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Sample records for adhs corridors making

  1. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... stored in the posterior pituitary gland at the base of the brain. ADH helps regulate water balance ... of ADH (vasopressin). Several blood and urine osmolality measurements are performed at timed intervals before and after ...

  2. Ectopic ADH secretion

    MedlinePlus

    ... ADH. Often, there are no symptoms from a low sodium level. When symptoms do occur, they may include ... Lab tests that can confirm and help diagnose low sodium include: Comprehensive metabolic panel (includes blood sodium) Osmolality ...

  3. Ethanol-induced alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) potentiates pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence.

  4. A distinct type of alcohol dehydrogenase, adh4+, complements ethanol fermentation in an adh1-deficient strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masao; Tohda, Hideki; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Giga-Hama, Yuko

    2004-03-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, only one alcohol dehydrogenase gene, adh1(+), has been identified. To elucidate the influence of adh1(+) on ethanol fermentation, we constructed the adh1 null strain (delta adh1). The delta adh1 cells still produced ethanol and grew fermentatively as the wild-type cells. Both DNA microarray and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that this ethanol production is caused by the enhanced expression of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH4-like gene product (SPAC5H10.06C named adh4(+)). Since the strain lacking both adh1 and adh4 genes (delta adh1 delta adh4) showed non-fermentative retarded growth, only these two ADHs produce ethanol for fermentative growth. This is the first observation that a S. cerevisiae ADH4-like alcohol dehydrogenase functions in yeast ethanol fermentation.

  5. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  6. ADH5 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    ADH5 is a member of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. This protein forms a homodimer. ADH5 is ineffective in oxidizing ethanol, but exhibits high activity for oxidation of long-chain primary alcohols and for oxidation of S-hydroxymethyl-glutathione, a spontaneous adduct between formaldehyde and glutathione. There are several non-transcribed pseuodogenes related to this gene.

  7. Characterization of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh and plasmid transduction in Lactobacillus acidophilus ADH.

    PubMed

    Raya, R R; Kleeman, E G; Luchansky, J B; Klaenhammer, T R

    1989-09-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus ADH is lysogenic and harbors an inducible prophage, phi adh. Bacteriophage were detected in cell lysates induced by treatment with mitomycin C or UV light. Electron microscopy of lysates revealed phage particles with a hexagonal head (62 nm) and a long, noncontractile, flexible tail (398 nm) ending in at last five short fibers. Phage phi adh was classified within Bradley's B1 phage group and the Siphoviridae family. The phi adh genome is a linear double-stranded DNA molecule of 41.7 kilobase pairs with cohesive ends: a physical map of the phi adh genome was constructed. A prophage-cured derivative of strain ADH, designated NCK102, was isolated from cells that survived UV exposure. NCK102 did not exhibit mitomycin C-induced lysis, but broth cultures lysed upon addition of phage. Phage phi adh produced clear plaques on NCK102 in media containing 10 mM CaCl2 at pH values between 5.2 and 5.5. A relysogenized derivative (NCK103) of NCK102 was isolated that exhibited mitomycin C-induced lysis and superinfection immunity to phage phi adh. Hybridization experiments showed that the phi adh genome was present in the ADH and NCK103 chromosomes, but absent in NCK102. These results demonstrated classic lytic and lysogenic cycles of replication for the temperate phage phi adh induced from L. acidophilus ADH. Phage phi adh also mediates transduction of plasmid DNA. Transductants of strain ADH containing pC194, pGK12, pGB354, and pVA797 were detected at frequencies in the range of 3.6 x 10(-8) to 8.3 x 10(-10) per PFU. Rearrangements or deletions were not detected in these plasmids as a consequence of transduction. This is the first description of plasmid transduction in the genus Lactobacillus.

  8. Replication Study of ESCC Susceptibility Genetic Polymorphisms Locating in the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 Cluster Identified by GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoling; Pan, Wenting; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Changchun; Liu, Chao; Gao, Jia; Yang, Ming; Mao, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    China was one of the countries with highest esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) incidence and mortality worldwide. Alcohol drinking has been identified as a major environmental risk-factor related to ESCC. The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family are major enzymes involved in the alcohol-metabolizing pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and ADH1C. Interestingly, ADH1B and ADH1C genes locate tandemly with ADH7 in a genomic segment as a gene cluster, and are all polymorphic. Several ESCC susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster have been identified previously through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). In the study, we examined the association between five ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs (rs1042026, rs17033, rs1614972, rs1789903 and rs17028973) and risk of developing ESCC. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Our data demonstrated that these ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs confer susceptibility to ESCC in these two case-control sets, which were consistent to results of the previous GWAS. PMID:24722735

  9. Replication study of ESCC susceptibility genetic polymorphisms locating in the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster identified by GWAS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiwen; Wei, Jinyu; Xu, Xiaoling; Pan, Wenting; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Changchun; Liu, Chao; Gao, Jia; Yang, Ming; Mao, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    China was one of the countries with highest esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) incidence and mortality worldwide. Alcohol drinking has been identified as a major environmental risk-factor related to ESCC. The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family are major enzymes involved in the alcohol-metabolizing pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and ADH1C. Interestingly, ADH1B and ADH1C genes locate tandemly with ADH7 in a genomic segment as a gene cluster, and are all polymorphic. Several ESCC susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster have been identified previously through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). In the study, we examined the association between five ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs (rs1042026, rs17033, rs1614972, rs1789903 and rs17028973) and risk of developing ESCC. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Our data demonstrated that these ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs confer susceptibility to ESCC in these two case-control sets, which were consistent to results of the previous GWAS.

  10. Cloning and functional analysis of adhS gene encoding quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase subunit III from Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108.

    PubMed

    Masud, Uraiwan; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Theeragool, Gunjana

    2010-03-31

    The adhS gene which encodes the smallest subunit, subunit III, of quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH) from Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108 has been cloned and characterized. The role of this subunit on the function of PQQ-ADH was investigated by construction of adhS gene disruptant and mutants. The adhS gene disruptant completely lost its PQQ-ADH activity and acetate-producing ability but retained acetic acid toleration. In contrast, this disruptant grew well, even better than the wild type, in the ethanol containing medium even though its PQQ-ADH activity and ethanol oxidizing ability was completely lost, while NAD(+)-dependent ADH (NAD(+)-ADH) was induced. Heme staining and immunoblot analysis of both membrane and soluble fractions with anti-ADH subunit III suggested that ethanol did not affect the adhS gene expression but induced PQQ-ADH activity. Over-expressed adhS did not enhance acetic acid production in both the wild type and the adhS disruptant. In addition, deletion analysis of upstream region of adhS gene suggested that its tentative promoter(s) might be located at around 118-268 bp upstream from an initiation codon. Random mutagenesis of adhS gene revealed that complete loss of PQQ-ADH activity and ethanol oxidizing ability were observed in the mutants' lack of the 140 and 73 amino acid residues at the C-terminal, whereas the lack of 22 amino acid residues at the C-terminal affected neither the PQQ-ADH activity nor ethanol oxidizing ability. In addition, some amino acid substitutions such as Leu18Gln, Ala26Val, Val36Ile, Val54Ile, Gly55Asp, Val70Ala and Val107Ala did not show any affect on PQQ-ADH activity and ethanol oxidizing ability. Interestingly, alteration of Thr104Lys led to a complete loss of ethanol oxidizing ability. However, point mutation at the possible promoter region also exhibited low PQQ-ADH activity and ethanol oxidizing ability. This result suggests that 104Thr might be involved in molecular coupling with subunit I in order

  11. Characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH12) from Haloarcula marismortui, an extreme halophile from the Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Timpson, Leanne M; Alsafadi, Diya; Mac Donnchadha, Cillín; Liddell, Susan; Sharkey, Michael A; Paradisi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Haloarchaeal alcohol dehydrogenases are of increasing interest as biocatalysts in the field of white biotechnology. In this study, the gene adh12 from the extreme halophile Haloarcula marismortui (HmADH12), encoding a 384 residue protein, was cloned into two vectors: pRV1 and pTA963. The resulting constructs were used to transform host strains Haloferax volcanii (DS70) and (H1209), respectively. Overexpressed His-tagged recombinant HmADH12 was purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). The His-tagged protein was visualized by SDS-PAGE, with a subunit molecular mass of 41.6 kDa, and its identity was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Purified HmADH12 catalyzed the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes and ketones, being optimally active in the presence of 2 M KCl. It was thermoactive, with maximum activity registered at 60°C. The NADP(H) dependent enzyme was haloalkaliphilic for the oxidative reaction with optimum activity at pH 10.0. It favored a slightly acidic pH of 6.0 for catalysis of the reductive reaction. HmADH12 was significantly more tolerant than mesophilic ADHs to selected organic solvents, making it a much more suitable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  12. Interior, underground corridor going to building 500 from the corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, underground corridor going to building 500 from the corridor connecting buildings 511 and 515. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. A New View of Alcohol Metabolism and Alcoholism—Role of the High-Km Class III Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH3)

    PubMed Central

    Haseba, Takeshi; Ohno, Youkichi

    2010-01-01

    intake increases. Furthermore, ADH3 is induced in damaged cells that have greater hydrophobicity, whereas ADH1 activity is lower when there is severe liver disease. These data suggest that chronic binge drinking and the resulting liver disease shifts the key enzyme in alcohol metabolism from low-Km ADH1 to high-Km ADH3, thereby reducing the rate of alcohol metabolism. The interdependent increase in the ADH3/ADH1 activity ratio and AUC may be a factor in the development of alcoholic liver disease. However, the adaptive increase in ADH3 sustains alcohol metabolism, even in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, which makes it possible for them to drink themselves to death. Thus, the regulation of ADH3 activity may be important in preventing alcoholism development. PMID:20617019

  14. Functional relevance of human adh polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, C J; Fukunaga, T; Sarkola, T; Chen, W J; Chen, C C; Ju, J M; Cheng, A T; Yamamoto, H; Kohlenberg-Müller, K; Kimura, M; Murayama, M; Matsushita, S; Kashima, H; Higuchi, S; Carr, L; Viljoen, D; Brooke, L; Stewart, T; Foroud, T; Su, J; Li, T K; Whitfield, J B

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chairs were C. J. Peter Eriksson and Tatsushige Fukunaga. The presentations were (1) 4-Methylpyrazole as a tool in the investigation of the role of ADH in the actions of alcohol in humans, by Taisto Sarkola and C. J. Peter Eriksson; (2) ADH2 polymorphism and flushing in Asian populations, by Wei J. Chen, C. C. Chen, J. M. Ju, and Andrew T. A. Cheng; (3) Role of ADH3 genotypes in the acute effects of alcohol in a Finnish population, by Hidetaka Yamamoto, Kathrin Kohlenberg-Müller, and C. J. Peter Eriksson; (4) Clinical characteristics and disease course of alcoholics with different ADH2 genotypes, by Mitsuru Kimura, Masanobu Murayama, Sachio Matsushita, Haruo Kashima, and Susumu Higuchi; (5) ADH2 polymorphism, alcohol drinking, and birth defects, by Lucinda Carr, D. Viljoen, L. Brooke, T. Stewart, T. Foroud, J. Su, and Ting-Kai Li; and (6) ADH genotypes and alcohol use in Europeans, by John B. Whitfield.

  15. 78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Rail Study (Study) also includes preparation of a service development plan for the corridor for each of... agency in the development of the EIS. The Service Level EIS will evaluate a reasonable range of corridor alternatives and make decisions regarding the preferred corridor, location of train service termini,...

  16. Adh1 and Adh1/4 knockout mice as possible rodent models for presymptomatic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anvret, Anna; Ran, Caroline; Westerlund, Marie; Gellhaar, Sandra; Lindqvist, Eva; Pernold, Karin; Lundströmer, Karin; Duester, Gregg; Felder, Michael R; Galter, Dagmar; Belin, Andrea Carmine

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) catalyze the reversible metabolism of many types of alcohols and aldehydes to prevent the possible toxic accumulation of these compounds. ADHs are of interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) since these compounds can be harmful to dopamine (DA) neurons. Genetic variants in ADH1C and ADH4 have been found to associate with PD and lack of Adh4 gene activity in a mouse model has recently been reported to induce changes in the DA system. Adh1 knockout (Adh1-/-) and Adh1/4 double knockout (Adh1/4-/-) mice were investigated for possible changes in DA system related activity, biochemical parameters and olfactory function compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Locomotor activity was tested at ∼7 (adult) and >15 months of age to mimic the late onset of PD. Adh1-/- and Adh1/4-/- mice displayed a significantly higher spontaneous locomotor activity than WT littermates. Both apomorphine and d-amphetamine increased total distance activity in Adh1-/- mice at both age intervals and in Adh1/4-/- mice at 7 months of age compared to WT mice. No significant changes were found regarding olfactory function, however biochemical data showed decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios in the olfactory bulb and decreased homovanillic acid (HVA)/DA ratios in the olfactory bulb, frontal cortex and striatum of Adh1/4-/- mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lack of Adh1 alone or Adh1 and Adh4 together lead to changes in DA system related behavior, and that these knockout mice might be possible rodent models to study presymptomatic PD.

  17. Rare ADH Variant Constellations are Specific for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Zhang, Heping; Malison, Robert T.; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Fei; Lu, Lingeng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoping; Krystal, John H.; Zhang, Fengyu; Deng, Hong-Wen; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Some of the well-known functional alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene variants (e.g. ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3 and ADH1C*2) that significantly affect the risk of alcohol dependence are rare variants in most populations. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between rare ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.05] and alcohol dependence, with several other neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders as reference. Methods: A total of 49,358 subjects in 22 independent cohorts with 11 different neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders were analyzed, including 3 cohorts with alcohol dependence. The entire ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5 at Chr4) was imputed in all samples using the same reference panels that included whole-genome sequencing data. We stringently cleaned the phenotype and genotype data to obtain a total of 870 single nucleotide polymorphisms with 0< MAF <0.05 for association analysis. Results: We found that a rare variant constellation across the entire ADH gene cluster was significantly associated with alcohol dependence in European-Americans (Fp1: simulated global P = 0.045), European-Australians (Fp5: global P = 0.027; collapsing: P = 0.038) and African-Americans (Fp5: global P = 0.050; collapsing: P = 0.038), but not with any other neuropsychiatric disease. Association signals in this region came principally from ADH6, ADH7, ADH1B and ADH1C. In particular, a rare ADH6 variant constellation showed a replicable association with alcohol dependence across these three independent cohorts. No individual rare variants were statistically significantly associated with any disease examined after group- and region-wide correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: We conclude that rare ADH variants are specific for alcohol dependence. The ADH gene cluster may harbor a causal variant(s) for alcohol dependence. PMID:23019235

  18. Corridor use by diverse taxa.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Nick, M.; Browne, David, R.; Cunningham, Alan; Danielson, Brent, J.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Sargent, Sarah; Spira, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Haddad, N.M., D.R. Browne, A. Cunningham, B.J. Danielson, D.J. Levey, S. Sargent, and T. Spira. 2003. Corridor use by diverse taxa. Ecology, 84(3):609-615. One of the most popular approaches for maintaining populations and conserving biodiversity in fragmented landscapes is to retain or create corridors that connect otherwise isolated habitat patches. Working in large-scale, experimental landscapes in which open-habitat patches and corridors were created by harvesting pine forest, we showed that corridors direct movements of different types of species, including butterflies, small mammals, and bird dispersed plants, causing higher movement between connected than between unconnected patches. Corridors directed the movement of all 10 species studied, with all corridor effect sizes >68%. However, this corridor effect was significant for five species, not significant for one species, and inconclusive for four species because of small sample sizes. Although we found no evidence that corridors increase emigration from a patch, our results show that movements of disparate taxa with broadly different life histories and functional roles are directed by corridors.

  19. 24. Interior view of entrance corridor looking down east corridor; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Interior view of entrance corridor looking down east corridor; showing unoccupied corner office space and stairs going down to lower floor; center of main section of building on main floor; view to northeast. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Group Administration & Secure Storage Building, 2372 Westover Avenue, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  20. Corridors and some ecological and evolutionary consequences of connectivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John L

    2004-07-01

    Abstract - By connecting disjunct patches, corridors may offset the effects of fragmentation by promoting gene flow and population persistence. However, the ultimate effect of corridors on a focal species may hinge upon two considerations: how corridors may affect ecological interactions that impinge upon that species, and how corridors might affect the fixation of novel alleles that ultimately determine fitness and persistence. Using an experimental landscape, I show that corridor-mediated changes in patch shape change seed predation in connected and unconnected patches, and shift the behavior, abundance, and distribution of seed predators. Rodent seed predators removed more seeds in connected patches, arthropod seed predators removed more seeds in rectangular patches, and avian seed predation did not differ due to patch type. Rodent foraging was greater in the interior of connected patches because changes in patch shape influenced risk perceived by rodents while foraging. Ant communities were also affected by changes in patch shape caused by corridors, rather than corridor effects per se. The distribution and abundance of ants differed among edge-rich areas (corridors and wings), edges, and the patch interior. In rectangular patches, fire ants (Solenopsis spp.) had negative impacts on other ant species. By changing the activity of rodents, and the composition of ant communities, corridors may have important impacts on seeds. Bird-dispersed seeds may benefit from increased dispersal among connected patches, but connected patches also have greater predation risk. Using a simulation model, I demonstrate that gene flow between a stable population and a population that experiences local extinction or a reduction in size (e.g. due to natural or anthropogenic disturbance) can dramatically affect fixation of alleles in the stable population. Alone or in concert, frequent disturbance, high rates of movement, and low habitat quality make it more likely that connectivity

  1. ADH single nucleotide polymorphism associations with alcohol metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Birley, Andrew J.; James, Michael R.; Dickson, Peter A.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously found that variation in alcohol metabolism in Europeans is linked to the chromosome 4q region containing the ADH gene family. We have now typed 103 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across this region to test for allelic associations with variation in blood and breath alcohol concentrations after an alcohol challenge. In vivo alcohol metabolism was modelled with three parameters that identified the absorption and rise of alcohol concentration following ingestion, and the rate of elimination. Alleles of ADH7 SNPs were associated with the early stages of alcohol metabolism, with additional effects in the ADH1A, ADH1B and ADH4 regions. Rate of elimination was associated with SNPs in the intragenic region between ADH7 and ADH1C, and across ADH1C and ADH1B. SNPs affecting alcohol metabolism did not correspond to those reported to affect alcohol dependence or alcohol-related disease. The combined SNP associations with early- and late-stage metabolism only account for approximately 20% of the total genetic variance linked to the ADH region, and most of the variance for in vivo alcohol metabolism linked to this region is yet to be explained. PMID:19193628

  2. Corridors cause differential seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-06-01

    Orrock, John, L., and Ellen I. Damschen. 2005. Corridors cause differential seed predation. Ecol. Apps. 15(3):793-798. Abstract. Corridors that connect disjunct populations are heavily debated in conservation, largely because the effects of corridors have rarely been evaluated by replicated, large-scale studies. Using large-scale experimental landscapes, we found that, in addition to documented positive effects, corridors also have negative impacts on bird-dispersed plants by affecting seed predation, and that overall predation is a function of the seeds primary consumer (rodents or arthropods). Both large-seeded Prunus serotina and small-seeded Rubus allegheniensis experienced greater predation in connected patches. However, P. serotina experienced significantly less seed predation compared to R. allegheniensis in unconnected patches, due to decreased impacts of rodent seed predators on this large-seeded species. Viewed in light of previous evidence that corridors have beneficial impacts by increasing pollination and seed dispersal, this work demonstrates that corridors may have both positive and negative effects for the same plant species at different life stages. Moreover, these effects may differentially affect plant species within the same community: seeds primarily consumed by rodents suffer less predation in unconnected patches. By shifting the impact of rodent and arthropod seed predators, corridors constructed for plant conservation could lead to shifts in the seed bank.

  3. Locus Adh of Drosophila melanogaster under selection for delayed senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Khaustova, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    Dynamics of the Adh activity and frequencies of alleles Adh{sup F} and Adh{sup S} were analyzed under selection for delayed senescence. The experiments were performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Lines Adh{sup S}cn and Adh{sup F}vg and experimental populations cn` and vg`, selected for an increased duration of reproductive period (late oviposition) were used. Analysis of fertility, longevity, viability and resistance to starvation showed that selection for late oviposition resulted in delayed senescence of flies of the experimental populations. Genetic structure of population vg` changed considerably with regard to the Adh locus. This was confirmed by parameters of activity, thermostability, and electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme isolated from flies after 30 generations of selection. Analysis of frequencies of the Adh alleles showed that in both selected populations, which initially had different genetic composition, accumulated allele Adh{sup S}, which encodes the isozyme that is less active but more resistant to inactivation. Genetic mechanism of delayed senescence in Drosophila is assumed to involve selection at vitally important enzyme loci, including Adh. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  4. Opossum alcohol dehydrogenases: Sequences, structures, phylogeny and evolution: evidence for the tandem location of ADH genes on opossum chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S

    2009-03-16

    BLAT (BLAST-Like Alignment Tool) analyses and interrogations of the recently published opossum genome were undertaken using previously reported rat ADH amino acid sequences. Evidence is presented for six opossum ADH genes localized on chromosome 5 and organized in a comparable ADH gene cluster to that reported for human and rat ADH genes. The predicted amino acid sequences and secondary structures for the opossum ADH subunits and the intron-exon boundaries for opossum ADH genes showed a high degree of similarity with other mammalian ADHs, and four opossum ADH classes were identified, namely ADH1, ADH3, ADH6 and ADH4 (for which three genes were observed: ADH4A, ADH4B and ADH4C). Previous biochemical analyses of opossum ADHs have reported the tissue distribution and properties for these enzymes: ADH1, the major liver enzyme; ADH3, widely distributed in opossum tissues with similar kinetic properties to mammalian class 3 ADHs; and ADH4, for which several forms were localized in extrahepatic tissues, especially in the digestive system and in the eye. These ADHs are likely to perform similar functions to those reported for other mammalian ADHs in the metabolism of ingested and endogenous alcohols and aldehydes. Phylogenetic analyses examined opossum, human, rat, chicken and cod ADHs, and supported the proposed designation of opossum ADHs as class I (ADH1), class III (ADH3), class IV (ADH4A, ADH4B and ADH4C) and class VI (ADH6). Percentage substitution rates were examined for ADHs during vertebrate evolution which indicated that ADH3 is evolving at a much slower rate to that of the other ADH classes.

  5. Effects of endogenous antidiuretic hormone (ADH) on macrophage phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Repollet, E.; Opava-Stitzer, S.; Tiffany, S.; Schwartz, A.

    1983-07-01

    Although several studies have indicated that antidiuretic hormone (ADH) enhances the phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in shock syndromes, it remains unknown what influence ADH exerts upon the individual phagocytic components of this system. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of endogenous ADH on the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage cells. As a phagocytic stimuli, fluorescent methacrylate microbeads were injected intraperitoneally into Brattleboro (ADH deficient) and normal Long Evans rats in the presence and absence of exogenous ADH. Peritoneal cells were harvested 19-22 hr after the administration of the microbeads and the percent phagocytosis was determined in macrophage cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Our results indicate that the percentage of peritoneal macrophages ingesting the fluorescent methacrylate microbeads was significantly reduced in the absence of ADH (Brattleboro rats: 5.4 +/- 0.6% versus Long Evans rats: 16.8 +/- 2.3%; p less than 0.001). In addition, our data demonstrate that exogenous administration of ADH significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis in Brattleboro (14.7 +/- 2.2%) and normal Long Evans (49.6 +/- 4.5%) rats. These data suggest, for the first time, that endogenous ADH might play a modulatory role in the phagocytic activity of a specific component of the RES, namely, the macrophage cell.

  6. 75 FR 48359 - Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Office of the Secretary Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting... the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission will be held on... make oral or written presentations to the Commission or file written statements. Such requests...

  7. The metabolic enzyme AdhE controls the virulence of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Katherine S H; Connolly, James P R; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Wang, Dai; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Tahoun, Amin; Gally, David L; Burgess, Karl; Burchmore, Richard J; Smith, Brian O; Beatson, Scott A; Byron, Olwyn; Wolfe, Alan J; Douce, Gillian R; Roe, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Classical studies have focused on the role that individual regulators play in controlling virulence gene expression. An emerging theme, however, is that bacterial metabolism also plays a key role in this process. Our previous work identified a series of proteins that were implicated in the regulation of virulence. One of these proteins was AdhE, a bi-functional acetaldehyde-CoA dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. Deletion of its gene (adhE) resulted in elevated levels of extracellular acetate and a stark pleiotropic phenotype: strong suppression of the Type Three Secretion System (T3SS) and overexpression of non-functional flagella. Correspondingly, the adhE mutant bound poorly to host cells and was unable to swim. Furthermore, the mutant was significantly less virulent than its parent when tested in vivo, which supports the hypothesis that attachment and motility are central to the colonization process. The molecular basis by which AdhE affects virulence gene regulation was found to be multifactorial, involving acetate-stimulated transcription of flagella expression and post-transcriptional regulation of the T3SS through Hfq. Our study reveals fascinating insights into the links between bacterial physiology, the expression of virulence genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism mechanisms by which these processes are regulated. PMID:24846743

  8. Corridor use by Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenjing; Lin, Liu; Luo, Aidong; Zhang, Li

    2009-06-01

    There are 18 km of Kunming-Bangkok Highway passing through the Mengyang Nature Reserve of Xishuangbanna National Nature Reserve in Yunnan Province, China. From September 2005 to September 2006 the impact of this highway on movement of wild Asian elephants between the eastern and western part of the nature reserve was studied using track transecting, rural surveys and direct monitoring. Our results showed that the number of crossroad corridors used by Asian elephants diminished from 28 to 23 following the construction of the highway. In some areas, the elephant activity diminished or even disappeared, which indicated a change in their home ranges. The utilization rate of artificial corridors was 44%. We also found that elephants preferred artificial corridors that were placed along their original corridors. During the research, wild elephants revealed their adaptation to the highway. They were found walking across the highway road surface many times and for different reasons. We suggest that the highway management bureau should revise their management strategies to mitigate the potential risks caused by elephants on the road for the safety of the public and to protect this endangered species from harm. It is also very important to protect and maintain current Asian elephants corridors in this region.

  9. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  10. Ethanol-Induced ADH Activity in Zebrafish: Differential Concentration-Dependent Effects on High- Versus Low-Affinity ADH Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Facciol, Amanda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish express enzymes that metabolize ethanol in a manner comparable to that of mammals, including humans. We previously demonstrated that acute ethanol exposure increases alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in an inverted U-shaped dose-dependent manner. It was hypothesized that the biphasic dose-response was due to the increased activity of a high-affinity ADH isoform following exposure to low concentrations of ethanol and increased activity of a low-affinity ADH isoform following exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol. To test this hypothesis, we exposed zebrafish to different concentrations of ethanol (0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1.0% v/v) for 30 min and measured the total ADH activity in the zebrafish liver. However, we also repeated this enzyme activity assay using a low concentration of the substrate (ethanol) to determine the activity of high-affinity ADH isoforms. We found that total ADH activity in response to ethanol induces an inverted U-shaped dose-response similar to our previous study. Using a lower substrate level in our enzyme assay targeting high-affinity isozymes, we found a similar dose-response. However, the difference in activity between the high and low substrate assays (high substrate activity - low substrate activity), which provide an index of activity for low-affinity ADH isoforms, revealed no significant effect of ethanol exposure. Our results suggest that the inverted U-shaped dose-response for total ADH activity in response to ethanol is driven primarily by high-affinity isoforms of ADH.

  11. Genetic Variation in the Expression of ADH in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, G.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.; Adams, D. A.; Wilton, A. N.

    1982-01-01

    Several chromosomes derived from natural populations have been identified that affect the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Second chromosomes, which also carry the structural gene Adh, show a great deal of polymorphism of genetic elements that determine how much enzyme protein accumulates. The level of enzyme was measured in third instar larvae, 6-to-8-day-old males and in larval fat bodies and alimentary canals. In general, activities in the different organs and stages are highly correlated with one another. One line was found, however, in which the ADH level in the fat body is more than twice the level one would expect on the basis of the activity in alimentary canal. We have also found evidence of third-chromosome elements that affect the level of ADH. PMID:6816669

  12. Taos Smart Growth Implementation Assistance: Concepts for the Paseo del Pueblo Sur Corridor

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes a technical assistance project with Taos, NM, to help make development along State Highway 68, the Paseo del Pueblo Sur commercial corridor, economically stronger and more attractive.

  13. Sequence variation of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) paralogs in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Eanes, Walter F

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the population genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in cactophilic Drosophila. Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae utilize cactus hosts, and each host contains a characteristic mixture of alcohol compounds. In these Drosophila species there are two functional Adh loci, an adult form (Adh-2) and a larval and ovarian form (Adh-1). Overall, the greater level of variation segregating in D. arizonae than in D. mojavensis suggests a larger population size for D. arizonae. There are markedly different patterns of variation between the paralogs across both species. A 16-bp intron haplotype segregates in both species at Adh-2, apparently the product of an ancient gene conversion event between the paralogs, which suggests that there is selection for the maintenance of the intron structure possibly for the maintenance of pre-mRNA structure. We observe a pattern of variation consistent with adaptive protein evolution in the D. mojavensis lineage at Adh-1, suggesting that the cactus host shift that occurred in the divergence of D. mojavensis from D. arizonae had an effect on the evolution of the larval expressed paralog. Contrary to previous work we estimate a recent time for both the divergence of D. mojavensis and D. arizonae (2.4 +/- 0.7 MY) and the age of the gene duplication (3.95 +/- 0.45 MY). PMID:12586706

  14. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  15. Isolation and DNA sequence of ADH3, a nuclear gene encoding the mitochondrial isozyme of alcohol dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Young, E T; Pilgrim, D

    1985-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear gene, ADH3, that encodes the mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase isozyme ADH III was cloned by virtue of its nucleotide homology to ADH1 and ADH2. Both chromosomal and plasmid-encoded ADH III isozymes were repressed by glucose and migrated heterogeneously on nondenaturing gels. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated 73 and 74% identity for ADH3 with ADH1 and ADH2, respectively. The amino acid identity between the predicted ADH III polypeptide and ADH I and ADH II was 79 and 80%, respectively. The open reading frame encoding ADH III has a highly basic 27-amino-acid amino-terminal extension relative to ADH I and ADH II. The nucleotide sequence of the presumed leader peptide has a high degree of identity with the untranslated leader regions of ADH1 and ADH2 mRNAs. A strain containing a null allele of ADH3 did not have a detectably altered phenotype. The cloned gene integrated at the ADH3 locus, indicating that this is the structural gene for ADH III. Images PMID:2943982

  16. How Corridors Reduce Indigo Bunting Nest Success.

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Aimee, J.

    2006-08-01

    Abstract: Corridors are a popular strategy to conserve biodiversity and promote gene flow in fragmented landscapes. Corridor effectiveness has been bolstered by the fact that no empirical field studies have shown negative effects on populations or communities. I tested the hypothesis that corridors increase nest predation in connected habitat fragments relative to unconnected fragments. I evaluated this hypothesis in a large-scale experimental system of open-habitat fragments that varied in shape and connectivity. Corridors increased nest predation rates in connected fragments relative to unconnected fragments with lower edge:area ratios. Nest predation rates were similar between connected and unconnected fragments with higher edge:area ratios. These results suggest that the increase in predator activity is largely attributable to edge effects incurred through the addition of a corridor. This is the first field study to demonstrate that corridors can negatively impact animal populations occupying connected fragments.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-05-17

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population.

  18. Crystal structure of the vertebrate NADP(H)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH8).

    PubMed

    Rosell, Albert; Valencia, Eva; Parés, Xavier; Fita, Ignacio; Farrés, Jaume; Ochoa, Wendy F

    2003-06-27

    The amphibian enzyme ADH8, previously named class IV-like, is the only known vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with specificity towards NADP(H). The three-dimensional structures of ADH8 and of the binary complex ADH8-NADP(+) have been now determined and refined to resolutions of 2.2A and 1.8A, respectively. The coenzyme and substrate specificity of ADH8, that has 50-65% sequence identity with vertebrate NAD(H)-dependent ADHs, suggest a role in aldehyde reduction probably as a retinal reductase. The large volume of the substrate-binding pocket can explain both the high catalytic efficiency of ADH8 with retinoids and the high K(m) value for ethanol. Preference of NADP(H) appears to be achieved by the presence in ADH8 of the triad Gly223-Thr224-His225 and the recruitment of conserved Lys228, which define a binding pocket for the terminal phosphate group of the cofactor. NADP(H) binds to ADH8 in an extended conformation that superimposes well with the NAD(H) molecules found in NAD(H)-dependent ADH complexes. No additional reshaping of the dinucleotide-binding site is observed which explains why NAD(H) can also be used as a cofactor by ADH8. The structural features support the classification of ADH8 as an independent ADH class.

  19. The role of green corridors for wildlife conservation in urban landscape: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, H. A.; Rasidi, M. H.

    2014-02-01

    Green corridors are an attempt to mitigate negative effects of the built environment of cities and towns. The corridors act as conservation for rapidly extreme intervention and development of the urban environment. Most importantly, it enables dispersal movement of animals within city areas. Issues relate to wildlife conservation in urban areas has been studied for many years and thus, the research makes a review for how the green corridors contribute to the conservation of urban wildlife. This study reviews groups of articles in disciplines of urban landscape planning and biology conservation to discuss the relationship between elements of green corridors and urban wildlife dispersal movement behaviour in Malaysian context. Accordingly, this research is purposely studied to give understanding on how green corridors contribute to the animals' ability of moving and dispersing within the built-up areas. In advance, it is found that there are three factors contribute to the capability of colonization among urban wildlife which are individual, physical and social factor. Green corridor has been defined as one of the physical factor that influence urban wildlife behaviour movement. Consequently, safety area indicating to animals species for traversing in any time such as at night can be defined as the primary potential corridor.

  20. 78 FR 77550 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Federal Highway Administration Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants AGENCY: Federal... is extending the application period for the Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants... Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants. The purpose of this notice was to invite...

  1. Long Island Smart Energy Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Mui, Ming

    2015-02-04

    The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) has teamed with Stony Brook University (Stony Brook or SBU) and Farmingdale State College (Farmingdale or FSC), two branches of the State University of New York (SUNY), to create a “Smart Energy Corridor.” The project, located along the Route 110 business corridor on Long Island, New York, demonstrated the integration of a suite of Smart Grid technologies from substations to end-use loads. The Smart Energy Corridor Project included the following key features: -TECHNOLOGY: Demonstrated a full range of smart energy technologies, including substations and distribution feeder automation, fiber and radio communications backbone, advanced metering infrastructure (AM”), meter data management (MDM) system (which LIPA implemented outside of this project), field tools automation, customer-level energy management including automated energy management systems, and integration with distributed generation and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. -MARKETING: A rigorous market test that identified customer response to an alternative time-of-use pricing plan and varying levels of information and analytical support. -CYBER SECURITY: Tested cyber security vulnerabilities in Smart Grid hardware, network, and application layers. Developed recommendations for policies, procedures, and technical controls to prevent or foil cyber-attacks and to harden the Smart Grid infrastructure. -RELIABILITY: Leveraged new Smart Grid-enabled data to increase system efficiency and reliability. Developed enhanced load forecasting, phase balancing, and voltage control techniques designed to work hand-in-hand with the Smart Grid technologies. -OUTREACH: Implemented public outreach and educational initiatives that were linked directly to the demonstration of Smart Grid technologies, tools, techniques, and system configurations. This included creation of full-scale operating models demonstrating application of Smart Grid technologies in business and residential

  2. Coexpression of Lactobacillus brevis ADH with GDH or G6PDH in Arxula adeninivorans for the synthesis of 1-(R)-phenylethanol.

    PubMed

    Rauter, Marion; Prokoph, Alexandra; Kasprzak, Jakub; Becker, Karin; Baronian, Keith; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard; Vorbrodt, H- Matthias

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Arxula adeninivorans was used for the overexpression of an ADH gene of Lactobacillus brevis coding for (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (LbADH) to synthesise enantiomerically pure 1-(R)-phenylethanol. Glucose dehydrogenase gene from Bacillus megaterium (BmGDH) or glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase of Bacillus pumilus (BpG6PDH) were coexpressed in Arxula to regenerate the cofactor NADPH by oxidising glucose or glucose 6-phosphate. The yeast strain expressing LbADH and BpG6PDH produced 5200 U l(-1) ADH and 370 U l(-1) G6PDH activity, whereas the strain expressing LbADH and BmGDH produced 2700 U l(-1) ADH and 170 U l(-1) GDH activity. However, the crude extract of both strains reduced 40 mM acetophenone to pure 1-(R)-phenylethanol with an enantiomeric excess (ee) of >99 % in 60 min without detectable by-products. An increase in yield was achieved using immobilised crude extracts (IEs), Triton X-100 permeabilised cells (PCs) and permeabilised immobilised cells (PICs) with PICs being most stable with GDH regeneration over 52 cycles. Even though the activity and synthesis rate of 1-(R)-phenylethanol with the BpG6PDH and LbADH coexpressing strain was higher, the BmGDH-LbADH strain was more stable over successive reaction cycles. This, combined with its higher total turnover number (TTN) of 391 mol product per mole NADP(+), makes it the preferred strain for continuous reaction systems. The initial non-optimised semi-continuous reaction produced 9.74 g l(-1) day(-1) or 406 g kg(-1) dry cell weight (dcw) day(-1) isolated 1-(R)-phenylethanol with an ee of 100 % and a TTN of 206 mol product per mole NADP(+). In conclusion, A. adeninivorans is a promising host for LbADH and BpG6PDH or BmGDH production and offers a simple method for the production of enantiomerically pure alcohols.

  3. Genetic variants in or near ADH1B and ADH1C affect susceptibility to alcohol dependence in a British and Irish population.

    PubMed

    Way, Michael; McQuillin, Andrew; Saini, Jit; Ruparelia, Kush; Lydall, Gregory J; Guerrini, Irene; Ball, David; Smith, Iain; Quadri, Giorgia; Thomson, Allan D; Kasiakogia-Worlley, Katherine; Cherian, Raquin; Gunwardena, Priyanthi; Rao, Harish; Kottalgi, Girija; Patel, Shamir; Hillman, Audrey; Douglas, Ewen; Qureshi, Sherhzad Y; Reynolds, Gerry; Jauhar, Sameer; O'Kane, Aideen; Dedman, Alex; Sharp, Sally; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Dar, Karim; Curtis, David; Morgan, Marsha Y; Gurling, Hugh M D

    2015-05-01

    Certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes confer a significant protective effect against alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS) in East Asian populations. Recently, attention has focused on the role of these SNPs in determining ADS risk in European populations. To further elucidate these associations, SNPs of interest in ADH1B, ADH1C and the ADH1B/1C intergenic region were genotyped in a British and Irish population (ADS cases n = 1076: controls n = 1027) to assess their relative contribution to ADS risk. A highly significant, protective association was observed between the minor allele of rs1229984 in ADH1B and ADS risk [allelic P = 8.4 × 10(-6) , odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.14, 0.49]. Significant associations were also observed between ADS risk and the ADH1B/1C intergenic variant, rs1789891 [allelic P = 7.2 × 10(-5) , OR = 1.4 (1.2, 1.6)] and three non-synonymous SNPs rs698, rs1693482 and rs283413 in ADH1C. However, these associations were not completely independent; thus, while the ADH1B rs1229984 minor allele association was independent of those of the intergenic variant rs1789891 and the three ADH1C variants, the three ADH1C variants were not individually independent. In conclusion, the rare ADH1B rs1229984 mutation provides significant protection against ADS in this British and Irish population; other variants in the ADH gene cluster also alter ADS risk, although the strong linkage disequilibrium between SNPs at this location precluded clear identification of the variant(s) driving the associations.

  4. Molecular Characterization and Transcriptional Analysis of adhE2, the Gene Encoding the NADH-Dependent Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Butanol Production in Alcohologenic Cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Lisa; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Girbal, Laurence; Yang, Xinghong; Croux, Christian; Soucaille, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The adhE2 gene of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AADH), was characterized from molecular and biochemical points of view. The 2,577-bp adhE2 codes for a 94.4-kDa protein. adhE2 is expressed, as a monocistronic operon, in alcohologenic cultures and not in solventogenic cultures. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 160 and 215 bp upstream of the adhE2 start codon. The expression of adhE2 from a plasmid in the DG1 mutant of C. acetobutylicum, a mutant cured of the pSOL1 megaplasmid, restored butanol production and provided elevated activities of NADH-dependent butyraldehyde and butanol dehydrogenases. The recombinant AdhE2 protein expressed in E. coli as a Strep-tag fusion protein and purified to homogeneity also demonstrated NADH-dependent butyraldehyde and butanol dehydrogenase activities. This is the second AADH identified in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and to our knowledge this is the first example of a bacterium with two AADHs. It is noteworthy that the two corresponding genes, adhE and adhE2, are carried by the pSOL1 megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. PMID:11790753

  5. Modeling Parkinson's disease genetics: altered function of the dopamine system in Adh4 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Belin, Andrea Carmine; Westerlund, Marie; Anvret, Anna; Lindqvist, Eva; Pernold, Karin; Ogren, Sven Ove; Duester, Gregg; Galter, Dagmar

    2011-03-01

    Class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4) efficiently reduces aldehydes produced during lipid peroxidation, and may thus serve to protect from toxic effects of aldehydes e.g. on neurons. We hypothesized that ADH4 dysfunction may increase risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) and previously reported association of an ADH4 allele with PD. We found that a promoter polymorphism in this allele induced a 25-30% reduction of transcriptional activity. Based on these findings, we have now investigated whether Adh4 homo- (Adh4-/-) or heterozygous (Adh4+/-) knockout mice display any dopamine system-related changes in behavior, biochemical parameters or olfaction compared to wild-type mice. The spontaneous locomotor activity was found to be similar in the three groups, whereas administration of d-amphetamine or apomorphine induced a significant increase in horizontal activity in the Adh4-/- mice compared to wild-type mice. We measured levels of monoamines and their metabolites in striatum, frontal cortex and substantia nigra and found increased levels of dopamine and DOPAC in substantia nigra of Adh4-/- mice. Investigation of olfactory function revealed a reduced sense of smell in Adh4-/- mice accompanied by alterations in dopamine metabolite levels in the olfactory bulb. Taken together, our results suggest that lack of Adh4 gene activity induces changes in the function of the dopamine system, findings which are compatible with a role of loss-of-function mutations in ADH4 as possible risk factors for PD.

  6. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Haddad

    2000-06-01

    Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering.

  8. REDD+ Policy: Corridors of carbon and biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Oscar

    2014-02-01

    Reducing tropical deforestation has huge potential for mitigating climate change and saving the Earth's most biologically diverse biome. Corridors connecting existing protected areas represent an elegant means of attaining both goals.

  9. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly, Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, N.

    1999-01-22

    Study hypothesized that corridors increase patch colonization by Junonia coenia regardless of insects initial distance from patch, as the butterfly is known to move between patches preferentially through corridors. Neither corridor nor distance had significant effect on patch colonization, but significant interaction between presence or absence of corridors and distance. One critical factor is interpatch distance which may determine the relative effectiveness of corridors and other landscape configurations.

  10. Noise control in the transportation corridor.

    PubMed

    Manning, C J; Harris, G J

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the opportunities for noise control within the route corridor required for construction of road, rail and other guided transport schemes. It deals with control of noise generation at source, and in the transmission path close to the point of generation. In this way it is possible to control the amount of acoustic power generated, and to absorb part of the radiated power at points of reflection. Purely reflective wayside barriers do little to absorb acoustic energy, merely reflecting it in a different direction. Whilst this has selfish benefits to the receptor in the shadow zone of the barrier, it makes things worse for others on the reflective side of the geometry. The paper therefore considers the options available to the engineer in the design of rolling and sliding interfaces and the use of acoustically absorptive finishes on all surfaces close to the point of noise generation. This includes the running surface itself, structural components, retaining walls, over and under passes, and the inner surfaces of track and wayside barriers.

  11. China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Tucker

    2017-01-01

    International trade and related economic activities in Central and South Asia are increasing as developing economies, particularly India and Pakistan, grow. China continues to emerge as a major regional and global power and has embarked upon numerous regional economic and political initiatives . A major development is the China - Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), a host of infrastructure and trade projects worth over 40 billion American dollars . This report analyzes CPEC a nd its potential regional effects, including the trade security implications of the port and land infrastructure developments . As trade increase s in the reg ion and the major CPEC infrastructure projects are completed, there will be numerous implications on trade security and geopolitics within South Asia. CPEC projects uniquely intersect numerous regional situations, including territorial disputes in Kashmir, the Afghanistan/Pakistan border, and Chinese foreign policy a mbitions. A nuanced understanding of these effects can influence future policy adjustments in this region . The views expressed in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of Sandia National Laboratories or the author's current and past institutions.

  12. Genetic and Cytogenetic Analysis of the ADH Region in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Janis; Mandel, Howard C.; Krauss, Marc; Sofer, William

    1977-01-01

    Eighteen Adh-negative mutations were selected with 1-pentyn-3-ol after feeding of formaldehyde. Twelve of the 18 were shown by cytological and genetic analysis to be deletions. Cytological examination of the deletions allowed us to localize the Adh gene to a region including bands 35B3–5 on the left arm of chromosome 2. The deletions were also used to order known visible loci located near Adh.—The vital loci near Adh were also investigated. A total of 109 lethal mutations were generated with EMS and 33 of these, localized within a region defined by the overlap of two of the deletions, were found to belong to 13 complementation groups. If one includes three other loci known to belong there (el, Adh and Sco), a total of 16 complementation groups have been identified in the region close to Adh. PMID:408228

  13. Large-Scale Habitat Corridors for Biodiversity Conservation: A Forest Corridor in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ramiadantsoa, Tanjona; Ovaskainen, Otso; Rybicki, Joel; Hanski, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity conservation, habitat corridors are assumed to increase landscape-level connectivity and to enhance the viability of otherwise isolated populations. While the role of corridors is supported by empirical evidence, studies have typically been conducted at small spatial scales. Here, we assess the quality and the functionality of a large 95-km long forest corridor connecting two large national parks (416 and 311 km2) in the southeastern escarpment of Madagascar. We analyze the occurrence of 300 species in 5 taxonomic groups in the parks and in the corridor, and combine high-resolution forest cover data with a simulation model to examine various scenarios of corridor destruction. At present, the corridor contains essentially the same communities as the national parks, reflecting its breadth which on average matches that of the parks. In the simulation model, we consider three types of dispersers: passive dispersers, which settle randomly around the source population; active dispersers, which settle only in favorable habitat; and gap-avoiding active dispersers, which avoid dispersing across non-habitat. Our results suggest that long-distance passive dispersers are most sensitive to ongoing degradation of the corridor, because increasing numbers of propagules are lost outside the forest habitat. For a wide range of dispersal parameters, the national parks are large enough to sustain stable populations until the corridor becomes severely broken, which will happen around 2065 if the current rate of forest loss continues. A significant decrease in gene flow along the corridor is expected after 2040, and this will exacerbate the adverse consequences of isolation. Our results demonstrate that simulation studies assessing the role of habitat corridors should pay close attention to the mode of dispersal and the effects of regional stochasticity. PMID:26200351

  14. Large-Scale Habitat Corridors for Biodiversity Conservation: A Forest Corridor in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Ramiadantsoa, Tanjona; Ovaskainen, Otso; Rybicki, Joel; Hanski, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity conservation, habitat corridors are assumed to increase landscape-level connectivity and to enhance the viability of otherwise isolated populations. While the role of corridors is supported by empirical evidence, studies have typically been conducted at small spatial scales. Here, we assess the quality and the functionality of a large 95-km long forest corridor connecting two large national parks (416 and 311 km2) in the southeastern escarpment of Madagascar. We analyze the occurrence of 300 species in 5 taxonomic groups in the parks and in the corridor, and combine high-resolution forest cover data with a simulation model to examine various scenarios of corridor destruction. At present, the corridor contains essentially the same communities as the national parks, reflecting its breadth which on average matches that of the parks. In the simulation model, we consider three types of dispersers: passive dispersers, which settle randomly around the source population; active dispersers, which settle only in favorable habitat; and gap-avoiding active dispersers, which avoid dispersing across non-habitat. Our results suggest that long-distance passive dispersers are most sensitive to ongoing degradation of the corridor, because increasing numbers of propagules are lost outside the forest habitat. For a wide range of dispersal parameters, the national parks are large enough to sustain stable populations until the corridor becomes severely broken, which will happen around 2065 if the current rate of forest loss continues. A significant decrease in gene flow along the corridor is expected after 2040, and this will exacerbate the adverse consequences of isolation. Our results demonstrate that simulation studies assessing the role of habitat corridors should pay close attention to the mode of dispersal and the effects of regional stochasticity.

