites, microelectronics, and energy conversion systems. We used the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique to deposit nanometer-thick films of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) on silicon and gold substrates in two distinct states: Liquid condensed (Lc) and Liquid expanded (Le). We used frequency domain thermoreflectance to measure the thermal conductivity of the PVAc film and its thermal interface conductance to the substrate. We found that PVAc films prepared through the LB process have a higher thermal conductivity when compared to bulk. We measured the thermal interface conductance between PVAc and gold to be approximately 90 MW/m2 K for both the Le and Lc states, and the thermal interface conductance between PVAc and silicon to be approximately 70 MW/m2 K for both the Le and Lc states.

  3. Thermal conductivity of disordered two-dimensional binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Cao, Hai-Yuan; Chen, Shi-You; Xiang, Hong-Jun; Gong, Xin-Gao

    2016-10-20

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the effect of disorder on the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) C1-xNx alloys. We find that the thermal conductivity not only depends on the substitution concentration of nitrogen, but also strongly depends on the disorder distribution. A general linear relationship is revealed between the thermal conductivity and the participation ratio of phonons in 2D alloys. Localization mode analysis further indicates that the thermal conductivity variation in the ordered alloys can be attributed to the number of inequivalent atoms. As for the disordered alloys, we find that the thermal conductivity variation can be described by a simple linear formula with the disorder degree and the substitution concentration. The present study suggests some general guidance for phonon manipulation and thermal engineering in low dimensional alloys.

  4. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the optimum design of cryogenic instruments requires accurate thermal models. The present models are limited by a lack of knowledge of the low temperature thermal conductance of the bolted joints which are typically used in the instrument-to-system interface. In connection with studies of pressed contacts, it has been found that the thermal conductance does not obey the Wiedemann-Franz law. The present investigation is concerned with the characterization of the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium-4 temperatures, taking into account the dependence of thermal contact conductance on applied force and temperature. It is shown that for the 0.4 micron OFHC copper pressed contact pair, the thermal conductance varies roughly as the second power of the temperature, and increases with increasing applied force.

  5. A fast response thermal conductivity gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, J. O., II; Krummerich, M. B.

    1986-04-01

    During the spring of 1983, the Ballistic Research Laboratory measured behind-the-armor effects for several weapons against a variety of targets. One of the major concerns was heat generation during and immediately following impact of the warhead against the targets. Previous tests of this type had used thin skin total heat gages and standard laboratory heat detectors. Thin skin gages record only the maximum temperature attained by the skins' back surface with no indication of the time required to reach this temperature. Although an approximation of the total heat deposition can be made, no rate of deposition can be estimated without knowing the time of the event. The large thermal mass of a typical laboratory detector such as an infrared power meter is designed to measure a steady-state flux and cannot respond quickly enough to register a transient event. Neither gage type can withstand severe blast and shock environments. Since the temperature inside the target rose sharply in a very short time, special thermal fluence gages were fabricated which emphasized the time response of the gage rather than its thermal capacity. This gage is used when the thermal flux is of short duration, 150 milliseconds or less, and of low total energy, 179 calories per square centimeter or less. The maximum operating temperature of the gage is 500 degree Celsius.

  6. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the porcine cornea.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Trembly, B Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal models for the cornea of the eye support the development of thermal techniques for reshaping the cornea and other scientific purposes. Heat transfer in the cornea must be quantified accurately so that a thermal treatment does not destroy the endothelial layer, which cannot regenerate, and yet is responsible for maintaining corneal transparency. We developed a custom apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of ex vivo porcine corneas perpendicular to the surface and applied a commercial apparatus to measure thermal conductivity parallel to the surface. We found that corneal thermal conductivity is 14% anisotropic at the normal state of corneal hydration. Small numbers of ex vivo feline and human corneas had a thermal conductivity perpendicular to the surface that was indistinguishable from the porcine corneas. Aqueous humor from ex vivo porcine, feline, and human eyes had a thermal conductivity nearly equal to that of water. Including the anisotropy of corneal thermal conductivity will improve the predictive power of thermal models of the eye.

  7. Minimum thermal conductivity considerations in aerogel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Kaehr, Bryan; Piekos, Edward S.; Dunphy, Darren; Jeffrey Brinker, C.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the use time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) to measure the thermal conductivity of the solid silica network of aerogel thin-films. TDTR presents a unique experimental capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of porous media due to the nanosecond time domain aspect of the measurement. In short, TDTR is capable of explicitly measuring the change in temperature with time of the solid portion of porous media independently from the pores or effective media. This makes TDTR ideal for determining the thermal transport through the solid network of the aerogel film. We measure the thermal conductivity of the solid silica networks of an aerogel film that is 10% solid, and the thermal conductivity of the same type of film that has been calcined to remove the terminating methyl groups. We find that for similar densities, the thermal conductivity through the silica in the aerogel thin films is similar to that of bulk aerogels. We theoretically describe the thermal transport in the aerogel films with a modified minimum limit to thermal conductivity that accounts for porosity through a reduction in phonon velocity. Our porous minimum limit agrees well with a wide range of experimental data in addition to sound agreement with differential effective medium theory. This porous minimum limit therefore demonstrates an approach to predict the thermal conductivity of porous disordered materials with no a priori knowledge of the corresponding bulk phase, unlike differential effective medium theory.

  8. Measuring thermal conductivity of thin films by Scanning Thermal Microscopy combined with thermal spreading resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Juszczyk, J; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, A; Firek, P; Bodzenta, J

    2017-01-27

    While measuring the thermal properties of a thin film, one of the most often encountered problems is the influence of the substrate thermal properties on measured signal and the need for its separation. In this work an approach for determining the thermal conductivity κ of a thin layer is presented. It bases on Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) measurement combined with thermal spreading resistance analysis for a system consisting of a single layer on a substrate. Presented approach allows to take into account the influence of the substrate thermal properties on SThM signal and to estimate the true value of a thin film κ. It is based on analytical solution of the problem being a function of dimensionless parameters and requires numerical solution of relatively simple integral equation. As the analysis utilizes a solution in dimensionless parameters it can be used for any substrate-layer system. As an example, the method was applied for determination of the thermal conductivities of 4 different thin layers of thicknesses from 12 to 100nm. The impact of model parameters on the uncertainty of the estimated final κ value was analyzed.

  9. Thermal conductivity and other properties of cementitious grouts

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.

    1998-08-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  10. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND OTHER PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.

    1998-05-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  11. Depressing thermal conductivity of fullerene by caging rare gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal conductivity of C60 and its derivatives caged with rare gas by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. It is reported that embedding C60 with different rare gas atoms has a significant impact on its thermal conductivity. We analyze the phenomenon through the phonon spectra of rare gas atom and the C-C bonds length of C60. When the number of atoms inside the C60 increases, the phonon spectra band width of rare gas expands and the length of C-C bonds becomes longer, which contributes to the depression of the thermal conductivity of C60. The method is applied to control the thermal conductivity of C60 chains, which maybe a kind of potential materials in thermal circuits. Our results also provide a controllable method for the thermal management in nanoscale materials.

  12. Model for predicting thermal conductivity using transient hot wire method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sublania Harish; Singh K., J.; Somani A., K.

    2016-05-01

    The use of the hot wire method for estimating the thermal conductivity measurement has recently known a significant increase. However, this method is theoretically not applicable to materials. Thermal conductivity values are necessary whenever a heat transfer problem is to be evaluated.

  13. Low-Thermal-Conduction Links For Silicon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, D. Brent

    1991-01-01

    Simple method of texturing surface of silicon reduces thermal conductivities of links in silicon x-ray calorimeters and infrared bolometers. Gives links high density of phonon scattering sites reducing conduction of heat. Links made shorter and more robust. Used in making x-ray calorimeters and infrared bolometers. Applicable to any microelectronic device in which high degree of thermal isolation needed.

  14. Thermal conduction effects in human skin.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Chianta, M A; Piergallini, J R

    1979-08-01

    To determine the maximum permissible temperature any material may attain without causing pain or burn on contact with bare skin, over 2000 observations were made of pain threshold during contact with materials at elevated temperatures. Six materials were used representing the full range of thermal properties from good conductors to good insulators. Time to pain threshold was converted to time to threshold blister on the basis of the relationship between pain and burn established earlier for radiant and for convective heating. Calculated times to blister were used to predict the material temperatures causative of "touch-burn". Experimentally produced threshold blisters at the predicted temperature-times verified the predictions. Graphs and equations were generated for determining safe temperatures for any material in contact with bare skin for 1-5 s solely from a knowledge of its thermal properties. Conversely, the thermal inertia (k rho c) of the optimal material for a specific use and skin contact can be predicted from a knowledge of the maximum material temperature and length of contact time anticipated.

  15. Thermal conductance of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2017-03-01

    The lattice-based scattering boundary method is applied to compute the phonon mode-resolved transmission coefficients and thermal conductances of in-plane heterostructures built from graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). The thermal conductance of all structures is dominated by acoustic phonon modes near the Brillouin zone center that have high group velocity, population, and transmission coefficient. Out-of-plane modes make their most significant contributions at low frequencies, whereas in-plane modes contribute across the frequency spectrum. Finite-length superlattice junctions between graphene and hBN leads have a lower thermal conductance than comparable junctions between two graphene leads due to lack of transmission in the hBN phonon bandgap. The thermal conductances of bilayer systems differ by less than 10% from their single-layer counterparts on a per area basis, in contrast to the strong thermal conductivity reduction when moving from single- to multi-layer graphene.

  16. Characteristics of thermal conductivity in classical water models.

    PubMed

    Sirk, Timothy W; Moore, Stan; Brown, Eugene F

    2013-02-14

    The thermal conductivities of common water models are compared using equilibrium (EMD) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation. A complete accounting for electrostatic contributions to the heat flux was found to resolve the previously reported differing results of NEMD and EMD Green-Kubo measurements for the extended simple point-charge (SPC/E) model. Accordingly, we demonstrate the influence of long-range electrostatics on the thermal conductivity with a simple coulomb cutoff, Ewald summation, and by an extended particle-particle particle-mesh method. For each water model, the thermal conductivity is computed and decomposed in terms of frequency-dependent thermodynamic and topological contributions. The rigid, three-site SPC, SPC/E, and transferable intermolecular potential (TIP3P-Ew) water models are shown to have similar thermal conductivity values at standard conditions, whereas models that include bond stretching and angle bending have higher thermal conductivities.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2005-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10SZ) - alumina composites containing 0-30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from the Maxwell-Eucken model where one phase is uniformly dispersed within a second major continuous phase.

  18. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot James; ...

    2016-04-01

    The thermal conductivity on n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thickness of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015 – 1018 cm–3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends–and their overall reduction relative to bulk–are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that size effects play a primary role in limiting thermal conductivity for layers even tens of microns thick. GaNmore » device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.« less

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, D. M.; Watson, K. A.; Ghose, S.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Ultem(TM) was mixed with three different carbon-based nanofillers in efforts to increase the thermal conductivity of the polymer. After initial mixing, the nanocomposites were extruded or processed via the Laboratory Mixing Molder (LMM) process. High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) revealed significant alignment of the nanofillers in the extruded samples. Thermal conductivity measurements were made both in the direction and perpendicular to the direction of alignment of nanofillers as well as for unaligned samples. It was found that the largest improvement in thermal conductivity was achieved in the case of aligned samples when the measurement was performed in the direction of alignment. Unaligned samples also showed a significant improvement in thermal conductivity and may be useful in applications when it is not possible to align the nanofiller. However the improvements in thermal conductivity did not approach those expected based on a rule of mixtures. This is likely due to poor phonon transfer through the matrix.

  20. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot James; Talin, Albert Alec; Rost, Christina M.; Maria, Jon -Paul; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal conductivity on n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thickness of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015 – 1018 cm–3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends–and their overall reduction relative to bulk–are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that size effects play a primary role in limiting thermal conductivity for layers even tens of microns thick. GaN device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.

  1. Impacts of atomistic coating on thermal conductivity of germanium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2012-06-13

    By using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that thermal conductivity of germanium nanowires can be reduced more than 25% at room temperature by atomistic coating. There is a critical coating thickness beyond which thermal conductivity of the coated nanowire is larger than that of the host nanowire. The diameter-dependent critical coating thickness and minimum thermal conductivity are explored. Moreover, we found that interface roughness can induce further reduction of thermal conductivity in coated nanowires. From the vibrational eigenmode analysis, it is found that coating induces localization for low-frequency phonons, while interface roughness localizes the high-frequency phonons. Our results provide an available approach to tune thermal conductivity of nanowires by atomic layer coating.

  2. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires embedded on thermoelectric platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, JinYong; Cho, Kyoungah; Yoon, Dae Sung; Kim, Sangsig

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we propose a simple method for obtaining the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) embedded on a thermoelectric platform. The approximation of the heat flux in SiNWs with temperature differences enables the determination of thermal conductivity. Using this method, the thermal conductivities of our n- and p-type SiNWs are found to be 18.06  ±  0.12 and 20.29  ±  0.77 W m-1 · K-1, respectively. The atomic weight of arsenic ions in the n-type SiNWs is responsible for a lower thermal conductivity than that of boron ions in the p-type SiNWs. Our results demonstrate that this simple method is capable of measuring the thermal conductivity of thermoelectric nanomaterials embedded on thermoelectric devices.

  3. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essedik Belkerk, Boubakeur; Achour, Amine; Zhang, Dongyan; Sahli, Salah; Djouadi, M.-Abdou; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, we report the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) films produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. High-quality BNNTs were synthesized at 1200 °C on fused silica substrates precoated with Pt thin-film thermometers. The thermal conductivity of the BNNTs was measured at room temperature by using a pulsed photothermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the BNNT coatings increased from 55 to 170 W m-1 K-1 when the thickness increased from 10 to 28 µm, while the thermal conductivity attained a value as high as 2400 W m-1 K-1. These results suggested that BNNTs, which are highly thermally conductive, but electrically insulating, are promising materials with unique properties.

  4. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  5. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C < T < 55 degrees C showed the thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C < T < 90 degrees C, the thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  6. Nanostructure-thermal conductivity relationships in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas; Varela, Luis M; Webber, Grant B; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2014-10-16

    The thermal conductivities of nine protic ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated between 293 and 340 K. Within this range, the thermal conductivities are between 0.18 and 0.30 W · m(-1) · K(-1). These values are higher than those typically associated with oils and aprotic ILs, but lower than those of strongly hydrogen bonding solvents like water. Weak linear decreases in thermal conductivity with temperature are noted, with the exception of ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN) where the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The dependence of thermal conductivity on IL type is analyzed with use of the Bahe-Varela pseudolattice theory. This theory treats the bulk IL as an array of ordered domains with intervening domains of uncorrelated structure which enable and provide barriers to heat propagation (respectively) via allowed vibrational modes. For the protic ILs investigated, thermal conductivity depends strongly on the IL cation alkyl chain length. This is because the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the IL bulk nanostructure, which consists of charged (ordered domains) and uncharged regions (disordered domains). As the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the disordered domains, it thus limits the thermal conductivity. To test the generality of this interpretation, the thermal conductivities of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and PAN-octanol mixtures were examined; water selectively swells the PAN charged domain, while octanol swells the uncharged regions. Up to a certain concentration, adding water increases thermal conduction and octanol decreases it, as expected. However, at high solute concentrations the IL nanostructure is broken. When additional solvent is added above this concentration the rate of change in thermal conductivity is greatly reduced. This is because, in the absence of nanostructure, the added solvent only serves to dilute the salt solution.

  7. A study of partial layout of adhesive on the thermal drift of MEMS capacitive accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Huijun; Hao, Qu; Peng, Bei; He, Xiaoping

    2017-03-01

    The die attachment adhesive is commonly fully deposited on the substrate to connect the chips and the package shell in the packaging of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices. The packaging stress and deformation will be changed under temperature variation and further impact the thermal stability of devices. This paper describes a partial layout of die attachment adhesive used in a comb MEMS capacitive accelerometer, which can attenuate the thermal deformation and reduce the thermal drift of the sensor. The accelerometers with the bonded area designed from the global portion to nonsensitive portion of the sensor die are modeled by using finite element analysis (FEA) to study the deformation of the sensitive component induced by temperature change, and the corresponding thermal drift is obtained by simulation and theoretical methods. Both the results indicate that the thermal drift will decrease when the length of the unbonded area is larger than about 700 μm, and when the adhesive bonds only in the area of the nonsensitive portion of the sensor, the thermal drift will reduce about 19% relative to the global attachment. The partial layout of die attachment adhesive is therefore a useful method to improve the thermal stability for stress-sensitive MEMS devices.

  8. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Controllable Electrical Conductivity and Water Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lijun; Guan, Jipeng; Li, Zhixiang; Zhao, Jingxin; Ye, Cuicui; You, Jichun; Li, Yongjin

    2017-02-14

    A facile and versatile strategy for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable electrical conductivity and water adhesion is reported. "Vine-on-fence"-structured and cerebral cortex-like superhydrophobic surfaces are constructed by filtering a suspension of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), using polyoxymethylene nonwovens as the filter paper. The nonwovens with micro- and nanoporous two-tier structures act as the skeleton, introducing a microscale structure. The MWCNTs act as nanoscale structures, creating hierarchical surface roughness. The surface topography and the electrical conductivity of the superhydrophobic surfaces are controlled by varying the MWCNT loading. The vine-on-fence-structured surfaces exhibit "sticky" superhydrophobicity with high water adhesion. The cerebral cortex-like surfaces exhibit self-cleaning properties with low water adhesion. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces are chemically resistant to acidic and alkaline environments of pH 2-12. They therefore have potential in applications such as droplet-based microreactors and thin-film microextraction. These findings aid our understanding of the role that surface topography plays in the design and fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces with different water-adhesion properties.

  9. Thermal conductivity of ruthenium aluminide (RuAl)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.A.; Lang, C.I.

    1998-01-06

    Ruthenium aluminide (RuAl) is an intermetallic compound which exhibits strength at high temperatures together with attractive room temperature toughness. This combination of properties makes it a promising material for use at higher temperatures than currently possible with conventional titanium and nickel based alloys. Although high temperature applications will demand a knowledge and understanding of the thermal properties of RuAl, no such information is available in the scientific literature. In this paper, measurements of the thermal conductivity of RuAl are reported for the first time. Although the electrical properties of RuAl have previously been investigated, further electrical resistivity measurements have been made, using the same samples used to measure thermal conductivity. This allows a direct, meaningful comparison of electrical and thermal conductivity data, offering insights into the thermal transport mechanisms in RuAl. Microstructure is shown to have a significant influence on thermal and electrical properties.

  10. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R.; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G. H.; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. PMID:23556837

  11. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R; Lee, K M; Chang, W S; Kim, D S; Rhee, G H; Choi, T Y

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature.

  12. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-03-11

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  13. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J.

    2015-01-01

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:25757414

  14. Enhanced cell viability and cell adhesion using low conductivity medium for negative dielectrophoretic cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Puttaswamy, Srinivasu Valagerahally; Sivashankar, Shilpa; Chen, Rong-Jhe; Chin, Chung-Kuang; Chang, Hwan-You; Liu, Cheng Hsien

    2010-10-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic (n-DEP) cell manipulation is an efficient way to pattern human liver cells on micro-electrode arrays. Maintaining cell viability is an important objective for this approach. This study investigates the effect of low conductivity medium and the optimally designed microchip on cell viability and cell adhesion. To explore the influence of conductivity on cell viability and cell adhesion, we have used earlier reported dielectrophoresis (DEP) buffer with a conductivity of 10.2 mS/m and three formulated media with conductivity of 9.02 (M1), 8.14 (M2), 9.55 (M3) mS/m. The earlier reported isotonic sucrose/dextrose buffer (DEP buffer) used for DEP manipulation has the drawback of poor cell adhesion and cell viability. A microchip prototype with well-defined positioning of titanium electrode arrays was designed and fabricated on a glass substrate. The gap between the radial electrodes was accurately determined to achieve good cell patterning performance. Parameters such as dimension of positioning electrode, amplitude, and frequency of voltage signal were investigated to optimize the performance of the microchip.

  15. Reliability of Conductive Adhesives as a Pb-free Alternative in Flip-Chip Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Woong; Lee, Young-Chul; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2008-01-01

    The temperature-humidity reliability of anisotropic conductive film (ACF) and non-conductive film (NCF) interconnects is investigated by measuring the interconnect resistance during temperature-humidity testing (THT) at 85°C and 85% relative humidity. The four-point probe method was used to measure the interconnect resistance of the adhesive joints constructed with Au bumps on Si chips and Cu pads on flexible printed circuits (FPCs). The interconnect resistance of the ACF joints was markedly higher than that of the NCF joints, mainly due to the constriction of the current flow and the intrinsic resistance of the conductive particles in the ACF joints. The interconnect resistances of both interconnects decreased with increasing bonding force, and subsequently converged to about 10 mΩ and 1 mΩ at a bonding force of 70 N and 80 N, for the ACF and NCF joints, respectively. During the THT, two different conduction behaviors were observed: increased interconnect resistance and the termination of Ohmic behavior. The former was due to the decreased contact area caused by z-directional swelling of the adhesives, whereas the latter was caused by either contact opening in the adhesive joints or interface cracking.

  16. Acoustic transducer apparatus with reduced thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G. (Inventor); Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Bhat, Balakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A horn is described for transmitting sound from a transducer to a heated chamber containing an object which is levitated by acoustic energy while it is heated to a molten state, which minimizes heat transfer to thereby minimize heating of the transducer, minimize temperature variation in the chamber, and minimize loss of heat from the chamber. The forward portion of the horn, which is the portion closest to the chamber, has holes that reduce its cross-sectional area to minimize the conduction of heat along the length of the horn, with the entire front portion of the horn being rigid and having an even front face to efficiently transfer high frequency acoustic energy to fluid in the chamber. In one arrangement, the horn has numerous rows of holes extending perpendicular to the length of horn, with alternate rows extending perpendicular to one another to form a sinuous path for the conduction of heat along the length of the horn.

  17. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8≤T∗≤6 and 0≤ρ∗≤1 . Additionally, it has been noted that all reduced thermal conductivity values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same “universal” curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  18. Investigation of the Thermal Conductance of Selected Opal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberton, , Jr.; Tritt, Terry M.; Zakhidov, A.; Baughmann, R.; Khayrullin, I.

    1999-11-01

    In relation to thermoelectrics, recently some attention has come to opal structures.^1 The structure of the SiO2 opals is hoped to be useful in lowering thermal conductivity when this structure is infiltrated with traditional thermoelectric materials, such as Bi or Bi_2Te_3. Preliminary measurements show that, by infiltration, it may be possible to increase the thermoelectric figure of merit by improving the ratio of electrical conductivity to thermal conductivity.^2 We have built a new steady state thermal conductivity apparatus for measuring thermal conductivity of samples between 10K and 350K. With this new system the thermal properties of the opal systems and the effects of infiltration will be investigated. Data from the thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements will be presented and discussed, along with a comparison of thermal conductivity obtained with the laser flash method. 1.) A. Zakhidov et al., Science , 282, 897 (1998) 2.) R. Baughman, A. Zakhidov, et.al, Proc. of ICT '98, IEEE Press, p 288 (1998)

  19. Computer Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity of Cometary Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Theodore E.; Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to estimate the thermal conductivity of cometry ices from computer simulations of model amorphous ices. This was divided into four specific tasks: (1) Generating samples of amorphous water ices at different microporosities; (2) Comparing the resulting molecular structures of the ices with experimental results, for those densities where data was available; (3) Calculating the thermal conductivities of liquid water and bulk amorphous ices and comparing these results with experimentally determined thermal conductivities; and (4) Investigating how the thermal conductivity of amorphous ice depends upon the microscopic porosity of the samples. The thermal conductivity was found to be only weakly dependent on the microstructure of the amorphous ice. In general, the amorphous ices were found to have thermal conductivities of the same order of magnitude as liquid water. This is in contradiction to recent experimental estimates of the thermal conductivity of amorphous ice, and it is suggested that the extremely low value obtained experimentally is due to larger-scale defects in the ice, such as cracks, but it is not an intrinsic property of the bulk amorphous ice.

  20. High and low thermal conductivity of amorphous macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xu; Yang, Kexin; Li, Dongyao; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Shin, Jungwoo; Braun, Paul V.; Cahill, David G.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and sound velocity of thin films of five polymers, nine polymer salts, and four caged molecules to advance the fundamental understanding of the lower and upper limits to heat conduction in amorphous macromolecules. The thermal conductivities vary by more than one order of magnitude, from 0.06 W m-1K-1 for [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester to 0.67 W m-1K-1 for poly(vinylphosphonic acid calcium salt). Minimum thermal conductivity calculated from the measured sound velocity and effective atomic density is in good agreement with the thermal conductivity of macromolecules with various molecular structures and intermolecular bonding strength.

  1. Conductive ink containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide and method a conductive circuit using the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A conductive ink containing a conductive polymer, wherein the conductive polymer contains at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, and it use in a method for making a conductive circuit.

  2. Extremes of heat conduction-Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, DG

    2012-09-12

    Thermal conductivity is a familiar property of materials: silver conducts heat well, and plastic does not. In recent years, an interdisciplinary group of materials scientists, engineers, physicists, and chemists have succeeded in pushing back long-established limits in the thermal conductivity of materials. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are at the high end of the thermal conductivity spectrum due to their high sound velocities and relative lack of processes that scatter phonons. Unfortunately, the superlative thermal properties of carbon nanotubes have not found immediate application in composites or interface materials because of difficulties in making good thermal contact with the nanotubes. At the low end of the thermal conductivity spectrum, solids that combine order and disorder in the random stacking of two-dimensional crystalline sheets, so-called "disordered layered crystals," show a thermal conductivity that is only a factor of 2 larger than air. The cause of this low thermal conductivity may be explained by the large anisotropy in elastic constants that suppresses the density of phonon modes that propagate along the soft direction. Low-dimensional quantum magnets demonstrate that electrons and phonons are not the only significant carriers of heat. Near room temperature, the spin thermal conductivity of spin-ladders is comparable to the electronic thermal conductivities of metals. Our measurements of nanoscale thermal transport properties employ a variety of ultrafast optical pump-probe metrology tools that we have developed over the past several years. We are currently working to extend these techniques to high pressures (60 GPa), high magnetic fields (5 T), and high temperatures (1000 K).

