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Sample records for adhs corridors making

  1. Ectopic ADH secretion

    MedlinePlus

    ... ADH. Often, there are no symptoms from a low sodium level. When symptoms do occur, they may include ... Lab tests that can confirm and help diagnose low sodium include: Comprehensive metabolic panel (includes blood sodium) Osmolality ...

  2. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Vasopressin; AVP Formal name: Antidiuretic Hormone; Arginine Vasopressin Related tests: Osmolality , BUN , Creatinine , Sodium , ... should know? How is it used? The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) test is used to help detect, diagnose, ...

  3. Cofactor Specificity of the Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Wild-Type and Mutant Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Tian, Liang; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lo, Jonathan; Hon, Shuen; Shaw, A. Joe; van Dijken, Johannes P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are thermophilic bacteria that have been engineered to produce ethanol from the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of biomass, respectively. Although engineered strains of T. saccharolyticum produce ethanol with a yield of 90% of the theoretical maximum, engineered strains of C. thermocellum produce ethanol at lower yields (∼50% of the theoretical maximum). In the course of engineering these strains, a number of mutations have been discovered in their adhE genes, which encode both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. To understand the effects of these mutations, the adhE genes from six strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzymes produced were purified by affinity chromatography, and enzyme activity was measured. In wild-type strains of both organisms, NADH was the preferred cofactor for both ALDH and ADH activities. In high-ethanol-producing (ethanologen) strains of T. saccharolyticum, both ALDH and ADH activities showed increased NADPH-linked activity. Interestingly, the AdhE protein of the ethanologenic strain of C. thermocellum has acquired high NADPH-linked ADH activity while maintaining NADH-linked ALDH and ADH activities at wild-type levels. When single amino acid mutations in AdhE that caused increased NADPH-linked ADH activity were introduced into C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum, ethanol production increased in both organisms. Structural analysis of the wild-type and mutant AdhE proteins was performed to provide explanations for the cofactor specificity change on a molecular level. IMPORTANCE This work describes the characterization of the AdhE enzyme from different strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum are thermophilic anaerobes that have been engineered to make high yields of ethanol and can solubilize components of

  4. Ethanol-Induced Alcohol Dehydrogenase E (AdhE) Potentiates Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence. PMID:25312953

  5. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  6. Characterization of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh and plasmid transduction in Lactobacillus acidophilus ADH.

    PubMed Central

    Raya, R R; Kleeman, E G; Luchansky, J B; Klaenhammer, T R

    1989-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus ADH is lysogenic and harbors an inducible prophage, phi adh. Bacteriophage were detected in cell lysates induced by treatment with mitomycin C or UV light. Electron microscopy of lysates revealed phage particles with a hexagonal head (62 nm) and a long, noncontractile, flexible tail (398 nm) ending in at last five short fibers. Phage phi adh was classified within Bradley's B1 phage group and the Siphoviridae family. The phi adh genome is a linear double-stranded DNA molecule of 41.7 kilobase pairs with cohesive ends: a physical map of the phi adh genome was constructed. A prophage-cured derivative of strain ADH, designated NCK102, was isolated from cells that survived UV exposure. NCK102 did not exhibit mitomycin C-induced lysis, but broth cultures lysed upon addition of phage. Phage phi adh produced clear plaques on NCK102 in media containing 10 mM CaCl2 at pH values between 5.2 and 5.5. A relysogenized derivative (NCK103) of NCK102 was isolated that exhibited mitomycin C-induced lysis and superinfection immunity to phage phi adh. Hybridization experiments showed that the phi adh genome was present in the ADH and NCK103 chromosomes, but absent in NCK102. These results demonstrated classic lytic and lysogenic cycles of replication for the temperate phage phi adh induced from L. acidophilus ADH. Phage phi adh also mediates transduction of plasmid DNA. Transductants of strain ADH containing pC194, pGK12, pGB354, and pVA797 were detected at frequencies in the range of 3.6 x 10(-8) to 8.3 x 10(-10) per PFU. Rearrangements or deletions were not detected in these plasmids as a consequence of transduction. This is the first description of plasmid transduction in the genus Lactobacillus. Images PMID:2508554

  7. Using collaborative tools for energy corridor planning.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J. A.; Cantwell, B.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Krummel, J.; Moore, R.; Sullivan, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-01-01

    In November 2007, the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the Western 11 States was released. The draft proposes a network of 6055 miles of energy corridors on lands managed by seven different federal agencies. Determining the proposed locations of the corridors was a large collaborative effort among the agencies and included local, state, and federal land managers. To connect this geographically dispersed group of people, the project team employed a variety of approaches to communicate corridor siting issues, including sharing GIS layers and electronic maps, a downloadable GIS database and ArcReader project, workshops, and Internet webcast teleconferences. This collaborative approach allowed difficult siting issues to be understood and discussed from many perspectives, which resulted in rapid and effective decision making. The result was a proposed corridor system that avoids many sensitive resources and protected lands while accommodating expected energy development.

  8. The EhADH112 recombinant polypeptide inhibits cell destruction and liver abscess formation by Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Carolina; Orozco, Esther; Sánchez, Tomás; García-Pérez, Rosa María; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2004-04-01

    The Entamoeba histolytica EhCPADH complex, formed by a cysteine proteinase (EhCP112) and an adhesin (EhADH112), is involved in adherence, phagocytosis and cytolysis. This makes this complex an attractive candidate as a vaccine against amoebiasis. Here, we produced the recombinant polypeptide EhADH243, which includes the adherence epitope detected by a monoclonal antibody against the EhCPADH complex. EhADH243 was purified, and the effect of the polypeptide on in vitro and in vivo virulence was studied. Antibodies against EhADH243 reacted with the EhCPADH complex and with the recombinant polypeptide. EhADH243 and antibodies against this polypeptide inhibited adherence, phagocytosis and destruction of cell monolayers by live trophozoites, but had little effect on cell monolayer destruction by trophozoite extracts. EhADH243 recognized a 97 kDa protein in the MDCK membrane fraction that could be a putative receptor for E. histolytica trophozoites. Hamsters immunized with EhADH243 developed humoral response against EhCPADH, and animals were partially protected from amoebic liver abscess. PMID:15009028

  9. ADH IB Expression, but Not ADH III, Is Decreased in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mutka, Sarah C.; Green, Lucia H.; Verderber, Evie L.; Richards, Jane P.; Looker, Doug L.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Rosenthal, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer. PMID:23285246

  10. ADH IB expression, but not ADH III, is decreased in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Sarah C; Green, Lucia H; Verderber, Evie L; Richards, Jane P; Looker, Doug L; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer. PMID:23285246

  11. The role of aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) in ethanol production from glycerol by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Baek-Rock; Hong, Won-Kyung; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Joe, Min-ho; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho

    2013-02-01

    Transcriptome analysis of a K. pneumoniae GEM167 mutant strain derived by irradiation with gamma rays, which exhibited high-level production of ethanol from glycerol, showed that the mutant expressed AdhE at a high level. Ethanol production decreased significantly, from 8.8 to 0.5 g l(-1), when an adhE-deficient derivative of that strain was grown on glycerol. Bacterial growth was also reduced under such conditions, showing that AdhE plays a critical role in maintenance of redox balance by catalyzing ethanol production. Overexpression of AdhE enhanced ethanol production, from pure or crude glycerol, to a maximal level of 31.9 g l(-1) under fed-batch fermentation conditions; this is the highest level of ethanol production from glycerol reported to date. PMID:23296976

  12. Locus Adh of Drosophila melanogaster under selection for delayed senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Khaustova, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    Dynamics of the Adh activity and frequencies of alleles Adh{sup F} and Adh{sup S} were analyzed under selection for delayed senescence. The experiments were performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Lines Adh{sup S}cn and Adh{sup F}vg and experimental populations cn` and vg`, selected for an increased duration of reproductive period (late oviposition) were used. Analysis of fertility, longevity, viability and resistance to starvation showed that selection for late oviposition resulted in delayed senescence of flies of the experimental populations. Genetic structure of population vg` changed considerably with regard to the Adh locus. This was confirmed by parameters of activity, thermostability, and electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme isolated from flies after 30 generations of selection. Analysis of frequencies of the Adh alleles showed that in both selected populations, which initially had different genetic composition, accumulated allele Adh{sup S}, which encodes the isozyme that is less active but more resistant to inactivation. Genetic mechanism of delayed senescence in Drosophila is assumed to involve selection at vitally important enzyme loci, including Adh. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. Effects of endogenous antidiuretic hormone (ADH) on macrophage phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Repollet, E.; Opava-Stitzer, S.; Tiffany, S.; Schwartz, A.

    1983-07-01

    Although several studies have indicated that antidiuretic hormone (ADH) enhances the phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in shock syndromes, it remains unknown what influence ADH exerts upon the individual phagocytic components of this system. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of endogenous ADH on the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage cells. As a phagocytic stimuli, fluorescent methacrylate microbeads were injected intraperitoneally into Brattleboro (ADH deficient) and normal Long Evans rats in the presence and absence of exogenous ADH. Peritoneal cells were harvested 19-22 hr after the administration of the microbeads and the percent phagocytosis was determined in macrophage cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Our results indicate that the percentage of peritoneal macrophages ingesting the fluorescent methacrylate microbeads was significantly reduced in the absence of ADH (Brattleboro rats: 5.4 +/- 0.6% versus Long Evans rats: 16.8 +/- 2.3%; p less than 0.001). In addition, our data demonstrate that exogenous administration of ADH significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis in Brattleboro (14.7 +/- 2.2%) and normal Long Evans (49.6 +/- 4.5%) rats. These data suggest, for the first time, that endogenous ADH might play a modulatory role in the phagocytic activity of a specific component of the RES, namely, the macrophage cell.

  14. The metabolic enzyme AdhE controls the virulence of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Katherine S H; Connolly, James P R; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Wang, Dai; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Tahoun, Amin; Gally, David L; Burgess, Karl; Burchmore, Richard J; Smith, Brian O; Beatson, Scott A; Byron, Olwyn; Wolfe, Alan J; Douce, Gillian R; Roe, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Classical studies have focused on the role that individual regulators play in controlling virulence gene expression. An emerging theme, however, is that bacterial metabolism also plays a key role in this process. Our previous work identified a series of proteins that were implicated in the regulation of virulence. One of these proteins was AdhE, a bi-functional acetaldehyde-CoA dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. Deletion of its gene (adhE) resulted in elevated levels of extracellular acetate and a stark pleiotropic phenotype: strong suppression of the Type Three Secretion System (T3SS) and overexpression of non-functional flagella. Correspondingly, the adhE mutant bound poorly to host cells and was unable to swim. Furthermore, the mutant was significantly less virulent than its parent when tested in vivo, which supports the hypothesis that attachment and motility are central to the colonization process. The molecular basis by which AdhE affects virulence gene regulation was found to be multifactorial, involving acetate-stimulated transcription of flagella expression and post-transcriptional regulation of the T3SS through Hfq. Our study reveals fascinating insights into the links between bacterial physiology, the expression of virulence genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism mechanisms by which these processes are regulated. PMID:24846743

  15. Bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) in chlorophyte algal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Henze, Katrin; Martin, William; Riveros-Rosas, Hector; González-Halphen, Diego

    2003-09-01

    Protein profiles of mitochondria isolated from the heterotrophic chlorophyte Polytomella sp. grown on ethanol at pH 6.0 and pH 3.7 were analyzed by Blue Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Steady-state levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were influenced by external pH. Levels of an abundant, soluble, mitochondrial protein of 85 kDa and its corresponding mRNA increased at pH 6.0 relative to pH 3.7. N-terminal and internal sequencing of the 85 kDa mitochondrial protein together with the corresponding cDNA identified it as a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) with strong similarity to homologues from eubacteria and amitochondriate protists. A mitochondrial targeting sequence of 27 amino acids precedes the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial protein. A gene encoding an ADHE homologue was also identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a photosynthetic relative of Polytomella. ADHE reveals a complex picture of sequence similarity among homologues. The lack of ADHE from archaebacteria indicates a eubacterial origin for the eukaryotic enzyme. Among eukaryotes, ADHE has hitherto been characteristic of anaerobes since it is essential to cytosolic energy metabolism of amitochondriate protists such as Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica. Its abundance and expression pattern suggest an important role for ADHE in mitochondrial metabolism of Polytomella under the conditions studied. The current data are compatible with the view that Polytomella ADHE could be involved either in ethanol production or assimilation, or both, depending upon environmental conditions. Presence of ADHE in an oxygen-respiring algal mitochondrion and co-expression at ambient oxygen levels with respiratory chain components is unexpected with respect to the view that eukaryotes acquired ADHE genes specifically as an adaptation to an anaerobic lifestyle. PMID:14756315

  16. Corridor use by diverse taxa.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Nick, M.; Browne, David, R.; Cunningham, Alan; Danielson, Brent, J.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Sargent, Sarah; Spira, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Haddad, N.M., D.R. Browne, A. Cunningham, B.J. Danielson, D.J. Levey, S. Sargent, and T. Spira. 2003. Corridor use by diverse taxa. Ecology, 84(3):609-615. One of the most popular approaches for maintaining populations and conserving biodiversity in fragmented landscapes is to retain or create corridors that connect otherwise isolated habitat patches. Working in large-scale, experimental landscapes in which open-habitat patches and corridors were created by harvesting pine forest, we showed that corridors direct movements of different types of species, including butterflies, small mammals, and bird dispersed plants, causing higher movement between connected than between unconnected patches. Corridors directed the movement of all 10 species studied, with all corridor effect sizes >68%. However, this corridor effect was significant for five species, not significant for one species, and inconclusive for four species because of small sample sizes. Although we found no evidence that corridors increase emigration from a patch, our results show that movements of disparate taxa with broadly different life histories and functional roles are directed by corridors.

  17. 18. Readiness Crew Building interior, lower level corridor. This corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Readiness Crew Building interior, lower level corridor. This corridor is located in the southwest side of the building and runs from southeast to northwest; view looking northwest from the exit door at the southeast end. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Bomber Alert Facility S-6, 1300 Alert Road, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  18. 20. Readiness Crew Building interior, upper level corridor. This corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Readiness Crew Building interior, upper level corridor. This corridor runs from northwest to southeast. Photograph taken at the northwest end looking southeast. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Bomber Alert Facility S-6, 1300 Alert Road, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  19. Fracture corridors in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelée, Sébastien; Lamarche, Juliette; Gauthier, Bertrand D. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among fractures, Fracture Corridors (FC) are anomalous structures made of highly persistent fracture clusters having a strong effect on multi-phase fluid flow in the subsurface. While mechanical and geological conditions for diffuse fracture systems are well constrained, FC genetic conditions remain a matter of questioning. FC can be localized in larger structures such as folds and fault zones but recent studies suggest that a large amount of fractures and FC also arise as distributed in the host rock and formed in tabular layers during burial with early rock mechanical differentiation. In addition, while the mechanical stratigraphy is of prime importance for fracture stratigraphy, it is still unknown which factor prevails on FC genesis among the local versus regional stress-state, the host rock mechanical stratigraphy or the sedimentary facies. We present a study of fractures in a 400×300 m wide quarry (Calvisson, SE France) dug in homogeneous marly limestones of Hauterivian age. The quarry exhibits diffuse fractures as well as 16 FC. The aim of this study is to reveal the genetics factor for FC development, their global geometry and internal morphologic variations, but also to clear the impact of fracture corridors on diffuse fracture. For that, we measured >2500 fractures (strike, dip, spacing, filling, aperture, etc.) and studied microstructures in 80 thin sections. We calculated fracture density and acquired LiDAR data with >90 million points with a resolution of 4 to 15mm. Diffuse fractures are organized as two perpendicular sets, a main set NE-SW-trending and minor set NW-SE-trending. The FC have the same trend, but the NW-SE trend prevail on the NE-SW one. The LiDAR acquisition allows to visualize the 3D lateral continuity with corridors with a minimal extension of 30m. We distinguish 4 internal morphologic types in FC, depending on fracture morphology, occurrence of breccia and number of zones. The types may occur in a single FC with a lateral transition

  20. Evolution of the adhE gene product of Escherichia coli from a functional reductase to a dehydrogenase. Genetic and biochemical studies of the mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Membrillo-Hernandez, J; Echave, P; Cabiscol, E; Tamarit, J; Ros, J; Lin, E C

    2000-10-27

    The multifunctional AdhE protein of Escherichia coli (encoded by the adhE gene) physiologically catalyzes the sequential reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol under fermentative conditions. The NH(2)-terminal region of the AdhE protein is highly homologous to aldehyde:NAD(+) oxidoreductases, whereas the COOH-terminal region is homologous to a family of Fe(2+)-dependent ethanol:NAD(+) oxidoreductases. This fusion protein also functions as a pyruvate formate lyase deactivase. E. coli cannot grow aerobically on ethanol as the sole carbon and energy source because of inadequate rate of adhE transcription and the vulnerability of the AdhE protein to metal-catalyzed oxidation. In this study, we characterized 16 independent two-step mutants with acquired and improved aerobic growth ability on ethanol. The AdhE proteins in these mutants catalyzed the sequential oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde and to acetyl-CoA. All first stage mutants grew on ethanol with a doubling time of about 240 min. Sequence analysis of a randomly chosen mutant revealed an Ala-267 --> Thr substitution in the acetaldehyde:NAD(+) oxidoreductase domain of AdhE. All second stage mutants grew on ethanol with a doubling time of about 90 min, and all of them produced an AdhE(A267T/E568K). Purified AdhE(A267T) and AdhE(A267T/E568K) showed highly elevated acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. It therefore appears that when AdhE catalyzes the two sequential reactions in the counter-physiological direction, acetaldehyde dehydrogenation is the rate-limiting step. Both mutant proteins were more thermosensitive than the wild-type protein, but AdhE(A267T/E568K) was more thermal stable than AdhE(A267T). Since both mutant enzymes exhibited similar kinetic properties, the second mutation probably conferred an increased growth rate on ethanol by stabilizing AdhE(A267T). PMID:10922373

  1. Corridors and some ecological and evolutionary consequences of connectivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John L

    2004-07-01

    Abstract - By connecting disjunct patches, corridors may offset the effects of fragmentation by promoting gene flow and population persistence. However, the ultimate effect of corridors on a focal species may hinge upon two considerations: how corridors may affect ecological interactions that impinge upon that species, and how corridors might affect the fixation of novel alleles that ultimately determine fitness and persistence. Using an experimental landscape, I show that corridor-mediated changes in patch shape change seed predation in connected and unconnected patches, and shift the behavior, abundance, and distribution of seed predators. Rodent seed predators removed more seeds in connected patches, arthropod seed predators removed more seeds in rectangular patches, and avian seed predation did not differ due to patch type. Rodent foraging was greater in the interior of connected patches because changes in patch shape influenced risk perceived by rodents while foraging. Ant communities were also affected by changes in patch shape caused by corridors, rather than corridor effects per se. The distribution and abundance of ants differed among edge-rich areas (corridors and wings), edges, and the patch interior. In rectangular patches, fire ants (Solenopsis spp.) had negative impacts on other ant species. By changing the activity of rodents, and the composition of ant communities, corridors may have important impacts on seeds. Bird-dispersed seeds may benefit from increased dispersal among connected patches, but connected patches also have greater predation risk. Using a simulation model, I demonstrate that gene flow between a stable population and a population that experiences local extinction or a reduction in size (e.g. due to natural or anthropogenic disturbance) can dramatically affect fixation of alleles in the stable population. Alone or in concert, frequent disturbance, high rates of movement, and low habitat quality make it more likely that connectivity

  2. Corridors cause differential seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-06-01

    Orrock, John, L., and Ellen I. Damschen. 2005. Corridors cause differential seed predation. Ecol. Apps. 15(3):793-798. Abstract. Corridors that connect disjunct populations are heavily debated in conservation, largely because the effects of corridors have rarely been evaluated by replicated, large-scale studies. Using large-scale experimental landscapes, we found that, in addition to documented positive effects, corridors also have negative impacts on bird-dispersed plants by affecting seed predation, and that overall predation is a function of the seeds primary consumer (rodents or arthropods). Both large-seeded Prunus serotina and small-seeded Rubus allegheniensis experienced greater predation in connected patches. However, P. serotina experienced significantly less seed predation compared to R. allegheniensis in unconnected patches, due to decreased impacts of rodent seed predators on this large-seeded species. Viewed in light of previous evidence that corridors have beneficial impacts by increasing pollination and seed dispersal, this work demonstrates that corridors may have both positive and negative effects for the same plant species at different life stages. Moreover, these effects may differentially affect plant species within the same community: seeds primarily consumed by rodents suffer less predation in unconnected patches. By shifting the impact of rodent and arthropod seed predators, corridors constructed for plant conservation could lead to shifts in the seed bank.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-01-01

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population. PMID:26042511

  4. Transcriptional control of ADH genes in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.Y.; Jeffries, T.W. |

    1999-06-01

    The authors studied the expression of the genes encoding group 1 alcohol dehydrogenases (PsADH1 and PsADH2) in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The cells expressed PsADH1 approximately 10 times higher under oxygen-limited conditions than under fully aerobic conditions when cultivated on xylose. Transcripts of PsADH2 were not detectable under either aeration condition. The authors used a PsADH1::lacZ fusion to monitor PsADH1 expression and found that expression increased as oxygen decreased. The level of PsADH1 transcript was expressed about 10-fold in cells grown in the presence of heme under oxygen-limited conditions. Concomitantly with the induction of PsADH1, PsCYC1 expression was regressed. These results indicate that oxygen availability regulates PsADH1 expression and that regulation may be mediated by heme. The regulation of PsADH2 expression was also examined in other genetic backgrounds. Disruption of PsADH1 dramatically increased PsADH2 expression on nonfermentable carbon sources under fully aerobic conditions, indicating that the expression of PsADH2 is subject to feedback regulation under these conditions.