  15. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation. Progress report, June 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-03-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  16. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms among Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Segal, B

    1999-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) involved in alcohol metabolism are polymorphic. Different alleles encode subunits of the enzymes that are related to differences in alcohol metabolism with different ethnic groups. This study examined the allele frequencies at the ADH1, ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci in Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism to determine if allele frequencies at these loci differ among five distinct Alaska Native groups: Yupik and Inupiat Eskimos, Athabascan, Tlingit and Aleut. It was found that all persons were homozygous for the ADH1*1, ADH2*1 and ALDH2*1 alleles. Variations, however, were found for the allele distribution of the ADH3 genotype. Comparison with a general population sample found no differences in allele distributions for ADHs and ALDH2*1, but differences were found when comparisons were made with four Asian Groups. The study's findings suggest that the Alaska Natives are not protected from the risk of alcoholism in the same way that Asians who possess the ALDH2*2 genotype are considered to have a negative risk factor. Nor, does there appear to be any generalized differences between Alaska Native alcoholics and members of the general population with respect to the ALDH and ADH polymorphisms studied herein.

  17. A biomimetic vision-based hovercraft accounts for bees' complex behaviour in various corridors.

    PubMed

    Roubieu, Frédéric L; Serres, Julien R; Colonnier, Fabien; Franceschini, Nicolas; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck

    2014-09-01

    Here we present the first systematic comparison between the visual guidance behaviour of a biomimetic robot and those of honeybees flying in similar environments. We built a miniature hovercraft which can travel safely along corridors with various configurations. For the first time, we implemented on a real physical robot the 'lateral optic flow regulation autopilot', which we previously studied computer simulations. This autopilot inspired by the results of experiments on various species of hymenoptera consists of two intertwined feedback loops, the speed and lateral control loops, each of which has its own optic flow (OF) set-point. A heading-lock system makes the robot move straight ahead as fast as 69 cm s(-1) with a clearance from one wall as small as 31 cm, giving an unusually high translational OF value (125° s(-1)). Our biomimetic robot was found to navigate safely along straight, tapered and bent corridors, and to react appropriately to perturbations such as the lack of texture on one wall, the presence of a tapering or non-stationary section of the corridor and even a sloping terrain equivalent to a wind disturbance. The front end of the visual system consists of only two local motion sensors (LMS), one on each side. This minimalistic visual system measuring the lateral OF suffices to control both the robot's forward speed and its clearance from the walls without ever measuring any speeds or distances. We added two additional LMSs oriented at +/-45° to improve the robot's performances in stiffly tapered corridors. The simple control system accounts for worker bees' ability to navigate safely in six challenging environments: straight corridors, single walls, tapered corridors, straight corridors with part of one wall moving or missing, as well as in the presence of wind.

  18. Final report: Prototyping a combustion corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Rutland, Christopher J.; Leach, Joshua

    2001-12-15

    The Combustion Corridor is a concept in which researchers in combustion and thermal sciences have unimpeded access to large volumes of remote computational results. This will enable remote, collaborative analysis and visualization of state-of-the-art combustion science results. The Engine Research Center (ERC) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison partnered with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, and several other universities to build and test the first stages of a combustion corridor. The ERC served two important functions in this partnership. First, we work extensively with combustion simulations so we were able to provide real world research data sets for testing the Corridor concepts. Second, the ERC was part of an extension of the high bandwidth based DOE National Laboratory connections to universities.

  19. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  20. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: −6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: −6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  1. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2016-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: -6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: -6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  2. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF CORRIDOR AROUND TRENTON STATION. TRENTON, MERCER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF CORRIDOR AROUND TRENTON STATION. TRENTON, MERCER CO., NJ. Sec. 1401, MP 56.70. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between Pennsylvania/New Jersey & New Jersey/New York State Lines, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  3. 78 FR 65751 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants AGENCY: Federal... continue Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) development with their partners, such as arterial management.... The purpose of this program is to promote the integrated management and operations of...

  4. 24. View looking north up corridor from Charles Street Bridge. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View looking north up corridor from Charles Street Bridge. Providence, Providence Co., RI. Sec. 4116, mp 186.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  5. 35. OUTER DRAWBRIDGE, ENTRY TO THE PROTECTIVE CORRIDOR BETWEEN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. OUTER DRAWBRIDGE, ENTRY TO THE PROTECTIVE CORRIDOR BETWEEN THE RAVELIN AND THE CASTILLO, AS SEEN FROM WITHIN THE CORRIDOR - Castillo de San Marcos, 1 Castillo Drive, Saint Augustine, St. Johns County, FL

  6. Interior, looking corridor connecting 511 to 515 into Medical Research ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking corridor connecting 511 to 515 into Medical Research Library in 516. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Central Service Building, North of Building No. 511, East of corridor connecting Building 511 to Building 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  8. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  9. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  10. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  11. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  12. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  13. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  14. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  15. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  16. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  17. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  18. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  19. 45 CFR 153.540 - Compliance with risk corridors standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with risk corridors standards. HHS or its designee may audit a QHP issuer to assess its compliance with... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance with risk corridors standards. 153.540... CARE ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE...

  20. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  1. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  2. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  3. 76 FR 72029 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... Federal Highway Administration Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program AGENCY: Federal... Corridor Operations and Management Program as authorized in 23 U.S.C. 511. This notice and correction... eligible entities interested in participating in the FHWA Multistate Corridor Operations and...

  4. Increased Variation in Adh Enzyme Activity in Drosophila Mutation-Accumulation Experiment Is Not Due to Transposable Elements at the Adh Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aquadro, C. F.; Tachida, H.; Langley, C. H.; Harada, K.; Mukai, T.

    1990-01-01

    We present here a molecular analysis of the region surrounding the structural gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in 47 lines of Drosophila melanogaster that have each accumulated mutations for 300 generations. While these lines show a significant increase in variation of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity compared to control lines, we found no restriction map variation in a 13-kb region including the complete Adh structural gene and roughly 5 kb of both 5' and 3' sequences. Thus, the rapid accumulation of ADH activity variation after 28,200 allele generations does not appear to have been due to the mobilization of transposable elements into or out of the Adh structural gene region. PMID:1963870

  5. Ethanol tolerance and membrane fatty acid adaptation in adh multiple and null mutants of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Heipieper, H J; Isken, S; Saliola, M

    2000-11-01

    The effects of ethanol and 1-octanol on growth and fatty acid composition of different strains of Kluyveromyces lactis containing a mutation in the four different alcohol dehydrogenase (KlADH) genes were investigated. In the presence of ethanol and 1-octanol K. lactis reduced the fluidity of its lipids by decreasing the unsaturation index (UI) of its membrane fatty acids. In this way, a direct correlation between nonlethal ethanol concentrations and the decrease in the UI could be observed. At concentrations which totally inhibited cell growth no reaction occurred. These adaptive modifications of the fatty acid pattern of K. lactis to ethanol contrasted with those reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Whereas these two yeasts increased the fluidity of their membrane lipids in the presence of ethanol, K. lactis reduced the fluidity (UI) of its lipids. Among the different isogenic adh negative strains tested, the strain containing no ADH (adh0) and that containing only KlADH1 were the most alcohol-sensitive. The strain with only KlADH2 showed nearly the same tolerance as reference strain CBS 2359/152 containing all four ADH genes. This suggests that the KlADH2 product could play an important role in the adaptation/detoxification reactions of K. lactis to high ethanol concentrations.

  6. Structure, Expression, Chromosomal Location and Product of the Gene Encoding Adh2 in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Gregerson, R. G.; Cameron, L.; McLean, M.; Dennis, P.; Strommer, J.

    1993-01-01

    In most higher plants the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase comprise a small gene family, usually with two members. The Adh1 gene of Petunia has been cloned and analyzed, but a second identifiable gene was not recovered from any of three genomic libraries. We have therefore employed the polymerase chain reaction to obtain the major portion of a second Adh gene. From sequence, mapping and northern data we conclude this gene encodes ADH2, the major anaerobically inducible Adh gene of Petunia. The availability of both Adh1 and Adh2 from Petunia has permitted us to compare their structures and patterns of expression to those of the well-studied Adh genes of maize, of which one is highly expressed developmentally, while both are induced in response to hypoxia. Despite their evolutionary distance, evidenced by deduced amino acid sequence as well as taxonomic classification, the pairs of genes are regulated in strikingly similar ways in maize and Petunia. Our findings suggest a significant biological basis for the regulatory strategy employed by these distant species for differential expression of multiple Adh genes. PMID:8096485

  7. 36 CFR 13.1108 - Alsek Corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alsek Corridor. 13.1108 Section 13.1108 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Glacier Bay National Park and...

  8. The inhibitory effect of the cerebellar fastigial stimulation on ADH secretion.

    PubMed

    Hata, N; Miura, M

    1974-11-01

    1. Both cardiovascular and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) responses to some neural inputs were examined in paralysed anaesthetized cats.2. Carotid occlusion elicited cardiovascular responses and increased ADH secretion. When the electrical stimulation of discrete loci of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus (fastigial pressor area) was superimposed on carotid occlusion, cardiovascular responses were further facilitated, while ADH secretion was inhibited.3. The fastigial stimulation alone elicited facilitory cardiovascular responses composed of hypertension and tachycardia, and the fastigial pressor response (FPR), but did not evoke any consistent ADH response.4. These facts indicate that cerebellar modulation of ADH secretion occurs not directly via the hypothalamo-hypophysial system but through the lower brain stem to which both carotid sinus nerves and outflows from the fastigial pressor area project.5. We conclude that the fastigial pressor area is specific for not only cardiovascular and other autonomic responses but pituitary hormonal response.

  9. Remote sensing impact on corridor selection and placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F. J.; Sellman, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    Computer-aided corridor selection techniques, utilizing digitized data bases of socio-economic, census, and cadastral data, and developed for highway corridor routing are considered. Land resource data generated from various remote sensing data sources were successfully merged with the ancillary data files of a corridor selection model and prototype highway corridors were designed using the combined data set. Remote sensing derived information considered useful for highway corridor location, special considerations in geometric correction of remote sensing data to facilitate merging it with ancillary data files, and special interface requirements are briefly discussed.

  10. Corridors Increase Plant Species Richness at Large Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock,John L.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2006-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the largest threats to biodiversity. Landscape corridors, which are hypothesized to reduce the negative consequences of fragmentation, have become common features of ecological management plans worldwide. Despite their popularity, there is little evidence documenting the effectiveness of corridors in preserving biodiversity at large scales. Using a large-scale replicated experiment, we showed that habitat patches connected by corridors retain more native plant species than do isolated patches, that this difference increases over time, and that corridors do not promote invasion by exotic species. Our results support the use of corridors in biodiversity conservation.

  11. RISK CORRIDORS AND REINSURANCE IN HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACES

    PubMed Central

    LAYTON, TIMOTHY J.; MCGUIRE, THOMAS G.; SINAIKO, ANNA D.

    2016-01-01

    Health Insurance Marketplaces established by the Affordable Care Act implement reinsurance and risk corridors. Reinsurance limits insurer costs associated with specific individuals, while risk corridors protect against aggregate losses. Both tighten the insurer’s distribution of expected costs. This paper compares the economic costs and consequences of reinsurance and risk corridors. We simulate the insurer’s cost distribution under reinsurance and risk corridors using data for a group of individuals likely to enroll in Marketplace plans from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We compare reinsurance and risk corridors in terms of risk reduction and incentives for cost containment. We find that reinsurance and one-sided risk corridors achieve comparable levels of risk reduction for a given level of incentives. We also find that the policies being implemented in the Marketplaces (a mix of reinsurance and two-sided risk corridor policies) substantially limit insurer risk but perform similarly to a simpler stand-alone reinsurance policy. PMID:26973861

  12. Mineral exploration, Mahd adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, Ronald G.

    1978-01-01

    Mahd adh Dhahab is the largest of numerous ancient gold mines scattered through the Precambrian shield of Saudi Arabia and the only one with recent production. During the period 1939-54, 765,768 fine ounces of gold and 1,002,029 ounces of silver were produced from the mines by the Saudi Arabian Mining Syndicate. Ore minerals at Mahd adh Dhahab include free gold and silver, tellurides, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in and associated with a system of north-trending quartz veins and quartz veinlet stockworks. Pyrite is a common sulfide gangue mineral. Country rocks are a north dipping sequence of pyroclastic and transported pyroclastic rocks of the Hulayfah Group that are locally highly silicified and potassium-feldspathized. The prime target for this exploration program was a north-trending zone of quartz veins and breccias, faults, alteration, and metalization approximately 400 m wide and 1000 m long. The ancient and recent mine workings are located in the northern part of this zone. Although the quartz veins and alteration cut all lithologies, the major metalization is confined to the intersection of veins and agglomerate. Ten holes were diamond drilled to explore geochemical, geological, and geophysical targets in the area. A significant new zone of metalization was discovered 700 m south of the ancient and recent mine workings and within the same major zone of quartz veins, alteration, and faults. Metalization in this southern mineralized zone is at the intersection of the quartz veins and a distinctive and highly altered agglomerate. The total zone of vein and agglomerate intercept is potentially metalized and comprises a block of ground 40 m thick and 400 m wide along the strike of the agglomerate and projected downdip 250 m. Tonnage of this block is 17.2 million tons. The explored zone, approximately 25 percent of the potentially metalized rock, has a potential resource of 1.1 million tons containing 27 g/t gold and 73 g/t silver.

  13. Oceanic Situational Awareness Over the Pacific Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfeld, Israel

    2005-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans impose a limitation on traffic capacity for a given corridor, given the projected traffic growth over the Pacific Ocean. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. This study uses Federal Aviation Administration data from a single day for the Pacific Corridor to analyze traffic loading to be used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from the aircraft to the satellites.

  14. Calculating toxic corridors. Revision. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, J.P.; Curry, R.G.; Kandler, R.A.

    1989-04-01

    Method for defining evacuation areas for accidental spills of toxic chemicals are presented. These spills can present serious health hazards to people exposed to excessive vapor concentrations downwind of the accident. An empirical diffusion equation is used to calculate the downwind hazard distance. The width of the toxic corridor, specified in angular degrees centered along the mean wind direction, is based upon the variability of the wind direction. Flexibility in estimating toxic corridor evacuation areas is allowed through a choice of four different methods involving the use of tables, nomograms, and a programmable calculator. Appendices present worksheets, example problems, procedures for determining meteorological units, a procedure for determining evaporative source strength, and other items.

  15. Corridors affect plants, animals, and their interactions in fragmented landscapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tewksbury, Joshua, J.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Haddad, Nick, M.; Sargent, Sarah; Orrock, John, L.; Weldon, Aimee; Danielson, Brent, J.; Brinkerhoff, Jory; Damschen, Ellen, I.; Townsend, Patricia

    2002-10-01

    Tewksbury, J.J., D.J. Levey, N.M. Haddad, S. Sargent, J.L. Orrock, A. Weldon, B.J. Danielson, J. Brinkerhoff, E.I. Damschen, and P. Townsend. 2002. Corridors affect plants, animals, and their interactions in fragmented landscapes. PNAS 99(20):12923-12926. Among the most popular strategies for maintaining populations of both plants and animals in fragmented landscapes is to connect isolated patches with thin strips of habitat, called corridors. Corridors are thought to increase the exchange of individuals between habitat patches, promoting genetic exchange and reducing population fluctuations. Empirical studies addressing the effects of corridors have either been small in scale or have ignored confounding effects of increased habitat area created by the presence of a corridor. These methodological difficulties, coupled with a paucity of studies examining the effects of corridors on plants and plant-animal interactions, have sparked debate over the purported value of corridors in conservation planning. We report results of a large-scale experiment that directly address this debate. We demonstrate that corridors not only increase the exchange of animals between patches, but also facilitate two key plant-animal interactions: pollination and seed dispersal. Our results show that the beneficial effects of corridors extend beyond the area they add, and suggest that increased plant and animal movement through corridors will have positive impacts on plant populations and community interactions in fragmented landscapes.

  16. Transient overexpression of adh8a increases allyl alcohol toxicity in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Ortmann, Julia; Paschke, Heidrun; Renner, Patrick; Ritter, Axel P; Scholz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Fish embryos are widely used as an alternative model to study toxicity in vertebrates. Due to their complexity, embryos are believed to more resemble an adult organism than in vitro cellular models. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the embryo's metabolic capacity. We recently identified allyl alcohol, an industrial chemical, to be several orders of magnitude less toxic to zebrafish embryo than to adult zebrafish (embryo LC50 = 478 mg/L vs. fish LC50 = 0.28 mg/L). Reports on mammals have indicated that allyl alcohol requires activation by alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh) to form the highly reactive and toxic metabolite acrolein, which shows similar toxicity in zebrafish embryos and adults. To identify if a limited metabolic capacity of embryos indeed can explain the low allyl alcohol sensitivity of zebrafish embryos, we compared the mRNA expression levels of Adh isoenzymes (adh5, adh8a, adh8b and adhfe1) during embryo development to that in adult fish. The greatest difference between embryo and adult fish was found for adh8a and adh8b expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that these genes might be required for allyl alcohol activation. Microinjection of adh8a, but not adh8b mRNA led to a significant increase of allyl alcohol toxicity in embryos similar to levels reported for adults (LC50 = 0.42 mg/L in adh8a mRNA-injected embryos). Furthermore, GC/MS analysis of adh8a-injected embryos indicated a significant decline of internal allyl alcohol concentrations from 0.23-58 ng/embryo to levels below the limit of detection (< 4.6 µg/L). Injection of neither adh8b nor gfp mRNA had an impact on internal allyl alcohol levels supporting that the increased allyl alcohol toxicity was mediated by an increase in its metabolization. These results underline the necessity to critically consider metabolic activation in the zebrafish embryo. As demonstrated here, mRNA injection is one useful approach to study the role of candidate enzymes involved in

  17. Corridors promote fire via connectivity and edge effects.

    PubMed

    Brudvig, Lars A; Wagner, Stephanie A; Damschen, Ellen I

    2012-04-01

    Landscape corridors, strips of habitat that connect otherwise isolated habitat patches, are commonly employed during management of fragmented landscapes. To date, most reported effects of corridors have been positive; however, there are long-standing concerns that corridors may have unintended consequences. Here, we address concerns over whether corridors promote propagation of disturbances such as fire. We collected data during prescribed fires in the world's largest and best replicated corridor experiment (Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA), six -50-ha landscapes of open (shrubby/herbaceous) habitat within a pine plantation matrix, to test several mechanisms for how corridors might influence fire. Corridors altered patterns of fire temperature through a direct connectivity effect and an indirect edge effect. The connectivity effect was independent of fuel levels and was consistent with a hypothesized wind-driven "bellows effect." Edges, a consequence of corridor implementation, elevated leaf litter (fuel) input from matrix pine trees, which in turn increased fire temperatures. We found no evidence for corridors or edges impacting patterns of fire spread: plots across all landscape positions burned with similar probability. Impacts of edges and connectivity on fire temperature led to changes in vegetation: hotter-burning plots supported higher bunch grass cover during the field season after burning, suggesting implications for woody/herbaceous species coexistence. To our knowledge, this represents the first experimental evidence that corridors can modify landscape-scale patterns of fire intensity. Corridor impacts on fire should be carefully considered during landscape management, both in the context of how corridors connect or break distributions of fuels and the desired role of fire as a disturbance, which may range from a management tool to an agent to be suppressed. In our focal ecosystem, longleaf pine woodland, corridors might provide a previously

  18. Complexity Analysis of Traffic in Corridors-in-the-Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min; Zelinski, Shannon Jean

    2010-01-01

    The corridors-in-the-sky concept imitates the highway system in ground transportation. The benefit expected from a corridor relies on its capability of handling high density traffic with negligible controller workload, the acceptance of extra fuel or distance, and the complexity reduction in underlying sectors. This work evaluates a selected corridor from these perspectives through simulations. To examine traffic inside the corridor, a corridor traffic simulation tool that can resolve conflicts is developed using C language. Prescribed conflict resolution maneuvers mimic corridor users behaviors and conflict resolution counts measure complexity. Different lane options and operational policies are proposed to examine their impacts on complexity. Fuel consumption is calculated and compared for corridor traffic. On the other hand, to investigate the complexity of non-corridor traffic in underlying sectors, the existing Airspace Concept Evaluation System tool is utilized along with the Automated Airspace Concept tool. The number of conflict resolutions is examined and treated as the complexity measurement. The results show heavy traffic can be managed with low complexity for a historical traffic schedule simulated with appropriate operational policies and lane options. For instance, with 608 flights and peak aircraft count of 100, only 84 actions need to be taken in a 24-hour period to resolve the conflicts for an 8-lane corridor. Compared with the fuel consumptions with great circle trajectories, the simulation of corridor traffic shows that the total extra fuel for corridor flights is 26,373 gallons, or 2.76%, which is 0.38% less than flying filed flight plans. Without taking climb and descent portions of corridor traffic, the complexity of underlying sectors is reduced by 17.71%. However the climb and descent portions will eliminate the reduction and the overall complexity of sectors is actually increased by 9.14%.

  19. Characterization of polymorphisms of genes ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 and relationship to the alcoholism in a Colombian population

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identify and characterize polymorphisms of genes ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 in a Colombian population residing in the city of Bogotá and determine its possible relationship to the alcoholism. Methods: ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2, and CYP2E1 genotypes a population of 148 individuals with non-problematic alcohol and 65 individuals with alcoholism were determined with TaqMan probes and PCR-RFLP. DNA was obtained from peripheral blood white cells. Results: Significant difference was found in family history of alcoholism and use of other psychoactive substances to compare alcoholics with controls. When allelic frequencies for each category (gender) were considered, frequency of A2 allele carriers in ADH2 was found higher in male patients than controls. In women, the relative frequency for c1 allele in CYP2E1 was lower in controls than alcoholics. The ALDH2 locus is monomorphic. No significant differences in allele distributions of the loci examined to compare two populations were observed, however when stratifying the same trend was found that these differences tended to be significant. Conclusions: This study allows us to conclude the positive association between family history of alcoholism and alcoholism suggesting that there is a favourable hereditary predisposition. Since substance dependence requires interaction of multiple genes, the combination of genotypes ADH2 * 2, CYP2E1 * 1 combined with genotype homozygous ALDH2 * 1 found in this study could be leading to the population to a potential risk to alcoholism. PMID:26848198

  20. The Complete Sequence of 340 kb of DNA around the Rice Adh1–Adh2 Region Reveals Interrupted Colinearity with Maize Chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Tarchini, Renato; Biddle, Phyllis; Wineland, Robin; Tingey, Scott; Rafalski, Antoni

    2000-01-01

    A 2.3-centimorgan (cM) segment of rice chromosome 11 consisting of 340 kb of DNA sequence around the alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and Adh2 loci was completely sequenced, revealing the presence of 33 putative genes, including several apparently involved in disease resistance. Fourteen of the genes were confirmed by identifying the corresponding transcripts. Five genes, spanning 1.9 cM of the region, cross-hybridized with maize genomic DNA and were genetically mapped in maize, revealing a stretch of colinearity with maize chromosome 4. The Adh1 gene marked one significant interruption. This gene mapped to maize chromosome 1, indicating a possible translocation of Adh1 after the evolutionary divergence leading to maize and sorghum. Several other genes, most notably genes similar to known disease resistance genes, showed no cross-hybridization with maize genomic DNA, suggesting sequence divergence or absence of these sequences in maize, which is in contrast to several other well-conserved genes, including Adh1 and Adh2. These findings indicate that the use of rice as the model system for other cereals may sometimes be complicated by the presence of rapidly evolving gene families and microtranslocations. Seven retrotransposons and eight transposons were identified in this rice segment, including a Tc1/Mariner–like element, which is new to rice. In contrast to maize, retroelements are less frequent in rice. Only 14.4% of this genome segment consist of retroelements. Miniature inverted repeat transposable elements were found to be the most frequently occurring class of repetitive elements, accounting for 18.8% of the total repetitive DNA. PMID:10715324

  1. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., landside infrastructure maintenance savings, improved safety, and added system resiliency. Additional... infrastructure maintenance costs, safety and system resiliency. Specify if the Marine Highway Corridor...

  2. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., landside infrastructure maintenance savings, improved safety, and added system resiliency. Additional... infrastructure maintenance costs, safety and system resiliency. Specify if the Marine Highway Corridor...

  3. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., landside infrastructure maintenance savings, improved safety, and added system resiliency. Additional... infrastructure maintenance costs, safety and system resiliency. Specify if the Marine Highway Corridor...

  4. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., landside infrastructure maintenance savings, improved safety, and added system resiliency. Additional... infrastructure maintenance costs, safety and system resiliency. Specify if the Marine Highway Corridor...

  5. WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ON FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING EAST - Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, 1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Molecular cloning of alcohol dehydrogenase genes of the yeast Pichia stipitis and identification of the fermentative ADH.

    PubMed

    Passoth, V; Schäfer, B; Liebel, B; Weierstall, T; Klinner, U

    1998-10-01

    Two Pichia stipitis ADH genes (PsADH1 and PsADH2) were isolated by complementation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adh(-)-mutant. The genes enabled the transformants to grow in the presence of antimycin A on glucose, to use ethanol as sole carbon source and made them sensitive to allylalcohol. The sequences of the genes showed similarities of 70-77% to sequences of ADH genes of Candida albicans, Kluyveromyces lactis, K. marxianus, and S. cerevisiae and about 60% homology to those of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Aspergillus flavus. Southern hybridization experiments suggested that P. stipitis has only these two ADH genes. Both genes are located on the largest chromosome of P. stipitis. PsADH2 encodes for the ADH activity that is responsible for ethanol formation at oxygen limitation. The gene is regulated at the transcriptional level. Moreover, also in cells grown on ethanol, only PsADH2 transcript was found. PsADH1 transcript was detected under aerobic conditions on fermentable carbon sources.

  7. Ethanol formation in adh0 mutants reveals the existence of a novel acetaldehyde-reducing activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Drewke, C; Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1990-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been constructed which is deficient in the four alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes known at present. This strain (adh0), being irreversibly mutated in the genes ADH1, ADH3, and ADH4 and carrying a point mutation in the gene ADH2 coding for the glucose-repressible isozyme ADHII, still produces up to one third of the theoretical maximum yield of ethanol in a homofermentative conversion of glucose to ethanol. Analysis of the glucose metabolism of adh0 cells shows that the lack of all known ADH isozymes results in the formation of glycerol as a major fermentation product, accompanied by a significant production of acetaldehyde and acetate. Treatment of glucose-growing adh0 cells with the respiratory-chain inhibitor antimycin A leads to an immediate cessation of ethanol production, demonstrating that ethanol production in adh0 cells is dependent on mitochondrial electron transport. Reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol in isolated mitochondria could also be demonstrated. This reduction is apparently linked to the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Preliminary data suggest that this novel type of ethanol formation in S. cerevisiae is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Images PMID:2193925

  8. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Laniewska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in gastric cancer cells (GC). Moreover, the activity of total ADH and class IV isoenzymes is significantly higher in cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as tumor markers for gastric cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value for positive and negative results, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 168 patients with gastric cancer before treatment and from 168 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH IV isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of gastric cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 73%, specificity 79%, positive and negative predictive values were 81 and 72% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.67. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as marker of gastric cancer.

  9. 'Africa Alive Corridors': Forging a new future for the people of Africa by the people of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix Toteu, Sadrack; Malcolm Anderson, John; de Wit, Maarten

    2010-11-01

    ' Africa Alive Corridors' (AAC) addresses major stewardship goals in Africa through a selection of 20 heritage Corridors (varying from 1000 to 4000 km in length and 50 to 100 km wide). These include more than 400 heritage nodes (World Heritage Sites, Biosphere Reserves, biodiversity hotspots, Geoparks, etc.). AAC tracks Africa's journey from around 4 billion years ago to the present day through these chronologically sequenced Corridors. And so, the 4-billion-year autobiography of the continent is told. It encompasses the geological, biological and anthropological/cultural history of Africa's 54 nations - a (hi-) story without borders. The wealth of scientific and biographical knowledge archived in this network of Corridors tells the story of continental drift, mega-geohazards, climate variability and change, and the origin and extinction of biodiversity; and includes our human roots, culture and spirituality, our impact on the Earth and our potential to influence its future. In telling this story of Africa, new research avenues will be discovered and new learning methodologies will be experienced and developed and shared. In this way, the AAC provide loci along which the eight UN-Millennium Development Goals may be readily and realistically achieved. In concert, they can form the basis for a new collective endeavour - of Pan African Earth Stewardship Science. In this, the final - 2010 - phase of IYPE (the International Year of Planet Earth), we aim to make a start at bringing the ' Africa Alive Corridors' into real-life context. Whilst the concept of the Corridors has been formulated and presented at various international forums—most recently in Africa at the launch of IYPE in Arusha, Tanzania, in May 2008—here we present in brief their conceptual framework, and summarize the rationale behind the selection of the 20 African Corridors. Then, we describe, for the first time, how the AAC concept might evolve. To achieve the latter, we focus on an exploratory

  10. Buccal Corridors: A Fact or a Myth in the Eyes of Laymen?

    PubMed Central

    Elhiny, Omnia A.; Harhash, Asmaa Y.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate laymen knowledge of the existence of the buccal corridor and whether it was an important factor for them in judging smile attractiveness and the effect of introducing the knowledge to them on their further judgment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine subjects were randomly selected with variable buccal corridor percentages. They were coached to smile in a posed fashion and full face smile photographs were taken from a standardised distance. The photographs were randomly arranged in a power point presentation and displayed to a panel of thirty-nine randomly selected laymen judges. The judges made their beauty judgment on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and filled a questionnaire. After their education about the buccal corridor, they were asked to make a second judgment on a second sheet with VAS and with a different random sequence of the photographs. RESULTS: Intra-class correlation agreement for all the judges between the first and second scores was 0.713. The Spearman’s rho Correlation coefficient indicated a positive correlation for all the photos. For the male judges, the agreement between the ratings was 0.839, and the correlation was positive for all the photos. For the female judges, the agreement between the ratings was 0.510, and the correlation was positive for all the photographs. Hundred percent of the judges were not familiar with the buccal corridor. Eighty percent of the female judges and 44.4% of the male judges mentioned that it would affect their further judgment. CONCLUSION: Laymen build their esthetic judgments on what we teach them, and modifying treatment plans to include corrections of buccal corridors for esthetic reasons only is a myth. PMID:28028418

  11. Population dynamics of Microtus pennsylvanicus in corridor-linked patches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffman, C.J.; Nichols, J.D.; Pollock, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Corridors have become a key issue in the discussion of conservation planning: however, few empirical data exist on the use of corridors and their effects on population dynamics. The objective of this replicated, population level, capture-re-capture experiment on meadow voles was to estimate and compare population characteristics of voles between (1) corridor-linked fragments, (2) isolated or non-linked fragments, and (3) unfragmented areas. We conducted two field experiments involving 22600 captures of 5700 individuals. In the first, the maintained corridor study, corridors were maintained at the time of fragmentation, and in the second, the constructed corridor study, we constructed corridors between patches that had been fragmented for some period of time. We applied multistate capture-recapture models with the robust design to estimate adult movement and survival rates, population size, temporal variation in population size, recruitment, and juvenile survival rates. Movement rates increased to a greater extent on constructed corridor-linked grids than on the unfragmented or non-linked fragmented grids between the pre- and post-treatment periods. We found significant differences in local survival on the treated (corridor-linked) grids compared to survival on the fragmented and unfragmented grids between the pre- and post-treatment periods. We found no clear pattern of treatment effects on population size or recruitment in either study. However, in both studies, we found that unfragmented grids were more stable than the fragmented grids based on lower temporal variability in population size. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental study demonstrating that corridors constructed between existing fragmented populations can indeed cause increases in movement and associated changes in demography, supporting the use of constructed corridors for this purpose in conservation biology.

  12. Evaluating landscape options for corridor restoration between giant panda reserves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; McShea, William J; Wang, Dajun; Li, Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Hao; Lu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda movements caused by

  13. Steric vs. electronic effects in the Lactobacillus brevis ADH-catalyzed bioreduction of ketones.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Borzęcka, Wioleta; Sattler, Johann H; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Lavandera, Iván; Gotor, Vicente

    2014-01-28

    Lactobacillus brevis ADH (LBADH) is an alcohol dehydrogenase that is commonly employed to reduce alkyl or aryl ketones usually bearing a methyl, an ethyl or a chloromethyl as a small ketone substituent to the corresponding (R)-alcohols. Herein we have tested a series of 24 acetophenone derivatives differing in their size and electronic properties for their reduction employing LBADH. After plotting the relative activity against the measured substrate volumes we observed that apart from the substrate size other effects must be responsible for the activity obtained. Compared to acetophenone (100% relative activity), other small substrates such as propiophenone, α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone, α-hydroxyacetophenone, and benzoylacetonitrile had relative activities lower than 30%, while medium-sized ketones such as α-bromo-, α,α-dichloro-, and α,α-dibromoacetophenone presented relative activities between 70% and 550%. Moreover, the comparison between the enzymatic activity and the obtained final conversions using an excess or just 2.5 equiv. of the hydrogen donor 2-propanol, denoted again deviations between them. These data supported that these hydrogen transfer (HT) transformations are mainly thermodynamically controlled. For instance, bulky α-halogenated derivatives could be quantitatively reduced by LBADH even employing 2.5 equiv. of 2-propanol independently of their kinetic values. Finally, we found good correlations between the IR absorption band of the carbonyl groups and the degrees of conversion obtained in these HT processes, making this simple method a convenient tool to predict the success of these transformations.

  14. 24. General view looking NE up the corridor towards downtown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. General view looking NE up the corridor towards downtown Newark with NJ State Highway ramp to Broad Street in center and Lehigh Valley Railroad Bridge in right corner. Newark, Essex Co., NJ. Sec. 1401, MP 10.35. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between Pennsylvania/New Jersey & New Jersey/New York State Lines, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  15. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  16. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  17. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  18. A corridor on the first floor of the building, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A corridor on the first floor of the building, looking west, shows some of the typical interior finishes in this section. At the end of the hallway, the corridor turns right after entering the next adjacent structure - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Electronics Laboratory Building (E Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  19. Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

    2011-08-01

    Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

  20. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... which lands may be suitable for right-of-way corridors, the factors BLM considers include, but are not..., local, and tribal laws; (2) Environmental impacts on cultural resources and natural resources, including... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the...

  1. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... which lands may be suitable for right-of-way corridors, the factors BLM considers include, but are not..., local, and tribal laws; (2) Environmental impacts on cultural resources and natural resources, including... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the...

  2. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... which lands may be suitable for right-of-way corridors, the factors BLM considers include, but are not..., local, and tribal laws; (2) Environmental impacts on cultural resources and natural resources, including... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the...

  3. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... which lands may be suitable for right-of-way corridors, the factors BLM considers include, but are not..., local, and tribal laws; (2) Environmental impacts on cultural resources and natural resources, including... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the...

  4. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  5. Courtyard. Left wall is corridor from 511 to 515. Right ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Courtyard. Left wall is corridor from 511 to 515. Right wall is the south side of 517. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  7. Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, 501, and 505), looking south towards the staff corridor vestibule (room 206A, representing rooms 305A, 405A, and 505A). - California State Office Building No. 1, 915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. An experimental test of whether habitat corridors affect pollen transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Patricia A.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2005-02-01

    Abstract. Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are thought to be diminished when habitat patches are joined by a corridor. A key assumption is that corridors facilitate exchange rates of organisms between otherwise isolated patches. If the organisms are pollinators, corridors may be important for maintaining genetically viable populations of the plants that they pollinate. We tested the hypothesis that corridors increase the movement of insect pollinators into patches of habitat and thereby increase pollen transfer for two species of plants, one pollinated by butterflies (Lantana camara) and the other by bees and wasps (Rudbeckia hirta). We worked in an experimental landscape consisting of 40 greater than or equal to 1-ha patches of early-successional habitat in a matrix of forest. Within each of eight experimental units, two patches were connected by a corridor (150 X 25 m), and three were not. Patch shape varied to control for the area added by the presence of a corridor. Differences in patch shape also allowed us to test alternative hypotheses of how corridors might function. The Traditional Corridor Hypothesis posits that corridors increase immigration and emigration by functioning as movement conduits between patches. The Drift Fence Hypothesis posits that corridors function by ‘‘capturing’’ organisms dispersing through the matrix, redirecting them into associated habitat patches. Using fluorescent powder to track pollen, we found that pollen transfer by butterflies between patches connected by a corridor was significantly higher than between unconnected patches (all values mean plus or minus 1 SE: 59% plus or minus 9.2% vs. 25% plus or minus 5.2% of flowers receiving pollen). Likewise, pollen transfer by bees and wasps was significantly higher between connected patches than between unconnected patches (30% plus or minus 4.2% vs. 14.5% plus or minus 2.2%). These results support the Traditional Corridor Hypothesis. There was little support, however

  9. ADH1A variation predisposes to personality traits and substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingjun; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R; Stein, Murray B; Zhang, Huiping; Wei, Feng; Sen, Srijan; Poling, James; Luo, Xingguang

    2010-03-05

    Human personality traits are strong predictors or characteristics of many psychiatric disorders including substance dependence (SD). Recently, significant associations between alcohol dehydrogenase type 1A gene (ADH1A) and SD have been reported, which led us to investigate the impact of ADH1A variation on personality traits and risk of SD. Five hundred fifty-eight subjects with SD [398 European-Americans (EAs) and 160 African-Americans (AAs)], 517 college students (384 EAs and 133 European-origin Hispanics), and 448 healthy subjects (385 EAs, 48 AAs, and 15 European-origin Hispanics) participated. Personality traits were assessed in 247 subjects with SD (179 EAs and 68 AAs), all 517 college students, and 332 healthy subjects (285 EAs, 40 AAs, and 7 European-origin Hispanics). The relationships between ADH1A and personality traits were comprehensively examined using stepwise multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), and then decomposed by stepwise analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The relationship between ADH1A and SD was examined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Admixture effects on analyses were considered. Overall, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were associated with the diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes, and/or alleles of ADH1A in three of four phenotype groups including EA SD subjects, healthy subjects, and AA SD subjects (1.7 x 10(-4) ADH1A (0.008 ADH1A variation may contribute to the genetic component of variation in personality traits and SD.

  10. Western Energy Corridor -- Energy Resource Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Roberts; Michael Hagood

    2011-06-01

    The world is facing significant growth in energy demand over the next several decades. Strategic in meeting this demand are the world-class energy resources concentrated along the Rocky Mountains and northern plains in Canada and the U.S., informally referred to as the Western Energy Corridor (WEC). The fossil energy resources in this region are rivaled only in a very few places in the world, and the proven uranium reserves are among the world's largest. Also concentrated in this region are renewable resources contributing to wind power, hydro power, bioenergy, geothermal energy, and solar energy. Substantial existing and planned energy infrastructure, including refineries, pipelines, electrical transmission lines, and rail lines provide access to these resources.

  11. Requirements Definition for ORNL Trusted Corridors Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Smith, Cyrus M; DeNap, Frank A; White, James D; Gross, Ian G; Gorman, Bryan L; Hively, Lee M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-02-01

    The ORNL Trusted Corridors Project has several other names: SensorNet Transportation Pilot; Identification and Monitoring of Radiation (in commerce) Shipments (IMR(ic)S); and Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP). The project involves acquisition and analysis of transportation data at two mobile and three fixed inspection stations in five states (Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington DC). Collaborators include the State Police organizations that are responsible for highway safety, law enforcement, and incident response. The three states with fixed weigh-station deployments (KY, SC, TN) are interested in coordination of this effort for highway safety, law enforcement, and sorting/targeting/interdiction of potentially non-compliant vehicles/persons/cargo. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is interested in these deployments, as a Pilot test (SETCP) to identify Improvised Nuclear Devices (INDs) in highway transport. However, the level of DNDO integration among these state deployments is presently uncertain. Moreover, DHS issues are considered secondary by the states, which perceive this work as an opportunity to leverage these (new) dual-use technologies for state needs. In addition, present experience shows that radiation detectors alone cannot detect DHS-identified IND threats. Continued SETCP success depends on the level of integration of current state/local police operations with the new DHS task of detecting IND threats, in addition to emergency preparedness and homeland security. This document describes the enabling components for continued SETCP development and success, including: sensors and their use at existing deployments (Section 1); personnel training (Section 2); concept of operations (Section 3); knowledge discovery from the copious data (Section 4); smart data collection, integration and database development, advanced algorithms for multiple sensors, and

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of the nuclear alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene family in Carex section Acrocystis (Cyperaceae) and combined analyses of Adh and nuclear ribosomal ITS and ETS sequences for inferring species relationships.

    PubMed

    Roalson, Eric H; Friar, Elizabeth A

    2004-12-01

    We analyzed sequence variation for the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene family in Carex section Acrocystis (Cyperaceae) to reconstruct Adh gene trees for Acrocystis species and to characterize the structure of the Adh gene family in Carex. Two Adh loci were included with ITS and ETS sequences in a combined Bayesian inference analysis of Carex section Acrocystis to gain a better understanding of species relationships in the section. In addition, we comment on how the results presented here contribute to our knowledge of the birth-death process of the Adh gene family in angiosperms. It appears that the structure of the Adh gene family in Carex is complex with possibly six loci present in the gene family. Additionally, variation among Acrocystis species within loci is quite low, and there is little phylogenetic resolution in the individual datasets. Bayesian inference analysis of the combined ITS, ETS, Adh1, and Adh2 datasets resulted in a moderately well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis of relationships in the section which is discussed in relation to previous hypotheses of relationships.

  13. Alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA plays a role in ethanol tolerance in model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Rebeca

    2017-02-03

    The protein AdhA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has been previously reported to show alcohol dehydrogenase activity towards ethanol and both NAD and NADP. This protein is currently being used in genetically modified strains of Synechocystis capable of synthesizing ethanol showing the highest ethanol productivities. In the present work, mutant strains of Synechocystis lacking AdhA have been constructed and tested for tolerance to ethanol. The lack of AdhA in the wild-type strain reduces survival to externally added ethanol at lethal concentration of 4% (v/v). On the other hand, the lack of AdhA in an ethanologenic strain diminishes tolerance of cells to internally produced ethanol. It is also shown that light-activated heterotrophic growth (LAHG) of the wild-type strain is impaired in the mutant strain lacking AdhA (∆adhA strain). Photoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and photoheterotrophic growth are not affected in the mutant strain. Based on phenotypic characterization of ∆adhA mutants, the possible physiological function of AdhA in Synechocystis is discussed.

  14. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3): Turbulence Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ER D C/ CH L CR -1 5- 1 Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3): Turbulence Closure Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic...military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our...library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CHL CR-15-1 June 2015 Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3

  15. A Practical Map-Analysis Tool for Detecting Potential Dispersal Corridors

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, William Walter; Hoffman, Forrest M; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann

    2005-01-01

    We describe the Pathway Analysis Through Habitat (PATH) tool, which can predict the location of potential corridors of animal movement between patches of habitat within any map. The algorithm works by launching virtual entities that we call 'walkers' from each patch of habitat in the map, simulating their travel as they journey through land cover types in the intervening matrix, and finally arrive at a different habitat 'island.' Each walker is imbued with a set of user-specified habitat preferences that make its walking behavior resemble a particular animal species. Because the tool operates in parallel on a supercomputer, large numbers of walkers can be efficiently simulated. The importance of each habitat patch as a source or a sink for a species is calculated, consistent with existing concepts in the metapopulation literature. The manipulation of a series of contrived artificial landscapes demonstrates that the location of potential dispersal corridors and relative source and sink importance among patches can be purposefully altered in expected ways. Finally, potential dispersal corridors are predicted among remnant woodlots within three actual landscape maps.

  16. [The ADH program: a logical Aid to Decision-making in Hematology with teaching applications].

    PubMed

    Sigaux, F; Imbert, M; Sultan, C

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the characteristics and the effectiveness of a Baysian computer method applied to haematological diagnosis are analysed. The programme which is more effective than 2 clinicians recently trained in haematology can be used for teaching purposes.

  17. 26. Interior of elevator, view from corridor. Thalheimer Whiteman ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Interior of elevator, view from corridor. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  18. 22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; view to southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  19. Facility No. 175, interior overview from secondfloor corridor on northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, interior overview from second-floor corridor on northwest side - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Interior view of connecting corridor looking from pavilion "B" to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of connecting corridor looking from pavilion "B" to "A" (original west pavilion to convalescent pavilion). - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Hospital, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  1. 76 FR 3695 - Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Corridor, Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Corridor, Virginia AGENCY... Administration is issuing this notice to advise the public of its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact..., Senior Environmental Specialist, Federal Highway Administration, Post Office Box 10249,...

  2. 37. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, NORTH OF ELEVATOR LOBBY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, NORTH OF ELEVATOR LOBBY 4, EAST WALL, AMERICAN BISON MURAL (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 7. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH HALF OF EAST CORRIDOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH HALF OF EAST CORRIDOR, RANGE 5, WITH CENTRAL ROOF SUPPORTS, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  4. 48. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, SOUTH WALL, DEER STALKING MURAL - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. Vault Area (original section), south corridor, looking west Fort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), south corridor, looking west - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. 7, looking up flue - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. 7, view west - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 3 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 3 showing inside surface of outer door - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north (Vault Nos. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north (Vault Nos. 1-9 - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. EXTERIOR DOOR DETAIL, CORRIDOR 137, FACING EAST Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR DOOR DETAIL, CORRIDOR 137, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, CORRIDOR 137 Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, CORRIDOR 137 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 11. View of east entry to central corridor of filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View of east entry to central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  14. 32. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  15. 31. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  16. 13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  17. 28. Main water inlet and outlet pipes under central corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Main water inlet and outlet pipes under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. VIEW OF BOTTOMLAND FOREST, WEST OF RAILROAD CORRIDOR, NORTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BOTTOMLAND FOREST, WEST OF RAILROAD CORRIDOR, NORTH OF OVERHILLS LAKE, FACING WEST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  19. 49. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, DETAIL OF DECORATIVE BEAM, CORBEL, AND CEILING - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 35. INTERIOR, FIRST (AND SECOND) FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR AND SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. INTERIOR, FIRST (AND SECOND) FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR AND SOUTH FOYER, DETAIL OF BRONZE BUILDING DIRECTORY (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. First floor corridor, looking west towards the lobby. The entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First floor corridor, looking west towards the lobby. The entrance to the display area (room 101) is located directly behind the camera - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  2. Ego-Vehicle Corridors for Vision-Based Driver Assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ruyi; Klette, Reinhard; Vaudrey, Tobi; Wang, Shigang

    Improving or generalizing lane detection solutions on curved roads with possibly broken lane marks is still a challenging task. This paper proposes a concept of a (virtual) corridor for modeling the space an ego-vehicle is able to drive through, using available (but often incomplete, e.g., due to occlusion, road conditions, or road intersections) information about the lane marks but also about the motion and relative position (with respect to the road) of the ego-vehicle. A corridor is defined in this paper by special features, such as two fixed starting points, a constant width, and a unique relationship with visible lane marks. Robust corridor detection is possible by hypothesis testing based on maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation, followed by boundary selection, and road patch extension. Obstacles are explicitly considered. A corridor tracking method is also discussed. Experimental results are provided.