  3. Low thermal conductivity in ultrathin carbon nanotube (2, 1).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liyan; Li, Baowen

    2014-05-12

    Molecular dynamic simulations reveal that the ultrathin carbon nanotube (CNT) (2, 1) with a reconstructed structure exhibits a surprisingly low thermal conductivity, which is only ~16-30% of those in regular CNTs, e.g. CNT (2, 2) and (5, 5). Detailed lattice dynamic calculations suggest that the acoustic phonon modes greatly soften in CNT (2, 1) as compared to regular CNTs. Moreover, both phonon group velocities and phonon lifetimes strikingly decrease in CNT (2, 1), which result in the remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity. Besides, isotope doping and chemical functionalization enable the further reduction of thermal conductivity in CNT (2, 1).

  4. A numerical study of transient, thermally-conductive solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, S. M.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient solar wind starting at the solar surface and arriving at 1 AU is performed by an implicit numerical method. The model hydrodynamic equations include thermal conduction terms for both steady and unsteady simulations. Simulation results show significant influence of thermal conduction on both steady and time-dependent solar wind. Higher thermal conduction results in higher solar wind speed, higher temperature, but lower plasma density at 1 AU. Higher base temperature at the solar surface gives lower plasma speed, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU. Higher base density, on the other hand, gives lower velocity, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU.

  5. Universal features of quantized thermal conductance of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2004-02-20

    The universal features of quantized thermal conductance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are revealed through a theoretical analysis based on the Landauer theory of heat transport. The phonon-derived thermal conductance of semiconducting CNTs exhibits a universal quantization in the low-temperature limit, independent of the radius or atomic geometry. The temperature dependence follows a single curve given in terms of temperature scaled by the phonon energy gap. The thermal conductance of metallic CNTs has an additional contribution from electronic states, which also exhibits quantized behavior up to room temperature.

  6. Effect of microstructure on the thermal conductivity of disordered carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Martinez, I.; Marks, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    Computational methods are used to control the degree of structural order in a variety of carbon materials containing primarily sp2 bonding. Room-temperature thermal conductivities are computed using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. Our results reproduce experimental data for amorphous and glassy carbons and confirm previously proposed structural models for vitreous carbons. An atomistic model is developed for highly oriented thin films seen experimentally, with a maximum computed thermal conductivity of 35 W m-1 K-1. This value is much higher than that of the amorphous and glassy structures, demonstrating that the microstructure influences the thermal conductivity more strongly than the density.

  7. Intrinsic low thermal conductivity in weakly ionic rocksalt structures

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yi; Dong, Jianjun; Kent, Paul R. C.; ...

    2015-07-06

    A fundamental challenge in thermoelectric (TE) material research is meeting the simultaneous requirements of high carrier mobility and low thermal conductivity. Simple crystal structures are ideal for maintaining high carrier mobility, but they usually have high thermal conductivity. In this paper, we show by first-principles lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport calculations that weakly ionic rocksalt structures exhibit strong lattice anharmonicity and low acoustic-phonon group velocity, which combine to produce intrinsic low thermal conductivity. Finally, we unveil microscopic mechanisms that explain experimental observations and provide insights for TE material design and discovery.

  8. Computer Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity of Cometary Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Theodore E.; Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The thermal conductivity was found to be only weakly dependent on the microstructure of the amorphous ice. In general, the amorphous ices were found to have thermal conductivities of the same order of magnitude as liquid water. This is in contradiction to recent experimental estimates of the thermal conductivity of amorphous ice, and it is suggested that the extremely low value obtained experimentally is due to larger-scale defects in the ice, such as cracks, but is not an intrinsic property of the bulk amorphous ice.

  9. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in epoxy-bonded magnetocaloric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Bruno; Sellschopp, Kai; Bierdel, Marius; Funk, Alexander; Bobeth, Manfred; Krautz, Maria; Waske, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management is one of the crucial issues in the development of magnetocaloric refrigeration technology for application. In order to ensure optimal exploitation of the materials "primary" properties, such as entropy change and temperature lift, thermal properties (and other "secondary" properties) play an important role. In magnetocaloric composites, which show an increased cycling stability in comparison to their bulk counterparts, thermal properties are strongly determined by the geometric arrangement of the corresponding components. In the first part of this paper, the inner structure of a polymer-bonded La(Fe, Co, Si)13-composite was studied by X-ray computed tomography. Based on this 3D data, a numerical study along all three spatial directions revealed anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite: Due to the preparation process, the long-axis of the magnetocaloric particles is aligned along the xy plane which is why the in-plane thermal conductivity is larger than the thermal conductivity along the z-axis. Further, the study is expanded to a second aspect devoted to the influence of particle distribution and alignment within the polymer matrix. Based on an equivalent ellipsoids model to describe the inner structure of the composite, numerical simulation of the thermal conductivity in different particle arrangements and orientation distributions were performed. This paper evaluates the possibilities of microstructural design for inducing and adjusting anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetocaloric composites.

  10. Electrical field effects on endothelial cell adhesion and growth on conducting biomaterials surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gwen Elaine

    A major problem for vascular graft implants is poor long-term patency for small-diameter (<6 mm) prostheses. Small-diameter woven Dacron RTM or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) grafts often occlude in a short time due to thrombus or polytetrafluoroethylene intimal hyperplasia. It has generally been considered that an endothelial cell lining of such grafts might reduce thrombogenicity and thereby produce a more biomimetic prosthesis. Electrical stimulation has been studied for effects on in vitro cell growth, motility, and adhesion characteristics, as well as for in vivo wound healing. A comprehensive literature review was conducted which suggested the need for further research concerning the effects of electrical fields on endothelial cell adhesion and growth properties. The focus of these studies was therefore to determine the effect of electrical fields on the proliferation and adhesion characteristics of endothelial cells cultured on various substrates using low-voltage direct current. Voltages of 0, 0.5, and 1 volt were used for in vitro endothelial cell cultures plated at 50,000 and 100,000 cells/mL. Growth experiments were performed on glass, MylarRTM, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-glass, on ITO-, carbon-, and gold-palladium-coated MylarRTM, and on polypyrrole-coated DacronRTM. Proliferation of endothelial cells was determined at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Adhesion characteristics were measured using a novel flow adhesion system. Characterization was via cell staining in conjunction with optical microscopy and a 6-keto-prostaglandin-F 1alpha assay to measure cell viability. Results of these cell growth studies in electric fields indicate that low voltage stimulation moderately increased endothelial cell growth on most substrates. The release of 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1alpha decreased over time at most cell concentrations and voltage levels. Cell adhesion experiments provided contrary results to the growth studies and suggested Rested that low-voltage electric

  11. Remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity in phosphorene phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene has received much attention due to its interesting physical and chemical properties, and its potential applications such as thermoelectricity. In thermoelectric applications, low thermal conductivity is essential for achieving a high figure of merit. In this work, we propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of phosphorene by adopting the phononic crystal structure, phosphorene nanomesh. With equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the thermal conductivity is remarkably reduced in the phononic crystal. Our analysis shows that the reduction is due to the depressed phonon group velocities induced by Brillouin zone folding, and the reduced phonon lifetimes in the phononic crystal. Interestingly, it is found that the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity could be tuned by the ‘non-square’ pores in the phononic crystal, as the phonon group velocities in the direction with larger projection of pores is more severely suppressed, leading to greater reduction of thermal conductivity in this direction. Our work provides deep insight into thermal transport in phononic crystals and proposes a new strategy to reduce the thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene.

  12. Predicting lattice thermal conductivity with help from ab initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broido, David

    2015-03-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity is a fundamental transport parameter that determines the utility a material for specific thermal management applications. Materials with low thermal conductivity find applicability in thermoelectric cooling and energy harvesting. High thermal conductivity materials are urgently needed to help address the ever-growing heat dissipation problem in microelectronic devices. Predictive computational approaches can provide critical guidance in the search and development of new materials for such applications. Ab initio methods for calculating lattice thermal conductivity have demonstrated predictive capability, but while they are becoming increasingly efficient, they are still computationally expensive particularly for complex crystals with large unit cells . In this talk, I will review our work on first principles phonon transport for which the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity is limited only by phonon-phonon scattering arising from anharmonicity. I will examine use of the phase space for anharmonic phonon scattering and the Grüneisen parameters as measures of the thermal conductivities for a range of materials and compare these to the widely used guidelines stemming from the theory of Liebfried and Schölmann. This research was supported primarily by the NSF under Grant CBET-1402949, and by the S3TEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0001299.

  13. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Method for Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joshua E. Daw; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie

    2009-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of advanced nuclear fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel and material performance. A joint Utah State University (USU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project, which is being conducted with assistance from the Institute for Energy Technology at the Norway Halden Reactor Project, is investigating in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement methods. This paper focuses on one of these methods – a multiple thermocouple method. This two-thermocouple method uses a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation to gain insights about in-pile detection of thermal conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that this method can measure thermal conductivity over a specific temperature range. This paper reports the thermal conductivity values obtained by this technique and compares these values with thermal property data obtained from standard thermal property measurement techniques available at INL’s High Test Temperature Laboratory. Experimental results and material properties data are also compared to finite element analysis results.

  14. Remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity in phosphorene phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang

    2016-05-05

    Phosphorene has received much attention due to its interesting physical and chemical properties, and its potential applications such as thermoelectricity. In thermoelectric applications, low thermal conductivity is essential for achieving a high figure of merit. In this work, we propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of phosphorene by adopting the phononic crystal structure, phosphorene nanomesh. With equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the thermal conductivity is remarkably reduced in the phononic crystal. Our analysis shows that the reduction is due to the depressed phonon group velocities induced by Brillouin zone folding, and the reduced phonon lifetimes in the phononic crystal. Interestingly, it is found that the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity could be tuned by the 'non-square' pores in the phononic crystal, as the phonon group velocities in the direction with larger projection of pores is more severely suppressed, leading to greater reduction of thermal conductivity in this direction. Our work provides deep insight into thermal transport in phononic crystals and proposes a new strategy to reduce the thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene.

  15. Lattice thermal conductivity of minerals in the deep mantle condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekura, H.; Tsuchiya, T.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal transport property of materials under pressure and temperature is of importance for understanding the dynamics of the solid Earth and the thermal history. Both experimental and theoretical determinations of the thermal conductivity, however, still remain technically challenging particularly at the deep mantle condition. Recent progress in ab initio computational method based on the density-functional theory is now makes it possible to examine the transport phenomena including the lattice thermal conduction. The intrinsic bulk thermal conduction of insulator is caused by lattice anharmonicity owing to phonon-phonon interaction. The key parameter to predict lattice thermal conductivity is thus the anharmonic coupling constant. Earlier theoretical works calculated the lattice thermal conductivity of MgO with ab initio molecular dynamics simulation or finite difference lattice dynamics simulation (Nico de Koker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 125902, 2009; X. Tang and J. Dong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 4539, 2010). However, in these approaches, the simulation cell size could often be insufficient for accurate description of the long wavelength phonon scattering. This leads to a lack of the decay channels for the phonons. As an alternative approach, the anharmonic coupling strength between phonon modes can be evaluated within the density-functional perturbation theory. In this approach, the higher-order force tensors are calculated through a number of phonon decay channels obtained within the perturbative scheme taking care only of the primitive cell. We have been developing a technique for calculation of the phonon linewidth necessary to obtain the phonon lifetime. Then the lattice thermal conductivity is evaluated combining with additional harmonic-level of propeties. In this presentation, we show the behavior of lattice thermal conductivity in lower mantle minerals, and discuss the effects of pressure and temperature on their conductivities up to the deep

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of a Conduction Cooled Thermal Neutron Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Heather Wampler; Adam Gerth; Heng Ban; Donna Post Guillen; Douglas Porter; Cynthia Papesch

    2010-06-01

    Installation of a conduction cooled thermal (low-energy) neutron filter in an existing domestic test reactor would provide the U.S. the capability to test new reactor fuels and materials for advanced fast (high-energy) reactor concepts. A composite consisting of Al3Hf-Al has been proposed for the neutron filter due to both the neutron filtering properties of hafnium and the conducting capabilities of aluminum. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of the Al3Hf-Al composite is essential for the design of the filtering system. The present objectives are to identify a suitable fabrication technique and to measure the thermophysical properties of the Al3Hf intermetallic, which has not been done previous to this study. A centrifugal casting method was used to prepare samples of Al3Hf. X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were conducted to determine the structural make-up of each of the samples. Thermophysical properties were measured as follows: specific heat by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal diffusivity by a laser flash thermal diffusivity measuring system, thermal expansion by a dilatometer, and thermal conductivity was calculated based on the previous measurements. All measurements were acquired over a temperature range of 90°C - 375°C with some measurements outside these bounds. The average thermal conductivity of the intermetallic Al3Hf (~7 at.% Hf) was found to be ~ 41 W/m-K for the given temperature range. This information fills a knowledge gap in the thermophysical properties of the intermetallic Al3Hf with the specified percentage of hafnium. A model designed to predict composite properties was used to calculate a thermal conductivity of ~177 W/m-K for an Al3Hf-Al composite with 23 vol% Al3Hf. This calculation was based upon the average thermal conductivity of Al3Hf over the specified temperature range.

  17. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond. PMID:25974383

  18. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-05-14

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond.

  19. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond.

  20. Direct Insulation-to-Conduction Transformation of Adhesive Catecholamine for Simultaneous Increases of Electrical Conductivity and Mechanical Strength of CNT Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Chou, Jeffrey B; Lee, Kyueui; Lee, Dongju; Hong, Soon Hyung; Zhao, Rong; Lee, Haeshin; Kim, Sang-gook

    2015-06-03

    Increase in conductivity and mechanical properties of a carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber inspired by mussel-adhesion chemistry is described. Infiltration of polydopamine into an as-drawn CNT fiber followed by pyrolysis results in a direct insulation-to-conduction transformation of poly(dopamine) into pyrolyzed-poly(dopamine) (py-PDA), retaining the intrinsic adhesive function of catecholamine. The py-PDA enhances both the electrical conductivity and the mechanical strength of the CNT fibers.

  1. Engineering thermal conductance using a two-dimensional phononic crystal

    PubMed Central

    Zen, Nobuyuki; Puurtinen, Tuomas A.; Isotalo, Tero J.; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Maasilta, Ilari J.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling thermal transport has become relevant in recent years. Traditionally, this control has been achieved by tuning the scattering of phonons by including various types of scattering centres in the material (nanoparticles, impurities, etc). Here we take another approach and demonstrate that one can also use coherent band structure effects to control phonon thermal conductance, with the help of periodically nanostructured phononic crystals. We perform the experiments at low temperatures below 1 K, which not only leads to negligible bulk phonon scattering, but also increases the wavelength of the dominant thermal phonons by more than two orders of magnitude compared to room temperature. Thus, phononic crystals with lattice constants ≥1 μm are shown to strongly reduce the thermal conduction. The observed effect is in quantitative agreement with the theoretical calculation presented, which accurately determined the ballistic thermal conductance in a phononic crystal device. PMID:24647049

  2. Indirect measurement of thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Pennelli, Giovanni Nannini, Andrea; Macucci, Massimo

    2014-02-28

    We report indirect measurements of thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructures. We have exploited a measurement technique based on the Joule self-heating of silicon nanowires. A standard model for the electron mobility has been used to determine the temperature through the accurate measurement of the nanowire resistance. We have applied this technique to devices fabricated with a top-down process that yields nanowires together with large silicon areas used both as electrical and as thermal contacts. As there is crystalline continuity between the nanowires and the large contact areas, our thermal conductivity measurements are not affected by any temperature drop due to the contact thermal resistance. Our results confirm the observed reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructures and are comparable with those previously reported in the literature, achieved with more complex measurement techniques.

  3. Fiber/Matrix Interfacial Thermal Conductance Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of SiC/SiC Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-04-20

    SiC/SiC composites used in fusion reactor applications are subjected to high heat fluxes and require knowledge and tailoring of their in-service thermal conductivity. Accurately predicting the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites as a function of temperature will guide the design of these materials for their intended use, which will eventually include the effects of 14-MeV neutron irradiations. This paper applies an Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach (EMTA) to compute the thermal conductivity of unirradiated SiC/SiC composites. The homogenization procedure includes three steps. In the first step EMTA computes the homogenized thermal conductivity of the unidirectional (UD) SiC fiber embraced by its coating layer. The second step computes the thermal conductivity of the UD composite formed by the equivalent SiC fibers embedded in a SiC matrix, and finally the thermal conductivity of the as-formed SiC/SiC composite is obtained by averaging the solution for the UD composite over all possible fiber orientations using the second-order fiber orientation tensor. The EMTA predictions for the transverse thermal conductivity of several types of SiC/SiC composites with different fiber types and interfaces are compared to the predicted and experimental results by Youngblood et al.

  4. Processing of generic circuits by conductive adhesives: Geometrical and rheological considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianguo

    2007-12-01

    Epoxy/Ni adhesives can be used as integrated circuit (IC) packaging materials due to their lower cost than epoxy/Ag adhesives with acceptable electrical conductivity. In this study, epoxy/Ni adhesives were prepared and filled into multi-layer hole structures of novel design, a prototype of potential electronic components in circuit boards, to study effects of the hole structure geometry on a component's electrical resistance. Rheological behaviors at different conditions for capillary flows of highly filled epoxy/Ni suspensions, including stable and unstable (filtering and matting behaviors), chemorheological behaviors during processing and cure, and yield behaviors of moderately filled epoxy/Ni suspensions, were investigated to potentially relate to electrical conduction behaviors and processing of prototypes in generic circuits. An empirical relationship between the contact resistance, hole diameter, and plate thickness was proposed, together with Ohm's law, to describe effects of the geometry on electrical resistance in generic circuits. Stable and unstable capillary flows were investigated for highly filled epoxy/Ni systems with 75 wt% of different Ni particles. It was determined that, lower resin viscosity and shear rates enhance the flow instabilities and filtering of the polymer binder, and the pressure oscillation frequency and the average force increase with increasing shear rate. Incorporation of Ni nanopowders promotes a stable flow at similar filler concentrations, whereas occurrence of particle agglomerates somewhat nullifies this advantage, and leads to flow instabilities. Similar phenomena occur for adhesives during cure, and the rheological behavior changes as cure proceeds. As an integrated circuit (IC) packaging material, chemorheological behaviors of electrically conductive epoxy/Ni adhesives were investigated. Strong nonlinearity and non-Newtonian flow behaviors were observed during cure. A comprehensive model, as well as its modified form, was

  5. Anisotropic Tuning of Graphite Thermal Conductivity by Lithium Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Gu, Xiaokun; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Yang, Ronggui

    2016-11-17

    Understanding thermal transport in lithium intercalated layered materials is not only important for managing heat generation and dissipation in lithium ion batteries but also the understanding potentially provides a novel way to design materials with reversibly tunable thermal conductivity. In this work, the thermal conductivity of lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (LixC6) is calculated using molecular dynamics simulations as a function of the amount of lithium intercalated. We found that intercalation of lithium has an anisotropic effect on tuning the thermal conductivity: the thermal conductivity in the basal plane decreases monotonically from 1232 W/m·K of pristine graphite to 444 W/m·K of the fully lithiated LiC6, while the thermal conductivity along the c-axis decreases first from 6.5 W/m·K for graphite to 1.3 W/m·K for LiC18 and then increases to 5.0 W/m·K for LiC6 as the lithium composition increases. More importantly, we provide the very first atomic-scale insight into the effect of lithium intercalation on the spectral phonon properties of graphite. The intercalated lithium ions are found to suppress the phonon lifetime and to reduce the group velocity of phonons parallel to the basal plane but significantly to increase the phonon group velocity along the c-axis, which anisotropically tunes the thermal conductivity of lithiated graphite compounds. This work could shed some light on the search for tunable thermal conductivity materials and might have strong impacts on the thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

  6. Anisotropic lattice thermal conductivity in chiral tellurium from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Hua; Kioussis, Nicholas; Stewart, Derek A.

    2015-12-21

    Using ab initio based calculations, we have calculated the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of chiral tellurium. We show that the interplay between the strong covalent intrachain and weak van der Waals interchain interactions gives rise to the phonon band gap between the lower and higher optical phonon branches. The underlying mechanism of the large anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is the anisotropy of the phonon group velocities and of the anharmonic interatomic force constants (IFCs), where large interchain anharmonic IFCs are associated with the lone electron pairs. We predict that tellurium has a large three-phonon scattering phase space that results in low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity anisotropy decreases under applied hydrostatic pressure.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Gas Mixtures in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, Richard S.

    1960-01-01

    The expression for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium is presented in a simpler and less restrictive form. This new form is shown to be equivalent to the previous equations.

  8. Comparative Study of the Thermal Conductivity of Solid Biomass Fuels

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid biomass fuels is useful information in the investigation of biomass combustion behavior and the development of modeling especially in the context of large scale power generation. There are little published data on the thermal conductivity of certain types of biomass such as wheat straw, miscanthus, and torrefied woods. Much published data on wood is in the context of bulk materials. A method for determining the thermal conductivities of small particles of biomass fuels has been developed using a custom built test apparatus. Fourteen different samples of various solid biomass fuel were processed to form a homogenized pellet for analysis. The thermal conductivities of the pelletized materials were determined and compared against each other and to existing data. PMID:27041819

  9. Thermal conductivity of backfill materials for inground heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Shadley, J.T.; Den Braven, K.R.

    1995-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of the material immediately surrounding the heat exchangers in a vertical borehole directly affects the performance and costs of a ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) system by regulating the flow of energy to or from the ground. Many properties of the backfill material such as moisture content, composition, specific heat and density influence the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivities of a wide variety of pure backfill materials and mixtures were measured. All the materials examined were compared with a standard bentonite backfill. Saturated natural sandy soil was the backfill material with the highest thermal conductivity. One attractive mixture consists of a pure silica sand, acrylic latex, and graphite. This mixture forms a solid backfill around the heat exchanger. Yet, the attractiveness of any backfill material combination remains very location and application dependent, varying with the native soils at the site, and the mode in which the GCHP is to be used.

  10. Enhanced thermal conductivity through the development of nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.A.; Choi, U.S.; Li, S.; Thompson, L.J.; Lee, S.

    1996-11-01

    Low thermal conductivity is a primary limitation in the development of energy-efficient heat transfer fluids required in many industrial applications. To overcome this limitation, a new class of heat transfer fluids is being developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids such as water or oil. The resulting nanofluids possess extremely high thermal conductivities compared to the liquids without dispersed nanocrystalline particles. For example, 5 volume % of nanocrystalline copper oxide particles suspended in water results in an improvement in thermal conductivity of almost 60% compared to water without nanoparticles. Excellent suspension properties are also observed, with no significant settling of nanocrystalline oxide particles occurring in stationary fluids over time periods longer than several days. Direct evaporation of Cu nanoparticles into pump oil results in similar improvements in thermal conductivity compared to oxide-in-water systems, but importantly, requires far smaller concentrations of dispersed nanocrystalline powder.

  11. Molecular Dynamics study of the mixed oxide fuel thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichenko, S.; Staicu, D.

    2013-08-01

    There is still no clear understanding of the plutonium content influence on the thermal conductivity behaviour of the (U,Pu) O2 MOX fuels. In this work Classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) was used to investigate the (U,Pu) O2 thermal conductivity in the whole concentration range and in the temperature range from 400 K to 1600 K. The Green-Kubo approach was used for the thermal conductivity calculation and an algorithm was proposed to improve the accuracy of the calculation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the literature experimental data and results of modelling of other authors. On the basis of the obtained results we give recommendations for the MOX thermal conductivity evaluation in the concentration range from pure UO2 up to pure PuO2.

  12. Thermal conductance of pressed brass contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Brooks, W. F.; Spivak, A. L.; Marks, W. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus has been designed and fabricated which will measure the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures as a function of applied force, with surface finish as a parameter. The apparatus is automated and was used to measure thermal conductance at temperatures from 1.5 to 6.5 K at applied forces up to 700 N for brass sample pairs having surface finishes from 0.1 to 1.6 micron rms. The experimental data were found to fit a simple power law where the thermal conductance is given by k = alpha T exp n, where k is the thermal conductance, T is the absolute temperature, and alpha and n are empirically determined constants.

  13. Predicting the effective thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube based nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Venkata Sastry, N N; Bhunia, Avijit; Sundararajan, T; Das, Sarit K

    2008-02-06

    Adding a small volume fraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to a liquid enhances the thermal conductivity significantly. Recent experimental findings report an anomalously wide range of enhancement values that continue to perplex the research community and remain unexplained. In this paper we present a theoretical model based on three-dimensional CNT chain formation (percolation) in the base liquid and the corresponding thermal resistance network. The model considers random CNT orientation and CNT-CNT interaction forming the percolating chain. Predictions are in good agreement with almost all available experimental data. Results show that the enhancement critically depends on the CNT geometry (length), volume fraction, thermal conductivity of the base liquid and the nanofluid (CNT-liquid suspension) preparation technique. Based on the physical mechanism of heat conduction in the nanofluid, we introduce a new dimensionless parameter that alone characterizes the nanofluid thermal conductivity with reasonable accuracy (∼ ± 5%).

  14. Evidence for enhanced thermal conduction through percolating structures in nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Philip, John; Shima, P D; Raj, Baldev

    2008-07-30

    The unusually large enhancement of thermal conductivity (k/k(f)∼4.0, where k and k(f) are the thermal conductivities of the nanofluid and the base fluid, respectively) observed in a nanofluid containing linear chain-like aggregates provides direct evidence for efficient transport of heat through percolating paths. The nanofluid used was a stable colloidal suspension of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles of average diameter 6.7 nm, coated with oleic acid and dispersed in kerosene. The maximum enhancement under magnetic field was about 48φ (where φ is the volume fraction). The maximum enhancement is observed when chain-like aggregates are uniformly dispersed without clumping. These results also suggest that nanofluids containing well-dispersed nanoparticles (without aggregates) do not exhibit significant enhancement of thermal conductivity. Our findings offer promising applications for developing a new generation of nanofluids with tunable thermal conductivity.