  5. Corridor Displays in Glass Cabinets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Lee D.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on the increased enthusiasm of college students toward physics following the development of student-activated corridor display units. Includes a listing of displays and comments on student reactions. (CP)

  6. Conserved enhancer and silencer elements responsible for differential Adh transcription in Drosophila cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1990-01-01

    The distal promoter of Adh is differentially expressed in Drosophila tissue culture cell lines. After transfection with an exogenous Adh gene, there was a specific increase in distal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) transcripts in ADH-expressing (ADH+) cells above the levels observed in transfected ADH-nonexpressing (ADH-) cells. We used deletion mutations and a comparative transient-expression assay to identify the cis-acting elements responsible for enhanced Adh distal transcription in ADH+ cells. DNA sequences controlling high levels of distal transcription were localized to a 15-base-pair (bp) region nearly 500 bp upstream of the distal RNA start site. In addition, a 61-bp negative cis-acting element was found upstream from and adjacent to the enhancer. When this silencer element was deleted, distal transcription increased only in the ADH+ cell line. These distant upstream elements must interact with the promoter elements, the Adf-1-binding site and the TATA box, as they only influenced transcription when at least one of these two positive distal promoter elements was present. Internal deletions targeted to the Adf-1-binding site or the TATA box reduced transcription in both cell types but did not affect the transcription initiation site. Distal transcription in transfected ADH- cells appears to be controlled primarily through these promoter elements and does not involve the upstream regulatory elements. Evolutionary conservation in distantly related Drosophila species suggests the importance of these upstream elements in correct developmental and tissue-specific expression of ADH. Images PMID:1694013

  7. Chromatin remodeling during Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 gene activation.

    PubMed

    Verdone, L; Camilloni, G; Di Mauro, E; Caserta, M

    1996-05-01

    We have analyzed at both low and high resolution the distribution of nucleosomes over the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter region in its chromosomal location, both under repressing (high-glucose) conditions and during derepression. Enzymatic treatments (micrococcal nuclease and restriction endonucleases) were used to probe the in vivo chromatin structure during ADH2 gene activation. Under glucose-repressed conditions, the ADH2 promoter was bound by a precise array of nucleosomes, the principal ones positioned at the RNA initiation sites (nucleosome +1), at the TATA box (nucleosome -1), and upstream of the ADR1-binding site (UAS1) (nucleosome -2). The UAS1 sequence and the adjacent UAS2 sequence constituted a nucleosome-free region. Nucleosomes -1 and +1 were destabilized soon after depletion of glucose and had become so before the appearance of ADH2 mRNA. When the transcription rate was high, nucleosomes -2 and +2 also underwent rearrangement. When spheroplasts were prepared from cells grown in minimal medium, detection of this chromatin remodeling required the addition of a small amount of glucose. Cells lacking the ADR1 protein did not display any of these chromatin modifications upon glucose depletion. Since the UAS1 sequence to which Adr1p binds is located immediately upstream of nucleosome -1, Adr1p is presumably required for destabilization of this nucleosome and for aiding the TATA-box accessibility to the transcription machinery. PMID:8628264

  8. Excess polymorphism at the Adh locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, M E; Aguadé, M

    1986-09-01

    The evolutionary history of a region of DNA encompassing the Adh locus is studied by comparing patterns of variation in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, D. simulans. An unexpectedly high level of silent polymorphism in the Adh coding region relative to the 5' and 3' flanking regions in D. melanogaster is revealed by a populational survey of restriction polymorphism using a four-cutter filter hybridization technique as well as by direct sequence comparisons. In both of these studies, a region of the Adh gene encompassing the three coding exons exhibits a frequency of polymorphism equal to that of a 4-kb 5' flanking region. In contrast, an interspecific sequence comparison shows a two-fold higher level of divergence in the 5' flanking sequence compared to the structural locus. Analysis of the patterns of variation suggest an excess of polymorphism within the D. melanogaster Adh locus, rather than lack of polymorphism in the 5' flanking region. An approach is outlined for testing neutral theory predictions about patterns of variation within and between species. This approach indicates that the observed patterns of variation are incompatible with an infinite site neutral model. PMID:3021568

  9. Corridor use by Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenjing; Lin, Liu; Luo, Aidong; Zhang, Li

    2009-06-01

    There are 18 km of Kunming-Bangkok Highway passing through the Mengyang Nature Reserve of Xishuangbanna National Nature Reserve in Yunnan Province, China. From September 2005 to September 2006 the impact of this highway on movement of wild Asian elephants between the eastern and western part of the nature reserve was studied using track transecting, rural surveys and direct monitoring. Our results showed that the number of crossroad corridors used by Asian elephants diminished from 28 to 23 following the construction of the highway. In some areas, the elephant activity diminished or even disappeared, which indicated a change in their home ranges. The utilization rate of artificial corridors was 44%. We also found that elephants preferred artificial corridors that were placed along their original corridors. During the research, wild elephants revealed their adaptation to the highway. They were found walking across the highway road surface many times and for different reasons. We suggest that the highway management bureau should revise their management strategies to mitigate the potential risks caused by elephants on the road for the safety of the public and to protect this endangered species from harm. It is also very important to protect and maintain current Asian elephants corridors in this region. PMID:21392292

  10. Competing interests in a lung cancer with metastasis to the pituitary gland: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion versus diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Gulsin, Gaurav Singh; Jacobs, Madeleine Louisa Bryson; Gohil, Shailesh; Thomas, Adam; Levy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the pituitary gland are rare; cancers that most commonly metastasize to the pituitary are breast and lung cancers. No specific computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging features reliably distinguish primary pituitary masses from metastases. A combination of a detailed clinical assessment together with specialist endocrine and neuroradiology support is essential to make the rare diagnosis of a pituitary metastasis. We present the case of a man with metastatic lung cancer, initially presenting as hypopituitarism. Subtle features in the history, together with neuroimaging findings atypical for pituitary adenomas, provided clues that the diagnosis was one of the pituitary metastases. Treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) with replacement antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was complicated by extreme difficulties in achieving a satisfactory sodium and water balance. This was the result of coexistent DI and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion perpetuated by the patient's primary lung cancer, a phenomenon not previously described in the literature. PMID:27274855

  11. Competing interests in a lung cancer with metastasis to the pituitary gland: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion versus diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Gulsin, Gaurav Singh; Jacobs, Madeleine Louisa Bryson; Gohil, Shailesh; Thomas, Adam; Levy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the pituitary gland are rare; cancers that most commonly metastasize to the pituitary are breast and lung cancers. No specific computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging features reliably distinguish primary pituitary masses from metastases. A combination of a detailed clinical assessment together with specialist endocrine and neuroradiology support is essential to make the rare diagnosis of a pituitary metastasis. We present the case of a man with metastatic lung cancer, initially presenting as hypopituitarism. Subtle features in the history, together with neuroimaging findings atypical for pituitary adenomas, provided clues that the diagnosis was one of the pituitary metastases. Treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) with replacement antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was complicated by extreme difficulties in achieving a satisfactory sodium and water balance. This was the result of coexistent DI and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion perpetuated by the patient's primary lung cancer, a phenomenon not previously described in the literature. PMID:27274855

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering. PMID:26743658

  13. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yasunami, M; Chen, C S; Yoshida, A

    1991-01-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. We isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5' region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role. Images PMID:1881901

  14. ADH-PGE2 interactions in cortical collecting tubule. II. inhibition of Ca and P reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Holt, W F; Lechene, C

    1981-10-01

    In the absence of ADH, microperfused cortical collecting tubules of rabbits reabsorb calcium and phosphorus. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) (200 microunits/ml Pitressin or synthetic arginine vasopressin) inhibits the reabsorption and may promote the secretion of calcium and phosphorus. At 5 min after incubation with ADH, there was a transitory increase in the potential difference and the reabsorption of sodium. The fluxes of calcium and phosphorus, however, showed no significant change from the control values. At 30-50 min after treatment with ADH, the reabsorption of calcium and phosphorus was inhibited and in some tubules calcium and phosphorus were secreted. The removal of vasopressin from the bath or the addition of 10(-5) M meclofenamate in vitro prevented ADH from inhibiting the reabsorption of calcium and phosphorus. Treatment of tubules with 10(-5) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) subsequent to incubation in a medium containing ADH and meclofenamate inhibited the reabsorption or even promoted the secretin of calcium and phosphorus, as did the prolonged incubation with ADH alone. We conclude that cortical collecting tubules reabsorb calcium and phosphorus in the absence of vasopressin and that ADH inhibits calcium and phosphorus reabsorption. Endogenous synthesis of PGE2 may mediate the inhibitory action of ADH, since meclofenamate (an inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins) opposes and exogenous PGE2 mimics ADH. PMID:6947697

  15. Responses of reindeer to water loading, water restriction and ADH.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, M; Eriksson, L

    1977-07-01

    Two female reindeer were hydrated by administration of (10% of b.wt.) water into the rumen. The diuretic response was very fast and strong but the urea and electrolyte excretion were little affected. Dehydration was carried out by not giving the reindeer water for 48 h. This water deprivation caused a loss of up to 20% of their body weight. The urine osmolality did not exceed 840 mosm/kg H2O, although the plasma osmolality rose from 300 to 346 and 368 mosm/kg H2O respectively. The plasma and urine urea concentrations were elevated during dehydration, while the urine urea excretion did not increase. Urine sodium concentration did not increase. When the urine flow rate, after two days of water deprivation, decreased to half of the original, the urine Na+ concentrations, instead of increasing, went down to half of the original. So did the potassium excretion. When ADH was injected intravenously into hydrated animals a dose of 30 mU of ADH was needed to induce antidiuresis or increased excretion of potassium. The resistance to ADH and the low relative thickness of the medulla confirm the limited capacity of reindeer kidney to concentrate urine or to excrete a solute load. On the other hand, reindeer is able rapidly to excrete surplus water without affecting the electrolyte or nitrogen balance. PMID:920204

  16. Effect of organic solvents on the activity and stability of halophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) from Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Alsafadi, Diya; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The effect of various organic solvents on the catalytic activity, stability and substrate specificity of alchohol dehydrogenase from Haloferax volcanii (HvADH2) was evaluated. The HvADH2 showed remarkable stability and catalysed the reaction in aqueous-organic medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH). Tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile were also investigated and adversely affected the stability of the enzyme. High concentration of salt, essential to maintain the enzymatic activity and structural integrity of the halophilic enzyme under standard conditions may be partially replaced by DMSO and MeOH. The presence of organic solvents did not induce gross changes in substrate specificity. DMSO offered a protective effect for the stability of the enzyme at nonoptimal pHs such as 6 and 10. Salt and solvent effects on the HvADH2 conformation and folding were examined through fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence findings were consistent with the activity and stability results and corroborated the denaturing properties of some solvents. The intrinsic tolerance of this enzyme to organic solvent makes it highly attractive to industry. PMID:23179592

  17. Quantitative analysis of RNA produced by slow and fast alleles of Adh in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, C C; Stam, L F

    1988-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) locus (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster in polymorphic on a world-wide basis for two allozymes, Fast and Slow. This study was undertaken to determine whether the well-established difference in ADH protein concentration between the allozymes is due to a difference in mRNA levels. RNA gel blot hybridization and an RNase protection assay were used to quantify ADH mRNA levels. Each method used an Adh null mutant as an internal standard. Several Slow and Fast allele pairs of different geographic origins were analyzed. The results provide strong evidence that the ADH protein concentration difference is not accounted for by RNA level. Images PMID:2455893

  18. Delineation of Cis-Acting Sequences Required for Expression of Drosophila Mojavensis Adh-1

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, C. A.; Curtiss, S. W.; Weaver, J. A.; Sullivan, D. T.

    1992-01-01

    The control of expression of the Adh-1 gene of Drosophila mojavensis has been analyzed by transforming ADH null Drosophila melanogaster hosts with P element constructs which contain D. mojavensis Adh-1 having deletions of different extent in the 5' and 3' ends. Adh-1 expression in the D. melanogaster hosts is qualitatively similar to expression in D. mojavensis, although expression is quantitatively lower in transformants. Deletions of the 5' end indicate that information required for normal temporal and tissue expression in larvae is contained within 70 bp of the transcription start site. However, deletion constructs to -70 are deficient in ovarian nurse cell expression, whereas the additional upstream sequences present in constructs containing deletions to -257 do support expression in the ovary. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence in the -257 to -70 region of Adh-1 of four species: D. mojavensis and Drosophila arizona, which express Adh-1 in the ovary, and Drosophila mulleri and Drosophila navojoa, which do not, has led to the identification of regions of sequence similarity that correlate with ovary expression. One of these bears a striking similarity to a conserved sequence located upstream of the three heat shock genes that have constitutive ovarian expression and may be an ovarian control element. We have identified an aberrant aspect of Adh-1 expression. In transformants which carry an Adh-1 gene without a functional upstream Adh-2 gene Adh-1 expression continues into the adult stage instead of ceasing at the onset of metamorphosis. In transformants with a functional Adh-2 gene, Adh-1 expression ceases in the third larval instar stage and aberrant expression in the adult stage does not occur. PMID:1317314

  19. In vivo roles of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), catalase and the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) in deermice

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, T.; Alderman, J.; Lieber, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    The relative importance of ADH and MEOS for ethanol oxidation in the liver has yet to be elucidated. The discovery of a strain of deermice genetically lacking ADH (ADH-) which can consume ethanol at greater than 50% of the rates seen in deermice having ADH (ADH+) suggested a significant role for non-ADH pathways in vivo. To quantitate contributions of the various pathways, the authors examined first the ethanol oxidation rates with or without 4-methylpyrazole in isolated deermice hepatocytes. 4-Methylpyrazole significantly reduced the ethanol oxidation in both ADH+ and ADH- hepatocytes. The reduction seen in ADH- cells can be applied to correct for the effect of 4-methylpyrazole on non-ADH pathways of ADH+ deermouse hepatocytes. After correction, non-ADH pathways were found to contribute 28% of ethanol metabolism at 10 mM and 52% at 50 mM. When using a different approach namely measurement of the isotope effect, MEOS was calculated to account for 35% at low and about 70% at high blood ethanol concentrations. Thus, they found that two different complementary approaches yielded similar results, namely that non-ADH pathways play a significant role in ethanol oxidation even in the presence of ADH.

  20. Potential negative ecological effects of corridors.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nick M; Brudvig, Lars A; Damschen, Ellen I; Evans, Daniel M; Johnson, Brenda L; Levey, Douglas J; Orrock, John L; Resasco, Julian; Sullivan, Lauren L; Tewksbury, Josh J; Wagner, Stephanie A; Weldon, Aimee J

    2014-10-01

    Despite many studies showing that landscape corridors increase dispersal and species richness for disparate taxa, concerns persist that corridors can have unintended negative effects. In particular, some of the same mechanisms that underlie positive effects of corridors on species of conservation interest may also increase the spread and impact of antagonistic species (e.g., predators and pathogens), foster negative effects of edges, increase invasion by exotic species, increase the spread of unwanted disturbances such as fire, or increase population synchrony and thus reduce persistence. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis to evaluate the prevalence of each of these negative effects. We found no evidence that corridors increase unwanted disturbance or non-native species invasion; however, these have not been well-studied concerns (1 and 6 studies, respectively). Other effects of corridors were more often studied and yielded inconsistent results; mean effect sizes were indistinguishable from zero. The effect of edges on abundances of target species was as likely to be positive as negative. Corridors were as likely to have no effect on antagonists or population synchrony as they were to increase those negative effects. We found 3 deficiencies in the literature. First, despite studies on how corridors affect predators, there are few studies of related consequences for prey population size and persistence. Second, properly designed studies of negative corridor effects are needed in natural corridors at scales larger than those achievable in experimental systems. Third, studies are needed to test more targeted hypotheses about when corridor-mediated effects on invasive species or disturbance may be negative for species of management concern. Overall, we found no overarching support for concerns that construction and maintenance of habitat corridors may result in unintended negative consequences. Negative edge effects may be mitigated by widening

  1. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  2. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation. Progress report, June 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-03-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  3. How Corridors Reduce Indigo Bunting Nest Success.

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Aimee, J.

    2006-08-01

    Abstract: Corridors are a popular strategy to conserve biodiversity and promote gene flow in fragmented landscapes. Corridor effectiveness has been bolstered by the fact that no empirical field studies have shown negative effects on populations or communities. I tested the hypothesis that corridors increase nest predation in connected habitat fragments relative to unconnected fragments. I evaluated this hypothesis in a large-scale experimental system of open-habitat fragments that varied in shape and connectivity. Corridors increased nest predation rates in connected fragments relative to unconnected fragments with lower edge:area ratios. Nest predation rates were similar between connected and unconnected fragments with higher edge:area ratios. These results suggest that the increase in predator activity is largely attributable to edge effects incurred through the addition of a corridor. This is the first field study to demonstrate that corridors can negatively impact animal populations occupying connected fragments.

  4. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  5. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  6. The Adh1 gene of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is expressed during insect colonization and required for full virulence.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; Padilla-Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Esquivel-Naranjo, Ulises; Padilla-Ballesteros, Maria Fernanda; García-Tapia, Adriana; Schrank, Augusto; Salazar-Solís, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Corona, Félix; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica

    2015-03-01

    Zymography of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae grown under various conditions revealed that micro-aerobic growth was associated with increased ADH activity. The major ADH protein, AdhIp, was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and has an estimated molecular weight of 41kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.4. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis allowed the identification and cloning of the gene that encodes this protein, Adh1, as annotated in the M. anisopliae genome database. AdhIp is related to the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR)/zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase-like family and contains conserved ADH sequence motifs, such as the zinc-containing ADH signature, the FAD/NAD binding domain and amino acid residues that are conserved in most microbial ADHs. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Adh1 gene expression occurs at low levels during early Plutella xylostella infection and that the Adh1 gene was primarily expressed at larval death and as mycelia emerge from the insect cuticle before conidiation. Antisense-RNA experiments indicated that NAD(+)-dependent ADH activity was diminished by 20-75% in the transformants, and the transformants that had lower ADH activity showed allyl alcohol resistance, which indicates that reduction in ADH activity also occurs in vivo. Bioassays performed using antisense adh1 transformants, which have lower ADH activity, showed that LC50 values were two to five times higher than the wild-type, indicating that AdhIp is required for full capability of the fungus to penetrate and/or colonize the insect. PMID:25534970

  7. The role of green corridors for wildlife conservation in urban landscape: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, H. A.; Rasidi, M. H.