  3. 14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator Building, general view VIEW SOUTHWEST, NORTH ELEVATION - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  4. 50. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, DETAIL OF TIN LIGHTING SCONCE - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 76 FR 65561 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... Federal Highway Administration Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program AGENCY: Federal... Operations and Management (MCOM) Program authorized by the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient... transportation challenges facing the efficient and effective operation and management of...

  6. Road-corridor planning in the EIA procedure in Spain. A review of case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Loro, Manuel [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Transport Research Centre Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Arce, Rosa M. [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Transport Research Centre Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Ortega, Emilio [Transport Research Centre Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Department of Construction and Rural Roads, Forestry Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s and others

    2014-01-15

    The assessment of different alternatives in road-corridor planning must be based on a number of well-defined territorial variables that serve as decision making criteria, and this requires a high-quality preliminary environmental assessment study. In Spain the formal specifications for the technical requirements stipulate the constraints that must be considered in the early stages of defining road corridors, but not how they should be analyzed and ranked. As part of the feasibility study of a new road definition, the most common methodology is to establish different levels of Territorial Carrying Capacity (TCC) in the study area in order to summarize the territorial variables on thematic maps and to ease the tracing process of road-corridor layout alternatives. This paper explores the variables used in 22 road-construction projects conducted by the Ministry of Public Works that were subject to the Spanish EIA regulation and published between 2006 and 2008. The aim was to evaluate the quality of the methods applied and the homogeneity and suitability of the variables used for defining the TCC. The variables were clustered into physical, environmental, land-use and cultural constraints for the purpose of comparing the TCC values assigned in the studies reviewed. We found the average quality of the studies to be generally acceptable in terms of the justification of the methodology, the weighting and classification of the variables, and the creation of a synthesis map. Nevertheless, the methods for assessing the TCC are not sufficiently standardized; there is a lack of uniformity in the cartographic information sources and methodologies for the TCC valuation. -- Highlights: • We explore 22 road-corridor planning studies subjected to the Spanish EIA regulation. • We analyze the variables selected for defining territorial carrying capacity. • The quality of the studies is acceptable (methodology, variable weighting, mapping). • There is heterogeneity in the

  7. River Corridor Project Workplace Air Monitoring Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect

    MANTOOTH, D.S.

    2001-01-17

    This document provides the technical basis by which the workplace air monitoring and sampling program is operated in the River Corridor Project (RCP). Revision 2 addresses and incorporates changes in the air monitoring program drivers and implementing documents which occurred after the previous revision was issued. This revision also includes an additional RCP project to make Revision 2 applicable to the entire RCP. These changes occurred in the following areas: (1) Changes resulting from the conversion of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1) into the Project Hanford Radiological Control Manual (F-5173). HNF-5173 is now the implementing document for 10CFR835. (2) Changes resulting from the issue of new and revised Hanford Site implementing procedures. (3) Changes resulting from the issue of new and revised, as well as the cancellation of RCP implementing procedures. (4) Addition of the 200 Area Accelerated Deactivation Project (ADP). (5) Modification of some air sampling/monitoring locations to better meet the needs of facility operations. (6) Changes resulting from the RCP reorganization.

  8. Monitoring vegetation water uptake in a semiarid riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Ochoa, C. G.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    With a changing global climate and growing demand for water throughout the world, responsible and sustainable land and water resource management practices are becoming increasingly important. Accounting for the amount of water used by riparian vegetation is a critical element for better managing water resources in arid and semiarid environments. The objective of this study was to determine water uptake by selected riparian vegetative species in a semiarid riparian corridor in North-Central Oregon. Exo-skin sap flow sensors (Dynamax, Houston, TX, U.S.A.) were used to measure sap flux in red alder (Alnus rubra) trees, the dominant overstory vegetation at the field site. Xylem sap flow data was collected from selected trees at the field site and in a greenhouse setting. Transpiration rates were determined based on an energy balance method, which makes it possible to estimate the mass flow of sap by measuring the velocity of electrical heat pulses through the plant stem. Preliminary field results indicate that red alder tree branches of about 1 inch diameter transpire between 2 and 6 kg of water/day. Higher transpiration rates of up to 7.3 kg of water/day were observed under greenhouse conditions. Streamflow and stream water temperature, vegetation characteristics, and meteorological data were analyzed in conjunction with transpiration data. Results of this study provide insight on riparian vegetation water consumption in water scarce ecosystems. This study is part of an overarching project focused on climate-vegetation interactions and ecohydrologic processes in arid and semiarid landscapes.

  9. Corridors and olfactory predator cues affect small mammal behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkerhoff, Robert Jory; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock, John L.

    2005-03-30

    Abstract The behavior of prey individuals is influenced by a variety of factors including, but not limited to, habitat configuration, risk of predation, and availability of resources, and these habitat-dependent factors may have interactive effects. We studied the responses of mice to an increase in perceived predation risk in a patchy environment to understand how habitat corridors might affect interactions among species in a fragmented landscape. We used a replicated experiment to investigate corridor-mediated prey responses to predator cues in a network of open habitat patches surrounded by a matrix of planted pine forest. Some of the patches were connected by corridors. We used mark–recapture techniques and foraging trays to monitor the movement, behavior, and abundance of small mammals. Predation threat was manipulated in one-half of the replicates by applying an olfactory predator cue. Corridors synchronized small mammal foraging activity among connected patches. Foraging also was inhibited in the presence of an olfactory predator cue but apparently increased in adjacent connected patches. Small mammal abundance did not change as a result of the predator manipulation and was not influenced by the presence of corridors. This study is among the 1st to indicate combined effects of landscape configuration and predation risk on prey behavior. These changes in prey behavior may, in turn, have cascading effects on community dynamics where corridors and differential predation risk influence movement and patch use.

  10. Wood and Sediment Dynamics in River Corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Scott, D.

    2015-12-01

    Large wood along rivers influences entrainment, transport, and storage of mineral sediment and particulate organic matter. We review how wood alters sediment dynamics and explore patterns among volumes of instream wood, sediment storage, and residual pools for dispersed pieces of wood, logjams, and beaver dams. We hypothesized that: volume of sediment per unit area of channel stored in association with wood is inversely proportional to drainage area; the form of sediment storage changes downstream; sediment storage correlates most strongly with wood load; and volume of sediment stored behind beaver dams correlates with pond area. Lack of data from larger drainage areas limits tests of these hypotheses, but analyses suggest a negative correlation between sediment volume and drainage area and a positive correlation between wood and sediment volume. The form of sediment storage in relation to wood changes downstream, with wedges of sediment upstream from jammed steps most prevalent in small, steep channels and more dispersed sediment storage in lower gradient channels. Use of a published relation between sediment volume, channel width, and gradient predicted about half of the variation in sediment stored upstream from jammed steps. Sediment volume correlates well with beaver pond area. Historically more abundant instream wood and beaver populations likely equated to greater sediment storage within river corridors. This review of the existing literature on wood and sediment dynamics highlights the lack of studies on larger rivers.

  11. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

    2006-02-09

    A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

  12. Interactions between ADH and prostaglandins in isolated erythrocyte-perfused rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberthal, W.; Vasilevsky, M.L.; Valeri, C.R.; Levinsky, N.G.

    1987-02-01

    Interactions between antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and renal prostaglandins in the regulation of sodium reabsorption and urinary concentrating ability were studied in isolated erythrocyte-perfused rat kidneys (IEPK). In this model, hemodynamic characteristics are comparable to those found in vivo, and tubular morphology is preserved throughout the period of perfusion. (Deamino)-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP) markedly reduced fractional sodium excretion (FE/sub Na/) in the IEPK. After indomethacin, FE/sub Na/ fell still further. In the absence of dDAVP indomethacin had no effect on sodium excretion. dDAVP increased urine osmolality in the IEPK. When prostaglandin synthesis was blocked with indomethacin, urinary osmolality increased further. In isolated kidneys perfused without erythrocytes (IPK), dDAVP decreased FE/sub Na/ from 14.5 +/- 1.8% to 9.6 +/- 1.2%. dDAVP increased urine osmolality only modestly in the IPK and indomethacin did not increase concentrating ability further. Thus the IEPK (unlike the IPK) can excrete markedly hypertonic urine in response to ADH. ADH also enhances tubular reabsorption of sodium in the IEPK. Prostaglandins inhibit both these actions of ADH but do not directly affect sodium excretion in the absence of the hormone. Prostaglandius were measured by radioimmunoassay.

  13. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  14. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired.

  15. Suppression of ADH during water immersion in normal man. [antidiuretic hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Pins, D. S.; Miller, M.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to ascertain whether diuresis induced by immersion is medicated by an inhibition of ADH. Immersion resulted in a progressive decrease in ADH excretion from 80.1 + or - 7 (SEM) to 37.3 + or - 6.3 microU/min (P less than 0.025). Cessation of immersion was associated with a marked increase in ADH from 37.3 + or - 6.3 microU/min to 176.6 + or - 72.6 microU/min during the recovery hour (P less than 0.05). Concomitant with these changes, urine osmolality decreased significantly beginning as early as the initial hour of immersion from 1044 + or - 36 to 542 + or - 66 mosmol/kg H2O during the final hour of immersion (P less than 0.001). These findings are consistent with the earlier suggestion that suppression of ADH release contributes to enhanced free water clearance in hydrated subjects undergoing immersion.

  16. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  17. Evaluation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter for protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, K Michael; DaSilva, Nancy A

    2005-04-30

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter (P(ADH2)) is repressed several hundred-fold in the presence of glucose; transcription is initiated once the glucose in the medium is exhausted. The promoter can thus be utilized for effective regulation of recombinant gene expression in S. cerevisiae without the addition of an inducer. To evaluate this promoter in the absence of plasmid copy number and stability variations, the P(ADH2)-lacZ cassette was integrated into the yeast chromosomes. The effects of medium composition, glucose concentration and cultivation time on promoter derepression and expression level were investigated. Maximum protein activity was obtained after 48 h of growth in complex YPD medium containing 1% glucose. The widely used S. cerevisiae GAL1 and CUP1 promoters both require the addition of an inducer [galactose and copper(II) ion, respectively] before regulated genes will be expressed. The strengths of these three different promoters were compared for cells containing one copy of an integrated lacZ gene under their control. The ADH2 promoter was superior for all induction strategies investigated.

  18. Temperature and water loss affect ADH activity and gene expression in grape berry during postharvest dehydration.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Marco; Bellincontro, Andrea; De Santis, Diana; Botondi, Rinaldo; Colao, Maria Chiara; Muleo, Rosario; Mencarelli, Fabio

    2012-05-01

    Clusters of Aleatico wine grape were picked at 18°Brix and placed at 10, 20, or 30°C, 45% relative humidity (RH) and 1.5m/s of air flow to dehydrate the berries up to 40% of loss of initial fresh weight. Sampling was done at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% weight loss (wl). ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene expression, enzyme activity, and related metabolites were analysed. At 10°C, acetaldehyde increased rapidly and then declined, while ethanol continued to rise. At 20°C, acetaldehyde and ethanol increased significantly with the same pattern and declined at 40%wl. At 30°C, acetaldehyde did not increase but ethanol increased rapidly already at 10%wl. At the latter temperature, a significant increase in acetic acid and ethyl acetate occurred, while at 10°C their values were low. At 30°C, the ADH activity (ethanol to acetaldehyde direction), increased rapidly but acetaldehyde did not rise because of its oxidation to acetic acid, which increased together with ethyl acetate. At 10°C, the ADH activity increased at 20%wl and continued to rise even at 40%wl, meaning that ethanol oxidation was delayed. At 20°C, the behaviour was intermediate to the other temperatures. The relative expression of the VvAdh2 gene was the highest at 10°C already at 10%wl in a synchrony with the ADH activity, indicating a rapid response likely due to low temperature. The expression subsequently declined. At 20 and 30°C, the expression was lower and increased slightly during dehydration in combination with the ADH activity. This imbalance between gene expression and ADH activity at 10°C, as well as the unexpected expression of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 (CCD1) gene, opens the discussion on the stress sensitivity and transcription event during postharvest dehydration, and the importance of carefully monitoring temperature during dehydration.

  19. The ADH7 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Vanillin-Inducible and Enables mRNA Translation Under Severe Vanillin Stress.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh T M; Iwaki, Aya; Izawa, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the major phenolic aldehyde compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass and acts as a potent fermentation inhibitor to repress the growth and fermentative ability of yeast. Vanillin can be reduced to its less toxic form, vanillyl alcohol, by the yeast NADPH-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenases, Adh6 and Adh7. However, there is little information available regarding the regulation of their gene expression upon severe vanillin stress, which has been shown to repress the bulk translation activity in yeast cells. Therefore, in this study, we investigated expression patterns of the ADH6 and ADH7 genes in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. We found that although both genes were transcriptionally upregulated by vanillin stress, they showed different protein expression patterns in response to vanillin. Expression of Adh6 was constitutive and gradually decreased under vanillin stress, whereas expression of Adh7 was inducible, and, importantly, occurred under severe vanillin stress. The null mutants of ADH6 or ADH7 genes were hypersensitive to vanillin and reduced vanillin less efficiently than the wild type, confirming the importance of Adh6 and Adh7 in vanillin detoxification. Additionally, we demonstrate that the ADH7 promoter is vanillin-inducible and enables effective protein synthesis even under severe vanillin stress, and it may be useful for the improvement of vanillin-tolerance and biofuel production efficiency via modification of yeast gene expression in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin.

  20. Opposing--activating or inhibitory--effects of cimetidine and daidzein on human ADH1C activity depending on substrates and solvents.

    PubMed

    Kollock, Ronny; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-01-01

    Toxification of benzylic alcohols (e.g. hydroxymethylpyrenes) by sulfotransferases is efficiently competed by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). We are interested in drugs and food constituents affecting this detoxification. Daidzein and cimetidine were reported to inhibit ADH1C-mediated ethanol oxidation. Surprisingly, we found that both modulators enhance the oxidation of 4-hydroxymethylpyrene by ADH1C. This activation was seen with either delivering solvents used, dimethylsulfoxide or acetonitrile. Addition of dimethylsulfoxide, but not acetonitrile, converted daidzein and cimetidine from inhibitors to activators of the ADH1C-mediated oxidation of the other substrate studied, ethanol (added in water). Other human ADH forms (ADH2, 3, 4) were inhibited by both agents independently of the substrate and the corresponding solvent used. Kinetic constants for the various reactions are presented. ADH1C was unique in its complex substrate-dependent interaction with daidzein/cimetidine and solvents.

  1. Use of Individual Flight Corridors to Avoid Vortex Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2001-01-01

    Vortex wakes of aircraft pose a hazard to following aircraft until the energetic parts of their flow fields have decayed to a harmless level. It is suggested here that in-trail spacings between aircraft can be significantly and safely reduced by designing an individual, vortex-free flight corridor for each aircraft. Because each aircraft will then have its own flight corridor, which is free of vortex wakes while in use by the assigned aircraft, the time intervals between aircraft operations can be safely reduced to the order of seconds. The productivity of airports can then be substantially increased. How large the offset distances between operational corridors need to be to have them vortex free, and how airports need to be changed to accommodate an individual flight-corridor process for landing and takeoff operations, are explored. Estimates are then made of the productivity of an individual flight-corridor system as a function of the in-trail time interval between operations for various values of wake decay time, runway width, and the velocity of a sidewind. The results confirm the need for short time intervals between aircraft operations if smaller offset distances and increased productivity are to be achieved.

  2. Identifying Corridors among Large Protected Areas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Belote, R. Travis; Dietz, Matthew S.; McRae, Brad H.; Theobald, David M.; McClure, Meredith L.; Irwin, G. Hugh; McKinley, Peter S.; Gage, Josh A.; Aplet, Gregory H.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation scientists emphasize the importance of maintaining a connected network of protected areas to prevent ecosystems and populations from becoming isolated, reduce the risk of extinction, and ultimately sustain biodiversity. Keeping protected areas connected in a network is increasingly recognized as a conservation priority in the current era of rapid climate change. Models that identify suitable linkages between core areas have been used to prioritize potentially important corridors for maintaining functional connectivity. Here, we identify the most “natural” (i.e., least human-modified) corridors between large protected areas in the contiguous Unites States. We aggregated results from multiple connectivity models to develop a composite map of corridors reflecting agreement of models run under different assumptions about how human modification of land may influence connectivity. To identify which land units are most important for sustaining structural connectivity, we used the composite map of corridors to evaluate connectivity priorities in two ways: (1) among land units outside of our pool of large core protected areas and (2) among units administratively protected as Inventoried Roadless (IRAs) or Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs). Corridor values varied substantially among classes of “unprotected” non-core land units, and land units of high connectivity value and priority represent diverse ownerships and existing levels of protections. We provide a ranking of IRAs and WSAs that should be prioritized for additional protection to maintain minimal human modification. Our results provide a coarse-scale assessment of connectivity priorities for maintaining a connected network of protected areas. PMID:27104683

  3. Parametric entry corridors for lunar/Mars aerocapture missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa M.; Baseggio, Franco M.; Fuhry, Douglas P.

    1991-01-01

    Parametric atmospheric entry corridor data are presented for Earth and Mars aerocapture. Parameter ranges were dictated by the range of mission designs currently envisioned as possibilities for the Human Exploration Initiative (HEI). This data, while not providing a means for exhaustive evaluation of aerocapture performance, should prove to be a useful aid for preliminary mission design and evaluation. Entry corridors are expressed as ranges of allowable vacuum periapse altitude of the planetary approach hyperbolic orbit, with chart provided for conversion to an approximate flight path angle corridor at entry interface (125 km altitude). The corridor boundaries are defined by open-loop aerocapture trajectories which satisfy boundary constraints while utilizing the full aerodynamic control capability of the vehicle (i.e., full lift-up or full lift-down). Parameters examined were limited to those of greatest importance from an aerocapture performance standpoint, including the approach orbit hyperbolic excess velocity, the vehicle lift to drag ratio, maximum aerodynamic load factor limit, and the apoapse of the target orbit. The impact of the atmospheric density bias uncertainties are also included. The corridor data is presented in graphical format, and examples of the utilization of these graphs for mission design and evaluation are included.

  4. High diversity and no significant selection signal of human ADH1B gene in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADH1B is one of the most studied human genes with many polymorphic sites. One of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1229984, coding for the Arg48His substitution, have been associated with many serious diseases including alcoholism and cancers of the digestive system. The derived allele, ADH1B*48His, reaches high frequency only in East Asia and Southwest Asia, and is highly associated with agriculture. Micro-evolutionary study has defined seven haplogroups for ADH1B based on seven SNPs encompassing the gene. Three of those haplogroups, H5, H6, and H7, contain the ADH1B*48His allele. H5 occurs in Southwest Asia and the other two are found in East Asia. H7 is derived from H6 by the derived allele of rs3811801. The H7 haplotype has been shown to have undergone significant positive selection in Han Chinese, Hmong, Koreans, Japanese, Khazak, Mongols, and so on. Methods In the present study, we tested whether Tibetans also showed evidence for selection by typing 23 SNPs in the region covering the ADH1B gene in 1,175 individuals from 12 Tibetan populations representing all districts of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Multiple statistics were estimated to examine the gene diversities and positive selection signals among the Tibetans and other populations in East Asia. Results The larger Tibetan populations (Qamdo, Lhasa, Nagqu, Nyingchi, Shannan, and Shigatse) comprised mostly farmers, have around 12% of H7, and 2% of H6. The smaller populations, living on hunting or recently switched to farming, have lower H7 frequencies (Tingri 9%, Gongbo 8%, Monba and Sherpa 6%). Luoba (2%) and Deng (0%) have even lower frequencies. Long-range haplotype analyses revealed very weak signals of positive selection for H7 among Tibetans. Interestingly, the haplotype diversity of H7 is higher in Tibetans than in any other populations studied, indicating a longer diversification history for that haplogroup in Tibetans. Network analysis on the long-range haplotypes revealed

  5. Enhanced H2 gas production from bagasse using adhE inactivated Klebsiella oxytoca HP1 by sequential dark-photo fermentations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaobing; Li, Qianyi; Dieudonne, Mutangana; Cong, Yibo; Zhou, Juan; Long, Minnan

    2010-12-01

    Sequential dark-photo fermentations (SDPF) was used for hydrogen production from bagasse, an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (adhE) gene inactivated Klebsiella oxytoca HP1 (DeltaadhE HP1) mutant was used to reduce the alcohol content in dark fermentation (DF) broths and to further enhance the hydrogen yield during the photo fermentation (PF) stage. Compared with that of the wild strain, the ethanol concentration in DF broths of DeltaadhE HP1 decreased 69.4%, which resulted in a hydrogen yield in the PF stage and the total hydrogen yield over the two steps increased by 54.7% and 23.5%, respectively. The culture conditions for hydrogen production from acid pretreated bagasse by SDPF were optimized as culture temperature 37.5 degrees C, initial pH 7.0, and cellulase loading 20 FPA/g in the DF stage, with initial pH 6.5, temperature 30 degrees C and photo intensity 5,000 lux in the PF stage. Under optimum conditions, by using DeltaadhE HP1 and wild type strain, the H(2) yields were 107.8+/-5.3 mL H(2)/g-bagasse, 96.2+/-4.4 mL H(2)/g-bagasse in DF and 54.3+/-2.2 mL H(2)/g-bagasse, 35.1+/-2.0 mL H(2)/g-bagasse in PF, respectively. The special hydrogen production rate (SHPR) were 5.51+/-0.34 mL H(2)/g-bagasseh, 4.95+/-0.22 mL H(2)/g-bagasseh in DF and 0.93+/-0.12 mL H(2)/g-bagasseh, 0.59+/-0.07 mL H(2)/g-bagasseh in PF, respectively. The total hydrogen yield from bagasse over two steps was 162.1+/-7.5 mL H(2)/g-bagasse by using DeltaadhE HP1, which was 50.4% higher than that from dark fermentation only. These results indicate that reducing ethanol content during dark fermentation by using an adhE inactivated strain can significantly enhance hydrogen production from bagasse in the SDPF system. This work also proved that SDPF was an effective way to improve hydrogen production from bagasse.

  6. Genome-wide responses to carbonyl electrophiles in Bacillus subtilis: control of the thiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase AdhA and cysteine proteinase YraA by the MerR-family regulator YraB (AdhR).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Huyen; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Mäder, Ulrike; Liebeke, Manuel; Lalk, Michael; Hecker, Michael; Helmann, John D; Antelmann, Haike

    2009-02-01

    Quinones and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls are naturally occurring electrophiles that target cysteine residues via thiol-(S)-alkylation. We analysed the global expression profile of Bacillus subtilis to the toxic carbonyls methylglyoxal (MG) and formaldehyde (FA). Both carbonyl compounds cause a stress response characteristic for thiol-reactive electrophiles as revealed by the induction of the Spx, CtsR, CymR, PerR, ArsR, CzrA, CsoR and SigmaD regulons. MG and FA triggered also a SOS response which indicates DNA damage. Protection against FA is mediated by both the hxlAB operon, encoding the ribulose monophosphate pathway for FA fixation, and a thiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (AdhA) and DJ-1/PfpI-family cysteine proteinase (YraA). The adhA-yraA operon and the yraC gene, encoding a gamma-carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase, are positively regulated by the MerR-family regulator, YraB(AdhR). AdhR binds specifically to its target promoters which contain a 7-4-7 inverted repeat (CTTAAAG-N4-CTTTAAG) between the -35 and -10 elements. Activation of adhA-yraA transcription by AdhR requires the conserved Cys52 residue in vivo. We speculate that AdhR is redox-regulated via thiol-(S)-alkylation by aldehydes and that AdhA and YraA are specifically involved in reduction of aldehydes and degradation or repair of damaged thiol-containing proteins respectively.

  7. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds.

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Bolker, Benjamin M.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Sargent, Sarah; Haddad, Nick M.

    2005-07-01

    Levey, Douglas, J., Benjamin M. Bolker, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Sarah Sargent, and Nick M. Haddad. 2005. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds. Science 309:146-148. Abstract: Habitat fragmentation threatens biodiversity by disrupting dispersal. The mechanisms and consequences of this disruption are controversial, primarily because most organisms are difficult to track. We examined the effect of habitat corridors on long-distance dispersal of seeds by birds, and tested whether small-scale (G20 meters) movements of birds could be scaled up to predict dispersal of seeds across hundreds of meters in eight experimentally fragmented landscapes. A simulation model accurately predicted the observed pattern of seed rain and revealed that corridors functioned through edge following behavior of birds. Our study shows how models based on easily observed behaviors can be scaled up to predict landscape-level processes.

  8. Pen Branch stream corridor and Delta Wetlands change assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Blohm, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data from 1987 to 1991 covering the Pen Branch corridor and delta at SRS were utilized to provide a detailed change detection analysis. The multispectral data were geo-referenced to a Universal Transverse Mercator projection using finite element registration. Each year was then classified into eleven different landcover categories, and the yearly changes in each landcover category were analyzed. The decrease in operations of K Reactor in 1988 has resulted in drying of the corridor and delta. This has led to the decline of nonpersistent vegetation and the increase of persistent vegetation. Cattails, willow, and bottomland hardwoods, in particular, have grown to dominate the corridor and most of the delta.

  9. Fixed-Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle for Accurate Corridor Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) equipped with precise position and attitude sensors that together with a pre-calibrated camera enables accurate corridor mapping. The design of the platform is based on widely available model components to which we integrate an open-source autopilot, customized mass-market camera and navigation sensors. We adapt the concepts of system calibration from larger mapping platforms to MAV and evaluate them practically for their achievable accuracy. We present case studies for accurate mapping without ground control points: first for a block configuration, later for a narrow corridor. We evaluate the mapping accuracy with respect to checkpoints and digital terrain model. We show that while it is possible to achieve pixel (3-5 cm) mapping accuracy in both cases, precise aerial position control is sufficient for block configuration, the precise position and attitude control is required for corridor mapping.

  10. The Analysis of Polymorphism of Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) Gene and Influence of Liver Function Status in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suhartini; Mustofa; Nurhantari, Yudha; Rianto, Bambang Udji Djoko

    2017-01-31

    Indonesian culture actually has no historical record of behaviors in consuming alcohol, but there are many recent reports of alcohol abuse among Asian people involving their traditional drink. In genotype studies, the damage of the liver caused by consuming alcohol is influenced by the presence of the polymorphism enzyme gene. The lack of study regarding such topic is a signal to further investigate ADH3 gene distribution and its effect on liver function status. The total of 197 research subjects of Javanese descent received alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) genetic polymorphism and liver status tests in the city of Yogyakarta, Indonesian. An analytical study with a cross-sectional design was then conducted on the subjects, with the resulting isolated DNAs amplified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genotype of ADH3 was determined by means of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using Ssp1 restricting enzyme. Liver function status was assessed by measuring serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) using a photometric system. Gene types of ADH3*1 (2.1%), ADH3*2 (82.7%) and ADH3*1/3*2 (15.2%) on the subjects were concluded, finding that there is no difference between the gender. In conclusion most of the ADH3 gene polymorphism of the subjects were ADH3*2 (82.7%). The influence of genetic polymorphisms on the status of liver function in the subjects showed significant difference according to GGT measurement, but the same cannot be said on the other two values measuring SGOT and SGPT.

  11. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of patients with brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) exist in the brain. Alcohol dehydrogenase and ALDH are also present in brain tumor cells. Moreover, the activity of class I isoenzymes was significantly higher in cancer than healthy brain cells. The activity of these enzymes in tumor tissue is reflected in the serum and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of brain neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of ADH and ALDH as markers for brain tumors. Material and methods Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 115 patients suffering from brain tumors (65 glioblastomas, 50 meningiomas). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. Results There was a significant increase in the activity of ADH I isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of brain tumor patients compared to the controls. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH I was 78%, specificity 85%, and positive and negative predictive values were 86% and 76% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ADH I increased with the stage of the carcinoma. Area under receiver-operating characteristic curve for ADH I was 0.71. Conclusions The results suggest a potential role for ADH I as a marker for brain tumor. PMID:28261287

  12. 13. I95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. I-95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. Providence, Providence County, RI. sec. 4116, mp 185.15. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  13. Smallholder farms as stepping stone corridors for crop-raiding elephant in northern Tanzania: integration of Bayesian expert system and network simulator.

    PubMed

    Pittiglio, Claudia; Skidmore, Andrew K; van Gils, Hein A M J; McCall, Michael K; Prins, Herbert H T

    2014-03-01

    Crop-raiding elephants affect local livelihoods, undermining conservation efforts. Yet, crop-raiding patterns are poorly understood, making prediction and protection difficult. We hypothesized that raiding elephants use corridors between daytime refuges and farmland. Elephant counts, crop-raiding records, household surveys, Bayesian expert system, and least-cost path simulation were used to predict four alternative categories of daily corridors: (1) footpaths, (2) dry river beds, (3) stepping stones along scattered small farms, and (4) trajectories of shortest distance to refuges. The corridor alignments were compared in terms of their minimum cumulative resistance to elephant movement and related to crop-raiding zones quantified by a kernel density function. The "stepping stone" corridors predicted the crop-raiding patterns. Elephant presence was confirmed along these corridors, demonstrating that small farms located between refuges and contiguous farmland increase habitat connectivity for elephant. Our analysis successfully predicted elephant occurrence in farmland where daytime counts failed to detect nocturnal presence. These results have conservation management implications.

  14. Differential interactions of promoter elements in stress responses of the Arabidopsis Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R; Jacobs, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1994-01-01

    The Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase, EC 1.1.1.1.) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. can be induced by dehydration and cold, as well as by hypoxia. A 1-kb promoter fragment (CADH: -964 to +53) is sufficient to confer the stress induction and tissue-specific developmental expression characteristics of the Adh gene to a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Deletion mapping of the 5' end and site-specific mutagenesis identified four regions of the promoter essential for expression under the three stress conditions. Some sequence elements are important for response to all three stress treatments, whereas others are stress specific. The most critical region essential for expression of the Arabidopsis Adh promoter under all three environmental stresses (region IV: -172 to -141) contains sequences homologous to the GT motif (-160 to -152) and the GC motif (-147 to -144) of the maize Adh1 anaerobic responsive element. Region III (-235 to -172) contains two regions shown by R.J. Ferl and B.H. Laughner ([1989] Plant Mol Biol 12: 357-366) to bind regulatory proteins; mutation of the G-box-1 region (5'-CCACGTGG-3', -216 to -209) does not affect expression under uninduced or hypoxic conditions, but significantly reduces induction by cold stress and, to a lesser extent, by dehydration stress. Mutation of the other G-box-like sequence (G-box-2: 5'-CCAAGTGG-3', -193 to -182) does not change hypoxic response and affects cold and dehydration stress only slightly. G-box-2 mutations also promote high levels of expression under uninduced conditions. Deletion of region I (-964 to -510) results in increased expression under uninduced and all stress conditions, suggesting that this region contains a repressor binding site. Region II (-510 to -384) contains a positive regulatory element and is necessary for high expression levels under all treatments. PMID:7972489

  15. DRYAD and ADH: Further comments on explaining age-related differences in memory.

    PubMed

    Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Smyth, Andrea C

    2016-02-01

    Recently, Smyth and Naveh-Benjamin (2016) questioned some of the main assumptions/hypotheses of DRYAD (or density of representations yields age-related deficits), a global-deficit model of aging and memory judgments (Benjamin, 2010; Benjamin et al., 2012). Smyth and Naveh-Benjamin (2016) provided empirical evidence that seems incompatible with DRYAD, but that fits the associative deficit hypothesis (ADH; Naveh-Benjamin, 2000), 1 specific-deficit theoretical view. In response, Aaron Benjamin (2016) offered a discussion of the complementary strengths and weaknesses of the DRYAD and the ADH, and the potential ways they might work together. We agree with many of his comments, but are not convinced that DRYAD is able to explain basic replicable empirical evidence of the type mentioned in Smyth and Naveh-Benjamin (2016). We discuss the reasons why we are not fully convinced by the demonstration of DRYAD's simulation of results presented in Benjamin (2016) and then present an implementation of ADH in a computationally based age-related impaired neuromodulation approach that was shown to simulate the basic empirical results of age-related associative memory deficits. We also discuss the issues of parsimony of theories and the appropriate type of representation, in the context of global versus specific deficits theoretical views. Finally, we show that the ADH's take on the distinction between items and associations has been adopted by some global computational models of memory. We believe that considerations of the above issues and others raised by Benjamin (2016) can lead to fruitful discussions that will benefit both theory development and existing knowledge of aging and memory.

  16. Is ADH1C genotype relevant for the cardioprotective effect of alcohol?

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Magnus, Per; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Jansen, Mona Dverdal; Næss, Oyvind; Tambs, Kristian; Mørland, Jørg

    2013-03-01

    The cardioprotective effect of ethanol has been suggested to be linked to one of the ethanol metabolizing enzymes (ADH1C), which constitutes a high V(max) and a low V(max) variant. This has been demonstrated in some studies, while others have not been able to replicate the findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between the different ADH1C genotypes, death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and alcohol in a material larger than the previously published studies. Eight hundred CHD deaths as well as 1303 controls were genotyped for the high V(max) (γ1) and the low V(max) (γ2) ADH1C variant. Information of alcohol use was available for all subjects. Multiple logistic regression analyses was used to study if the decreased risk of death from CHD in alcohol consuming subjects was more pronounced in subjects homozygous for the γ2 allele (γ2γ2 subjects) compared to γ1γ1 and γ1γ2 subjects. The odds ratio (OR) for death from CHD in alcohol consumers compared to abstainers was similar in the genotype groups, i.e., 0.62 (95% CI: 0.43-0.88) in γ1γ1 subjects and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.42-0.91) in γ2γ2 subjects. Also when stratifying the results by gender and when dividing alcohol consumers into different alcohol consumption groups, there was no difference in the OR between the different genotype groups. This study, which included the largest study group published so far, failed to find any link between the ADH1C genotype and the cardioprotective effects of alcohol.

  17. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  18. Effects of ADH2 overexpression in Saccharomyces bayanus during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Oscar; García-Martínez, Teresa; Peinado, Rafael A; Mauricio, Juan C

    2008-02-01

    The effect of overexpression of the gene ADH2 on metabolic and biological activity in Saccharomyces bayanus V5 during alcoholic fermentation has been evaluated. This gene is known to encode alcohol dehydrogenase II (ADH II). During the biological aging of sherry wines, where yeasts have to grow on ethanol owing to the absence of glucose, this isoenzyme plays a prominent role by converting the ethanol into acetaldehyde and producing NADH in the process. Overexpression of the gene ADH2 during alcoholic fermentation has no effect on the proteomic profile or the net production of some metabolites associated with glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation such as ethanol, acetaldehyde, and glycerol. However, it affects indirectly glucose and ammonium uptakes, cell growth, and intracellular redox potential, which lead to an altered metabolome. The increased contents in acetoin, acetic acid, and L-proline present in the fermentation medium under these conditions can be ascribed to detoxification by removal of excess acetaldehyde and the need to restore and maintain the intracellular redox potential balance.

  19. Low-quality habitat corridors as movement conduits for two butterfly species.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Nick, M.; Tewksbury, Joshua, J.

    2005-01-01

    Haddad, Nick, M, and Joshua J. Tewksbury. Low-quality habitat corridors as movement conduits for two butterfly species. Ecol. Apps. 15(1):250-257. Abstract. Corridors are a primary conservation tool to increase connectivity, promote individual movement, and increase gene flow among populations in fragmented landscapes. The establishment of effective conservation corridors will depend on constructing or pre-serving connecting habitat that attracts dispersing individuals. Yet, it remains unclear whether corridors must necessarily be composed of high-quality habitat to be effective and promote dispersal and gene flow. We address this issue with two mobile, open-habitat butterfly species, Junonia coenia HuÈbner and Euptoieta claudia Cramer. Using experimental landscapes created explicitly to examine the effects of corridors on dispersal rates, we show that open-habitat corridors can serve as dispersal conduits even when corridors do not support resident butterfly populations. Both butterfly species were rare near forest edges and equally rare in narrow corridors, yet both species dispersed more often between patches connected by these corridors than between isolated patches. At least for species that can traverse corridors within a generation, corridor habitat may be lower in quality than larger patches and still increase dispersal and gene flow. For these species, abundance surveys may not accurately represent the conservation value of corridors.

  20. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  1. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  2. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  3. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  4. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  5. The Relationship between CmADHs and the Diversity of Volatile Organic Compounds of Three Aroma Types of Melon (Cucumis melo)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao; Jin, Yazhong; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays an important role in aroma volatile compounds synthesis of plants. In this paper, we tried to explore the relationship between CmADHs and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in oriental melon. Three different aroma types of melon were used as materials. The principle component analysis of three types of melon fruit was conducted. We also measured the CmADHs expression level and enzymatic activities of ADH and alcohol acyl-transferase (AAT) on different stages of fruit ripening. An incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of substrates and inhibitor (4-MP, 4-methylpyrazole) on CmADHs expression, ADH activity, and the main compounds of oriental melon. The results illustrated that ethyl acetate, hexyl acetate (E,Z)-3,6-nonadien-1-ol and 2-ethyl-2hexen-1-ol were the four principal volatile compounds of these three types of melon. AAT activity was increasing with fruit ripening, and the AAT activity in CH were the highest, whereas ADH activity peaked on 32 DAP, 2 days before maturation, and the ADH activity in CB and CG were higher than that in CH. The expression pattern of 11 CmADH genes from 24 to 36 day after pollination (DAP) was found to vary in three melon varieties. CmADH4 was only expressed in CG and the expression levels of CmADH3 and CmADH12 in CH and CB were much higher than that in CG, and they both peaked 2 days before fruit ripening. Ethanol and 4-MP decreased the reductase activity of ADH, the expression of most CmADHs and ethyl acetate or hexyl acetate contents of CB, except for 0.1 mM 4-MP, while aldehyde improved the two acetate ester contents. In addition, we found a positive correlation between the expression of CmADH3 and CmADH12 and the key volatile compound of CB. The relationship between CmADHs and VOCs synthesis of oriental melon was discussed. PMID:27445845

  6. Interior view of the northwest end corridor, showing doors and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the northwest end corridor, showing doors and barred openings to former fan and engine rooms (now garage) and entry to northwest gun chamber (labeled "Gun Turret No. One") - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Battery Adair, Princeton Place, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 25. Corridor between the Launch Control Center and the Launch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Corridor between the Launch Control Center and the Launch Control Equipment Room, view from Launch Control Center. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  8. Interior view, east to west corridor from the Fourteenth Street ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, east to west corridor from the Fourteenth Street lobby to the Fifteenth Street side of the building (168' in length) - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. View looking north along the main corridor on the third ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking north along the main corridor on the third floor of the south wing. This view, before the damaged roof was removed, captures the manner in which the continuous roof monitor provided natural illumination and ventilation for the third-floor. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. This image, looking south, shows a typical corridor in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    This image, looking south, shows a typical corridor in the laboratory area of the building, where numerous pipes were required to carry the various utilities needed for procedure and safety equipment - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Electronics Laboratory Building (E Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  11. 34. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 27, "CLEAN ROOM" ENTRANCE CORRIDOR LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 27, "CLEAN ROOM" ENTRANCE CORRIDOR LOOKING SOUTH. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  12. Interior view, secondstory passage extending westward from main corridor to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, second-story passage extending westward from main corridor to rooms on the north side of the rotunda in the rotunda extension. The roof and third-floor in this area is completely missing. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…

  14. 51. BF corridor, (example of older building meeting with new ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. BF corridor, (example of older building meeting with new building addition) from outside room BF-6, basement level, building 500, looking south - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. 1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING SOUTHWEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; BUILDING 92 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING SOUTHWEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; BUILDING 92 IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE AT UPPER RIGHT; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) AT LOWER LEFT - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  16. Interior view, secondfloor corridor looking east. Note the door to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, second-floor corridor looking east. Note the door to Egyptian Hall in the center distance and the door to Gothic Hall on the eastern entresol (third floor) at the top of the stairs - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north, showing tops ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north, showing tops of individual vaults and vent housings - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 5, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 5, showing inner set of doors on vault - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 2. INTERIOR VIEW OF MAIN CORRIDOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; DOORS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR VIEW OF MAIN CORRIDOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; DOORS TO HALLWAY LEADING TO HYDROTHERAPY ROOM, ELECTRIC LIGHT CABINETS AND DRESSING ROOM ON LEFT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1054, South side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  20. INTERIOR VIEW OF NARROW CORRIDOR. NOTE THE ENTRY STAIRWAY (STAIRS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF NARROW CORRIDOR. NOTE THE ENTRY STAIRWAY (STAIRS COVERED WITH EARTH) LEADING UP TO GROUND LEVEL ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CORRIDOR DOOR TO THE SOUTH ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CORRIDOR DOOR TO THE SOUTH ROOM SHOWING THE STRAP HINGES AND LATCHES. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. 31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR AT MEZZANINE AND LOWER LEVELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106352. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 37. PLAN OF ACCESS CORRIDOR PIPING INCLUDES WASTE HOLD TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PLAN OF ACCESS CORRIDOR PIPING INCLUDES WASTE HOLD TANK CELL, OFFGAS CELL, ADSORBER CELL, AND OFFGAS FILTER CELL. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106453. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-P-58. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 38. SECTIONS OF ACCESS CORRIDOR, INCLUDES SECTION SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. SECTIONS OF ACCESS CORRIDOR, INCLUDES SECTION SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF NAVY GUN BARRELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106454. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-59. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 29. Basement under central corridor. Shaft on right actuates cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Basement under central corridor. Shaft on right actuates cross over valve. Shaft at left operates main flood valve to admit water into the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  6. 15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  7. 9. View northwest of east entry to central corridor between ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View northwest of east entry to central corridor between the filtration beds. Note square chimney at right center of photograph which is a part of the Armory Street Pumping Station. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. 16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  9. 30. Valves under central corridor of filtration bed building. Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Valves under central corridor of filtration bed building. Main flood valves is at left and crossover valve is a right. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  10. 45 CFR 153.530 - Risk corridors data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Risk corridors data requirements. 153.530 Section... data requirements. (a) Premium data. A QHP issuer must submit to HHS data on the premiums earned with... of benefit and payment parameters. (b) Allowable costs. A QHP issuer must submit to HHS data on...

  11. 16. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor, interior view showing highcapacity venting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor, interior view showing high-capacity venting system and black-out shades on south wall VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  12. Interior view, ground floor passage crossing the main corridor at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, ground floor passage crossing the main corridor at its center, looking east through the doorway linking the two perpendicular axes. The door at the end of the passage opens onto a passage running under the entrance portico bearing ground floor exterior doors at each end. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. 33. Miter gears located on ceiling of central corridor of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Miter gears located on ceiling of central corridor of filtration building. Gears allow valve wheels above to be offset from location of gate valve on pipes below. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  14. 16. DETAIL OF AUTOMATIC DOORS OPENING INTO REFIGERATED CORRIDOR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF AUTOMATIC DOORS OPENING INTO REFIGERATED CORRIDOR IN BUILDING 148; CATTLE CARCASSES PASSED THROUGH TALL DOOR ON RIGHT; SHEEP AND VEAL PASSED THROUGH LOWER DOOR ON LEFT - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2, alcohol consumption, and the risk of gastric cancer: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Akihisa; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Sawada, Norie; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-02-01

    The association between alcohol consumption, genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and gastric cancer risk is not completely understood. We investigated the association between ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms, alcohol consumption and the risk of gastric cancer among Japanese subjects in a population-based, nested, case-control study (1990-2004). Among 36 745 subjects who answered the baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples, 457 new gastric cancer cases matched to 457 controls were used in the analysis. The odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression models. No association was observed between alcohol consumption, ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk. However, considering gene-environmental interaction, ADH1C G allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week of ethanol had a 2.5-fold increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.05-6.17) relative to AA genotype carriers who drink 0 to <150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.02). ALDH2 A allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week also had an increased risk (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.05-4.12) relative to GG genotype carriers who drink 0 to < 150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.08). To find the relation between alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk, it is important to consider both alcohol consumption level and ADH1C and ALDH2 polymorphisms.

  16. River Corridor Closure at DOE's Hanford Site - 12503

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan; Franco, Joe

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's River Corridor will cover work that has already been completed plus the work remaining to be done. This includes the buildings, waste sites, and groundwater plumes in the 300 Area; large-scale burial ground remediation in the 600 Area; plutonium production reactor dismantling and 'cocooning' along the river; preservation of the world's first full-scale plutonium production reactor; removal of more than 14 million tons of contaminated soil and debris along the Columbia River shoreline and throughout the River Corridor; and the excavation of buried waste sites in the river shore area. It also includes operating an EPA-permitted low-level waste disposal facility in the central portion of the site. At the completions of cleanup in 2015, Hanford's River Corridor will be the largest closure project ever completed by the Department of Energy. Cleanup of the River Corridor has been one of Hanford's top priorities since the early 1990's. This urgency has been due to the proximity of hundreds of waste sites to the Columbia River. In addition, removal of the sludge from K West Basin, near the river, remains a high priority. This 220-square-mile area of the Hanford Site sits on the edge of the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River. The River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site includes the 100 and 300 Areas along the south shore of the Columbia River. The 100 Areas contain nine retired plutonium production reactors. These areas are also the location of numerous support facilities and solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. The 300 Area, located just north of the city of Richland, contains fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear research and development facilities, and their associated solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. In order to ensure that cleanup actions address all threats to human health and the environment, the River Corridor includes the

  17. The ADH1B and DRD2 gene polymorphism may modify the protective effect of the ALDH2 gene against heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Chen-Lin; Yeh, Pin-Hsi; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2013-06-03

    Understanding the influences of genes involved in dopamine and serotonin metabolism, such as the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) genes, is critical for understanding addictive behavior. In addition, dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene may also interact with the dopamine metabolizing genes and link to addiction. Therefore, we investigated the association between the ALDH2, ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphisms and heroin dependence. Heroin-dependent Han Chinese patients (n=304) and healthy controls (n=335) were recruited. Genotypes of ALDH2, ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphisms were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequency of the ALDH2*1/*1 genotype was significantly lower in heroin-dependent patients than in controls, but the frequency of ADH1B and DRD2 genotypes was not significantly different. Further stratification of the ALDH2 gene with the ADH1B gene showed that the protective effect of ALDH2*1/*1 existed only in patients who also carried the ADH1B*1/*1 and ADH1B*1/*2 genotype. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant interaction between ALDH2 and ADH1B (P=0.022) and DRD2, ALDH2 and ADH1B in patients (P=0.037). The ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1, and ADH1B*1/*2 genotypes may interact and protect their carriers against heroin dependence and the protective effect may be varied by the DRD2 gene polymorphism. We conclude that the protective effect of the ALDH2 polymorphism against heroin dependence may be modified by the ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphism.