  15. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  16. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  17. Toward nanofluids of ultra-high thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqiu; Fan, Jing

    2011-02-18

    The assessment of proposed origins for thermal conductivity enhancement in nanofluids signifies the importance of particle morphology and coupled transport in determining nanofluid heat conduction and thermal conductivity. The success of developing nanofluids of superior conductivity depends thus very much on our understanding and manipulation of the morphology and the coupled transport. Nanofluids with conductivity of upper Hashin-Shtrikman (H-S) bound can be obtained by manipulating particles into an interconnected configuration that disperses the base fluid and thus significantly enhancing the particle-fluid interfacial energy transport. Nanofluids with conductivity higher than the upper H-S bound could also be developed by manipulating the coupled transport among various transport processes, and thus the nature of heat conduction in nanofluids. While the direct contributions of ordered liquid layer and particle Brownian motion to the nanofluid conductivity are negligible, their indirect effects can be significant via their influence on the particle morphology and/or the coupled transport.

  18. Analysis of effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Futschik, Michael W.; Witte, Larry C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the various mechanisms of heat transfer through fibrous materials and to gain insight into how fill-gas pressure influences the effective thermal conductivity. By way of first principles and some empiricism, two mathematical models are constructed to correlate experimental data. The data are obtained from a test series measuring the effective thermal conductivity of Nomex using a two-sided guarded hot-plate heater apparatus. Tests are conducted for certain mean temperatures and fill-gases over a range of pressures varying from vacuum to atmospheric conditions. The models are then evaluated to determine their effectiveness in representing the effective thermal conductivity of a fibrous material. The models presented herein predict the effective thermal conductivity of Nomex extremely well. Since the influence of gas conduction is determined to be the most influential component in predicting the effective thermal conductivity of a fibrous material, an improved representation of gas conduction is developed. Finally, some recommendations for extension to other random-oriented fiber materials are made concerning the usefulness of each model depending on their advantages and disadvantages.

  19. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal contact conductance of a 0.4 micrometer surface finish OFHC copper sample pair has been investigated from 1.6 to 3.8 K for a range of applied contact forces up to 670 N. Experimental data have been fitted to the relation Q = the integral alpha T to the nth power dt by assuming that the thermal contact conductance is a simple power function of the sample temperature. It has been found that the conductance is proportional to T squared and that conductance increases with an increase in applied contact force. These results confirm earlier work.

  20. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  1. Thermal Conductivity Changes in Titanium-Graphene Composite upon Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, Kasichainula

    2016-02-01

    Ti-graphene composite films were prepared on polished Ti substrates by deposition of graphene platelets from suspension followed by deposition of Ti by magnetron sputtering. The films were annealed at different temperatures up to 1073 K (800 °C) and different time periods in argon atmosphere. The annealed films were characterized by X-ray diffraction for phase identification, scanning electron microscopy for microstructure, energy-dispersive spectrometry for chemical analysis, atomic force microscopy for surface roughness, and transient thermoreflectance for thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance. The results showed that the interface between the composite film and Ti substrate remained continuous with the absence of voids. Oxygen concentration in the composite films has increased for higher temperature and time of annealing. TiO2 and TiC phases are formed only in the film annealed at 1073 K (800 °C). The thermal conductivity of the composite film decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. The effective thermal conductance of the film annealed at 1073 K (800 °C) was significantly lower. The interface thermal conductance between the composite film and the Ti substrate is also reduced for higher oxygen concentration. Formation of microscopic TiO2 phase bound by interface boundaries and oxygen incorporation is considered responsible for the lower thermal conductance of the Ti-graphene composite annealed at 1073 K (800 °C).

  2. Uncertainties Quantification of Effective Thermal Conductivity for Ceramic Fiber Blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-yuan; Li, Jian-jun; He, Xiao-dong

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, a probabilistic propagation model for assessing the uncertainty of the effective thermal conductivity was developed based on a combined conduction and radiation heat transfer model of a ceramic fiber blanket composite. The Monte Carlo technique was used to cope with the uncertainties in the material density, radiative properties, and boundary temperatures observed in experimental tests. The calculated effective thermal-conductivity distribution for the sample was compared with the experimental measurements performed on multiple samples, and the predicted mean values were in good agreement with the measured data. The result validates the thermal predictive model and demonstrates the suitability of the stochastic model containing statistical distributions in the input variables. Statistical information also indicates that the uncertainty effect can be enlarged at high temperatures. Response sensitivity analysis between the random inputs and the effective thermal conductivity demonstrates that the randomness in the hot-side temperature, the cold-side temperature, and extinction coefficient of the sample has a significant influence on the variability of thermal-conductivity properties. The extinction coefficient becomes more and more important with an increase of temperature due to the dominant radiative heat transfer contribution at high temperature. The analysis provides good insight into the scattering control in the experimental measurement and theoretical prediction of the effective thermal conductivity of a ceramic fiber composite.

  3. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, M. A.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1994-04-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions.

  4. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1994-04-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions. 25 refs.

  5. Thermal conductivity anisotropy of metasedimentary and igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael G.; Chapman, David S.; van Wagoner, Thomas M.; Armstrong, Phillip A.

    2007-05-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for three sets of metasedimentary and igneous rocks from central Utah, USA. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kpar) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kpar and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kpar/kperp. Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for Price Canyon sedimentary samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming [1994] that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  6. High adhesion transparent conducting films using graphene oxide hybrid carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Jia, Song-Lin; Xu, Chun-Xia; Li, Lin-Ge; Shi, Pei-Pei; Li, Guangfen

    2017-01-01

    Flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted more and more attention for their wide range of potential applications. While, there are still some problems to be solved on several aspects. In this study, a graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) hybrid TCF was fabricated through the simple spray coating method. GO sheets were introduced to form new electron transporting channels. It was found that the best optoelectronic property films were fabricated when the ratio of GO/CNT is 1.5:1.0, which the sheet resistance of the film was found to be 146 Ω/sq at the transmittance of 86.0%. Due to the two-dimensional structure and the oxidation groups of GO sheets, flatness and wettability of the electrode surface was improved obviously. Adhesion factor of the TCFs was calculated by the change of transparent and sheet resistance after trial test, the addition of GO sheets enhanced the adhesion dramatically and the mechanism was analyzed. Improvements of conductivity, flatness, wettability and adhesion above are all advantageous for the solution-based processing of organic electronics for spraying and printing.

  7. Revisiting the block method for evaluating thermal conductivities of clay and granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal conductivities of porous media using the contact method is revisited and revalidated with consideration of thermal contact resistance. Problems that limit the accuracy of determination of thermal conductivities of porous media are discussed. Thermal conductivities of granite...

  8. Methods of measuring adhesion for thermally grown oxide scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P.Y.; Atkinson, A.

    1994-06-01

    High temperature alloys and coatings rely on the formation of adherent scales to protect against further oxidation, but scale spallation is often problematic. Despite the technical importance of the problem, ``practical adhesion``, which refers to the separation of the oxide from the metal, has mainly been treated qualitatively in the past. Various techniques now exist such that the subject can be assessed in quantitative or semi-quantitative terms. Some of the techniques are described in this paper, and their weakness and strength are discussed. The experimental methods addressed here include: tensile pulling, micro-indentation, scratch test, residual stress induced delamination, laser or shock wave induced spallation, double cantilever beam and several 4-point beam bending approaches. To date, there is not an universal, easy test for oxide adhesion measurement that can provide reproducible information on interfacial fracture energy for a variety of oxide/metal systems. Much experimentation is still needed to increase confidence in many of the existing tests, and the fundamental mechanics for some present techniques also require further development.

  9. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Wafer-Bonded Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    ZL Liau; LR Danielson; PM Fourspring; L Hu; G Chen; GW Turner

    2006-11-27

    Blocks of silicon up to 3-mm thick have been formed by directly bonding stacks of thin wafer chips. These stacks showed significant reductions in the thermal conductivity in the bonding direction. In each sample, the wafer chips were obtained by polishing a commercial wafer to as thin as 36 {micro}m, followed by dicing. Stacks whose starting wafers were patterned with shallow dots showed greater reductions in thermal conductivity. Diluted-HF treatment of wafer chips prior to bonding led to the largest reduction of the effective thermal conductivity, by approximately a factor of 50. Theoretical modeling based on restricted conduction through the contacting dots and some conduction across the planar nanometer air gaps yielded fair agreement for samples fabricated without the HF treatment.

  10. Ultralow thermal conductivity in Electrolessly Etched (EE) Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Chen, Renkun; Budaev, Bair; Tang, Jinyao; Andrews, Sean; Murphy, Padraig; Mukerjee, Subroto; Moore, Joel; Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arun

    2009-03-01

    EE process produces single-crystalline Silicon nanowires with rough walls. We use suspended structures to directly compute the heat transfer through single nanowires. Nanowires with diameters less than the mean free path of phonons impede transport by boundary scattering. The roughness acts as a secondary scattering mechanism to further reduce phonon transport. By controlling the amount of roughness it is possible to push limits to the extent that nanowire conductance close to quanta of thermal conductance,πkB^2 T / πkB^2 T 6 . - 6 is observed. Traditionally, the lower limit of conductivity is amorphous Silicon at 1 W/mK at room temperature. The measured conductivity of our nanostructures challenges even this amorphous limit pointing towards previously unstudied mechanisms of thermal resistance. We measure thermal conductivity of ˜150nm diameter EE wires to be ˜1 W/mK.

  11. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  12. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of Cda 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J.; Canavan, E.; DiPirro, M.

    2010-04-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, results vary among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). These harnesses dominate the heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment that measured its electrical and thermal conductivity between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  13. Spatially resolved determination of thermal conductivity by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoib, B.; Filser, S.; Stötzel, J.; Greppmair, A.; Petermann, N.; Wiggers, H.; Schierning, G.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    We review the Raman shift method as a non-destructive optical tool to investigate the thermal conductivity and demonstrate the possibility to map this quantity with a micrometer resolution by studying thin film and bulk materials for thermoelectric applications. In this method, a focused laser beam both thermally excites a sample and undergoes Raman scattering at the excitation spot. The temperature dependence of the phonon energies measured is used as a local thermometer. We discuss that the temperature measured is an effective one and describe how the thermal conductivity is deduced from single temperature measurements to full temperature maps, with the help of analytical or numerical treatments of heat diffusion. We validate the method and its analysis on three- and two-dimensional single crystalline samples before applying it to more complex Si-based materials. A suspended thin mesoporous film of phosphorus-doped laser-sintered S{{i}78}G{{e}22} nanoparticles is investigated to extract the in-plane thermal conductivity from the effective temperatures, measured as a function of the distance to the heat sink. Using an iterative multigrid Gauss-Seidel algorithm the experimental data can be modelled yielding a thermal conductivity of 0.1 W/m K after normalizing by the porosity. As a second application we map the surface of a phosphorus-doped three-dimensional bulk-nanocrystalline Si sample which exhibits anisotropic and oxygen-rich precipitates. Thermal conductivities as low as 11 W/m K are found in the regions of the precipitates, significantly lower than the 17 W/m K in the surrounding matrix. The present work serves as a basis to more routinely use the Raman shift method as a versatile tool for thermal conductivity investigations, both for samples with high and low thermal conductivity and in a variety of geometries.

  14. Molecular-dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Hee; Biswas, R.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Chan, C. T.; Ho, K. M.

    1991-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity κ(T) of amorphous silicon has been calculated from equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations using the time correlations of the heat flux operator in which anharmonicity is explicitly incorporated. The Stillinger-Weber two- and three-body Si potential and the Wooten-Weaire-Winer a-Si model were utilized. The calculations correctly predict an increasing thermal conductivity at low temperatures (below 400 K). The κ(T), for T>400 K, is affected by the thermally generated coordination-defect states. Comparisons to both experiment and previous calculations will be described.

  15. Thermal radiation and conduction in microscale structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.L.

    1998-09-02

    The general objective of the current research program is to achieve a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of thermal radiation and heat conduction in microscale structures commonly encountered in engineering applications. Specifically, the program includes both experimental and analytical investigations of radiative heat transfer in microstructures, conductive heat transfer in micro devices, and short-pulse laser material interactions. Future work is planned to apply the knowledge of microscale heat transfer gained in this project to developing thermal insulating aerogel materials, thermal design schemes for quantum well lasers, and short-pulse laser micro-fabrication techniques. A listing of publications by Chang-Lin Tien is included.

  16. Thermal conductivity measurements of particulate materials under Martian conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presley, M. A.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle diameter of surficial units on Mars has been approximated by applying thermal inertia determinations from the Mariner 9 Infrared Radiometer and the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data together with thermal conductivity measurement. Several studies have used this approximation to characterize surficial units and infer their nature and possible origin. Such interpretations are possible because previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of particulate materials have shown that particle size significantly affects thermal conductivity under martian atmospheric pressures. The transfer of thermal energy due to collisions of gas molecules is the predominant mechanism of thermal conductivity in porous systems for gas pressures above about 0.01 torr. At martian atmospheric pressures the mean free path of the gas molecules becomes greater than the effective distance over which conduction takes place between the particles. Gas particles are then more likely to collide with the solid particles than they are with each other. The average heat transfer distance between particles, which is related to particle size, shape and packing, thus determines how fast heat will flow through a particulate material.The derived one-to-one correspondence of thermal inertia to mean particle diameter implies a certain homogeneity in the materials analyzed. Yet the samples used were often characterized by fairly wide ranges of particle sizes with little information about the possible distribution of sizes within those ranges. Interpretation of thermal inertia data is further limited by the lack of data on other effects on the interparticle spacing relative to particle size, such as particle shape, bimodal or polymodal mixtures of grain sizes and formation of salt cements between grains. To address these limitations and to provide a more comprehensive set of thermal conductivities vs. particle size a linear heat source apparatus, similar to that of Cremers, was assembled to

  17. Method of simultaneous measurement of radiative and lattice thermal conductivity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, J. F.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    A new technique of high-temperature thermal-conductivity measurement is described. A CO2 gas laser is used to generate a low-frequency temperature wave at one face of a small disk-shaped sample, and an infrared detector views the opposite face to detect the phase of the emerging radiation. A mathematical expression is derived which enables phase data at several frequencies to be used for the simultaneous determination of thermal diffusivity and mean extinction coefficient. Lattice and radiative thermal conductivities are then calculated. Test results for sintered aluminum oxide at temperatures from 530 to 1924 K are within the range of error of previously existing data.

  18. Quasi-ballistic Electronic Thermal Conduction in Metal Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Sood, Aditya; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Junjie; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Zheng, Xiaolin; Braun, Paul V; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2016-04-13

    Porous metals are used in interfacial transport applications that leverage the combination of electrical and/or thermal conductivity and the large available surface area. As nanomaterials push toward smaller pore sizes to increase the total surface area and reduce diffusion length scales, electron conduction within the metal scaffold becomes suppressed due to increased surface scattering. Here we observe the transition from diffusive to quasi-ballistic thermal conduction using metal inverse opals (IOs), which are metal films that contain a periodic arrangement of interconnected spherical pores. As the material dimensions are reduced from ∼230 nm to ∼23 nm, the thermal conductivity of copper IOs is reduced by more than 57% due to the increase in surface scattering. In contrast, nickel IOs exhibit diffusive-like conduction and have a constant thermal conductivity over this size regime. The quasi-ballistic nature of electron transport at these length scales is modeled considering the inverse opal geometry, surface scattering, and grain boundaries. Understanding the characteristics of electron conduction at the nanoscale is essential to minimizing the total resistance of porous metals for interfacial transport applications, such as the total electrical resistance of battery electrodes and the total thermal resistance of microscale heat exchangers.

  19. Ab Initio Thermal Conductivity Model of the Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Dekura, H.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lattice thermal conductivity of minerals under pressure and temperature is a key property to understanding dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior. However, determination of the thermal conductivity still remains technically challenging both experimentally and theoretically particularly at the deep mantle and core conditions. Here we show a new technique to calculate lattice thermal conductivity of minerals non-empirically. Since the anharmonic coupling strength is calculated efficiently based on the density functional perturbation theory, our technique can be applicable to minerals even with complex structure and chemistry such as perovskite and post-perovskite MgSiO3. Calculated lattice thermal conductivity of perovskite agrees satisfactorily with an experimental value at ambient condition, and those of perovskite and post-perovskite are found quite different at deep mantle pressures and temperatures. This indicates that the D" discontinuity is not only the phase transition boundary but also the boundary of conductivity. Using the obtained thermal conductivities, we determine the effective conductivity of the Earth's lower mantle and estimate the energy flow carried across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Our results demonstrate that the CMB heat flux could change significantly from place to place by reflecting a possible temperature heterogeneity located atop the core. Research supported by KAKENHI and Grant from Senior Research Fellow Center, Ehime University.

  20. Voltage tunability of thermal conductivity in ferroelectric materials

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Hopkins, Patrick Edward

    2016-02-09

    A method to control thermal energy transport uses mobile coherent interfaces in nanoscale ferroelectric films to scatter phonons. The thermal conductivity can be actively tuned, simply by applying an electrical potential across the ferroelectric material and thereby altering the density of these coherent boundaries to directly impact thermal transport at room temperature and above. The invention eliminates the necessity of using moving components or poor efficiency methods to control heat transfer, enabling a means of thermal energy control at the micro- and nano-scales.

  1. Thermal Conductivity Based on Modified Laser Flash Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2005-01-01

    The laser flash method is a standard method for thermal diffusivity measurement. It employs single-pulse heating of one side of a thin specimen and measures the temperature response of the other side. The thermal diffusivity of the specimen can be obtained based on a one-dimensional transient heat transfer analysis. This paper reports the development of a theory that includes a transparent reference layer with known thermal property attached to the back of sample. With the inclusion of heat conduction from the sample to the reference layer in the theoretical analysis, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of sample can be extracted from the temperature response data. Furthermore, a procedure is established to select two points from the data to calculate these properties. The uncertainty analysis indicates that this method can be used with acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  3. Remote cooling by a novel thermal lens with anisotropic positive thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A novel thermal lens that can achieve a remote cooling effect is designed by transformation thermodynamics. The effective distance between the separate hot source and cold source is shortened by our shelled thermal lens without any negative thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our thermal lens. Based on the effective medium theory, we also propose a practical way to realize our lens using two-layered isotropic thermal media that are both found in nature. The proposed thermal lens will have potential applications in remote temperature control and in creating other thermal illusions. PMID:28098221

  4. Remote cooling by a novel thermal lens with anisotropic positive thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A novel thermal lens that can achieve a remote cooling effect is designed by transformation thermodynamics. The effective distance between the separate hot source and cold source is shortened by our shelled thermal lens without any negative thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our thermal lens. Based on the effective medium theory, we also propose a practical way to realize our lens using two-layered isotropic thermal media that are both found in nature. The proposed thermal lens will have potential applications in remote temperature control and in creating other thermal illusions.

  5. Thermal conductivity characteristics of dewatered sewage sludge by thermal hydrolysis reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyoung Woon; Park, Keum Joo; Han, Seong Kuk; Jung, Hee Suk

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the thermal conductivity of sewage sludge related to reaction temperature for the optimal design of a thermal hydrolysis reactor. We continuously quantified the thermal conductivity of dewatered sludge related to the reaction temperature. As the reaction temperature increased, the dewatered sludge is thermally liquefied under high temperature and pressure by the thermal hydrolysis reaction. Therefore, the bound water in the sludge cells comes out as free water, which changes the dewatered sludge from a solid phase to slurry in a liquid phase. As a result, the thermal conductivity of the sludge was more than 2.64 times lower than that of the water at 20. However, above 200, it became 0.704 W/m* degrees C, which is about 4% higher than that of water. As a result, the change in physical properties due to thermal hydrolysis appears to be an important factor for heat transfer efficiency. Implications: The thermal conductivity of dewatered sludge is an important factor the optimal design of a thermal hydrolysis reactor. The dewatered sludge is thermally liquefied under high temperature and pressure by the thermal hydrolysis reaction. The liquid phase slurry has a higher thermal conductivity than pure water.

  6. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-01-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm−1K−1(+141 Wm−1K−1/ −24 Wm−1K−1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN. PMID:27142571

  7. Effective thermal conductivity of composites with fibre-matrix debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadale, T. D.; Taya, M.

    1991-01-01

    Debonding of the fiber-matrix interface is a major cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties and the loss of thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composites. This paper discusses two analytical approaches for modeling the thermal conduction problem of composites. One is based on the concept of modeling the thermal barrier by an equivalent heat transfer coefficient at the fiber-matrix interface, as described by Hasselman and Johnson (1987) and Benveniste and Miloh (1986). The other approach, suggested by Hatta and Taya (1986), is by treating a composite with debonded interface as a coated-fiber composite. The major advantage of the latter aproach is that the thickness of the fiber coating can be realistically modeled depending upon the extent of degradation of the composite with the thermal conductivity of the coating as that of air.

  8. Determining Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fabrics by Using Fractal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Li, Kejing

    2010-03-01

    In this article, a fractal effective thermal conductivity model for woven fabrics with multiple layers is developed. Structural models of yarn and plain woven fabric are derived based on the fractal characteristics of macro-pores (gap or channel) between the yarns and micro-pores inside the yarns. The fractal effective thermal conductivity model can be expressed as a function of the pore structure (fractal dimension) and architectural parameters of the woven fabric. Good agreement is found between the fractal model and the thermal conductivity measurements in the general porosity ranges. It is expected that the model will be helpful in the evaluation of thermal comfort for woven fabric in the whole range of porosity.

  9. Thermal conductivity enhancement in thermal grease containing different CuO structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Zhao, Junchang; Wang, Mingzhu; Hu, Yiheng; Chen, Lifei; Xie, Huaqing

    2015-03-01

    Different cupric oxide (CuO) structures have attracted intensive interest because of their promising applications in various fields. In this study, three kinds of CuO structures, namely, CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres, are synthesized by solution-based synthetic methods. The morphologies and crystal structures of these CuO structures are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer, respectively. They are used as thermal conductive fillers to prepare silicone-based thermal greases, giving rise to great enhancement in thermal conductivity. Compared with pure silicone base, the thermal conductivities of thermal greases with CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres are 0.283, 0256, and 0.239 W/mK, respectively, at filler loading of 9 vol.%, which increases 139%, 116%, and 99%, respectively. These thermal greases present a slight descendent tendency in thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. These experimental data are compared with Nan's model prediction, indicating that the shape factor has a great influence on thermal conductivity improvement of thermal greases with different CuO structures. Meanwhile, due to large aspect ratio of CuO microdisks, they can form thermal networks more effectively than the other two structures, resulting in higher thermal conductivity enhancement.

  10. Thermal conductivity enhancement in thermal grease containing different CuO structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zhao, Junchang; Wang, Mingzhu; Hu, Yiheng; Chen, Lifei; Xie, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    Different cupric oxide (CuO) structures have attracted intensive interest because of their promising applications in various fields. In this study, three kinds of CuO structures, namely, CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres, are synthesized by solution-based synthetic methods. The morphologies and crystal structures of these CuO structures are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer, respectively. They are used as thermal conductive fillers to prepare silicone-based thermal greases, giving rise to great enhancement in thermal conductivity. Compared with pure silicone base, the thermal conductivities of thermal greases with CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres are 0.283, 0256, and 0.239 W/mK, respectively, at filler loading of 9 vol.%, which increases 139%, 116%, and 99%, respectively. These thermal greases present a slight descendent tendency in thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. These experimental data are compared with Nan's model prediction, indicating that the shape factor has a great influence on thermal conductivity improvement of thermal greases with different CuO structures. Meanwhile, due to large aspect ratio of CuO microdisks, they can form thermal networks more effectively than the other two structures, resulting in higher thermal conductivity enhancement.

  11. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts. PMID:26374147

  12. Thermal conductivity modeling of core-shell and tubular nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronggui; Chen, Gang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of crystalline core-shell nanostructures of a variety of materials has become possible in recent years, allowing the realization of various novel nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. The increased surface or interface area will decrease the thermal conductivity of such nanostructures and impose challenges for the thermal management of such devices. In the meantime, the decreased thermal conductivity might benefit the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. In this paper, we present modeling results on the lattice thermal conductivity of core-shell and tubular nanowires along the wire axis direction using the phonon Boltzmann equation. We report the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the surface conditions and the core-shell geometry for silicon core-germanium shell and tubular silicon nanowires at room temperature. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity changes not only with the composition of the constituents but also with the radius of the nanowires and nanopores due to the nature of the ballistic phonon transport. The results in this work have implications for the design and operation of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronic devices, and thermoelectric materials and devices.

  13. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers. PMID:26911859

  14. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-16

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts.

  15. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-25

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers.

  16. Discussion on the thermal conductivity enhancement of nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huaqing; Yu, Wei; Li, Yang; Chen, Lifei

    2011-02-09

    Increasing interests have been paid to nanofluids because of the intriguing heat transfer enhancement performances presented by this kind of promising heat transfer media. We produced a series of nanofluids and measured their thermal conductivities. In this article, we discussed the measurements and the enhancements of the thermal conductivity of a variety of nanofluids. The base fluids used included those that are most employed heat transfer fluids, such as deionized water (DW), ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol, silicone oil, and the binary mixture of DW and EG. Various nanoparticles (NPs) involving Al2O3 NPs with different sizes, SiC NPs with different shapes, MgO NPs, ZnO NPs, SiO2 NPs, Fe3O4 NPs, TiO2 NPs, diamond NPs, and carbon nanotubes with different pretreatments were used as additives. Our findings demonstrated that the thermal conductivity enhancements of nanofluids could be influenced by multi-faceted factors including the volume fraction of the dispersed NPs, the tested temperature, the thermal conductivity of the base fluid, the size of the dispersed NPs, the pretreatment process, and the additives of the fluids. The thermal transport mechanisms in nanofluids were further discussed, and the promising approaches for optimizing the thermal conductivity of nanofluids have been proposed.