    2014-02-01

    Green corridors are an attempt to mitigate negative effects of the built environment of cities and towns. The corridors act as conservation for rapidly extreme intervention and development of the urban environment. Most importantly, it enables dispersal movement of animals within city areas. Issues relate to wildlife conservation in urban areas has been studied for many years and thus, the research makes a review for how the green corridors contribute to the conservation of urban wildlife. This study reviews groups of articles in disciplines of urban landscape planning and biology conservation to discuss the relationship between elements of green corridors and urban wildlife dispersal movement behaviour in Malaysian context. Accordingly, this research is purposely studied to give understanding on how green corridors contribute to the animals' ability of moving and dispersing within the built-up areas. In advance, it is found that there are three factors contribute to the capability of colonization among urban wildlife which are individual, physical and social factor. Green corridor has been defined as one of the physical factor that influence urban wildlife behaviour movement. Consequently, safety area indicating to animals species for traversing in any time such as at night can be defined as the primary potential corridor.

  8. Increased Variation in Adh Enzyme Activity in Drosophila Mutation-Accumulation Experiment Is Not Due to Transposable Elements at the Adh Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aquadro, C. F.; Tachida, H.; Langley, C. H.; Harada, K.; Mukai, T.

    1990-01-01

    We present here a molecular analysis of the region surrounding the structural gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in 47 lines of Drosophila melanogaster that have each accumulated mutations for 300 generations. While these lines show a significant increase in variation of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity compared to control lines, we found no restriction map variation in a 13-kb region including the complete Adh structural gene and roughly 5 kb of both 5' and 3' sequences. Thus, the rapid accumulation of ADH activity variation after 28,200 allele generations does not appear to have been due to the mobilization of transposable elements into or out of the Adh structural gene region. PMID:1963870

  9. Fructophilic characteristics of Fructobacillus spp. may be due to the absence of an alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (adhE).

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Tanaka, Naoto; Oikawa, Yo; Okada, Sanae; Dicks, Leon

    2014-04-01

    Fructophilic strains of Leuconostoc spp. have recently been reclassified to a new genus, i.e., Fructobacillus. Members of the genus are differentiated from Leuconostoc spp. by their preference for fructose on growth, requirement of an electron acceptor for glucose metabolism, and the inability to produce ethanol from the fermentation of glucose. In the present study, enzyme activities and genes involved in ethanol production were studied, since this is the key pathway for NAD(+)/NADH cycling in heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Fructobacillus spp. has a weak alcohol dehydrogenase activity and has no acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, whereas both enzymes are active in Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene, adhE, was described in Leuconostoc spp., but not in Fructobacillus spp. These results suggested that, due to the deficiency of the adhE gene, the normal pathway for ethanol production is absent in Fructobacillus spp. This leads to a shortage of NAD(+), and the requirement for an electron acceptor in glucose metabolism. Fructophilic characteristics, as observed for Fructobacillus spp., are thus due to the absence of the adhE gene, and a phenotype that most likely evolved as a result of regressive evolution. PMID:24352296

  10. Long Island Smart Energy Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Mui, Ming

    2015-02-04

    The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) has teamed with Stony Brook University (Stony Brook or SBU) and Farmingdale State College (Farmingdale or FSC), two branches of the State University of New York (SUNY), to create a “Smart Energy Corridor.” The project, located along the Route 110 business corridor on Long Island, New York, demonstrated the integration of a suite of Smart Grid technologies from substations to end-use loads. The Smart Energy Corridor Project included the following key features: -TECHNOLOGY: Demonstrated a full range of smart energy technologies, including substations and distribution feeder automation, fiber and radio communications backbone, advanced metering infrastructure (AM”), meter data management (MDM) system (which LIPA implemented outside of this project), field tools automation, customer-level energy management including automated energy management systems, and integration with distributed generation and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. -MARKETING: A rigorous market test that identified customer response to an alternative time-of-use pricing plan and varying levels of information and analytical support. -CYBER SECURITY: Tested cyber security vulnerabilities in Smart Grid hardware, network, and application layers. Developed recommendations for policies, procedures, and technical controls to prevent or foil cyber-attacks and to harden the Smart Grid infrastructure. -RELIABILITY: Leveraged new Smart Grid-enabled data to increase system efficiency and reliability. Developed enhanced load forecasting, phase balancing, and voltage control techniques designed to work hand-in-hand with the Smart Grid technologies. -OUTREACH: Implemented public outreach and educational initiatives that were linked directly to the demonstration of Smart Grid technologies, tools, techniques, and system configurations. This included creation of full-scale operating models demonstrating application of Smart Grid technologies in business and residential

  11. Mineral exploration, Mahd adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, Ronald G.

    1978-01-01

    Mahd adh Dhahab is the largest of numerous ancient gold mines scattered through the Precambrian shield of Saudi Arabia and the only one with recent production. During the period 1939-54, 765,768 fine ounces of gold and 1,002,029 ounces of silver were produced from the mines by the Saudi Arabian Mining Syndicate. Ore minerals at Mahd adh Dhahab include free gold and silver, tellurides, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in and associated with a system of north-trending quartz veins and quartz veinlet stockworks. Pyrite is a common sulfide gangue mineral. Country rocks are a north dipping sequence of pyroclastic and transported pyroclastic rocks of the Hulayfah Group that are locally highly silicified and potassium-feldspathized. The prime target for this exploration program was a north-trending zone of quartz veins and breccias, faults, alteration, and metalization approximately 400 m wide and 1000 m long. The ancient and recent mine workings are located in the northern part of this zone. Although the quartz veins and alteration cut all lithologies, the major metalization is confined to the intersection of veins and agglomerate. Ten holes were diamond drilled to explore geochemical, geological, and geophysical targets in the area. A significant new zone of metalization was discovered 700 m south of the ancient and recent mine workings and within the same major zone of quartz veins, alteration, and faults. Metalization in this southern mineralized zone is at the intersection of the quartz veins and a distinctive and highly altered agglomerate. The total zone of vein and agglomerate intercept is potentially metalized and comprises a block of ground 40 m thick and 400 m wide along the strike of the agglomerate and projected downdip 250 m. Tonnage of this block is 17.2 million tons. The explored zone, approximately 25 percent of the potentially metalized rock, has a potential resource of 1.1 million tons containing 27 g/t gold and 73 g/t silver.

  12. Transient Overexpression of adh8a Increases Allyl Alcohol Toxicity in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Klüver, Nils; Ortmann, Julia; Paschke, Heidrun; Renner, Patrick; Ritter, Axel P.; Scholz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Fish embryos are widely used as an alternative model to study toxicity in vertebrates. Due to their complexity, embryos are believed to more resemble an adult organism than in vitro cellular models. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the embryo's metabolic capacity. We recently identified allyl alcohol, an industrial chemical, to be several orders of magnitude less toxic to zebrafish embryo than to adult zebrafish (embryo LC50 = 478 mg/L vs. fish LC50 = 0.28 mg/L). Reports on mammals have indicated that allyl alcohol requires activation by alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh) to form the highly reactive and toxic metabolite acrolein, which shows similar toxicity in zebrafish embryos and adults. To identify if a limited metabolic capacity of embryos indeed can explain the low allyl alcohol sensitivity of zebrafish embryos, we compared the mRNA expression levels of Adh isoenzymes (adh5, adh8a, adh8b and adhfe1) during embryo development to that in adult fish. The greatest difference between embryo and adult fish was found for adh8a and adh8b expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that these genes might be required for allyl alcohol activation. Microinjection of adh8a, but not adh8b mRNA led to a significant increase of allyl alcohol toxicity in embryos similar to levels reported for adults (LC50 = 0.42 mg/L in adh8a mRNA-injected embryos). Furthermore, GC/MS analysis of adh8a-injected embryos indicated a significant decline of internal allyl alcohol concentrations from 0.23-58 ng/embryo to levels below the limit of detection (< 4.6 µg/L). Injection of neither adh8b nor gfp mRNA had an impact on internal allyl alcohol levels supporting that the increased allyl alcohol toxicity was mediated by an increase in its metabolization. These results underline the necessity to critically consider metabolic activation in the zebrafish embryo. As demonstrated here, mRNA injection is one useful approach to study the role of candidate enzymes involved in

  13. Transient overexpression of adh8a increases allyl alcohol toxicity in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Ortmann, Julia; Paschke, Heidrun; Renner, Patrick; Ritter, Axel P; Scholz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Fish embryos are widely used as an alternative model to study toxicity in vertebrates. Due to their complexity, embryos are believed to more resemble an adult organism than in vitro cellular models. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the embryo's metabolic capacity. We recently identified allyl alcohol, an industrial chemical, to be several orders of magnitude less toxic to zebrafish embryo than to adult zebrafish (embryo LC50 = 478 mg/L vs. fish LC50 = 0.28 mg/L). Reports on mammals have indicated that allyl alcohol requires activation by alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh) to form the highly reactive and toxic metabolite acrolein, which shows similar toxicity in zebrafish embryos and adults. To identify if a limited metabolic capacity of embryos indeed can explain the low allyl alcohol sensitivity of zebrafish embryos, we compared the mRNA expression levels of Adh isoenzymes (adh5, adh8a, adh8b and adhfe1) during embryo development to that in adult fish. The greatest difference between embryo and adult fish was found for adh8a and adh8b expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that these genes might be required for allyl alcohol activation. Microinjection of adh8a, but not adh8b mRNA led to a significant increase of allyl alcohol toxicity in embryos similar to levels reported for adults (LC50 = 0.42 mg/L in adh8a mRNA-injected embryos). Furthermore, GC/MS analysis of adh8a-injected embryos indicated a significant decline of internal allyl alcohol concentrations from 0.23-58 ng/embryo to levels below the limit of detection (< 4.6 µg/L). Injection of neither adh8b nor gfp mRNA had an impact on internal allyl alcohol levels supporting that the increased allyl alcohol toxicity was mediated by an increase in its metabolization. These results underline the necessity to critically consider metabolic activation in the zebrafish embryo. As demonstrated here, mRNA injection is one useful approach to study the role of candidate enzymes involved in

  14. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Haddad

    2000-06-01

    Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

  15. Influence of ADH1B polymorphism on alcohol use and its subjective effects in a Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Carr, Lucinda G; Foroud, Tatiana; Stewart, Trent; Castelluccio, Peter; Edenberg, Howard J; Li, Ting-Kai

    2002-10-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Genetic polymorphism at the ADH1B locus (old nomenclature ADH2) results in isozymes with quite different catalytic properties. The frequency of the ADH1B*2 allele varies among ethnic groups. ADH1B*2 is most often observed in Asian populations, and has been shown to be protective against alcoholism. The Jewish population has a higher frequency of the ADH1B*2 allele and lower rates of alcohol-related problems as compared to other Caucasian populations. Thus, it would be of interest to determine whether the ADH1B*2 allele is associated with alcohol consumption and its subjective effects in this group. Four groups of Jewish subjects (male and female college-age samples, and male and female general samples) were recruited from the same region of the United States. All subjects completed a questionnaire to delineate alcohol consumption and its subjective consequences. Genotype at the ADH1B locus was determined for each participant. ADH1B*2 allele frequencies were similar for the Jewish college-age and general population samples. Men in both the college-age and general population in the ADH1B*2 group reported more unpleasant reactions following alcohol consumption than men in the ADH1B*1 group. Men in the general population in the ADH1B*2 group drank alcohol less frequently than men who were homozygous ADH1B*1; there was a similar trend among the women. The ADH1B polymorphism is associated with unpleasant reactions after alcohol consumption, and frequency of alcohol consumption in these Jewish samples. PMID:12244546

  16. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly, Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, N.

    1999-01-22

    Study hypothesized that corridors increase patch colonization by Junonia coenia regardless of insects initial distance from patch, as the butterfly is known to move between patches preferentially through corridors. Neither corridor nor distance had significant effect on patch colonization, but significant interaction between presence or absence of corridors and distance. One critical factor is interpatch distance which may determine the relative effectiveness of corridors and other landscape configurations.

  17. Characterization of polymorphisms of genes ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 and relationship to the alcoholism in a Colombian population

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identify and characterize polymorphisms of genes ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 in a Colombian population residing in the city of Bogotá and determine its possible relationship to the alcoholism. Methods: ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2, and CYP2E1 genotypes a population of 148 individuals with non-problematic alcohol and 65 individuals with alcoholism were determined with TaqMan probes and PCR-RFLP. DNA was obtained from peripheral blood white cells. Results: Significant difference was found in family history of alcoholism and use of other psychoactive substances to compare alcoholics with controls. When allelic frequencies for each category (gender) were considered, frequency of A2 allele carriers in ADH2 was found higher in male patients than controls. In women, the relative frequency for c1 allele in CYP2E1 was lower in controls than alcoholics. The ALDH2 locus is monomorphic. No significant differences in allele distributions of the loci examined to compare two populations were observed, however when stratifying the same trend was found that these differences tended to be significant. Conclusions: This study allows us to conclude the positive association between family history of alcoholism and alcoholism suggesting that there is a favourable hereditary predisposition. Since substance dependence requires interaction of multiple genes, the combination of genotypes ADH2 * 2, CYP2E1 * 1 combined with genotype homozygous ALDH2 * 1 found in this study could be leading to the population to a potential risk to alcoholism. PMID:26848198

  18. Noise control in the transportation corridor.

    PubMed

    Manning, C J; Harris, G J

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the opportunities for noise control within the route corridor required for construction of road, rail and other guided transport schemes. It deals with control of noise generation at source, and in the transmission path close to the point of generation. In this way it is possible to control the amount of acoustic power generated, and to absorb part of the radiated power at points of reflection. Purely reflective wayside barriers do little to absorb acoustic energy, merely reflecting it in a different direction. Whilst this has selfish benefits to the receptor in the shadow zone of the barrier, it makes things worse for others on the reflective side of the geometry. The paper therefore considers the options available to the engineer in the design of rolling and sliding interfaces and the use of acoustically absorptive finishes on all surfaces close to the point of noise generation. This includes the running surface itself, structural components, retaining walls, over and under passes, and the inner surfaces of track and wayside barriers. PMID:12631436

  19. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms and alcohol dependence in Mexican and Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.; Liang, Tiebing; Gizer, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is primarily metabolized in the liver by 2 rate-limiting reactions: conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and subsequent conversion of acetaldehyde to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). ADH and ALDH exist in multiple isozymes that differ in their kinetic properties. Notably, polymorphisms within the genes that encode for these isozymes vary in their allele frequencies between ethnic groups, and thus, they have been considered as candidate genes that may differentially influence risk for the development of alcohol dependence across ethnic groups. Objectives and Methods Associations between alcohol dependence and polymorphisms in ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2, were compared in a community sample of Native Americans living on reservations (n=791) and Mexican Americans (n=391) living within the same county. Results Two Mexican Americans and no Native Americans possessed one ALDH2*2 allele. Presence of at least one ADH1B*2 allele was found in 7% of the Native Americans and 13% of the Mexican Americans, but was only associated with protection against alcohol dependence in the Mexican Americans. Presence of at least one ADH1B*3 allele was found in 4% if the Native Americans and 2% of the Mexican Americans, but was associated with protection against alcohol dependence only in the Native Americans. No associations between alcohol dependence and polymorphisms in ADH1C were found. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Polymorphisms in ADH1B are protective against alcoholism in these two populations; however, these findings do not explain the high prevalence of alcoholism in these populations. PMID:22931071

  20. [Changes in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in liver cirrhosis with resistant ascites].

    PubMed

    Marenco, G; Giudici Cipriani, A; Folco, U; Colombo, P; Menardo, G; Cattana, A; Barbetti, V; Rembado, R

    1989-09-01

    The pathogenetic role of ADH in determining hyponatremia in patients with liver cirrhosis is still much debated. Osmotic stimuli are not able to inhibit secretion of ADH in refractory ascites and under such conditions the reduction in effective plasma volume has been put forward as the main cause. Twenty patients with liver cirrhosis and refractory ascites were studied before and during extraction-concentration-reinfusion (ECR) of ascitic fluid by means of Rhodiascit. ADH, renin, aldosterone, blood and urine osmolarity, plasma and urinary concentration of sodium, potassium, chlorine, and the clearance of free water were evaluated. All patients presented high renin values (15.4 +/- 11.7 ng/ml), aldosterone (341 +/- 172 ng/ml), ADH (6.3 +/- 5.2 pg/ml). During ECR, a significant drop was observed in renin (p less than 0.001), aldosterone (p less than 0.001) urinary osmolarity (p less than 0.001) and an equality significant increase in diuresis (p less than 0.001), natriuria (p less than 0.005), kaliuria (p less than 0.001) while ADH presented an irregular course: in 11 cases it remained unchanged, in 3 it fell and in 6 it presented a constant increase. To conclude, data suggest that the diminished filtrate reaching the distal tubule constitutes the greatest cause of the inability to dilute urine in many patients with cirrhosis and that ADH is a permissive rather than a primary factor. PMID:2682381

  1. Effect of ADH on rubidium transport in isolated perfused rat cortical collecting tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, J.A.; Troutman, S.L.

    1986-06-01

    Unidirectional fluxes of 86Rb+ were measured as an indicator of potassium transport in isolated rat cortical collecting tubules perfused and bathed at 38 degrees C with isotonic solutions in which Rb+ replaced K+. Under control conditions the lumen-to-bath flux (Jl----b) was significantly less than the bath-to-lumen flux (Jb----l), indicating net Rb+ secretion. Net secretion increased approximately 180% after addition of 100 microU/ml of arginine vasopressin (ADH) to the bathing solution, due to a rapid and reversible increase in Jb----l from 4.6 +/- 0.8 to 9.0 +/- 1.9 pmol X min-1 X mm-1 with no significant change in Jl----b. The ADH effect was completely inhibited by 2 mM luminal Ba2+. The average transepithelial voltage (Ve) was not significantly different from zero in the control period but became lumen negative (-5 to -10 mV) after ADH. With 10(-5) M amiloride in the lumen Ve was lumen positive (+2 to +4 mV) and was unaltered by ADH or Ba2+, yet ADH produced a significant but attentuated increase in Jb----l with no change in Jl----b. The results indicate that ADH augments net K+ secretion either by an increase in the Ba2+-sensitive conductance of the apical membrane or by an increase in the electrochemical potential driving force for net Rb+ secretion through this pathway.