  18. Improving Urban Corridor that Respect to Public Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahrah, W.; Rahmadhani, N.; Nasution, A. D.; Pane, I. F.

    2017-03-01

    The urban corridor is more than just a linear space to circulation. It is a place for community activities. Since the urban area in Indonesia functionates without guidelines, it is necessary to analyze how this space being used by the community. The objective of the research is to explore the problems in utilization of public space in Dr. Mansur corridor in Medan and to propose some recommendation to improve it. The survey was started by mapping the physical situation that based on urban design aspects and the activities occur. Based on the data, the study identified the problems of the public space utilization. Next, study selected several buildings that significant in generating public life. The study interviewed the building’s owners and users/customers to get their opinion and perception about the using of urban public space utilization in the corridor in relation to their private function. The study analyzed the problems and opportunity to redesign the buildings that respect to public space. Then, the design ideas were presented to the buildings owners to get their response. The result of the observation shows that the fundamental problem in the corridor is the intervention of the private interest to the street as public space. The study indicates that the majority of the buildings owner was not aware that their buildings had distracted the urban public space. However, they gave a positive respond to the design recommendation. The design offered the solution that provided individual needs without intervention to the public realm. The study can contribute to improving urban corridor by educating the community with architecture and urban design.

  19. Evaluating Rifean Corridor Closure using Detrital Zircon Sediment Provenance of the Taza-Guercif Basin, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. R.; Barbeau, D. L.; Emran, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the late Miocene, the connection between the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean was tectonically severed leading to severe evaporative draw down of Mediterranean sea level such that the entire basin was desiccated or near desiccated in an event from ~5.96-5.33 Ma known as the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). The MSC sequestered 6% of global ocean salinity into evaporite deposits, created a deep, dry and hot basin that altered global atmospheric circulation, opened passageways for mammal migration between Europe, Africa and Arabia and ended in the largest flood observed in the geologic record. The combined effects of the Messinian Salinity Crisis make it the most important oceanic event in the last 20 million years, yet despite the dramatic ramifications of the MSC, the exact nature of its cause has remained both elusive and controversial. By examining the sedimentary provenance of Rifean Corridor, this research evaluates the progression of corridor closure and the tectonic context of the initiation of the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The difficulty in evaluating the progression of closure is due to the tectonic complexity of the Africa-Eurasia convergent plate boundary in north-central Morocco. The shortening associated with the tectonic convergence is accommodated by two genetically and tectonically distinct orogenic systems, the Rif and Atlas mountain belts, which lie in juxtaposition to the slab-rollback dominated Alboran Sea. The basins of the Rifean corridor lie between these two orogens and as such shortening and uplift associated with either or both ranges could be the cause of the corridor closure. Several hypotheses have been posited for the tectonic controls on basin emergence including slab-rollback related delamination on the Alboran margin, domal uplift of the Middle Atlas as well as a more traditional propagation of the Rifean orogenic wedge. This research provides the first quantitative provenance data for the Taza-Guercif basin in the form of LA

  20. Lessons from the Corridors of College Success Initiative: An Introduction. Corridors of College Success Series. CCRC Research Brief. Number 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Lundy-Wagner, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    "Collective impact" is a new place-based model of educational and social intervention that aims to shift responsibility for improvement in outcomes from individual organizations to entire systems that affect the lives of people in a particular location. CCRC's "Corridors of College Success Series" provides insights into…

  1. Maintenance of the Adh polymorphism in Ambystoma tigrinum nebulosum (tiger salamanders). I. Genotypic differences in time to metamorphosis in extreme oxygen environments.

    PubMed

    Carter, P A

    1997-01-01

    Populations of gilled tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum nebulosum) living in ephemeral ponds were studied in order to determine what evolutionary processes might be affecting genetic variation at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus. Ponds frequently dried in late summer; salamanders that did not metamorphose and leave drying ponds died of desiccation. Low levels of water oxygen significantly slowed metamorphosis of tiger salamanders in both natural and laboratory populations. Adh- SS frequency was significantly positively correlated with daily oxygen maxima in ponds, Adh-FF frequency demonstrated a nonsignificant trend to be negatively correlated with this measure, and Adh-SF frequency was unrelated to pond oxygen. Genotype frequency changes across the season in hypoxic and supersaturated ponds suggested that differential mortality of genotypes might explain the relationships with pond oxygen, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. Individuals of the Adh-SS genotype metamorphosed more slowly in hypoxic water than in normoxic water in the laboratory, and Adh-FF individuals metamorphosed more slowly in supersaturated water in the field, and in hypoxic water in the laboratory, than they did in normoxic water. Adh-SF individuals metamorphosed at the same rate in all oxygen environments. These data suggest that the Adh polymorphism in tiger salamanders is being maintained by selection for Adh or for a linked locus through differential metamorphosis in extreme oxygen environments.

  2. RISK CORRIDORS AND REINSURANCE IN HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACES: Insurance for Insurers.

    PubMed

    Layton, Timothy J; McGuire, Thomas G; Sinaiko, Anna D

    2016-01-01

    Health Insurance Marketplaces established by the Affordable Care Act implement reinsurance and risk corridors. Reinsurance limits insurer costs associated with specific individuals, while risk corridors protect against aggregate losses. Both tighten the insurer's distribution of expected costs. This paper compares the economic costs and consequences of reinsurance and risk corridors. We simulate the insurer's cost distribution under reinsurance and risk corridors using data for a group of individuals likely to enroll in Marketplace plans from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We compare reinsurance and risk corridors in terms of risk reduction and incentives for cost containment. We find that reinsurance and one-sided risk corridors achieve comparable levels of risk reduction for a given level of incentives. We also find that the policies being implemented in the Marketplaces (a mix of reinsurance and two-sided risk corridor policies) substantially limit insurer risk but perform similarly to a simpler stand-alone reinsurance policy.

  3. Role of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during acute simulated weightlessness in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Sandler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes, designed to induce central blood volume shifts in ten cardiac and one heart-lung transplant recipients, to assess the contribution of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during the initial acute phase of exposure to weightlessness. Each subject underwent 15 min of a sitting-control period (C) followed by 30 min of 6 deg headdown tilt (T) and 30 min of resumed sitting (S). Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions were taken at 0 and 15 min of C; 5, 15, and 30 min of T; and 5, 15, and 30 min of S. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded every two min. Plasma osmolality was not altered by posture changes. Mean left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased (P less than 0.05) from 90 ml in C to 106 ml in T and returned to 87 ml in S. Plasma ADH was reduced by 20 percent (P less than 0.05) with T, and returned to control levels with S. These responses were similar in six normal cardiac-innervated control subjects. These data may suggest that cardiac volume receptors are not the primary mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute central volume shifts in man.

  4. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  5. Inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase after 2-propanol exposure in different geographic races of Drosophila mojavensis: lack of evidence for selection at the Adh-2 locus.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Edward; Reed, Laura K; Markow, Therese A

    2005-03-15

    High frequencies of the fast allele of alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (Adh-2F) are found in populations of Drosophila mojavensis that inhabit the Baja California peninsula (race BII) whereas the slow allele (Adh-2S) predominates at most other localities within the species' geographic range. Race BII flies utilize necrotic tissue of pitaya agria cactus (Stenocereus gummosus) which contains high levels of 2-propanol, whereas flies from most other localities utilize different cactus hosts in which 2-propanol levels are low. To test if 2-propanol acts as a selective force on Adh-2 genotype, or whether some other yet undetermined genetic factor is responsible, mature males of D. mojavensis lines derived from the Grand Canyon (race A) and Santa Catalina Island (race C), each with individuals homozygous for Adh-2F and Adh-2S, were exposed to 2-propanol for 24 h and ADH-2 specific activity was then determined on each genotype. Flies from five other localities homozygous for either the fast or slow allele also were examined. Results for all reported races of D. mojavensis were obtained. 2-propanol exposure inhibited ADH-2 specific activity in both genotypes from all localities, but inhibition was significantly less in two populations of race BII flies homozygous for Adh-2F. When F/F and S/S genotypes in flies from the same locality were compared, both genotypes showed high 2-propanol inhibition that was not statistically different, indicating that the F/F genotype alone does not provide a benefit against the inhibitory effects of 2-propanol. ADH-1 activity in female ovaries was inhibited less by 2-propanol than ADH-2. These results do not support the hypothesis that 2-propanol acts as a selective factor favoring the Adh-2F allele.

  6. The Making of Safe and Secure Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoolhouse of Quality, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Explains why the architectural design of school facilities is the first step in the process of making safer schools. School areas examined include the front entrance design; the design of corridors, stairwells, and restrooms; and building placement. Other safety considerations discussed include lighting and other visibility enhancements, and the…

  7. Urea for management of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Solà-Morales, Oriol; Riera, Maribel

    2014-11-01

    Urea has been recently proposed for the management of hyponatremia linked to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH). The objective of the study was to review the levels of evidence for treatment of hyponatremia associated with SIADH with urea. We performed a: systematic review of experimental trials and grading according to SIGN. No clinical trials were found. The 6 studies analysed had methodological limitations and were prone to biases. In conclusion, there is no evidence to support the efficacy of urea for the treatment of hyponatremia following SIADH.

  8. Oceanic Situational Awareness over the North Atlantic Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfield, Israel

    2005-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans impose a limitation on traffic capacity for a given corridor, given the projected traffic growth over the oceanic domain. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. This study uses Federal Aviation Administration data from a single day for the North Atlantic Corridor to analyze traffic loading to be used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from the aircraft to the satellites.

  9. Building America's energy corridor: Oil & gas development and Louisiana's wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theriot, Jason P.

    2011-12-01

    Over the last half century, Louisiana's coastal wetlands have evolved into an elaborate energy landscape that supports onshore and offshore oil and gas development. Since the 1950s, this region has become a vital part of America's energy security and economic prosperity. Today, roughly one quarter of America's oil and gas resources flow through this energy corridor. The environmental changes as a result of these activities have been substantial, as the vast network of pipeline canals and related infrastructure have radically altered these wetlands. This work explores the intersection between energy and environment in coastal Louisiana and offers a historical view of how this energy system and this environment system evolved together to form America's Energy Corridor.

  10. Air transportation in the California Corridor of 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, M.; Mahaffy, K.; Yanagi, G.; Lechmanski, L.; Riddle, T.; Howard, K.; Chan, C.; Gorman, M.; Bauer, B.

    1989-01-01

    The topic of the 1988-1989 NASA/USRA Advanced Design Project at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, was the development of an air transportation system to meet the needs of the California Corridor for the year 2010. As aircraft design is taught by two instructors having different philosophies about the teaching process, the two classes took different approaches to address the problem. The first part of this summary (California Air Transit System) represents the work done by the students of Professor A. E. Andreoli, who followed a systems approach, emphasizing the determination of the proper mission. The second part of the summary (Four Aircraft to Service the California Corridor) contains the four aircraft designed by Dr. D. R. Sandlin's class based on specifications determined from work done in previous years.

  11. 2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

    2011-11-14

    This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  12. 2. Pipe Floor Front Corridor, view to the northwest, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Pipe Floor Front Corridor, view to the northwest, with Unit 4 turbine pit visible in right foreground of photograph. One of the governor compressors, originally used as an air blast circuit breaker compressor, is visible in the left foreground with one of the station sump and unwatering pump clusters located just beyond the compressor. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  13. Bow-corridor local integrated resource plan: Draft plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This plan presents the Government of Alberta's resource management policy for public lands and resources within the Bow Corridor. Resource potentials and opportunities for development are identified to assist in the economic progress of the province. The plan includes identification of its purpose and scope and the context in which it is presented; and resource management objectives and guidelines for ecological and aesthetic resources, fisheries, forests, historical resources, minerals, range land, settlement, tourism/recreation, water and watersheds and wildlife.

  14. 2. Operating Floor Rear (west) Corridor, view to the south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Operating Floor Rear (west) Corridor, view to the south. Note the cooling and service water take-off pipes for Unit 4 visible in left foreground of photograph. The deck plating that covers the oil pipes is also visible in the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  15. 2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

    2010-09-30

    This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  16. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  17. Corridor guided transport system utilizing permanent magnet levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, J.J.; Poland, A.P.; Lombardi, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    The invention relates to a corridor guided transport system including a guided goods conveyance container utilizing permanent magnet levitation. The transport system of the invention eliminates the need for the wheel and track arrangement presently required by known and utilized conventional train systems and also required by some conventional magnetic levitation transport systems and, as a result, is safer to operate and maintain than either of these known transportation systems.

  18. Moving beyond science to protect a mammalian migration corridor.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    As the discipline of conservation biology evolves and practitioners grow increasingly concerned about how to put results into achievable conservation, it is still unclear the extent to which science drives conservation outcomes, especially across rural landscapes. We addressed this issue by examining the role of science in the protection of a biological corridor. Our focus is on a North American endemic mammal reliant on long distance migration as an adaptive strategy, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The role of science in realizing policy change, while critical as a first step, was surprisingly small relative to the role of other human dimensions. In a case study, we strategically addressed a variety of conservation needs beyond science, first by building a partnership between government and private interests and then by enhancing interest in migratory phenomena across a landscape with divergent political ideologies and economic bases. By developing awareness and even people's pride in the concept of corridor conservation, we achieved local, state, and federal acceptance for protection of a 70 km long, 2 km wide pathway for the longest terrestrial migrant in the contiguous United States. Key steps included conducting and publishing research that defined the migration corridor; fostering a variety of media coverage at local, regional, and national levels; conducting public outreach through stakeholder workshops, meetings, and presentations; and meeting with and gaining the support of elected officials. All these contributed to the eventual policy change that created the first federally protected migration corridor in the United States, which in turn stimulated additional conservation actions. On the basis of our experience, we believe conservation scientists can and should step beyond traditional research roles to assist with on-the-ground conservation by engaging in aspects of conservation that involve local

  19. Bison phylogeography constrains dispersal and viability of the Ice Free Corridor in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Heintzman, Peter D; Froese, Duane; Ives, John W; Soares, André E R; Zazula, Grant D; Letts, Brandon; Andrews, Thomas D; Driver, Jonathan C; Hall, Elizabeth; Hare, P Gregory; Jass, Christopher N; MacKay, Glen; Southon, John R; Stiller, Mathias; Woywitka, Robin; Suchard, Marc A; Shapiro, Beth

    2016-07-19

    The Ice Free Corridor has been invoked as a route for Pleistocene human and animal dispersals between eastern Beringia and more southerly areas of North America. Despite the significance of the corridor, there are limited data for when and how this corridor was used. Hypothetical uses of the corridor include: the first expansion of humans from Beringia into the Americas, northward postglacial expansions of fluted point technologies into Beringia, and continued use of the corridor as a contact route between the north and south. Here, we use radiocarbon dates and ancient mitochondrial DNA from late Pleistocene bison fossils to determine the chronology for when the corridor was open and viable for biotic dispersals. The corridor was closed after ∼23,000 until 13,400 calendar years ago (cal y BP), after which we find the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bison used this route to disperse from the south, and by 13,000 y from the north. Our chronology supports a habitable and traversable corridor by at least 13,000 cal y BP, just before the first appearance of Clovis technology in interior North America, and indicates that the corridor would not have been available for significantly earlier southward human dispersal. Following the opening of the corridor, multiple dispersals of human groups between Beringia and interior North America may have continued throughout the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene. Our results highlight the utility of phylogeographic analyses to test hypotheses about paleoecological history and the viability of dispersal routes over time.

  20. [Changes in kidney function and the cortisol and ADH levels after peritoneal dialysis with 5% glucose in dogs].

    PubMed

    Nachev, N; Bratanova, Ts; Pavlov, D

    1975-01-01

    The authors made peritoneal dialisis with 5% of glucose (7 ml/kg of body weight) in 11 dogs under the conditions of an acute experiments. They examined cortiosl and ADH activity, hematocrite and plasma protein in the samples of blood, obtained on the 20th and 50th minute. ADH was titrated biologicaly by a new method, proposed by Nacev. The results were compared with the changes in the circulatory and renal indices, obtained at the same procedure in the preceding investigations. There was an increase in the cortisol and ADH activity, which could be explained by the total hypovolemia, induced by peritoneal dialisis. The increase of the cortisol level is described as a separate link in a more complex mechanism, assuring metabolic homeostasis.

  1. Enantiomeric recognition of racemic 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives via chiralpak AD-H stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhi; Pittman, Charles U; Li, Tingyu

    2012-10-01

    The chromatographic chiral resolution of two new series of racemic 4-substituted-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives was studied on a commercial Chiralpak AD-H column. Analytes without 5,5-dimethyl substituents (1-15) are more efficiently resolved than analytes with 5,5-dimethyl groups (16-30). The AD-H column discriminated between enantiomers through both hydrogen bonding attractions and π-π interactions. This interpretation is in accord with plots of the logarithm of separation factors, log(α), versus σ (Hammett-Swain substituent parameter) and σ(+) (Brown substituent constant) plots. By elucidating the effects of the remote substituents on these chiral separations, it was shown that the influence of π-π interaction forces increase when steric bulk effects act to decrease the hydrogen bonding attractive forces on the AD-H column.

  2. Emission Corridors Preserving the Atlantic Ocean Thermohaline Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickfeld, K.; Bruckner, T.

    2001-12-01

    The Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) transports large amounts of heat northward, acting as a heating system for the northern North Atlantic and north-western Europe. A large number of model simulations have shown the THC to be self-sustaining within certain limits, with well-defined thresholds where the circulation shuts down. Manabe and Stouffer (1993), for example, have simulated a complete shutdown of the THC for a quadrupling of atmospheric CO2. Because of the possibly severe consequences that a collapse of the THC would have upon the North Atlantic and north-western Europe, such an event may be considered as "dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system" that Article 2 of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) calls to avoid. Here we present bundles of emission paths (the so called "emission corridors") that preserve the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. These corridors are calculated on the methodological and conceptual basis of the Tolerable Windows Approach. For this purpose a multi-gas reduced-form climate model has been supplemented by a dynamic Stommel-type boxmodel of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. Both models allow for the relevant uncertainties (i.e., emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases, climate sensitivity, Atlantic hydrological sensitivity) to be taken into account. The sensitivity of emissions corridors with respect to the uncertain parameters is explored and the implications for a climate policy committed to the preservation of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in the sense of Article 2 are discussed.

  3. A bee in the corridor: centering and wall-following

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serres, Julien R.; Masson, Guillaume P.; Ruffier, Franck; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    In an attempt to better understand the mechanism underlying lateral collision avoidance in flying insects, we trained honeybees ( Apis mellifera) to fly through a large (95-cm wide) flight tunnel. We found that, depending on the entrance and feeder positions, honeybees would either center along the corridor midline or fly along one wall. Bees kept following one wall even when a major (150-cm long) part of the opposite wall was removed. These findings cannot be accounted for by the “optic flow balance” hypothesis that has been put forward to explain the typical bees’ “centering response” observed in narrower corridors. Both centering and wall-following behaviors are well accounted for, however, by a control scheme called the lateral optic flow regulator, i.e., a feedback system that strives to maintain the unilateral optic flow constant. The power of this control scheme is that it would allow the bee to guide itself visually in a corridor without having to measure its speed or distance from the walls.

  4. Design Analysis of Corridors-in-the-Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min

    2008-01-01

    Corridors-in-the-sky or tubes is one of new concepts in dynamic airspace configuration. It accommodates high density traffic, which has similar trajectories. Less air traffic controllers workload is expected than classic airspaces, thus, corridors-in-the-sky may increase national airspace capacity and reduce flight delays. To design corridors-in-the-sky, besides identifying their locations, their utilization, altitudes, and impacts on remaining system need to be analyzed. This paper chooses one tube candidate and presents analyses of spatial and temporal utilization of the tube, the impact on the remaining traffic, and the potential benefit caused by off-loading the traffic from underlying sectors. Fundamental issues regarding to the benefits have been also clarified. Methods developed to assist the analysis are described. Analysis results suggest dynamic tubes in terms of varied utilizations during different time periods. And it is found that combined lane options would be a good choice to lower the impact on non-tube users. Finally, it shows significant reduction of peak aircraft count in underlying sectors with only one tube enabled.

  5. Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, James A.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hlava, Kevin J.; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B.; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2014-02-24

    This report, Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). The intent of WECC’s work was to identify planning-level energy corridors that the Department of Energy (DOE) and its affiliates could study in greater detail. Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the WECC Proposed Energy Corridors in five topic areas for use in reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. In compliance with Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Secretaries of Energy, Agriculture, and the Interior (Secretaries) published a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in 2008 to address the proposed designation of energy transport corridors on federal lands in the 11 western states. Subsequently, Records of Decision designating the corridors were issued in 2009 by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The 2012 settlement of a lawsuit, brought by The Wilderness Society and others against the United States, which identified environmental concerns for many of the corridors requires, among other things, periodic reviews of the corridors to assess the need for revisions, deletions, or additions. A 2013 Presidential Memorandum requires the Secretaries to undertake a continuing effort to identify and designate energy corridors. The WECC Proposed Energy Corridors and their analyses in this report provide key information for reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. Load centers and generation hubs identified in the WECC analysis, particularly as they reflect renewable energy development, would be useful in reviewing and potentially updating the designated Section 368 corridor network. Argonne used Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to

  6. Habitat corridors function as both drift fences and movement conduits for dispersing flies.

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, Joanna H.; Levey Douglas J.; Hogsette, Jerome A.

    2005-03-30

    Abstract Corridors connect otherwise isolated habitat patches and can direct movement of animals among such patches. In eight experimental landscapes, we tested two hypotheses of how corridors might affect dispersal behavior. The Traditional Corridor hypothesis posits that animals preferentially leave patches via corridors, following them into adjacent patches. The Drift Fence hypothesis posits that animals dispersing through matrix habitat are diverted into patches with corridors because they follow corridors when encountered. House flies (Musca domestica L.), a species that prefers the habitat of our patches and corridors, were released in a central patch (100•100 m) and recaptured in peripheral patches that were or were not connected by a corridor. Flies were captured more frequently in connected than unconnected patches, thereby supporting the Traditional Corridor hypothesis. The Drift Fence hypothesis was also supported, as flies were captured more frequently in unconnected patches with blind (dead end) corridors than in unconnected patches of equal area without blind corridors. A second experiment tested whether these results might be dependent on the type of patch-matrix boundary encountered by dispersing flies and whether edge-following behavior might be the mechanism underlying the observed corridor effect in the first experiment. We recorded dispersal patterns of flies released along forest edges with dense undergrowth in the forest (‘‘closed’’ edges) and along edges with little forest understory (‘‘open’’ edges). Flies were less likely to cross and more likely to follow closed edges than open edges, indicating that when patch and corridor edges are pronounced, edge-following behavior of flies may direct them along corridors into connected patches. Because edges in the first experiment were open, these results also suggest that corridor effects for flies in that experiment would have been even stronger if the edges around the source

  7. Dynamically Coupled Food-web and Hydrodynamic Modeling with ADH-CASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C.; Swannack, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oysters and freshwater mussels are "ecological engineers," modifying the local water quality by filtering zooplankton and other suspended particulate matter from the water column and flow hydraulics by impinging on the near-bed flow environment. The success of sessile, benthic invertebrates such as oysters depends on environmental factors including but not limited to temperature, salinity, and flow regime. Typically food-web and other types of ecological models use flow and water quality data as direct input without regard to the feedback between the ecosystem and the physical environment. The USACE-ERDC has developed a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological modeling approach that dynamically couples a 2-D hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH), with a bioenergetics food-web model, the Comprehensive Aquatics Systems Model (CASM), which captures the dynamic feedback between aquatic ecological systems and the environment. We present modeling results from restored oyster reefs in the Great Wicomico River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, which quantify ecosystem services such as the influence of the benthic ecosystem on water quality. Preliminary results indicate that while the influence of oyster reefs on bulk flow dynamics is limited due to the localized influence of oyster reefs, large reefs and the associated benthic ecosystem can create measurable changes in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon in the areas around reefs. We also present a sensitivity analysis to quantify the relative sensitivity of the coupled ADH-CASM model to both hydrodynamic and ecological parameter choice.

  8. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  9. Identification of functional corridors with movement characteristics of brown bears on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, T.A.; Farley, S.; Goldstein, M.I.; Servheen, C.

    2007-01-01

    We identified primary habitat and functional corridors across a landscape using Global Positioning System (GPS) collar locations of brown bears (Ursus arctos). After deriving density, speed, and angular deviation of movement, we classified landscape function for a group of animals with a cluster analysis. We described areas with high amounts of sinuous movement as primary habitat patches and areas with high amounts of very directional, fast movement as highly functional bear corridors. The time between bear locations and scale of analysis influenced the number and size of corridors identified. Bear locations should be collected at intervals ???6 h to correctly identify travel corridors. Our corridor identification technique will help managers move beyond the theoretical discussion of corridors and linkage zones to active management of landscape features that will preserve connectivity. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  10. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species.

    SciTech Connect

    Resasco, Julian; et al,

    2014-04-01

    Abstract. Landscape corridors are commonly used to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, but concerns persist that they may facilitate the spread of invasive species. In a replicated landscape experiment of open habitat, we measured effects of corridors on the invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, and native ants. Fire ants have two social forms: polygyne, which tend to disperse poorly but establish at high densities, and monogyne, which disperse widely but establish at lower densities. In landscapes dominated by polygyne fire ants, fire ant abundance was higher and native ant diversity was lower in habitat patches connected by corridors than in unconnected patches. Conversely, in landscapes dominated by monogyne fire ants, connectivity had no influence on fire ant abundance and native ant diversity. Polygyne fire ants dominated recently created landscapes, suggesting that these corridor effects may be transient. Our results suggest that corridors can facilitate invasion and they highlight the importance of considering species’ traits when assessing corridor utility.

  11. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species.

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, Karen, E.; Barrett, Gary, W.

    2002-04-30

    Mabry, K.E., and G.W. Barrett. 2002. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species. Landscape Ecol. 17:629-636. Corridors are predicted to benefit populations in patchy habitats by promoting movement, which should increase population densities, gene flow, and recolonization of extinct patch populations. However, few investigators have considered use of the total landscape, particularly the possibility of interpatch movement through matrix habitat, by small mammals. This study compares home range sizes of 3 species of small mammals, the cotton mouse, old field mouse and cotton rat between patches with and without corridors. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant influence on average home range size. Habitat specialization and sex influenced the probability of an individual moving between 2 patches without corridors. The results of this study suggest that small mammals may be more capable of interpatch movement without corridors than is frequently assumed.

  12. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species.

    PubMed

    Resasco, Julian; Haddad, Nick M; Orrock, John L; Shoemaker, DeWayne; Brudvig, Lars A; Damschen, Ellen I; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Levey, Douglas J

    2014-08-01

    Landscape corridors are commonly used to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, but concerns persist that they may facilitate the spread of invasive species. In a replicated landscape experiment of open habitat, we measured effects of corridors on the invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, and native ants. Fire ants have two social forms: polygyne, which tend to disperse poorly but establish at high densities, and monogyne, which disperse widely but establish at lower densities. In landscapes dominated by polygyne fire ants, fire ant abundance was higher and native ant diversity was lower in habitat patches connected by corridors than in unconnected patches. Conversely, in landscapes dominated by monogyne fire ants, connectivity had no influence on fire ant abundance and native ant diversity. Polygyne fire ants dominated recently created landscapes, suggesting that these corridor effects may be transient. Our results suggest that corridors can facilitate invasion and they highlight the importance of considering species' traits when assessing corridor utility.

  13. Combination of ADH1B*2/ALDH2*2 polymorphisms alters acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the blood of Japanese alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Manabu; Hori, Kimiko; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Yokoyama, Akira; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2012-09-01

    The acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages is an evident carcinogen for the esophagus. Genetic polymorphisms of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genes are associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, the exact mechanism via which these genetic polymorphisms affect esophageal carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. ADH1B*2 is involved in overproduction of acetaldehyde due to increased ethanol metabolism into acetaldehyde, and ALDH2*2 is involved in accumulation of acetaldehyde due to the deficiency of acetaldehyde metabolism. Acetaldehyde can interact with DNA and form DNA adducts, resulting in DNA damage. N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dG) is the most abundant DNA adduct derived from acetaldehyde. Therefore, we quantified N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood samples from 66 Japanese alcoholic patients using liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and investigated the relationship between N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels and ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes. The median N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels (25th percentile, 75th percentile) in patients with ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*2, and ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*2 were 2.14 (0.97, 2.37)/10(7) bases, 2.38 (1.18, 2.98)/10(7) bases, 5.38 (3.19, 6.52)/10(7) bases, and 21.04 (12.75, 34.80)/10(7) bases, respectively. In the ALDH2*1/*2 group, N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in ADH1B*2 carriers than in the ADH1B*1/*1 group (P < 0.01). N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in the ALDH2*1/*2 group than in the ALDH2*1/*1 group, regardless of ADH1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1, P < 0.05; ADH1B*2 carriers, P < 0.01) N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood DNA of the alcoholics was remarkably higher in individuals with a combination of the ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 alleles. These results provide a new perspective on the carcinogenicity of the acetaldehyde associated with

  14. Structural insights into substrate specificity and solvent tolerance in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber DSM 44541.

    PubMed

    Karabec, Martin; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Tauber, Katharina C; Steinkellner, Georg; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Grogan, Gideon; Gruber, Karl

    2010-09-14

    The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber reveals possible reasons for its remarkable tolerance to organic co-solvents and suggests new directions for structure-informed mutagenesis to produce enzymes of altered substrate specificity or improved selectivity.

  15. Dispersal Ecology Informs Design of Large-Scale Wildlife Corridors

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Robin A.; Boyce, Mark S.; Thurfjell, Henrik; Paton, Dale G.; Musiani, Marco; Dormann, Carsten F.; Ciuti, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Landscape connectivity describes how the movement of animals relates to landscape structure. The way in which movement among populations is affected by environmental conditions is important for predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation, and for defining conservation corridors. One approach has been to map resistance surfaces to characterize how environmental variables affect animal movement, and to use these surfaces to model connectivity. However, current connectivity modelling typically uses information on species location or habitat preference rather than movement, which unfortunately may not capture dispersal limitations. Here we emphasize the importance of implementing dispersal ecology into landscape connectivity, i.e., observing patterns of habitat selection by dispersers during different phases of new areas’ colonization to infer habitat connectivity. Disperser animals undertake a complex sequence of movements concatenated over time and strictly dependent on species ecology. Using satellite telemetry, we investigated the movement ecology of 54 young male elk Cervus elaphus, which commonly disperse, to design a corridor network across the Northern Rocky Mountains. Winter residency period is often followed by a spring-summer movement phase, when young elk migrate with mothers’ groups to summering areas, and by a further dispersal bout performed alone to a novel summer area. After another summer residency phase, dispersers usually undertake a final autumnal movement to reach novel wintering areas. We used resource selection functions to identify winter and summer habitats selected by elk during residency phases. We then extracted movements undertaken during spring to move from winter to summer areas, and during autumn to move from summer to winter areas, and modelled them using step selection functions. We built friction surfaces, merged the different movement phases, and eventually mapped least-cost corridors. We showed an application of this tool

  16. Dispersal Ecology Informs Design of Large-Scale Wildlife Corridors.

    PubMed

    Benz, Robin A; Boyce, Mark S; Thurfjell, Henrik; Paton, Dale G; Musiani, Marco; Dormann, Carsten F; Ciuti, Simone

    Landscape connectivity describes how the movement of animals relates to landscape structure. The way in which movement among populations is affected by environmental conditions is important for predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation, and for defining conservation corridors. One approach has been to map resistance surfaces to characterize how environmental variables affect animal movement, and to use these surfaces to model connectivity. However, current connectivity modelling typically uses information on species location or habitat preference rather than movement, which unfortunately may not capture dispersal limitations. Here we emphasize the importance of implementing dispersal ecology into landscape connectivity, i.e., observing patterns of habitat selection by dispersers during different phases of new areas' colonization to infer habitat connectivity. Disperser animals undertake a complex sequence of movements concatenated over time and strictly dependent on species ecology. Using satellite telemetry, we investigated the movement ecology of 54 young male elk Cervus elaphus, which commonly disperse, to design a corridor network across the Northern Rocky Mountains. Winter residency period is often followed by a spring-summer movement phase, when young elk migrate with mothers' groups to summering areas, and by a further dispersal bout performed alone to a novel summer area. After another summer residency phase, dispersers usually undertake a final autumnal movement to reach novel wintering areas. We used resource selection functions to identify winter and summer habitats selected by elk during residency phases. We then extracted movements undertaken during spring to move from winter to summer areas, and during autumn to move from summer to winter areas, and modelled them using step selection functions. We built friction surfaces, merged the different movement phases, and eventually mapped least-cost corridors. We showed an application of this tool by

  17. Traction studies of northeast corridor rail passenger service: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macie, T. W.; Stallkamp, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The enabling legislation of 1976 for improvement of service in the Northeast corridor (NEC) requires a schedule of 2 h 40 min between Washington and New York City by 1981 and 3 h 40 min between NYC and Boston, when the electrification is completed. Various options of the NEC operation that may satisfy the legislation were investigated, particularly in terms of travel time and energy consumption. NEC operations were compared with overseas systems and practices. The emerging new technology of AC traction was also evaluated.

  18. Potential corridors and barriers for plague spread in central Asia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a vector-borne disease which caused millions of human deaths in the Middle Ages. The hosts of plague are mostly rodents, and the disease is spread by the fleas that feed on them. Currently, the disease still circulates amongst sylvatic rodent populations all over the world, including great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations in Central Asia. Great gerbils are social desert rodents that live in family groups in burrows, which are visible on satellite images. In great gerbil populations an abundance threshold exists, above which plague can spread causing epizootics. The spatial distribution of the host species is thought to influence the plague dynamics, such as the direction of plague spread, however no detailed analysis exists on the possible functional or structural corridors and barriers that are present in this population and landscape. This study aims to fill that gap. Methods Three 20 by 20 km areas with known great gerbil burrow distributions were used to analyse the spatial distribution of the burrows. Object-based image analysis was used to map the landscape at several scales, and was linked to the burrow maps. A novel object-based method was developed – the mean neighbour absolute burrow density difference (MNABDD) – to identify the optimal scale and evaluate the efficacy of using landscape objects as opposed to square cells. Multiple regression using raster maps was used to identify the landscape-ecological variables that explain burrow density best. Functional corridors and barriers were mapped using burrow density thresholds. Cumulative resistance of the burrow distribution to potential disease spread was evaluated using cost distance analysis. A 46-year plague surveillance dataset was used to evaluate whether plague spread was radially symmetric. Results The burrow distribution was found to be non-random and negatively correlated with Greenness, especially in the floodplain areas. Corridors and

  19. Enhanced Oceanic Situational Awareness for the North Atlantic Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfield, Israel

    2004-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans, impose a limitation of traffic capacity for a given corridor. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. Traffic loading from a specific day are used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from aircraft to the satellites.

  20. 1. Pipe Floor Rear Corridor, view to the southeast. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Pipe Floor Rear Corridor, view to the southeast. The wall of Unit 2 turbine pit is visible in the right foreground. The pipe and valve cluster in the right foreground is part of the blow down valve for Unit 2. This valve allows the water in the draft chest to be lowered (i.e., 'blown down') so that the unit can be motored (i.e., run like an electric motor rather than an electric power generator). - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  1. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human large bowel: association of the functional polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with hemorrhoids and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Jao, Shu-Wen; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chung, Chia-Chi; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Functional polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes occur among racial populations. The goal of this study was to systematically determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADHs and ALDHs in human rectal mucosa, the lesions of adenocarcinoma and hemorrhoid, and the genetic association of allelic variations of ADH and ALDH with large bowel disorders. Twenty-one surgical specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa, including 16 paired tissues of rectal tumor, normal mucosae of rectum and sigmoid colon from the same individuals, and 18 surgical mixed hemorrhoid specimens and leukocyte DNA samples from 103 colorectal cancer patients, 67 hemorrhoid patients, and 545 control subjects recruited in previous study, were investigated. The isozyme/allozyme expression patterns of ADH and ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting using the corresponding purified class-specific antibodies; the cellular activity and protein localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry, respectively. Genotypes of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. At 33mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activity of ADH1C*1/1 phenotypes exhibited 87% higher than that of the ADH1C*1/*2 phenotypes in normal rectal mucosa. The activity of ALDH2-active phenotypes of rectal mucosa was 33% greater than ALDH2-inactive phenotypes at 200μM acetaldehyde. The protein contents in normal rectal mucosa were in the following order: ADH1>ALDH2>ADH3≈ALDH1A1, whereas those of ADH2, ADH4, and ALDH3A1 were fairly low. Both activity and content of ADH1 were significantly decreased in rectal tumors, whereas the ALDH activity remained

  2. Trade-offs and efficiencies in optimal budget-constrained multispecies corridor networks.

    PubMed

    Dilkina, Bistra; Houtman, Rachel; Gomes, Carla P; Montgomery, Claire A; McKelvey, Kevin S; Kendall, Katherine; Graves, Tabitha A; Bernstein, Richard; Schwartz, Michael K

    2017-02-01

    Conservation biologists recognize that a system of isolated protected areas will be necessary but insufficient to meet biodiversity objectives. Current approaches to connecting core conservation areas through corridors consider optimal corridor placement based on a single optimization goal: commonly, maximizing the movement for a target species across a network of protected areas. We show that designing corridors for single species based on purely ecological criteria leads to extremely expensive linkages that are suboptimal for multispecies connectivity objectives. Similarly, acquiring the least-expensive linkages leads to ecologically poor solutions. We developed algorithms for optimizing corridors for multispecies use given a specific budget. We applied our approach in western Montana to demonstrate how the solutions may be used to evaluate trade-offs in connectivity for 2 species with different habitat requirements, different core areas, and different conservation values under different budgets. We evaluated corridors that were optimal for each species individually and for both species jointly. Incorporating a budget constraint and jointly optimizing for both species resulted in corridors that were close to the individual species movement-potential optima but with substantial cost savings. Our approach produced corridors that were within 14% and 11% of the best possible corridor connectivity for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and wolverines (Gulo gulo), respectively, and saved 75% of the cost. Similarly, joint optimization under a combined budget resulted in improved connectivity for both species relative to splitting the budget in 2 to optimize for each species individually. Our results demonstrate economies of scale and complementarities conservation planners can achieve by optimizing corridor designs for financial costs and for multiple species connectivity jointly. We believe that our approach will facilitate corridor conservation by reducing acquisition costs

  3. Trade-offs and efficiencies in optimal budget-constrained multispecies corridor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dilkina, Bistra; Houtman, Rachel; Gomes, Carla P.; Montgomery, Claire A.; McKelvey, Kevin; Kendall, Katherine; Graves, Tabitha A.; Bernstein, Richard; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    Conservation biologists recognize that a system of isolated protected areas will be necessary but insufficient to meet biodiversity objectives. Current approaches to connecting core conservation areas through corridors consider optimal corridor placement based on a single optimization goal: commonly, maximizing the movement for a target species across a network of protected areas. We show that designing corridors for single species based on purely ecological criteria leads to extremely expensive linkages that are suboptimal for multispecies connectivity objectives. Similarly, acquiring the least-expensive linkages leads to ecologically poor solutions. We developed algorithms for optimizing corridors for multispecies use given a specific budget. We applied our approach in western Montana to demonstrate how the solutions may be used to evaluate trade-offs in connectivity for 2 species with different habitat requirements, different core areas, and different conservation values under different budgets. We evaluated corridors that were optimal for each species individually and for both species jointly. Incorporating a budget constraint and jointly optimizing for both species resulted in corridors that were close to the individual species movement-potential optima but with substantial cost savings. Our approach produced corridors that were within 14% and 11% of the best possible corridor connectivity for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and wolverines (Gulo gulo), respectively, and saved 75% of the cost. Similarly, joint optimization under a combined budget resulted in improved connectivity for both species relative to splitting the budget in 2 to optimize for each species individually. Our results demonstrate economies of scale and complementarities conservation planners can achieve by optimizing corridor designs for financial costs and for multiple species connectivity jointly. We believe that our approach will facilitate corridor conservation by reducing acquisition costs

  4. Interaction of vitamin A supplementation level with ADH1C genotype on intramuscular fat in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Krone, K G; Ward, A K; Madder, K M; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; Buchanan, F C

    2016-03-01

    Previously, the single nucleotide polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1C c.-64T>C) was shown to have an association with intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle when vitamin A was limited in finishing rations of beef steers. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum vitamin A supplementation level, in combination with ADH1C genotype, to increase IMF of the LT muscle. In total, 45 TT genotype, 45 CT and 27 CC Black Angus crossbred steers were backgrounded on a commercial ration containing 3360 IU vitamin A/kg dry matter (DM). During finishing, the steers were randomly assigned to one of three vitamin A treatments at 25%, 50% and 75% of the National Research Council recommendation of 2200 IU/kg DM. Treatments were administered via an oral bolus. Carcass quality was evaluated and a sample from the LT muscle was collected for analysis of IMF. A treatment×genotype interaction (P=0.04) was observed for IMF; TT steers on the 75% treatment had higher IMF relative to CT and CC steers on the same treatment. Western blot analysis showed that TT steers had higher (P=0.02) ADH1C protein expression in hepatic tissue. Previously, TT steers exhibited increased IMF when fed limited vitamin A. In the current study, the lack of variation in IMF between treatments and genotypes at the lower vitamin A treatment levels was likely due to the majority of the steers grading Canada AAA (USDA Choice). However, the western blot data supports that TT steers are expected to have higher IMF deposition, due to an increased production of ADH1C. The interaction between ADH1C genotype and vitamin A supplementation level has the potential for use in marker-assisted management programs to target niche markets based on increased marbling.

  5. T-shaped trichome-specific expression of monoterpene synthase ADH2 using promoter-β-GUS fusion in transgenic Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xueqing; Shi, Pu; Shen, Qian; Jiang, Weimin; Tang, Yueli; Lv, Zongyou; Yan, Tingxiang; Li, Ling; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-11-01

    Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia annua L. (sweet wormwood), is extensively used in the treatment of malaria. In order to better understand the metabolism of terpenes in A. annua and the influence of terpene synthases on artemisinin yield, the expression pattern of a monoterpene alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) has been studied using transgenic plants expressing promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion. ADH2 played a major role in monoterpenoid biosynthesis including carveol, borneol, and artemisia ketone through in vitro biochemical analysis. In this study, the ADH2 promoter was cloned by the genome walking method. A number of putative cis-acting elements were predicted in promoter region, suggesting that the ADH2 is driven by a complex regulation mechanism. ADH2 gene was highly expressed in old leaves, whereas the artemisinin biosynthetic genes were mainly expressed in bud and young leaves. The expression of ADH2 gene increased quickly during leaf development, revealed by qRT-PCR. GUS expression analysis in different tissues of transgenic A. annua demonstrates that ADH2 expression is exclusively located to T-shaped trichome, not glandular secretory trichome.

  6. Evidence for a role for AtMYB2 in the induction of the Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1) by low oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeren, F U; Dolferus, R; Wu, Y; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1998-01-01

    The transcription factor AtMYB2 binds to two sequence motifs in the promoter of the Arabidopsis ADH1 gene. The binding to the GT-motif (5'-TGGTTT-3') is essential for induction of ADH1 by low oxygen, while binding to the second motif, MBS-2, is not essential for induction. We show that AtMYB2 is induced by hypoxia with kinetics compatible with a role in the regulation of ADH1. Like ADH1, AtMYB2 has root-limited expression. When driven by a constitutive promoter, AtMYB2 is able to transactivate ADH1 expression in transient assays in both Arabidopsis and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia protoplasts, and in particle bombardment of Pisum sativum leaves. Mutation of the GT-motif abolished binding of AtMYB2 and caused loss of activity of the ADH1 promoter in both transient assays and transgenic Arabidopsis plants. These results are consistent with AtMYB2 being a key regulatory factor in the induction of the ADH1 promoter by low oxygen. PMID:9611167

  7. SPINK1, ADH2, and ALDH2 gene variants and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kume, Kiyoshi; Masamune, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    The serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) is a potent antiprotease and an important inactivation factor of intrapancreatic trypsin activity. Loss of function by the SPINK1 mutations leads to decreased inhibitory capacity. The significance of SPINK1 mutations in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP) in Japan and its functional role remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to clarify the incidence of SPINK1, alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) variants in CP patients in Japan. One hundred and 86 patients with CP, and 527 healthy volunteers were enrolled. Mutational analyses were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing. Serum pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) level was measured by radioimmunoassay. The frequencies of N34S and IVS3 + 2T > C in the SPINK1 gene were significantly higher in patients with non-alcoholic CP (12.9% and 8.6%, respectively) than in normal subjects (0.37% and 0%). In total, 18 of 93 (19.4%) patients with non-alcoholic CP had at least one SPINK1 mutation. Concerning alcoholic CP, we found IVS3 + 2T > C in a small number of patients (3.9%). Serum PSTI concentration was decreased in patients with the IVS3 + 2T > C mutation. The frequency of the ADH2*2 allele in the alcoholic CP group was significantly higher than that in alcoholics without pancreatitis. The frequency of the ALDH2*2 allele was significantly low in patients with alcoholic CP compared with healthy controls. In conclusion, SPINK1 mutations were associated with non-alcoholic CP. Furthermore, we revealed the amount of wild-type PSTI was decreased in patients with IVS3 + 2T > C mutation. Variants of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes appeared in the relation to alcoholic CP.

  8. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baptiste Dafflon

    2015-04-07

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013).Processing flowchart for each corridor:Ground control points (GCP, 20.3 cm square white targets, every 20 m) surveyed with RTK GPS. Acquisition of RGB pictures using a Kite-based platform. Structure from Motion based reconstruction using hundreds of pictures and GCP coordinates. Export of DEM and RGB mosaic in geotiff format (NAD 83, 2012 geoid, UTM zone 4 north) with pixel resolution of about 2 cm, and x,y,z accuracy in centimeter range (less than 10 cm). High-accuracy and high-resolution inside GCPs zone for L2 corridor (500x20m), AB corridor (500x40) DEM will be updated once all GCPs will be measured. Only zones between GCPs are accurate although all the mosaic is provided.