  17. Rock thermal conductivity as key parameter for geothermal numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sipio, Eloisa; Chiesa, Sergio; Destro, Elisa; Galgaro, Antonio; Giaretta, Aurelio; Gola, Gianluca; Manzella, Adele

    2013-04-01

    The geothermal energy applications are undergoing a rapid development. However, there are still several challenges in the successful exploitation of geothermal energy resources. In particular, a special effort is required to characterize the thermal properties of the ground along with the implementation of efficient thermal energy transfer technologies. This paper focuses on understanding the quantitative contribution that geosciences can receive from the characterization of rock thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of materials is one of the main input parameters in geothermal modeling since it directly controls the steady state temperature field. An evaluation of this thermal property is required in several fields, such as Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical multiphysics analysis of frozen soils, designing ground source heat pumps plant, modeling the deep geothermal reservoirs structure, assessing the geothermal potential of subsoil. Aim of this study is to provide original rock thermal conductivity values useful for the evaluation of both low and high enthalpy resources at regional or local scale. To overcome the existing lack of thermal conductivity data of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks, a series of laboratory measurements has been performed on several samples, collected in outcrop, representative of the main lithologies of the regions included in the VIGOR Project (southern Italy). Thermal properties tests were carried out both in dry and wet conditions, using a C-Therm TCi device, operating following the Modified Transient Plane Source method.Measurements were made at standard laboratory conditions on samples both water saturated and dehydrated with a fan-forced drying oven at 70 ° C for 24 hr, for preserving the mineral assemblage and preventing the change of effective porosity. Subsequently, the samples have been stored in an air-conditioned room while bulk density, solid volume and porosity were detected. The measured thermal conductivity

  18. An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, J; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

  19. Scanning thermal microscopy with heat conductive nanowire probes.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Maria; Bolshakov, Alexey; Tovee, Peter D; Zeze, Dagou A; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2016-03-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), which enables measurement of thermal transport and temperature distribution in devices and materials with nanoscale resolution is rapidly becoming a key approach in resolving heat dissipation problems in modern processors and assisting development of new thermoelectric materials. In SThM, the self-heating thermal sensor contacts the sample allowing studying of the temperature distribution and heat transport in nanoscaled materials and devices. The main factors that limit the resolution and sensitivities of SThM measurements are the low efficiency of thermal coupling and the lateral dimensions of the probed area of the surface studied. The thermal conductivity of the sample plays a key role in the sensitivity of SThM measurements. During the SThM measurements of the areas with higher thermal conductivity the heat flux via SThM probe is increased compared to the areas with lower thermal conductivity. For optimal SThM measurements of interfaces between low and high thermal conductivity materials, well defined nanoscale probes with high thermal conductivity at the probe apex are required to achieve a higher quality of the probe-sample thermal contact while preserving the lateral resolution of the system. In this paper, we consider a SThM approach that can help address these complex problems by using high thermal conductivity nanowires (NW) attached to a tip apex. We propose analytical models of such NW-SThM probes and analyse the influence of the contact resistance between the SThM probe and the sample studied. The latter becomes particularly important when both tip and sample surface have high thermal conductivities. These models were complemented by finite element analysis simulations and experimental tests using prototype probe where a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is exploited as an excellent example of a high thermal conductivity NW. These results elucidate critical relationships between the performance of the SThM probe on

  20. Thermal conductivity switch: Optimal semiconductor/metal melting transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangnam; Kaviany, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    Scrutinizing distinct solid/liquid (s /l ) and solid/solid (s /s ) phase transitions (passive transitions) for large change in bulk (and homogenous) thermal conductivity, we find the s /l semiconductor/metal (S/M) transition produces the largest dimensionless thermal conductivity switch (TCS) figure of merit ZTCS (change in thermal conductivity divided by smaller conductivity). At melting temperature, the solid phonon and liquid molecular thermal conductivities are comparable and generally small, so the TCS requires localized electron solid and delocalized electron liquid states. For cyclic phase reversibility, the congruent phase transition (no change in composition) is as important as the thermal transport. We identify X Sb and X As (X =Al , Cd, Ga, In, Zn) and describe atomic-structural metrics for large ZTCS, then show the superiority of S/M phonon- to electron-dominated transport melting transition. We use existing experimental results and theoretical and ab initio calculations of the related properties for both phases (including the Kubo-Greenwood and Bridgman formulations of liquid conductivities). The 5 p orbital of Sb contributes to the semiconductor behavior in the solid-phase band gap and upon disorder and bond-length changes in the liquid phase this changes to metallic, creating the large contrast in thermal conductivity. The charge density distribution, electronic localization function, and electron density of states are used to mark this S/M transition. For optimal TCS, we examine the elemental selection from the transition, basic, and semimetals and semiconductor groups. For CdSb, addition of residual Ag suppresses the bipolar conductivity and its ZTCS is over 7, and for Zn3Sb2 it is expected to be over 14, based on the structure and transport properties of the better-known β -Zn4Sb3 . This is the highest ZTCS identified. In addition to the metallic melting, the high ZTCS is due to the electron-poor nature of II-V semiconductors, leading to the

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Ionic Liquids: Measurement and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröba, A. P.; Rausch, M. H.; Krzeminski, K.; Assenbaum, D.; Wasserscheid, P.; Leipertz, A.

    2010-12-01

    This study reports thermal-conductivity data for a series of [EMIM] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium)-based ionic liquids (ILs) having the anions [NTf2] (bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide), [OAc] (acetate), [N(CN)2] (dicyanimide), [C(CN)3] (tricyanomethide), [MeOHPO2] (methylphosphonate), [EtSO4] (ethylsulfate), or [OcSO4] (octylsulfate), and in addition for ILs with the [NTf2]-anion having the cations [HMIM] (1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium), [OMA] (methyltrioctylammonium), or [BBIM] (1,3-dibutylimidazolium). Measurements were performed in the temperature range between (273.15 and 333.15) K by a stationary guarded parallel-plate instrument with a total measurement uncertainty of 3 % ( k = 2). For all ILs, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity can well be represented by a linear equation. While for the [NTf2]-based ILs, a slight increase of the thermal conductivity with increasing molar mass of the cation is found at a given temperature, the [EMIM]-based ILs show a pronounced, approximately linear decrease with increasing molar mass of the different probed anions. Based on the experimental data obtained in this study, a simple relationship between the thermal conductivity, molar mass, and density is proposed for the prediction of the thermal-conductivity data of ILs. For this, also densities were measured for [EMIM][OAc], [EMIM][C(CN)3], and [HMIM][NTf2]. The mean absolute percentage deviation of all thermal-conductivity data for ILs found in the literature from the proposed prediction is about 7 %. This result represents a convenient simplification in the acquisition of thermal conductivity information for the enormous amount of structurally different IL cation/anion combinations available.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of ZnO Single Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Sh U; Yalishev, V Sh; Cho, H D; Kang, T W

    2016-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of a single ZnO nanowire with diameter of ~150 nm was measured using a four-point-probe 3omega method over a temperature range of 140-300 K. The measured ther- mal conductivity of ZnO nanowire is strongly reduced compared to bulk ZnO crystal due to the enhanced phonon-boundary and impurity (isotope) scattering. The maximum of the thermal conductivity is shifted to a higher temperature than that of bulk counterpart. Temperature dependent measurements show that beyond the low-temperature maximum, the thermal conductivity decreases with temperature as T(-1.5) indicating strong impurity (isotope) scattering at intermediate and high temperatures.

  3. Bulk thermal conductivity of composites with spherical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Yao, C.

    1988-03-01

    The problem of determining the bulk or effective thermal conductivity of a two-phase composite material whose unit cells contain N(N>1) spherical particles of thermal conductivity αk suspended in a medium of thermal conductivity k has been treated by extending an earlier analysis of McPhedran and Milton [Appl. Phys. A 26, 207 (1981)] who considered the case N=1. The technique is applied to computer-generated two-phase composites with N=16 whose radial distribution functions approximately satisfy the Percus-Yevick equation. The results, which are presented for a wide range of α and φ (the volume fraction of the spheres), are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental values of conductivity of fluidized beds reported by Turner [Chem. Eng. Sci. 31, 487 (1976)].

  4. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  5. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zongmeng; Huai, Ping; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC2 with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C2 dimer in ThC2 is similar to that of a free standing C2 dimer. This indicates that the C2 dimer in ThC2 is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC2 was calculated by means of the Debye-Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC2 contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  6. Highly thermally conductive papers with percolative layered boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Li, Yuanyuan; Fang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Jiajun; Cao, Fangyu; Wan, Jiayu; Preston, Colin; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2014-04-22

    In this work, we report a dielectric nanocomposite paper with layered boron nitride (BN) nanosheets wired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) that has superior thermal and mechanical properties. These nanocomposite papers are fabricated from a filtration of BN and NFC suspensions, in which NFC is used as a stabilizer to stabilize BN nanosheets. In these nanocomposite papers, two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets form a thermally conductive network, while 1D NFC provides mechanical strength. A high thermal conductivity has been achieved along the BN paper surface (up to 145.7 W/m K for 50 wt % of BN), which is an order of magnitude higher than that in randomly distributed BN nanosheet composites and is even comparable to the thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys. Such a high thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the structural alignment within the BN nanosheet papers; the effects of the interfacial thermal contact resistance are minimized by the fact that the heat transfer is in the direction parallel to the interface between BN nanosheets and that a large contact area occurs between BN nanosheets.

  7. Development of Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced multi-component, low conductivity oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities and improved thermal stability due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  8. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-02

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  9. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-04-27

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms.

  10. Thermal conductivity of III-V semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.

    2015-11-07

    This paper presents a semiclassical model for the anisotropic thermal transport in III-V semiconductor superlattices (SLs). An effective interface rms roughness is the only adjustable parameter. Thermal transport inside a layer is described by the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and is affected by the relevant scattering mechanisms (three-phonon, mass-difference, and dopant and electron scattering of phonons), as well as by diffuse scattering from the interfaces captured via an effective interface scattering rate. The in-plane thermal conductivity is obtained from the layer conductivities connected in parallel. The cross-plane thermal conductivity is calculated from the layer thermal conductivities in series with one another and with thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) associated with each interface; the TBRs dominate cross-plane transport. The TBR of each interface is calculated from the transmission coefficient obtained by interpolating between the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), where the weight of the AMM transmission coefficient is the same wavelength-dependent specularity parameter related to the effective interface rms roughness that is commonly used to describe diffuse interface scattering. The model is applied to multiple III-arsenide superlattices, and the results are in very good agreement with experimental findings. The method is both simple and accurate, easy to implement, and applicable to complicated SL systems, such as the active regions of quantum cascade lasers. It is also valid for other SL material systems with high-quality interfaces and predominantly incoherent phonon transport.

  11. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  12. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  13. Characterization of the thermal conductivity for ceramic pebble beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Frano, R.; Aquaro, D.; Scaletti, L.; Olivi, N.

    2015-11-01

    The evaluation of the thermal conductivity of breeder materials is one of the main goals to find the best candidate material for the fusion reactor technology. The aim of this paper is to evaluate experimentally the thermal conductivity of a ceramic material by applying the hot wire method at different temperatures, ranging from 50 to about 800°C. The updated experimental facility, available at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa, used to determine the thermal conductivity of a ceramic material (alumina), will be described along with the measurement acquisition system. Moreover it will be also provided an overview of the current state of art of the ceramic pebble bed breeder thermos-mechanics R&D (e.g. Lithium Orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) and Lithium Metatitanate (Li2TiO3)) focusing on the up-to-date analysis. The methodological approach adopted is articulated in two phase: the first one aimed at the experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of a ceramic material by means of hot wire method, to be subsequently used in the second phase that is based on the test rig method, through which is measured the thermal conductivity of pebble bed material. In this framework, the experimental procedure and the measured results obtained varying the temperature, are presented and discussed.

  14. On the thermal conductivity of gold nanoparticle colloids.

    PubMed

    Shalkevich, Natallia; Escher, Werner; Bürgi, Thomas; Michel, Bruno; Si-Ahmed, Lynda; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2010-01-19

    Nanofluids (colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles) have been reported to display significantly enhanced thermal conductivities relative to those of conventional heat transfer fluids, also at low concentrations well below 1% per volume (Putnam, S. A., et at. J. Appl. Phys. 2006, 99, 084308; Liu, M.-S. L., et al. Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer. 2006, 49; Patel, H. E., et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2003, 83, 2931-2933). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the particle size, concentration, stabilization method and particle clustering on the thermal conductivity of gold nanofluids. We synthesized spherical gold nanoparticles of different size (from 2 to 45 nm) and prepared stable gold colloids in the range of volume fraction of 0.00025-1%. The colloids were inspected by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermal conductivity has been measured by the transient hot-wire method (THW) and the steady state parallel plate method (GAP method). Despite a significant search in parameter space no significant anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity was observed. The highest enhancement in thermal conductivity is 1.4% for 40 nm sized gold particles stabilized by EGMUDE (triethyleneglycolmono-11-mercaptoundecylether) and suspended in water with a particle-concentration of 0.11 vol%.

  15. Low Temperature Thermal Conductivity of Woven Fabric Glass Fibre Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagaraj, S.; Pattanayak, S.

    2004-06-01

    Fibre reinforced composites are replacing conventional materials due to its compatible and superior properties at low temperatures. Transverse thermal conductivity of plain fabric E-glass/Epoxy composites with the fibre concentrations of 32.5%, 35.2%, 39.2% and 48.9% has been studied in a GM-refrigerator based experimental setup using guarded hotplate technique. Experiments are carried out with the sets of stability criteria. This paper presents the investigation of the influence of the fibre concentration and temperature on the thermal conductivity of fabric composites from 30 K to 300K. It is observed from the experimental results that thermal conductivity increases with the increase of temperature and also with fibre concentration with different rate in different temperature range. The series model has been used to predict the thermal conductivity and compared with the experimental results. It is observed that below the crossover temperature of the composites, which varies from 150-225K depending upon their fibre concentration, the experimental results are within 10% with that of predicted values. The possible causes of variation are analyzed. The physical phenomenon behind the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is discussed in detail.

  16. Low Temperature Thermal Conductivity of Woven Fabric Glass Fibre Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagaraj, S.; Pattanayak, S.

    2004-06-28

    Fibre reinforced composites are replacing conventional materials due to its compatible and superior properties at low temperatures. Transverse thermal conductivity of plain fabric E-glass/Epoxy composites with the fibre concentrations of 32.5%, 35.2%, 39.2% and 48.9% has been studied in a GM-refrigerator based experimental setup using guarded hotplate technique. Experiments are carried out with the sets of stability criteria. This paper presents the investigation of the influence of the fibre concentration and temperature on the thermal conductivity of fabric composites from 30 K to 300K. It is observed from the experimental results that thermal conductivity increases with the increase of temperature and also with fibre concentration with different rate in different temperature range. The series model has been used to predict the thermal conductivity and compared with the experimental results. It is observed that below the crossover temperature of the composites, which varies from 150-225K depending upon their fibre concentration, the experimental results are within 10% with that of predicted values. The possible causes of variation are analyzed. The physical phenomenon behind the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is discussed in detail.

  17. Thermal interface conductance across metal alloy-dielectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Justin P.; Yu, Xiaoxiao; Davis, Robert F.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of thermal interface conductance as a function of metal alloy composition. Composition spread alloy films of A uxC u1 -x and A uxP d1 -x solid solutions were deposited on single crystal sapphire substrates via dual electron-beam evaporation. High throughput measurements of thermal interface conductance across the (metal alloy)-sapphire interfaces were made by positional scanning of frequency domain thermoreflectance measurements to sample a continuum of Au atomic fractions (x ˜0 →1 ) . At a temperature of 300 K, the thermal interface conductance at the A uxC u1 -x -sapphire interfaces monotonically decreased from 197 ±39 MW m-2K-1 to 74 ±11 MW m-2K-1 for x =0 →0.95 ±0.02 and at the A uxP d1 -x -sapphire interfaces from 167 ±35 MW m-2K-1 to 60 ±10 MW m-2K-1 for x =0.03 →0.97 ±0.02 . To shed light on the phonon physics at the interface, a Diffuse Mismatch Model for thermal interface conductance with alloys is presented and agrees reasonably with the thermal interface conductance data.

  18. The thermal conductivity of neon, methane and tetrafluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millat, J.; Ross, M.; Wakeham, W. A.; Zalaf, M.

    1988-02-01

    New, absolute measurements of the thermal conductivity of neon (Ne), methane (CH 4) and tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) are reported for the temperature range 308 to 428 K at pressures up to 10 MPa. The data have an estimated accuracy of ±0.3%. A statistical analysis of the density dependence of the thermal conductivity has been employed to deduce the thermal conductivity of the gases in the limit of zero density and the firt density coefficient. For methane the first density coefficient is well represented by a correlation based on data for monatomic gases whereas for tetrafluoromethane the same correlation greatly underestimates the same coefficient. The thermal conductivity in the limit of zero density has been used in conjuction with other transport property data to deduce a consistent set of effective cross-sections for the two gases over all the range of temperature studied, based entirely on experiment. Among other quantities the collision number for rotational relaxation has been deduced and is shown to be significantly different between the two gases. Although the Mason-Monchick approximation is inappropriate for the evaluation of some of the effective cross-sections for the gases, a recent, very simple formulation of the kinetic theory of polyatomic gases provides a satisfactory description of the thermal conductivity data.

  19. Review of interfacial layer's effect on thermal conductivity in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotia, Ankit; Borkakoti, Sheeba; Deval, Piyush; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    An ordered liquid layer around the particle-liquid interface is called as interfacial layer. It has been observed that interfacial layer is an essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. The review attempts to summarize the prominent articles related to interfacial layer effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. First section of the paper discusses about various experimental approaches used to describe the effect of interfacial layer. Second section deals with about the mathematical models and assumed values regarding the thickness of interfacial layer by several authors. A review of previous works featuring mathematical investigations and experimental approaches seem to be suggesting that, interfacial layer have dominating effect on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids. Third section of the paper deals with various mathematical models available in open literature for interfacial layer thermal conductivity. In the last section, models for effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids considering the interfacial layer and percentage deviations in the predictions of mathematical models have been discussed.

  20. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber/copper matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, D.L.; McDanels, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  1. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  2. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber/copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  3. Anisotropic thermal conduction with magnetic fields in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arth, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander; Petkova, Margarita; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role for the propagation and diffusion of charged particles, which are responsible for thermal conduction. In this poster, we present an implementation of thermal conduction including the anisotropic effects of magnetic fields for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The anisotropic thermal conduction is mainly proceeding parallel to magnetic fields and suppressed perpendicular to the fields. We derive the SPH formalism for the anisotropic heat transport and solve the corresponding equation with an implicit conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss several issues of unphysical heat transport in the cases of extreme ansiotropies or unmagnetized regions and present possible numerical workarounds. We implement our algorithm into the cosmological simulation code GADGET and study its behaviour in several test cases. In general, we reproduce the analytical solutions of our idealised test problems, and obtain good results in cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formations. Within galaxy clusters, the anisotropic conduction produces a net heat transport similar to an isotropic Spitzer conduction model with low efficiency. In contrast to isotropic conduction our new formalism allows small-scale structure in the temperature distribution to remain stable, because of their decoupling caused by magnetic field lines. Compared to observations, strong isotropic conduction leads to an oversmoothed temperature distribution within clusters, while the results obtained with anisotropic thermal conduction reproduce the observed temperature fluctuations well. A proper treatment of heat transport is crucial especially in the outskirts of clusters and also in high density regions. It's connection to the local dynamical state of the cluster also might contribute to the observed bimodal distribution of cool core and non cool core clusters. Our new scheme significantly advances the modelling of thermal conduction in numerical simulations and overall gives

  4. Towards Practical Application of Paper based Printed Circuits: Capillarity Effectively Enhances Conductivity of the Thermoplastic Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Lin, Wei; Yang, Cheng; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Jingping; Cui, Xiaoya; Kang, Feiyu; Wong, Ching Ping

    2014-01-01

    Direct printing nanoparticle-based conductive inks onto paper substrates has encountered difficulties e.g. the nanoparticles are prone to penetrate into the pores of the paper and become partially segmented, and the necessary low-temperature-sintering process is harmful to the dimension-stability of paper. Here we prototyped the paper-based circuit substrate in combination with printed thermoplastic electrically conductive adhesives (ECA), which takes the advantage of the capillarity of paper and thus both the conductivity and mechanical robustness of the printed circuitsweredrastically improved without sintering process. For instance, the electrical resistivity of the ECA specimen on a pulp paper (6 × 10−5Ω·cm, with 50 wt% loading of Ag) was only 14% of that on PET film than that on PET film. This improvement has been found directly related to the sizing degree of paper, in agreement with the effective medium approximation simulation results in this work. The thermoplastic nature also enables excellent mechanical strength of the printed ECA to resist repeated folding. Considering the generality of the process and the wide acceptance of ECA technique in the modern electronic packages, this method may find vast applications in e.g. circuit boards, capacitive touch pads, and radio frequency identification antennas, which have been prototyped in the manuscript. PMID:25182052

  5. Towards Practical Application of Paper based Printed Circuits: Capillarity Effectively Enhances Conductivity of the Thermoplastic Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Lin, Wei; Yang, Cheng; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Jingping; Cui, Xiaoya; Kang, Feiyu; Wong, Ching Ping

    2014-09-01

    Direct printing nanoparticle-based conductive inks onto paper substrates has encountered difficulties e.g. the nanoparticles are prone to penetrate into the pores of the paper and become partially segmented, and the necessary low-temperature-sintering process is harmful to the dimension-stability of paper. Here we prototyped the paper-based circuit substrate in combination with printed thermoplastic electrically conductive adhesives (ECA), which takes the advantage of the capillarity of paper and thus both the conductivity and mechanical robustness of the printed circuitsweredrastically improved without sintering process. For instance, the electrical resistivity of the ECA specimen on a pulp paper (6 × 10-5Ω.cm, with 50 wt% loading of Ag) was only 14% of that on PET film than that on PET film. This improvement has been found directly related to the sizing degree of paper, in agreement with the effective medium approximation simulation results in this work. The thermoplastic nature also enables excellent mechanical strength of the printed ECA to resist repeated folding. Considering the generality of the process and the wide acceptance of ECA technique in the modern electronic packages, this method may find vast applications in e.g. circuit boards, capacitive touch pads, and radio frequency identification antennas, which have been prototyped in the manuscript.

  6. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  7. Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakak Khadem, Masoud

    The thermal conductivity of graphite nano-fibers (GNFs) with different styles is predicted computationally. GNFs are formed as basal planes of graphene stacked based on the catalytic configuration. The large GNF thermal conductivity relative to a base phase change material (PCM) may lead to improved PCM performance when embedded with GNFs. Three different types of GNFs are modeled: platelet, ribbon, and herringbone. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this study as a means to predict the thermal conductivity tensor based on atomic behavior. The in-house MD code, Molecular Dynamics in Arbitrary Geometries (MDAG), was updated with the features required to create the predictions. To model both interlayer van-der Waals and intralayer covalent bonding of carbon atoms in GNFs, a combination of the optimized Tersoff potential function for atoms within the layers and a pairwise Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function to model the interactions between the layers was used. Tests of energy conservation in the NVE ensemble have been performed to validate the employed potential model. Nose-Hoover, Andersen, and Berendsen thermostats were also incorporated into MDAG to enable MD simulations in NVT ensembles, where the volume, number of atoms, and temperature of the system are conserved. Equilibrium MD with Green-Kubo (GK) relations was then employed to extract the thermal conductivity tensor for symmetric GNFs (platelet and ribbon). The thermal conductivity of solid argon at different temperatures was calculated and compared to other studies to validate the GK implementation. Different heat current formulations, as a result of using the three-body Tersoff potential, were considered and the discrepancy in the calculated thermal conductivity values of graphene using each formula was resolved by employing a novel comparative technique that identifies the most accurate formulation. The effect of stacking configuration on the thermal conductivity of platelet and ribbon GNFs

  8. A transparent conductive adhesive laminate electrode for high-efficiency organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Daniel; Greenwood, Peter; Troughton, Joel; Wijdekop, Maarten; Carnie, Mathew; Davies, Matthew; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Snaith, Henry J; Watson, Trystan; Worsley, David

    2014-11-26

    A self-adhesive laminate solar-cell electrode is presented based on a metal grid embedded in a polymer film (x-y conduction) and set in contact with the active layer using a pressure-sensitive adhesive containing a very low quantity (1.8%) of organic conductor, which self-organizes to provide z conduction to the grid. This ITO-free material performs in an identical fashion to evaporated gold in high-efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  9. Thermally responsive polymer systems for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaofan

    Responsive polymers are "smart" materials that are capable of performing prescribed, dynamic functions under an applied stimulus. In this dissertation, we explore several novel design strategies to develop thermally responsive polymers and polymer composites for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2 and 3, a thermally triggered self-healing material was prepared by blending a high-temperature epoxy resin with a thermoplastic polymer, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL). The initially miscible system undergoes polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) during the curing of epoxy and yields a variety of compositionally dependent morphologies. At a particular PCL loading, the cured blend displays a "bricks-and-mortar" morphology in which epoxy exists as interconnected spheres ("bricks") within a continuous PCL matrix ("mortar"). A heat induced "bleeding" phenomenon was observed in the form of spontaneous wetting of all free surfaces by the molten PCL, and is attributed to the volumetric thermal expansion of PCL above its melting point in excess of epoxy brick expansion, which we term differential expansive bleeding (DEB). This DEB is capable of healing damage such as cracks. In controlled self-healing experiments, heating of a cracked specimen led to PCL bleeding from the bulk that yields a liquid layer bridging the crack gap. Upon cooling, a "scar" composed of PCL crystals was formed at the site of the crack, restoring a significant portion of mechanical strength. We further utilized DEB to enable strong and thermally-reversible adhesion of the material to itself and to metallic substrates, without any requirement for macroscopic softening or flow. After that, Chapters 4--6 present a novel composite strategy for the design and fabrication of shape memory polymer composites. The basic approach involves physically combining two or more functional components into an interpenetrating fiber

  10. Thermally conductive, dielectric PCM-boron nitride nanosheet composites for efficient electronic system thermal management.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Lihui; Luo, Wei; Wan, Jiayu; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Fu, Kun; Henderson, Doug; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-11-24

    Phase change materials (PCMs) possessing ideal properties, such as superior mass specific heat of fusion, low cost, light weight, excellent thermal stability as well as isothermal phase change behavior, have drawn considerable attention for thermal management systems. Currently, the low thermal conductivity of PCMs (usually less than 1 W mK(-1)) greatly limits their heat dissipation performance in thermal management applications. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional material known for its excellent thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties, which make it a promising candidate to be used in electronic systems for thermal management. In this work, a composite, consisting of h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs) and commercialized paraffin wax was developed, which inherits high thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties from BNNSs and substantial heat of fusion from paraffin wax. With the help of BNNSs, the thermal conductivity of wax-BNNS composites reaches 3.47 W mK(-1), which exhibits a 12-time enhancement compared to that of pristine wax (0.29 W mK(-1)). Moreover, an 11.3-13.3 MV m(-1) breakdown voltage of wax-BNNS composites was achieved, which shows further improved electrical insulating properties. Simultaneously enhanced thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties of wax-BNNS composites demonstrate their promising application for thermal management in electronic systems.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Hard Anodized Coatings on Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    aqueous sulfuric Thermal Conductivities of several commercial anodic coatings. acid and oxalic acid solutions, using triple deionized water. The aluminum...coatings needed to protect expensive thermal propulsion systems. ... 1.5 Oxalic acid can be used in aqueous solution as an alternative to sulfuric acid...at least as hard and abrasion resistant as those coatings produced in sulfuric acid,W Anodic coatings produced in oxalic acid are known to be less

  12. Pulse accumulation, radial heat conduction, and anisotropic thermal conductivity in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron J; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-11-01

    The relationship between pulse accumulation and radial heat conduction in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance (TTR) is explored. The results illustrate how pulse accumulation allows TTR to probe two thermal length scales simultaneously. In addition, the conditions under which radial transport effects are important are described. An analytical solution for anisotropic heat flow in layered structures is given, and a method for measuring both cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of thermally anisotropic thin films is described. As verification, the technique is used to extract the cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Results are found to be in good agreement with literature values.