  2. Large-Scale Habitat Corridors for Biodiversity Conservation: A Forest Corridor in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ramiadantsoa, Tanjona; Ovaskainen, Otso; Rybicki, Joel; Hanski, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity conservation, habitat corridors are assumed to increase landscape-level connectivity and to enhance the viability of otherwise isolated populations. While the role of corridors is supported by empirical evidence, studies have typically been conducted at small spatial scales. Here, we assess the quality and the functionality of a large 95-km long forest corridor connecting two large national parks (416 and 311 km2) in the southeastern escarpment of Madagascar. We analyze the occurrence of 300 species in 5 taxonomic groups in the parks and in the corridor, and combine high-resolution forest cover data with a simulation model to examine various scenarios of corridor destruction. At present, the corridor contains essentially the same communities as the national parks, reflecting its breadth which on average matches that of the parks. In the simulation model, we consider three types of dispersers: passive dispersers, which settle randomly around the source population; active dispersers, which settle only in favorable habitat; and gap-avoiding active dispersers, which avoid dispersing across non-habitat. Our results suggest that long-distance passive dispersers are most sensitive to ongoing degradation of the corridor, because increasing numbers of propagules are lost outside the forest habitat. For a wide range of dispersal parameters, the national parks are large enough to sustain stable populations until the corridor becomes severely broken, which will happen around 2065 if the current rate of forest loss continues. A significant decrease in gene flow along the corridor is expected after 2040, and this will exacerbate the adverse consequences of isolation. Our results demonstrate that simulation studies assessing the role of habitat corridors should pay close attention to the mode of dispersal and the effects of regional stochasticity. PMID:26200351

  3. Steric vs. electronic effects in the Lactobacillus brevis ADH-catalyzed bioreduction of ketones.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Borzęcka, Wioleta; Sattler, Johann H; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Lavandera, Iván; Gotor, Vicente

    2014-01-28

    Lactobacillus brevis ADH (LBADH) is an alcohol dehydrogenase that is commonly employed to reduce alkyl or aryl ketones usually bearing a methyl, an ethyl or a chloromethyl as a small ketone substituent to the corresponding (R)-alcohols. Herein we have tested a series of 24 acetophenone derivatives differing in their size and electronic properties for their reduction employing LBADH. After plotting the relative activity against the measured substrate volumes we observed that apart from the substrate size other effects must be responsible for the activity obtained. Compared to acetophenone (100% relative activity), other small substrates such as propiophenone, α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone, α-hydroxyacetophenone, and benzoylacetonitrile had relative activities lower than 30%, while medium-sized ketones such as α-bromo-, α,α-dichloro-, and α,α-dibromoacetophenone presented relative activities between 70% and 550%. Moreover, the comparison between the enzymatic activity and the obtained final conversions using an excess or just 2.5 equiv. of the hydrogen donor 2-propanol, denoted again deviations between them. These data supported that these hydrogen transfer (HT) transformations are mainly thermodynamically controlled. For instance, bulky α-halogenated derivatives could be quantitatively reduced by LBADH even employing 2.5 equiv. of 2-propanol independently of their kinetic values. Finally, we found good correlations between the IR absorption band of the carbonyl groups and the degrees of conversion obtained in these HT processes, making this simple method a convenient tool to predict the success of these transformations. PMID:24302226

  4. ADH1A variation predisposes to personality traits and substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Stein, Murray B.; Zhang, Huiping; Wei, Feng; Sen, Srijan; Poling, James; Luo, Xingguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Human personality traits are strong predictors or characteristics of many psychiatric disorders including substance dependence (SD). Recently, significant associations between ADH1A and SD have been reported, which led us to investigate the impact of ADH1A variation on personality traits and risk of SD. Methods Five hundred fifty-eight subjects with SD [398 European-Americans (EAs) and 160 African-Americans (AAs)], 517 college students (384 EAs and 133 European-origin Hispanics) and 448 healthy subjects (385 EAs, 48 AAs and 15 European-origin Hispanics) participated. Personality traits were assessed in 247 subjects with SD (179 EAs and 68 AAs), all 517 college students, and 332 healthy subjects (285 EAs, 40 AAs and 7 European-origin Hispanics). The relationships between ADH1A and personality traits were comprehensively examined using stepwise multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), and then decomposed by stepwise analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The relationship between ADH1A and SD was examined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Admixture effects on analyses were considered. Results Overall, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were associated with the diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes and/or alleles of ADH1A in three of four phenotype groups including European-American SD subjects, healthy subjects, and African-American SD subjects (1.7×10-4≤p≤0.055), but not college students. Neuroticism was associated with diplotype, haplotypes and genotypes in African-American SD subjects (0.001≤p≤0.031). In addition, SD was associated with diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes and/or alleles of ADH1A (0.008≤p≤0.060). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the ADH1A variation may contribute to the genetic component of variation in personality traits and SD. PMID:19526455

  5. Primary structure and functional analysis of the lysis genes of Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh.

    PubMed

    Henrich, B; Binishofer, B; Bläsi, U

    1995-02-01

    The lysis genes of the Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh were isolated by complementation of a lambda Sam mutation in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 1,735-bp DNA fragment revealed two adjacent coding regions of 342 bp (hol) and 951 bp (lys) in the same reading frame which appear to belong to a common transcriptional unit. Proteins corresponding to the predicted gene products, holin (12.9 kDa) and lysin (34.7 kDa), were identified by in vitro and in vivo expression of the cloned genes. The phi adh holin is a membrane-bound protein with structural similarity to lysis proteins of other phage, known to be required for the transit of murein hydrolases through the cytoplasmic membrane. The phi adh lysin shows homology with mureinolytic enzymes encoded by the Lactobacillus bulgaricus phage mv4, the Streptococcus pneumoniae phage Cp-1, Cp-7, and Cp-9, and the Lactococcus lactis phage phi LC3. Significant homology with the N termini of known muramidases suggests that phi adh lysin acts by a similar catalytic mechanism. In E. coli, the phi adh lysin seems to be associated with the total membrane fraction, from which it can be extracted with lauryl sarcosinate. Either one of the phi adh lysis proteins provoked lysis of E. coli when expressed along with holins or lysins of phage lambda or Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29. Concomitant expression of the combined holin and lysin functions of phi adh in E. coli, however, did not result in efficient cell lysis. PMID:7836307

  6. A biomimetic vision-based hovercraft accounts for bees' complex behaviour in various corridors.

    PubMed

    Roubieu, Frédéric L; Serres, Julien R; Colonnier, Fabien; Franceschini, Nicolas; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck

    2014-09-01

    Here we present the first systematic comparison between the visual guidance behaviour of a biomimetic robot and those of honeybees flying in similar environments. We built a miniature hovercraft which can travel safely along corridors with various configurations. For the first time, we implemented on a real physical robot the 'lateral optic flow regulation autopilot', which we previously studied computer simulations. This autopilot inspired by the results of experiments on various species of hymenoptera consists of two intertwined feedback loops, the speed and lateral control loops, each of which has its own optic flow (OF) set-point. A heading-lock system makes the robot move straight ahead as fast as 69 cm s(-1) with a clearance from one wall as small as 31 cm, giving an unusually high translational OF value (125° s(-1)). Our biomimetic robot was found to navigate safely along straight, tapered and bent corridors, and to react appropriately to perturbations such as the lack of texture on one wall, the presence of a tapering or non-stationary section of the corridor and even a sloping terrain equivalent to a wind disturbance. The front end of the visual system consists of only two local motion sensors (LMS), one on each side. This minimalistic visual system measuring the lateral OF suffices to control both the robot's forward speed and its clearance from the walls without ever measuring any speeds or distances. We added two additional LMSs oriented at +/-45° to improve the robot's performances in stiffly tapered corridors. The simple control system accounts for worker bees' ability to navigate safely in six challenging environments: straight corridors, single walls, tapered corridors, straight corridors with part of one wall moving or missing, as well as in the presence of wind. PMID:24615558

  7. Final report: Prototyping a combustion corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Rutland, Christopher J.; Leach, Joshua

    2001-12-15

    The Combustion Corridor is a concept in which researchers in combustion and thermal sciences have unimpeded access to large volumes of remote computational results. This will enable remote, collaborative analysis and visualization of state-of-the-art combustion science results. The Engine Research Center (ERC) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison partnered with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, and several other universities to build and test the first stages of a combustion corridor. The ERC served two important functions in this partnership. First, we work extensively with combustion simulations so we were able to provide real world research data sets for testing the Corridor concepts. Second, the ERC was part of an extension of the high bandwidth based DOE National Laboratory connections to universities.

  8. 45 CFR 153.540 - Compliance with risk corridors standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CARE ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards Related to the Risk Corridors Program § 153.540...

  9. 24. View looking north up corridor from Charles Street Bridge. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View looking north up corridor from Charles Street Bridge. Providence, Providence Co., RI. Sec. 4116, mp 186.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  10. 1. HEBRONVILLE MILL COMPLEX ADJACENT TO NORTHEAST CORRIDOR. HEBRONVILLE, BRISTOL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. HEBRONVILLE MILL COMPLEX ADJACENT TO NORTHEAST CORRIDOR. HEBRONVILLE, BRISTOL CO., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 193.75. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  11. 23. Looking N up corridor from Chick Interlocking Tower. Boston, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Looking N up corridor from Chick Interlocking Tower. Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 227.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. 3. DODGEVILLE MILL COMPLEX ADJACENT TO NORTHEAST CORRIDOR DODGEVILLE, BRISTOL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DODGEVILLE MILL COMPLEX ADJACENT TO NORTHEAST CORRIDOR DODGEVILLE, BRISTOL CO., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 195.55. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. 76 FR 3695 - Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Corridor, Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Corridor, Virginia AGENCY... Statement (EIS) in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Transportation for potential transportation improvements along the Interstate 64 corridor in Virginia. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John...

  14. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the right-of...) Transportation and utility corridor studies previously developed by user groups; and (9) Engineering...

  15. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the right-of...) Transportation and utility corridor studies previously developed by user groups; and (9) Engineering...

  16. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... activities located within the proposed right-of-way corridor; (7) Social and economic impacts of the right-of...) Transportation and utility corridor studies previously developed by user groups; and (9) Engineering...

  17. 76 FR 65561 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... corridor transportation activities and research to apply for participation in the Multistate Corridor... Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Research... implementation for research programs and projects to improve multimodal transportation system management...

  18. Interior, looking corridor connecting 511 to 515 into Medical Research ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking corridor connecting 511 to 515 into Medical Research Library in 516. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Central Service Building, North of Building No. 511, East of corridor connecting Building 511 to Building 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Neurite outgrowth resistance to rho kinase inhibitors in PC12 Adh cell.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua; Hou, Xiaolin; Tao, Tingrui; Lv, Xiaoman; Zhang, Luyong; Duan, Weigang

    2015-05-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor is a promising agent for neural injury disorders, which mechanism is associated with neurite outgrowth. However, neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell was treated with ROCK inhibitors for a longer time. PC12 Adh cells were treated with ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or NGF for different durations. Neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell exposed to Y27632 (33 µM) for 3 or more days, but not happen when exposed to nerve growth factor (NGF, 100 ng/mL). The gene expression in the PC12 Adh cells treated with Y27632 (33 µM) or NGF (100 ng/mL) for 2 or 4 days was assayed by gene microarray, and the reliability of the results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Cluster analysis proved that the gene expression profile of PC12 Adh cell treated with Y27632 for 4 days was different from that treated with Y27632 for 2 days and those treated with NGF for 2 and 4 days, respectively. Pathway analysis hinted that the neurite outgrowth resistance could be associated with up-regulation of inflammatory pathways, especially rno04610 (complement and coagulation cascades), and down-regulation of cell cycle pathways, especially rno04110. PMID:25571866

  20. Isolation and Identification of Genes Activating Uas2-Dependent Adh2 Expression in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Donoviel, M. S.; Young, E. T.

    1996-01-01

    Two cis-acting elements have been identified that act synergistically to regulate expression of the glucose-repressed alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) gene. UAS1 is bound by the trans-activator Adr1p. UAS2 is thought to be the binding site for an unidentified regulatory protein. A genetic selection based on a UAS2-dependent ADH2 reporter was devised to isolate genes capable of activating UAS2-dependent transcription. One set of UAS2-dependent genes contained SPT6/CRE2/SSN20. Multicopy SPT6 caused improper expression of chromosomal ADH2. A second set of UAS2-dependent clones contained a previously uncharacterized open reading frame designated MEU1 (Multicopy Enhancer of UAS2). A frame shift mutation in MEU1 abolished its ability to activate UAS2-dependent gene expression. Multicopy MEU1 expression suppressed the constitutive ADH2 expression caused by cre2-1. Disruption of MEU1 reduced endogenous ADH2 expression about twofold but had no effect on cell viability or growth. No homologues of MEU1 were identified by low-stringency Southern hybridization of yeast genomic DNA, and no significant homologues were found in the sequence data bases. A MEU1/β-gal fusion protein was not localized to a particular region of the cell. MEU1 is linked to PPR1 on chromosome XII. PMID:8807288

  1. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  2. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  3. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  4. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  5. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  6. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  7. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  8. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  9. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  10. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  11. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  12. 46 CFR 190.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 190.10-30 Section 190.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent,...

  13. 46 CFR 92.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 92.10-30 Section 92.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 92.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or...

  14. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  15. 46 CFR 72.10-30 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 72.10-30 Section 72.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 72.10-30 Dead end corridors. (a) Dead end corridors, or the equivalent, more than...

  16. 45 CFR 153.530 - Risk corridors data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Risk corridors data requirements. 153.530 Section... ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards Related to the Risk Corridors Program § 153.530 Risk...

  17. 45 CFR 153.530 - Risk corridors data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Risk corridors data requirements. 153.530 Section... ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards Related to the Risk Corridors Program § 153.530 Risk...

  18. Exceptionally High Levels of Restriction Site Polymorphism in DNA near the Maize Adh1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Mitrick A.; Strommer, Judith N.; Freeling, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Restriction maps have been prepared for the chromosomal region near seven biochemically and genetically distinct maize alcohol dehydrogenase-1 (Adh1) alleles using a small cDNA probe for Adh1. Five restriction sites spanning about 4 kb in and near the Adh1 transcription unit appear identical in all seven alleles. Outside this conserved region, variation in restriction site position is the rule. Six of the seven alleles are distinguishable, and the alleles appear to fall into four groups. The DNA flanking the 1S-type alleles seems to share no restriction site homology with the DNA near the 1F-type alleles. Several hypotheses are put forward to explain how such high levels of polymorphism could have arisen in a species that has been domesticated for only about 10,000 years. PMID:17246173

  19. Which alcohol use disorder criteria contribute to the association of ADH1B with alcohol dependence?

    PubMed

    Hart, Amy B; Lynch, Kevin G; Farrer, Lindsay; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R

    2016-07-01

    Although alcohol dependence (AD) is approximately 50% heritable, little is known about how specific genetic loci affect AD risk. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified highly significant associations between two population-specific functional variants in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) and AD in African-Americans (AAs; rs2066702) and European-Americans (EAs; rs1229984). In the current study, we determined which specific diagnostic criteria contributed to the observed associations of ADH1B SNPs with AD. Our analysis included both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. We also investigated the relationship of ADH1B variants to the maximum number of drinks consumed in a 24-hour period (MaxDrinks), a presumed intermediate phenotype of AD. We found that, although all criteria made strong individual contributions to the associations, the largest contributions came from those reflecting neuroadaptation: tolerance (rs2066702) and withdrawal (rs1229984). Overall, evidence for association with DSM-5 criteria was slightly stronger than for DSM-IV criteria. For rs2066702, results were similar for DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria. However, the most significant DSM-5 criterion associated with rs1229984 was alcohol-related social/interpersonal problems. Both ADH1B variants were associated with MaxDrinks, a measure of innate tolerance, and MaxDrinks mediated the associations between ADH1B and alcohol outcomes. We replicated the findings for rs2066702 and tolerance in an independent sample of AAs. Taken together, these results suggest that variation in ADH1B affects the adaptation to heavy drinking, highlighting population-specific differences in genetic risk for AUD. They also suggest that the revisions reflected in DSM-5 AUD may enhance the utility of that diagnosis for gene finding. PMID:25828809

  20. EhADH112 Is a Bro1 Domain-Containing Protein Involved in the Entamoeba histolytica Multivesicular Bodies Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Cecilia; García-Rivera, Guillermina; López-Reyes, Israel; Mendoza, Leobardo; González-Robles, Arturo; Herranz, Silvia; Vincent, Olivier; Orozco, Esther

    2012-01-01

    EhADH112 is an Entamoeba histolytica Bro1 domain-containing protein, structurally related to mammalian ALIX and yeast BRO1, both involved in the Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT)-mediated multivesicular bodies (MVB) biogenesis. Here, we investigated an alternative role for EhADH112 in the MVB protein trafficking pathway by overexpressing 166 amino acids of its N-terminal Bro1 domain in trophozoites. Trophozoites displayed diminished phagocytosis rates and accumulated exogenous Bro1 at cytoplasmic vesicles which aggregated into aberrant complexes at late stages of phagocytosis, probably preventing EhADH112 function. Additionally, the existence of a putative E. histolytica ESCRT-III subunit (EhVps32) presumably interacting with EhADH112, led us to perform pull-down experiments with GST-EhVps32 and [35S]-labeled EhADH112 or EhADH112 derivatives, confirming EhVps32 binding to EhADH112 through its Bro1 domain. Our overall results define EhADH112 as a novel member of ESCRT-accessory proteins transiently present at cellular surface and endosomal compartments, probably contributing to MVB formation during phagocytosis. PMID:22500103

  1. Corridors Increase Plant Species Richness at Large Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock,John L.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2006-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the largest threats to biodiversity. Landscape corridors, which are hypothesized to reduce the negative consequences of fragmentation, have become common features of ecological management plans worldwide. Despite their popularity, there is little evidence documenting the effectiveness of corridors in preserving biodiversity at large scales. Using a large-scale replicated experiment, we showed that habitat patches connected by corridors retain more native plant species than do isolated patches, that this difference increases over time, and that corridors do not promote invasion by exotic species. Our results support the use of corridors in biodiversity conservation.

  2. Remote sensing impact on corridor selection and placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F. J.; Sellman, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    Computer-aided corridor selection techniques, utilizing digitized data bases of socio-economic, census, and cadastral data, and developed for highway corridor routing are considered. Land resource data generated from various remote sensing data sources were successfully merged with the ancillary data files of a corridor selection model and prototype highway corridors were designed using the combined data set. Remote sensing derived information considered useful for highway corridor location, special considerations in geometric correction of remote sensing data to facilitate merging it with ancillary data files, and special interface requirements are briefly discussed.

  3. Activity of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenases on Benzyl Alcohols and Benzaldehydes. Characterization of ADH1 from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Transition State Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Suresh; Park, Doo-Hong; Plapp, Bryce V.

    2009-01-01

    The substrate specificities of yeast alcohol dehydrogenases I and II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SceADH1 and SceADH2) and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis (ScbADH1) were studied. For this work, the gene for the S. carlsbergensis ADH1 was cloned, sequenced and expressed. The amino acid sequence of ScbADH1 differs at four positions as compared to SceADH1, including substitutions of two glutamine residues with glutamic acid residues, and has the same sequence as the commercial yeast enzyme, which apparently is prepared from S. carlsbergensis. The electrophoretic mobilities of ScbADH1, SceADH2 and commercial ADH are similar. The kinetics and specificities of ScbADH1 and SceADH1 acting on branched, long-chain and benzyl alcohols are very similar, but the catalytic efficiency of SceADH2 is about 10 to 100-fold higher on these substrates. A three dimensional structure of SceADH1 shows that the substrate binding pocket has Met-270, whereas SceADH2 has Leu-270, which allows larger substrates to bind. The reduction of a series of p-substituted benzaldehydes catalyzed by SceADH2 is significantly enhanced by electron-withdrawing groups, whereas the oxidation of p-substituted aromatic alcohols may be only slightly affected by the substituents. The substituent effects on catalysis generally reflect the effects on the equilibrium constant for the reaction, where electron-withdrawing substituents favor alcohol. The results are consistent with a transition state that is electronically similar to the alcohol, supporting previous results obtained with commercial yeast ADH. PMID:19022233

  4. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-09-14

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms. PMID:25232272

  5. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired. PMID:20739429

  6. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  7. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  8. Evaluation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter for protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, K Michael; DaSilva, Nancy A

    2005-04-30

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter (P(ADH2)) is repressed several hundred-fold in the presence of glucose; transcription is initiated once the glucose in the medium is exhausted. The promoter can thus be utilized for effective regulation of recombinant gene expression in S. cerevisiae without the addition of an inducer. To evaluate this promoter in the absence of plasmid copy number and stability variations, the P(ADH2)-lacZ cassette was integrated into the yeast chromosomes. The effects of medium composition, glucose concentration and cultivation time on promoter derepression and expression level were investigated. Maximum protein activity was obtained after 48 h of growth in complex YPD medium containing 1% glucose. The widely used S. cerevisiae GAL1 and CUP1 promoters both require the addition of an inducer [galactose and copper(II) ion, respectively] before regulated genes will be expressed. The strengths of these three different promoters were compared for cells containing one copy of an integrated lacZ gene under their control. The ADH2 promoter was superior for all induction strategies investigated. PMID:15849781

  9. Effects of ADH on the apical and basolateral membranes of toad urinary bladder epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P J; Leader, J P

    1993-11-01

    Short-circuited urinary bladders from Bufo marinus were supported on their apical surface by an agar mounting method and impaled with microelectrodes via their basolateral membrane. This arrangement provided stable and long-lasting impalements of epithelial cells and yielded reliable membrane potentials and voltage divider ratios (Ra/Rb), where Ra and Rb are apical and basolateral membrane resistances respectively. The membrane potential under short-circuit conditions (Vsc) was -51.4 +/- 2.2 mV (n = 59), while under open-circuit conditions apical membrane potential (Va) and basolateral membrane potential (Vb) were -31.0 +/- 2.4 and 59.5 +/- 2.4 mV, respectively. This yields a "well-shaped" potential profile across the toad urinary bladder, where Va is inversely related to the rate of transport, Isc. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) produced a hyperpolarisation of Vsc and Vb but had no significant effect on Va. In addition, Ra/Rb was significantly increased by ADH (4.6 +/- 0.5 to 10.2 +/- 3.6). Calculation of individual membrane resistances following the addition of amiloride showed that ADH produced a parallel decrease in Ra and Rb membrane resistance, with the observed increase in Ra/Rb being due to a greater percentage decrease in Rb than in Ra. The ability of ADH to effect parallel changes in apical and basolateral membrane conductance helps to maintain a constant cellular volume despite an increase in transepithelial transport. PMID:8309781

  10. Interactions between ADH and prostaglandins in isolated erythrocyte-perfused rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberthal, W.; Vasilevsky, M.L.; Valeri, C.R.; Levinsky, N.G.