  9. Protective effects of the alcohol dehydrogenase-ADH1B*3 allele on attention and behavior problems in adolescents exposed to alcohol during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Neil C; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase is a critical enzyme in the metabolism of alcohol. Expression of three alleles at the ADH1B locus results in enzymes that differ in turnover rate and affinity for alcohol. The ADH1B*3 allele, which appears to be unique to individuals of African descent, is associated with more rapid alcohol metabolism than the more prevalent ADH1B*1 allele. It has been previously demonstrated that the presence of at least one maternal ADH1B*3 allele confers a protective effect against alcohol teratogenicity in infants and children. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of the ADH1B*3 allele in the mother or child continues to be protective in alcohol-exposed individuals during adolescence. 186 adolescents and 167 mothers participating in a 14-year follow-up of the Detroit Longitudinal Cohort were genotyped for ADH1B alleles. Behavioral reports were obtained from classroom teachers. Frequencies of the ADH1B*3 allele were 17.6% in the mothers and 21.0% in the adolescents, which are consistent with the 15-20% expected for African Americans. Prenatal alcohol exposure was associated with increased attention problems and externalizing behaviors in adolescents born to mothers with two ADH1B*1 alleles but not in those whose mothers had at least one ADH1B*3 allele. A similar pattern was seen in relation to the presence or absence of an ADH1B*3 allele in the adolescent, which may have reflected the presence/absence of the maternal variant. This study is the first to demonstrate that the protective effects of the maternal ADH1B*3 allele continue to be evident during adolescence. These persistent individual differences in vulnerability of offspring to the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure are likely attributable to more rapid metabolism of alcohol that the ADH1B*3 variant confers on the mother, leading to a reduction of the peak blood alcohol concentration to which the fetus is exposed during each drinking episode.

  10. River-Corridor Habitat Dynamics, Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Intensive management of the Missouri River for navigation, flood control, and power generation has resulted in substantial physical changes to the river corridor. Historically, the Missouri River was characterized by a shifting, multithread channel and abundant unvegetated sandbars. The shifting channel provided a wide variety of hydraulic environments and large areas of connected and unconnected off-channel water bodies. Beginning in the early 1800s and continuing to the present, the channel of the Lower Missouri River (downstream from Sioux City, Iowa) has been trained into a fast, deep, single-thread channel to stabilize banks and maintain commercial navigation. Wing dikes now concentrate the flow, and revetments and levees keep the channel in place and disconnect it from the flood plain. In addition, reservoir regulation of the Missouri River upstream of Yankton, South Dakota, has substantially changed the annual hydrograph, sediment loads, temperature regime, and nutrient budgets. While changes to the Missouri River have resulted in broad social and economic benefits, they have also been associated with loss of river-corridor habitats and diminished populations of native fish and wildlife species. Today, Missouri River stakeholders are seeking ways to restore some natural ecosystem benefits of the Lower Missouri River without compromising traditional economic uses of the river and flood plain.

  11. Corridors of barchan dunes: Stability and size selection.

    PubMed

    Hersen, P; Andersen, K H; Elbelrhiti, H; Andreotti, B; Claudin, P; Douady, S

    2004-01-01

    Barchans are crescentic dunes propagating on a solid ground. They form dune fields in the shape of elongated corridors in which the size and spacing between dunes are rather well selected. We show that even very realistic models for solitary dunes do not reproduce these corridors. Instead, two instabilities take place. First, barchans receive a sand flux at their back proportional to their width while the sand escapes only from their horns. Large dunes proportionally capture more sand than they lose, while the situation is reversed for small ones: therefore, solitary dunes cannot remain in a steady state. Second, the propagation speed of dunes decreases with the size of the dune: this leads, through the collision process, to a coarsening of barchan fields. We show that these phenomena are not specific to the model, but result from general and robust mechanisms. The length scales needed for these instabilities to develop are derived and discussed. They turn out to be much smaller than the dune field length. As a conclusion, there should exist further, yet unknown, mechanisms regulating and selecting the size of dunes.

  12. Barchan dune corridors: Field characterization and investigation of control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbelrhiti, H.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2008-06-01

    The structure of the barchan field located between Tarfaya and Laayoune (Atlantic Sahara, Morocco) is quantitatively investigated and compared to that in La Pampa de la Joya (Arequipa, Peru). On the basis of field measurements, we show how the volume, the velocity, and the output sand flux of a dune can be computed from the value of its body and horn widths. The dune size distribution is obtained from the analysis of aerial photographs. It shows that these fields are in a statistically homogeneous state along the wind direction and present a "corridor" structure in the transverse direction, in which the dunes have a rather well selected size. Investigating the possible external parameters controlling these corridors, we demonstrate that none among topography, granulometry, wind, and sand flux is relevant. We finally discuss the dynamical processes at work in these fields (collisions and wind fluctuations) and investigate the way they could regulate the size of the dunes. Furthermore, we show that the overall sand flux transported by a dune field is smaller than the maximum transport that could be reached in the absence of dunes, i.e., in saltation over the solid ground.

  13. Identification of Candidate Clean Air Corridors for the Colorado Plateau.

    PubMed

    Gratn, M C; Pitchford, M L; Ashbaugh, L

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act, amended in 1990, mandated the establishment of the Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission (GCVTC). The commission is required to submit a report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency addressing visibility issues in the region, including "the establishment of clean air corridors, in which additional restrictions on increases in emissions may be appropriate to protect visibility in affected Class I areas." This paper presents a methodology to identify candidate geographic areas for consideration for Clean Air Corridor (CAC) status for Colorado Plateau Class I areas. The methodology uses thousands of model determined trajectories over a five year period (1988 to 1992) to indicate the paths taken by air that arrives during clean air conditions at Class I areas. These clean air back-trajectories identify upwind areas where pollution emissions could jeopardize currently pristine visibility. Using this methodology, six candidate areas are identified, ranging in size from 75,000 to 506,000 square miles, and permitting varying levels of visibility protection for clean air days at Grand Canyon, Canyonlands, and Petrified Forest National Parks. Assuming effective emissions management of the CAC, the larger the CAC, the greater the visibility protection during clean air conditions.

  14. 75 FR 17756 - Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission will be held on... on May 20, 2010 at 9 a.m. at Atria Draper Place located at 25 Hopedale Street, Hopedale, MA for the..., Executive Director, John H. Chafee, Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission, One...

  15. 77 FR 28421 - Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Central Corridor Light Rail Transit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Light Rail Transit Project, Minneapolis and Saint Paul, MN AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... prepare a Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) for the Central Corridor Light Rail... miles long and consists of 23 Central Corridor Light Rail Transit (LRT) stations. The SDEIS...

  16. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although corridors have become commonplace in conservation to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, concerns persist that they may facilitate spread of invasive species. In a large-scale experiment, we measured effects of corridors on invasive fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, and on comm...

  17. 78 FR 73559 - Moose-Wilson Corridor Comprehensive Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, Grand Teton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... National Park Service Moose-Wilson Corridor Comprehensive Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement... the Moose-Wilson Corridor, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. DATES: The National Park Service will...://parkplanning.nps.gov/MooseWilson , at the Grand Teton National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Teton Park...

  18. MTR WING, TRA604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. WEST CORRIDOR. CAMERA FACES NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. WEST CORRIDOR. CAMERA FACES NORTH. HVAC AREA IS AT RIGHT OF CORRIDOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-13-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Abort-once-around entry dispersion corridor analysis. [for space shuttle reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    Abort-Once-Around (AOA) entry dispersion corridors were determined for Shuttle Mission 3A. These corridors are presented as plots of entry interface flight path angle versus range to target. The methods used to determine the corridors are discussed. Major dispersion sources are discussed and results presented. While specific trajectory inputs and constraints are subject to change, the dispersion corridors show the trends under consideration. The corridors presented show the delta V advantage of the two-burn over the one-burn AOA. The atmospheric dispersion study illustrates the need to target for the seasonal atmosphere. The 40 deg/30 deg angle of attack (alpha) (TPS design) profile did not provide adequate crossrange capability with worst case aerodynamic dispersions. This problem was alleviated with the change to a 38 deg/28 deg alpha profile. The backface temperatures calculated were generally higher than the present limits.

  20. Moving shadows contribute to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomoko; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies have reported that backgrounds depicting linear perspective and texture gradients influence relative size discrimination in nonhuman animals (known as the "corridor illusion"), but research has not yet identified the other kinds of depth cues contributing to the corridor illusion. This study examined the effects of linear perspective and shadows on the responses of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) to the corridor illusion. The performance of the chimpanzee was worse when a smaller object was presented at the farther position on a background reflecting a linear perspective, implying that the corridor illusion was replicated in the chimpanzee (Imura, Tomonaga, & Yagi, 2008). The extent of the illusion changed as a function of the position of the shadows cast by the objects only when the shadows were moving in synchrony with the objects. These findings suggest that moving shadows and linear perspective contributed to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee.

  1. Bison phylogeography constrains dispersal and viability of the Ice Free Corridor in western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Duane; Ives, John W.; Zazula, Grant D.; Letts, Brandon; Andrews, Thomas D.; Driver, Jonathan C.; Hall, Elizabeth; Hare, P. Gregory; Jass, Christopher N.; MacKay, Glen; Southon, John R.; Stiller, Mathias; Woywitka, Robin; Suchard, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ice Free Corridor has been invoked as a route for Pleistocene human and animal dispersals between eastern Beringia and more southerly areas of North America. Despite the significance of the corridor, there are limited data for when and how this corridor was used. Hypothetical uses of the corridor include: the first expansion of humans from Beringia into the Americas, northward postglacial expansions of fluted point technologies into Beringia, and continued use of the corridor as a contact route between the north and south. Here, we use radiocarbon dates and ancient mitochondrial DNA from late Pleistocene bison fossils to determine the chronology for when the corridor was open and viable for biotic dispersals. The corridor was closed after ∼23,000 until 13,400 calendar years ago (cal y BP), after which we find the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bison used this route to disperse from the south, and by 13,000 y from the north. Our chronology supports a habitable and traversable corridor by at least 13,000 cal y BP, just before the first appearance of Clovis technology in interior North America, and indicates that the corridor would not have been available for significantly earlier southward human dispersal. Following the opening of the corridor, multiple dispersals of human groups between Beringia and interior North America may have continued throughout the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene. Our results highlight the utility of phylogeographic analyses to test hypotheses about paleoecological history and the viability of dispersal routes over time. PMID:27274051

  2. Predicting which species will benefit from corridors in fragmented landscapes from population growth models.

    PubMed

    Hudgens, Brian R; Haddad, Nick M

    2003-05-01

    Connecting isolated patches of habitat in fragmented landscapes with corridors is a popular conservation strategy. This strategy is also controversial in large part because of uncertainty about what characteristics of a species and its environment promote corridor use. In this article we address the question, For what types of species will populations benefit from corridors? We asked this question using a model of two logistically growing populations connected by migration in which both emigration and migration success were determined by the presence or absence of a corridor. We found that in the short run (e.g., during recovery from disaster), corridors are most effective for species with fast-growing populations that have low survivorship when dispersing through unsuitable (matrix) habitat. We also found that emigration rates and habitat-specific mortality rates are key determinants of the effects of corridors on population size. In the long term, corridors are most likely to benefit species with slow-growing populations that have low survivorship when dispersing through matrix habitat. Our results confirm the major conclusions from previous empirical studies of corridor benefits. However, most studies fail to consider the most appropriate questions to determine the potential benefits of habitat corridors. First, what is the time scale of the conservation goal? Corridors have positive effects on different suites of species in the short and long term. Second, is the major threat of local extinction due to sustained population decline or boom-bust cycles? Third, what is the migration rate through the matrix? Fourth, what fraction of migrants dispersing through the matrix successfully immigrate to another patch?

  3. Predicting which species will benefit from corridors in fragmented landscapes from population growth models

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgens, Brian R.; Haddad, Nick M.

    2003-05-01

    abstract: Connecting isolated patches of habitat in fragmented landscapes with corridors is a popular conservation strategy. This strategy is also controversial in large part because of uncertainty about what characteristics of a species and its environment promote corridor use. In this article we address the question, For what types of species will populations benefit from corridors? We asked this question using a model of two logistically growing populations connected by migration in which both emigration and migration success were determined by the presence or absence of a corridor. We found that in the short run (e.g., during recovery from disaster), corridors are most effective for species with fast-growing populations that have low survivorship when dispersing through unsuitable (matrix) habitat. We also found that emigration rates and habitat-specific mortality rates are key determinants of the effects of corridors on population size. In the long term, corridors are most likely to benefit species with slow-growing populations that have low survivorship when dispersing through matrix habitat. Our results confirm the major conclusions from previous empirical studies of corridor benefits. However, most studies fail to consider the most appropriate questions to determine the potential benefits of habitat corridors. First, what is the time scale of the conservation goal? Corridors have positive effects on different suites of species in the short and long term. Second, is the major threat of local extinction due to sustained population decline or boom-bust cycles? Third, what is the migration rate through the matrix? Fourth, what fraction of migrants dispersing through the matrix successfully immigrate to another patch?

  4. 76 FR 42762 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Transit Improvements in the Mid-Coast Corridor of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... options to employment, education, medical, and retail centers for corridor residents, commuters, and... employment centers currently anchor both the northern and southern ends of the Mid-Coast Corridor, with.... Increased population and employment will lead to increased travel demand in the corridor. The...

  5. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  6. The Genetics of a Small Autosomal Region of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER Containing the Structural Gene for Alcohol Dehydrogenase. I. Characterization of Deficiencies and Mapping of ADH and Visible Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, R. C.; Ashburner, M.

    1979-01-01

    The position of the structural gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in Drosophila melanogaster has been shown to be within polytene chromosome bands 35B1 and 35B3, most probably within 35B2. The genetic and cytological properties of twelve deficiencies in polytene chromosome region 34–35 have been characterized, eleven of which include Adh. Also mapped cytogenetically are seven other recessive visible mutant loci. Flies heterozygous for overlapping deficiencies that include both the Adh locus and that for the outspread mutant (osp: a recessive wing phenotype) are homozygous viable and show a complete ADH negative phenotype and strong osp phenotype. These deficiencies probably include two polytene chromosome bands, 35B2 and 35B3. PMID:115743

  7. Comparing the sustainability of different action policy possibilities: application to the issue of both household survival and forest preservation in the corridor of Fianarantsoa.

    PubMed

    Bernard, C; Martin, S

    2013-10-01

    A sustainability issue for the rain forest in the corridor of Fianarantsoa (Madagascar) is to preserve the forest while ensuring the development of the local population. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the current situation is sustainable or not according to different action policy possibilities. We propose a general procedure based on viability analysis: Translation of sustainability issues into constraints on the system state; elaboration of a mathematical model of system evolution rules in the form of controlled dynamical system; computations of the viability kernels according to different action policy possibilities. Among control variables, we focus on monetary transfer. Without monetary transfer, we show that the current situation of the rain forest corridor is not sustainable in our mathematical modeling framework. We then estimate the minimal maximal amount per year necessary to make the current situation sustainable.

  8. The California corridor transportation system: A design summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A design group was assembled to find and research criteria relevent to the design of a California Corridor Transportation System. The efforts of this group included defining the problem, conducting a market analysis, formulation of a demand model, identification and evaluation of design drivers, and the systematic development of a solution. The problems of the current system were analyzed and used to determine design drivers, which were divided into the broad categories of cost, convenience, feasibility, environment, safety, and social impact. The relative importance of individual problems was addressed, resulting in a hierarchy of design drivers. Where possible, methods of evaluating the relative merit of proposed systems with respect to each driver were developed. Short takeoff vertical landing aircraft concepts are also discussed for supersonic fighters.

  9. 7. View (looking west) of the second floor corridor in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View (looking west) of the second floor corridor in the south segment of building. The second floor was designed for residential rental rooms. The guardrail, balusters, newel posts, and handrail, as well as the two upper-level door openings with transoms, are original features. The doors, proper, are nonoriginal and probably were installed when the second floor was converted to office use. The pair of doors (one leaf is open and one is closed) is located at the intermediate stair landing. The original exterior doorway (without a door) is located at the bottom of the stair. The upper-level door without a transom is nonoriginal, as are the floor tile and wall paneling. At the time of documentation a suspended ceiling and duct were removed to ... - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. Strategy for the Identification of an INL Comprehensive Utility Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    This report documents the strategy developed to identify a comprehensive utility corridor (CUC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The strategy established the process for which the Campus Development Office will evaluate land management issues. It is a process that uses geographical information system geospatial technology to layer critical INL mission information in a way that thorough evaluations can be conducted and strategies developed. The objective of the CUC Project was to develop a process that could be implemented to identify potential utility corridor options for consideration. The process had to take into account all the missions occurring on the INL and other land-related issues. The process for developing a CUC strategy consists of the following four basic elements using geographical information system capabilities: 1. Development of an INL base layer map; this base layer map geospatially references all stationary geographical features on INL and sitewide information. 2. Development of current and future mission land-use need maps; this involved working with each directorate to identify current mission land use needs and future land use needs that project 30 years into the future. 3. Development of restricted and potential constraint maps; this included geospatially mapping areas such as wells, contaminated areas, firing ranges, cultural areas, ecological areas, hunting areas, easement, and grazing areas. 4. Development of state highway and power line rights of way map; this included geospatially mapping rights-of-way along existing state highways and power lines running through the INL that support INL operations. It was determined after completing and evaluating the geospatial information that the area with the least impact to INL missions was around the perimeter of the INL Site. Option 1, in this document, identifies this perimeter; however, it does not mean the entire perimeter is viable. Many places along the perimeter corridor cannot

  11. Lakes in the greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, T.W.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of an inventory of the lakes in the central one-third of the Colorado Front Range Urban Corridor. This inventory provides information that might be helpful in planning the best and most beneficial use of lakes in an area of rapid population growth. The report includes data on lake size and water quality. Size data are included on most of the lakes of 2 hectares (20,000 m2, or about 5 acres) or greater, and water-quality data are provided on most lakes larger than 10 hectares (about 25 acres). Bodies of water resulting form excavation of gravel (borrow pits) were generally not included in the inventory.

  12. ADH1B and CDH1 polymorphisms predict prognosis in male patients with non-metastatic laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianbo; He, Na; Ren, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Qingna; Xu, Ran; Tao, Hong; Zeng, Guang; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes and the prognosis of laryngeal cancer (LC) patients. Thirty-seven SNPs in 26 genes were genotyped in 170 male Han Chinese patients with LC. The effects of the candidate genes on the prognosis of LC patients were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The GA genotype of rs1229984 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.537; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.340–0.848; p = 0.008) in alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B), and the AA genotype of rs9929218 (HR, 6.074; 95% CI, 1.426–25.870; p = 0.015) in CDH1 were associated with overall survival. Our data suggest that polymorphisms in ADH1B and CDH1 may be prognostic indicators in LC. PMID:27689323

  13. District heating feasibility, Industrial Corridor, Jamestown, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The Industrial Corridor of Jamestown, New York, contains more than twenty industrial/manufacturing companies, whose thermal demands, in addition to space heating, include significant process heating loads. This study investigated in depth, the technical and economic feasibility of implementing a district heating system in the Industrial Corridor which can serve both process and space heating loads. Based upon the heat load assessment conducted, the study focused upon nine companies with the largest thermal demand. Alternative system implementation designs were considered including new conventional centralized boiler plants, gas turbine cogeneration, and both high temperature hot water and steam as the heat transport media in an underground distribution system. The study concluded that, in view of the nature of existing prospective customer loads being primarily steam based, the most economical system for near term phased development is a steam based system with a new conventional centrally located steam boiler plant. The economic potential for a cogeneration system was found to be sensitive to electricity buy back rates, which at present, are not attractive. Implementing a modern high temperature hot water system would require significant customer retrofit costs to convert their steam based systems to hot water, resulting in long and unattractive pay back periods. Unless customer hot water retrofit costs can be expended without penalty to the district system economics, hot water district heating is not considered economically feasible. Chapters describe heat load assessment; heat source analysis; system implementation; transmission and distribution systems assessment; institutional assessment; system economic analysis; and customer retrofit, economic analysis, and conclusions 20 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP839) in the adh1 reference gene affects the quantitation of genetically modified maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Broothaerts, Wim; Corbisier, Philippe; Schimmel, Heinz; Trapmann, Stefanie; Vincent, Sandra; Emons, Hendrik

    2008-10-08

    The real-time PCR methods recommended in the European Union for the quantitation of genetically modified (GM) maize events NK603, GA21, and MON 863 measure the number of copies of the GM event in relation to those of the maize-specific adh1 reference gene. The study reported here revealed that the targeted 70 base pair adh1 region exhibits a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP839) that hampers the binding of the reverse primer used in the adh1 detection method. Partial fragments of the adh1-A and adh1-F allele were cloned. By allele-specific real-time PCR, it was shown that SNP839 corresponds to a common allelic polymorphism in maize. As a result, the quantitation of the GM maize events mentioned is positively or negatively biased, depending on the adh1 genotype of sample and calibrant. Therefore, it is proposed to revise the quantitative detection methods for NK603, GA21, and MON 863 maize.

  15. Adh enhances Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity by binding to OR5M11 and activating p38 which induces apoptosis of PAMs and IL-8 release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Zhang, Jing; Bao, Chuntong; Zhang, Hu; Che, Yanyi; Sun, Changjiang; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Richard, Paul Langford; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-04-05

    Members of the Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin (TAA) family play a crucial role in the adhesion of Gram-negative pathogens to host cells, but the immunopathogenesis of TAAs remains unknown. Our previous studies demonstrated that Adh from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is required for full bacterial pathogenicity. Alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against respiratory infections. This study compared the interactions between porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae (5b WT) or an Adh-deletion strain (5b ΔAdh) via gene microarray, immunoprecipitation and other technologies. We found that Adh was shown to interact with the PAMs membrane protein OR5M11, an olfactory receptor, resulting in the high-level secretion of IL-8 by activation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Subsequently, PAMs apoptosis via the activation of the Fax and Bax signaling pathways was observed, followed by activation of caspases 8, 9, and 3. The immunological pathogenic roles of Adh were also confirmed in both murine and piglets infectious models in vivo. These results identify a novel immunological strategy for TAAs to boost the pathogenicity of A. pleuropneumoniae. Together, these datas reveal the high versatility of the Adh protein as a virulence factor and provide novel insight into the immunological pathogenic role of TAAs.

  16. Grizzly bears and calving caribou: What is the relation with river corridors?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Donald D.; McCabe, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers have debated the effect of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline (TAP) and associated developments to caribou (Rangifer tarandus) of the central Arctic herd (CAH) since the 1970s. Several studies have demonstrated that cows and calves of the CAH avoided the TAP corridor because of disturbance associated with the pipeline, whereas others have indicated that female caribou of the CAH avoided riparian habitats closely associated with the pipeline. This avoidance was explained as a predator-avoidance strategy. We investigated the relation between female caribou and grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) use of river corridors on the yet undisturbed calving grounds of the Porcupine caribou herd (PCH) in northeastern Alaska. On the coastal plain, caribou were closer to river corridors than expected (P = 0.038), but bear use of river corridors did not differ from expected (P = 0.740). In the foothills, caribou use of river corridors did not differ from expected (P = 0.520), but bears were farther from rivers than expected (P = 0.001). Our results did not suggest an avoidance of river corridors by calving caribou or a propensity for bears to be associated with riparian habitats, presumably for stalking or ambush cover. We propose that PCH caribou reduce the risks of predation to neonates by migrating to a common calving grounds, where predator swamping is the operational antipredator strategy. Consequently, we hypothesize that nutritional demands, not predator avoidance strategies, ultimately regulate habitat use patterns (e.g., use of river corridors) of calving PCH caribou.

  17. Carbon stock corridors to mitigate climate change and promote biodiversity in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantz, Patrick; Goetz, Scott; Laporte, Nadine

    2014-02-01

    A key issue in global conservation is how biodiversity co-benefits can be incorporated into land use and climate change mitigation activities, particularly those being negotiated under the United Nations to reduce emissions from tropical deforestation and forest degradation. Protected areas have been the dominant strategy for tropical forest conservation and they have increased substantially in recent decades. Avoiding deforestation by preserving carbon stored in vegetation between protected areas provides an opportunity to mitigate the effects of land use and climate change on biodiversity by maintaining habitat connectivity across landscapes. Here we use a high-resolution data set of vegetation carbon stock to map corridors traversing areas of highest biomass between protected areas in the tropics. The derived corridors contain 15% of the total unprotected aboveground carbon in the tropical region. A large number of corridors have carbon densities that approach or exceed those of the protected areas they connect, suggesting these are suitable areas for achieving both habitat connectivity and climate change mitigation benefits. To further illustrate how economic and biological information can be used for corridor prioritization on a regional scale, we conducted a multicriteria analysis of corridors in the Legal Amazon, identifying corridors with high carbon, high species richness and endemism, and low economic opportunity costs. We also assessed the vulnerability of corridors to future deforestation threat.

  18. The potential of electricity transmission corridors in forested areas as bumblebee habitat

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Declines in pollinator abundance and diversity are not only a conservation issue, but also a threat to crop pollination. Maintained infrastructure corridors, such as those containing electricity transmission lines, are potentially important wild pollinator habitat. However, there is a lack of evidence comparing the abundance and diversity of wild pollinators in transmission corridors with other important pollinator habitats. We compared the diversity of a key pollinator group, bumblebees (Bombus spp.), between transmission corridors and the surrounding semi-natural and managed habitat types at 10 sites across Sweden's Uppland region. Our results show that transmission corridors have no impact on bumblebee diversity in the surrounding area. However, transmission corridors and other maintained habitats such as roadsides have a level of bumblebee abundance and diversity comparable to semi-natural grasslands and host species that are important for conservation and ecosystem service provision. Under the current management regime, transmission corridors already provide valuable bumblebee habitat, but given that host plant density is the main determinant of bumblebee abundance, these areas could potentially be enhanced by establishing and maintaining key host plants. We show that in northern temperate regions the maintenance of transmission corridors has the potential to contribute to bumblebee conservation and the ecosystem services they provide. PMID:28018640

  19. The potential of electricity transmission corridors in forested areas as bumblebee habitat.

    PubMed

    Hill, Bruce; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2016-11-01

    Declines in pollinator abundance and diversity are not only a conservation issue, but also a threat to crop pollination. Maintained infrastructure corridors, such as those containing electricity transmission lines, are potentially important wild pollinator habitat. However, there is a lack of evidence comparing the abundance and diversity of wild pollinators in transmission corridors with other important pollinator habitats. We compared the diversity of a key pollinator group, bumblebees (Bombus spp.), between transmission corridors and the surrounding semi-natural and managed habitat types at 10 sites across Sweden's Uppland region. Our results show that transmission corridors have no impact on bumblebee diversity in the surrounding area. However, transmission corridors and other maintained habitats such as roadsides have a level of bumblebee abundance and diversity comparable to semi-natural grasslands and host species that are important for conservation and ecosystem service provision. Under the current management regime, transmission corridors already provide valuable bumblebee habitat, but given that host plant density is the main determinant of bumblebee abundance, these areas could potentially be enhanced by establishing and maintaining key host plants. We show that in northern temperate regions the maintenance of transmission corridors has the potential to contribute to bumblebee conservation and the ecosystem services they provide.

  20. Overexpression of ADH1 and HXT1 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves the fermentative efficiency during tequila elaboration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica; Cira-Chávez, Luis Alberto; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos; Ramírez-Córdova, Jose de Jesús

    2008-05-01

    This work assessed the effect of the overexpression of ADH1 and HXT1 genes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae AR5 strain during fermentation of Agave tequilana Weber blue variety must. Both genes were cloned individually and simultaneously into a yeast centromere plasmid. Two transformant strains overexpressing ADH1 and HXT1 individually and one strain overexpressing both genes were randomly selected and named A1, A3 and A5 respectively. Overexpression effect on growth and ethanol production of the A1, A3 and A5 strains was evaluated in fermentative conditions in A. tequilana Weber blue variety must and YPD medium. During growth in YPD and Agave media, all the recombinant strains showed lower cell mass formation than the wild type AR5 strain. Adh enzymatic activity in the recombinant strains A1 and A5 cultivated in A. tequilana and YPD medium was higher than in the wild type. The overexpression of both genes individually and simultaneously had no significant effect on ethanol formation; however, the fermentative efficiency of the A5 strain increased from 80.33% to 84.57% and 89.40% to 94.29% in YPD and Agave medium respectively.

  1. Recombinant industrial brewing yeast strains with ADH2 interruption using self-cloning GSH1+CUP1 cassette.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yue; Wang, Jin-Jing; Liu, Xi-Feng; He, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2009-06-01

    A self-cloning module for gene knock-out and knock-in in industrial brewing yeast strain was constructed that contains copper resistance and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene cassette, flanked by alcohol dehydrogenase II gene (ADH2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The module was used to obtain recombined strains RY1 and RY2 by targeting the ADH2 locus of host Y1. RY1 and RY2 were genetically stable. PCR and enzyme activity analysis of RY1 and RY2 cells showed that one copy of ADH2 was deleted by GSH1+CUP1 insertion, and an additional copy of wild type was still present. The fermentation ability of the recombinants was not changed after genetic modification, and a high level of glutathione (GSH) was secreted, resulting from GSH1 overexpression, which codes for gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase. A pilot-scale brewing test for RY1 and RY2 indicated that acetaldehyde content in fermenting liquor decreased by 21-22%, GSH content increased by 20-22% compared with the host, the antioxidizability of the recombinants was improved, and the sensorial evaluation was also better than that of the host. No heterologous DNA was harbored in the recombinants; therefore, they could be applied in the beer industry in terms of their biosafety.

  2. Optimal traffic control strategy for a freeway corridor under incident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Hobeika, Antoine G.

    1998-01-01

    A nonlinear programming model was formulated to provide an integrated traffic control strategy for a freeway corridor under incident conditions. The model includes diversion routes, diversion rates, on- and off-ramp metering rates, and arterial intersection timing plans as control variables. A gradient projection algorithm was employed to solve simultaneously the optimal control measures. The model performance was evaluated and validated by running the simulation and optimization programs of TRANSYT-7F and INTEGRATION. It has been found that the proposed model and control strategy reduce the overall system delay, increase the throughput of the corridor, and thus improve the traffic conditions of the entire corridor.

  3. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Piriya, P. Sobana; Vasan, P. Thirumalai; Padma, V. S.; Vidhyadevi, U.; Archana, K.; Vennison, S. John

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II) were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v) ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production. PMID:22919503

  4. South side to the west of CO172BU5, west of corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side to the west of CO-172-BU-5, west of corridor connecting to building 511. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. South side to the west of CO172BU4, east of corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side to the west of CO-172-BU-4, east of corridor connecting to building 511. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. 11. Interior view of main corridor looking into open secretarial/reception ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view of main corridor looking into open secretarial/reception space; showing closed doorway to office; center of west wing, view to southwest. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Administration Office, 2704 George Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  7. Interior, south wing, corridor, looking west U.S. Veterans Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, south wing, corridor, looking west - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  8. DC66843 VIEW OF THE INDEPENDENCE AVENUE CORRIDOR SPANNED BY THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-43 VIEW OF THE INDEPENDENCE AVENUE CORRIDOR SPANNED BY THE •DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BRIDGES, LOOKING WEST FROM TWELFTH STREET, SW - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. View of corridor running north/south on the second floor showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of corridor running north/south on the second floor showing door openings to residential rooms, window opening to lightwell, and secondary stair to third floor - Hotel Adams, 391 Leavenworth Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 420 - Method for Defining a Flight Corridor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conic projection. The FAA will accept a “Lambert-Conformal” conic projection. A polar aspect of a plane... appendix A, use appendix B to narrow the flight corridor, or complete a risk analysis in accordance...

  11. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 420 - Method for Defining a Flight Corridor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conic projection. The FAA will accept a “Lambert-Conformal” conic projection. A polar aspect of a plane... appendix A, use appendix B to narrow the flight corridor, or complete a risk analysis in accordance...

  12. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 420 - Method for Defining a Flight Corridor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conic projection. The FAA will accept a “Lambert-Conformal” conic projection. A polar aspect of a plane... appendix A, use appendix B to narrow the flight corridor, or complete a risk analysis in accordance...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 420 - Method for Defining a Flight Corridor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conic projection. The FAA will accept a “Lambert-Conformal” conic projection. A polar aspect of a plane... appendix A, use appendix B to narrow the flight corridor, or complete a risk analysis in accordance...

  14. EFFECTS OF HABITAT DISTURBANCE FROM RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON BREEDING BIRD COMMUNITIES IN RIPARIAN CORRIDORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship of land use, riparian vegetation, and avian populations. Our objective was to compare indicators of condition for vegetated riparian corridors with the composition of breeding bird populations in eight Rhode Island subwatersheds...

  15. Corridor connecting giant panda habitats from north to south in the Min Mountains, Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kaipu; Xie, Yan; Wu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    The giant panda faces severe threats from habitat fragmentation and isolation. Currently, giant panda populations have been fragmented into 30 habitat patches. The disappearance of isolated small populations and studies on the genetic diversity of various populations have shown that small isolated panda populations are at a high risk of dying out completely. Habitat fragmentation has seriously impaired the ability of the giant panda to resist climate changes and other natural disasters, such as large-scale, synchronous bamboo blooming. The Min Mountains have the largest population of pandas in China, numbering 581 individuals and accounting for 52% of the total (1114) in China. Geographic isolation means that giant pandas in the Min Mountains are divided into two populations (population A in the north and population B in the south). Population B, which had only 42 individuals in 1989, is severely threatened by high-density human populations and the loss of genetic diversity. However, we have identified an important corridor connecting the two populations. This paper explains the importance and the feasibility of reestablishing this corridor. Due to the special geographic locations of these two populations (two rivers block the migration of giant pandas between south and north), the corridor is the only passage for giant pandas in the region. Recent studies have also shown an increase of giant panda activity in the area of the corridor. However, vegetation in the corridor has been severely degraded. Bamboo forest must be restored in this area to provide food for the pandas during migration. The effects of human activities must be reduced in order to maintain panda habitat. We believe that a restored corridor will be of great benefit to the survival of giant pandas in the Min Mountains, especially for population B. Successful re-establishment of a corridor will be a valuable model for corridor construction in the future.

  16. Rail transportation corridor analysis report: Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    An environmental data base was developed for the purpose of preliminary siting of potential rail access corridors between existing rail lines and the potential repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The categories of the data base were environmental conditions considered significant in rail line construction and operation. These included land cover, population areas, slope, surface hydrology, cultivated prime agricultural lands, cultural features, and utility rights-of-way. The categories were divided into avoidance, constraint, and opportunity features, and the constraint features were then weighted for environmental impact potential. An environmental screening analysis using the computerized Geographical Information System (GIS) was then performed. The analysis involved applying the GIS overlay process to the various constraint data categories to produce a composite constraint map of the study area. The composite constraint map, color coded for various levels of constraint to corridor siting, was subsequently used as a guide for the selection of a series of alternative corridors. By means of a further application of GIS procedures, the corridor alternatives were statistically analyzed for adherence to corridor selection guidelines. In addition, a supplementary analysis was performed to compare the alternatives in terms of four impact categories: road crossings, construction costs, degree of land disruption, and population impact. The statistical and supplementary impact analyses led to a preliminary selection of a preferred corridor. The corridor assessment process indicated the importance of analyzing alternative trade-offs, as well as the need for more detailed investigation of certain conditions and a detailed comparison of alternatives prior to final corridor siting.

  17. Evolution of the landscape along the Clear Creek Corridor, Colorado; urbanization, aggregate mining and reclamation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arbogast, Belinda; Knepper, Daniel H.; Melick, Roger A.; Hickman, John

    2002-01-01

    Prime agricultural land along the Clear Creek floodplain, Colorado, attracted settlement in the 1850's but the demand for sand and gravel for 1900's construction initiated a sequence of events that exceeded previous interests and created the modified landscape and urban ecosystem that exists today. The Clear Creek valley corridor offers a landscape filled with a persistent visible and hidden reminder of it's past use. The map sheets illustrate the Clear Creek landscape as a series of compositions, both at the macro view (in the spatial context of urban structure and highways from aerial photographs) and micro view (from the civic scale where landscape features like trees, buildings, and sidewalks are included). The large-scale topographic features, such as mountains and terraces, appear 'changeless' (they do change over geologic time), while Clear Creek has changed from a wide braided stream to a narrow confined stream. Transportation networks (streets and highways) and spiraling population growth in adjacent cities (from approximately 38,000 people in 1880 to over a million in 1999) form two dominant landscape patterns. Mining and wetland/riparian occupy the smallest amount of land use acres compared to urban, transportation, or water reservoir activities in the Clear Creek aggregate reserve study area. Four types of reclaimed pits along Clear Creek were determined: water storage facilities, wildlife/greenbelt space, multiple-purpose reservoirs, and 'hidden scenery.' The latter involves infilling gravel pits (with earth backfill, concrete rubble, or sanitary landfill) and covering the site with light industry or residential housing making the landform hard to detect as a past mine site. Easier to recognize are the strong-edged, rectilinear water reservoirs, reclaimed from off-channel sand and gravel pits that reflect the land survey grid and property boundaries. The general public may not realize softly contoured linear wildlife corridors connecting urban

  18. Extension of an iterative closest point algorithm for simultaneous localization and mapping in corridor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Haosong; Chen, Weihai; Wu, Xingming; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is a crucial technique for intelligent robots to navigate autonomously and execute complex tasks. It can also be applied to shape measurement, reverse engineering, and many other scientific or engineering fields. A widespread SLAM algorithm, named KinectFusion, performs well in environments with complex shapes. However, it cannot handle translation uncertainties well in highly structured scenes. This paper improves the KinectFusion algorithm and makes it competent in both structured and unstructured environments. 3-D line features are first extracted according to both color and depth data captured by Kinect sensor. Then the lines in the current data frame are matched with the lines extracted from the entire constructed world model. Finally, we fuse the distance errors of these line-pairs into the standard KinectFusion framework and estimate sensor poses using an iterative closest point-based algorithm. Comparative experiments with the KinectFusion algorithm and one state-of-the-art method in a corridor scene have been done. The experimental results demonstrate that after our improvement, the KinectFusion algorithm can also be applied to structured environments and has higher accuracy. Experiments on two open access datasets further validated our improvements.

  19. Mapping threats to power line corridors for Connecticut rights-of-way management.

    PubMed

    Poulos, H M; Camp, A E

    2011-02-01

    Trees are a major threat to power line security across forested regions of the world. We developed a decision support system for identifying locations in Connecticut, USA where trees have grown tall enough to make contact with transmission lines during storms. We used the Random Forest algorithm, danger tree presence/absence data, and 25 raster environmental datasets to develop (1) an understanding of the abiotic environmental settings that host danger trees and (2) a spatially explicit map of danger tree distributions across Connecticut power line corridors. Danger trees were prevalent in locations (1) with an infrequent history of storms; (2) forested and residential land uses; and (3) low to middle elevations. Products from this research can be transferred to adaptive right-of-way management because they present managers with key information on where danger trees are likely to occur, and the methods presented herein have great potential for future application to other regions managers seek to identify high priority areas for danger tree removal.

  20. Assessment of frequent cutting as a plant-community management technique in power-line corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luken, James O.; Hinton, Andrew C.; Baker, Douglas G.

    1991-05-01

    Repeated cutting of vegetation at or near ground level in power-line corridors is a common practice for inhibiting tree growth and regeneration. However, few data exist on long-term community responses. In this study, we sampled 20 northern Kentucky power-line corridors and compared their seedling and sapling communities to the edges and interiors of adjacent undisturbed forests. Mean seedling and sapling density in corridors was roughly twice that of adjacent undisturbed forest interiors, suggesting that repeated cutting is not a viable method of inhibiting tree regeneration. Corridor communities were dominated by Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) and Fraxinus americana (white ash), but ordinations indicated strong similaritties among communities in corridors and adjacent forests. Many of the tree species found in adjacent forests, with the exception of a few shade-tolerant species, had highest seedling and sapling densities in corridors. Stump or root sprouting by many species appears to regenerate forests quickly after cutting. However, disturbed soil and detritus accumulations caused by management crews and their equipment may also create a large variety of microsites for seedling establishment. Because repeated cutting selects for dominance by species with highest sprout growth rates, it should not be used as the sole management technique. It may instead be used to alter the vigor, stature, and stored reserves of trees so that herbicides or other methods of tree control can be used more efficiently.

  1. Mapping mountain torrent hazards in the Hexi Corridor using an evidential reasoning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Youhua; Liu, Jinpeng; Tian, Feng; Wang, Dekai

    2017-02-01

    The Hexi Corridor is an important part of the Silk Road Economic Belt and a crucial channel for westward development in China. Many important national engineering projects pass through the corridor, such as highways, railways, and the West-to-East Gas Pipeline. The frequent torrent disasters greatly impact the security of infrastructure and human safety. In this study, an evidential reasoning approach based on Dempster-Shafer theory is proposed for mapping mountain torrent hazards in the Hexi Corridor. A torrent hazard map for the Hexi Corridor was generated by integrating the driving factors of mountain torrent disasters including precipitation, terrain, flow concentration processes, and the vegetation fraction. The results show that the capability of the proposed method is satisfactory. The torrent hazard map shows that there is high potential torrent hazard in the central and southeastern Hexi Corridor. The results are useful for engineering planning support and resource protection in the Hexi Corridor. Further efforts are discussed for improving torrent hazard mapping and prediction.

  2. Small mammal populations in a restored stream corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-03-13

    An opportunity to study the response of a small mammal community to restoration of a riparian wetland was provided by the Pen Branch project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Live trapping of small mammals was conducted on six transects at Pen Branch in 1996 and 1998 and at three transects at Meyer's Branch, an unimpacted stream at SRS, in 1997 and 1998. Distributions of rates of capture of the four most common species were both spatially and temporally uneven. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance found no significant differences in the relationship of capture rates between species and between treatment and both the within-stream control and Meyers Branch. Habitat use and movement within stream corridors appears to be dependent primarily on species, with age and sex perhaps contributing to preference and distance moved. The lack of differences in capture rates related to transect or treatment may be due to the close proximity of sample transects relative to the movement potential of the species sampled.

  3. TA-59 North Parking Lot and Pajarito Road Corridor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide traffic engineering services for the TA-59 North Parking Lot/Pajarito Road corridor Analysis at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The following tasks were accomplished to assess the development of the north parking lot and Pajarito Road in the vicinity of TA-59: conducted turning-movement counts from 7 AM to 9 AM and from 4 PM to 6 PM at the Pajarito Road/TA-59 intersection; conducted a parking supply and demand survey for all the parking lots within TA-59 on half-hour intervals between 0600--1800 (6 AM to 6 PM); conducted mid-day directional speed study along Pajarito Road, just east or south of the TA-59/Pajarito Road intersection; conducted peak hour gap study on Pajarito Road in the vicinity of TA-59; reviewed the TA-59 Parking Lot North of Pajarito Road, FY-94 Weapons GPP Short List Candidate {number_sign}9 report and other documents pertaining to past transportation studies; reassigned current turning-movement volumes with a 100 space parking lot being built on the north side of Pajarito Road; prepared traffic projections for the Pajarito Road/TA-59 intersection according to the proposed development on the north side of Pajarito Road that would employee 246 people; and assigned pedestrian crossing volumes between the northern lot/future development site and areas south of Pajarito Road.

  4. Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Grace C.; Deshmukh, Ranjit; Ndhlukula, Kudakwashe; Radojicic, Tijana; Reilly, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) is a study approach developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the support of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The approach combines geospatial, statistical, energy engineering, and economic methods to comprehensively identify and value high-quality wind, solar PV, and solar CSP resources for grid integration based on techno-economic criteria, generation profiles (for wind), and socio-environmental impacts. The Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor study sought to identify and comprehensively value high-quality wind, solar photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) resources in 21 countries in the East and Southern Africa Power Pools to support the prioritization of areas for development through a multi-criteria planning process. These countries include Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The study includes the methodology and the key results including renewable energy potential for each region.

  5. Mapping transactional sex on the Northern Corridor highway in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alan G; Morris, Chester N

    2007-06-01

    Even in generalized HIV/AIDS epidemics, vulnerable populations such as sex workers and truckers require special attention in programming. Combining a number of elicitation methods, centred on Geographical Information Systems (GIS) mapping, the Kenyan section of the Northern Corridor highway was studied to characterize the 'hot spots' where transactional sex is concentrated and to provide estimates of numbers of truckers and sex workers and the volumes of transactional sex taking place on the highway. An average of 2400 trucks park overnight at the 39 hot spots identified. These spots have an estimated sex worker population of 5600 women. Analysis of 403 sex worker diaries shows an average of 13.6 different clients and 54.2 sex acts in a month. Condom use is 69% in liaisons with regular clients and 90% with casual clients. The use of GIS is demonstrated at regional and local scales. The 'bridge population' of clients of sex workers, containing a wide rage of occupations, supports the concept of programming for 'vulnerable places' as well as vulnerable groups.

  6. Biogeochemical sampling in the Mahd Adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebens, Richard J.; Shacklette, Hansford T.; Worl, Ronald G.

    1983-01-01

    A biogeochemical reconnaissance of the Mahd adh Dhahab district, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, confirms the ability of deep-rooted Acacia trees to reflect bedrock concentrations of some trace elements. The analytical values for lead, zinc, selenium, and cadmium in ash of tree branches are significantly higher in samples from areas of known mineralization (13 sites) than in samples from areas of no known mineralization (12 sites). Geometric mean concentrations of these elements in the two areas (mineralized; nonmineralized), quoted as parts per million in ash, are lead (122; 28), zinc (713; 443), selenium (1.2; 0.6), and cadmium (1.4; 0.5). The range of molybdenum values in ash from the two areas is similar, but a cluster of four sites in an area classified as nonmineralized corresponds to an area where the U.S. Geological Survey reported anomalous molybdenum values in rock in 1965. Results for other elements were either equivocal (mercury, tellurium, silver) or showed no correspondence to the two areas. Mean values for barium, manganese, potassium, and sodium are significantly higher in areas of no known mineralization, but we conclude that this reflects a difference in country rock major-element chemistry rather than the effect of ore-forming processes. The pattern of trace-metal values in Acacia ash is present whether the sampled tree grows on bedrock, on talus, or on residual or modern alluvium. This fact suggests that the trace-element chemistry of the trees reflects bedrock geochemistry and implies that Acacia biogeochemistry could be applied as a prospecting tool in areas where bedrock is not well exposed.