  13. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  14. Spectral mapping of thermal conductivity through nanoscale ballistic transport.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjie; Zeng, Lingping; Minnich, Austin J; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Controlling thermal properties is central to many applications, such as thermoelectric energy conversion and the thermal management of integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by structuring materials at different length scales, but a clear relationship between structure size and thermal properties remains to be established. The main challenge comes from the unknown intrinsic spectral distribution of energy among heat carriers. Here, we experimentally measure this spectral distribution by probing quasi-ballistic transport near nanostructured heaters down to 30 nm using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. Our approach allows us to quantify up to 95% of the total spectral contribution to thermal conductivity from all phonon modes. The measurement agrees well with multiscale and first-principles-based simulations. We further demonstrate the direct construction of mean free path distributions. Our results provide a new fundamental understanding of thermal transport and will enable materials design in a rational way to achieve high performance.

  15. Thermal insulation attaching means. [adhesive bonding of felt vibration insulators under ceramic tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved isolation system is provided for attaching ceramic tiles of insulating material to the surface of a structure to be protected against extreme temperatures of the nature expected to be encountered by the space shuttle orbiter. This system isolates the fragile ceramic tiles from thermally and mechanically induced vehicle structural strains. The insulating tiles are affixed to a felt isolation pad formed of closely arranged and randomly oriented fibers by means of a flexible adhesive and in turn the felt pad is affixed to the metallic vehicle structure by an additional layer of flexible adhesive.

  16. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter; Jenks, Jeromy; Schaef, Herbert T.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F.; Nune, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) and the properties depended on the amount of GO added. MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited a significant increase in the thermal conductivity (by approximately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid (methanol) was increased by about 20%. The increase in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to GO functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model. PMID:27302196

  17. Effect of variable thermal conductivity on isotherms in Bridgman growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1983-01-01

    A change in thermal conductivity associated with melting or solidification can have a profound influence on the isotherms near the solidification interface if the material is being directionally solidified in an ampoule whose walls carry a substantial portion of the heat. This analysis was prompted by a recent discovery that the thermal conductivity of Hg(1-x)CD(x)Te increased dramatically as the material is heated above the solidus curve. An illustrative example is shown in which the sample is approximated as an infinite cylinder with constant but diffferent thermal properties in the solid and melt. The boundary conditions are fixed on the surface by a conductive ampoule in a two-zone Bridgman furnace with an adiabatic region separating the two zones. The effect of the adiabatic zone in this case is to intensify the curvature of the interface rather than to lessen it.

  18. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  19. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    DOEpatents

    Allan, Marita

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  20. Lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined half-Heusler solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiyuan Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian

    2014-05-19

    We report a phenomenological model of atomic weight, lattice constant, temperature, and grain size to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined solid solutions. The theoretical treatment developed here is reasonably consistent with the experimental results of n-type MNiSn and p-type MCoSb alloys, where M is the combination of Hf, Zr, and Ti. For disordered half-Heusler alloys with moderated grain sizes, we predict that the reduction in lattice thermal conductivity due to grain boundary scattering is independent of the scattering parameter, which characterizes the phonon scattering cross section of point defects. In addition, the lattice thermal conductivity falls off with temperature as T{sup –1∕2} around the Debye temperature.

  1. On thermal conductivity of gas mixtures containing hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Victor P.; Pätz, Markus

    2016-12-01

    A brief review of formulas used for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in CFD simulations of rocket combustion chambers is carried out in the present work. In most cases, the transport properties of mixtures are calculated from the properties of individual components using special mixing rules. The analysis of different mixing rules starts from basic equations and ends by very complex semi-empirical expressions. The formulas for the thermal conductivity are taken for the analysis from the works on modelling of rocket combustion chambers. H_2- O_2 mixtures are chosen for the evaluation of the accuracy of the considered mixing rules. The analysis shows that two of them, of Mathur et al. (Mol Phys 12(6):569-579, 1967), and of Mason and Saxena (Phys Fluids 1(5):361-369, 1958), have better agreement with the experimental data than other equations for the thermal conductivity of multicomponent gas mixtures.

  2. Thermal conductivity of rigid foam insulations for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2013-05-01

    The present work describes measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of NCFI 24-124 foam, a spray-on foam insulation used formerly on the Space Shuttle external fuel tank. A novel apparatus to measure the effective thermal conductivity of rigid foam at temperatures ranging from 20 K to 300 K was developed and used to study three samples of NCFI 24-124 foam insulation. In preparation for measurement, the foam samples were either treated with a uniquely designed moisture absorption apparatus or different residual gases to study their impact on the effective thermal conductivity of the foam. The resulting data are compared to other measurements and mathematical models reported in the literature.

  3. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter; Jenks, Jeromy; Schaef, Herbert T.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F.; Nune, Satish K.

    2016-06-01

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) and the properties depended on the amount of GO added. MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited a significant increase in the thermal conductivity (by approximately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid (methanol) was increased by about 20%. The increase in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to GO functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model.

  4. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

  5. Thermal conductivity measurement of thin films by a dc method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junyou; Zhang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Yunfeng

    2010-11-01

    A dc method, which needs no complex numerical calculation and expensive hardware configuration, was developed to measure the cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films in this paper. Two parallel metallic heaters, which were deposited on different parts of the sample, serve simultaneously as the heaters and temperature sensors during the measurement. A direct current was flowed through the same two metallic strips to heat the thin-film sample. The heating power and the heater's temperature were obtained by a data acquisition device, and the thermal conductivity of thin film was calculated. To verify the validity of the dc method, several SiO(2) films with different thicknesses were deposited on Si wafers, respectively, and their thermal conductivities were measured by both the dc method and 3ω method. The results of two methods are in good agreement within an acceptable error, and they are also inconsistent with some of previously published data.

  6. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Nandasiri, Manjula I; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B Peter; Jenks, Jeromy; Schaef, Herbert T; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F; Nune, Satish K

    2016-06-15

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) and the properties depended on the amount of GO added. MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited a significant increase in the thermal conductivity (by approximately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid (methanol) was increased by about 20%. The increase in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to GO functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of AlN-Ethanol Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Shan, Wan-Liang; Yu, Fei; Chen, Ze-Shao

    2008-12-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) particles of 20 nm diameter were dispersed into ethanol by a two-step process, first magnetic striation and then ultrasonic agitation. Castor oil was added as a dispersant to improve the stability of the AlN suspension. The thermal conductivities of AlN-ethanol nanofluids were measured by a hot-disk method from 0.5 vol% to 4.0 vol% at temperatures of 273.15 K and 297.15 K. Results show about 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of ethanol with the addition of 4.0 vol% at 273.15 K, and a strong temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity.

  8. Study of thermally reworkable epoxy materials and thermal conductivity enhancement using carbon fiber for electronics packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiying

    Epoxy resins are widely used as the underfill materials for the integrated circuit (IC) chips for the reliability enhancement and as the binder of electrically conductive adhesives (ECA). However, cured epoxy materials are infusible and insoluble networks which is a problem for the repair of a printed circuit board assembly packaged with epoxy materials. In this study, six diepoxides containing aromatic moieties and low temperature degradable linkages, secondary and tertiary benzoates, and carbonates, were synthesized and characterized. Underfills based on four of these epoxides were developed and evaluated respect to their properties and reworkabilility. One of the reworkable underfills was evaluated with the 85°C/85% relative humidity test as the underfill of several ball-grid-array components on a organic board, which showed a high enhanced reliability. Underfill materials based on a synthesized bisphenol-A diepoxide were developed for the no-flow underfill process and were evaluated regarding the application on both tin/lead and lead-free solders. The latent curing mechanism of the catalyst and the influence of fluxing agents were studied. The reworkable underfills showed satisfying overall properties on both Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu solders. A unique approach for solving the problem of low reliability of ECAs was demonstrated. Small amount of sacrificial metal and alloy powders were added in silver flake based ECA and applied on six pad surfaces. The aging of bulk resistivity and contact resistance of ECA/metal surface pairs were studied and two alloys stabilized the contact resistance on all tested metal surfaces. The internal heat generation of IC devices quickly increases which leads to deteriorated performance and low reliability. The thermally insulating property of polymeric underfills make this even worse with slow heat dissipation. In this study, a carbon fiber of high thermal conductivity was used together with silica in epoxy underfill materials and a 300

  9. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  10. Thermal conductivity of chirality-sorted carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Feifei; Llinas, Juan P.; Li, Zuanyi; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of significant interest, yet their dependence on SWNT chirality has been, until now, not explored experimentally. Here, we used electrical heating and infrared thermal imaging to simultaneously study thermal and electrical transport in chirality-sorted SWNT networks. We examined solution processed 90% semiconducting, 90% metallic, purified unsorted (66% semiconducting), and as-grown HiPco SWNT films. The thermal conductivities of these films range from 80 to 370 W m-1 K-1 but are not controlled by chirality, instead being dependent on the morphology (i.e., mass and junction density, quasi-alignment) of the networks. The upper range of the thermal conductivities measured is comparable to that of the best metals (Cu and Ag), but with over an order of magnitude lower mass density. This study reveals important factors controlling the thermal properties of light-weight chirality-sorted SWNT films, for potential thermal and thermoelectric applications.

  11. Simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurement of individual nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Moon, Jaeyun; Chen, Renkun

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental phonon transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures are important for their applications in energy conversion and storage, such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Thermal conductivity measurements of semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively pursued and have enhanced our understanding of phonon transport physics. Specific heat of individual nanostructures, despite being an important thermophysical parameter that reflects the thermodynamics of solids, has remained difficult to characterize. Prior measurements were limited to ensembles of nanostructures in which coupling and sample inhomogeneity could play a role. Herein we report the first simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of individual rod-like nanostructures such as nanowires and nanofibers. This technique is demonstrated by measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of single ˜600-700 nm diameter Nylon-11 nanofibers (NFs). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the NF is increased by 50% over the bulk value, while the specific heat of the NFs exhibits bulk-like behavior. We find that the thermal diffusivity obtained from the measurement, which is related to the phonon mean free path (MFP), decreases with temperature, indicating that the intrinsic phonon Umklapp scattering plays a role in the NFs. This platform can also be applied to one- and two- dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to probe size effects on the phonon spectra and other transport physics.

  12. Theory of thermal conductivity in the disordered electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiete, G.; Finkel'stein, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    We study thermal conductivity in the disordered two-dimensional electron liquid in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions. We describe a microscopic analysis of the problem using the partition function defined on the Keldysh contour as a starting point. We extend the renormalization group (RG) analysis developed for thermal transport in the disordered Fermi liquid and include scattering processes induced by the long-range Coulomb interaction in the sub-temperature energy range. For the thermal conductivity, unlike for the electrical conductivity, these scattering processes yield a logarithmic correction that may compete with the RG corrections. The interest in this correction arises from the fact that it violates the Wiedemann-Franz law. We checked that the sub-temperature correction to the thermal conductivity is not modified either by the inclusion of Fermi liquid interaction amplitudes or as a result of the RG flow. We therefore expect that the answer obtained for this correction is final. We use the theory to describe thermal transport on the metallic side of the metal-insulator transition in Si MOSFETs.

  13. Thermal characterization of micro/nanoscale conductive and non-conductive wires based on optical heating and electrical thermal sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jinbo; Wang, Xinwei; Guo, Jiaqi

    2006-08-01

    In this work, a technique based on optical heating and electrical thermal sensing (OHETS) is developed to characterize the thermophysical properties of one-dimensional micro/nanoscale conductive and non-conductive wires. In this method, the to-be-measured thin wire is suspended over two electrodes and is irradiated with a periodically modulated laser beam. The laser beam induces a periodical temperature variation in the wire/tube, which will lead to a periodical change in its electrical resistance. A dc current is applied to the sample, and the resulting periodical voltage variation over the wire is measured and used to extract the thermophysical properties of the wire/tube. A 25.4 µm thick platinum wire is used as the reference sample to verify this technique. Sound agreement is obtained between the measured thermal conductivity and the reference value. Applying the OHETS technique, the thermal diffusivity of conductive single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles and non-conductive human hair and cloth fibres are measured. For non-conductive wires, a thin (~nm) metallic film is coated at the outside of the wire for electrical thermal sensing. The measured thermal diffusivities for three different SWCNT bundles are 2.98 × 10-5 m2 s-1, 4.41 × 10-5 m2 s-1 and 6.64 × 10-5 m2 s-1. These values are much less than the thermal diffusivity of graphite in the layer direction. For human hair and microscale cloth fibres, our experiments show that their thermal diffusivities are at the level of 10-6 m2 s-1.

  14. Thermal contact conductance between metals in a vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Basic heat transfer data for structural materials used in the Saturn 1B/V 1U component case structural design were obtained. The main emphasis is on thermal contact conductance between dissimilar metallic surfaces, since thermal conductivity values within solids have been sufficiently established previously. The test program outline and test results are described. The following materials were tested: aluminum 6061-T6 (12 samples), aluminum 356 (as cast), almag 35 (as cast), magnesium AZ91C-T4 (4 samples), and mag lithium LA-141 (2 samples).

  15. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity of Meat During Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbayeva, A.; Arkharov, I.; Aldiyarov, A.; Drobyshev, A.; Zhubaniyazova, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2017-04-01

    The cryogenic technologies of processing and storage of agricultural products are becoming increasingly indispensable in the food industry as an important factor of ensuring food safety. One of such technologies is the shock freezing of meat, which provides a higher degree of preservation of the quality of frozen products in comparison with traditional technologies. The thermal conductivity of meat is an important parameter influencing the energy consumption in the freezing process. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of beef. The measurements were taken by using a specially designed measurement cell, which allows covering the temperature range from 80 to 300 K.

  16. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  17. Viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, H. J. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Equations and tables are presented for the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen at temperatures between 80 K and 400 K for pressures up to 200 atm. and at temperatures between 80 K and 2000 K for the dilute gas. A description of the anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity in the critical region is included. The tabulated coefficients are reliable to within about 15% except for a region in the immediate vicinity of the critical point. Some possibilities for future improvements of this reliability are discussed.

  18. Thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient strontium titanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-05-01

    We report significant thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient lanthanum-doped strontium titanate (Sr1-xLaxTiO3-δ) films as compared to unreduced strontium titanates. Our experimental results suggest that the oxygen vacancies could have played an important role in the reduction. This could be due to the nature of randomly distributed and clustered vacancies, which would be very effective to scatter phonons. Our results could provide a pathway for tailoring the thermal conductivity of complex oxides, which is very beneficial to various applications including thermoelectrics.

  19. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  20. One-Step Preparation of Silver Hexagonal Microsheets as Electrically Conductive Adhesive Fillers for Printed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hu-Ming; Guo, Ying; Huang, Sheng-Yun; Zhang, Kai; Yuen, Matthew M F; Fu, Xian-Zhu; Yu, Shuhui; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-06-24

    A facile one-step solution-phase chemical reduction method has been developed to synthesize Ag microsheets at room temperature. The morphology of Ag sheets is a regular hexagon more than 1 μm in size and about 200 nm in thickness. The hexagonal Ag microsheets possess a smoother and straighter surface compared with that of the commercial Ag micrometer-sized flakes prepared by ball milling for electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs). The function of the reagents and the formation mechanism of Ag hexagonal microsheets are also investigated. For the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate facet-selective capping, the Ag atoms freshly reduced by N2H4 would orientationally grow alone on the {111} facet of Ag seeds, with the synergistically selective etching of irregular and small Ag particles by H2O2, to form Ag hexagonal microsheets. The hexagonal Ag microsheet-filled epoxy adhesives, as electrically conductive materials, can be easily printed on various substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), epoxy, glass, and flexible papers. The hexagonal Ag microsheet filled ECAs demonstrate lower bulk resistivity (approximately 8 × 10(-5) Ω cm) than that of the traditional Ag micrometer-sized-flake-filled ECAs with the same Ag content of 80 wt % (approximately 1.2 × 10(-4) Ω cm).

  1. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed Ajmal, C.; Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-01

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm-1) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  2. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, C Muhammed; Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-03

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm(-1)) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  3. High performance low cost interconnections for flip chip attachment with electrically conductive adhesive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This final report is a compilation of final reports from each of the groups participating in the program. The main three groups involved in this effort are the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM Corporation in Yorktown Heights, New York, Assembly Process Design of IBM Corporation in Endicott, New York, and SMT Laboratory of Universal Instruments Corporation in Binghamton, New York. The group at the research center focused on the conductive adhesive materials development and characterization. The group in process development focused on processing of the Polymer-Metal-Solvent Paste (PMSP) to form conductive adhesive bumps, formation of the Polymer-Metal Composite (PMC) on semiconductor devices and study of the bonding process to circuitized organic carriers, and the long term durability and reliability of joints formed using the process. The group at Universal Instruments focused on development of an equipment set and bonding parameters for the equipment to produce bond assembly tooling. Reports of each of these individual groups are presented here reviewing their technical efforts and achievements.

  4. New Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Meteorites: Implications for Asteroid Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, Guy; Opeil, C. P.; Britt, D. T.

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity at low temperatures (5K to 300 K) of meteorites representing a range of compositions, including the ordinary chondrites Chronstad (H5) and Lumpkin (L6), the enstatite chondrite Abee (E4), the carbonaceous chondrites NWA 5515 (CK4 find) and Cold Bokkeveld (CM2), and the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo (IAB find). All measurements were made using a Quantum Design P670 TTO on samples cut into 0.5 - 1 cm prisms. The iron meteorite conductivity increases roughly linearly from 17 W/mK at 100K to 27 W/mK at 300 K. The conductivities of all the stony samples except Abee appear to be controlled by the inhomogeneous nature of the meteorite fabric, resulting in values that are much lower than those of pure minerals and essentially independent of temperature above 100K. The L and CK sample conductivities above 100 K are both 1.5 W/mK, that of the H is 1.9 W/mK, and that of the CM sample is 0.5 W/mK; by contrast the literature value at 300 K for serpentine is 2.5 W/mK and that of enstatite and olivine is 4.5 to 5 W/mK (comparable to our Abee value). Below 100 K all materials' conductivities drop sharply. These low thermal conductivities will have significant effects on the thermal evolution of asteroids and other small solar system bodies where the rocky component is assumed to be meteoritic. These values would indicate lower thermal inertias, potentially affecting the YORP and Yarkovsky spin/orbital evolution of small meteoroids. However, for most asteroids, thermal inertia is dominated by the dusty nature of the regolith rather than the conductivity of the material itself.

  5. Thermal Conductivity Anisotropy of Metasedimentary and Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. G.; Chapman, D. S.; van Wagoner, T. M.; Armstrong, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for two sets of rocks: a series of sandstones, mudstones, and limey shales of Cretaceous age from Price Canyon, Utah, and metasedimentary argillites and quartzites of Precambrian age from the Big Cottonwood Formation in north central Utah. Additional anisotropy measurements were made on granitic rocks from two Tertiary plutons in Little Cottonwood Canyon, north central Utah. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line-source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kmax) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kmax and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady-state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kmax/kperp. The Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for the Price Canyon samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming (1994) that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  6. Interfacial thermal conductance of thiolate-protected gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Kelsey M.; Neidhart, Suzanne M.; Gezelter, J. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of thiolate-protected and solvated gold nanoparticles were carried out in the presence of a non-equilibrium heat flux between the solvent and the core of the particle. The interfacial thermal conductance (G) was computed for these interfaces, and the behavior of the thermal conductance was studied as a function of particle size, ligand flexibility, and ligand chain length. In all cases, thermal conductance of the ligand-protected particles was higher than the bare metal-solvent interface. A number of mechanisms for the enhanced conductance were investigated, including thiolate-driven corrugation of the metal surface, solvent ordering at the interface, solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand ordering relative to the particle surface. Only the smallest particles exhibited significant corrugation. All ligands permitted substantial solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand chain length has a significant influence on the orientational ordering of interfacial solvent. Solvent-ligand vibrational overlap, particularly in the low frequency range (<80 cm-1), was significantly altered by ligand rigidity, and had direct influence on the interfacial thermal conductance.

  7. Thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, S. V.; Churazov, E. M.; Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The plasma of galaxy clusters is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength δB/B ˜ 1. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to ≈0.2 of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and ≈0.3 for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations δB/B ˜ 1 can be present on much larger scales, of the order of the scale of turbulent motions. However, we do not expect large suppression of thermal conduction by these, because their scale is considerably larger than the collisional mean free path of the ICM electrons. The obtained suppression of thermal conduction by a factor of ˜5 appears to be characteristic and potentially universal for a weakly collisional mirror-unstable plasma.

  8. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  9. Reduction in thermal conductivity of BiSbTe lump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Wan, C.; Al-Eshaikh, M. A.; Kadachi, A. N.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, systematic investigations on the thermal conductivities of BiSbTe lump, microstructured pristine BiSbTe bulk and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/BiSbTe bulk nanocomposites were performed. BiSbTe lumps were crushed to form a coarse powder (200 µm) and effect of particle size reduction on the effective thermal conductivity of BiSbTe (200 µm) bulk were analyzed. For further reduction in the conductivity, a two pronged strategy has been employed. First, additional refinement of BiSbTe (200 µm) were performed through ball milling in an inert environment. Second, SWCNTs in 0.75, and 1.0 vol% were distributed uniformly in the fine BiSbTe ball milled powder. The results showed that the effective thermal conductivities decrease with the reduction in the particle size from lump to BiSbTe (200 µm) bulk as well as with the addition of SWCNTs accompanied by further refinement of BiSbTe particles. The significant reduction in thermal conductivities of the lump was achieved for pure BiSbTe (200 µm) bulk and 0.75 vol% of SWCNTs/BiSbTe composite. This can be ascribed to the enhanced phonon scattering by the grain boundaries between the nanostructured BiSbTe particles as well as the interfaces between BiSbTe and the low dimensional carbon nanotubes.

  10. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We investigated error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed -- Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materialsmore » under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter -- termed the Raman stress factor -- is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.« less

  11. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We investigated error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed -- Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materials under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter -- termed the Raman stress factor -- is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.

  12. High conductivity, low cost aluminum composite for thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, J.L.

    1997-04-01

    In order to produce an inexpensive packaging material that exhibits high thermal conductivity and low CTE, Technical Research Associates, Inc. (TRA) has shown in Phase I the feasibility of incorporating natural flake graphite in an aluminum matrix. TRA has developed a proprietary coating technique where graphite flakes have been coated with a thin layer of molybdenum/molybdenum carbide (approximately 0.2 microns). This barrier coating can protect the graphite flake from chemical reaction and high temperature degradation in molten aluminum silicon alloys. Methods to successfully vacuum infiltrate coated flake with molten aluminum alloys were developed. The resulted metal matrix composites exhibited lower CTE than aluminum metal. The CTE of the composites were significantly lower than aluminum and its alloys. The CTE can potentially be tailored for specific applications. The in plane thermal conductivity was higher than the aluminum matrix alloy. The thermal conductivity and CTE of the composite may be significantly improved by improving the bond strength of the molybdenum coating on the graphite flake. The flake can potentially be incorporated in the molten aluminum and pressure die cast to align the flakes within the aluminum matrix. By preferentially aligning high conductivity graphite flakes within a plane or direction, the thermal conductivity of the resulting composite will be above pure aluminum in the alignment direction.

  13. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays with controlled roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, JP; Sadhu, JS; Azeredo, BP; Hsu, KH; Ma, J; Kim, J; Seong, M; Fang, NX; Li, XL; Ferreira, PM; Sinha, S; Cahill, DG

    2012-12-01

    A two-step metal assisted chemical etching technique is used to systematically vary the sidewall roughness of Si nanowires in vertically aligned arrays. The thermal conductivities of nanowire arrays are studied using time domain thermoreflectance and compared to their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy determined roughness. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with small roughness is close to a theoretical prediction based on an upper limit of the mean-free-paths of phonons given by the nanowire diameter. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with large roughness is found to be significantly below this prediction. Raman spectroscopy reveals that nanowires with large roughness also display significant broadening of the one-phonon peak; the broadening correlates well with the reduction in thermal conductivity. The origin of this broadening is not yet understood, as it is inconsistent with phonon confinement models, but could derive from microstructural changes that affect both the optical phonons observed in Raman scattering and the acoustic phonons that are important for heat conduction. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4767456

  14. The thermal conductivity of meteorites: New measurements and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opeil, C. P.; Consolmagno, G. J.; Britt, D. T.