    1987-02-01

    Interactions between antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and renal prostaglandins in the regulation of sodium reabsorption and urinary concentrating ability were studied in isolated erythrocyte-perfused rat kidneys (IEPK). In this model, hemodynamic characteristics are comparable to those found in vivo, and tubular morphology is preserved throughout the period of perfusion. (Deamino)-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP) markedly reduced fractional sodium excretion (FE/sub Na/) in the IEPK. After indomethacin, FE/sub Na/ fell still further. In the absence of dDAVP indomethacin had no effect on sodium excretion. dDAVP increased urine osmolality in the IEPK. When prostaglandin synthesis was blocked with indomethacin, urinary osmolality increased further. In isolated kidneys perfused without erythrocytes (IPK), dDAVP decreased FE/sub Na/ from 14.5 +/- 1.8% to 9.6 +/- 1.2%. dDAVP increased urine osmolality only modestly in the IPK and indomethacin did not increase concentrating ability further. Thus the IEPK (unlike the IPK) can excrete markedly hypertonic urine in response to ADH. ADH also enhances tubular reabsorption of sodium in the IEPK. Prostaglandins inhibit both these actions of ADH but do not directly affect sodium excretion in the absence of the hormone. Prostaglandius were measured by radioimmunoassay.

  11. Suppression of ADH during water immersion in normal man. [antidiuretic hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Pins, D. S.; Miller, M.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to ascertain whether diuresis induced by immersion is medicated by an inhibition of ADH. Immersion resulted in a progressive decrease in ADH excretion from 80.1 + or - 7 (SEM) to 37.3 + or - 6.3 microU/min (P less than 0.025). Cessation of immersion was associated with a marked increase in ADH from 37.3 + or - 6.3 microU/min to 176.6 + or - 72.6 microU/min during the recovery hour (P less than 0.05). Concomitant with these changes, urine osmolality decreased significantly beginning as early as the initial hour of immersion from 1044 + or - 36 to 542 + or - 66 mosmol/kg H2O during the final hour of immersion (P less than 0.001). These findings are consistent with the earlier suggestion that suppression of ADH release contributes to enhanced free water clearance in hydrated subjects undergoing immersion.

  12. Site mitigation issues along the Alameda Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Ripaldi, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Alameda Corridor is a consolidated railroad link between the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and the regional and national rail systems linking the nation. A joint Environmental Impacts Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) was prepared for the project. The Final EIS was issued in February 1996, and a record of decision was issued in May, 1996. Various Phase 1 and Phase 2 Environmental Site Assessments have provided extensive historical documentation of environmental contamination in the vicinity of the Alameda Corridor Transportation Project. A Site Mitigation Master Plan provides guidance and direction for the clean-up activities. Samples will be analyzed for metals, PCB`s TRPH, BTEX, and VOCs.

  13. Oceanic Situational Awareness Over the Pacific Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfeld, Israel

    2005-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans impose a limitation on traffic capacity for a given corridor, given the projected traffic growth over the Pacific Ocean. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. This study uses Federal Aviation Administration data from a single day for the Pacific Corridor to analyze traffic loading to be used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from the aircraft to the satellites.

  14. Corridors affect plants, animals, and their interactions in fragmented landscapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tewksbury, Joshua, J.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Haddad, Nick, M.; Sargent, Sarah; Orrock, John, L.; Weldon, Aimee; Danielson, Brent, J.; Brinkerhoff, Jory; Damschen, Ellen, I.; Townsend, Patricia

    2002-10-01

    Tewksbury, J.J., D.J. Levey, N.M. Haddad, S. Sargent, J.L. Orrock, A. Weldon, B.J. Danielson, J. Brinkerhoff, E.I. Damschen, and P. Townsend. 2002. Corridors affect plants, animals, and their interactions in fragmented landscapes. PNAS 99(20):12923-12926. Among the most popular strategies for maintaining populations of both plants and animals in fragmented landscapes is to connect isolated patches with thin strips of habitat, called corridors. Corridors are thought to increase the exchange of individuals between habitat patches, promoting genetic exchange and reducing population fluctuations. Empirical studies addressing the effects of corridors have either been small in scale or have ignored confounding effects of increased habitat area created by the presence of a corridor. These methodological difficulties, coupled with a paucity of studies examining the effects of corridors on plants and plant-animal interactions, have sparked debate over the purported value of corridors in conservation planning. We report results of a large-scale experiment that directly address this debate. We demonstrate that corridors not only increase the exchange of animals between patches, but also facilitate two key plant-animal interactions: pollination and seed dispersal. Our results show that the beneficial effects of corridors extend beyond the area they add, and suggest that increased plant and animal movement through corridors will have positive impacts on plant populations and community interactions in fragmented landscapes.

  15. The Adh-related gene of Drosophila melanogaster is expressed as a functional dicistronic messenger RNA: multigenic transcription in higher organisms.

    PubMed

    Brogna, S; Ashburner, M

    1997-04-15

    Essentially all eukaryotic cellular mRNAs are monocistronic, and are usually transcribed individually. Two tandemly arranged Drosophila genes, alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and Adh-related (Adhr), are transcribed as a dicistronic transcript. From transcripts initiated from the Adh promoter, two classes of mRNA are accumulated, one is monocistronic and encodes Adh alone, the other is dicistronic and includes the open reading frames of both Adh and Adhr. The dicistronic transcript is found in polysomes and the Adhr protein product is detected by antibody staining. We present evidence that the accumulation of the dicistronic mRNA is controlled at the level of the 3' end processing. PMID:9155028

  16. Alcohol Consumption Mediates the Relationship Between ADH1B and DSM-IV Alcohol Use Disorder and Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Bari; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Aharonovich, Efrat; Greenstein, Eliana; Frisch, Amos; Weizman, Abraham; Spivak, Baruch; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel; Hasin, Deborah S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A single nucleotide variation in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) gene, rs1229984, produces an ADH1B enzyme with faster acetaldehyde production. This protective variant is associated with lower alcohol consumption and lower risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Based on the premise that faster ADH1B kinetics decreases alcohol consumption, we formally tested if the association between ADH1B variant rs1229984 and AUDs occurs through consumption. We also tested whether the association between rs1 229984 and each of the 11 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), AUD criteria occurs through consumption. Method: A total of 1,130 lifetime drinkers from an Israeli household sample were assessed with a structured interview and genotyped for rs1229984 (protective allele frequency = 0.28). Logistic regression evaluated the association between rs1229984 and each phenotype (AUDs, 11 individual DSM-IV criteria). For phenotypes significantly related to rs1229984, the effect through consumption was tested with logistic regression and bootstrapping. Results: ADH1B rs1229984 was significantly associated with AUDs and six criteria, with odds ratios ranging from 1.32 to 1.96. The effect through consumption was significant for these relationships, explaining 23%–74% of the total ADH1B effect. Conclusions: This is the first study to show that ADH1B rs1229984 is related to 6 of the 11 DSM-IV AUD criteria and that alcohol consumption explained a significant proportion of these associations and the association of ADH1B with AUDs. Better understanding of the relationship between ADH1B and the DSM-IV AUD criteria, including effects through consumption, will enhance our understanding of the etiologic model through which AUDs can occur. PMID:24988262

  17. Polymorphism of Alcohol Metabolizing Gene ADH3 Predisposes to Development of Alcoholic Pancreatitis in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Divya; Negi, Tajwar S.; Upadhyay, Ghanshyam; Choudhuri, Gourdas

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: Genetic factors regulating alcohol metabolism could predispose in developing alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP). Studies revealed that alcohol could be metabolized by both ways, oxidative and non-oxidative. The main oxidative pathway includes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and cytochrome P450 enzyme. We investigated the association of polymorphisms in these enzymes with the alcoholic pancreatitis in the north Indian population. Method: Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP; n = 72), tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP; n = 75), alcoholic controls (AC; n = 40), and healthy controls (HC; n = 100) were included in the study. Blood samples were collected from the subjects in EDTA coated vials. DNA was extracted and genotyping for ADH3, ALDH2, and CYP2E1 was done by PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction—restriction fragment length polymorphism). The products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Result: The frequency distribution of ADH3*1/*1 genotype was significantly higher in ACP group (59.7%) compared with TCP (38.7%), HC (42%), and AC (37.5%) and was found to be associated with increased risk of alcoholic pancreatitis. There was no statistically significant difference between the frequency distribution of ADH3*1/*1, ADH3*1/*2, and ADH3*2/*2 genotypes between TCP and HC or healthy alcoholics. ALDH2 gene was monomorphic in our population, and the frequencies for CYP2E1 intron 6 Dra I polymorphism were comparable in all the four groups. Conclusion: This study shows that carriers of ADH3*1/*1 individuals consuming alcohol are at higher risk for alcoholic pancreatitis than those with other genotypes such as ADH3*1/*2 and ADH3*2/*2. PMID:26734614

  18. The ADH7 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Vanillin-Inducible and Enables mRNA Translation Under Severe Vanillin Stress.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh T M; Iwaki, Aya; Izawa, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the major phenolic aldehyde compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass and acts as a potent fermentation inhibitor to repress the growth and fermentative ability of yeast. Vanillin can be reduced to its less toxic form, vanillyl alcohol, by the yeast NADPH-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenases, Adh6 and Adh7. However, there is little information available regarding the regulation of their gene expression upon severe vanillin stress, which has been shown to repress the bulk translation activity in yeast cells. Therefore, in this study, we investigated expression patterns of the ADH6 and ADH7 genes in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. We found that although both genes were transcriptionally upregulated by vanillin stress, they showed different protein expression patterns in response to vanillin. Expression of Adh6 was constitutive and gradually decreased under vanillin stress, whereas expression of Adh7 was inducible, and, importantly, occurred under severe vanillin stress. The null mutants of ADH6 or ADH7 genes were hypersensitive to vanillin and reduced vanillin less efficiently than the wild type, confirming the importance of Adh6 and Adh7 in vanillin detoxification. Additionally, we demonstrate that the ADH7 promoter is vanillin-inducible and enables effective protein synthesis even under severe vanillin stress, and it may be useful for the improvement of vanillin-tolerance and biofuel production efficiency via modification of yeast gene expression in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. PMID:26696995

  19. The ADH7 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Vanillin-Inducible and Enables mRNA Translation Under Severe Vanillin Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trinh T. M.; Iwaki, Aya; Izawa, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the major phenolic aldehyde compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass and acts as a potent fermentation inhibitor to repress the growth and fermentative ability of yeast. Vanillin can be reduced to its less toxic form, vanillyl alcohol, by the yeast NADPH-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenases, Adh6 and Adh7. However, there is little information available regarding the regulation of their gene expression upon severe vanillin stress, which has been shown to repress the bulk translation activity in yeast cells. Therefore, in this study, we investigated expression patterns of the ADH6 and ADH7 genes in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. We found that although both genes were transcriptionally upregulated by vanillin stress, they showed different protein expression patterns in response to vanillin. Expression of Adh6 was constitutive and gradually decreased under vanillin stress, whereas expression of Adh7 was inducible, and, importantly, occurred under severe vanillin stress. The null mutants of ADH6 or ADH7 genes were hypersensitive to vanillin and reduced vanillin less efficiently than the wild type, confirming the importance of Adh6 and Adh7 in vanillin detoxification. Additionally, we demonstrate that the ADH7 promoter is vanillin-inducible and enables effective protein synthesis even under severe vanillin stress, and it may be useful for the improvement of vanillin-tolerance and biofuel production efficiency via modification of yeast gene expression in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. PMID:26696995

  20. Complexity Analysis of Traffic in Corridors-in-the-Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min; Zelinski, Shannon Jean

    2010-01-01

    The corridors-in-the-sky concept imitates the highway system in ground transportation. The benefit expected from a corridor relies on its capability of handling high density traffic with negligible controller workload, the acceptance of extra fuel or distance, and the complexity reduction in underlying sectors. This work evaluates a selected corridor from these perspectives through simulations. To examine traffic inside the corridor, a corridor traffic simulation tool that can resolve conflicts is developed using C language. Prescribed conflict resolution maneuvers mimic corridor users behaviors and conflict resolution counts measure complexity. Different lane options and operational policies are proposed to examine their impacts on complexity. Fuel consumption is calculated and compared for corridor traffic. On the other hand, to investigate the complexity of non-corridor traffic in underlying sectors, the existing Airspace Concept Evaluation System tool is utilized along with the Automated Airspace Concept tool. The number of conflict resolutions is examined and treated as the complexity measurement. The results show heavy traffic can be managed with low complexity for a historical traffic schedule simulated with appropriate operational policies and lane options. For instance, with 608 flights and peak aircraft count of 100, only 84 actions need to be taken in a 24-hour period to resolve the conflicts for an 8-lane corridor. Compared with the fuel consumptions with great circle trajectories, the simulation of corridor traffic shows that the total extra fuel for corridor flights is 26,373 gallons, or 2.76%, which is 0.38% less than flying filed flight plans. Without taking climb and descent portions of corridor traffic, the complexity of underlying sectors is reduced by 17.71%. However the climb and descent portions will eliminate the reduction and the overall complexity of sectors is actually increased by 9.14%.

  1. High diversity and no significant selection signal of human ADH1B gene in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADH1B is one of the most studied human genes with many polymorphic sites. One of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1229984, coding for the Arg48His substitution, have been associated with many serious diseases including alcoholism and cancers of the digestive system. The derived allele, ADH1B*48His, reaches high frequency only in East Asia and Southwest Asia, and is highly associated with agriculture. Micro-evolutionary study has defined seven haplogroups for ADH1B based on seven SNPs encompassing the gene. Three of those haplogroups, H5, H6, and H7, contain the ADH1B*48His allele. H5 occurs in Southwest Asia and the other two are found in East Asia. H7 is derived from H6 by the derived allele of rs3811801. The H7 haplotype has been shown to have undergone significant positive selection in Han Chinese, Hmong, Koreans, Japanese, Khazak, Mongols, and so on. Methods In the present study, we tested whether Tibetans also showed evidence for selection by typing 23 SNPs in the region covering the ADH1B gene in 1,175 individuals from 12 Tibetan populations representing all districts of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Multiple statistics were estimated to examine the gene diversities and positive selection signals among the Tibetans and other populations in East Asia. Results The larger Tibetan populations (Qamdo, Lhasa, Nagqu, Nyingchi, Shannan, and Shigatse) comprised mostly farmers, have around 12% of H7, and 2% of H6. The smaller populations, living on hunting or recently switched to farming, have lower H7 frequencies (Tingri 9%, Gongbo 8%, Monba and Sherpa 6%). Luoba (2%) and Deng (0%) have even lower frequencies. Long-range haplotype analyses revealed very weak signals of positive selection for H7 among Tibetans. Interestingly, the haplotype diversity of H7 is higher in Tibetans than in any other populations studied, indicating a longer diversification history for that haplogroup in Tibetans. Network analysis on the long-range haplotypes revealed

  2. WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ON FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING EAST - Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, 1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. 'Africa Alive Corridors': Forging a new future for the people of Africa by the people of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix Toteu, Sadrack; Malcolm Anderson, John; de Wit, Maarten

    2010-11-01

    ' Africa Alive Corridors' (AAC) addresses major stewardship goals in Africa through a selection of 20 heritage Corridors (varying from 1000 to 4000 km in length and 50 to 100 km wide). These include more than 400 heritage nodes (World Heritage Sites, Biosphere Reserves, biodiversity hotspots, Geoparks, etc.). AAC tracks Africa's journey from around 4 billion years ago to the present day through these chronologically sequenced Corridors. And so, the 4-billion-year autobiography of the continent is told. It encompasses the geological, biological and anthropological/cultural history of Africa's 54 nations - a (hi-) story without borders. The wealth of scientific and biographical knowledge archived in this network of Corridors tells the story of continental drift, mega-geohazards, climate variability and change, and the origin and extinction of biodiversity; and includes our human roots, culture and spirituality, our impact on the Earth and our potential to influence its future. In telling this story of Africa, new research avenues will be discovered and new learning methodologies will be experienced and developed and shared. In this way, the AAC provide loci along which the eight UN-Millennium Development Goals may be readily and realistically achieved. In concert, they can form the basis for a new collective endeavour - of Pan African Earth Stewardship Science. In this, the final - 2010 - phase of IYPE (the International Year of Planet Earth), we aim to make a start at bringing the ' Africa Alive Corridors' into real-life context. Whilst the concept of the Corridors has been formulated and presented at various international forums—most recently in Africa at the launch of IYPE in Arusha, Tanzania, in May 2008—here we present in brief their conceptual framework, and summarize the rationale behind the selection of the 20 African Corridors. Then, we describe, for the first time, how the AAC concept might evolve. To achieve the latter, we focus on an exploratory

  4. Evaluating landscape options for corridor restoration between giant panda reserves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; McShea, William J; Wang, Dajun; Li, Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Hao; Lu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda movements caused by

  5. Population dynamics of Microtus pennsylvanicus in corridor-linked patches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffman, C.J.; Nichols, J.D.; Pollock, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Corridors have become a key issue in the discussion of conservation planning: however, few empirical data exist on the use of corridors and their effects on population dynamics. The objective of this replicated, population level, capture-re-capture experiment on meadow voles was to estimate and compare population characteristics of voles between (1) corridor-linked fragments, (2) isolated or non-linked fragments, and (3) unfragmented areas. We conducted two field experiments involving 22600 captures of 5700 individuals. In the first, the maintained corridor study, corridors were maintained at the time of fragmentation, and in the second, the constructed corridor study, we constructed corridors between patches that had been fragmented for some period of time. We applied multistate capture-recapture models with the robust design to estimate adult movement and survival rates, population size, temporal variation in population size, recruitment, and juvenile survival rates. Movement rates increased to a greater extent on constructed corridor-linked grids than on the unfragmented or non-linked fragmented grids between the pre- and post-treatment periods. We found significant differences in local survival on the treated (corridor-linked) grids compared to survival on the fragmented and unfragmented grids between the pre- and post-treatment periods. We found no clear pattern of treatment effects on population size or recruitment in either study. However, in both studies, we found that unfragmented grids were more stable than the fragmented grids based on lower temporal variability in population size. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental study demonstrating that corridors constructed between existing fragmented populations can indeed cause increases in movement and associated changes in demography, supporting the use of constructed corridors for this purpose in conservation biology.