  7. Promoter elements required for developmental expression of the maize Adh1 gene in transgenic rice.

    PubMed Central

    Kyozuka, J; Olive, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S; Shimamoto, K

    1994-01-01

    To define the regions of the maize alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) promoter that confer tissue-specific expression, a series of 5' promoter deletions and substitution mutations were linked to the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase A (uidA) reporter gene and introduced into rice plants. A region between -140 and -99 not only conferred anaerobically inducible expression in the roots of transgenic plants but was also required for expression in the root cap, embryo, and in endosperm under aerobic conditions. GC-rich (GC-1, GC-2, and GC-3) or GT-rich (GT-1 and GT-2) sequence motifs in this region were necessary for expression in these tissues, as they were in anaerobic expression. Expression in the root cap under aerobic conditions required all the GC- and GT-rich motifs. The GT-1, GC-1, GC-2, and GC-3 motifs, and to a lesser extent the GT-2 motif, were also required for anaerobic responsiveness in rice roots. All elements except the GC-3 motif were needed for endosperm-specific expression. The GC-2 motif and perhaps the GT-1 motif appeared to be the only elements required for high-level expression in the embryos of rice seeds. Promoter regions important for shoot-, embryo-, and pollen-specific expression were proximal to -99, and nucleotides required for shoot-specific expression occurred between positions -72 and -43. Pollen-specific expression required a sequence element outside the promoter region, between +54 and +106 of the untranslated leader, as well as a silencer element in the promoter between -72 and -43. PMID:8061518

  8. Nurses’ perceptions of medication adherence in schizophrenia: results of the ADHES cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Robin; Alptekin, Koksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M.; Naber, Dieter; Olivares, José Manuel; Papageorgiou, Georgios; Roca, Miguel; Thomas, Pierre; Hargarter, Ludger; Schreiner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment is a widespread problem within schizophrenia therapy with serious consequences including increased risks of relapse and rehospitalization. Mounting evidence supports the key roles that nurses play in monitoring patient progress and facilitating long-term treatment adherence. The Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) nurses’ survey was designed to assess the opinions of nurses on the causes and management of partial/nonadherence to antipsychotic medication. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 4120 nurses from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Interpretation of results was based on a descriptive comparison of responses. Results: Nurses perceived 54% of patients seen in the preceding month to be partially/nonadherent to treatment. Most nurses (90%) reported some level of experience with administration of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics, with 24% of nurses administering >10 injections per month. The majority (85%) of nurses surveyed believed that improving adherence would improve patient outcomes. Nearly half (49%) reported that most of their patients depend on a family member or other nonprofessional carer to remind them to take their medication as prescribed. A similar proportion of nurses (43%) reported that most of their patients relied on a professional to remind them to take medication. Most nurses (92%) felt that ensuring continuous medication with LAI antipsychotics would yield long-term benefits for patients, but their opinion was that over a third of patients were unaware of LAI antipsychotic treatments. In a series of forced options, the strategy used most often by respondents (89%) to promote medication adherence was to build trusting relationships with patients while listening to and interpreting their needs and concerns. Respondents also rated this as the most effective strategy that they used (48%). Conclusion: Nurses are highly aware of adherence

  9. How to comprehensively evaluate river corridor conditions? A comparison of different biotic and morphological indices in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfieri, Bruno; Surian, Nicola; Hardersen, Sönke; Maiolini, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of river conditions is crucial for planning appropriate management actions. The European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (WFD) requires the assessment of biological, physical-chemical and hydromorphological elements to define the ecological status of rivers. The WFD suggests the use of different bioindicators (i.e. benthic macroinvertebrates, diatoms, aquatic macrophytes and fish), the so called "biological quality elements" (BQEs). However, recent studies showed that BQEs-based indices have two main limitations: (i) their standard application is limited to flowing channels and (ii) they are not sensitive to hydromorphological alteration. Hydromorphological conditions are usually evaluated applying methods for physical habitat assessment (i.e. the River Habitat Survey or derived methods) that consist in site-scale inventories of river forms and anthropic structures. The lack of consideration of wider spatial (i.e. reach or catchment scale) and temporal scales (e.g. channel evolution over the last 50-100 years) make such methods inadequate for a sound diagnosis of morphological alterations. The Morphological Quality Index (MQI) and the dragonfly-based Odonate River Index (ORI) were developed in the recent years to overcome the above-mentioned limitations and to assess the condition of the whole river corridor (i.e. the channel and its adjacent floodplain) at reach scale. In this study we correlated the assessments of MQI, ORI and two BQEs-based biotic indices (i.e. STAR_ICMi for benthic macroinvertebrates and ICMi for diatoms) in 15 lowland river reaches in northern Italy. The selected reaches are characterized by a wide range of morphological degradation. MQI and ORI were highly correlated, probably because both methods work at reach scale and consider the integrity of the whole river corridor, either in terms of morphology or considering ecological aspects. In contrast, no significant relationships were found between MQI and ORI and the BQEs

  10. Impact of Deforestation on Clouds and Rainfall On the Northern Part of the Proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Nair, U. S.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.

    2004-12-01

    greater that 2m for any ecosystem type. To properly characterize the surface energy budget, the root water uptake was modified based on our field observations to allow for extraction of water from deeper soil layers by the trees. We also used the more recent ecosystem database generated at the University of Maryland from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery to simulate current conditions. Leaf Area Index (LAI) derived from MODIS satellite observations are used in the simulations and values prescribed for forested and deforested conditions. In addition a soil database was added to RAMS based on the one-degree Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) soil types and depths. These additions add considerable new capabilities to accurately model conditions in Central America. These changes result in significant modification to the surface energy budgets together with the modification of the thermodynamic profile of the near surface atmosphere during the dry season. We demonstrate that deforestation has serious consequences for the proposed biological corridors. Surface air over deforested areas tends to get warmer and drier, and when these winds flow over forested patches they impact the cloud formation processes and rainfall. Numerical simulations show the locations where these impacts will be the largest, potentially making these regions climatically unstable. The managers of the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor project can utilize this information for better planning.

  11. Ethylene-responsive transcription factors interact with promoters of ADH and PDC involved in persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit de-astringency.

    PubMed

    Min, Ting; Yin, Xue-ren; Shi, Yan-na; Luo, Zheng-rong; Yao, Yun-cong; Grierson, Donald; Ferguson, Ian B; Chen, Kun-song

    2012-11-01

    The persimmon fruit is a particularly good model for studying fruit response to hypoxia, in particular, the hypoxia-response ERF (HRE) genes. An anaerobic environment reduces fruit astringency by converting soluble condensed tannins (SCTs) into an insoluble form. Although the physiology of de-astringency has been widely studied, its molecular control is poorly understood. Both CO(2) and ethylene treatments efficiently removed the astringency from 'Mopan' persimmon fruit, as indicated by a decrease in SCTs. Acetaldehyde, the putative agent for causing de-astringency, accumulated during these treatments, as did activities of the key enzymes of acetaldehyde synthesis, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). Eight DkADH and DkPDC genes were isolated, and three candidates for a role in de-astringency, DkADH1, DkPDC1, and DkPDC2, were characterized by transcriptional analysis in different tissues. The significance of these specific isoforms was confirmed by principal component analysis. Transient expression in leaf tissue showed that DkPDC2 decreased SCTs. Interactions of six hypoxia-responsive ERF genes and target promoters were tested in transient assays. The results indicated that two hypoxia-responsive ERF genes, DkERF9 and DkERF10, were involved in separately regulating the DkPDC2 and DkADH1 promoters. It is proposed that a DkERF-DkADH/DkPDC cascade is involved in regulating persimmon de-astringency.

  12. Copeptin as a marker for arginine-vasopressin/antidiuretic hormone secretion in the diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, A; Dixit, K C; Szinnai, G; Werth, S C; Haagen, U; Christ-Crain, M; Morgenthaler, N; Brabant, G

    2013-12-01

    Direct measurement of arginine-vasopressin/antidiuretic hormone (AVP/ADH) concentrations is not included in the standard diagnostic procedures for paraneoplastic syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH). Here, we evaluate the potential of copeptin measurement as a surrogate marker of AVP/ADH secretion for the direct diagnosis of suspected SIADH in cancer patients. Forty-six unselected cancer patients with serum sodium concentrations permanently below 135 mmol/L were included in this study. We compared standard diagnostic criteria for SIADH to the measurement of plasma copeptin in relation to osmolality. Normative data for comparison were constructed from 24 healthy controls studied under basal conditions, experimental dehydration, and hypotonic hypervolemia as well as from 222 hospital patients with no suspicion of an altered ADH regulation. Log transformation of copeptin revealed a linear relationship to plasma osmolality in the controls (R = 0.495, p < 0.001). Compared to these normative data, copeptin levels in most cancer patients were inappropriately high for plasma osmolality and were not significantly correlated. These results, suggestive for paraneoplastic SIADH, could be confirmed by conventional diagnostic procedures for SIADH. Current strategies to diagnose SIADH are difficult to perform under outpatients conditions. Our approach allows screening from a single plasma sample for true paraneoplastic ADH oversecretion and thus rapid selection for a specific therapy with an AVP receptor antagonist.

  13. Co-expression of TAL1 and ADH1 in recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of furfural.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Nambu, Yumiko; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass dedicated to bioethanol production usually contains pentoses and inhibitory compounds such as furfural that are not well tolerated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, S. cerevisiae strains with the capability of utilizing both glucose and xylose in the presence of inhibitors such as furfural are very important in industrial ethanol production. Under the synergistic conditions of transaldolase (TAL) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) overexpression, S. cerevisiae MT8-1X/TAL-ADH was able to produce 1.3-fold and 2.3-fold more ethanol in the presence of 70 mM furfural than a TAL-expressing strain and a control strain, respectively. We also tested the strains' ability by mimicking industrial ethanol production from hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing fermentation inhibitors, and ethanol production was further improved by 16% when using MT8-1X/TAL-ADH compared to the control strain. Transcript analysis further revealed that besides the pentose phosphate pathway genes TKL1 and TAL1, ADH7 was also upregulated in response to furfural stress, which resulted in higher ethanol production compared to the TAL-expressing strain. The improved capability of our modified strain was based on its capacity to more quickly reduce furfural in situ resulting in higher ethanol production. The co-expression of TAL/ADH genes is one crucial strategy to fully utilize undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate, leading to cost-competitive ethanol production.

  14. Use of a modified alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH1, promoter in construction of diacetyl non-producing brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Onnela, M L; Suihko, M L; Penttilä, M; Keränen, S

    1996-08-20

    The bacterial gene, encoding alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (alpha-ALDC), was expressed in a bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast under the control of a modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) promoter which lacks the upstream regions from -800 bp to -1500 bp. In pilot scale brewing conditions, the level of alpha-ALDC produced was high enough to reduce the concentration of diacetyl so that lagering was not required. alpha-ALDC active brewer's yeast strains were also shown to be suitable for high gravity brewing.

  15. Integrating occupancy modeling and interview data for corridor identification: A case study for jaguars in Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, K.A.; Nijhawan, S.; Salom-Perez, R.; Potosme, S.H.; Hines, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Corridors are critical elements in the long-term conservation of wide-ranging species like the jaguar (Panthera onca). Jaguar corridors across the range of the species were initially identified using a GIS-based least-cost corridor model. However, due to inherent errors in remotely sensed data and model uncertainties, these corridors warrant field verification before conservation efforts can begin. We developed a novel corridor assessment protocol based on interview data and site occupancy modeling. We divided our pilot study area, in southeastern Nicaragua, into 71, 6. ??. 6 km sampling units and conducted 160 structured interviews with local residents. Interviews were designed to collect data on jaguar and seven prey species so that detection/non-detection matrices could be constructed for each sampling unit. Jaguars were reportedly detected in 57% of the sampling units and had a detection probability of 28%. With the exception of white-lipped peccary, prey species were reportedly detected in 82-100% of the sampling units. Though the use of interview data may violate some assumptions of the occupancy modeling approach for determining 'proportion of area occupied', we countered these shortcomings through study design and interpreting the occupancy parameter, psi, as 'probability of habitat used'. Probability of habitat use was modeled for each target species using single state or multistate models. A combination of the estimated probabilities of habitat use for jaguar and prey was selected to identify the final jaguar corridor. This protocol provides an efficient field methodology for identifying corridors for easily-identifiable species, across large study areas comprised of unprotected, private lands. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Particulate Matter Concentrations in East Oakland's High Street Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, P.; Jackson, J.; Lewis, R.; Marigny, A.; Mitchell, J. D.; Nguyen, R.; Philips, B.; Randle, D.; Romero, D.; Spears, D.; Telles, C.; Weissman, D.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of small solid pieces and/or liquid droplets in the air. High concentrations of PM can pose a serious health hazard because inhalation can result in breathing problems and/or aggravate asthma. Long term exposure can increase the likelihood of respiratory problems like asthma and emphysema as well as cancer. The smaller the particles, the deeper they can get into the respiratory system. For this reason, the smallest particles, those smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5), are the most dangerous. PM2.5 is largely emitted from motor vehicles burning fuels that don't break down fully. Our research team investigated the levels of PM2.5 as well as particles smaller than 10 micrometers (PM10) and total suspended particulate (TSP) along the northeast-southwest trending High Street Corridor, near Fremont High School in East Oakland, California. Using the Aerocet 531 mass particle counter, team members walked through neighborhoods and along major roads within a 1 mile radius of Fremont High School. The Aerocet 531 recorded two minute average measurements of all the relevant PM sizes, which are reported in mg/m3. Measurements were consistently taken in the morning, between 8:30 and 11:30 am. Preliminary results indicate maximum readings of all PM sizes at sites that are in close proximity to a major freeway (Interstate-880). These results support our initial hypothesis that proximity to major roads and freeways, especially those with high diesel-fuel burning truck traffic, would be the primary factor affecting PM concentration levels. Preliminary median and maximum readings all suggest particulate matter levels below what the EPA would consider unhealthy or risky.

  17. Africa’s oesophageal cancer corridor - do hot beverages contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Munishi, Michael Oresto; Hanisch, Rachel; Mapunda, Oscar; Ndyetabura, Theonest; Ndaro, Arnold; Schüz, Joachim; Kibiki, Gibson; McCormack, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hot beverage consumption has been linked to oesophageal squamous cell cancer (EC) but its contribution to the poorly-understood East African EC corridor is not known. Methods In a cross-sectional study of general-population residents in Kilimanjaro, North Tanzania, tea drinking temperatures and times were measured. Using linear regression models, we compared drinking temperatures to those in previous studies, by socio-demographic factors and tea type (“milky tea” which can be 50% or more milk and water boiled together vs “black tea” which has no milk). Results Participants started drinking at a mean of 70.6°C (standard deviation 3.9, n=188), which exceeds that in all previous studies (p≤0.01 for each). Tea type, gender and age were associated with drinking temperatures. After mutual adjustment for each other, milky tea drinkers drank their tea 1.9°C (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 2.9) hotter than drinkers of black tea, largely because black tea cooled twice as fast as milky tea. Men commenced drinking tea 0.9°C (−0.2, 2.1) hotter than women did, and finished their cups 30 (−9, 69) seconds faster. 70% and 39% of milky and black tea drinkers, respectively, reported a history of tongue burning. Conclusions Hot tea consumption, especially milky tea, may be an important and modifiable risk factor for EC in Tanzania. The contribution of this habit to EC risk needs to be evaluated in this setting, jointly with that of the many risk factors acting synergistically in this multi-factorial disease. PMID:26245249

  18. On groundwater fluctuations, evapotranspiration, and understory removal in riparian corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Maceo C.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Cleverly, James R.; Thibault, James R.; Schuetz, Jennifer F.; Dahm, Clifford N.

    2009-05-01

    This study utilizes 7 years of continuously monitored groundwater-level data from four sites along the Río Grande riparian corridor in central New Mexico to calculate evapotranspiration from groundwater and assess impacts of understory vegetation removal during a restoration project. Diurnal groundwater fluctuation measurements were used to compare the well-known White method for estimating evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETg) to colocated measurements of total riparian evapotranspiration (ET) measured using the eddy covariance method. On average, the two methods were linearly correlated and had similar variability, but groundwater hydrograph estimates of ETg tended to be larger than tower ET estimates. Average ETg estimates for two wells at one site ranged from 91.45% to 164.77% of measured tower ET estimates, but were also shown to range from 57.35% to 254.34% at another site. Comparisons between the methods improved with deeper water tables, reduced groundwater and river connectivity, and where soil profiles were dominated by coarse-sized particles. Using a range of texture-based estimates of specific yield (Sy) with water table position improves the field application of the White method. River-induced fluctuations in groundwater increased the variability of ETg measurements. Removal of understory vegetation at one site resulted in a small but significant reduction in diel groundwater fluctuation amplitude of 19-21%. Caution is required when understory vegetation removal is used as a means to decrease overall riparian ET. Diel groundwater fluctuation amplitudes can be useful in gauging the hydrological effects of vegetation removal. Riparian groundwater hydrographs are critical to investigating the hydrologic connectivity between river and shallow groundwater, the temporal patterns of vegetative consumption, and monitoring changes to the vegetation community.

  19. Remote sensing methods for power line corridor surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, Leena; Lehtomäki, Matti; Ahokas, Eero; Hyyppä, Juha; Karjalainen, Mika; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Kukko, Antero; Heinonen, Tero

    2016-09-01

    To secure uninterrupted distribution of electricity, effective monitoring and maintenance of power lines are needed. This literature review article aims to give a wide overview of the possibilities provided by modern remote sensing sensors in power line corridor surveys and to discuss the potential and limitations of different approaches. Monitoring of both power line components and vegetation around them is included. Remotely sensed data sources discussed in the review include synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, optical satellite and aerial images, thermal images, airborne laser scanner (ALS) data, land-based mobile mapping data, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) data. The review shows that most previous studies have concentrated on the mapping and analysis of network components. In particular, automated extraction of power line conductors has achieved much attention, and promising results have been reported. For example, accuracy levels above 90% have been presented for the extraction of conductors from ALS data or aerial images. However, in many studies datasets have been small and numerical quality analyses have been omitted. Mapping of vegetation near power lines has been a less common research topic than mapping of the components, but several studies have also been carried out in this field, especially using optical aerial and satellite images. Based on the review we conclude that in future research more attention should be given to an integrated use of various data sources to benefit from the various techniques in an optimal way. Knowledge in related fields, such as vegetation monitoring from ALS, SAR and optical image data should be better exploited to develop useful monitoring approaches. Special attention should be given to rapidly developing remote sensing techniques such as UAVs and laser scanning from airborne and land-based platforms. To demonstrate and verify the capabilities of automated monitoring approaches, large tests in various environments

  20. A new regulatory element mediates ethanol repression of KlADH3, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene coding for a mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Saliola, Michele; Getuli, Claudia; Mazzoni, Cristina; Fantozzi, Ivana; Falcone, Claudio

    2007-08-01

    KlADH3 is a Kluyveromyces lactis alcohol dehydrogenase gene induced in the presence of all respiratory carbon sources except ethanol, which specifically represses this gene. Deletion analysis of the KlADH3 promoter revealed the presence of both positive and negative elements. However, by site-directed mutagenesis and gel retardation experiments, we identified a 15-bp element responsible for the transcriptional repression of this gene by ethanol. In particular, this element showed putative sites required for the sequential binding of ethanol-induced factors responsible for the repressed conditions, and the binding of additional factors relieved repression. In addition, we showed that the ethanol element was required for in vivo repression of KlAdh3 activity.

  1. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR318C (ADH6) gene product as a broad specificity NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase: relevance in aldehyde reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Larroy, Carol; Fernández, M Rosario; González, Eva; Parés, Xavier; Biosca, Josep A

    2002-01-01

    YMR318C represents an open reading frame from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with unknown function. It possesses a conserved sequence motif, the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) signature, specific to the medium-chain zinc-containing ADHs. In the present study, the YMR318C gene product has been purified to homogeneity from overexpressing yeast cells, and found to be a homodimeric ADH, composed of 40 kDa subunits and with a pI of 5.0-5.4. The enzyme was strictly specific for NADPH and was active with a wide variety of substrates, including aliphatic (linear and branched-chain) and aromatic primary alcohols and aldehydes. Aldehydes were processed with a 50-fold higher catalytic efficiency than that for the corresponding alcohols. The highest k(cat)/K(m) values were found with pentanal>veratraldehyde > hexanal > 3-methylbutanal >cinnamaldehyde. Taking into consideration the substrate specificity and sequence characteristics of the YMR318C gene product, we have proposed this gene to be called ADH6. The disruption of ADH6 was not lethal for the yeast under laboratory conditions. Although S. cerevisiae is considered a non lignin-degrading organism, the catalytic activity of ADHVI can direct veratraldehyde and anisaldehyde, arising from the oxidation of lignocellulose by fungal lignin peroxidases, to the lignin biodegradation pathway. ADHVI is the only S. cerevisiae enzyme able to significantly reduce veratraldehyde in vivo, and its overexpression allowed yeast to grow under toxic concentrations of this aldehyde. The enzyme may also be involved in the synthesis of fusel alcohols. To our knowledge this is the first NADPH-dependent medium-chain ADH to be characterized in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11742541

  2. Methodology for Collision Risk Assessment of an Airspace Flow Corridor Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yimin

    This dissertation presents a methodology to estimate the collision risk associated with a future air-transportation concept called the flow corridor. The flow corridor is a Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept to reduce congestion and increase throughput in en-route airspace. The flow corridor has the potential to increase throughput by reducing the controller workload required to manage aircraft outside the corridor and by reducing separation of aircraft within corridor. The analysis in this dissertation is a starting point for the safety analysis required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to eventually approve and implement the corridor concept. This dissertation develops a hybrid risk analysis methodology that combines Monte Carlo simulation with dynamic event tree analysis. The analysis captures the unique characteristics of the flow corridor concept, including self-separation within the corridor, lane change maneuvers, speed adjustments, and the automated separation assurance system. Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the movement of aircraft in the flow corridor and to identify precursor events that might lead to a collision. Since these precursor events are not rare, standard Monte Carlo simulation can be used to estimate these occurrence rates. Dynamic event trees are then used to model the subsequent series of events that may lead to collision. When two aircraft are on course for a near-mid-air collision (NMAC), the on-board automated separation assurance system provides a series of safety layers to prevent the impending NNAC or collision. Dynamic event trees are used to evaluate the potential failures of these layers in order to estimate the rare-event collision probabilities. The results show that the throughput can be increased by reducing separation to 2 nautical miles while maintaining the current level of safety. A sensitivity analysis shows that the most critical parameters in the model related to the overall

  3. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    J. L . Orrock; B. J. Danielson; M. J. Burns; D. J. Levey

    2003-02-03

    J.L. Orrock, B.J. Danielson, M.J. Burns, and D.J. Levey. 2003. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation. Ecology, 84(10):2589-2599. Abstract: Corridors that connect patches of disjunct habitat may be promising tools for mediating the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation, but little is known about how corridors affect ecological interactions. In eight 12-ha experimental landscapes, we examined how corridors affect the impact of invertebrate, rodent, and avian seed predators on pokeweed, Phytolacca americana. Over 13 months in 2000 and 2001, we quantified the effects of patch shape, connectivity, and predator type on the number of seeds germinating in the field (germinants), seed removal, and the viability of remaining seeds. Corridors did not affect the number of P. americana germinants in experimental exclosures or the viability of seeds remaining in exclosures. However, corridors affected the removal of seeds in a predator-specific manner: invertebrates removed more seeds in unconnected patches, whereas rodents removed more seeds in connected patches. Seed removal by birds was similar in connected and unconnected patches. Total seed removal by all seed predators was not affected by corridors, because invertebrates removed more seeds where rodents removed fewer seeds, and vice versa. Overall, seed predation signi®cantly reduced the number and viability of remaining seeds, and reduced the number of germinants in 2000 but not in 2001. The abundance of naturally occurring P. americana plants in our experimental patches in 2000 decreased with increasing seed removal from exclosures but was not related to viability or germinants in 2000, suggesting that seed removal may shape the distribution and abundance of this species. Complementary patterns of seed removal by rodents and invertebrates suggest that corridors alter the effects of these predator taxa by changing the relative amounts of edge and core

  4. Climate change and plant dispersal along corridors in fragmented landscapes of Mesoamerica

    PubMed Central

    Imbach, Pablo A; Locatelli, Bruno; Molina, Luis G; Ciais, Philippe; Leadley, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is a threat to biodiversity, and adaptation measures should be considered in biodiversity conservation planning. Protected areas (PA) are expected to be impacted by climate change and improving their connectivity with biological corridors (BC) has been proposed as a potential adaptation measure, although assessing its effectiveness remains a challenge. In Mesoamerica, efforts to preserve the biodiversity have led to the creation of a regional network of PA and, more recently, BC. This study evaluates the role of BC for facilitating plant dispersal between PA under climate change in Mesoamerica. A spatially explicit dynamic model (cellular automaton) was developed to simulate species dispersal under different climate and conservation policy scenarios. Plant functional types (PFT) were defined based on a range of dispersal rates and vegetation types to represent the diversity of species in the region. The impacts of climate change on PA and the role of BC for dispersal were assessed spatially. Results show that most impacted PA are those with low altitudinal range in hot, dry, or high latitude areas. PA with low altitudinal range in high cool areas benefit the most from corridors. The most important corridors cover larger areas and have high altitude gradients. Only the fastest PFT can keep up with the expected change in climate and benefit from corridors for dispersal. We conclude that the spatial assessment of the vulnerability of PA and the role of corridors in facilitating dispersal can help conservation planning under a changing climate. PMID:24101983

  5. California air transportation study: A transportation system for the California Corridor of the year 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    To define and solve the problems of transportation in the California Corrider in the year 2010, the 1989 California Polytechnic State University Aeronautical Engineering Senior Design class determined future corridor transportation needs and developed a system to meet the requirements. A market study, which included interpreting travel demand and gauging the future of regional and national air travel in and out of the corridor, allowed the goals of the project to be accurately refined. Comprehensive trade-off studies of several proposed transporation systems were conducted to determine which components would form the final proposed system. Preliminary design and further analysis were performed for each resulting component. The proposed system consists of three vehicles and a special hub or mode mixer, the Corridor Access Port (CAP). The vehicles are: (1) an electric powered aircraft to serve secondary airports and the CAP; (2) a high speed magnetic levitation train running through the CAP and the high population density areas of the corridor; and (3) a vertical takeoff and landing tilt rotor aircraft to serve both intercity and intrametropolitan travelers from the CAP and city vertiports. The CAP is a combination and an extension of the hub, mode mixer, and Wayport concepts. The CAP is an integrated part of the system which meets the travel demands in the corridor, and interfaces with interstate and international travel.

  6. Corridors restore animal-mediated pollination in fragmented tropical forest landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kormann, Urs; Scherber, Christoph; Tscharntke, Teja; Klein, Nadja; Larbig, Manuel; Valente, Jonathon J.; Hadley, Adam S.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions have become heavily eroded through habitat loss. Animal-mediated pollination is required in more than 94% of higher tropical plant species and 75% of the world's leading food crops, but it remains unclear if corridors avert deforestation-driven pollination breakdown in fragmented tropical landscapes. Here, we used manipulative resource experiments and field observations to show that corridors functionally connect neotropical forest fragments for forest-associated hummingbirds and increase pollen transfer. Further, corridors boosted forest-associated pollinator availability in fragments by 14.3 times compared with unconnected equivalents, increasing overall pollination success. Plants in patches without corridors showed pollination rates equal to bagged control flowers, indicating pollination failure in isolated fragments. This indicates, for the first time, that corridors benefit tropical forest ecosystems beyond boosting local species richness, by functionally connecting mutualistic network partners. We conclude that small-scale adjustments to landscape configuration safeguard native pollinators and associated pollination services in tropical forest landscapes. PMID:26817765

  7. Corridors restore animal-mediated pollination in fragmented tropical forest landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kormann, Urs; Scherber, Christoph; Tscharntke, Teja; Klein, Nadja; Larbig, Manuel; Valente, Jonathon J; Hadley, Adam S; Betts, Matthew G

    2016-01-27

    Tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions have become heavily eroded through habitat loss. Animal-mediated pollination is required in more than 94% of higher tropical plant species and 75% of the world's leading food crops, but it remains unclear if corridors avert deforestation-driven pollination breakdown in fragmented tropical landscapes. Here, we used manipulative resource experiments and field observations to show that corridors functionally connect neotropical forest fragments for forest-associated hummingbirds and increase pollen transfer. Further, corridors boosted forest-associated pollinator availability in fragments by 14.3 times compared with unconnected equivalents, increasing overall pollination success. Plants in patches without corridors showed pollination rates equal to bagged control flowers, indicating pollination failure in isolated fragments. This indicates, for the first time, that corridors benefit tropical forest ecosystems beyond boosting local species richness, by functionally connecting mutualistic network partners. We conclude that small-scale adjustments to landscape configuration safeguard native pollinators and associated pollination services in tropical forest landscapes.

  8. Climate change and plant dispersal along corridors in fragmented landscapes of Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Imbach, Pablo A; Locatelli, Bruno; Molina, Luis G; Ciais, Philippe; Leadley, Paul W

    2013-09-01

    Climate change is a threat to biodiversity, and adaptation measures should be considered in biodiversity conservation planning. Protected areas (PA) are expected to be impacted by climate change and improving their connectivity with biological corridors (BC) has been proposed as a potential adaptation measure, although assessing its effectiveness remains a challenge. In Mesoamerica, efforts to preserve the biodiversity have led to the creation of a regional network of PA and, more recently, BC. This study evaluates the role of BC for facilitating plant dispersal between PA under climate change in Mesoamerica. A spatially explicit dynamic model (cellular automaton) was developed to simulate species dispersal under different climate and conservation policy scenarios. Plant functional types (PFT) were defined based on a range of dispersal rates and vegetation types to represent the diversity of species in the region. The impacts of climate change on PA and the role of BC for dispersal were assessed spatially. Results show that most impacted PA are those with low altitudinal range in hot, dry, or high latitude areas. PA with low altitudinal range in high cool areas benefit the most from corridors. The most important corridors cover larger areas and have high altitude gradients. Only the fastest PFT can keep up with the expected change in climate and benefit from corridors for dispersal. We conclude that the spatial assessment of the vulnerability of PA and the role of corridors in facilitating dispersal can help conservation planning under a changing climate.

  9. Habitat patch shape, not corridors, determines herbivory and fruit production of an annual plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Daniel M; Turley, Nash E; Levey, Douglas J; Tewksbury, Joshua J

    2012-05-01

    Habitat corridors confer many conservation benefits by increasing movement of organisms between habitat patches, but the benefits for some species may exact costs for others. For example, corridors may increase the abundance of consumers in a habitat to the detriment of the species they consume. In this study we assessed the impact of corridors on insect herbivory of a native plant, Solanum americanum, in large-scale, experimentally fragmented landscapes. We quantified leaf herbivory and assessed fruit production as a proxy for plant fitness. We also conducted field surveys of grasshoppers (Orthoptera), a group of abundant, generalist herbivores that feed on S. americanum, and we used exclosure cages to explicitly link grasshopper herbivory to fruit production of individual S. americanum. The presence of corridors did not increase herbivory or decrease plant fruit production. Likewise, corridors did not increase grasshopper abundance. Instead, patches in our landscapes with the least amount of edge habitat and the greatest amount of warmer "core" area had the highest levels of herbivory, the largest cost to plant fruit production as a result of herbivory, and the most grasshoppers. Thus habitat quality, governed by patch shape, can be more important than connectivity for determining levels of herbivory and the impact of herbivory on plant fitness in fragmented landscapes.

  10. A method for developing biomechanical response corridors based on principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Jin, J H; Reed, M P; Gayzik, F S; Danelson, K A; Bass, C R; Zhang, J Y; Rupp, J D

    2016-10-03

    The standard method for specifying target responses for human surrogates, such as crash test dummies and human computational models, involves developing a corridor based on the distribution of a set of empirical mechanical responses. These responses are commonly normalized to account for the effects of subject body shape, size, and mass on impact response. Limitations of this method arise from the normalization techniques, which are based on the assumptions that human geometry linearly scales with size and in some cases, on simple mechanical models. To address these limitations, a new method was developed for corridor generation that applies principal component (PC) analysis to align response histories. Rather than use normalization techniques to account for the effects of subject size on impact response, linear regression models are used to model the relationship between PC features and subject characteristics. Corridors are generated using Monte Carlo simulation based on estimated distributions of PC features for each PC. This method is applied to pelvis impact force data from a recent series of lateral impact tests to develop corridor bounds for a group of signals associated with a particular subject size. Comparing to the two most common methods for response normalization, the corridors generated by the new method are narrower and better retain the features in signals that are related to subject size and body shape.

  11. Influence of Smile Arc and Buccal Corridors on Facial Attractiveness: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Shashank; Vaz, Anna C; Singh, Baldeep; Taneja, Lavina; Vinod, KS; Verma, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Two aspects of the smile: the Smile Arc (SA) and Buccal Corridors (BC) have been the interest of the orthodontist in recent years. Aim The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of the smile arc and buccal corridors on facial attractiveness as evaluated by orthodontists, general dentists and laymen. Materials and Methods Two subjects (one male & one female) were selected from the regional population fulfilling the criteria of an ideal smile arc and ideal buccal corridors. Frontal smile view photographs of these subjects were taken and modified by using adobe photoshop 7.0 to create combination of three smile arc variance and three buccal corridors variations respectively which were shown to 25 orthodontists, 25 general dentists & 25 laymen, to rate the facial attractiveness of each image on a rating scale. Results All the three groups (laypersons, dentists and orthodontists) showed significant difference in ratings, indicating that they had different perceptions on the facial attractiveness. Conclusion Orthodontists were more precise in discerning the smile arc and buccal corridors compared to dentists and laypersons. PMID:27790573

  12. Influence d'un traitement laser sur les propriétés d'adhésion de surfaces métalliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, A.; Delaporte, Ph.; Cros, A.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.; Thomann, A. L.; Leborgne, C.; Semmar, N.

    2005-06-01

    Nous avons mis en évidence une nanostructuration de la surface due à la formation de nanoparticules d'oxydes métalliques dans le plasma et une modification de propriétés chimiques de la surface permettant l'établissement de liaisons acide-base. Les tests mécaniques d'adhérence ont révélé une qualité d'adhésion tout à fait satisfaisante. Le procédé laser apparaît donc comme une technique llpropregg de préparation de surface.

  13. A 5-hydroxymethyl furfural reducing enzyme encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH6 gene conveys HMF tolerance.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Anneli; Almeida, João R M; Modig, Tobias; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F; Lidén, Gunnar

    2006-04-30

    The fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fuel ethanol production is inhibited by 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), a furan derivative which is formed during the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. The inhibition can be avoided if the yeast strain used in the fermentation has the ability to reduce HMF to 5-hydroxymethylfurfuryl alcohol. To enable the identification of enzyme(s) responsible for HMF conversion in S. cerevisiae, microarray analyses of two strains with different abilities to convert HMF were performed. Based on the expression data, a subset of 15 reductase genes was chosen to be further examined using an overexpression strain collection. Three candidate genes were cloned from two different strains, TMB3000 and the laboratory strain CEN.PK 113-5D, and overexpressed using a strong promoter in the strain CEN.PK 113-5D. Strains overexpressing ADH6 had increased HMF conversion activity in cell-free crude extracts with both NADPH and NADH as co-factors. In vitro activities were recorded of 8 mU/mg with NADH as co-factor and as high as 1200 mU/mg for the NADPH-coupled reduction. Yeast strains overexpressing ADH6 also had a substantially higher in vivo conversion rate of HMF in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures, showing that the overexpression indeed conveyed the desired increased reduction capacity.

  14. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism, starch utilisation and the beta-hbd-adh1 gene cluster in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Reid, S J

    1995-10-01

    The successful genetic manipulation of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the increased production of solvents will depend on an understanding of gene structure and regulation in the bacterium. The glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene is regulated by antisense RNA, transcribed from a downstream promoter, in the opposite direction to the glnA gene. An open reading frame (ORF) was detected downstream of the glnA gene, which has sequence homology to response regulators with anti-termination activity and may be involved in sensing nitrogen conditions. The expression of the linked beta-hbd, adh1 and fixB genes was investigated throughout the bacterial growth cycle by RNA hybridisation techniques. The adh1 gene was independently expressed as a 2.4-kb transcript which peaked at 12 h, immediately prior to the solventogenic phase. The beta-hbd and fixB genes were transcribed throughout the acidogenic and solventogenic phases. A regulator gene, regA, which complements a Bacillus subtilis ccpA mutant, has been identified and sequenced from C. acetobutylicum P262. The regA gene repressed the degradation of starch by an uncharacterised C. acetobutylicum gene, and may therefore play a role in the utilisation of carbohydrate substrates in this organism.

  15. Hydroclimatological Processes in the Central American Dry Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, H. G.; Duran-Quesada, A. M.; Amador, J. A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Mora, G.

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the hydroclimatological variability and the climatic precursors of drought in the Central American Dry Corridor (CADC), a subregion located in the Pacific coast of Southern Mexico and Central America. Droughts are frequent in the CADC, which is featured by a higher climatological aridity compared to the highlands and Caribbean coast of Central America. The CADC region presents large social vulnerability to hydroclimatological impacts originated from dry conditions, as there is a large part of population that depends on subsistance agriculture. The influence of large-scale climatic precursors such as ENSO, the Caribbean Low-Level Jet (CLLJ), low frequency signals from the Pacific and Caribbean and some intra-seasonal signals such as the MJO are evaluated. Previous work by the authors identified a connection between the CLLJ and CADC precipitation. This connection is more complex than a simple rain-shadow effect, and instead it was suggested that convection at the exit of the jet in the Costa-Rica and Nicaragua Caribbean coasts and consequent subsidence in the Pacific could be playing a role in this connection. During summer, when the CLLJ is stronger than normal, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (located mainly in the Pacific) displaces to a more southern position, and vice-versa, suggesting a connection between these two processes that has not been fully explained yet. The role of the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool also needs more research. All this is important, as it suggest a working hypothesis that during summer, the effect of the Caribbean wind strength may be responsible for the dry climate of the CADC. Another previous analysis by the authors was based on downscaled precipitation and temperature from GCMs and the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. The data was later used in a hydrological model. Results showed a negative trend in reanalysis' runoff for 1980-2012 in San José (Costa Rica) and Tegucigalpa (Honduras). This highly significant drying trend

  16. Lifelines and Earthquake Hazards in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor: Cottage Grove to Woodburn, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, M.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wells, R.E.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.; ,

    2004-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway corridor, stretching from Mexico to Canada, is not only the economic artery of the Pacific Northwest, but is also home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems, such as railroads and electrical transmission lines, have major components in the I-5 corridor. The section of I-5 from Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Blaine, Washington, is rapidly urbanizing, with population growth and economic development centered around the cities of Eugene, Salem, Portland, Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham. For the purposes of this map, we refer to this area as the I-5 Urban Corridor. This publicaton consists of two large sheets: A map and a text-and-figures poster.

  17. The onset of the MSC at the Atlantic side of the Rifian Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenhoven, Tanja; Cutler, Alistair; Flecker, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    The onset of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) as documented by benthic foraminifera in the Mediterranean area is not quite as clearly reflected at the Atlantic side of the Rifian Corridor. Mediterranean data indicate an early, important step in the restriction of deeper waters around 7.167 Ma; progressive isolation of the Mediterranean towards the MSC being, among others, related to astronomical cyclicity. Land-based sections located near Rabat (Morocco) at Ain El Beida and Oued Akrech, together with the nearby Salé Briqueterie core represent a continuous stratigraphy across the Tortonian and Messinian into the Pliocene, providing an opportunity to compare benthic faunal patterns at both sides of the Rifian Corridor. We present quantitative benthic foraminiferal data of this composite stratigraphic section with the aim to discuss the reflection of the onset of the MSC at the Atlantic side of the Rifian Corridor, and inferences in terms of Mediterranean-Atlantic circulation.

  18. Earthquake Hazards and Lifelines in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor - Cottage Grove to Woodburn, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, Y.; Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway (I-5) corridor, which stretches from Mexico to Canada, is both the main economic artery of the Pacific Northwest and home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems have major components located within the I-5 corridor. For the purposes of this map, we refer to these essential systems as lifeline systems. The Pacific Northwest section of I-5, the I-5 urban corridor, extends from Eugene, Oregon, to the border of Canada. The population of this region is rapidly increasing with the bulk of growth and economic development centered in the cities of Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Oregon, and Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, Washington.

  19. Earthquake Hazards and Lifelines in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor - Woodburn, Oregon, to Centralia, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, Y.; Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway (I-5) corridor, which stretches from Mexico to Canada, is both the main economic artery of the Pacific Northwest and home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems have major components located within the I-5 corridor. For the purposes of this map, we refer to these essential systems as lifeline systems. The Pacific Northwest section of I-5, the I-5 urban corridor, extends from Eugene, Oregon, to the border of Canada. The population of this region is rapidly increasing with the bulk of growth and economic development centered in the cities of Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Oregon, and Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, Washington.

  20. An Optimal Deployment of Wireless Charging Lane for Electric Vehicles on Highway Corridors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongxi

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrated modeling framework to optimally locate wireless charging facilities along a highway corridor to provide sufficient in-motion charging. The integrated model consists of a master, Infrastructure Planning Model that determines best locations with integrated two sub-models that explicitly capture energy consumption and charging and the interactions between electric vehicle and wireless charging technologies, geometrics of highway corridors, speed, and auxiliary system. The model is implemented in an illustrative case study of a highway corridor of Interstate 5 in Oregon. We found that the cost of establishing the charging lane is sensitive and increases with the speed to achieve. Through sensitivity analyses, we gain better understanding on the extent of impacts of geometric characteristics of highways and battery capacity on the charging lane design.

  1. A Feeder-Bus Dispatch Planning Model for Emergency Evacuation in Urban Rail Transit Corridors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Yan, Xuedong; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    The mobility of modern metropolises strongly relies on urban rail transit (URT) systems, and such a heavy dependence causes that even minor service interruptions would make the URT systems unsustainable. This study aims at optimally dispatching the ground feeder-bus to coordinate with the urban rails’ operation for eliminating the effect of unexpected service interruptions in URT corridors. A feeder-bus dispatch planning model was proposed for the collaborative optimization of URT and feeder-bus cooperation under emergency situations and minimizing the total evacuation cost of the feeder-buses. To solve the model, a concept of dummy feeder-bus system is proposed to transform the non-linear model into traditional linear programming (ILP) model, i.e., traditional transportation problem. The case study of Line #2 of Nanjing URT in China was adopted to illustrate the model application and sensitivity analyses of the key variables. The modeling results show that as the evacuation time window increases, the total evacuation cost as well as the number of dispatched feeder-buses decrease, and the dispatched feeder-buses need operate for more times along the feeder-bus line. The number of dispatched feeder-buses does not show an obvious change with the increase of parking spot capacity and time window, indicating that simply increasing the parking spot capacity would cause huge waste for the emergent bus utilization. When the unbalanced evacuation demand exists between stations, the more feeder-buses are needed. The method of this study will contribute to improving transportation emergency management and resource allocation for URT systems. PMID:27676179

  2. Integrated modelling for Sustainability Appraisal of urban river corridors: going beyond compartmentalised thinking.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Rouquette, J R; Lerner, David N

    2013-12-15

    Sustainability Appraisal (SA) is a complex task that involves integration of social, environmental and economic considerations and often requires trade-offs between multiple stakeholders that may not easily be brought to consensus. Classical SA, often compartmentalised in the rigid boundary of disciplines, can facilitate discussion, but can only partially inform decision makers as many important aspects of sustainability remain abstract and not interlinked. A fully integrated model can overcome compartmentality in the assessment process and provides opportunity for a better integrative exploratory planning process. The objective of this paper is to explore the benefit of an integrated modelling approach to SA and how a structured integrated model can be used to provide a coherent, consistent and deliberative platform to assess policy or planning proposals. The paper discusses a participative and integrative modelling approach to urban river corridor development, incorporating the principal of sustainability. The paper uses a case study site in Sheffield, UK, with three alternative development scenarios, incorporating a number of possible riverside design features. An integrated SA model is used to develop better design by optimising different design elements and delivering a more sustainable (re)-development plan. We conclude that participatory integrated modelling has strong potential for supporting the SA processes. A high degree of integration provides the opportunity for more inclusive and informed decision-making regarding issues of urban development. It also provides the opportunity to reflect on their long-term dynamics, and to gain insights on the interrelationships underlying persistent sustainability problems. Thus the ability to address economic, social and environmental interdependencies within policies, plans, and legislations is enhanced.

  3. A Feeder-Bus Dispatch Planning Model for Emergency Evacuation in Urban Rail Transit Corridors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Yan, Xuedong; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Wenyi

    The mobility of modern metropolises strongly relies on urban rail transit (URT) systems, and such a heavy dependence causes that even minor service interruptions would make the URT systems unsustainable. This study aims at optimally dispatching the ground feeder-bus to coordinate with the urban rails' operation for eliminating the effect of unexpected service interruptions in URT corridors. A feeder-bus dispatch planning model was proposed for the collaborative optimization of URT and feeder-bus cooperation under emergency situations and minimizing the total evacuation cost of the feeder-buses. To solve the model, a concept of dummy feeder-bus system is proposed to transform the non-linear model into traditional linear programming (ILP) model, i.e., traditional transportation problem. The case study of Line #2 of Nanjing URT in China was adopted to illustrate the model application and sensitivity analyses of the key variables. The modeling results show that as the evacuation time window increases, the total evacuation cost as well as the number of dispatched feeder-buses decrease, and the dispatched feeder-buses need operate for more times along the feeder-bus line. The number of dispatched feeder-buses does not show an obvious change with the increase of parking spot capacity and time window, indicating that simply increasing the parking spot capacity would cause huge waste for the emergent bus utilization. When the unbalanced evacuation demand exists between stations, the more feeder-buses are needed. The method of this study will contribute to improving transportation emergency management and resource allocation for URT systems.

  4. From mountains to the ocean: quantifying connectivity along the river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rivers are the landscape's arteries; they convey water, solutes, energy, and living organisms from the hillslopes, floodplains, aquifers, and atmosphere to the oceans. As water moves along this complex circulatory system, it is continuously exchanged with the surrounding alluvial aquifer, termed hyporheic exchange, which strongly conditions and constrains the biogeochemical evolution of water at the local scale with basin-scale consequences. Over the last two decades, considerable efforts have focused on the use of detailed mathematical models to explore the hydrodynamics and biogeochemical effect of hyporheic exchange at the scale of individual channel morphologies. While these efforts are essential to gain mechanistic understanding, their computational demand makes them impractical for basin applications. In this talk, a parsimonious but physically based model of hyporheic flow for application in large river basins is presented: Networks with EXchange and Subsurface Storage (NEXSS). At the core of NEXSS are the up-scaling of detailed mathematical models and a characterization of the channel geometry, geomorphic features, and related hydraulic drivers based on scaling equations from the literature and readily accessible information such as river discharge, width, grain size, sinuosity, channel slope, and regional groundwater gradients. As a proof-of-concept, we use NEXSS to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of hyporheic exchange and denitrification potential along the Mississippi River basin. This modeling approach allows us to map the location of critical hot spots for biogeochemical transformation, their geomorphic drivers, and cumulative effect. Finally, we discuss new avenues to incorporate exchange with floodplains and ponded waters, which also play a key role in water quality along the river corridor. This new modeling approach is critical to transition from purely empirical continental models of water quality to hybrid approaches that

  5. "FluvialCorridor": A new ArcGIS toolbox package for multiscale riverscape exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Clément; Alber, Adrien; Bertrand, Mélanie; Vaudor, Lise; Piégay, Hervé

    2015-08-01

    Both for scientists and river basin managers, development of automated geographic information system (GIS) tools is essential today to characterize riverscapes and explore biogeomorphologic processes over large channel networks. Since the 1990s, GIS toolboxes and add-in programs have been used to characterize catchments. However, there is currently no equivalent to a planimetric and longitudinal characterization of fluvial corridor networks at multiple scales. This paper describes FluvialCorridor, a new GIS toolbox. This package allows the user: (i) to extract a large set of riverscape features such as the main components of fluvial corridors from DEM and vector layers (e.g. stream network or valley bottom), and (ii) to aggregate spatial features into homogeneous segments and metrics characterizing each of them. The methodological frameworks involved have been previously described by Alber and Piégay (2011), Leviandier et al. (2012) and Bertrand et al. (2013) and this contribution focuses on the GIS tools allowing the user to automatically operate them. A case study on the Drôme River (France) is provided to illustrate the potential of the package both for geomorphologic understanding and target management actions. FluvialCorridor has been developed for ArcGIS with the related native Python library named ArcPy and tested on ArcGIS 10.0 and 10.1. Obviously, each component of the package can be used separately; however, it also provides a complete workflow for fluvial corridor characterization, even as the toolbox is continually under development and revision. Case study database, FluvialCorridor package and guidelines are available online at http://umrevs-isig.fr.