    2010-07-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity at low temperatures (5-300 K) of six meteorites representing a range of compositions, including the ordinary chondrites Cronstad (H5) and Lumpkin (L6), the enstatite chondrite Abee (E4), the carbonaceous chondrites NWA 5515 (CK4 find) and Cold Bokkeveld (CM2), and the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo (IAB find). All measurements were made using a Quantum Design Physical Properties Measurement System, Thermal Transport Option (TTO) on samples cut into regular parallelepipeds of ˜2-6 mm dimension. The iron meteorite conductivity increases roughly linearly from 15 W m -1 K -1 at 100 K to 27 W m -1 K -1 at 300 K, comparable to typical values for metallic iron. By contrast, the conductivities of all the stony samples except Abee appear to be controlled by the inhomogeneous nature of the meteorite fabric, resulting in values that are much lower than those of pure minerals and which vary only slightly with temperature above 100 K. The L and CK sample conductivities above 100 K are both about 1.5 W m -1 K -1, that of the H is 1.9 W m -1 K -1, and that of the CM sample is 0.5 W m -1 K -1; by contrast the literature value at 300 K for serpentine is 2.5 W m -1 K -1 and those of enstatite and olivine range from 4.5 to 5 W m -1 K -1 (which is comparable to the Abee value). These measurements are among the first direct measurements of thermal conductivity for meteorites. The results compare well with previous estimates for meteorites, where conductivity was derived from diffusivity measurements and modeled heat capacities; our new values are of a higher precision and cover a wider range of temperatures and meteorite types. If the rocky material that makes up asteroids and provides the dust to comets, Kuiper Belt objects, and icy satellites has the same low thermal conductivities as the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites measured here, this would significantly change models of their thermal evolution. These values would also lower their

  15. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  16. The thermal conductivity of electrically-conducting liquids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, W. A.; Zalaf, M.

    1986-05-01

    The paper describes a new instrument for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of electrically-conducting liquids at pressures up to 700 MPa with an accuracy of ±0.3%. The instrument is based upon the transient hot-wire principle and the novel features that make it applicable to electrically-conducting fluids are described. In particular a new automatic bridge for the direct measurement of the temperature rise of the hot-wires is discussed.

  17. Anomalously low electronic thermal conductivity in metallic vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwook; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Yang, Fan; Hong, Jiawang; Ko, Changhyun; Suh, Joonki; Liu, Kai; Wang, Kevin; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Xiang; Dames, Chris; Hartnoll, Sean A.; Delaire, Olivier; Wu, Junqiao

    2017-01-01

    In electrically conductive solids, the Wiedemann-Franz law requires the electronic contribution to thermal conductivity to be proportional to electrical conductivity. Violations of the Wiedemann-Franz law are typically an indication of unconventional quasiparticle dynamics, such as inelastic scattering, or hydrodynamic collective motion of charge carriers, typically pronounced only at cryogenic temperatures. We report an order-of-magnitude breakdown of the Wiedemann-Franz law at high temperatures ranging from 240 to 340 kelvin in metallic vanadium dioxide in the vicinity of its metal-insulator transition. Different from previously established mechanisms, the unusually low electronic thermal conductivity is a signature of the absence of quasiparticles in a strongly correlated electron fluid where heat and charge diffuse independently.

  18. Anomalously low electronic thermal conductivity in metallic vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwook; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Yang, Fan; Hong, Jiawang; Ko, Changhyun; Suh, Joonki; Liu, Kai; Wang, Kevin; Urban, Jeffrey J; Zhang, Xiang; Dames, Chris; Hartnoll, Sean A; Delaire, Olivier; Wu, Junqiao

    2017-01-27

    In electrically conductive solids, the Wiedemann-Franz law requires the electronic contribution to thermal conductivity to be proportional to electrical conductivity. Violations of the Wiedemann-Franz law are typically an indication of unconventional quasiparticle dynamics, such as inelastic scattering, or hydrodynamic collective motion of charge carriers, typically pronounced only at cryogenic temperatures. We report an order-of-magnitude breakdown of the Wiedemann-Franz law at high temperatures ranging from 240 to 340 kelvin in metallic vanadium dioxide in the vicinity of its metal-insulator transition. Different from previously established mechanisms, the unusually low electronic thermal conductivity is a signature of the absence of quasiparticles in a strongly correlated electron fluid where heat and charge diffuse independently.

  19. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Spin-Polarized Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sawkey, D.; Puech, L.; Wolf, P.E.

    2006-06-02

    We present the first measurements of the thermal conductivity of spin-polarized normal liquid {sup 3}He. Using the rapid melting technique to produce nuclear polarizations up to 0.7, and a vibrating wire both as a heater and a thermometer, we show that, unlike the viscosity, the conductivity increases much less than predicted for s-wave scattering. We suggest that this might be due to a small probability for head-on collisions between quasiparticles.

  1. Thermal conductivity and rectification study of restructured Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Anuj

    Electronics' miniaturization, has led to search for better thermal management techniques and discovery of important transport phenomenon. Thermal rectification, directionally preferential heat transport analogous to electrical diode, is one such technique, garnering tremendous interest. Its possibility has been explored through structural asymmetry, introducing a differential phonon density of states in hot and cold regions. As of now, mass and shape asymmetries have been studied, both experimentally and theoretically. However, strict requirements of material length being shorter than phonon mean free path and phonon coherence preservation at surface, makes connecting two materials with different temperature-dependent thermal conductivities, a more natural approach. To avoid resultant thermal boundary resistance and integration complexities, we achieve the affect in single material, by restructuring a region of Graphene by introducing defects. The asymmetry impedes ballistic phonon transport, modulating temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in the two regions. We perform deviational Monte Carlo simulations based on Energy-based formulation to microscopically investigate phonon transport, possibility and optimal conditions for thermal rectification. The proposed method uses phonon properties obtained from first principle, treat phonon-boundary scattering explicitly with properties drawn from Bose-Einstein Distribution.

  2. Strain- and defect-mediated thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathryn F; Piccione, Brian; Zanjani, Mehdi B; Lukes, Jennifer R; Gianola, Daniel S

    2014-07-09

    The unique thermal transport of insulating nanostructures is attributed to the convergence of material length scales with the mean free paths of quantized lattice vibrations known as phonons, enabling promising next-generation thermal transistors, thermal barriers, and thermoelectrics. Apart from size, strain and defects are also known to drastically affect heat transport when introduced in an otherwise undisturbed crystalline lattice. Here we report the first experimental measurements of the effect of both spatially uniform strain and point defects on thermal conductivity of an individual suspended nanowire using in situ Raman piezothermography. Our results show that whereas phononic transport in undoped Si nanowires with diameters in the range of 170-180 nm is largely unaffected by uniform elastic tensile strain, another means of disturbing a pristine lattice, namely, point defects introduced via ion bombardment, can reduce the thermal conductivity by over 70%. In addition to discerning surface- and core-governed pathways for controlling thermal transport in phonon-dominated insulators and semiconductors, we expect our novel approach to have broad applicability to a wide class of functional one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  3. Comparison of different methods for measuring thermal conductivities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, D.; Gather, F.; Klar, P. J.

    2012-06-26

    Two different methods for the measurement of the thermal conductivity have been applied to a glass (borosilicate) bulk sample. The first method was in the steady-state using an arrangement of gold wires on the sample to create a thermal gradient and to measure the temperatures locally. This allows one to calculate the in-plane thermal conductivity of the sample. The same wire arrangement was also used for a 3{omega}-measurement of the direction-independent bulk thermal conductivity. The 3{omega}-approach is based on periodical heating and a frequency dependent analysis of the temperature response. The results of both methods are in good agreement with each other for this isotropic material, if thermal and radiative losses are accounted for. Our results demonstrate that especially in the case of thin-film measurements, finite element analysis has to be applied to correct for heat losses due to geometry and radiation. In this fashion, the wire positions can be optimized in order to minimize measurement errors.

  4. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  5. Investigation of thermal conductivity and tribological properties of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gara, Luan

    Nanofluids are engineered by dispersing and stably suspending nanoparticles with typical length on the order of 1--50 nm in traditional fluids. In the past decade, scientists and engineers have made great progresses in finding that a very small amount (< 1 vol %) of dispersed nanoparticles can provide dramatic improvement in the thermal properties of the base fluids. Therefore, numerous mechanisms and models have been proposed to account for the thermal enhancement of nanofluids. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has become an important tool in the study of dynamic properties of liquids, molecular solutions, and macromolecules. Therefore, MD simulation is a very helpful tool to model the enhanced thermal conduction and predict thermal conductivities of nanofluids. In recent years, investigations on the tribological properties of nanofluids have also been carried out. Some papers have reported that nanofluids are effective in reducing wear and friction. The mechanisms of friction reduction and anti-wear of nanoparticles in lubricants have been reported as colloidal effect, rolling effect, protective film, and third body. The objective of this research is to study the thermal conductivity and tribological properties of nanofluids. The thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated theoretically through MD simulation. Nanodiamond was selected as the nanoparticle and octane as the base oil. The Large-scale Atomic-Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) was used. The effects of the particle size, shape and concentration on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated. The thermal conductivity of oil based nanofluids with nanodiamond particles was also measured experimentally using transient hot-wire method. The tribological properties of nanofluids were studied through experimental investigation using commercially available nanopowders and nanofluids. Both water based and oil based nanofluids were investigated. A Universal Micro

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Delozier, D. M.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In efforts to improve the thermal conductivity (TC) of Ultem(TM) 1000, it was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nano-fillers were aligned. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and the mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction using the Nanoflash technique. The results of this study will be presented.

  7. Phonon thermal conductivity of a nanowire attached to leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershfield, Selman; Muttalib, Khandker

    2015-03-01

    There is experimental evidence as well as theoretical proposals that nanowires can be made to have high thermoelectric efficiency by tuning the electronic properties; however, there is always a phonon contribution to the heat transport which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency. In the harmonic approximation we compute the transmission of phonons through a nanowire coupled to large leads. There is a finite thermal conductivity because of the restriction provided by the nanowire. The nanowire reduces the thermal transport because of the mismatch between the leads and wire modes. We examine the effect of disorder in three places: in the wire, in the leads near the wire, and in the leads far way from the wire. In some cases disorder can increase the thermal conduction because of enhanced mode coupling. We will discuss the implications of our results for thermoelectric nanowire devices.

  8. Metastable Lennard-Jones fluids. II. Thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Protsenko, Sergey P

    2014-06-07

    The method of equilibrium molecular dynamics with the use of the Green-Kubo formalism has been used to calculate the thermal conductivity λ in stable and metastable regions of a Lennard-Jones fluid. Calculations have been made in the range of reduced temperatures 0.4 ≤ T* = k(b)T/ε ≤ 2.0 and densities 0.01 ≤ ρ* = ρσ³ ≤ 1.2 on 15 isotherms for 234 states, 130 of which refer to metastable regions: superheated and supercooled liquids, supersaturated vapor. Equations have been built up which describe the dependence of the regular part of the thermal conductivity on temperature and density, and also on temperature and pressure. It has been found that in (p, T) variables in the region of a liquid-gas phase transition a family of lines of constant value of excess thermal conductivity Δλ = λ - λ0, where λ0 is the thermal conductivity of a dilute gas, has an envelope which coincides with the spinodal. Thus, at the approach to the spinodal of a superheated liquid and supersaturated vapor (∂Δλ/∂p)T → ∞, (∂Δλ/∂T)p → ∞.

  9. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous mixtures and lunar soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, R. I.; Prakouras, A. G.; Crane, R.; Khader, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The theoretical evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of granular materials is discussed with emphasis upon the heat transport properties of lunar soil. The following types of models are compared: probabilistic, parallel isotherm, stochastic, lunar, and a model based on nonlinear heat flow system synthesis.

  10. Thermal conductivity of alternative refrigerants in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yata, J.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Minamiyama, T.

    1996-05-01

    Measurements of the thermal conductivity of five alternative refrigerants, namely, difluoromethane (HFC-32), pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), 1,1,1-trifluorethane (HFC-143a), and dichloropentafluoropropanes (HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb), are carried out in the liquid phase. The range of temperature is 253-324 K for HFC-32, 257-305 K for HFC-125, 268-314 K for HFC-134a, 267-325 K for HCF-225ca, and 286-345 K for HCFC-225cb. The pressure range is from saturation to 30 MPa. The reproducibility of the data is better than 0.5%, and the accuracy of the data is estimated to be of the order of 1%. The experimental results for the thermal conductivity of each substance are correlated by an equation which is a function of temperature and pressure. A short discussion is given to the comparison of the present results with literature values for HFC-125. The saturated liquid thermal conductivity values of HFC-32, HFC-125, and HFC-143a are compared with those of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and it is shown that the value of HFC-32 is highest, while that of HFC-125 is lowest, among these substances. The dependence of thermal conductivity on number of fluorine atoms among the refrigerants with the same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms is discussed.

  11. Fabrication of setup for high temperature thermal conductivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashutosh; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of an experimental setup for high temperature thermal conductivity (κ) measurement. It can characterize samples with various dimensions and shapes. Steady state based axial heat flow technique is used for κ measurement. Heat loss is measured using parallel thermal conductance technique. Simple design, lightweight, and small size sample holder is developed by using a thin heater and limited components. Low heat loss value is achieved by using very low thermal conductive insulator block with small cross-sectional area. Power delivered to the heater is measured accurately by using 4-wire technique and for this, the heater is developed with 4 wires. This setup is validated by using Bi0.36Sb1.45Te3, polycrystalline bismuth, gadolinium, and alumina samples. The data obtained for these samples are found to be in good agreement with the reported data. The maximum deviation of 6% in the value κ is observed. This maximum deviation is observed with the gadolinium sample. We also report the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline tellurium from 320 K to 550 K and the nonmonotonous behavior of κ with temperature is observed.

  12. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  13. Resonant bonding leads to low lattice thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangyeop; Esfarjani, Keivan; Luo, Tengfei; Zhou, Jiawei; Tian, Zhiting; Chen, Gang

    2014-04-28

    Understanding the lattice dynamics and low thermal conductivities of IV-VI, V2-VI3 and V materials is critical to the development of better thermoelectric and phase-change materials. Here we provide a link between chemical bonding and low thermal conductivity. Our first-principles calculations reveal that long-ranged interaction along the 〈100〉 direction of the rocksalt structure exist in lead chalcogenides, SnTe, Bi2Te3, Bi and Sb due to the resonant bonding that is common to all of them. This long-ranged interaction in lead chalcogenides and SnTe cause optical phonon softening, strong anharmonic scattering and large phase space for three-phonon scattering processes, which explain why rocksalt IV-VI compounds have much lower thermal conductivities than zincblende III-V compounds. The new insights on the relationship between resonant bonding and low thermal conductivity will help in the development of better thermoelectric and phase change materials.

  14. Thermal conduction in single-layer black phosphorus: highly anisotropic?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-02-06

    The single-layer black phosphorus is characteristic for its puckered structure, which has led to distinct anisotropy in its optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. We use the non-equilibrium Green's function approach and the first-principles method to investigate the thermal conductance for single-layer black phosphorus in the ballistic transport regime, in which the phonon-phonon scattering is neglected. We find that the anisotropy in the thermal conduction is very weak for the single-layer black phosphorus--the difference between two in-plane directions is less than 4%. Our phonon calculations disclose that the out-of-plane acoustic phonon branch has lower group velocities in the direction perpendicular to the pucker, as the black phosphorus is softer in this direction, leading to a weakening effect for the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction. However, the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch behaves abnormally; i.e., the group velocity of this phonon branch is higher in the perpendicular direction, although the single-layer black phosphorus is softer in this direction. The abnormal behavior of the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch is closely related to the highly anisotropic Poisson's ratio in the single-layer black phosphorus. As a result of the counteraction between the out-of-plane phonon mode and the in-plane phonon modes, the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction is weaker than the parallel direction, but the anisotropy is pretty small.

  15. Thermal conductivity of silicene from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Han; Bao, Hua E-mail: hua.bao@sjtu.edu.cn; Hu, Ming E-mail: hua.bao@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-03-31

    Silicene, as a graphene-like two-dimensional material, now receives exceptional attention of a wide community of scientists and engineers beyond graphene. Despite extensive study on its electric property, little research has been done to accurately calculate the phonon transport of silicene so far. In this paper, thermal conductivity of monolayer silicene is predicted from first-principles method. At 300 K, the thermal conductivity of monolayer silicene is found to be 9.4 W/mK and much smaller than bulk silicon. The contributions from in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations to thermal conductivity are quantified, and the out-of-plane vibration contributes less than 10% of the overall thermal conductivity, which is different from the results of the similar studies on graphene. The difference is explained by the presence of small buckling, which breaks the reflectional symmetry of the structure. The flexural modes are thus not purely out-of-plane vibration and have strong scattering with other modes.

  16. Thermal conductivity and temperature profiles in carbon electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burheim, Odne S.; Aslan, Mesut; Atchison, Jennifer S.; Presser, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of supercapacitor film electrodes composed of activated carbon (AC), AC with 15 mass% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), AC with 15 mass% onion-like carbon (OLC), and only OLC, all mixed with polymer binder (polytetrafluoroethylene), has been measured. This was done for dry electrodes and after the electrodes have been saturated with an organic electrolyte (1 M tetraethylammonium-tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, TEA-BF4). The thermal conductivity data was implemented in a simple model of generation and transport of heat in a cylindrical cell supercapacitor systems. Dry electrodes showed a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.09-0.19 W K-1 m-1 and the electrodes soaked with an organic electrolyte yielded values for the thermal conductivity between 0.42 and 0.47 W K-1 m-1. It was seen that the values related strongly to the porosity of the carbon electrode materials. Modeling of the internal temperature profiles of a supercapacitor under conditions corresponding to extreme cycling demonstrated that only a moderate temperature gradient of several degrees Celsius can be expected and which depends on the ohmic resistance of the cell as well as the wetting of the electrode materials.

  17. In situ thermal conductivity measurements of Titan's lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, B.; Ball, A. J.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Daniell, P. M.; Garry, J. R. C.; Hagermann, A.; Leese, M. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Towner, M. C.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements, presented in this paper (Fig. 3), were made during the descent of the Huygens probe through the atmosphere of Titan below the altitude of 30 km. The measurements are broadly consistent with reference values derived from the composition, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere; except in narrow altitude regions around 19 km and 11 km, where the measured thermal conductivity is lower than the reference by 1% and 2%, respectively. Only single data point exists at each of the two altitudes mentioned above; if true however, the result supports the case for existence for molecules heavier than nitrogen in these regions (such as: ethane, other primordial noble gases, carbon dioxide, and other hydrocarbon derivatives). The increasing thermal conductivity observed below 7 km altitude could be due to some liquid deposition during the descent; either due to condensation and/or due to passing through layers of fog/cloud containing liquid nitrogen-methane. Thermal conductivity measurements do not allow conclusions to be drawn about how such liquid may have entered the sensor, but an estimate of the cumulative liquid content encountered in the last 7 km is 0.6% by volume of the Titan's atmosphere sampled during descent.

  18. Porous alumina and zirconia ceramics with tailored thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorová, E.; Pabst, W.; Sofer, Z.; Jankovský, O.; Matějíček, J.

    2012-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of porous ceramics can be tailored by slip casting and uniaxial dry pressing, using either fugitive pore formers (saccharides) or partial sintering. Porous alumina and zirconia ceramics have been prepared using appropriate powder types (ungranulated for casting, granulated for pressing) and identical firing regimes (but different maximum temperatures in the case of partial sintering). Thermal diffusivities have been measured by the laser- and xenon-flash method and transformed into relative thermal conductivities, which enable a temperature-independent comparison between different materials. While the porosity can be controlled in a similar way for both materials when using pore formers, partial sintering exhibits characteristic differences between alumina and zirconia (for alumina porosities below 45 %, full density above 1600 °C, for zirconia porosities below 60 %, full density above 1300 °C). The different compaction behavior of alumina and zirconia (porosity after pressing 0.465 and 0.597, respectively) is reflected in the fact that for alumina the relative conductivity data of partially sintered materials are below the exponential prediction, while for zirconia they coincide with the latter. Notwithstanding these characteristic differences, for both alumina and zirconia it is possible to tailor the thermal conductivity from 100 % down to approx. 15 % of the solid phase value.

  19. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of stable graphite suspensions near percolation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Wang, Jianjian; Marconnet, Amy M; Barbati, Alexander C; McKinley, Gareth H; Liu, Wei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-14

    Nanofluids have received much attention in part due to the range of properties possible with different combinations of nanoparticles and base fluids. In this work, we measure the viscosity of suspensions of graphite particles in ethylene glycol as a function of the volume fraction, shear rate, and temperature below and above the percolation threshold. We also measure and contrast the trends observed in the viscosity with increasing volume fraction to the thermal conductivity behavior of the same suspensions: above the percolation threshold, the slope that describes the rate of thermal conductivity enhancement with concentration reduces compared to below the percolation threshold, whereas that of the viscosity enhancement increases. While the thermal conductivity enhancement is independent of temperature, the viscosity changes show a strong dependence on temperature and exhibit different trends with respect to the temperature at different shear rates above the percolation threshold. Interpretation of the experimental observations is provided within the framework of Stokesian dynamics simulations of the suspension microstructure and suggests that although diffusive contributions are not important for the observed thermal conductivity enhancement, they are important for understanding the variations in the viscosity with changes of temperature and shear rate above the percolation threshold. The experimental results can be collapsed to a single master curve through calculation of a single dimensionless parameter (a Péclet number based on the rotary diffusivity of the graphite particles).

  20. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes. PMID:26982458

  1. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes.

  2. Apparatus measures thermal conductivity of honeycomb-core panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Overall thermal conductivity of honeycomb-core panels at elevated temperatures is measured by an apparatus with a heater assembly and a calibrated heat-rate transducer. The apparatus has space between the heater and transducer for insertion of a test panel and insulation.

  3. Molecular disorder effects in the thermal conductivity of solid thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovichenko, G. A.; Krivchikov, A. I.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Romantsova, O. O.

    2014-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity κ(T) of solid thiophene is measured in a sequence of stable orientationally disordered phases with different degrees of orientational ordering of the molecules: in orientational glass (Vg); in phase V with large angular librational molecular vibrations; in incommensurate phase IV with a static orientational disorder; and in orientationally disordered crystalline phase III with dynamic orientational disorder of the molecules. Measurements are made at the saturated vapor pressure in a temperature range of 2-180 K. It is found that the thermal conductivity of thiophene is practically independent of temperature in phases III and V with dynamic orientational disorder of the molecules. In the orientational glass state and in the incommensurate state, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of thiophene has a form typical of crystals with a long-range orientational order. A distinct hysteresis of the thermal conductivity is found at temperatures slightly below the temperature of the transition from phase IV into phase V.

  4. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  5. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  6. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  7. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity in few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, Joseph C., Jr.

    Carbon is an extremely versatile element due to the ability of its electronic structure to allow strong bonds with many elements including other carbon atoms. This allows for the formation of many types of large and complex architectures, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, at the nanoscale. One of the most fascinating allotropes of carbon is graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice with carbon in sp2 hybridization, which building block for layered graphite and other nanocarbons.[1] Because of its unique structure, graphene displays several interesting properties including high thermal[2-4] and electrical mobility and conductivity[1,5]. The initial studies on graphene were performed on mechanically exfoliated samples, which were limited to few microns in size. In the recent years, large areas of single- and few-layer graphene (˜few cm x cm) are being produced by chemical vapor deposition technique for practical applications. However, chemical vapor deposition grown graphene is highly polycrystalline with interfaces such as edges, grain boundaries, dislocations, and point defects. This inevitable presence of defects in graphene influences its electrical and thermal transport. While many studies have previously focused on the influence of defects on electrical mobility and conductivity, there is little information on the influence of defects on the thermal properties of graphene. This study specifically investigates the effect of both intrinsic and extrinsic defects on the in-plane thermal properties of graphene using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The in-plane thermal conductivity of few-layered graphene (FLG) was measured using Raman spectroscopy, following the work of Balandin et al. [4]The thermal conductivity was estimated from a shift of the characteristic G-band of graphene as a function of the excitation laser power. The graphene samples were synthesized on nickel substrates using chemical vapor deposition, and transferred to copper TEM grids and

  9. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO2 multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO2 in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO2, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO2. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO2 multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials.

  10. Interplay of variable thermal conductivity and expansivity on the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, S.; Yuen, D. A.

    The sensitivity of pressure- and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity (k: W/m/K) and the thermal expansivity (α:1/K) on the thermal structure of the oceanic plate is investigated parametrically by comparing the ocean floor depth and heat flux calculated by one-dimensional conduction model with those of GDH1, a theoretical thermal model of the oceanic lithosphere. We find that an optimum fit is obtained, when the value of thermal expansivity is ˜ 3 × 10-5, while those associated with the thermal conductivity have many possibilities. The estimates, which give an equally good fit to the GDH1 model, of the plate thickness D (km) and the temperature at the base of the plate Tm (°C) may be given by Tm ˜ 1450-(k0-4.5) × 100-(α-3.0 × 10-5) × 105×100, D ˜ 90 + (k0-4.5) × 20 - (α-3.0 × 10-5) × 105 × 20 where k0 (W/m/K) is the lattice thermal conductivity at the ocean floor. A similar relation is obtained for constant thermal conductivity.