  6. Estimating the Environmental Costs of Africa's Massive "Development Corridors".

    PubMed

    Laurance, William F; Sloan, Sean; Weng, Lingfei; Sayer, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-21

    In sub-Saharan Africa, dozens of major "development corridors" have been proposed or are being created to increase agricultural production [1-4], mineral exports [5-7], and economic integration. The corridors involve large-scale expansion of infrastructure such as roads, railroads, pipelines, and port facilities and will open up extensive areas of land to new environmental pressures [1, 4, 8]. We assessed the potential environmental impacts of 33 planned or existing corridors that, if completed, would total over 53,000 km in length and crisscross much of the African continent. We mapped each corridor and estimated human occupancy (using the distribution of persistent night-lights) and environmental values (endangered and endemic vertebrates, plant diversity, critical habitats, carbon storage, and climate-regulation services) inside a 50-km-wide band overlaid onto each corridor. We also assessed the potential for each corridor to facilitate increases in agricultural production. The corridors varied considerably in their environmental values, and many were only sparsely populated. Because of marginal soils or climates, some corridors appear to have only modest agricultural potential. Collectively, the corridors would bisect over 400 existing protected areas and could degrade a further ~1,800 by promoting habitat disruption near or inside the reserves. We conclude that many of the development corridors will promote serious and largely irreversible environmental changes and should proceed only if rigorous mitigation and protection measures can be employed. Some planned corridors with high environmental values and limited agricultural benefits should possibly be cancelled altogether. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26628009

  7. Evaluating Landscape Options for Corridor Restoration between Giant Panda Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; McShea, William J.; Wang, Dajun; Li, Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Hao; Lu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda movements caused by

  8. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  9. DRYAD and ADH: Further comments on explaining age-related differences in memory.

    PubMed

    Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Smyth, Andrea C

    2016-02-01

    Recently, Smyth and Naveh-Benjamin (2016) questioned some of the main assumptions/hypotheses of DRYAD (or density of representations yields age-related deficits), a global-deficit model of aging and memory judgments (Benjamin, 2010; Benjamin et al., 2012). Smyth and Naveh-Benjamin (2016) provided empirical evidence that seems incompatible with DRYAD, but that fits the associative deficit hypothesis (ADH; Naveh-Benjamin, 2000), 1 specific-deficit theoretical view. In response, Aaron Benjamin (2016) offered a discussion of the complementary strengths and weaknesses of the DRYAD and the ADH, and the potential ways they might work together. We agree with many of his comments, but are not convinced that DRYAD is able to explain basic replicable empirical evidence of the type mentioned in Smyth and Naveh-Benjamin (2016). We discuss the reasons why we are not fully convinced by the demonstration of DRYAD's simulation of results presented in Benjamin (2016) and then present an implementation of ADH in a computationally based age-related impaired neuromodulation approach that was shown to simulate the basic empirical results of age-related associative memory deficits. We also discuss the issues of parsimony of theories and the appropriate type of representation, in the context of global versus specific deficits theoretical views. Finally, we show that the ADH's take on the distinction between items and associations has been adopted by some global computational models of memory. We believe that considerations of the above issues and others raised by Benjamin (2016) can lead to fruitful discussions that will benefit both theory development and existing knowledge of aging and memory. PMID:26866588

  10. Differential interactions of promoter elements in stress responses of the Arabidopsis Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R; Jacobs, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1994-01-01

    The Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase, EC 1.1.1.1.) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. can be induced by dehydration and cold, as well as by hypoxia. A 1-kb promoter fragment (CADH: -964 to +53) is sufficient to confer the stress induction and tissue-specific developmental expression characteristics of the Adh gene to a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Deletion mapping of the 5' end and site-specific mutagenesis identified four regions of the promoter essential for expression under the three stress conditions. Some sequence elements are important for response to all three stress treatments, whereas others are stress specific. The most critical region essential for expression of the Arabidopsis Adh promoter under all three environmental stresses (region IV: -172 to -141) contains sequences homologous to the GT motif (-160 to -152) and the GC motif (-147 to -144) of the maize Adh1 anaerobic responsive element. Region III (-235 to -172) contains two regions shown by R.J. Ferl and B.H. Laughner ([1989] Plant Mol Biol 12: 357-366) to bind regulatory proteins; mutation of the G-box-1 region (5'-CCACGTGG-3', -216 to -209) does not affect expression under uninduced or hypoxic conditions, but significantly reduces induction by cold stress and, to a lesser extent, by dehydration stress. Mutation of the other G-box-like sequence (G-box-2: 5'-CCAAGTGG-3', -193 to -182) does not change hypoxic response and affects cold and dehydration stress only slightly. G-box-2 mutations also promote high levels of expression under uninduced conditions. Deletion of region I (-964 to -510) results in increased expression under uninduced and all stress conditions, suggesting that this region contains a repressor binding site. Region II (-510 to -384) contains a positive regulatory element and is necessary for high expression levels under all treatments. PMID:7972489

  11. Soil Quality and the Solar Corridor Crop System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solar corridor crop system (SCCS) is designed for improved crop productivity based on highly efficient use of solar radiation by integrating row crops with drilled or solid-seeded crops in broad strips (corridors) that also facilitate establishment of cover crops for year-round soil cover. The S...

  12. 45 CFR 153.530 - Risk corridors data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Risk corridors data requirements. 153.530 Section 153.530 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards...

  13. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  14. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  15. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  16. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  17. 46 CFR 108.161 - Dead end corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead end corridors. 108.161 Section 108.161 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.161 Dead end corridors. No dead end...

  18. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine Highway Corridors. 393.3 Section 393.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 AMERICA'S MARINE HIGHWAY PROGRAM § 393.3 Marine Highway Corridors. (a) Summary. The purpose of this section is to designate specific routes as Marine...

  19. Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

    2011-08-01

    Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

  20. Courtyard. Left wall is corridor from 511 to 515. Right ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Courtyard. Left wall is corridor from 511 to 515. Right wall is the south side of 517. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. STREAM CORRIDOR RESTORATION AND ITS POTENTIAL TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed stream corridors are being degraded by anthropogenic impacts of increased flow from runoff, sediment loading from erosion and contaminants such as nitrate from non-point sources. One solution is to restore stream corridors with bank stabilization and energy dissipation ...

  2. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine Highway Corridors. 393.3 Section 393.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 AMERICA'S MARINE HIGHWAY PROGRAM § 393.3 Marine Highway Corridors. (a) Summary. The purpose of this section is to...

  3. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine Highway Corridors. 393.3 Section 393.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 AMERICA'S MARINE HIGHWAY PROGRAM § 393.3 Marine Highway Corridors. (a) Summary. The purpose of this section is to...

  4. 46 CFR 393.3 - Marine Highway Corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine Highway Corridors. 393.3 Section 393.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 AMERICA'S MARINE HIGHWAY PROGRAM § 393.3 Marine Highway Corridors. (a) Summary. The purpose of this section is to...

  5. Abort-once-around entry corridor analysis program document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    The abort once around entry target corridor analysis program (ABECAP) was studied. The allowable range of flight path angles at entry interface for acceptable entry trajectories from a shuttle abort once around (AOA) situation was established. The solutions thus determined may be shown as corridor plots of entry interface flight path angle versus range from entry interface (EI) to the target.

  6. Soil quality and the solar corridor crop system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solar corridor crop system (SCCS) is designed for improved crop productivity based on highly efficient use of solar radiation by integrating row crops with drilled or solid-seeded crops in broad strips (corridors) that also facilitate establishment of cover crops for year-round soil cover. The S...

  7. A corridor on the first floor of the building, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A corridor on the first floor of the building, looking west, shows some of the typical interior finishes in this section. At the end of the hallway, the corridor turns right after entering the next adjacent structure - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Electronics Laboratory Building (E Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  8. An experimental test of whether habitat corridors affect pollen transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Patricia A.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2005-02-01

    Abstract. Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are thought to be diminished when habitat patches are joined by a corridor. A key assumption is that corridors facilitate exchange rates of organisms between otherwise isolated patches. If the organisms are pollinators, corridors may be important for maintaining genetically viable populations of the plants that they pollinate. We tested the hypothesis that corridors increase the movement of insect pollinators into patches of habitat and thereby increase pollen transfer for two species of plants, one pollinated by butterflies (Lantana camara) and the other by bees and wasps (Rudbeckia hirta). We worked in an experimental landscape consisting of 40 greater than or equal to 1-ha patches of early-successional habitat in a matrix of forest. Within each of eight experimental units, two patches were connected by a corridor (150 X 25 m), and three were not. Patch shape varied to control for the area added by the presence of a corridor. Differences in patch shape also allowed us to test alternative hypotheses of how corridors might function. The Traditional Corridor Hypothesis posits that corridors increase immigration and emigration by functioning as movement conduits between patches. The Drift Fence Hypothesis posits that corridors function by ‘‘capturing’’ organisms dispersing through the matrix, redirecting them into associated habitat patches. Using fluorescent powder to track pollen, we found that pollen transfer by butterflies between patches connected by a corridor was significantly higher than between unconnected patches (all values mean plus or minus 1 SE: 59% plus or minus 9.2% vs. 25% plus or minus 5.2% of flowers receiving pollen). Likewise, pollen transfer by bees and wasps was significantly higher between connected patches than between unconnected patches (30% plus or minus 4.2% vs. 14.5% plus or minus 2.2%). These results support the Traditional Corridor Hypothesis. There was little support, however

  9. The Relationship between CmADHs and the Diversity of Volatile Organic Compounds of Three Aroma Types of Melon (Cucumis melo).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao; Jin, Yazhong; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays an important role in aroma volatile compounds synthesis of plants. In this paper, we tried to explore the relationship between CmADHs and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in oriental melon. Three different aroma types of melon were used as materials. The principle component analysis of three types of melon fruit was conducted. We also measured the CmADHs expression level and enzymatic activities of ADH and alcohol acyl-transferase (AAT) on different stages of fruit ripening. An incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of substrates and inhibitor (4-MP, 4-methylpyrazole) on CmADHs expression, ADH activity, and the main compounds of oriental melon. The results illustrated that ethyl acetate, hexyl acetate (E,Z)-3,6-nonadien-1-ol and 2-ethyl-2hexen-1-ol were the four principal volatile compounds of these three types of melon. AAT activity was increasing with fruit ripening, and the AAT activity in CH were the highest, whereas ADH activity peaked on 32 DAP, 2 days before maturation, and the ADH activity in CB and CG were higher than that in CH. The expression pattern of 11 CmADH genes from 24 to 36 day after pollination (DAP) was found to vary in three melon varieties. CmADH4 was only expressed in CG and the expression levels of CmADH3 and CmADH12 in CH and CB were much higher than that in CG, and they both peaked 2 days before fruit ripening. Ethanol and 4-MP decreased the reductase activity of ADH, the expression of most CmADHs and ethyl acetate or hexyl acetate contents of CB, except for 0.1 mM 4-MP, while aldehyde improved the two acetate ester contents. In addition, we found a positive correlation between the expression of CmADH3 and CmADH12 and the key volatile compound of CB. The relationship between CmADHs and VOCs synthesis of oriental melon was discussed. PMID:27445845

  10. The Relationship between CmADHs and the Diversity of Volatile Organic Compounds of Three Aroma Types of Melon (Cucumis melo)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao; Jin, Yazhong; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays an important role in aroma volatile compounds synthesis of plants. In this paper, we tried to explore the relationship between CmADHs and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in oriental melon. Three different aroma types of melon were used as materials. The principle component analysis of three types of melon fruit was conducted. We also measured the CmADHs expression level and enzymatic activities of ADH and alcohol acyl-transferase (AAT) on different stages of fruit ripening. An incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of substrates and inhibitor (4-MP, 4-methylpyrazole) on CmADHs expression, ADH activity, and the main compounds of oriental melon. The results illustrated that ethyl acetate, hexyl acetate (E,Z)-3,6-nonadien-1-ol and 2-ethyl-2hexen-1-ol were the four principal volatile compounds of these three types of melon. AAT activity was increasing with fruit ripening, and the AAT activity in CH were the highest, whereas ADH activity peaked on 32 DAP, 2 days before maturation, and the ADH activity in CB and CG were higher than that in CH. The expression pattern of 11 CmADH genes from 24 to 36 day after pollination (DAP) was found to vary in three melon varieties. CmADH4 was only expressed in CG and the expression levels of CmADH3 and CmADH12 in CH and CB were much higher than that in CG, and they both peaked 2 days before fruit ripening. Ethanol and 4-MP decreased the reductase activity of ADH, the expression of most CmADHs and ethyl acetate or hexyl acetate contents of CB, except for 0.1 mM 4-MP, while aldehyde improved the two acetate ester contents. In addition, we found a positive correlation between the expression of CmADH3 and CmADH12 and the key volatile compound of CB. The relationship between CmADHs and VOCs synthesis of oriental melon was discussed. PMID:27445845

  11. Designing large-scale conservation corridors for pattern and process.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Mathieu; Cowling, Richard M; Lombard, Amanda T; Knight, Andrew T; Kerley, Graham I H

    2006-04-01

    A major challenge for conservation assessments is to identify priority areas that incorporate biological patterns and processes. Because large-scale processes are mostly oriented along environmental gradients, we propose to accommodate them by designing regional-scale corridors to capture these gradients. Based on systematic conservation planning principles such as representation and persistence, we identified large tracts of untransformed land (i.e., conservation corridors) for conservation that would achieve biodiversity targets for pattern and process in the Subtropical Thicket Biome of South Africa. We combined least-cost path analysis with a target-driven algorithm to identify the best option for capturing key environmental gradients while considering biodiversity targets and conservation opportunities and constraints. We identified seven conservation corridors on the basis of subtropical thicket representation, habitat transformation and degradation, wildlife suitability, irreplaceability of vegetation types, protected area networks, and future land-use pressures. These conservation corridors covered 21.1% of the planning region (ranging from 600 to 5200 km2) and successfully achieved targets for biological processes and to a lesser extent for vegetation types. The corridors we identified are intended to promote the persistence of ecological processes (gradients and fixed processes) and fulfill half of the biodiversity pattern target. We compared the conservation corridors with a simplified corridor design consisting of a fixed-width buffer along major rivers. Conservation corridors outperformed river buffers in seven out of eight criteria. Our corridor design can provide a tool for quantifying trade-offs between various criteria (biodiversity pattern and process, implementation constraints and opportunities). A land-use management model was developed to facilitate implementation of conservation actions within these corridors. PMID:16903115

  12. Meander dynamics in a changing river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdaleno, Fernando; Fernández-Yuste, José A.

    2011-07-01

    In the first decades of the twentieth century, the Ebro River was the Iberian channel with the most active fluvial dynamics and the most remarkable spatial-temporal evolution. Its meandering typology, the dimensions of its floodplain (with an average width > 3.0 km), and the singularities of its flow regime produced a especially interesting set of river functions from the perspective of the fluvial geomorphology of the largest Mediterranean channels. The largest dynamics of the Ebro River are concentrated along the meandering profile of the central sector. During the twentieth century, this sector experienced a large alteration of its geomorphological structure. We present here an analysis of this evolution through the cartographic study of a long segment of the river (~ 250 km) in 1927, 1956, and 2003. The study is focused on a wide set of geomorphic parameters and indicators that represent the forms of the meander belt, its lateral dynamics, and the overall mobility of the river corridor. The results of the analysis show a large transformation of the meander dynamics, as well as a massive loss of the river lateral activity, most of which occurred in the second half of the twentieth century. This intense geomorphological transformation becomes visible in (i) the large reduction of the bankfull width and the active channel area; (ii) the decrease in the rate of lateral channel migration; (iii) the loss of channel activity; and (iv) the large reduction of coincidence of the active channel areas. However, the most traditional form parameters (i.e., wavelength, amplitude, radius of curvature, and meander length) do not show significant differences throughout the time interval analysed. The study reinforces the necessity of integrating a wide range of dynamic indicators, which may complement the classical form parameters and represent the real functioning of the river corridor, in the geomorphological analyses of meander dynamics. This work also shows the most

  13. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M; Keyes, Katherine M; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect and parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes 'maximum drinks in a day' (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variables, in an Israeli sample of adult household residents (n = 1143) evaluated between 2007 and 2009. Childhood adversity and absence of the protective ADH1B-rs1229984 A allele were associated with greater mean Maxdrinks (mean differences: 1.50; 1.13, respectively) and AUD severity (mean ratios: 0.71; 0.27, respectively). In addition, childhood adversity moderated the ADH1B-rs1229984 effect on Maxdrinks (P < 0.01) and AUD severity (P < 0.05), in that there was a stronger effect of ADH1B-rs1229984 genotype on Maxdrinks and AUD severity among those who had experienced childhood adversity compared with those who had not. ADH1B-rs1229984 impacts alcohol metabolism. Therefore, among those at risk for greater consumption, e.g. those who experienced childhood adversity, ADH1B-rs1229984 appears to have a stronger effect on alcohol consumption and consequently on risk for AUD symptom severity. Evidence for the interaction of genetic vulnerability and early life adversity on alcohol-related phenotypes provides further insight into the complex relationships between genetic and environmental risk factors. PMID:24164917

  14. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L.; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J.; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect, parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes “maximum drinks in a day” (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variables, in an Israeli sample of adult household residents (n=1,143) evaluated between 2007–2009. Childhood adversity and absence of the protective ADH1B-rs1229984 A allele were associated with greater mean Maxdrinks [Mean Differences: 1.50; 1.13 respectively] and AUD severity [Mean Ratios: 0.71; 0.27 respectively]). In addition, childhood adversity moderated the ADH1B-rs1229984 effect on Maxdrinks (p<0.01) and AUD severity (p<0.05), in that there was a stronger effect of ADH1B-rs1229984 genotype on Maxdrinks and AUD severity among those who had experienced childhood adversity compared to those who had not. ADH1B-rs1229984 impacts alcohol metabolism. Therefore, among those at risk for greater consumption, e.g., those who experienced childhood adversity, ADH1B-rs1229984 appears to have a stronger effect on alcohol consumption and consequently on risk for AUD symptom severity. Evidence for the interaction of genetic vulnerability and early life adversity on alcohol-related phenotypes provides further insight into the complex relationships between genetic and environmental risk factors. PMID:24164917

  15. Western Energy Corridor -- Energy Resource Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Roberts; Michael Hagood

    2011-06-01

    The world is facing significant growth in energy demand over the next several decades. Strategic in meeting this demand are the world-class energy resources concentrated along the Rocky Mountains and northern plains in Canada and the U.S., informally referred to as the Western Energy Corridor (WEC). The fossil energy resources in this region are rivaled only in a very few places in the world, and the proven uranium reserves are among the world's largest. Also concentrated in this region are renewable resources contributing to wind power, hydro power, bioenergy, geothermal energy, and solar energy. Substantial existing and planned energy infrastructure, including refineries, pipelines, electrical transmission lines, and rail lines provide access to these resources.

  16. Requirements Definition for ORNL Trusted Corridors Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Smith, Cyrus M; DeNap, Frank A; White, James D; Gross, Ian G; Gorman, Bryan L; Hively, Lee M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-02-01

    The ORNL Trusted Corridors Project has several other names: SensorNet Transportation Pilot; Identification and Monitoring of Radiation (in commerce) Shipments (IMR(ic)S); and Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP). The project involves acquisition and analysis of transportation data at two mobile and three fixed inspection stations in five states (Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington DC). Collaborators include the State Police organizations that are responsible for highway safety, law enforcement, and incident response. The three states with fixed weigh-station deployments (KY, SC, TN) are interested in coordination of this effort for highway safety, law enforcement, and sorting/targeting/interdiction of potentially non-compliant vehicles/persons/cargo. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is interested in these deployments, as a Pilot test (SETCP) to identify Improvised Nuclear Devices (INDs) in highway transport. However, the level of DNDO integration among these state deployments is presently uncertain. Moreover, DHS issues are considered secondary by the states, which perceive this work as an opportunity to leverage these (new) dual-use technologies for state needs. In addition, present experience shows that radiation detectors alone cannot detect DHS-identified IND threats. Continued SETCP success depends on the level of integration of current state/local police operations with the new DHS task of detecting IND threats, in addition to emergency preparedness and homeland security. This document describes the enabling components for continued SETCP development and success, including: sensors and their use at existing deployments (Section 1); personnel training (Section 2); concept of operations (Section 3); knowledge discovery from the copious data (Section 4); smart data collection, integration and database development, advanced algorithms for multiple sensors, and

  17. 78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ...) for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor... currently has no passenger rail service. This corridor is part of the South Central High Speed Rail Corridor and is a federally-designated high-speed rail (HSR) corridor. ODOT envisions the Tulsa--Oklahoma...