  6. The Effect of Lift on Entry Corridor Depth and Guidance Requirements for the Return Lunar Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Thomas J.; Slye, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    Corridors for manned vehicles are defined consistent with requirements for avoiding radiation exposure and for limiting values of peak deceleration. Use of lift increases the depth of the entry corridor. Mid-course guidance requirements appear to be critical only for the flight-path angle. Increasing the energy of the transport orbit increases the required guidance accuracy for the flight-path angle. Corrective thrust applied essentially parallel to the local horizontal produces the maximum change in perigee altitude for a given increment of velocity. Energy required to effect a given change in perigee altitude varies inversely with range measured from the center of the earth.

  7. Land-use classification map of the greater Denver area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    The Greater Denver area, in the Front Range Urban Corridor of Colorado, is an area of rapid population growth and expanding land development. At present no overall land-use policy exists for this area, although man individuals and groups are concerned about environmental, economic, and social stresses caused by population pressures. A well-structured land-use policy for the entire Front Range Urban Corridor, in which compatible land uses are taken into account, could lead to overall improvements in land values. A land classification map is the first step toward implementing such a policy.

  8. Urban Power Line Corridors as Novel Habitats for Grassland and Alien Plant Species in South-Western Finland

    PubMed Central

    Lampinen, Jussi; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Huhta, Ari-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Regularly managed electric power line corridors may provide habitats for both early-successional grassland plant species and disturbance-dependent alien plant species. These habitats are especially important in urban areas, where they can help conserve native grassland species and communities in urban greenspace. However, they can also provide further footholds for potentially invasive alien species that already characterize urban areas. In order to implement power line corridors into urban conservation, it is important to understand which environmental conditions in the corridors favor grassland species and which alien species. Likewise it is important to know whether similar environmental factors in the corridors control the species composition of the two groups. We conducted a vegetation study in a 43 kilometer long urban power line corridor network in south-western Finland, and used generalized linear models and distance-based redundancy analysis to determine which environmental factors best predict the occurrence and composition of grassland and alien plant species in the corridors. The results imply that old corridors on dry soils and steep slopes characterized by a history as open areas and pastures are especially suitable for grassland species. Corridors suitable for alien species, in turn, are characterized by productive soils and abundant light and are surrounded by a dense urban fabric. Factors controlling species composition in the two groups are somewhat correlated, with the most important factors including light abundance, soil moisture, soil calcium concentration and soil productivity. The results have implications for grassland conservation and invasive alien species control in urban areas. PMID:26565700

  9. 76 FR 3624 - Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC's application...

  10. Urban Power Line Corridors as Novel Habitats for Grassland and Alien Plant Species in South-Western Finland.

    PubMed

    Lampinen, Jussi; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Huhta, Ari-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Regularly managed electric power line corridors may provide habitats for both early-successional grassland plant species and disturbance-dependent alien plant species. These habitats are especially important in urban areas, where they can help conserve native grassland species and communities in urban greenspace. However, they can also provide further footholds for potentially invasive alien species that already characterize urban areas. In order to implement power line corridors into urban conservation, it is important to understand which environmental conditions in the corridors favor grassland species and which alien species. Likewise it is important to know whether similar environmental factors in the corridors control the species composition of the two groups. We conducted a vegetation study in a 43 kilometer long urban power line corridor network in south-western Finland, and used generalized linear models and distance-based redundancy analysis to determine which environmental factors best predict the occurrence and composition of grassland and alien plant species in the corridors. The results imply that old corridors on dry soils and steep slopes characterized by a history as open areas and pastures are especially suitable for grassland species. Corridors suitable for alien species, in turn, are characterized by productive soils and abundant light and are surrounded by a dense urban fabric. Factors controlling species composition in the two groups are somewhat correlated, with the most important factors including light abundance, soil moisture, soil calcium concentration and soil productivity. The results have implications for grassland conservation and invasive alien species control in urban areas.

  11. 78 FR 52602 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent and Draft Environmental Impact Statement: I-17 Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Statement: I-17 Corridor Improvement Study; Maricopa County, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration... Maricopa County, Arizona. A NOI to prepare an EIS for the I-17 Corridor Improvement Study was published in... Phoenix, and the study area limits for the EIS consisted of approximately 21 miles of I-17. A...

  12. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  13. Preliminary mineralogic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope study of the Mahd adh Dhahab gold mine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert O.; Hall, W.E.; Cunningham, C.G.; Czamanske, G.K.; Afifi, A.M.; Stacey, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Mahd adh Dhahab mine, located about 280 km northeast of Jiddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, has yielded more than 2 million ounces of gold from periodic production during the past 3,000 years. A new orebody on the southern side of the ancient workings, known as the South orebody, is being developed by Gold Fields-Mahd adh Dhahab Limited. A suite of samples was collected from the newly exposed orebody for preliminary mineralogic, stable isotope, fluid inclusion, and geochemical studies. The Mahd adh Dhahab deposit is in the carapace of a Proterozoic epizonal rhyolite stock that domed pyroclastic and metasedimentary rocks of the Proterozoic Halaban group. Ore of gold, silver, copper, zinc, tellurium, and lead is associated with north-trending, steeply dipping quartz veins in a zone 1,000 m long and 400 m wide. The veins include an assemblage of quartz-chlorite-pyrite-hematite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-precious metals, which is similar to the mineral assemblage at the epithermal deposit at Creede, Colorado. The primary ore contains abundant chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrite in addition to a complex precious metal assemblage. Gold and silver occur principally as minute grains of telluride minerals disseminated in quartz-chlorite-hematite and as inclusions in chalcopyrite and sphalerite. Telluride minerals include petzite, hessite, and sylvanite. Free gold is present but not abundant. All of the vein-quartz samples contained abundant, minute inclusions of both low-density, vapor-rich fluids and liquid-rich fluids. Primary fluid inclusions yielded homogenization temperatures of from 110? to 238? C. Preliminary light-stable isotope studies of the sulfide minerals and quartz showed that all of the d34S values are between 1.2 and 6.3 per mil, which is a typical range for hydrothermal sulfide minerals that derive their sulfur from an igneous source. The data-suggest that the sulfide sulfur isotope geochemistry was controlled by exchange with la large sulfur isotope

  14. The Impact of ADH1B Alleles and Educational Status on Levels and Modes of Alcohol Consumption in Russian Male Individuals.

    PubMed

    Borinskaya, S A; Kim, A A; Rubanovich, A V; Yankovsky, N K

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the main reasons behind the low life span in Russia. Both social and genetic factors affect the alcohol consumption level. The genetic factors are alleles of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B and aldehyde dehydrogenaseALDH2 genes. We have typed and found frequencies for the alleles in a cohort of 642 men, ethnic Russians. The individuals of the cohort were asked to complete a questionnaire in the framework of the Izhevsk Family Study (Leon et al., 2007, 2009) regarding the amount of alcohol consumed and on the type of hazardous alcohol consumption (nonbeverage alcohol consumption and the so-called "zapoï" which is a Russian term for a heavy drinking bout lasting for at least 2 days, when an individual is withdrawn from the normal social life). The ADH1B*48His allele was found among heterozygous individuals only (N=68, 10.6% of the cohort). The ALDH2*504Lys allele was also found among heterozygous individuals only (N=2, 0.3%) The effect of ADH1B alleles and the influence of the education level on the amount and type of alcohol consumed had not previously been studied in Russians. We have found that the amount of consumed alcohol is 21.6% lower (1733 g of ethanol per year) for ADH1B*48His allele carriers in the cohort of Russian men. The amount of consumed alcohol was found to be 9.8% lower (793 g of ethanol per year) in the case when individuals had a higher education as compared to those who had a secondary- or elementary school education level in the same cohort. Hence, the protective effect of the genetic factor (ADH1B*48His allele carriage) has proven to be more pronounced than the influence of the social factor (education level) at the individual level in the cohort of Russian men. Both factors have also proven to have a protective effect against hazardous types of alcohol consumption. Zapoï was not scored among individuals of the cohort with ADH1B*48His allele carriage (OR=12.6, P=0.006), as compared to 8.4% of "zapoï" individuals who

  15. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  16. The interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene, ALDH2 and ADH1B in the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sen-Tien; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Ou, Chun-Yen; Fang, Sheen-Yie; Chen, Ken-Chung; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Wei-Ting; Lo, Hung-I; Huang, Jehn-Shyun; Wu, Jiunn-Liang; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Yang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Forn-Chia; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Shang-Yin; Liao, Hsiao-Chen; Lin, Chen-Lin; Wang, Yi-Hui; Weng, Ya-Ling; Yang, Han-Chien; Chang, Jeffrey S

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). The major carcinogen from alcohol is acetaldehyde, which may be produced by humans or by oral microorganisms through the metabolism of ethanol. To account for the different sources of acetaldehyde production, the current study examined the interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene (as a proxy measure for the growth of oral microorganisms), and alcohol-metabolizing genes (ADH1B and ALDH2) in the risk of HNC. We found that both the fast (*2/*2) and the slow (*1/*1+ *1/*2) ADH1B genotypes increased the risk of HNC due to alcohol consumption, and this association differed according to the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes (*1/*2+ *2/*2) or poor oral hygiene. In persons with the fast ADH1B genotype, the HNC risk associated with alcohol drinking was increased for those with the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes. For those with the slow ADH1B genotypes, oral hygiene appeared to play an important role; the highest magnitude of an increased HNC risk in alcohol drinkers occurred among those with the worst oral hygiene. This is the first study to show that the association between alcohol drinking and HNC risk may be modified by the interplay between genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B and ALDH2 and oral hygiene. Although it is important to promote abstinence from or reduction of alcohol drinking to decrease the occurrence of HNC, improving oral hygiene practices may provide additional benefit.

  17. 76 FR 41929 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... July 15, 2011 Part III Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 153 Patient Protection and... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 153 RIN 0938-AR07 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment AGENCY: Department of Health and...

  18. 77 FR 29235 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 153 RIN 0938-AR07 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards... ] entitled, ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors... section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However, we can waive...

  19. [Ecological and economic harmony evaluation and spatial evolution of the Hexi corridor, northwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-long; Shi, Pei-ji; Li, Sheng-mei; Tong, Hua-li; Nie, Xiao-ying; Wei, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between economic development and environment and the evolution characteristics of spatial pattern in Hexi Corridor of Northwest China were analyzed based on Landsat images in 1985, 1995, 2000 and 2011 with twenty counties in Hexi Corridor chosen as the basic research units. The ecological economic harmony during 1985-2011 was estimated according to ESV (ecosystem services value) and EEH (ecological and economic harmony) index with the ecosystem services value estimation methods. The results showed that the land type of the study area dramatically changed during the study period, the grassland decreased badly, and the construction land and cultivated land increased quickly. The ESV showed an overall downward trend, especially in the Shiyang River basin and the middle of Heihe River. The ESV in the Shule River basin in this period. After 2000, the economic growth speeded up visibly in the study area. The economic development concentrated in the resource-based cities and regional central cities, and declined from the center of corridor to the both sides. The ecological-economic relation in Hexi Corridor experienced a transformation of "preliminary deterioration--further deterioration--low grade coordination". The EEH had large changes in the Shiyang River basin and the middle of Heihe River, which experienced a transformation of "conflict--more conflicts--less conflicts", however, there was little change in Shule River basin. The development mode and the comprehensive reclamation of Shiyang River basin and Heihe River basin had a significant influence on the regional ecological and economic harmony.

  20. MTR WING A, TRA604, INTERIOR. MAIN FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604, INTERIOR. MAIN FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR 2 (BETWEEN ROOMS ON WEST WALL AND IN CENTER OF FLOOR). CAMERA FACING SOUTH. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-12-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  2. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  3. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  4. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  5. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  6. Lessons Learned during Creation of the I-65 Biofuels Corridor (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    A team of Clean Cities coalitions and state agencies worked together to create a biofuels corridor along I-65 between Indiana and Alabama. The team built relationships with stakeholders and learned the value of strong partnerships, good communication, marketing, and preparation.

  7. 76 FR 63346 - Environmental Impact Statement, Tappan Zee Bridge/I-287 Corridor Project (Rockland and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Analysis (AA) and EIS was published in the Federal Register on December 23, 2002. A Revised NOI to prepare... (NOI) to prepare an Alternatives Analysis (AA) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the I-287 Corridor in Rockland and Westchester Counties, New York. The AA explored a number of options...

  8. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  9. Environmental Planning and Management Alternatives for the Tennessee-Tombigbee Corridor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    References Davis, Henrietta R., Alison , Gloria L., and Summerville, James. 1981. "Cul- tural Resources of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Corridor," Urban...community ser- vices, such as health services, ser- vices and facilities for the handi - capped, public safety, care for the elderly, and recreation

  10. MTR WING, TRA604. SECTIONS A, B, AND C SHOW CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. SECTIONS A, B, AND C SHOW CORRIDOR ARRANGEMENTS AND CONNECTIONS TO MTR BUILDING. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-6, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-00-098-100631, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 420 - Method for Defining a Flight Corridor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... method, a semi-automated method, or a fully-automated method to plot a flight corridor on maps. A source... Administration, National Ocean Service. (i) Projections for mechanical plotting method. An applicant shall use a... plotting method. An applicant shall use cylindrical, conic, or plane projections for...

  12. VIEW OF TRANSFER BASIN CORRIDOR OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP603). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF TRANSFER BASIN CORRIDOR OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-17-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. EAST/WEST TRUCK BAY AREA OF TRANSFER BASIN CORRIDOR OF FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST/WEST TRUCK BAY AREA OF TRANSFER BASIN CORRIDOR OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTHWEST. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-19-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. DC66812 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-12 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, LOOKING NORTH FROM ABOVE EAST POTOMAC PARK TOWARD THE MALL AND BEYOND - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IN WEST CORRIDOR FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IN WEST CORRIDOR FACING SOUTH. FREIGHT ELEVATOR IS AT RIGHT OF VIEW. AT CENTER VIEW IS MTR VAULT NO. 1, USED TO STORE SPECIAL OR FISSIONABLE MATERIALS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-6-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED BY EAST WALL ON LEFT AND APPARATUS ON RIGHT. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-1-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. 45 CFR 800.204 - Reinsurance, risk corridors, and risk adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reinsurance, risk corridors, and risk adjustment. 800.204 Section 800.204 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT MULTI-STATE PLAN PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and...

  18. 45 CFR 800.204 - Reinsurance, risk corridors, and risk adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reinsurance, risk corridors, and risk adjustment. 800.204 Section 800.204 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT MULTI-STATE PLAN PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and...

  19. 77 FR 37737 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Northeast Corridor Between Washington, DC, New York, NY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ..., MA. FRA is leading the planning and environmental evaluation of the Northeast Corridor (NEC), an... the NEC FUTURE program is to define current and future markets for improved rail service and capacity... needs, and create a regional planning framework to engage stakeholders throughout the region in...

  20. Migration and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) along highway corridors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    The east-west density gradient and the pattern and mode of migration of the wetland exotic, purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.), were assessed in a survey of populations along the New York State Thruway from Albany to Buffalo to determine if the highway corridor contributed to the spread of this species. During the peak flowering season of late July to early August, individual colonies of purple loosestrife were identified and categorized into three size classes in parallel belt transects consisting of the median strip and highway rights-of-way on the north and south sides of the road. Data were also collected on the presence of colonies adjacent to the corridor and on highway drainage patterns. Although a distinct east-west density gradient existed in the corridor, it corresponded to the gradient on adjacent lands and was greatly influenced by a major infestation at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. The disturbed highway corridor served as a migration route for purple loosestrife, but topographic features dictated that this migration was a short-distance rather than long-distance process. Ditch and culvert drainage patterns increased the ability of purple loosestrife to migrate to new wetland sites. Management strategies proposed to reduce the spread of this wetland threat include minimizing disturbance, pulling by hand, spraying with glyphosate, disking, and mowing.

  1. 76 FR 29290 - Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel Corridor, Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ...The Federal Highway Administration is issuing this notice to advise the public of its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Transportation for potential transportation improvements along the Interstate 64 Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel (HRBT) corridor in...

  2. 78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... Geographic Information System (GIS) data, field investigations and site visits/sampling where necessary. The... information can be found online at www.TulsaOKCRailCorridor.com . ADDRESSES: Written comments on the scope of.... 21st Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73105-3204. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Catherine...

  3. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Fragaria (strawberry) using intron-containing sequence from the ADH-1 gene.

    PubMed

    DiMeglio, Laura M; Staudt, Günter; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae.

  4. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Genus Fragaria (Strawberry) Using Intron-Containing Sequence from the ADH-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    DiMeglio, Laura M.; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae. PMID:25078607

  5. Identification of priority conservation areas and potential corridors for jaguars in the Caatinga biome, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; Ferraz, Katia Maria Paschoaletto Micchi de Barros; de Paula, Rogério Cunha; de Campos, Cláudia Bueno

    2014-01-01

    The jaguar, Panthera onca, is a top predator with the extant population found within the Brazilian Caatinga biome now known to be on the brink of extinction. Designing new conservation units and potential corridors are therefore crucial for the long-term survival of the species within the Caatinga biome. Thus, our aims were: 1) to recognize suitable areas for jaguar occurrence, 2) to delineate areas for jaguar conservation (PJCUs), 3) to design corridors among priority areas, and 4) to prioritize PJCUs. A total of 62 points records of jaguar occurrence and 10 potential predictors were analyzed in a GIS environment. A predictive distributional map was obtained using Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) as performed by the Maximum Entropy (Maxent) algorithm. Areas equal to or higher than the median suitability value of 0.595 were selected as of high suitability for jaguar occurrence and named as Priority Jaguar Conservation Units (PJCU). Ten PJCUs with sizes varying from 23.6 km2 to 4,311.0 km2 were identified. Afterwards, we combined the response curve, as generated by SDM, and expert opinions to create a permeability matrix and to identify least cost corridors and buffer zones between each PJCU pair. Connectivity corridors and buffer zone for jaguar movement included an area of 8.884,26 km2 and the total corridor length is about 160.94 km. Prioritizing criteria indicated the PJCU representing c.a. 68.61% of the total PJCU area (PJCU # 1) as of high priority for conservation and connectivity with others PJCUs (PJCUs # 4, 5 and 7) desirable for the long term survival of the species. In conclusion, by using the jaguar as a focal species and combining SDM and expert opinion we were able to create a valid framework for practical conservation actions at the Caatinga biome. The same approach could be used for the conservation of other carnivores.

  6. Pollination and reproduction of a self-incompatible forest herb in hedgerow corridors and forest patches.

    PubMed

    Schmucki, Reto; de Blois, Sylvie

    2009-07-01

    Habitat-corridors are assumed to counteract the negative impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation, but their efficiency in doing so depends on the maintenance of ecological processes in corridor conditions. For plants dispersing in linear habitats, one of these critical processes is the maintenance of adequate pollen transfer to insure seed production within the corridor. This study focuses on a common, self-incompatible forest herb, Trillium grandiflorum, to assess plant-pollinator interactions and the influence of spatial processes on plant reproduction in hedgerow corridors compared to forests. First, using pollen supplementation experiments over 2 years, we quantified the extent of pollen limitation in both habitats, testing the prediction of greater limitation in small hedgerow populations than in forests. While pollen limitation of fruit and seed set was common, its magnitude did not differ between habitats. Variations among sites, however, suggested an influence of landscape context on pollination services. Second, we examined the effect of isolation on plant reproduction by monitoring fruit and seed production, as well as pollinator activity and assemblage, in small flower arrays transplanted in hedgerows at increasing distances from forest and from each other. We detected no difference in the proportion of flowers setting fruit or in pollinator activity with isolation, but we observed some differences in pollinator assemblages. Seed set, on the other hand, declined significantly with increasing isolation in the second year of the study, but not in the first year, suggesting altered pollen transfer with distance. Overall, plants in hedgerow corridors and forests benefited from similar pollination services. In this system, plant-pollinator interactions and reproduction seem to be influenced more by variations in resource distribution over years and landscapes than by local habitat conditions.

  7. Identification of Priority Conservation Areas and Potential Corridors for Jaguars in the Caatinga Biome, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; Ferraz, Katia Maria Paschoaletto Micchi de Barros; de Paula, Rogério Cunha; de Campos, Cláudia Bueno

    2014-01-01

    The jaguar, Panthera onca, is a top predator with the extant population found within the Brazilian Caatinga biome now known to be on the brink of extinction. Designing new conservation units and potential corridors are therefore crucial for the long-term survival of the species within the Caatinga biome. Thus, our aims were: 1) to recognize suitable areas for jaguar occurrence, 2) to delineate areas for jaguar conservation (PJCUs), 3) to design corridors among priority areas, and 4) to prioritize PJCUs. A total of 62 points records of jaguar occurrence and 10 potential predictors were analyzed in a GIS environment. A predictive distributional map was obtained using Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) as performed by the Maximum Entropy (Maxent) algorithm. Areas equal to or higher than the median suitability value of 0.595 were selected as of high suitability for jaguar occurrence and named as Priority Jaguar Conservation Units (PJCU). Ten PJCUs with sizes varying from 23.6 km2 to 4,311.0 km2 were identified. Afterwards, we combined the response curve, as generated by SDM, and expert opinions to create a permeability matrix and to identify least cost corridors and buffer zones between each PJCU pair. Connectivity corridors and buffer zone for jaguar movement included an area of 8.884,26 km2 and the total corridor length is about 160.94 km. Prioritizing criteria indicated the PJCU representing c.a. 68.61% of the total PJCU area (PJCU # 1) as of high priority for conservation and connectivity with others PJCUs (PJCUs # 4, 5 and 7) desirable for the long term survival of the species. In conclusion, by using the jaguar as a focal species and combining SDM and expert opinion we were able to create a valid framework for practical conservation actions at the Caatinga biome. The same approach could be used for the conservation of other carnivores. PMID:24709817

  8. Mapping High Biomass Corridors for Climate and Biodiversity Co-Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantz, P.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.

    2013-12-01

    A key issue in global conservation is how climate mitigation activities can secure biodiversity co-benefits. Tropical deforestation releases significant amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere and results in widespread biodiversity loss. The dominant strategy for forest conservation has been protected area designation. However, maintaining biodiversity in protected areas requires ecological exchange with ecosystems in which they are embedded. At current funding levels, existing conservation strategies are unlikely to prevent further loss of connectivity between protected areas and surrounding landscapes. The emergence of REDD+, a mechanism for funding carbon emissions reductions from deforestation in developing countries, suggests an alignment of goals and financial resources for protecting forest carbon, maintaining biodiversity in protected areas, and minimizing loss of forest ecosystem services. Identifying, protecting and sustainably managing vegetation carbon stocks between protected areas can provide both climate mitigation benefits through avoided CO2 emissions from deforestation and biodiversity benefits through the targeted protection of forests that maintain connectivity between protected areas and surrounding ecosystems. We used a high resolution, pan-tropical map of vegetation carbon stocks derived from MODIS, GLAS lidar and field measurements to map corridors that traverse areas of highest aboveground biomass between protected areas. We mapped over 13,000 corridors containing 49 GtC, accounting for 14% of unprotected vegetation carbon stock in the tropics. In the majority of cases, carbon density in corridors was commensurate with that of the protected areas they connect, suggesting significant opportunities for achieving climate mitigation and biodiversity co-benefits. To further illustrate the utility of this approach, we conducted a multi-criteria analysis of corridors in the Brazilian Amazon, identifying high biodiversity, high vegetation carbon stock

  9. Study on the oasis corridor landscape in the arid regions based on RS and GIS methods--application of Jinta Oasis, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-guo; Wang, Xue-mei; Cheng, Guo-dong

    2003-03-01

    The study on the oasis corridor landsape is a new hotspot in the ecological environment research in the arid regions. In oasis, main corridor landscape types include river, ditch, shelterbelt and road. This paper introduces the basic ecological effects of the corridor landscape on the transporting mass and energy and obstructing desert landscape expansion and incursion. Using Geographic Information System (GIS), we have researched the corridor distribution and its spatial relationship with other landscape types in the Jinta Oasis. Based on the dynamically monitoring on the landscape pattern change of the Jinta Oasis during the latter 10 years by using Remote Sensing (RS) and GIS, the driving functions of the corridors on this change have been analyzed in detail. The analysis results showed that all kinds of corridors' characteristics can be quantified by the indexes such as length and width, ratio of perimeter and area, density and non-heterogeneity. The total corridor length of Jinta Oasis is 1838.5 km and its density is 2.1 km/km2. The corridor density of the irrigation land, forest and resident area is maximal, which shows that affection degree of the oasis corridors on them is the most. The improvement of the corridors quality is one of the important driving factors on the irrigation land and so on. The organic combination of the RS and GIS technologies and landscape research methods would be an effective means for the corridor landscape research on arid region oasis.

  10. The Vapor Plume at Material Disposal Are C in Relation to Pajarito Corridor Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, William B.

    2012-04-02

    A vapor plume made up of volatile organic compounds is present beneath Material Disposal Area C (MDA C) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The location and concentrations within the vapor plume are discussed in relation to existing and planned facilities and construction activities along Pajarito Road (the 'Pajarito Corridor') and in terms of worker health and safety. This document provides information that indicates that the vapor plume does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of proposed facilities along Pajarito Road. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) monitors emissions, effluents, and environmental media to meet environmental compliance requirements, determine actions to protect the environment, and monitor the long-term health of the local environment. LANL also studies and characterizes 'legacy' waste from past Laboratory operations to make informed decisions regarding eventual corrective actions and the disposition of that waste. Starting in 1969, these activities have been annually reported in the LANL Environmental Report (formerly Environmental Surveillance Report), and are detailed in publicly accessible technical reports meeting environmental compliance requirements. Included among the legacy sites being investigated are several formerly used material disposal areas (MDAs) set aside by the Laboratory for the general on-site disposal of waste from mission-related activities. One such area is MDA C located in Technical Area 50 (TA-50), which was used for waste disposal between 1948 and 1974. The location of TA-50 is depicted in Figure 1. The present paper uses a series of maps and cross sections to address the public concerns raised about the vapor plume at MDA C. As illustrated here, extensive sampling and data interpretation indicate that the vapor plume at MDA C does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers

  11. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-08-15

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling.

  12. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  13. Predicting the continuum between corridors and barriers to animal movements using Step Selection Functions and Randomized Shortest Paths.

    PubMed

    Panzacchi, Manuela; Van Moorter, Bram; Strand, Olav; Saerens, Marco; Kivimäki, Ilkka; St Clair, Colleen C; Herfindal, Ivar; Boitani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The loss, fragmentation and degradation of habitat everywhere on Earth prompts increasing attention to identifying landscape features that support animal movement (corridors) or impedes it (barriers). Most algorithms used to predict corridors assume that animals move through preferred habitat either optimally (e.g. least cost path) or as random walkers (e.g. current models), but neither extreme is realistic. We propose that corridors and barriers are two sides of the same coin and that animals experience landscapes as spatiotemporally dynamic corridor-barrier continua connecting (separating) functional areas where individuals fulfil specific ecological processes. Based on this conceptual framework, we propose a novel methodological approach that uses high-resolution individual-based movement data to predict corridor-barrier continua with increased realism. Our approach consists of two innovations. First, we use step selection functions (SSF) to predict friction maps quantifying corridor-barrier continua for tactical steps between consecutive locations. Secondly, we introduce to movement ecology the randomized shortest path algorithm (RSP) which operates on friction maps to predict the corridor-barrier continuum for strategic movements between functional areas. By modulating the parameter Ѳ, which controls the trade-off between exploration and optimal exploitation of the environment, RSP bridges the gap between algorithms assuming optimal movements (when Ѳ approaches infinity, RSP is equivalent to LCP) or random walk (when Ѳ → 0, RSP → current models). Using this approach, we identify migration corridors for GPS-monitored wild reindeer (Rangifer t. tarandus) in Norway. We demonstrate that reindeer movement is best predicted by an intermediate value of Ѳ, indicative of a movement trade-off between optimization and exploration. Model calibration allows identification of a corridor-barrier continuum that closely fits empirical data and demonstrates that RSP

  14. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose....

  15. Vegetation and substrate on aeolian landscapes in the Colorado River corridor, Cataract Canyon, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Gillette, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation and substrate data presented in this report characterize ground cover on aeolian landscapes of the Colorado River corridor through Cataract Canyon, Utah, in Canyonlands National Park. The 27-km-long Cataract Canyon reach has undergone less anthropogenic alteration than other reaches of the mainstem Colorado River. Characterizing ecosystem parameters there provides a basis against which to evaluate future changes, such as those that could result from the further spread of nonnative plant species or increased visitor use. Upstream dams have less effect on the hydrology and sediment supply in Cataract Canyon compared with downstream reaches in Grand Canyon National Park. For this reason, comparison of these vegetation and substrate measurements with similar data from aeolian landscapes of Grand Canyon will help to resolve the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on the Colorado River corridor ecosystem.

  16. Vegetation and substrate properties of aeolian dune fields in the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes vegetation and substrate properties of aeolian landscapes in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Arizona, in Grand Canyon National Park. Characterizing these parameters provides a basis from which to assess future changes in this ecosystem, including the spread of nonnative plant species. Differences are apparent between aeolian dune fields that are downwind of where modern controlled flooding deposits new sandbars (modern-fluvial-sourced dune fields) and those that have received little or no new windblown sand since river regulation began in the 1960s (relict-fluvial-sourced dune fields). The most substantial difference between modern- and relict-fluvial-sourced aeolian dune fields is the greater abundance of biologic soil crust in relict dune fields. These findings can be used with similar investigations in other geomorphic settings in Grand Canyon and elsewhere in the Colorado River corridor to evaluate the health of the Colorado River ecosystem over time.

  17. Monitoring the vernal advancement and retrogradation (green wave effect) of natural vegetation. [Great Plains Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Haas, R. H.; Deering, D. W.; Schell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Great Plains Corridor rangeland project utilizes natural vegetation systems as phenological indicators of seasonal development and climatic effects upon regional growth conditions. A method has been developed for quantitative measurement of vegetation conditions over broad regions using ERTS-1 MSS data. Radiance values recorded in ERTS-1 spectral bands 5 and 7, corrected for sun angle, are used to compute a band ratio parameter which is shown to be correlated with green biomass and vegetation moisture content. This report details the progress being made toward determining factors associated with the transformed vegetation index (TVI) and limitations on the method. During the first year of ERTS-1 operation (cycles 1-20), an average of 50% usable ERTS-1 data was obtained for the ten Great Plains Corridor test sites.

  18. Gravel resources, urbanization, and future land use, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, James M.; Fitch, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    An assessment of gravel needs in Front Range Urban Corridor markets to 2000 A.D., based on forecast population increases and urbanization, indicates that adequate resources to meet anticipated needs are potentially available, if future land use does not preclude their extraction. Because of urban encroachment onto gravel-bearing lands, this basic construction material is in short supply nationally and in the Front Range Urban Corridor. Longer hauls, increased prices, and use of alternatives, especially crushed rock aggregate, have resulted. An analysis of possible sequential land uses following gravel mining indicates that a desirable use is for 'real estate' ponds and small lakes. A method for computing gravel reserves, based on planimeter measurement of area of resource-bearing lands and statistical analysis of reliability of thickness and size distribution data, was developed to compute reserves in individual markets. A discussion of the qualitative 'usability' of these reserves is then made for the individual markets.

  19. The impact of precipitation on speed-flow relationships along a UK motorway corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Elizabeth; Chapman, Lee; Quinn, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Although the fundamental traffic diagram provides the characteristics of a typical road traffic speed-flow relationship, little consideration has been given to the impact of adverse weather conditions on the relationship and the subsequent impact on local speed-flow. For the first time, this study uses precipitation radar along with a state-of-the art traffic information system to ascertain the relationship between speed-flow and precipitation on a UK transport corridor at the local (junction to junction) scale. It is evident that precipitation causes a significant reduction in speed and maximum flow on many links of the corridor as well as a downward reduction in the overall speed-flow relationship. With increased instances of heavy precipitation predicted in the UK as a result of climate change, these findings highlight the subsequent impact on journey travel times and associated economic costs.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric dustfall from the industrial corridor in Hubei Province, Central China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaquan; Qu, Chengkai; Qi, Shihua; Cao, Junji; Zhan, Changlin; Xing, Xinli; Xiao, Yulun; Zheng, Jingru; Xiao, Wensheng

    2015-10-01

    Thirty atmospheric dustfall samples collected from an industrial corridor in Hubei Province, central China, were analyzed for 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to investigate their concentrations, spatial distributions, sources, and health risks. Total PAH concentrations (ΣPAHs) ranged from 1.72 to 13.17 µg/g and averaged 4.91 µg/g. High molecular weight (4-5 rings) PAHs averaged 59.67% of the ΣPAHs. Individual PAH concentrations were not significantly correlated with total organic carbon, possibly due to the semi-continuous inputs from anthropogenic sources. Source identification studies suggest that the PAHs were mainly from motor vehicles and biomass/coal combustion. The incremental lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to PAHs in the dustfall ranged from 10(-4) to 10(-6); these indicate potentially serious carcinogenic risks for exposed populations in the industrial corridor.

  1. A Small Mammal Community in a Forest Fragment, Vegetation Corridor and Coffee Matrix System in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Mariana Ferreira; Passamani, Marcelo; Louzada, Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our work was to verify the value of the vegetation corridor in the conservation of small mammals in fragmented tropical landscapes, using a model system in the southeastern Minas Gerais. We evaluated and compared the composition and structure of small mammals in a vegetation corridor, forest fragments and a coffee matrix. A total of 15 species were recorded, and the highest species richness was observed in the vegetation corridor (13 species), followed by the forest fragments (10) and the coffee matrix (6). The absolute abundance was similar between the vegetation corridor and fragments (F = 22.94; p = 0.064), and the greatest differences occurred between the vegetation corridor and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.001) and the forest fragments and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.007). Six species showed significant habitat preference possibly related to the sensitivity of the species to the forest disturbance. Marmosops incanus was the species most sensitive to disturbance; Akodon montensis, Cerradomys subflavus, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Rhipidomys sp. displayed little sensitivity to disturbance, with a high relative abundance in the vegetation corridor. Calomys sp. was the species least affected by habitat disturbance, displaying a high relative abundance in the coffee matrix. Although the vegetation corridors are narrow (4 m width), our results support the hypothesis in which they work as a forest extension, share most species with the forest fragment and support species richness and abundance closer to forest fragments than to the coffee matrix. Our work highlights the importance and cost-effectiveness of these corridors to biodiversity management in the fragmented Atlantic Forest landscapes and at the regional level. PMID:21912591

  2. A small mammal community in a forest fragment, vegetation corridor and coffee matrix system in the Brazilian Atlantic forest.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Mariana Ferreira; Passamani, Marcelo; Louzada, Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our work was to verify the value of the vegetation corridor in the conservation of small mammals in fragmented tropical landscapes, using a model system in the southeastern Minas Gerais. We evaluated and compared the composition and structure of small mammals in a vegetation corridor, forest fragments and a coffee matrix. A total of 15 species were recorded, and the highest species richness was observed in the vegetation corridor (13 species), followed by the forest fragments (10) and the coffee matrix (6). The absolute abundance was similar between the vegetation corridor and fragments (F = 22.94; p = 0.064), and the greatest differences occurred between the vegetation corridor and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.001) and the forest fragments and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.007). Six species showed significant habitat preference possibly related to the sensitivity of the species to the forest disturbance. Marmosops incanus was the species most sensitive to disturbance; Akodon montensis, Cerradomys subflavus, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Rhipidomys sp. displayed little sensitivity to disturbance, with a high relative abundance in the vegetation corridor. Calomys sp. was the species least affected by habitat disturbance, displaying a high relative abundance in the coffee matrix. Although the vegetation corridors are narrow (4 m width), our results support the hypothesis in which they work as a forest extension, share most species with the forest fragment and support species richness and abundance closer to forest fragments than to the coffee matrix. Our work highlights the importance and cost-effectiveness of these corridors to biodiversity management in the fragmented Atlantic Forest landscapes and at the regional level.

  3. Freight train scheduling on a single line corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Amirah; Froyland, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Most of the world's freight rail network consists of single track lines with sidings where interactions between trains occur (meet, pass). The goal is to generate a schedule where the trains spend as little time as possible traversing between loading and unloading stations while ensuring that the interactions happen safely. Currently, scheduling is a manual operation performed by train controllers or dispatchers. The complexity of the problem makes it a demanding and highly time consuming task. We present an integer program formulation and results obtained from numerical experiments.

  4. Sailing From the Seas of Chaos Into the Corridor of Stability: Practical Recommendations to Increase the Informational Value of Studies.

    PubMed

    Lakens, Daniël; Evers, Ellen R K

    2014-05-01

    Recent events have led psychologists to acknowledge that the inherent uncertainty encapsulated in an inductive science is amplified by problematic research practices. In this article, we provide a practical introduction to recently developed statistical tools that can be used to deal with these uncertainties when performing and evaluating research. In Part 1, we discuss the importance of accurate and stable effect size estimates as well as how to design studies to reach a corridor of stability around effect size estimates. In Part 2, we explain how, given uncertain effect size estimates, well-powered studies can be designed with sequential analyses. In Part 3, we (a) explain what p values convey about the likelihood that an effect is true, (b) illustrate how the v statistic can be used to evaluate the accuracy of individual studies, and (c) show how the evidential value of multiple studies can be examined with a p-curve analysis. We end by discussing the consequences of incorporating our recommendations in terms of a reduced quantity, but increased quality, of the research output. We hope that the practical recommendations discussed in this article will provide researchers with the tools to make important steps toward a psychological science that allows researchers to differentiate among all possible truths on the basis of their likelihood.

  5. Introduction of structural health and safety monitoring warning systems for Shenzhen-Hong Kong Western Corridor Shenzhen Bay Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhou, X. T.; Leng, J.; Liang, Z.; Zheng, C.; Sun, X. F.

    2008-03-01

    Though the brief introduction of the completed structural health and safety monitoring warning systems for Shenzhen-Hongkong western corridor Shenzhen bay highway bridge (SZBHMS), the self-developed system frame, hardware and software scheme of this practical research project are systematically discussed in this paper. The data acquisition and transmission hardware and the basic software based on the NI (National Instruments) Company virtual instruments technology were selected in this system, which adopted GPS time service receiver technology and so on. The objectives are to establish the structural safety monitoring and status evaluation system to monitor the structural responses and working conditions in real time and to analyze the structural working statue using information obtained from the measured data. It will be also provided the scientific decision-making bases for the bridge management and maintenance. Potential technical approaches to the structural safety warning systems, status identification and evaluation method are presented. The result indicated that the performance of the system has achieved the desired objectives, ensure the longterm high reliability, real time concurrence and advanced technology of SZBHMS. The innovate achievement which is the first time to implement in domestic, provide the reference for long-span bridge structural health and safety monitoring warning systems design.

  6. Geometric Context and Orientation Map Combination for Indoor Corridor Modeling Using a Single Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baligh Jahromi, Ali; Sohn, Gunho

    2016-06-01

    Since people spend most of their time indoors, their indoor activities and related issues in health, security and energy consumption have to be understood. Hence, gathering and representing spatial information of indoor spaces in form of 3D models become very important. Considering the available data gathering techniques with respect to the sensors cost and data processing time, single images proved to be one of the reliable sources. Many of the current single image based indoor space modeling methods are defining the scene as a single box primitive. This domain-specific knowledge is usually not applicable in various cases where multiple corridors are joined at one scene. Here, we addressed this issue by hypothesizing-verifying multiple box primitives which represents the indoor corridor layout. Middle-level perceptual organization is the foundation of the proposed method, which relies on finding corridor layout boundaries using both detected line segments and virtual rays created by orthogonal vanishing points. Due to the presence of objects, shadows and occlusions, a comprehensive interpretation of the edge relations is often concealed. This necessitates the utilization of virtual rays to create a physically valid layout hypothesis. Many of the former methods used Orientation Map or Geometric Context to evaluate their proposed layout hypotheses. Orientation map is a map that reveals the local belief of region orientations computed from line segments, and in a segmented image geometric context uses color, texture, edge, and vanishing point cues to estimate the likelihood of each possible label for all super-pixels. Here, the created layout hypotheses are evaluated by an objective function which considers the fusion of orientation map and geometric context with respect to the horizontal viewing angle at each image pixel. Finally, the best indoor corridor layout hypothesis which gets the highest score from the scoring function will be selected and converted to a 3D

  7. Migratory corridors of adult female Kemp’s ridley turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaver, Donna J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Rubio, Cynthia; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.; Pena, Jaime; Gamez, Daniel Gomez; Gonzales Diaz Miron, Raul de Jesus; Burchfield, Patrick M.; Martinez, Hector J.; Ortiz, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    For many marine species, locations of migratory pathways are not well defined. We used satellite telemetry and switching state-space modeling (SSM) to define the migratory corridor used by Kemp's ridley turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) in the Gulf of Mexico. The turtles were tagged after nesting at Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA from 1997 to 2014 (PAIS; n = 80); Rancho Nuevo, Tamaulipas, Mexico from 2010 to 2011 (RN; n = 14); Tecolutla, Veracruz, Mexico from 2012 to 2013 (VC; n = 13); and Gulf Shores, Alabama, USA during 2012 (GS; n = 1). The migratory corridor lies in nearshore Gulf of Mexico waters in the USA and Mexico with mean water depth of 26 m and a mean distance of 20 km from the nearest mainland coast. Migration from the nesting beach is a short phenomenon that occurs from late-May through August, with a peak in June. There was spatial similarity of post-nesting migratory pathways for different turtles over a 16 year period. Thus, our results indicate that these nearshore Gulf waters represent a critical migratory habitat for this species. However, there is a gap in our understanding of the migratory pathways used by this and other species to return from foraging grounds to nesting beaches. Therefore, our results highlight the need for tracking reproductive individuals from foraging grounds to nesting beaches. Continued tracking of adult females from PAIS, RN, and VC nesting beaches will allow further study of environmental and bathymetric components of migratory habitat and threats occurring within our defined corridor. Furthermore, the existence of this migratory corridor in nearshore waters of both the USA and Mexico demonstrates that international cooperation is necessary to protect essential migratory habitat for this imperiled species.

  8. Oblique lateral impact biofidelity deflection corridors from Post Mortem Human Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John R; Arun, Mike W J W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the thorax and abdomen deflection-time corridors in oblique side impacts. Data were analyzed from Post Mortem Human Surrogate (PMHS) sled tests, certain aspects of which were previously published. A modular and scalable anthropometry-specific segmented load-wall system was fixed to the platform of the sled. Region-specific forces were recorded from load cells attached to the load-wall plates. The thorax and abdomen regions were instrumented with chestbands, and deflection contours were obtained. Biomechanical responses were processed using the impulse-momentum normalization method and scaled to the mid-size male mass, 76-kg. The individual effective masses of the thorax and abdomen were used to determine the scale factors in each sled test, thus using the response from each experiment. The maximum deflections and their times of attainments were obtained, and mean and plus minus one standard deviation corridors were derived. Test-by-test thorax and abdomen force-time histories are given. Deflection-time histories for each specimen for the two body regions and corridors are presented. The mean maximum deflections for the thorax and abdomen body regions were 68.41 ± 16.1 and 68.98 ± 12.69 mm, respectively. Deflections were greater in oblique than pure lateral loading tests for both body regions, indicating the increased sensitivity of oblique side impact vector to the human response. The mean and one standard deviation responses of the thorax and abdomen serve as biofidelity corridors under oblique loading. Because modern instrumentation techniques can accommodate deflection sensors in the thorax and abdomen in devices such as WorldSID, and computer finite element models are flexible enough to extract regional and local deformation fields, the present data can be used to evaluate dummy biofidelity and validate and verify numerical models. They can be used to advance injury assessment reference values in oblique impacts.

  9. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. OPEN CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. OPEN CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH WALL OF BUILDING. CAMERA IS NEAR HOT CELL NO. 1, FACES WEST TOWARDS WALL OF TEST-TRAIN ASSEMBLY (TRA-632A). NOTE MOTORIZED RAIL CRANE ABOVE STAIRWAY. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED BY REACTOR (LEFT OF VIEW) AND WEST WALL ON RIGHT. BRIDGE OVERHEAD PROVIDED ACCESS TO TOP OF REACTOR FROM BALCONY. NOTE WIDTH OF BRIDGE. CAMERA FACING SOUTH TOWARDS OPEN DOOR OF REACTOR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-1-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Palaeohydrological corridors for hominin dispersals in the Middle East ∼250-70,000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeze, Paul S.; Groucutt, Huw S.; Drake, Nick A.; White, Tom S.; Jennings, Richard P.; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    The timing and extent of palaeoenvironmental connections between northeast Africa, the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula during the Middle and Late Pleistocene are critical to debates surrounding dispersals of hominins, including movements of Homo sapiens out of Africa. Although there is evidence that synchronous episodes of climatic amelioration during the late Middle and Late Pleistocene may have allowed connections to form between northern Africa and western Asia, a number of palaeoclimate models indicate the continued existence of an arid barrier between northern Arabia and the Levant. Here we evaluate the palaeoenvironmental setting for hominin dispersals between, and within, northeast Africa and southwest Asia during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 7-5 using reconstructions of surface freshwater availability as an environmental proxy. We use remotely sensed data to map palaeohydrological features (lakes, wetlands and rivers) across the presently hyper-arid areas of northern Arabia and surrounding regions, integrating these results with palaeoclimate models, palaeoenvironmental proxy data and absolute dating to determine when these features were active. Our analyses suggest limited potential for dispersals during MIS 7 and 6, but indicate the formation of a palaeohydrological corridor (the 'Tabuk Corridor') between the Levant and the Arabian interior during the MIS 6-5e glacial-interglacial transition and during MIS 5e. A recurrence of this corridor, following a slightly different route, also occurred during MIS 5a. These palaeohydrological and terrestrial data can be used to establish when proposed routes for hominin dispersals became viable. Furthermore, the distribution of Arabian archaeological sites with affinities to Levantine assemblages, some of which are associated with Homo sapiens fossils, and the relative density of Middle Palaeolithic assemblages within the Tabuk Corridor, are consistent with it being utilised for dispersals at various times.

  12. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  13. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH III) presequences that affect both in vitro mitochondrial import and in vitro processing by the matrix protease.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, D T; Pilgrim, D B; Young, E T

    1990-01-01

    Point mutations in the presequence of the mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogerase isoenzyme (ADH III) have been shown to affect either the import of the precursor protein into yeast mitochondria in vivo or its processing within the organelle. In the present work, the behavior of these mutants during in vitro import into isolated mitochondria was investigated. All point mutants tested were imported with a slower initial rate than that of the wild-type precursor. This defect was corrected when the precursors were treated with urea prior to import. Once imported, the extent of processing to the mature form of mutant precursors varied greatly and correlated well with the defects observed in vivo. This result was not affected by prior urea treatment. When matrix extracts enriched for the processing protease were used, this defect was shown to be due to failure of the protease to efficiently recognize or cleave the presequence, rather than to a lack of access to the precursor. The rate of import of two ADH III precursors bearing internal deletions in the leader sequence was similar to those of the point mutants, whereas a deletion leading to the removal of the 15 amino-terminal amino acids was poorly imported. The mature amino terminus of wild-type ADH III was determined to be Gln-25. Mutant m01 (Ser-26 to Phe), which reduced the efficiency of cleavage in vitro by 80%, was cleaved at the correct site. Images PMID:2188098

  14. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  15. Problèmes de mesure d'adhérence de revêtement métallique sur substrat métallique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, A.; Chassaing, E.; Goryachev, S. B.