  11. Interlayer thermal conductance within a phosphorene and graphene bilayer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jingchao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-24

    Monolayer graphene possesses unusual thermal properties, and is often considered as a prototype system for the study of thermal physics of low-dimensional electronic/thermal materials, despite the absence of a direct bandgap. Another two-dimensional (2D) atomic layered material, phosphorene, is a natural p-type semiconductor and it has attracted growing interest in recent years. When a graphene monolayer is overlaid on phosphorene, the hybrid van der Waals (vdW) bilayer becomes a potential candidate for high-performance thermal/electronic applications, owing to the combination of the direct-bandgap properties of phosphorene with the exceptional thermal properties of graphene. In this work, the interlayer thermal conductance at the phosphorene/graphene interface is systematically investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The transient pump-probe heating method is employed to compute the interfacial thermal resistance (R) of the bilayer. The predicted R value at the phosphorene/graphene interface is 8.41 × 10(-8) K m(2) W(-1) at room temperature. Different external and internal conditions, i.e., temperature, contact pressure, vacancy defect, and chemical functionalization, can all effectively reduce R at the interface. Numerical results of R reduction as a function of temperature, interfacial coupling strength, defect ratio, or hydrogen coverage are reported with the most R reduction amounting to 56.5%, 70.4%, 34.8% and 84.5%, respectively.

  12. Low Thermal Conductance Transition Edge Sensor (TES) for SPICA

    SciTech Connect

    Khosropanah, P.; Dirks, B.; Kuur, J. van der; Ridder, M.; Bruijn, M.; Popescu, M.; Hoevers, H.; Gao, J. R.; Morozov, D.; Mauskopf, P.

    2009-12-16

    We fabricated and characterized low thermal conductance transition edge sensors (TES) for SAFARI instrument on SPICA. The device is based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer deposited on suspended SiN membrane. The critical temperature of the device is 113 mK. The low thermal conductance is realized by using long and narrow SiN supporting legs. All measurements were performed having the device in a light-tight box, which to a great extent eliminates the loading of the background radiation. We measured the current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the device in different bath temperatures and determine the thermal conductance (G) to be equal to 320 fW/K. This value corresponds to a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 3x10{sup -19} W/{radical}(Hz). The current noise and complex impedance is also measured at different bias points at 55 mK bath temperature. The measured electrical (dark) NEP is 1x10{sup -18} W/{radical}(Hz), which is about a factor of 3 higher than what we expect from the thermal conductance that comes out of the IV curves. Despite using a light-tight box, the photon noise might still be the source of this excess noise. We also measured the complex impedance of the same device at several bias points. Fitting a simple first order thermal-electrical model to the measured data, we find an effective time constant of about 2.7 ms and a thermal capacity of 13 fJ/K in the middle of the transition.

  13. Enhancing Thermal Conductivity of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Filled Thermoplastics for Thermal Interface Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prindl, John

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride has been shown to enhance thermal conductivity in polymer composites more so than conventional ceramic fillers. However, to see a significant increase in thermal conductivity a high loading level of the advanced ceramic is often needed which can have an adverse effect on the mechanical behavior of the composite part. Applications for thermal management using thermal interface materials (TIM) continue to grow with thermoplastic injection molded parts emerging as an area for market growth. There is a growing need for published technical data in this particular area of application. In the current study, the thermal conductivity and mechanical behavior of hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) loaded thermoplastic composites is investigated. The main objectives of this work is produce a novel data package which illustrates the effects of hBN, loaded at high concentrations, across several different thermoplastic resins with the ultimate goal being to find a desirable formulation for specific thermal management applications. The desired properties for such applications being high thermal conductivity and high electrical resistivity with a minimal decrease in mechanical properties. Hexagonal BN cooling filler agglomerates were compounded into polypropylene (PP), nylon-6 (PA-6), and thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) via twin-screw extruder at 3 different loading levels. Injection molded samples were produced and characterized to show varying degrees of thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Results from this research showed that in all cases, the thermal conductivity increased with increasing levels of hBN addition. The largest increases in thermal conductivity were seen in the PA-6 and TPE systems with the possible indication of exceeding the percolation threshold in the TPE system. This is hypothesized to occur due to the preferential migration of hBN to form conduction pathways around the elastomeric domains in the TPE matrix. Though TPE produced

  14. The thermal conductivity of silicon nitride with molybdenum disilicide additions

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Abeel, A.M.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Room-temperature thermal conductivity has been measured for a series of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix composites with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) additions of 2, 5 10, 25 and 50 wt. %. Included in these measurements were a pure MoSi{sub 2} sample and a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample containing only sintering aids. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added as the sintering aids, at approximately 6 and 2 respectively. When the amount of MoSi{sub 2} was increased to greater than 10 wt. %, the amount of the sintering aids necessary to densify the composite was decreased. No sintering aids were added to the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample. Thermal conductivities of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample without MoSi{sub 2} and the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample wee 36 W/m.K and 52 W/m.K respectively, which agree very well with the literature values for similar materials. No statistically significant changes were observed in the thermal conductivity for those samples containing up to 10 wt. % MoSi{sub 2}. However, between 10 and 25 wt. % MoSi{sub 2} there was a dramatic decrease in the thermal conductivity from 37 to 20.9 W/m.K. The thermal conductivity then increased steadily with further additions of MoSi{sub 2} up to 52 W/m.K for the pure MoSi{sub 2} specimen.

  15. Thermal conductivity and multiferroics of electroactive polymers and polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiezhu

    Electronically conducting polymers and electromechanical polymers are the two important branches of the cutting-edge electroactive polymers. They have shown significant impact on many modern technologies such as flat panel display, energy transport, energy conversion, sensors and actuators. To utilize conducting polymers in microelectronics, optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, it is necessary to have a comprehensive study of their thermal conductivity since thermal conductivity is a fundamental materials property that is particularly important and sometimes a determining factor of the device performance. For electromechanical polymers, larger piezoelectric effect will contribute to the improvement of magnetoelectric (ME) coupling efficiency in their multiferroic composites. This dissertation is devoted to characterizing electronically conducting polymers for their electrical and thermal conductivity, and developing new classes of electromechanical polymers and strain-mediated electromechanical polymer-based multiferroic ME composites. Conducting polymers opened up new possibilities for devices combining novel electrical and thermal properties, but there has been limited understanding of the length-scale effect of the electrical and thermal conductivity, and the mechanism underlying the electricity and heat transport behavior. In this dissertation, the analytical model and experimental technique are presented to measure the in-plane thermal conductivity of polyaniline thin films. For camphorsulfonic acid doped polyaniline patterned on silicon oxide/silicon substrate using photolithography and reactive ion etching, the thermal conductivity of the film with thickness of 20 nm is measured to be 0.0406 W/m˙K, which significantly deviates from their bulk (> 0.26 W/m˙K). The size effect on thermal conductivity at this scale is attributed to the significant phonon boundary scattering. When the film goes up to 130 nm thick, the thermal conductivity increases to 0.166 W

  16. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube/nanofiber Arrays as Conductive and Dry Adhesive Interface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Tao; Zhao, Yang; Delzeit, Lance; Majumdar, Arun; Kashani, Ali

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of making conductive and dry adhesive interfaces between multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and nanofiber (MWNF) arrays grown by chemical vapor deposition with transition-metal as catalyst on highly Boron doped silicon substrates. The maximum observed adhesion force between MWNT and MWNF surfaces is 3.5 mN for an apparent contact area of 2 mm by 4 mm. The minimum contact resistance measured at the same time is approx.20 Omega. Contact resistances of MWNT-MWNT and MWNT-gold interfaces were also measured as pressure forces around several mN were applied at the interface. The resulting minimum contact resistances are on the same order but with considerable variation from sample to sample. For MWNT-MWNT contacts, a minimum contact resistance of approx.1 Omega is observed for a contact area of 2 mm by 1 mm. The relatively high contact resistances, considering the area density of the nanotubes, might be explained by the high cross-tube resistances at the contact interfaces.

  17. The Origin of High Thermal Conductivity and Ultralow Thermal Expansion in Copper-Graphite Composites.

    PubMed

    Firkowska, Izabela; Boden, André; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2015-07-08

    We developed a nanocomposite with highly aligned graphite platelets in a copper matrix. Spark plasma sintering ensured an excellent copper-graphite interface for transmitting heat and stress. The resulting composite has superior thermal conductivity (500 W m(-1) K(-1), 140% of copper), which is in excellent agreement with modeling based on the effective medium approximation. The thermal expansion perpendicular to the graphite platelets drops dramatically from ∼20 ppm K(-1) for graphite and copper separately to 2 ppm K(-1) for the combined structure. We show that this originates from the layered, highly anisotropic structure of graphite combined with residual stress under ambient conditions, that is, strain-engineering of the thermal expansion. Combining excellent thermal conductivity with ultralow thermal expansion results in ideal materials for heat sinks and other devices for thermal management.

  18. Thermal Crosslinking of Organic Semiconducting Polythiophene Improves Transverse Hole Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gearba, I.R.; Nam, C.-Y.; Pindak, R.; Black, C.T.

    2009-10-26

    Thermal crosslinking using a suitable radical initiator simultaneously improves electrical conductivity in the semiconducting polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) and makes the material insoluble. Crosslinked polythiophene shows as much as a fivefold increase in hole conductivity across the film thickness without any shift in spectral light absorption. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction reveals more in-plane polymer lamellae stacking with only a small decrease in film crystallinity. Improved transverse conductivity increases the performance of model planar solar cells by threefold, from 0.07% to 0.2%. The ability to render polythiophene insoluble without disrupting film structural order enables fabrication pathways to more complex device architectures.

  19. Thermal conductivity calculations of crystalline quartz from the BKS potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Car, Roberto; Srolovitz, David J.; Scandolo, Sandro

    2003-03-01

    We present thermal conductivity calculations from the classical BKS potential[1]. Following a velocity rescaling method for a constant heat flux proposed by P. Jund and R. Jullien[2], thermal conductivity as a heat flux to temperature gradient ratio is directly calculated in periodic simulation cells. Our calculations in a wide temperature range at which crystalline quartz exists are consistent with the experimental trend[3]. The conductivity decreases with temperature in the alpha-quartz regime, and increases after the phase transition to beta-quartz. The temperature dependence is rather small in the beta-quartz regime. [1] B. W. H. van Beest, G. J. Kramer, and R. A. van Santen, Phy. Rev. Lett. 64, 1995 (1990). [2] P. Jund, and R. Jullien, Phy. Rev. B 59, 13707 (1999). [3] H. Kanamori, N. Fujii, and H. Mizutani, J. Geophys. Res. 73, 595 (1968).

  20. Thermal stability and adhesion of low-emissivity electroplated Au coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jorenby, Jeff W.; Hachman, John T., Jr.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a low-emissivity thermal management coating system to minimize radiative heat losses under a high-vacuum environment. Good adhesion, low outgassing, and good thermal stability of the coating material are essential elements for a long-life, reliable thermal management device. The system of electroplated Au coating on the adhesion-enhancing Wood's Ni strike and 304L substrate was selected due to its low emissivity and low surface chemical reactivity. The physical and chemical properties, interface bonding, thermal aging, and compatibility of the above Au/Ni/304L system were examined extensively. The study shows that the as-plated electroplated Au and Ni samples contain submicron columnar grains, stringers of nanopores, and/or H{sub 2} gas bubbles, as expected. The grain structure of Au and Ni are thermally stable up to 250 C for 63 days. The interface bonding is strong, which can be attributed to good mechanical locking among the Au, the 304L, and the porous Ni strike. However, thermal instability of the nanopore structure (i.e., pore coalescence and coarsening due to vacancy and/or entrapped gaseous phase diffusion) and Ni diffusion were observed. In addition, the study also found that prebaking 304L in the furnace at {ge} 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr promotes surface Cr-oxides on the 304L surface, which reduces the effectiveness of the intended H-removal. The extent of the pore coalescence and coarsening and their effect on the long-term system integrity and outgassing are yet to be understood. Mitigating system outgassing and improving Au adhesion require a further understanding of the process-structure-system performance relationships within the electroplated Au/Ni/304L system.

  1. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900 °C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900 °C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650 °C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900 °C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  2. Influence of moisture content and temperature on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of rice flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of four types of rice flours and one type of rice protein were determine at temperatures ranging from 4.8 to 36.8 C, bulk densities 535 to 875.8 kg/m3, and moisture contents 2.6 to 16.7 percent (w.b.), using a KD2 Thermal Properties Analyzer. It was ...

  3. Study of the demolding process—implications for thermal stress, adhesion and friction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuhua; Liu, Gang; Xiong, Yin; Tian, Yangchao

    2007-01-01

    With the improvements of large-scale parallel replication and automation for hot embossing machines, hot embossing has become not only popular in laboratories but also possible and attractive in industry. Most difficulties in polymer micro-molding are caused by the demolding of molds rather than the filling of them. Due to the lack of accurate analysis tools and simulation tools for demolding, it is difficult to improve the process or give design rules for the molds, which could harm the further applications of hot embossing. This paper gives our studies of the demolding process using LIGA mold inserts. The demolding forces mainly consist of thermal shrinkage stress and adhesive forces. First, a finite elements method (FEM) is applied to analyze thermal stress caused by the shrinkage differences between the mold and polymer using ABAQUS/Standard, and a thermal stress barrier is proposed as an auxiliary structure to protect against the converging stress at the bottom corner of microstructures. Then, regarding the adhesion and friction forces, the nanotribology of PMMA is studied by AFM with nickel and PTFE-coated Si3N4 tips. And based on the measurements, the adhesion and friction forces in a demolding cycle are also simulated by FEM using ABAQUS/Standard. At last Ni-PTFE is recommended as the mold material for achieving a lower surface energy and lower friction force. This work proposes several methods that can optimize the demolding process and introduces some good suggestions for mold tool design.

  4. Thermal conductivity measurement and interface thermal resistance estimation using SiO2 thin film.

    PubMed

    Chien, Heng-Chieh; Yao, Da-Jeng; Huang, Mei-Jiau; Chang, Tien-Yao

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we describe an easy-to-use method to measure the thermal conductivity of thin films based on an electrical heating/sensing mechanism and a steady-state technique. The method used relative commonly used instruments, and without any signal processing circuit, is easy to be used in such thin-film thermal conductivity measurement. The SiO2 thin-film samples, prepared by thermal oxidation, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and E-beam evaporator, were deposited on a silicon substrate. The apparent thermal conductivity, the intrinsic thermal conductivity of SiO2 films, and the total interface thermal resistance of the heater/SiO2/silicon system were evaluated. Our data showed agreement with those data obtained from previous literatures and from the 3 omega method. Furthermore, by using a sandwiched structure, the interface thermal resistance of Cr/PECVD SiO2 and PECVD SiO2/silicon were also separately evaluated in this work. The data showed that the interface thermal resistance of Cr/PECVD SiO2 (metal/dielectric) is about one order of magnitude larger than that of PECVD SiO2/silicon (dielectric/dielectric).

  5. Design and Construction of a Thermal Contact Resistance and Thermal Conductivity Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    systems to improve fuel efficiency and performance. Comprehensive details of the design, construction, and operation of the experimental device are... heat transfer issues facing the Department of Defense. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Thermal contact resistance, thermal conductivity, measurement system 15...analyze component interfaces and advanced material applications within Department of Defense’s energy systems to improve fuel efficiency and

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Nano-filler Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.; Working, Dennis C.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, Elvax 260 was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. In an attempt to improve compatibility between the Elvax and nanofillers, MWCNTs and EGs were modified through non covalent and covalent attachment of alkyl groups. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned, and samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using a Nanoflash technique. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction. The results of this study will be presented.

  7. Switch on the high thermal conductivity of graphene paper.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangsu; Yuan, Pengyu; Wang, Tianyu; Hashemi, Nastaran; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-10-14

    This work reports on the discovery of a high thermal conductivity (κ) switch-on phenomenon in high purity graphene paper (GP) when its temperature is reduced from room temperature down to 10 K. The κ after switch-on (1732 to 3013 W m(-1) K(-1)) is 4-8 times that before switch-on. The triggering temperature is 245-260 K. The switch-on behavior is attributed to the thermal expansion mismatch between pure graphene flakes and impurity-embedded flakes. This is confirmed by the switch behavior of the temperature coefficient of resistance. Before switch-on, the interactions between pure graphene flakes and surrounding impurity-embedded flakes efficiently suppress phonon transport in GP. After switch-on, the structure separation frees the pure graphene flakes from the impurity-embedded neighbors, leading to a several-fold κ increase. The measured κ before and after switch-on is consistent with the literature reported κ values of supported and suspended graphene. By conducting comparison studies with pyrolytic graphite, graphene oxide paper and partly reduced graphene paper, the whole physical picture is illustrated clearly. The thermal expansion induced switch-on is feasible only for high purity GP materials. This finding points out a novel way to switch on/off the thermal conductivity of graphene paper based on substrate-phonon scattering.

  8. Thermal conductivity and sound attenuation in dilute atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, Matt; Chao Jingyi; Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-09-15

    We compute the thermal conductivity and sound attenuation length of a dilute atomic Fermi gas in the framework of kinetic theory. Above the critical temperature for superfluidity, T{sub c}, the quasiparticles are fermions, whereas below T{sub c}, the dominant excitations are phonons. We calculate the thermal conductivity in both cases. We find that at unitarity the thermal conductivity {kappa} in the normal phase scales as {kappa}{proportional_to}T{sup 3/2}. In the superfluid phase we find {kappa}{proportional_to}T{sup 2}. At high temperature the Prandtl number, the ratio of the momentum and thermal diffusion constants, is 2/3. The ratio increases as the temperature is lowered. As a consequence we expect sound attenuation in the normal phase just above T{sub c} to be dominated by shear viscosity. We comment on the possibility of extracting the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas at unitarity using measurements of the sound absorption length.

  9. Copper-based conductive composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    PubMed

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Tucker, Ryan; Star, Kurt; Lan, Esther H; Ju, Yongho Sungtaek; Dunn, Bruce

    2013-11-13

    We have devised a moderate temperature hot-pressing route for preparing metal-matrix composites which possess tunable thermal expansion coefficients in combination with high electrical and thermal conductivities. The composites are based on incorporating ZrW2O8, a material with a negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), within a continuous copper matrix. The ZrW2O8 enables us to tune the CTE in a predictable manner, while the copper phase is responsible for the electrical and thermal conductivity properties. An important consideration in the processing of these materials is to avoid the decomposition of the ZrW2O8 phase. This is accomplished by using relatively mild hot-pressing conditions of 500 °C for 1 h at 40 MPa. To ensure that these conditions enable sintering of the copper, we developed a synthesis route for the preparation of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) based on the reduction of a common copper salt in aqueous solution in the presence of a size control agent. Upon hot pressing these nanoparticles at 500 °C, we are able to achieve 92-93% of the theoretical density of copper. The resulting materials exhibit a CTE which can be tuned between the value of pure copper (16.5 ppm/°C) and less than 1 ppm/°C. Thus, by adjusting the relative amount of the two components, the properties of the composite can be designed so that a material with high electrical conductivity and a CTE that matches the relatively low CTE values of semiconductor or thermoelectric materials can be achieved. This unique combination of electrical and thermal properties enables these Cu-based metal-matrix composites to be used as electrical contacts to a variety of semiconductor and thermoelectric devices which offer stable operation under thermal cycling conditions.

  10. Measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity using a thermoelectric module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Pitarch, Braulio; Márquez-García, Lourdes; Min, Gao; García-Cañadas, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    A proof of concept of using a thermoelectric module to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of bulk disc samples at room temperature is demonstrated. The method involves the calculation of the integral area from an impedance spectrum, which empirically correlates with the thermal properties of the sample through an exponential relationship. This relationship was obtained employing different reference materials. The impedance spectroscopy measurements are performed in a very simple setup, comprising a thermoelectric module, which is soldered at its bottom side to a Cu block (heat sink) and thermally connected with the sample at its top side employing thermal grease. Random and systematic errors of the method were calculated for the thermal conductivity (18.6% and 10.9%, respectively) and thermal diffusivity (14.2% and 14.7%, respectively) employing a BCR724 standard reference material. Although errors are somewhat high, the technique could be useful for screening purposes or high-throughput measurements at its current state. This new method establishes a new application for thermoelectric modules as thermal properties sensors. It involves the use of a very simple setup in conjunction with a frequency response analyzer, which provides a low cost alternative to most of currently available apparatus in the market. In addition, impedance analyzers are reliable and widely spread equipment, which facilities the sometimes difficult access to thermal conductivity facilities.

  11. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  12. Applications of high thermal conductivity composites to electronics and spacecraft thermal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Loftin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, high thermal conductivity continuous graphite fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) have become available that can save much weight over present methods of heat conduction. These materials have two or three times higher thermal conductivity in the fiber direction than the pure metals when compared on a thermal conductivity to weight basis. Use of these materials for heat conduction purposes can result in weight savings of from 50 to 70 percent over structural aluminum. Another significant advantage is that these materials can be used without the plumbing and testing complexities that accompany the use of liquid heat pipes. A spinoff of this research was the development of other MMC's as electronic device heat sinks. These use particulates rather than fibers and are formulated to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of electronic substrates in order to alleviate thermally induced stresses. The development of both types of these materials as viable weight saving substitutes for traditional methods of thermal control for electronics packaging and also for spacecraft thermal control applications are the subject of this report.

  13. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  14. Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2012-07-01

    Computational study of thermal conductivity of interconnected networks of bundles in carbon nanotube (CNT) films reveals a strong effect of the finite thermal conductivity kT of individual nanotubes on the conductivity k of the CNT materials. The physical origin of this effect is explained in a theoretical analysis of systems composed of straight randomly dispersed CNTs. An analytical equation for quantitative description of the effect of finite kT on the value of k is obtained and adopted for continuous networks of bundles characteristic of CNT films and buckypaper. Contrary to the common assumption of the dominant effect of the contact conductance, the contribution of the finite kT is found to control the value of k at material densities and CNT lengths typical for real materials.

  15. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  16. Thermal conductivity modeling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Cho, Byoung Jin; Sohn, Dong-Seong; Park, Jong Man

    2015-11-01

    A dataset for the thermal conductivity of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel made available by KAERI was reanalyzed. Using this dataset, an analytical model was obtained by expanding the Bruggeman model. The newly developed model incorporates thermal resistances at the interface between the U-Mo particles and the Al matrix and the defects within the Al matrix (grain boundaries, cracks, and dislocations). The interfacial resistances are expressed as functions of U-Mo particle size and Al grain size obtained empirically by fitting to measured data from KAERI. The model was then validated against an independently measured dataset from ANL.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Ten Selected Binary Alloy Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    electrons by solute atoms, so that the electronic thermal conductivity may be calculated from the Wiedemann -Franz-Lorenz relationship, k 1 1 ILeT where...temperatures below 100 K. These deviations may be taken into account by assuming that they are related by the Wiedemann -Franz-Lorenz law: Ap/AW = LT, where L...from Matthiessen’s rule. Thus, to a good apprmatio, the deviations from Matthiessen’s rule and its thermal analog are related by the Wiedemann - Franz

  18. Thermal resistance optimization of GaN/substrate stacks considering thermal boundary resistance and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Bayram, C.

    2016-10-01

    Here, we investigate the effects of thermal boundary resistance (TBR) and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity on the thermal resistance of GaN/substrate stacks. A combination of parameters such as substrates {diamond, silicon carbide, silicon, and sapphire}, thermal boundary resistance {10-60 m2K/GW}, heat source lengths {10 nm-20 μm}, and power dissipation levels {1-8 W} are studied by using technology computer-aided design (TCAD) software Synopsys. Among diamond, silicon carbide, silicon, and sapphire substrates, the diamond provides the lowest thermal resistance due to its superior thermal conductivity. We report that due to non-zero thermal boundary resistance and localized heating in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors, an optimum separation between the heat source and substrate exists. For high power (i.e., 8 W) heat dissipation on high thermal conductive substrates (i.e., diamond), the optimum separation between the heat source and substrate becomes submicron thick (i.e., 500 nm), which reduces the hotspot temperature as much as 50 °C compared to conventional multi-micron thick case (i.e., 4 μm). This is attributed to the thermal conductivity drop in GaN near the heat source. Improving the TBR between GaN and diamond increases temperature reduction by our further approach. Overall, we provide thermal management design guidelines for GaN-based devices.

  19. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  20. Thermal conductivity in nanocrystalline-SiC/C superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Habermehl, S.; Serrano, J. R.

    2015-11-17

    We reported the formation of thin film superlattices consisting of alternating layers of nitrogen-doped SiC (SiC:N) and C. Periodically terminating the SiC:N surface with a graphitic C boundary layer and controlling the SiC:N/C thickness ratio yield nanocrystalline SiC grains ranging in size from 365 to 23 nm. Frequency domain thermo-reflectance is employed to determine the thermal conductivity, which is found to vary from 35.5 W m-1 K-1 for monolithic undoped α-SiC films to 1.6 W m-1 K-1 for a SiC:N/C superlattice with a 47 nm period and a SiC:N/C thickness ratio of 11. A series conductance model is employed to explain the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the superlatticestructure. Our results indicate that the thermal conductivity is more dependent on the SiC:N/C thickness ratio than the SiC:N grain size, indicative of strong boundary layerphonon scattering.

  1. VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

    2011-03-01

    A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

  2. Thermal conductance of metal–diamond interfaces at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hohensee, Gregory T.; Wilson, R. B.; Cahill, David G.

    2015-03-06

    The thermal conductance of interfaces between metals and diamond, which has a comparatively high Debye temperature, is often greater than can be accounted for by two phonon-processes. The high pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell can significantly extend the metal phonon density of states to higher frequencies, and can also suppress extrinsic effects by greatly stiffening interface bonding. Here we report time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of metal-diamond interface thermal conductance up to 50 GPa in the DAC for Pb, Au0.95Pd0.05, Pt, and Al films deposited on Type 1A natural [100] and Type 2A synthetic [110] diamond anvils. In all cases, the thermal conductances increase weakly or saturate to similar values at high pressure. Lastly, our results suggest that anharmonic conductance at metal-diamond interfaces is controlled by partial transmission processes, where a diamond phonon that inelastically scatters at the interface absorbs or emits a metal phonon.

  3. Thermal conductance of metal–diamond interfaces at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Hohensee, Gregory T.; Wilson, R. B.; Cahill, David G.