  18. Biosynthetic burden and plasmid burden limit expression of chromosomally integrated heterologous genes (pdc, adhB) in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; York, S.W.; Yomano, L.P.; Pineda, V.L.; Davis, F.C.; Shelton, J.C.; Ingram, L.O.

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have shown an unexpectedly high nutrient requirement for efficient ethanol production by ethanologenic recombinants of Escherichia coli B such as LY01 which contain chromosomally integrated Zymomonas mobilis genes (pdc, adhB) encoding the ethanol pathway. The basis for this requirement has been identified as a media-dependent effect on the expression of the Z. mobilis genes rather than a nutritional limitation. Ethanol production was substantially increased without additional nutrients simply by increasing the level of pyruvate decarboxylase activity. This was accomplished by adding a multicopy plasmid containing pdc alone (but not adhB alone) to strain LY01, and by adding multicopy plasmids which express pdc and adhB from strong promoters. New strong promoters were isolated from random fragments of Z. mobilis DNA and characterized but were not used to construct integrated biocatalysts. These promoters contained regions resembling recognition sites for 3 different E. coli sigma factors: {sigma}{sup 70}, {sigma}{sup 38}, and {sigma}{sup 28}. The most effective plasmid-based promoters for fermentation were recognized by multiple sigma factors, expressed both pdc and adhB at high levels, and produced ethanol efficiently while allowing up to 80% reduction in complex nutrients as compared to LY01. The ability to utilize multiple sigma factors may be advantageous to maintain the high levels of PDC and ADH needed for efficient ethanol production throughout batch fermentation.

  19. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  20. Role of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during acute simulated weightlessness in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Sandler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes, designed to induce central blood volume shifts in ten cardiac and one heart-lung transplant recipients, to assess the contribution of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during the initial acute phase of exposure to weightlessness. Each subject underwent 15 min of a sitting-control period (C) followed by 30 min of 6 deg headdown tilt (T) and 30 min of resumed sitting (S). Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions were taken at 0 and 15 min of C; 5, 15, and 30 min of T; and 5, 15, and 30 min of S. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded every two min. Plasma osmolality was not altered by posture changes. Mean left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased (P less than 0.05) from 90 ml in C to 106 ml in T and returned to 87 ml in S. Plasma ADH was reduced by 20 percent (P less than 0.05) with T, and returned to control levels with S. These responses were similar in six normal cardiac-innervated control subjects. These data may suggest that cardiac volume receptors are not the primary mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute central volume shifts in man.

  1. Regulation of human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH7: importance of an AP-1 site.

    PubMed

    Kotagiri, S; Edenberg, H J

    1998-07-01

    The structure and function of the human alcohol dehydrogenase 7 (ADH7) promoter were analyzed. A promoter fragment extending to bp -232 functioned well in H4IIE-C3, CV-1, and HeLa cells, whereas the region extending further upstream to bp -799 had no significant effect on activity. We identified cis-acting elements in the proximal 232 bp and examined their effect on promoter activity. Mutation of site A, where c-Jun bound, caused a drastic decrease in the promoter activity in H4IIE-C3 and CV-1 cells, suggesting that AP-1 plays an important role in the regulation of ADH7. Mutation of site B also caused a large drop in promoter activity in both cell lines; C/EBPalpha can bind to this site, but because the site affects activity approximately equally in CV-1 cells that lack C/EBPalpha and in H4IIE-C3 cells that contain low levels, other proteins are likely to play the major roles in vivo. Mutation of site C, where C/EBP bound and c-Jun bound weakly, had different effects in the two cell lines: in H4IIE-C3 cells, the site C mutation did not significantly increase promoter activity, whereas in CV-1 cells, which lack C/EBPalpha, it led to a doubling of activity. Surprisingly, cotransfection of the wild-type promoter with C/EBPa or C/EBPbeta led to a decrease in promoter activity, which might in part explain the lack of activity of ADH7 in adult liver. PMID:9703017

  2. A Practical Map-Analysis Tool for Detecting Potential Dispersal Corridors

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, William Walter; Hoffman, Forrest M; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann

    2005-01-01

    We describe the Pathway Analysis Through Habitat (PATH) tool, which can predict the location of potential corridors of animal movement between patches of habitat within any map. The algorithm works by launching virtual entities that we call 'walkers' from each patch of habitat in the map, simulating their travel as they journey through land cover types in the intervening matrix, and finally arrive at a different habitat 'island.' Each walker is imbued with a set of user-specified habitat preferences that make its walking behavior resemble a particular animal species. Because the tool operates in parallel on a supercomputer, large numbers of walkers can be efficiently simulated. The importance of each habitat patch as a source or a sink for a species is calculated, consistent with existing concepts in the metapopulation literature. The manipulation of a series of contrived artificial landscapes demonstrates that the location of potential dispersal corridors and relative source and sink importance among patches can be purposefully altered in expected ways. Finally, potential dispersal corridors are predicted among remnant woodlots within three actual landscape maps.

  3. Inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase after 2-propanol exposure in different geographic races of Drosophila mojavensis: lack of evidence for selection at the Adh-2 locus.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Edward; Reed, Laura K; Markow, Therese A

    2005-03-15

    High frequencies of the fast allele of alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (Adh-2F) are found in populations of Drosophila mojavensis that inhabit the Baja California peninsula (race BII) whereas the slow allele (Adh-2S) predominates at most other localities within the species' geographic range. Race BII flies utilize necrotic tissue of pitaya agria cactus (Stenocereus gummosus) which contains high levels of 2-propanol, whereas flies from most other localities utilize different cactus hosts in which 2-propanol levels are low. To test if 2-propanol acts as a selective force on Adh-2 genotype, or whether some other yet undetermined genetic factor is responsible, mature males of D. mojavensis lines derived from the Grand Canyon (race A) and Santa Catalina Island (race C), each with individuals homozygous for Adh-2F and Adh-2S, were exposed to 2-propanol for 24 h and ADH-2 specific activity was then determined on each genotype. Flies from five other localities homozygous for either the fast or slow allele also were examined. Results for all reported races of D. mojavensis were obtained. 2-propanol exposure inhibited ADH-2 specific activity in both genotypes from all localities, but inhibition was significantly less in two populations of race BII flies homozygous for Adh-2F. When F/F and S/S genotypes in flies from the same locality were compared, both genotypes showed high 2-propanol inhibition that was not statistically different, indicating that the F/F genotype alone does not provide a benefit against the inhibitory effects of 2-propanol. ADH-1 activity in female ovaries was inhibited less by 2-propanol than ADH-2. These results do not support the hypothesis that 2-propanol acts as a selective factor favoring the Adh-2F allele. PMID:15726639

  4. Road-corridor planning in the EIA procedure in Spain. A review of case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Loro, Manuel [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Transport Research Centre Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Arce, Rosa M. [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Transport Research Centre Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Ortega, Emilio [Transport Research Centre Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Department of Construction and Rural Roads, Forestry Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s and others

    2014-01-15

    The assessment of different alternatives in road-corridor planning must be based on a number of well-defined territorial variables that serve as decision making criteria, and this requires a high-quality preliminary environmental assessment study. In Spain the formal specifications for the technical requirements stipulate the constraints that must be considered in the early stages of defining road corridors, but not how they should be analyzed and ranked. As part of the feasibility study of a new road definition, the most common methodology is to establish different levels of Territorial Carrying Capacity (TCC) in the study area in order to summarize the territorial variables on thematic maps and to ease the tracing process of road-corridor layout alternatives. This paper explores the variables used in 22 road-construction projects conducted by the Ministry of Public Works that were subject to the Spanish EIA regulation and published between 2006 and 2008. The aim was to evaluate the quality of the methods applied and the homogeneity and suitability of the variables used for defining the TCC. The variables were clustered into physical, environmental, land-use and cultural constraints for the purpose of comparing the TCC values assigned in the studies reviewed. We found the average quality of the studies to be generally acceptable in terms of the justification of the methodology, the weighting and classification of the variables, and the creation of a synthesis map. Nevertheless, the methods for assessing the TCC are not sufficiently standardized; there is a lack of uniformity in the cartographic information sources and methodologies for the TCC valuation. -- Highlights: • We explore 22 road-corridor planning studies subjected to the Spanish EIA regulation. • We analyze the variables selected for defining territorial carrying capacity. • The quality of the studies is acceptable (methodology, variable weighting, mapping). • There is heterogeneity in the

  5. Facility No. 175, interior overview from secondfloor corridor on northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, interior overview from second-floor corridor on northwest side - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator Building, general view VIEW SOUTHWEST, NORTH ELEVATION - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  7. 37. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, NORTH OF ELEVATOR LOBBY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, NORTH OF ELEVATOR LOBBY 4, EAST WALL, AMERICAN BISON MURAL (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CORRIDOR, LOOKING NORTH; NOTE ENTRANCE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CORRIDOR, LOOKING NORTH; NOTE ENTRANCE TO THE RADIOGRAPHY ROOM ON THE RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1031, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  9. 76 FR 21790 - Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 66 Corridor, Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Public Transportation, for potential transportation improvements in the Interstate 66 corridor in... cooperation with the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) and Virginia Department of Rail and Public... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  10. 35. INTERIOR, FIRST (AND SECOND) FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR AND SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. INTERIOR, FIRST (AND SECOND) FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR AND SOUTH FOYER, DETAIL OF BRONZE BUILDING DIRECTORY (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 12. VIEW OF CONNECTING CORRIDOR BETWEEN BUILDINGS 130 AND 131, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF CONNECTING CORRIDOR BETWEEN BUILDINGS 130 AND 131, FACING SOUTH FROM HOWE STREET. - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  12. 76 FR 34139 - Northeast Corridor Safety Committee; Meeting Postponement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... June 6, 2011 (See 76 FR 32391). This meeting is postponed until further notice and will be rescheduled... Federal Railroad Administration Northeast Corridor Safety Committee; Meeting Postponement AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of meeting;...

  13. 11. View of east entry to central corridor of filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View of east entry to central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  14. 32. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  15. 13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  16. 28. Main water inlet and outlet pipes under central corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Main water inlet and outlet pipes under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  17. 31. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Piping under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. 21. Interior, view of shot corridor looking from the south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Interior, view of shot corridor looking from the south to illustrate struyctural failure and a 15" shift - Fort Point, Gun Emplacement Number 1, 25 Wentworth Road, New Castle, Rockingham County, NH

  19. Interior, central entrance corridor, looking southwest from main entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, central entrance corridor, looking southwest from main entrance - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  20. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. 7, looking up flue - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Vault Area (original section), south corridor, looking west Fort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), south corridor, looking west - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. 7, view west - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 3 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 3 showing inside surface of outer door - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north (Vault Nos. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north (Vault Nos. 1-9 - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 17. Readiness Crew Building interior, lower level, central cross corridor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Readiness Crew Building interior, lower level, central cross corridor, looking northeast from the central lower level tunnel entrance. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Bomber Alert Facility S-6, 1300 Alert Road, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  6. 19. Readiness Crew Building interior, upper level corridor. Photograph taken ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Readiness Crew Building interior, upper level corridor. Photograph taken at southeast end looking northwest. Stairs at left. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Bomber Alert Facility S-6, 1300 Alert Road, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  7. 7. INTERIOR, KITCHEN SOUTH OF CENTRAL EASTWEST CORRIDOR, FROM ENTRY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR, KITCHEN SOUTH OF CENTRAL EAST-WEST CORRIDOR, FROM ENTRY, LOOKING SOUTH. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Administration Building-Dental Annex-Dispensary, Between E & F Streets, East of Third Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. 48. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, SOUTH WALL, DEER STALKING MURAL - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 50. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, DETAIL OF TIN LIGHTING SCONCE - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 49. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, DETAIL OF DECORATIVE BEAM, CORBEL, AND CEILING - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Interior, first floor, corridor in the medical library section (east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, first floor, corridor in the medical library section (east half of building). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. 7. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH HALF OF EAST CORRIDOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH HALF OF EAST CORRIDOR, RANGE 5, WITH CENTRAL ROOF SUPPORTS, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, CORRIDOR 137 Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, CORRIDOR 137 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. EXTERIOR DOOR DETAIL, CORRIDOR 137, FACING EAST Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR DOOR DETAIL, CORRIDOR 137, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. 22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; view to southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  16. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Data on docking and dynamics simulation of Entamoeba histolytica EhADH (an ALIX protein) and lysobisphosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Castro, Silvia; Montaño, Sarita; Orozco, Esther

    2016-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan agent responsible for human amoebiasis. Trophozoites are highly phagocytic cells and the lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) is involved in endocytosis. LBPA interacts with EhADH protein (an ALIX family member) also participating in phagocytosis, as it is referred in the research article Identification of the phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid in the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica: an active molecule in endocytosis (Castellanos-Castro et al., 2016) [1]. To unveil the interaction site between EhADH and LBPA, here we performed molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking. Molecular modeling and docking predictions revealed that EhADH interacts with LBPA through the Bro1 domain, located at the N-terminus of the protein and through the adherence domain at the C-terminus. In silico mutation abolished these interactions, supporting the data obtained in molecular dynamic and docking in silico assays. PMID:27014730

  18. Data on docking and dynamics simulation of Entamoeba histolytica EhADH (an ALIX protein) and lysobisphosphatidic acid

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Castro, Silvia; Montaño, Sarita; Orozco, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan agent responsible for human amoebiasis. Trophozoites are highly phagocytic cells and the lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) is involved in endocytosis. LBPA interacts with EhADH protein (an ALIX family member) also participating in phagocytosis, as it is referred in the research article Identification of the phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid in the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica: an active molecule in endocytosis (Castellanos-Castro et al., 2016) [1]. To unveil the interaction site between EhADH and LBPA, here we performed molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking. Molecular modeling and docking predictions revealed that EhADH interacts with LBPA through the Bro1 domain, located at the N-terminus of the protein and through the adherence domain at the C-terminus. In silico mutation abolished these interactions, supporting the data obtained in molecular dynamic and docking in silico assays. PMID:27014730

  19. Environmental impacts of pipeline corridors in the Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wilshire, H.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Three recently-built gas and oil pipelines that cross the Mojave Desert have graded constructed zones averaging 107 feet wide (range 68--200) on terrain of low relief, and 135 feet (range 77--273) on steeper terrain. Where corridors overlap, the graded width of two pipelines combined averages 157 feet (range 100--388). Right Of Way (ROW) Grants stipulate ROWs 50 feet wide, with an extra 25 feet allowed for construction. Pre- and post-construction measurements on one pipeline show that the width of the graded corridor exceeds the surveyed width by about 21%. A moderate rainstorm of 4 hr duration in the Tehachapi Mtns. eroded about 120 tons/ac to 250 tons/ac of soil from one pipeline corridor, measured on 3 transects across steep slopes. Especially in the western Mojave Desert, the pipeline corridors remain vulnerable to wind erosion for at least 5 years, and thus pose hazards to traffic on nearby highways. Pipeline corridors that pass through areas of stable eolian deposits are undergoing active erosion that expands by undercutting roots and sandblasting plants on downwind sides of the corridors, and by burial of plants beneath drifts. Techniques used to clear vegetation from construction corridors range from deep bulldozing to those designed to remove foliage while leaving root systems intact; the former technique guarantees long-term impacts, but the latter technique may have been defeated by final grading. Problems arise from failure to implement existing mitigations, inadequacies in environmental stipulations, and inadequacies in engineering oversight. Environmental benefits can be achieved by reducing or eliminating the practice of mechanical grading of the corridor, and by placing ditch lines of subsequent pipelines within existing 50 ft. ROWs and limiting construction disturbance to the existing disturbed zone.

  20. Monitoring vegetation water uptake in a semiarid riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Ochoa, C. G.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    With a changing global climate and growing demand for water throughout the world, responsible and sustainable land and water resource management practices are becoming increasingly important. Accounting for the amount of water used by riparian vegetation is a critical element for better managing water resources in arid and semiarid environments. The objective of this study was to determine water uptake by selected riparian vegetative species in a semiarid riparian corridor in North-Central Oregon. Exo-skin sap flow sensors (Dynamax, Houston, TX, U.S.A.) were used to measure sap flux in red alder (Alnus rubra) trees, the dominant overstory vegetation at the field site. Xylem sap flow data was collected from selected trees at the field site and in a greenhouse setting. Transpiration rates were determined based on an energy balance method, which makes it possible to estimate the mass flow of sap by measuring the velocity of electrical heat pulses through the plant stem. Preliminary field results indicate that red alder tree branches of about 1 inch diameter transpire between 2 and 6 kg of water/day. Higher transpiration rates of up to 7.3 kg of water/day were observed under greenhouse conditions. Streamflow and stream water temperature, vegetation characteristics, and meteorological data were analyzed in conjunction with transpiration data. Results of this study provide insight on riparian vegetation water consumption in water scarce ecosystems. This study is part of an overarching project focused on climate-vegetation interactions and ecohydrologic processes in arid and semiarid landscapes.

  1. Improvement of tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose by expression of ADH1.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Horie, Kenta; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Hot-compressed water treatment of cellulose and hemicellulose for subsequent bioethanol production is a novel, economically feasible, and nonhazardous method for recovering sugars. However, the hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and hemicellulose inhibit subsequent ethanol fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this problem, we engineered a yeast strain with improved tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. We first determined that glycolaldehyde has a greater inhibitory effect than 5-HMF and furfural and a combinational effect with them. On the basis of the hypothesis that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol should detoxify glycolaldehyde, we developed a strain overexpressing the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH1. The ADH1-overexpressing strain exhibits an improved fermentation profile in a glycolaldehyde-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 30 ± 1.9% when the control strain is used; this ratio increases to 77 ± 3.6% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. A glycolaldehyde treatment and the overexpression of ADH1 cause changes in the fermentation products so as to balance the metabolic carbon flux and the redox status. Finally, the ADH1-overexpressing strain shows a statistically significantly improved fermentation profile in a hot-compressed water-treated cellulose-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 33 ± 0.85% when the control strain is used but increases to 72 ± 1.7% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. These results show that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is a promising strategy to decrease the toxicity of hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. This is the first report on the improvement of yeast tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and glycolaldehyde. PMID:22311646

  2. Corridors and olfactory predator cues affect small mammal behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkerhoff, Robert Jory; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock, John L.

    2005-03-30

    Abstract The behavior of prey individuals is influenced by a variety of factors including, but not limited to, habitat configuration, risk of predation, and availability of resources, and these habitat-dependent factors may have interactive effects. We studied the responses of mice to an increase in perceived predation risk in a patchy environment to understand how habitat corridors might affect interactions among species in a fragmented landscape. We used a replicated experiment to investigate corridor-mediated prey responses to predator cues in a network of open habitat patches surrounded by a matrix of planted pine forest. Some of the patches were connected by corridors. We used mark–recapture techniques and foraging trays to monitor the movement, behavior, and abundance of small mammals. Predation threat was manipulated in one-half of the replicates by applying an olfactory predator cue. Corridors synchronized small mammal foraging activity among connected patches. Foraging also was inhibited in the presence of an olfactory predator cue but apparently increased in adjacent connected patches. Small mammal abundance did not change as a result of the predator manipulation and was not influenced by the presence of corridors. This study is among the 1st to indicate combined effects of landscape configuration and predation risk on prey behavior. These changes in prey behavior may, in turn, have cascading effects on community dynamics where corridors and differential predation risk influence movement and patch use.