    2003-03-01

    De tous les couples film/substrat, les systèmes métal/métal sont ceux qui présentent le plus de difficultés lorsqu'il s'agit de mesurer leur énergie d'adhérence. Les deux principales concernent d'une part leur caractère fortement adhérent, d'autre part la grande ductilité des matériaux mis en jeu. Parmi les nombreux tests mécaniques de mesure d'adhérence, les tests de rupture interfaciale, qui consistent à mesurer la résistance à la propagation d'une fissure interfaciale, sont les plus intéressants. Cependant, les tests de ce type les plus utilisés s'avèrent inadaptés aux interfaces métal/métal et un test original, le test de pelage avec cylindre en rotation, semble plus adéquat.

  16. Molecular Variation of Adh and P6 Genes in an African Population of Drosophila Melanogaster and Its Relation to Chromosomal Inversions

    PubMed Central

    Benassi, V.; Aulard, S.; Mazeau, S.; Veuille, M.

    1993-01-01

    Four-cutter molecular polymorphism of Adh and P6, and chromosome inversion polymorphism of chromosome II were investigated in 95 isogenic lines of an Ivory Coast population of Drosophila melanogaster, a species assumed to have recently spread throughout the world from a West African origin. The P6 gene showed little linkage disequilibrium with the In(2L)t inversion, although it is located within this inversion. This suggests that the inversion and the P6 locus have extensively exchanged genetic information through either double crossover or gene conversion. Allozymic variation in ADH was in linkage disequilibrium with In(2L)t and In(2R)NS inversions. Evidence suggests either that inversion linkage with the Fast allele is selectively maintained, or that this allele only recently appeared. Molecular polymorphism at the Adh locus in the Ivory Coast is not higher than in North American populations. New haplotypes specific to the African population were found, some of them connect the ``Wa(s)-like'' haplotypes found at high frequencies in the United States to the other slow haplotypes. Their relation with In(2L)t supports the hypothesis that Wa(s) recently recombined away from an In(2L)t chromosome which may be the cause of its divergence from the other haplotypes. PMID:8349110

  17. Blood Parasites of Blue-winged Teal ( Anas discors ) from Two Migratory Corridors, in the Southern USA.

    PubMed

    Garvon, Jason M; Mott, Joanna B; Jacobs, Sandy Serio; Fedynich, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    We collected 180 Blue-winged Teal ( Anas discors ) in September and October 2002 from Florida, US (n=100, representing the eastern migratory corridor) and the Louisiana-Texas, US, border (n=80, representing the western migratory corridor) and examined for blood parasites using thin heart-blood smears. Leucocytozoon simondi, Haemoproteus nettionis, and microfilariae were found in 16, 23, and 27 birds, respectively. Prevalence of L. simondi and H. nettionis did not vary by migratory corridor, but the prevalence of microfilariae was higher in the western corridor (23%) than the eastern corridor (9%). No differences in prevalence of L. simondi, H. nettionis, and microfilariae were observed by host age or sex. The mean density of L. simondi and H. nettionis averaged 1.5±0.3 and 2.3±0.4 (±SE per 3,000 erythrocytes), respectively. Ranked abundance models for main and interactive effects of corridor, age, and sex were not statistically significant for L. simondi or H. nettionis. Low prevalence and abundance of hematozoa in early autumn migrants reflects the likelihood of low exposure probabilities of Blue-winged Teal on the breeding grounds, compared to their congeners.

  18. 2007 Weather and Aeolian Sand-Transport Data from the Colorado River Corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Andrews, Timothy; Fairley, Helen C.; Brown, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    Weather data constitute an integral part of ecosystem monitoring in the Colorado River corridor and are particularly valuable for understanding processes of landscape change that contribute to the stability of archeological sites. Data collected in 2007 are reported from nine weather stations in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Ariz. The stations were deployed in February and March 2007 to measure wind speed and direction, rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, and barometric pressure. Sand traps near each weather station collect windblown sand, from which daily aeolian sand-transport rates are calculated. The data reported here were collected as part of an ongoing study to test and evaluate methods for quantifying processes that affect the physical integrity of archeological sites along the river corridor; as such, these data can be used to identify rainfall events capable of causing gully incision and to predict likely transport pathways for aeolian sand, two landscape processes integral to the preservation of archeological sites. Weather data also have widespread applications to other studies of physical, cultural, and biological resources in Grand Canyon. Aeolian sand-transport data reported here, collected in the year before the March 2008 High-Flow Experiment (HFE) at Glen Canyon Dam, represent baseline data against which the effects of the 2008 HFE on windblown sand will be compared in future reports.

  19. Corridors maintain species richness in the fragmented landscapes of a microecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, F.; Gonzalez, A.; Evans-Freke, I.

    1998-01-01

    Theory predicts that species richness or single-species populations can be maintained, or at least extinctions minimized, by boosting rates of immigration. One possible way of achieving this is by establishing corridors of suitable habitat between reserves. Using moss patches as model microecosystems, we provide here probably the first field experimental test of the idea that corridors can reduce the rate of loss of species, and therefore help to maintain species richness. Connecting patches of habitat with corridors did indeed slow the rate of extinction of species, preserving species richness for longer periods of time than in disconnected habitat patches. The pattern of γ-diversity, the cumulative species richness of entire connected systems, is similarly higher than that of fragmented systems, despite the homogenizing effects of movement. Predators are predicted to be more susceptible to fragmentation because of their greater mobility and smaller population sizes. Our data are consistent with this prediction: the proportion of predator species declined significantly in disconnected as compared with connected treatments.

  20. Planning for long, wide conservation corridors on private lands in the Oak Ridges Moraine, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Graham S; Eagles, Paul F J

    2007-06-01

    We explored the role of conservation biology in the planning of a natural-heritage system that includes long, wide conservation corridors situated primarily on private lands, and established to connect natural core areas in the Oak Ridges Moraine of Ontario, Canada. We based our review on government documents, semi-structured interviews with participants involved in this land-use planning process, and our involvement with the issue from 1990 through 2002. Conservation biology had a major influence on the outcome of the land-use planning process for this moraine. The landform was identified as an area of value by the environmental movement within the context of a number of ongoing government studies that began in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Conservation biologists and planners in government, the environmental movement, and the private sector carried out work related to conservation biology, including inventories and the development and application of criteria for the delineation of core areas and conservation corridors. Once the political timing was favorable (2001-2002), decision makers linked the science of conservation biology to planning policies and law in Ontario. The Oak Ridges Moraine land-use planning process was precedent setting in Canada, and possibly internationally. To our knowledge this is the first time long, wide conservation corridors on private lands were regulated through land-use-planning legislation and led to restrictions on urban development and aggregate resource extraction.

  1. Mechanisms of nutrient retention and its relation to flow connectivity in river-floodplain corridors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Laurel; Harvey, Judson; Maglio, Morgan M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heterogeneity or patchiness in the distribution of vegetation and retention of C and nutrients in river corridors is critical for setting priorities for river management and restoration. Several mechanisms of spatial differentiation in nutrient retention in river and floodplain corridors have been recognized, but few studies have distinguished their relative importance or established their role in long-term geomorphic change, nutrient retention, and connectivity with downstream systems. We evaluated the ability of 3 mechanisms (evapotranspiration focusing [EF], differential hydrologic exchange [DHE], and particulate nutrient redistribution [PNR]) to explain spatial patterns of P retention and function in the Everglades (Florida, USA). We used field measurements in sloughs and on slightly higher, more densely vegetated ridges to quantify P fluxes attributable to the 3 mechanisms. EF does not explain Everglades nutrient retention or P concentrations on ridges and in sloughs. However, DHE resulting from different periods of groundwater–surface-water connectivity across topographic elements is the primary cause of elevated P concentrations on ridges and completely explains interpatch differences in long-term P accumulation rates. With historical flow velocities, which were an order of magnitude higher than at present, PNR would have further increased the interpatch difference in long-term P retention rates nearly 2-fold. In conclusion, DHE and PNR are the dominant drivers of nutrient patchiness in the Everglades and are hypothesized to be important in P-limited river and floodplain corridors globally.

  2. Postglacial viability and colonization in North America’s ice-free corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mikkel W.; Ruter, Anthony; Schweger, Charles; Friebe, Harvey; Staff, Richard A.; Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Mendoza, Marie L. Z.; Beaudoin, Alwynne B.; Zutter, Cynthia; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Potter, Ben A.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Rainville, Rebecca A.; Orlando, Ludovic; Meltzer, David J.; Kjær, Kurt H.; Willerslev, Eske

    2016-09-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, continental ice sheets isolated Beringia (northeast Siberia and northwest North America) from unglaciated North America. By around 15 to 14 thousand calibrated radiocarbon years before present (cal. kyr BP), glacial retreat opened an approximately 1,500-km-long corridor between the ice sheets. It remains unclear when plants and animals colonized this corridor and it became biologically viable for human migration. We obtained radiocarbon dates, pollen, macrofossils and metagenomic DNA from lake sediment cores in a bottleneck portion of the corridor. We find evidence of steppe vegetation, bison and mammoth by approximately 12.6 cal. kyr BP, followed by open forest, with evidence of moose and elk at about 11.5 cal. kyr BP, and boreal forest approximately 10 cal. kyr BP. Our findings reveal that the first Americans, whether Clovis or earlier groups in unglaciated North America before 12.6 cal. kyr BP, are unlikely to have travelled by this route into the Americas. However, later groups may have used this north-south passageway.

  3. Usage of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Along the Corridors between the EV Project Major Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Mindy Kirkpatrick

    2012-05-01

    The report explains how the EVSE are being used along the corridors between the EV Project cities. The EV Project consists of a nationwide collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), ECOtality North America, Nissan, General Motors, and more than 40 other city, regional and state governments, and electric utilities. The purpose of the EV Project is to demonstrate the deployment and use of approximately 14,000 Level II (208-240V) electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and 300 fast chargers in 16 major cities. This research investigates the usage of all currently installed EV Project commercial EVSE along major interstate corridors. ESRI ArcMap software products are utilized to create geographic EVSE data layers for analysis and visualization of commercial EVSE usage. This research locates the crucial interstate corridors lacking sufficient commercial EVSE and targets locations for future commercial EVSE placement. The results and methods introduced in this research will be used by INL for the duration of the EV Project.

  4. Skip entry guidance using numerical predictor-corrector and patched corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zong-Fu; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Tang, Guo-Jian

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a skip entry guidance algorithm that uses a numerical predictor-corrector and a patched corridor for low-lifting capsules returning from the Moon. The longitudinal and lateral channels are assumed to be decoupled. The bank angle magnitude profile is parameterized using piecewise linear segments with respect to a normalized energy. The shape of the bank-vs-energy profile is determined using a single piecewise-defined variable. The predicted longitudinal bias is nullified using a false position method. The adverse effects of aerodynamic and atmospheric uncertainties are mitigated using an on-board estimating strategy during the trajectory prediction. A patched corridor is devised to manage the lateral state based on analytical derivations and reasonable approximations. The sign of the bank angle is reversed when the boundary of the patched corridor is violated. Dispersed simulations are implemented in a three-degree-of-freedom dynamical context, and the results demonstrate the high performance of the proposed guidance algorithm under stressful testing conditions.

  5. Negative and matrix-dependent effects of dispersal corridors in an experimental metacommunity.

    PubMed

    Aström, Jens; Pärt, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are well-known phenomena in ecology, and the use of corridors is one suggested remedy to ameliorate community disassembly. Most experiments of landscape structure, however, do not consider matrix quality and environmental conditions, despite their potential to affect both landscape permeability and population densities. For the first time in fragmented landscapes, we simultaneously investigated the effects of local disturbance, dispersal corridors, matrix quality, and environmental stress, as well as their interactions, on species richness and abundance. We used a natural micro-ecosystem of bryophyte patches with microarthropods as a model system. Contrary to expectations, there were no negative responses to fragmentation of large continuous habitats. Surprisingly, connecting fragmented patches with dispersal corridors had negative effects on the abundance and species richness of the most species-rich group, oribatid mites. It had also negative effects on the abundance of collembolans and predatory mites in landscapes with complex matrix, which was also generally detrimental. Environmental stress was detrimental for all taxa but interacted with matrix type for oribatid species richness and juvenile oribatid abundance. Our results indicate that interactions can strongly alter community responses to common explanatory factors such as fragmentation, disturbance, connectivity, and environmental quality. Future studies of metacommunity dynamics need to consider the potential for such interactions in order to produce robust predictions of spatially structured landscapes.

  6. Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: Ecological corridor rather than barrier?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Douglas, D.C.; Handel, C.M.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Gottschalck, J.C.; Warnock, N.; McCaffery, B.J.; Battley, Phil F.; Piersma, Theunis

    2009-01-01

    Mountain ranges, deserts, ice fields and oceans generally act as barriers to the movement of land-dependent animals, often profoundly shaping migration routes. We used satellite telemetry to track the southward flights of bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri), shorebirds whose breeding and non-breeding areas are separated by the vast central Pacific Ocean. Seven females with surgically implanted transmitters flew non-stop 8117-11680km (10153??1043 s.d.) directly across the Pacific Ocean; two males with external transmitters flew non-stop along the same corridor for 7008-7390km. Flight duration ranged from 6.0 to 9.4 days (7.8??1.3 s.d.) for birds with implants and 5.0 to 6.6 days for birds with externally attached transmitters. These extraordinary non-stop flights establish new extremes for avian flight performance, have profound implications for understanding the physiological capabilities of vertebrates and how birds navigate, and challenge current physiological paradigms on topics such as sleep, dehydration and phenotypic flexibility. Predicted changes in climatic systems may affect survival rates if weather conditions at their departure hub or along the migration corridor should change. We propose that this transoceanic route may function as an ecological corridor rather than a barrier, providing a wind-assisted passage relatively free of pathogens and predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  7. Forest corridors maintain historical gene flow in a tiger metapopulation in the highlands of central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep; Dutta, Trishna; Maldonado, Jesús E.; Wood, Thomas C.; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Seidensticker, John

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of gene flow of an endangered species metapopulation occupying a fragmented habitat is crucial for landscape-level conservation planning and devising effective conservation strategies. Tigers (Panthera tigris) are globally endangered and their populations are highly fragmented and exist in a few isolated metapopulations across their range. We used multi-locus genotypic data from 273 individual tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) from four tiger populations of the Satpura–Maikal landscape of central India to determine whether the corridors in this landscape are functional. This 45 000 km2 landscape contains 17% of India's tiger population and 12% of its tiger habitat. We applied Bayesian and coalescent-based analyses to estimate contemporary and historical gene flow among these populations and to infer their evolutionary history. We found that the tiger metapopulation in central India has high rates of historical and contemporary gene flow. The tests for population history reveal that tigers populated central India about 10 000 years ago. Their population subdivision began about 1000 years ago and accelerated about 200 years ago owing to habitat fragmentation, leading to four spatially separated populations. These four populations have been in migration–drift equilibrium maintained by high gene flow. We found the highest rates of contemporary gene flow in populations that are connected by forest corridors. This information is highly relevant to conservation practitioners and policy makers, because deforestation, road widening and mining are imminent threats to these corridors. PMID:23902910

  8. Connecting the dots: an invariant migration corridor links the Holocene to the present

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L; Berger, Kim Murray

    2006-01-01

    Numerous species undergo impressive movements, but due to massive changes in land use, long distance migration in terrestrial vertebrates has become a highly fragile ecological phenomenon. Uncertainty about the locations of past migrations and the importance of current corridors hampers conservation planning. Using archeological data from historic kill sites and modern methods to track migration, we document an invariant, 150 km (one-way) migration corridor used for at least 6000 years by North America's sole extant endemic ungulate. Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) from the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, like other long distant migrants including Serengeti wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and Arctic caribou (Rangifer tarandus), move nearly 50 km d−1, but in contrast to these other species, rely on an invariant corridor averaging only 2 km wide. Because an entire population accesses a national park (Grand Teton) by passage through bottlenecks as narrow as 121 m, any blockage to movement will result in extirpation. Based on animation of real data coupled with the loss of six historic routes, alternative pathways throughout the 60 000 km2 Yellowstone ecosystem are no longer available. Our findings have implications for developing strategies to protect long distance land migrations in Africa, Asia and North America and to prevent the disappearance of ecological phenomena that have operated for millennia. PMID:17148280

  9. Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: ecological corridor rather than barrier?

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Robert E.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Douglas, David C.; Handel, Colleen M.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Gottschalck, Jon C.; Warnock, Nils; McCaffery, Brian J.; Battley, Philip F.; Piersma, Theunis

    2008-01-01

    Mountain ranges, deserts, ice fields and oceans generally act as barriers to the movement of land-dependent animals, often profoundly shaping migration routes. We used satellite telemetry to track the southward flights of bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri), shorebirds whose breeding and non-breeding areas are separated by the vast central Pacific Ocean. Seven females with surgically implanted transmitters flew non-stop 8117–11 680 km (10 153±1043 s.d.) directly across the Pacific Ocean; two males with external transmitters flew non-stop along the same corridor for 7008–7390 km. Flight duration ranged from 6.0 to 9.4 days (7.8±1.3 s.d.) for birds with implants and 5.0 to 6.6 days for birds with externally attached transmitters. These extraordinary non-stop flights establish new extremes for avian flight performance, have profound implications for understanding the physiological capabilities of vertebrates and how birds navigate, and challenge current physiological paradigms on topics such as sleep, dehydration and phenotypic flexibility. Predicted changes in climatic systems may affect survival rates if weather conditions at their departure hub or along the migration corridor should change. We propose that this transoceanic route may function as an ecological corridor rather than a barrier, providing a wind-assisted passage relatively free of pathogens and predators. PMID:18974033

  10. Road network in an agrarian landscape: Potential habitat, corridor or barrier for small mammals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon (de), Louis; Le Viol, Isabelle; Jiguet, Frédéric; Machon, Nathalie; Scher, Olivier; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2015-01-01

    If the negative effects of road networks on biodiversity are now recognized, their role as barriers, habitats or corridors remain to be clarified in human altered landscapes in which road verges often constitute the few semi-natural habitats where a part of biodiversity important for ecosystem functioning may maintain. In human-dominated landscape, their roles are crucial to precise in comparison to other habitats for small mammal species considered as major natural actors (pests (voles) or biological control agents (shrew)). We studied these roles through the comparison of small mammal abundance captured (418 individuals belonging to 8 species) using non-attractive pitfall traps (n = 813) in 176 sampled sites distributed in marginal zones of road and crop, in natural areas and in fields. We examined the effect of roadside width and isolation of sites. We found the higher small mammal abundances in roadside verges and an effect of width margins for shrews. The significant effect of the distance to the next adjacent natural habitat at the same side of the road on the relative abundance of Sorex coronatus, and the absence of a significant effect of distance to the next natural habitat at the opposite side of road, suggest that highway and road verges could be used as corridor for their dispersal, but have also a barrier effect for shrews. Our results show that in intensive agricultural landscapes roadside and highway verges may often serve as refuge, habitat and corridor for small mammals depending on species and margin characteristics.

  11. Forest corridors maintain historical gene flow in a tiger metapopulation in the highlands of central India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep; Dutta, Trishna; Maldonado, Jesús E; Wood, Thomas C; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Seidensticker, John

    2013-09-22

    Understanding the patterns of gene flow of an endangered species metapopulation occupying a fragmented habitat is crucial for landscape-level conservation planning and devising effective conservation strategies. Tigers (Panthera tigris) are globally endangered and their populations are highly fragmented and exist in a few isolated metapopulations across their range. We used multi-locus genotypic data from 273 individual tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) from four tiger populations of the Satpura-Maikal landscape of central India to determine whether the corridors in this landscape are functional. This 45 000 km(2) landscape contains 17% of India's tiger population and 12% of its tiger habitat. We applied Bayesian and coalescent-based analyses to estimate contemporary and historical gene flow among these populations and to infer their evolutionary history. We found that the tiger metapopulation in central India has high rates of historical and contemporary gene flow. The tests for population history reveal that tigers populated central India about 10 000 years ago. Their population subdivision began about 1000 years ago and accelerated about 200 years ago owing to habitat fragmentation, leading to four spatially separated populations. These four populations have been in migration-drift equilibrium maintained by high gene flow. We found the highest rates of contemporary gene flow in populations that are connected by forest corridors. This information is highly relevant to conservation practitioners and policy makers, because deforestation, road widening and mining are imminent threats to these corridors.

  12. Identifying ecological corridors for Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) and Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis).

    PubMed

    Miquelle, Dale G; Rozhnov, Vyachaslav V; Ermoshin, Victor; Murzin, Andre A; Nikolaev, Igor G; Hernandez-Blanco, Jose A; Naidenko, Sergie V

    2015-07-01

    The rapid explosion of human populations and the associated development of human-dominated landscapes have drastically reduced and fragmented habitat for tigers (Panthera tigris) and leopards (Panthera pardus) across Asia, resulting in multiple small populations. However, Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) habitat in Russia has remained largely interconnected, except for a break between tigers in southwest Primorye and the southern Sikhote-Alin Mountains. This habitat patch in southwest Primorye also retains the last population of Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis). Genetic differentiation of tigers in southwest Primorye and the Sikhote-Alin Mountains along with survey data suggest that habitat fragmentation is limiting movement of tigers and leopards across the Razdolnaya River basin. We looked at historical and recent survey data on tigers and leopards and mapped existing cover types to examine land-use patterns of both large felids and humans in the development strip along the Razdolnaya River. We then used least-cost distance analyses to identify the most effective potential corridor to retain connectivity for large felids between Land of the Leopard National Park and Ussuriskii Zapovednik (Reserve). We identified a single potential corridor that still exists with a total distance of 62.5 km from Land of the Leopard National Park to Ussuriskii Zapovednik, mostly (93%) through forested habitat. We recommend formal recognition of a Razdolnaya ecological corridor and provide specific recommendations for each of 3 proposed management sections.

  13. Hydrologic investigations in the Mammoth Corridor, Yellowstone National Park and Vicinity, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Mammoth Corridor in and adjacent to Yellowstone National Park encompasses a N-S alignment of geothermal features that extends from the Norris Geyser Basin adjacent to the Yellowstone caldera through Mammoth Hot Springs to the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA). Thermal springs in this region discharge water that ranges from Na-K-Cl, silica-depositing type to Ca-Na-HCO3-SO4, travertine-depositing type. Although only a few relatively shallow wells have been drilled in the corridor, the region is of special interest because of the environmental issues associated with potential geothermal development adjacent to Yellowstone National Park. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an intensive hydrogeologic study of this region during 1988-1990 and continued to collect hydrologic and geophysical data until 1994. The results of these investigations document the rates of discharge of thermal water and heat within the corridor, evidence for a magmatic heat source beneath the Mammoth Hot Springs area, and evidence for separate geothermal systems associated with Mammoth Hot Springs and with thermal waters discharging in the KGRA in the vicinity of La Duke Hot Springs. These investigations also indicate that limited development of the 70??C geothermal resource in the La Duke area would not affect thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. ?? 1997 CNR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-03-03

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984(∗)T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease.

  15. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Kevin J.; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J.; Price, Alkes L.

    2016-01-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984∗T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  16. Precision Analysis of Point-And Photogrammetric Measurements for Corridor Mapping: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P.; Blázquez, M.; Sastre, J.; Colomina, I.

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the key aspects of the sensor orientation and calibration approach within the mapKITE concept for corridor mapping, focusing on the contribution analysis of point-and-scale measurements of kinematic ground control points. MapKITE is a new mobile, simultaneous terrestrial and aerial, geodata acquisition and post-processing method. On one hand, the acquisition system is a tandem composed of a terrestrial mobile mapping system and an unmanned aerial system, the latter equipped with a remote sensing payload, and linked through a 'virtual tether', that is, a real-time waypoint supply from the terrestrial vehicle to the unmanned aircraft. On the other hand, mapKITE entails a method for geodata post-processing (specifically, sensor orientation and calibration) based on the described acquisition paradigm, focusing on few key aspects: the particular geometric relationship of a mapKITE network - the aerial vehicle always observes the terrestrial one as they both move -, precise air and ground trajectory determination - the terrestrial vehicle is regarded as a kinematic ground control point - and new photogrammetric measurements - pointing on and measuring the scale of an optical target on the roof of the terrestrial vehicle - are exploited. In this paper, we analyze the performance of aerial image orientation and calibration in mapKITE for corridor mapping, which is the natural application niche of mapKITE, based on the principles and procedures of integrated sensor orientation with the addition of point-and-scale photogrammetric measurements of the kinematic ground control points. To do so, traditional (static ground control points, photogrammetric tie points, aerial control) and new (pointing-and-scaling of kinematic ground control points) measurements have been simulated for mapKITE corridor mapping missions, consisting on takeoff and calibration pattern, single-pass corridor operation potentially performing calibration patterns, and landing and

  17. Geology of the Mahd Adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Major-element data show that the Mahd Group was produced from separate basaltic and dacitic-rhyolitic magmas that overlapped without mixing. The alkalis and alkaline-earth elements were particularly mobile during metamorphism (which caused widespread albitization of feldspars) and also during hydrothermal alteration (which added secondary microcline). This mobility adversely affected rubidium-strontium whole-rock systematics, which makes whole-rock isochron dates obtained from these rocks questionable. The new geological data presented here are combined with the geochronologic data of Calvez and Kemp (1982) to re-interpret the geologic history of this area.

  18. Streamlining Transportation Corridor Planning Processess: Freight and Traffic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar

    2010-08-01

    The traffic investigation is one of the most important parts of an Environmental Impact Statement of projects involving the construction of new roadway facilities and/or the improvement of existing ones. The focus of the traffic analysis is on the determination of anticipated traffic flow characteristics of the proposed project, by the application of analytical methods that can be grouped under the umbrella of capacity analysis methodologies. In general, the main traffic parameter used in EISs to describe the quality of traffic flow is the Level of Service (LOS). The current state of the practice in terms of the traffic investigations for EISs has two main shortcomings. The first one is related to the information that is necessary to conduct the traffic analysis, and specifically to the lack of integration among the different transportation models and the sources of information that, in general, reside in GIS databases. A discussion of the benefits of integrating CRS&SI technologies and the transportation models used in the EIS traffic investigation is included. The second shortcoming is in the presentation of the results, both in terms of the appearance and formatting, as well as content. The presentation of traffic results (current and proposed) is discussed. This chapter also addresses the need of additional data, in terms of content and coverage. Regarding the former, other traffic parameters (e.g., delays) that are more meaningful to non-transportation experts than LOS, as well as additional information (e.g., freight flows) that can impact traffic conditions and safety are discussed. Spatial information technologies can decrease the negative effects of, and even eliminate, these shortcomings by making the relevant information that is input to the models more complete and readily available, and by providing the means to communicate the results in a more clear and efficient manner. The benefits that the application and use of CRS&SI technologies can provide to

  19. Biomorphometric analysis of ilio-sacro-iliacal corridors for an intra-osseous implant to fix posterior pelvic ring fractures.

    PubMed

    Gras, Florian; Hillmann, Sophia; Rausch, Sascha; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O; Marintschev, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    It is hypothesized that ilio-sacro-iliacal corridors for a new envisioned pelvic ring implant (trans-sacral nail with two iliacal bolts = ISI-nail: ilio-sacro-iliacal nail) exists on the level of S1- or S2-vertebra in each patient. The corridors of 84 healthy human pelves (42x ♂; 42x ♀, 18-85 years) were measured in high resolution CT scans using the Merlin Diagnostic Workcenter Software. Trans-sacral corridors (≥ 9 mm diameter) on the level of S1 and S2 were found in 62% and 54% of pelves with a mean length [mm ± SD] of 164 ± 12.9 and 142 ± 10.2. Corresponding iliac corridors were present in all specimens in caudally tilted axial planes of 37.8 ± 0.67° and 53.7 ± 0.94° in relation to the operating table plane and divergent angulations of 69.0 ± 0.49° and 70.1 ± 0.32° in relation to the sagittal midline plane. Sacral dysmorphism, with compensatory larger S2 corridors were prevalent in 24% of pelves; ilio-sacro-iliacal osseous corridors for the envisioned implant were found in 88% of pelves on the level of S1 or S2. In the remaining 12% with too narrow corridors for any trans-sacral implant (screws, bars, ISI nail) alternative fixation methods have to be considered. Expected advantages of the envisioned ISI nail compared to available fixation devices are discussed.

  20. Making Pickles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Sarah

    1977-01-01

    Making pickles developed from a laboratory lesson during a unit on solutions, suspensions, acids, and bases. The pickle lab has been used as a summation and application of these topics. Directions for setting up the lab experience and actually making the pickles are included. (MA)

  1. Bidirectional recovery patterns of Mojave Desert vegetation in an aqueduct pipeline corridor after 36 years: I. Perennial shrubs and grasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Kristin H.; Weigand, James F.; Gowan, Timothy A.; Mack, Jeremy S.

    2015-01-01

    We studied recovery of 21 perennial plant species along a severely disturbed aqueduct corridor in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa plant alliance in the Mojave Desert 36 years after construction. The 97-m wide corridor contained a central dirt road and buried aqueduct pipeline. We established transects at 0 m (road verge), 20 m and 40 m into the disturbance corridor, and at 100 m in undisturbed habitat (the control). Although total numbers of shrubs per transect did not vary significantly with distance from the verge, canopy cover of shrubs, species richness, and species diversity were higher in the control than at the verge and other distances. Canopy cover of common shrubs (Ericameria nauseosa, Ambrosia salsola, A. dumosa, L. tridentata, Grayia spinosa) and perennial grasses (Elymus elymoides, Poa secunda) also varied significantly by location. Discriminant analysis clearly separated the four distances based on plant composition. Patterns of recovery were bidirectional: secondary succession from the control into the disturbance corridor and inhibition from the verge in the direction of the control. Time estimated for species composition to resemble the control is dependent on location within the disturbance corridor and could be centuries at the road verge. Our findings have applications to other deserts.

  2. Identification of a G‐Protein Subunit‐α11 Gain‐of‐Function Mutation, Val340Met, in a Family With Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia Type 2 (ADH2)

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Sian E; Gorvin, Caroline M; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howles, Sarah A; Cranston, Treena; Rust, Nigel; Nesbit, M Andrew; Glaser, Ben; Taylor, Jenny C; Buchs, Andreas E; Hannan, Fadil M

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is characterized by hypocalcemia, inappropriately low serum parathyroid hormone concentrations and hypercalciuria. ADH is genetically heterogeneous with ADH type 1 (ADH1), the predominant form, being caused by germline gain‐of‐function mutations of the G‐protein coupled calcium‐sensing receptor (CaSR), and ADH2 caused by germline gain‐of‐function mutations of G‐protein subunit α‐11 (Gα11). To date Gα11 mutations causing ADH2 have been reported in only five probands. We investigated a multigenerational nonconsanguineous family, from Iran, with ADH and keratoconus which are not known to be associated, for causative mutations by whole‐exome sequencing in two individuals with hypoparathyroidism, of whom one also had keratoconus, followed by cosegregation analysis of variants. This identified a novel heterozygous germline Val340Met Gα11 mutation in both individuals, and this was also present in the other two relatives with hypocalcemia that were tested. Three‐dimensional modeling revealed the Val340Met mutation to likely alter the conformation of the C‐terminal α5 helix, which may affect G‐protein coupled receptor binding and G‐protein activation. In vitro functional expression of wild‐type (Val340) and mutant (Met340) Gα11 proteins in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaSR, demonstrated that the intracellular calcium responses following stimulation with extracellular calcium, of the mutant Met340 Gα11 led to a leftward shift of the concentration‐response curve with a significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced mean half‐maximal concentration (EC50) value of 2.44 mM (95% CI, 2.31 to 2.77 mM) when compared to the wild‐type EC50 of 3.14 mM (95% CI, 3.03 to 3.26 mM), consistent with a gain‐of‐function mutation. A novel His403Gln variant in transforming growth factor, beta‐induced (TGFBI), that may be causing keratoconus was also identified, indicating likely digenic

  3. Out of Africa: the importance of rivers as human migration corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J. A.; Coulthard, T. J.; Rogerson, M.; Barton, N.; Bruecher, T.

    2013-12-01

    The route and timing of Homo sapiens exiting Africa remains uncertain. Corridors leading out of Africa through the Sahara, the Nile Valley, and the Red Sea coast have been proposed as migration routes for anatomically modern humans 80,000-130,000 years ago. During this time climate conditions in the Sahara were wetter than present day, and monsoon rainfall fed rivers that flowed across the desert landscape. The location and timing of these rivers may have supported human migration northward from central Africa to the Mediterranean coast, and onwards to Europe or Asia. Here, we use palaeoclimate rainfall and a hydrological model to spatially simulate and quantitatively test the existence of three major rivers crossing the Sahara from south to north during the time of human migration. We provide evidence that, given realistic underlying climatology, the well-known Sahabi and Kufrah rivers very likely flowed across modern day Libya and reached the coast. More unexpectedly an additional river crossed the core of the Sahara through Algeria (Irharhar river) and flowed into the Chotts basin. The Irharhar river is unique, because it links locations in central Africa experiencing monsoon climates with temperate coastal Mediterranean environments where food and resources were likely abundant. From an ecological perspective, this little-known corridor may prove to be the most parsimonious migration route. Support for the Irharar as a viable migration corridor is provided by its geographic proximity to middle Stone Age archaeological artefacts found in North Africa. Our new, highly novel approach provides the first quantitative analysis of the likelihood that rivers occurred during the critical period of human migration out of Africa. Simulated probability of surface water in North Africa during the last interglacial and the location of tools and ornaments from the Middle Stone Age.

  4. Recreational trails as corridors for alien plants in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Floye H.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Alien plant species often use areas of heavy human activity for habitat and dispersal. Roads and utility corridors have been shown to harbor more alien species than the surrounding vegetation and are therefore believed to contribute to alien plant persistence and spread. Recreational trails represent another corridor that could harbor alien species and aid their spread. Effective management of invasive species requires understanding how alien plants are distributed at trailheads and trails and how their dispersal may be influenced by native vegetation. Our overall goal was to investigate the distribution of alien plants at trailheads and trails in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. At trailheads, we found that although the number of alien species was less than the number of native species, alien plant cover ( x̄=50%) did not differ from native plant cover, and we observed a large number of alien seedlings in the soil seed bank, suggesting that alien plants are a large component of trailhead communities and will continue to be so in the future. Along trails, we found higher alien species richness and cover on trail (as opposed to 4 m from the trail) in 3 out of 4 vegetation types, and we observed higher alien richness and cover in meadows than in other vegetation types. Plant communities at both trailheads and trails, as well as seed banks at trailheads, contain substantial diversity and abundance of alien plants. These results suggest that recreational trails in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado may function as corridors that facilitate the spread of alien species into wildlands. Our results suggest that control of alien plants should begin at trailheads where there are large numbers of aliens and that control efforts on trails should be prioritized by vegetation type.

  5. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-03

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed.

  6. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kim, Soo Rin; Subramaniam, Vijay; Steffen, David; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-10-01

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite that cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose. Microbial strains capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose into lactic acid are needed for sustainable and economic lactic acid production. In this study, we introduced a lactic acid-producing pathway into an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose. Specifically, ldhA from the fungi Rhizopus oryzae was overexpressed under the control of the PGK1 promoter through integration of the expression cassette in the chromosome. The resulting strain exhibited a high lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced lactic acid from glucose or xylose. Interestingly, we observed that the engineered strain exhibited substrate-dependent product formation. When the engineered yeast was cultured on glucose, the major fermentation product was ethanol while lactic acid was a minor product. In contrast, the engineered yeast produced lactic acid almost exclusively when cultured on xylose under oxygen-limited conditions. The yields of ethanol and lactic acid from glucose were 0.31 g ethanol/g glucose and 0.22 g lactic acid/g glucose, respectively. On xylose, the yields of ethanol and lactic acid were <0.01 g ethanol/g xylose and 0.69 g lactic acid/g xylose, respectively. These results demonstrate that lactic acid can be produced from xylose with a high yield by S. cerevisiae without deleting pyruvate decarboxylase, and the formation patterns of fermentations can be altered by substrates.

  7. Metabolic process engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum Δack-adhE2 for enhanced n-butanol production from glucose: effects of methyl viologen on NADH availability, flux distribution, and fermentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Yu, Mingrui; Tang, I-Ching; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-04-01

    Butanol biosynthesis through aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2) is usually limited by NADH availability, resulting in low butanol titer, yield, and productivity. To alleviate this limitation and improve n-butanol production by Clostridium tyrobutyricum Δack-adhE2 overexpressing adhE2, the NADH availability was increased by using methyl viologen (MV) as an artificial electron carrier to divert electrons from ferredoxin normally used for H2 production. In the batch fermentation with the addition of 500 μM MV, H2 , acetate, and butyrate production was reduced by more than 80-90%, while butanol production increased more than 40% to 14.5 g/L. Metabolic flux analysis revealed that butanol production increased in the fermentation with MV because of increased NADH availability as a result of reduced H2 production. Furthermore, continuous butanol production of ∼55 g/L with a high yield of ∼0.33 g/g glucose and extremely low ethanol, acetate, and butyrate production was obtained in fed-batch fermentation with gas stripping for in situ butanol recovery. This study demonstrated a stable and reliable process for high-yield and high-titer n-butanol production by metabolically engineered C. tyrobutyricum by applying MV as an electron carrier to increase butanol biosynthesis.

  8. Comparative use of riparian corridors and oases by migrating birds in southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, S.K.; Melcher, C.P.; Howe, W.H.; Knopf, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of cottonwood-willow riparian corridors and isolated oases to land birds migrating across southeastern Arizona was evaluated during four spring migrations, 1989 to 1994, based on patterns of species richness, relative abundance, density, and body condition of birds. We surveyed birds in 13 study sites ranging in size and connectivity from small isolated patches to extensive riparian forest, sampled vegetation and insects, and captured birds in mistnets. The continuous band of riparian vegetation along the San Pedro River does not appear to be functioning as a corridor for many migrating species, although it may for a few, namely Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens), Summer Tanagers (Piranga rubra), and Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Steldigopteryx serripennis), which account for fewer than 10% of the individuals migrating through the area. Small, isolated oases hosted more avian species than the corridor sites, and the relative abundances of most migrating birds did not differ between sites relative to size-connectivity. There were few differences in between-year variability in the relative abundances of migrating birds between corridor and oasis sites. Between-year variability decreased with overall abundance of species and was greater for species with breeding ranges that centered north of 50??N latitude. Body condition of birds did not differ relative to the size-connectivity of the capture site, but individuals of species with more northerly breeding ranges had more body fat than species that breed nearby. Peak migration densities of several bird species far exceeded breeding densities reported for the San Pedro River, suggesting that large components of these species were en route migrants. Peak densities of Yellow Warblers (Dendroica petechia) reached 48.0 birds/ha, of Wilson's Warblers (Wilsonia pusilla) 33.7 birds/ha, and of Yellow-rumped Warblers (D. coronata) 30.1 birds/ha. Riparian vegetation is limited in extent in the

  9. Development and Implementation of the Waste Management Information System to Support Hanford's River Corridor Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, L. M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a Waste Information Management System (WMIS) to support the waste designation, transportation, and disposal processes used by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC to support cleanup of the Columbia River Corridor. This waste, primarily consisting of remediated burial sites and building demolition debris, is disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), which is located in the center of the Hanford Site (an approximately 1460 square kilometers site). WMIS uses a combination of bar-code scanning, hand-held computers, and strategic employment of a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag system to track each waste shipment from waste generation to disposal. (authors)

  10. Monitoring the Vernal Advancement and Retrogradation (Green Wave Effect) of Natural Vegetation. [Great Plains Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Haas, R. H.; Deering, D. W.; Schell, J. A.; Harlan, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Great Plains Corridor rangeland project successfully utilized natural vegetation systems as phenological indicators of seasonal development and climatic effects upon regional growth conditions. An effective method was developed for quantitative measurement of vegetation conditions, including green biomass estimates, recorded in bands 5 and 6, corrected for sun angle, were used to compute a ratio parameter (TV16) which is shown to be highly correlated with green biomass and vegatation moisture content. Analyses results of ERTS-1 digital data and correlated ground data are summarized. Attention was given to analyzing weather influences and test site variables on vegetation condition measurements with ERTS-1 data.

  11. Studies on the mode of bacterial contamination of an operating theatre corridor floor.

    PubMed

    Nagai, I; Kadota, M; Takechi, M; Kumamoto, R; Ueoka, M; Matsuoka, K; Jitsukawa, S

    1984-03-01

    Bacterial contamination of the floor of a corridor leading into an operating theatre suite was studied in relation to the site chosen for changing footwear. Recovery of bacteria showed a peak at the site of exchange of footwear, and decreased with increasing distance from the site. When the site of exchange was moved further away from the clean area, the peak of contamination moved to the new site and bacterial contamination decreased in the clean area. These results indicate that exchange of footwear should occur as far from the operating theatre as possible.

  12. Dynamics of a Two-Link Vehicle in an L-Shaped Corridor Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonyuk, E. Ya.; Zabuga, A. T.

    2014-03-01

    The kinematics of a two-link mobile robot with three steerable wheels moving in an L-shaped corridor is analyzed. A smooth (with continuous first derivative) path is designed maintaining the optimal maneuverability of the vehicle. The motion of the vehicle along this path is planned. Analytical expressions for the reactions at the contact of the wheels with the ground are given in the general case of motion. The radius of curvature of the programmed path is shown to have a strong influence on the reactions.

  13. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  14. Comparison of serial and parallel simulations of a corridor fire using FDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valasek, L.

    2015-09-01

    Current fire simulators allow to model the course of fire in large areas and its impact on structure and equipment. This paper deals with a comparison of serial and parallel calculations of simulation of a corridor fire by the FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator) system. In parallel case, the whole computational domain is divided into several computational meshes, the computation on each mesh is considered as a single MPI (Message Passing Interface) process realised on one computational core and communication between MPI processes is provided by MPI. The aim of this paper is to determine the size of error caused by parallelization of computation, which occurs at touches of computational meshes.

  15. Corridor of existence of thermodynamically consistent solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equation.

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, V S; Martynov, G A

    2007-07-14

    We obtain the exact equation for a correction to the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation based on the assumption of the uniqueness of thermodynamical functions. We show that this equation is reduced to a differential equation with one arbitrary parameter for the hard sphere model. The compressibility factor within narrow limits of this parameter variation can either coincide with one of the formulas obtained on the basis of analytical solutions of the OZ equation or assume all intermediate values lying in a corridor between these solutions. In particular, we find the value of this parameter when the thermodynamically consistent compressibility factor corresponds to the Carnahan-Stirling formula.

  16. Making Movies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Zoe; Davies, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Children enjoy making movies but can it help them to understand science? In this article, the authors discuss how creating stop-frame animations of salt dissolving can deepen children's understanding of this process. (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Mural Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Five articles describe techniques of mural making and mural projects which have been accomplished by elementary and secondary students, including a class of blind and partially sighted children. (SJL)

  18. Prospective Multicenter Phase II Trial of Systemic ADH-1 in Combination With Melphalan via Isolated Limb Infusion in Patients With Advanced Extremity Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Georgia M.; Riboh, Jonathan C.; Augustine, Christina K.; Zager, Jonathan S.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Peterson, Bercedis; Royal, Richard; Ross, Merrick I.; Tyler, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Isolated limb infusion (ILI) with melphalan (M-ILI) dosing corrected for ideal body weight (IBW) is a well-tolerated treatment for patients with in-transit melanoma with a 29% complete response rate. ADH-1 is a cyclic pentapeptide that disrupts N-cadherin adhesion complexes. In a preclinical animal model, systemic ADH-1 given with regional melphalan demonstrated synergistic antitumor activity, and in a phase I trial with M-ILI it had minimal toxicity. Patients and Methods Patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage IIIB or IIIC extremity melanoma were treated with 4,000 mg of ADH-1, administered systemically on days 1 and 8, and with M-ILI corrected for IBW on day 1. Drug pharmacokinetics and N-cadherin immunohistochemical staining were performed on pretreatment tumor. The primary end point was response at 12 weeks determined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Results In all, 45 patients were enrolled over 15 months at four institutions. In-field responses included 17 patients with complete responses (CRs; 38%), 10 with partial responses (22%), six with stable disease (13%), eight with progressive disease (18%), and four (9%) who were not evaluable. Median duration of in-field response among the 17 CRs was 5 months, and median time to in-field progression among 41 evaluable patients was 4.6 months (95% CI, 4.0 to 7.1 months). N-cadherin was detected in 20 (69%) of 29 tumor samples. Grade 4 toxicities included creatinine phosphokinase increase (four patients), arterial injury (one), neutropenia (one), and pneumonitis (one). Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this phase II trial is the first prospective multicenter ILI trial and the first to incorporate a targeted agent in an attempt to augment antitumor responses to regional chemotherapy. Although targeting N-cadherin may improve melanoma sensitivity to chemotherapy, no difference in response to treatment was seen in this study. PMID:21343562

  19. The influence of genetic polymorphisms in XRCC3 and ADH5 genes on the frequency of genotoxicity biomarkers in workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, Carina; Viegas, Susana; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Manuel C; Brito, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer classified formaldehyde as carcinogenic to humans because there is "sufficient epidemiological evidence that it causes nasopharyngeal cancer in humans". Genes involved in DNA repair and maintenance of genome integrity are critically involved in protecting against mutations that lead to cancer and/or inherited genetic disease. Association studies have recently provided evidence for a link between DNA repair polymorphisms and micronucleus (MN) induction. We used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN assay) in peripheral lymphocytes and MN test in buccal cells to investigate the effects of XRCC3 Thr241Met, ADH5 Val309Ile, and Asp353Glu polymorphisms on the frequency of genotoxicity biomarkers in individuals occupationally exposed to formaldehyde (n = 54) and unexposed workers (n = 82). XRCC3 participates in DNA double-strand break/recombination repair, while ADH5 is an important component of cellular metabolism for the elimination of formaldehyde. Exposed workers had significantly higher frequencies (P < 0.01) than controls for all genotoxicity biomarkers evaluated in this study. Moreover, there were significant associations between XRCC3 genotypes and nuclear buds, namely XRCC3 Met/Met (OR = 3.975, CI 1.053-14.998, P = 0.042) and XRCC3 Thr/Met (OR = 5.632, CI 1.673-18.961, P = 0.005) in comparison with XRCC3 Thr/Thr. ADH5 polymorphisms did not show significant effects. This study highlights the importance of integrating genotoxicity biomarkers and genetic polymorphisms in human biomonitoring studies.

  20. Colonization of the Hawaiian Archipelago via Johnston Atoll: a characterization of oceanographic transport corridors for pelagic larvae using computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Donald R.

    2006-08-01

    Larval transport between Johnston Atoll and the Hawaiian Archipelago was examined using computer simulation and high-resolution ocean current data. The effects of pelagic larval duration and spawning seasonality on long-distance transport and local retention were examined using a Lagrangian, individual-based approach. Retention around Johnston Atoll appeared to be low, and there appeared to be seasonal effects on both retention and dispersal. Potential larval transport corridors between Johnston Atoll and the Hawaiian Archipelago were charted. One corridor connects Johnston Atoll with the middle portion of the Hawaiian Archipelago in the vicinity of French Frigate Shoals. Another corridor connects Johnston Atoll with the lower inhabited islands in the vicinity of Kauai. Transport appears to be related to the subtropical countercurrent and the Hawaiian Lee countercurrent, both located to the west of the archipelago and flowing to the east. A new analytical tool, termed CONREC-IRC is presented for the quantification of spatial patterns.