    2015-03-06

    The thermal conductance of interfaces between metals and diamond, which has a comparatively high Debye temperature, is often greater than can be accounted for by two phonon-processes. The high pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell can significantly extend the metal phonon density of states to higher frequencies, and can also suppress extrinsic effects by greatly stiffening interface bonding. Here we report time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of metal-diamond interface thermal conductance up to 50 GPa in the DAC for Pb, Au0.95Pd0.05, Pt, and Al films deposited on Type 1A natural [100] and Type 2A synthetic [110] diamond anvils. In all cases,more » the thermal conductances increase weakly or saturate to similar values at high pressure. Lastly, our results suggest that anharmonic conductance at metal-diamond interfaces is controlled by partial transmission processes, where a diamond phonon that inelastically scatters at the interface absorbs or emits a metal phonon.« less

  4. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  5. Thermal conductance of metal-diamond interfaces at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, Gregory T; Wilson, R B; Cahill, David G

    2015-03-06

    The thermal conductance of interfaces between metals and diamond, which has a comparatively high Debye temperature, is often greater than can be accounted for by two-phonon processes. The high pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) can significantly extend the metal phonon density of states to higher frequencies, and can also suppress extrinsic effects by greatly stiffening interface bonding. Here we report time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of metal-diamond interface thermal conductance up to 50 GPa in the DAC for Pb, Au0.95Pd0.05, Pt and Al films deposited on type 1A natural [100] and type 2A synthetic [110] diamond anvils. In all cases, the thermal conductances increase weakly or saturate to similar values at high pressure. Our results suggest that anharmonic conductance at metal-diamond interfaces is controlled by partial transmission processes, where a diamond phonon that inelastically scatters at the interface absorbs or emits a metal phonon.

  6. Thermal conductivity in nanocrystalline-SiC/C superlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Habermehl, S.; Serrano, J. R.

    2015-11-17

    We reported the formation of thin film superlattices consisting of alternating layers of nitrogen-doped SiC (SiC:N) and C. Periodically terminating the SiC:N surface with a graphitic C boundary layer and controlling the SiC:N/C thickness ratio yield nanocrystalline SiC grains ranging in size from 365 to 23 nm. Frequency domain thermo-reflectance is employed to determine the thermal conductivity, which is found to vary from 35.5 W m-1 K-1 for monolithic undoped α-SiC films to 1.6 W m-1 K-1 for a SiC:N/C superlattice with a 47 nm period and a SiC:N/C thickness ratio of 11. A series conductance model is employed tomore » explain the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the superlatticestructure. Our results indicate that the thermal conductivity is more dependent on the SiC:N/C thickness ratio than the SiC:N grain size, indicative of strong boundary layerphonon scattering.« less

  7. Controlling thermal gelation properties of novel Tetronic RTM hydrogel-based tissue adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejos, Martin Fernando

    The advancement in laparoscopic and robotic surgeries is calling for innovation in wound closure methods where the classical mechanical ligatures are proving very challenging due to reduction in surgical spaces, even for seasoned surgeons. Tissue adhesives have been investigated as an alternative and/or adjuvant method to address some of these unmet needs. Previously in our lab, Sanders and co-workers developed a successful synthetic adhesive by modifying Tetronic 1107 to incorporate acrylate (ACR) for chemical crosslinking and N-hydroxisuccinimide (NHS) to enhance tissue bonding, improving the seminal work done by Cho et al. However, solutions of modified T1107 would undergo reverse thermal gelation below room temperature, imposing a usability limitation since they could gel while being handled, and a functional limitation because if the material gelled to fast it would not make a good contact with the microstructure of the underlying tissues. Therefore, the main objective of this master's thesis research is to further improve the performance of these Tetronic-based adhesives by controlling the gelation temperature of these polymeric systems. To control the gelation temperatures of functionalized T1107 blends solutions, the acrylated version of a lower molecular Tetronic, T304, was incorporated into these polymers blends. This strategy proved to be effective to control de gelation temperature of the Tetronic-based adhesives, and also extended their degradation times. However, increased amounts of T304-ACR were correlated with lower adhesive strengths. With the right blend ratio, these three properties can be balanced to yield a mechanically strong adhesive, with a useful degradation profile and controlled gelation temperature.

  8. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has already added to the existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The object of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS.

  9. Measurement of interfacial thermal conductance in Lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitonde, Aalok; Nimmagadda, Amulya; Marconnet, Amy

    2017-03-01

    Increasing usage and recent accidents due to Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries exploding or catching on fire has inspired research on the thermal management of these batteries. In cylindrical 18650 cells, heat generated during the charge/discharge cycle must dissipate to the surrounding through its metallic case due to the poor thermal conductivity of the jelly roll, which is spirally wound with many interfaces between electrodes and the polymeric separator. This work develops a technique to measure the thermal resistance across the case-separator interface, which ultimately limits heat transfer out of the jelly roll. Commercial 18650 batteries are discharged and opened using a battery disassembly tool, and the 25 μm thick separator and the 200 μm thick metallic case are harvested to make samples. A miniaturized version of the conventional reference bar method

  10. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  11. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  12. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  13. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  14. Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance in harmonic chains with nonlinear system-bath coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Li, Hui-Min; Ding, Ze-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance were realized in harmonic chains in this work. We used the generalized Caldeira-Leggett model to study the heat flow. In contrast to most previous studies considering only the linear system-bath coupling, we considered the nonlinear system-bath coupling based on recent experiment [Eichler et al., Nat. Nanotech. 6, 339 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.71]. When the linear coupling constant is weak, the multiphonon processes induced by the nonlinear coupling allow more phonons transport across the system-bath interface and hence the heat current is enhanced. Consequently, thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance are achieved when the nonlinear couplings are asymmetric. However, when the linear coupling constant is strong, the umklapp processes dominate the multiphonon processes. Nonlinear coupling suppresses the heat current. Thermal rectification is also achieved. But the direction of rectification is reversed compared to the results of weak linear coupling constant.

  15. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Ronewicz, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil) with manufacturer's data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  16. Variable thermal properties and thermal relaxation time in hyperbolic heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions were obtained for a finite slab with an applied surface heat flux at one boundary using both the hyperbolic (MacCormack's method) and parabolic (Crank-Nicolson method) heat conduction equations. The effects on the temperature distributions of varying density, specific heat, and thermal relaxation time were calculated. Each of these properties had an effect on the thermal front velocity (in the hyperbolic solution) as well as the temperatures in the medium. In the hyperbolic solutions, as the density or specific heat decreased with temperature, both the temperatures within the medium and the thermal front velocity increased. The value taken for the thermal relaxation time was found to determine the 'hyperbolicity' of the heat conduction model. The use of a time dependent relaxation time allowed for solutions where the thermal energy propagated as a high temperature wave initially, but approached a diffusion process more rapidly than was possible with a constant large relaxation time.

  17. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  18. Mapping thermal conductivity using bimetallic atomic force microscopy probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ranjan; McCarthy, Brendan; Sarid, Dror; Guven, Ibrahim

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate a technique to measure local thermal conductivity of materials using an atomic force microscope equipped with a commercial silicon cantilever coated by a thin metal film. This bimaterial cantilever acts as a bimetallic strip that bends when heated by a focused laser beam. The bending is apparent as a topographic distortion, which varies with the amount of heat flowing from the cantilever's tip into the sample. By comparing the surface topographies of the sample, as measured with heated and unheated cantilevers, the local thermal conductivity of the tip-sample contact area can be determined. Experimental results with this system are presented and found to be in good agreement with a finite element model.

  19. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals.

  20. Lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudites: An anharmonicity perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiyuan Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian

    2014-10-28

    We report a phenomenological model to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudite antimonides. The model needs no phonon resonant scattering terms. Instead, we assume that umklapp processes dominate the high-temperature phonon scattering. In order to represent the anharmonicity introduced by the filling atom, we introduce a Gaussian term into the relaxation time of the umklapp process. The developed model agrees remarkably well with the experimental results of RE{sub f}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and RE{sub f}Fe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (RE = Yb, Ba, and Ca) alloys. To further test the validity of our model, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of nanostructured or multi-filled skutterudites. The calculation results are also in good agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the developed anharmonicity model.

  1. Thermal conductivity determination of cometary and asteroid material analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaszkiewicz, M.; Seweryn, K.; Wawrzaszek, R.

    Measurements of physical properties of surface and subsurface layers of planetary bodies often provide important information about the structure of the medium and processes that occur there Thermal properties of cometary nuclues subsurface material are crucial in determining the heat and gas transport Similarly asteroid s regolith is a buffering zone in heat transfer from to surface to from interior of a body There are space experiments planned to perform temperature and thermal conductivity measurements on a comet ROSETTA and one can easily foresee such measurements carried out by future robotic missions on Mars planetary satellites and asteroids In the paper we present the results of measurements carried out with a new type of thermal sensors The elementary cylindrical sensor is made of platinum wire resistance thermometer and isotan wire heating element that can operate independently By choosing these materials the problems of temperature measurement calibration and constant heating power are resolved We confront the results of measurements made for a number of sensors combined into a long cylinder in delrin basalt ice-dust mixture comet analogue and regolith-like material with models and show that agreement is very good Therefore we can recommend both the sensors and the method of data interpretation for the thermal conductivity determination as very useful tools in future space missions and in laboratory experiments on cometary and asteroid material analogues

  2. Prediction of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Powder Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lingxue; Park, Jiho; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    The powder insulation method is widely used in structural and cryogenic systems such as transportation and storage tanks of cryogenic fluids. The powder insulation layer is constructed by small particle powder with light weight and some residual gas with high porosity. So far, many experiments have been carried out to test the thermal performance of various kinds of powder, including expanded perlite, glass microspheres, expanded polystyrene (EPS). However, it is still difficult to predict the thermal performance of powder insulation by calculation due to the complicated geometries, including various particle shapes, wide powder diameter distribution, and various pore sizes. In this paper, the effective thermal conductivity of powder insulation has been predicted based on an effective thermal conductivity calculationmodel of porous packed beds. The calculation methodology was applied to the insulation system with expanded perlite, glass microspheres and EPS beads at cryogenic temperature and various vacuum pressures. The calculation results were compared with previous experimental data. Moreover, additional tests were carried out at cryogenic temperature in this research. The fitting equations of the deformation factor of the area-contact model are presented for various powders. The calculation results show agood agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Swift heavy ion irradiation reduces porous silicon thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, M.; Canut, B.; Newby, P.; Frechette, L.; Chapuis, P. O.; Bluet, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    While the electrical conductivity of semiconductors can be easily changed over order of magnitudes (8 in silicon) by playing on the doping, the thermal conductivity (TC) control is a challenging issue. Nevertheless, numerous applications require TC control in Si down to 1 W m-1 K-1. Among them, there are thermal insulation requirements in MEMS, thermal management issues in 3D packaging or TC reduction for thermoelectric applications. Towards this end, the formation of nanoporous Si by electrochemical anodisation is efficient. Nevertheless, in this case the material is too fragile for MEMS application or even to withstand CMOS technological processes. In this work, we show that ion irradiation in the electronic regime is efficient for reducing TC in meso-porous Si (PSi), which is more mechanically robust than the nanoporous PSi. We have studied three different mass to energy ratios (238U at 110 MeV and 130Xe at 91 MeV and 29 MeV) with fluences ranging from 1012 cm-2 to 7 × 1013 cm-2. The sample properties, after irradiation, have been measured by infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The TC has been measured using scanning thermal microscopy. Although, bulk Si is insensitive to ion interaction in the electronic regime, we have observed the amorphisation of the PSi resulting in a TC reduction even for the low dose and energy. For the highest irradiation dose a very important reduction factor of four was obtained.

  4. Substrate-induced reduction of graphene thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koniakhin, S. V.; Utesov, O. I.; Terterov, I. N.; Nalitov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a theory of heat conductivity in supported graphene, accounting for coherent phonon scattering on disorder induced by an amorphous substrate. We derive spectra for in-plane and out-of-plane phonons in the framework of Green's function approach. The energy parameters of the theory are obtained using molecular dynamics simulations for graphene on a SiO2 substrate. The heat conductivity is calculated by the Boltzmann transport equation. We find that the interaction with the substrate drastically reduces the phonon lifetime and completely suppresses the contribution of flexural (ZA) phonons to the heat conductivity. As a result, the total heat conductivity is reduced by several times, which matches with the tendency observed in the available experimental data. The considered effect is important for managing the thermal properties of graphene-based electronic devices.

  5. Pure-oxygen radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Steady state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen are calculated with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich SNRs. Models with electron thermal conduction differ significantly from models in which conduction is neglected. Conduction reduces postshock electron temperatures by a factor of 7-10 and flattens temperature gradients. The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 km/s. The electron temperature in the O III forbidden line formation region is 30,000 K, in agreement with the 20,000 K derived from observations. All models with conduction have extensive warm (T above 4000 K) photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical O I line strengths.

  6. Reference Correlations of the Thermal Conductivity of Ethene and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Koutian, A.; Huber, M. L.; Perkins, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    New, wide-range reference equations for the thermal conductivity of ethene and propene as a function of temperature and density are presented. The equations are based in part upon a body of experimental data that has been critically assessed for internal consistency and for agreement with theory whenever possible. For ethene, we estimate the uncertainty (at the 95% confidence level) for the thermal conductivity from 110 K to 520 K at pressures up to 200 MPa to be 5% for the compressed liquid and supercritical phases. For the low-pressure gas phase (to 0.1 MPa) over the temperature range 270 K to 680 K, the estimated uncertainty is 4%. The correlation is valid from 110 K to 680 K and up to 200 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 300 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. In the case of propene, data are much more limited. We estimate the uncertainty for the thermal conductivity of propene from 180 K to 625 K at pressures up to 50 MPa to be 5% for the gas, liquid, and supercritical phases. The correlation is valid from 180 K to 625 K and up to 50 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 100 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. For both fluids, uncertainties in the critical region are much larger, since the thermal conductivity approaches infinity at the critical point and is very sensitive to small changes in density. PMID:27818536

  7. Electronic thermal conductivity in a superconducting vortex state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, H.; Miranovic, P.; Ichioka, M.; Machida, K.

    2007-10-01

    The longitudinal component of the electronic thermal conductivity κxx in a superconducting vortex state is calculated as a function of magnetic field B. Calculations are performed by taking account of the spatial dependence of normal Green's function g, which was neglected in the previous studies using the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt method. We discuss the possibility of using κxx(B) as a probe of the pair potential symmetry.

  8. Reference Correlations of the Thermal Conductivity of Ethene and Propene.

    PubMed

    Assael, M J; Koutian, A; Huber, M L; Perkins, R A

    2016-09-01

    New, wide-range reference equations for the thermal conductivity of ethene and propene as a function of temperature and density are presented. The equations are based in part upon a body of experimental data that has been critically assessed for internal consistency and for agreement with theory whenever possible. For ethene, we estimate the uncertainty (at the 95% confidence level) for the thermal conductivity from 110 K to 520 K at pressures up to 200 MPa to be 5% for the compressed liquid and supercritical phases. For the low-pressure gas phase (to 0.1 MPa) over the temperature range 270 K to 680 K, the estimated uncertainty is 4%. The correlation is valid from 110 K to 680 K and up to 200 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 300 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. In the case of propene, data are much more limited. We estimate the uncertainty for the thermal conductivity of propene from 180 K to 625 K at pressures up to 50 MPa to be 5% for the gas, liquid, and supercritical phases. The correlation is valid from 180 K to 625 K and up to 50 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 100 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. For both fluids, uncertainties in the critical region are much larger, since the thermal conductivity approaches infinity at the critical point and is very sensitive to small changes in density.

  9. Thermal Conductances Of Cold Metal Contacts Below 6 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Scherkenbach, F. E.; Spivak, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    Conductances vary with temperature according to simple power law. Report presents data on thermal conductances of pure aluminum and stainless-steel 304 contact pairs. Data cover contacts with surface finishes of 0.1- to 1.6-micrometer root-mean-square roughness at temperatures from 1.6 to 6.0 K, under applied contact forces up to 670 N. Such data needed for optimal design of bolted joints in cryogenic instruments, particularly infrared instruments and focal-plane sensors.

  10. Device and method for measuring thermal conductivity of thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R. (Inventor); Subramanian, Chelakara (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor); Sealey, Bradley S. (Inventor); Burkett, Jr., Cecil G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device and method are provided for measuring the thermal conductivity of rigid or flexible, homogeneous or heterogeneous, thin films between 50 .mu.m and 150 .mu.m thick with relative standard deviations of less than five percent. The specimen is sandwiched between like material, highly conductive upper and lower slabs. Each slab is instrumented with six thermocouples embedded within the slab and flush with their corresponding surfaces. A heat source heats the lower slab and a heat sink cools the upper slab. The heat sink also provides sufficient contact pressure onto the specimen. Testing is performed within a vacuum environment (bell-jar) between 10.sup.-3 to 10.sup.-6 Torr. An anti-radiant shield on the interior surface of the bell-jar is used to avoid radiation heat losses. Insulation is placed adjacent to the heat source and adjacent to the heat sink to prevent conduction losses. A temperature controlled water circulator circulates water from a constant temperature bath through the heat sink. Fourier's one-dimensional law of heat conduction is the governing equation. Data, including temperatures, are measured with a multi-channel data acquisition system. On-line computer processing is used for thermal conductivity calculations.

  11. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  12. Lattice thermal conductivity of borophene from first principle calculation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Huaping; Cao, Wei; Ouyang, Tao; Guo, Sumei; He, Chaoyu; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    The phonon transport property is a foundation of understanding a material and predicting the potential application in mirco/nano devices. In this paper, the thermal transport property of borophene is investigated by combining first-principle calculations and phonon Boltzmann transport equation. At room temperature, the lattice thermal conductivity of borophene is found to be about 14.34 W/mK (error is about 3%), which is much smaller than that of graphene (about 3500 W/mK). The contributions from different phonon modes are qualified, and some phonon modes with high frequency abnormally play critical role on the thermal transport of borophene. This is quite different from the traditional understanding that thermal transport is usually largely contributed by the low frequency acoustic phonon modes for most of suspended 2D materials. Detailed analysis further reveals that the scattering between the out-of-plane flexural acoustic mode (FA) and other modes likes FA + FA/TA/LA/OP ↔ TA/LA/OP is the predominant phonon process channel. Finally the vibrational characteristic of some typical phonon modes and mean free path distribution of different phonon modes are also presented in this work. Our results shed light on the fundamental phonon transport properties of borophene, and foreshow the potential application for thermal management community. PMID:28374853

  13. Lattice thermal conductivity of multi-component alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, Magdalena; Béland, Laurent K.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stoller, Roger E.; Caro, Alfredo

    2015-06-12

    High entropy alloys (HEA) have unique properties including the potential to be radiation tolerant. These materials with extreme disorder could resist damage because disorder, stabilized by entropy, is the equilibrium thermodynamic state. Disorder also reduces electron and phonon conductivity keeping the damage energy longer at the deposition locations, eventually favoring defect recombination. In the short time-scales related to thermal spikes induced by collision cascades, phonons become the relevant energy carrier. In this paper, we perform a systematic study of phonon thermal conductivity in multiple component solid solutions represented by Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials. We explore the conditions that minimize phonon mean free path via extreme alloy complexity, by varying the composition and the elements (differing in mass, atomic radii, and cohesive energy). We show that alloy complexity can be tailored to modify the scattering mechanisms that control energy transport in the phonon subsystem. Finally, our analysis provides a qualitative guidance for the selection criteria used in the design of HEA alloys with low phonon thermal conductivity.

  14. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Schaef, Herbert T.; Shutthanandan, V.; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F.; Nune, Satish K.

    2016-06-15

    Metal organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. MOHCs utilize the MOF properties to improve the thermo-physical properties of base fluids. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC containing MIL-101(Cr)/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nano MIL-101(Cr) and the properties depend on the amount of GO added. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) confirmed the preserved crystallinity of MIL-101(Cr) in all nanocomposites with the absence of any unreacted GO. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the presence of near spherical MIL-101(Cr) nanoparticles in the range of 40-80 nm in diameter. MOHC nanofluids containing MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity (by approxi-mately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nano MIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of base fluid (methanol) was enhanced by about 20 %. The enhancement in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to graphene oxide functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model.

  15. Magnetized thermal conduction fronts. [between hot and cold astrophysical plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balbus, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of planar thermal conduction fronts in the presence of a dynamically weak, but otherwise self-consistent, magnetic field is considered. The field is assumed to be connected and untangled. In the diffusion limit for the thermal conductivity, these fronts exhibit self-similar behavior, even in the presence of a field. The role of the field is restricted to channeling the heat flux along its lines of force, and it enters into the problem as a dimensionless angle variable. 'Combing' (or opening) of insulating field lines by the evaporative flow is explicitly demonstrated. Unless the field is nearly perpendicular to the front normal in the hot gas, insulating effects are not profound. Self-similarity breaks down if the front becomes saturated, and under certain conditions magnetized saturated conduction fronts cannot propagate: the solution characteristics of the wave equation form caustics. The physical resolution is the advent of two-fluid (nonlocal) heating. Such Coulomb-heated fronts are expected to be relatively rare in typical astrophysical systems. The large-scale effects of a magnetic field on cloud evaporation in the interstellar medium are briefly discussed, and it is suggested that these fields preclude the presence of time-independent evaporative solutions. Thermal interfaces may then continue to evolve until radiative cooling halts their development; large tracts of warm 10,000 K gas may result.

  16. Thermal conductivity measurement of fluids using the 3ω method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Min

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a procedure to measure the thermal conductivity of dielectric liquids and gases using a steady state ac hot wire method in which a thin metal wire is used as a heater and thermometer. The temperature response of the heater wire was measured in a four-probe geometry using an electronic circuit developed for the conventional 3ω method. The measurements have been performed in the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 kHz. We devised a method to transform the raw data into well-known linear logarithmic frequency dependence plot. After the transformation, an optimal frequency region of the thermal conductivity data was clearly determined as has been done with the data from thin metal film heater. The method was tested with air, water, ethanol, mono-, and tetraethylene glycol. Volumetric heat capacity of the fluids was also calculated with uncertainty and the capability as a probe for metal-liquid thermal boundary conductance was discussed.

  17. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Liquids at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Degiovanni, A.; Demeurie, F.; Meulemans, J.; Lombard, P.

    2012-11-01

    The goal purchased in this paper is to implement a pulse method to measure the thermal conductivity of liquid silica glass above 1200°C until 1600°C. A heat flux stimulation controlled in energy and in time is generated on the front face of an experimental cell. The temperature rise is measured on the rear face of this cell face by using a fast cooled infrared camera. The choice of the measurement cell geometry is fundamental to be able to estimate at the same time the thermal diffusivity and the specific heat of the liquid by an inverse technique. The parameters estimation problem takes into account the optimization of the cell wall thickness. The theoretical model used for the inversion takes into account the coupled heat transfer modes (conduction, convection and radiation) that can occur during the experiment, particularly the thermal conductive short-cut through metallic lateral walls of the cell and radiative transfer within the semi-transparent and participating medium. First measurements are performed on a cell filled with water at ambient temperature in order to validate the parameters estimation procedure.

  18. Thermal conductivity of color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, Matt; Chao Jingyi; Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    We compute the thermal conductivity of color-flavor-locked (CFL) quark matter. At temperatures below the scale set by the gap in the quark spectrum, transport properties are determined by collective modes. In this work we focus on the contribution from the lightest modes, the superfluid phonon and the massive neutral kaon. The calculation is done in the framework of kinetic theory, using variational solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation. We find that the thermal conductivity owing to phonons is kappa{sup (P)}approx1.04x10{sup 26} mu{sub 500}{sup 8}DELTA{sub 50}{sup -6} erg cm{sup -1} s{sup -1} K{sup -1} and the contribution of kaons is kappa{sup (K)}approx2.81x10{sup 21} f{sub p}i{sub ,100}{sup 4}T{sub MeV}{sup 1/2}m{sub 10}{sup -5/2} erg cm{sup -1} s{sup -1} K{sup -1}. These values are smaller than previous estimates but still much larger than (in the case of phonons) or similar to (for kaons) the corresponding values in nuclear matter. From the phonon thermal conductivity we estimate that a CFL quark matter core of a compact star becomes isothermal on a time scale of a few seconds.

  19. Lattice thermal conductivity of multi-component alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Caro, Magdalena; Béland, Laurent K.; Samolyuk, German D.; ...

    2015-06-12

    High entropy alloys (HEA) have unique properties including the potential to be radiation tolerant. These materials with extreme disorder could resist damage because disorder, stabilized by entropy, is the equilibrium thermodynamic state. Disorder also reduces electron and phonon conductivity keeping the damage energy longer at the deposition locations, eventually favoring defect recombination. In the short time-scales related to thermal spikes induced by collision cascades, phonons become the relevant energy carrier. In this paper, we perform a systematic study of phonon thermal conductivity in multiple component solid solutions represented by Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials. We explore the conditions that minimize phonon meanmore » free path via extreme alloy complexity, by varying the composition and the elements (differing in mass, atomic radii, and cohesive energy). We show that alloy complexity can be tailored to modify the scattering mechanisms that control energy transport in the phonon subsystem. Finally, our analysis provides a qualitative guidance for the selection criteria used in the design of HEA alloys with low phonon thermal conductivity.« less

  20. Origin of low thermal conductivity in SnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yu; Chang, Cheng; Pei, Yanling; Wu, Di; Peng, Kunling; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Gong, Shengkai; He, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zeng, Zhi; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2016-09-01

    We provide direct evidence to understand the origin of low thermal conductivity of SnSe using elastic measurements. Compared to state-of-the-art lead chalcogenides Pb Q (Q =Te , Se, S), SnSe exhibits low values of sound velocity (˜1420 m /s ) , Young's modulus (E ˜27.7 GPa ) , and shear modulus (G ˜9.6 GPa ) , which are ascribed to the extremely weak Sn-Se atomic interactions (or bonds between layers); meanwhile, the deduced average Grüneisen parameter γ of SnSe is as large as ˜3.13, originating from the strong anharmonicity of the bonding arrangement. The calculated phonon mean free path (l ˜ 0.84 nm) at 300 K is comparable to the lattice parameters of SnSe, indicating little room is left for further reduction of the thermal conductivity through introducing nanoscale microstructures and microscale grain boundaries. The low elastic properties indicate that the weak chemical bonding stiffness of SnSe generally causes phonon modes softening which eventually slows down phonon propagation. This work provides insightful data to understand the low lattice thermal conductivity of SnSe.