  3. Selection variability for Arg48His in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B among Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Evsyukov, Alexey; Ivanov, Denis

    2013-08-01

    The variant His at codon 48 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1B) results in more efficient ethanol metabolism than with the "typical" codon 48Arg. In this study we introduced selection properties of Arg48His genotypes of ADH1B and estimated fitness in four ethnic-geographical clusters in Asia. Population genetics models were employed that derive observed gene frequencies from fitness relationships among genotypes, to infer the selection pattern of polymorphisms in an indirect manner. The data were analyzed using the model of "complete stationary distribution" by Wright that takes into account random genetic drift, pressure of migrations, mutations, and selection as influential factors of gene frequency. We found that the different population groups showed some variation in the types of selection for Arg48His. Han Chinese from eastern and southeastern China and the Japanese and Korean populations showed stabilizing selection, while the groups from Central Asian and Indochina showed divergent selection. However, all the groups demonstrated a strong positive selection for Arg48His. PMID:25019189

  4. Dynamically Coupled Food-web and Hydrodynamic Modeling with ADH-CASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C.; Swannack, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oysters and freshwater mussels are "ecological engineers," modifying the local water quality by filtering zooplankton and other suspended particulate matter from the water column and flow hydraulics by impinging on the near-bed flow environment. The success of sessile, benthic invertebrates such as oysters depends on environmental factors including but not limited to temperature, salinity, and flow regime. Typically food-web and other types of ecological models use flow and water quality data as direct input without regard to the feedback between the ecosystem and the physical environment. The USACE-ERDC has developed a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological modeling approach that dynamically couples a 2-D hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH), with a bioenergetics food-web model, the Comprehensive Aquatics Systems Model (CASM), which captures the dynamic feedback between aquatic ecological systems and the environment. We present modeling results from restored oyster reefs in the Great Wicomico River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, which quantify ecosystem services such as the influence of the benthic ecosystem on water quality. Preliminary results indicate that while the influence of oyster reefs on bulk flow dynamics is limited due to the localized influence of oyster reefs, large reefs and the associated benthic ecosystem can create measurable changes in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon in the areas around reefs. We also present a sensitivity analysis to quantify the relative sensitivity of the coupled ADH-CASM model to both hydrodynamic and ecological parameter choice.

  5. Optical isopropanol biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH).

    PubMed

    Chien, Po-Jen; Ye, Ming; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    Isopropanol (IPA) is an important solvent used in industrial activity often found in hospitals as antiseptic alcohol rub. Also, IPA may have the potential to be a biomarker of diabetic ketoacidosis. In this study, an optical biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) for IPA measurement was constructed and evaluated. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED, λ=340nm) was employed as the excitation light to excite nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was connected to a two-way branch optical fiber for measuring the fluorescence emitted from the NADH. S-ADH was immobilized on the membrane to catalyze IPA to acetone and reduce NAD(+) to be NADH. This IPA biosensor shows highly sensitivity and selectivity, the calibration range is from 500 nmol L(-1) to 1mmolL(-1). The optimization of buffer pH, temperature, and the enzyme-immobilized method were also evaluated. The detection of IPA in nail related cosmetic using our IPA biosensor was also carried out. The results showed that large amounts of IPA were used in these kinds of cosmetics. This IPA biosensor comes with the advantages of rapid reaction, good reproducibility, and wide dynamic range, and is also expected to use for clinical IPA detections in serum or other medical and health related applications. PMID:27474326

  6. Analysis and in situ mapping of the Adh locus in species of the willistoni group of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Rohde, C; Abdelhay, E; Pinto Júnior, H; Schrank, A; Valente, V L

    1995-01-01

    The Adh locus was mapped by in situ hybridization with the heterologous biotinylated probe SAC-PAT to the salivary chromosomes of seven species of the willistoni group of Drosophila. Hybridization signals were obtained mainly at a single site to the right arm of chromosome II in six species, but in Drosophila nebulosa two sites hybridized with the same consistency. Southern blot analysis Eco RI-digested genomic DNA of the seven species revealed high molecular weight bands shared by three species, plus the appropriately sized fragment expected, suggesting the presence of Adh pseudogenes in those species. PMID:7671636

  7. Wood and Sediment Dynamics in River Corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Scott, D.

    2015-12-01

    Large wood along rivers influences entrainment, transport, and storage of mineral sediment and particulate organic matter. We review how wood alters sediment dynamics and explore patterns among volumes of instream wood, sediment storage, and residual pools for dispersed pieces of wood, logjams, and beaver dams. We hypothesized that: volume of sediment per unit area of channel stored in association with wood is inversely proportional to drainage area; the form of sediment storage changes downstream; sediment storage correlates most strongly with wood load; and volume of sediment stored behind beaver dams correlates with pond area. Lack of data from larger drainage areas limits tests of these hypotheses, but analyses suggest a negative correlation between sediment volume and drainage area and a positive correlation between wood and sediment volume. The form of sediment storage in relation to wood changes downstream, with wedges of sediment upstream from jammed steps most prevalent in small, steep channels and more dispersed sediment storage in lower gradient channels. Use of a published relation between sediment volume, channel width, and gradient predicted about half of the variation in sediment stored upstream from jammed steps. Sediment volume correlates well with beaver pond area. Historically more abundant instream wood and beaver populations likely equated to greater sediment storage within river corridors. This review of the existing literature on wood and sediment dynamics highlights the lack of studies on larger rivers.

  8. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

    2006-02-09

    A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

  9. Robust analysis of an underwater navigational strategy in electrically heterogeneous corridors.

    PubMed

    Dimble, Kedar D; Ranganathan, Badri N; Keshavan, Jishnu; Humbert, J Sean

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles and other global stimuli provide relevant navigational cues to a weakly electric fish. In this work, robust analysis of a control strategy based on electrolocation for performing obstacle avoidance in electrically heterogeneous corridors is presented and validated. Static output feedback control is shown to achieve the desired goal of reflexive obstacle avoidance in such environments in simulation and experimentation. The proposed approach is computationally inexpensive and readily implementable on a small scale underwater vehicle, making underwater autonomous navigation feasible in real-time. PMID:27478091

  10. CHRONIC FEEDING ALCOHOL-CONTAINING DIETS VIA TOTAL ENTERAL NUTRITION INDUCES ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (ADH) AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction of Class 1 ADH occurs in rats fed alcohol chronically, and we have reported that C/EBPs and SREBP-1 are important signaling factors in this process. Chronic alcohol intake in humans can result in alcohol-induced diabetes. We have studied insulin signaling pathways in adult male Sprague-D...

  11. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension. PMID:23578856

  12. Use of Individual Flight Corridors to Avoid Vortex Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2001-01-01

    Vortex wakes of aircraft pose a hazard to following aircraft until the energetic parts of their flow fields have decayed to a harmless level. It is suggested here that in-trail spacings between aircraft can be significantly and safely reduced by designing an individual, vortex-free flight corridor for each aircraft. Because each aircraft will then have its own flight corridor, which is free of vortex wakes while in use by the assigned aircraft, the time intervals between aircraft operations can be safely reduced to the order of seconds. The productivity of airports can then be substantially increased. How large the offset distances between operational corridors need to be to have them vortex free, and how airports need to be changed to accommodate an individual flight-corridor process for landing and takeoff operations, are explored. Estimates are then made of the productivity of an individual flight-corridor system as a function of the in-trail time interval between operations for various values of wake decay time, runway width, and the velocity of a sidewind. The results confirm the need for short time intervals between aircraft operations if smaller offset distances and increased productivity are to be achieved.

  13. Identifying Corridors among Large Protected Areas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Belote, R. Travis; Dietz, Matthew S.; McRae, Brad H.; Theobald, David M.; McClure, Meredith L.; Irwin, G. Hugh; McKinley, Peter S.; Gage, Josh A.; Aplet, Gregory H.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation scientists emphasize the importance of maintaining a connected network of protected areas to prevent ecosystems and populations from becoming isolated, reduce the risk of extinction, and ultimately sustain biodiversity. Keeping protected areas connected in a network is increasingly recognized as a conservation priority in the current era of rapid climate change. Models that identify suitable linkages between core areas have been used to prioritize potentially important corridors for maintaining functional connectivity. Here, we identify the most “natural” (i.e., least human-modified) corridors between large protected areas in the contiguous Unites States. We aggregated results from multiple connectivity models to develop a composite map of corridors reflecting agreement of models run under different assumptions about how human modification of land may influence connectivity. To identify which land units are most important for sustaining structural connectivity, we used the composite map of corridors to evaluate connectivity priorities in two ways: (1) among land units outside of our pool of large core protected areas and (2) among units administratively protected as Inventoried Roadless (IRAs) or Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs). Corridor values varied substantially among classes of “unprotected” non-core land units, and land units of high connectivity value and priority represent diverse ownerships and existing levels of protections. We provide a ranking of IRAs and WSAs that should be prioritized for additional protection to maintain minimal human modification. Our results provide a coarse-scale assessment of connectivity priorities for maintaining a connected network of protected areas. PMID:27104683

  14. Parametric entry corridors for lunar/Mars aerocapture missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa M.; Baseggio, Franco M.; Fuhry, Douglas P.

    1991-01-01

    Parametric atmospheric entry corridor data are presented for Earth and Mars aerocapture. Parameter ranges were dictated by the range of mission designs currently envisioned as possibilities for the Human Exploration Initiative (HEI). This data, while not providing a means for exhaustive evaluation of aerocapture performance, should prove to be a useful aid for preliminary mission design and evaluation. Entry corridors are expressed as ranges of allowable vacuum periapse altitude of the planetary approach hyperbolic orbit, with chart provided for conversion to an approximate flight path angle corridor at entry interface (125 km altitude). The corridor boundaries are defined by open-loop aerocapture trajectories which satisfy boundary constraints while utilizing the full aerodynamic control capability of the vehicle (i.e., full lift-up or full lift-down). Parameters examined were limited to those of greatest importance from an aerocapture performance standpoint, including the approach orbit hyperbolic excess velocity, the vehicle lift to drag ratio, maximum aerodynamic load factor limit, and the apoapse of the target orbit. The impact of the atmospheric density bias uncertainties are also included. The corridor data is presented in graphical format, and examples of the utilization of these graphs for mission design and evaluation are included.

  15. Identifying Corridors among Large Protected Areas in the United States.

    PubMed

    Belote, R Travis; Dietz, Matthew S; McRae, Brad H; Theobald, David M; McClure, Meredith L; Irwin, G Hugh; McKinley, Peter S; Gage, Josh A; Aplet, Gregory H

    2016-01-01

    Conservation scientists emphasize the importance of maintaining a connected network of protected areas to prevent ecosystems and populations from becoming isolated, reduce the risk of extinction, and ultimately sustain biodiversity. Keeping protected areas connected in a network is increasingly recognized as a conservation priority in the current era of rapid climate change. Models that identify suitable linkages between core areas have been used to prioritize potentially important corridors for maintaining functional connectivity. Here, we identify the most "natural" (i.e., least human-modified) corridors between large protected areas in the contiguous Unites States. We aggregated results from multiple connectivity models to develop a composite map of corridors reflecting agreement of models run under different assumptions about how human modification of land may influence connectivity. To identify which land units are most important for sustaining structural connectivity, we used the composite map of corridors to evaluate connectivity priorities in two ways: (1) among land units outside of our pool of large core protected areas and (2) among units administratively protected as Inventoried Roadless (IRAs) or Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs). Corridor values varied substantially among classes of "unprotected" non-core land units, and land units of high connectivity value and priority represent diverse ownerships and existing levels of protections. We provide a ranking of IRAs and WSAs that should be prioritized for additional protection to maintain minimal human modification. Our results provide a coarse-scale assessment of connectivity priorities for maintaining a connected network of protected areas. PMID:27104683

  16. Interaction of vitamin A supplementation level with ADH1C genotype on intramuscular fat in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Krone, K G; Ward, A K; Madder, K M; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; Buchanan, F C

    2016-03-01

    Previously, the single nucleotide polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1C c.-64T>C) was shown to have an association with intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle when vitamin A was limited in finishing rations of beef steers. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum vitamin A supplementation level, in combination with ADH1C genotype, to increase IMF of the LT muscle. In total, 45 TT genotype, 45 CT and 27 CC Black Angus crossbred steers were backgrounded on a commercial ration containing 3360 IU vitamin A/kg dry matter (DM). During finishing, the steers were randomly assigned to one of three vitamin A treatments at 25%, 50% and 75% of the National Research Council recommendation of 2200 IU/kg DM. Treatments were administered via an oral bolus. Carcass quality was evaluated and a sample from the LT muscle was collected for analysis of IMF. A treatment×genotype interaction (P=0.04) was observed for IMF; TT steers on the 75% treatment had higher IMF relative to CT and CC steers on the same treatment. Western blot analysis showed that TT steers had higher (P=0.02) ADH1C protein expression in hepatic tissue. Previously, TT steers exhibited increased IMF when fed limited vitamin A. In the current study, the lack of variation in IMF between treatments and genotypes at the lower vitamin A treatment levels was likely due to the majority of the steers grading Canada AAA (USDA Choice). However, the western blot data supports that TT steers are expected to have higher IMF deposition, due to an increased production of ADH1C. The interaction between ADH1C genotype and vitamin A supplementation level has the potential for use in marker-assisted management programs to target niche markets based on increased marbling. PMID:26511067

  17. Habitat corridors facilitate genetic resilience irrespective of species dispersal abilities or population sizes

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Mark R; Knowles, L Lacey

    2015-01-01

    Corridors are frequently proposed to connect patches of habitat that have become isolated due to human-mediated alterations to the landscape. While it is understood that corridors can facilitate dispersal between patches, it remains unknown whether corridors can mitigate the negative genetic effects for entire communities modified by habitat fragmentation. These negative genetic effects, which include reduced genetic diversity, limit the potential for populations to respond to selective agents such as disease epidemics and global climate change. We provide clear evidence from a forward-time, agent-based model (ABM) that corridors can facilitate genetic resilience in fragmented habitats across a broad range of species dispersal abilities and population sizes. Our results demonstrate that even modest increases in corridor width decreased the genetic differentiation between patches and increased the genetic diversity and effective population size within patches. Furthermore, we document a trade-off between corridor quality and corridor design whereby populations connected by high-quality habitat (i.e., low corridor mortality) are more resilient to suboptimal corridor design (e.g., long and narrow corridors). The ABM also revealed that species interactions can play a greater role than corridor design in shaping the genetic responses of populations to corridors. These results demonstrate how corridors can provide long-term conservation benefits that extend beyond targeted taxa and scale up to entire communities irrespective of species dispersal abilities or population sizes. PMID:26029259

  18. CvADH1, a member of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, is inducible by gibberellin and sucrose in developing watermelon seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyul; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Jun, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Jinwon; Yim, Jieun; An, Gynheung

    2003-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that control seed formation, we selected a seed-preferential gene (CvADH1) from the ESTs of developing watermelon seeds. RNA blot analysis and in situ localization showed that CvADH1 was preferentially expressed in the nucellar tissue. The CvADH1 protein shared about 50% homology with short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase including ABA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana, stem secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase in Forsythia intermedia, and 3beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase in Digitalis lanata. We investigated gene-expression levels in seeds from both normally pollinated fruits and those made parthenocarpic via N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea treatment, the latter of which lack zygotic tissues. Whereas the transcripts of CvADH1 rapidly started to accumulate from about the pre-heart stage in normal seeds, they were not detectable in the parthenocarpic seeds. Treating the parthenogenic fruit with GA(3) strongly induced gene expression, up to the level accumulated in pollinated seeds. These results suggest that the CvADH1 gene is induced in maternal tissues by signals made in the zygotic tissues, and that gibberellin might be one of those signals. We also observed that CvADH1 expression was induced by sucrose in the parthenocarpic seeds. Therefore, we propose that the CvADH1 gene is inducible by gibberellin, and that sucrose plays an important role in the maternal tissues of watermelon during early seed development. PMID:12552151

  19. Association and ancestry analysis of sequence variants in ADH and ALDH using alcohol-related phenotypes in a Native American community sample

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qian; Gizer, Ian R.; Libiger, Ondrej; Bizon, Chris; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2015-01-01

    Higher rates of alcohol use and other drug-dependence have been observed in some Native American populations relative to other ethnic groups in the U.S. Previous studies have shown that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes may affect the risk of development of alcohol dependence, and that polymorphisms within these genes may differentially affect risk for the disorder depending on the ethnic group evaluated. We evaluated variations in the ADH and ALDH genes in a large study investigating risk factors for substance use in a Native American population. We assessed ancestry admixture and tested for associations between alcohol-related phenotypes in the genomic regions around the ADH1-7 and ALDH2 and ALDH1A1 genes. Seventy-two (72) ADH variants showed significant evidence of association with a severity level of alcohol drinking-related dependence symptoms phenotype. These significant variants spanned across the entire 7 ADH gene cluster regions. Two significant associations, one in ADH and one in ALDH2, were observed with alcohol dependence diagnosis. Seventeen (17) variants showed significant association with the largest number of alcohol drinks ingested during any 24-hour period. Variants in or near ADH7 were significantly negatively associated with alcohol-related phenotypes, suggesting a potential protective effect of this gene. In addition, our results suggested that a higher degree of Native American ancestry is associated with higher frequencies of potential risk variants and lower frequencies of potential protective variants for alcohol dependence phenotypes. PMID:25270064

  20. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds.

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Bolker, Benjamin M.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Sargent, Sarah; Haddad, Nick M.

    2005-07-01

    Levey, Douglas, J., Benjamin M. Bolker, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Sarah Sargent, and Nick M. Haddad. 2005. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds. Science 309:146-148. Abstract: Habitat fragmentation threatens biodiversity by disrupting dispersal. The mechanisms and consequences of this disruption are controversial, primarily because most organisms are difficult to track. We examined the effect of habitat corridors on long-distance dispersal of seeds by birds, and tested whether small-scale (G20 meters) movements of birds could be scaled up to predict dispersal of seeds across hundreds of meters in eight experimentally fragmented landscapes. A simulation model accurately predicted the observed pattern of seed rain and revealed that corridors functioned through edge following behavior of birds. Our study shows how models based on easily observed behaviors can be scaled up to predict landscape-level processes.

  1. Corridor location: the multi-gateway shortest path model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaparra, Maria P.; Church, Richard L.; Medrano, F. Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The problem of corridor location can be found in a number of fields including power transmission, highways, and pipelines. It involves the placement of a corridor or rights-of-way that traverses a landscape starting at an origin and ending at a destination. Since most systems are subject to environmental review, it is important to generate competitive, but different alternatives. This paper addresses the problem of generating efficient, spatially different alternatives to the corridor location problem. We discuss the weaknesses in current models and propose a new approach which is designed to overcome many of these problems. We present an application of this model to a real landscape and compare the results to past work. Overall, the new model called the multi-gateway shortest path problem can generate a wide variety of efficient alignments, which eclipse what could be generated by past work.

  2. Fixed-Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle for Accurate Corridor Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) equipped with precise position and attitude sensors that together with a pre-calibrated camera enables accurate corridor mapping. The design of the platform is based on widely available model components to which we integrate an open-source autopilot, customized mass-market camera and navigation sensors. We adapt the concepts of system calibration from larger mapping platforms to MAV and evaluate them practically for their achievable accuracy. We present case studies for accurate mapping without ground control points: first for a block configuration, later for a narrow corridor. We evaluate the mapping accuracy with respect to checkpoints and digital terrain model. We show that while it is possible to achieve pixel (3-5 cm) mapping accuracy in both cases, precise aerial position control is sufficient for block configuration, the precise position and attitude control is required for corridor mapping.

  3. Pen Branch stream corridor and Delta Wetlands change assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Blohm, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data from 1987 to 1991 covering the Pen Branch corridor and delta at SRS were utilized to provide a detailed change detection analysis. The multispectral data were geo-referenced to a Universal Transverse Mercator projection using finite element registration. Each year was then classified into eleven different landcover categories, and the yearly changes in each landcover category were analyzed. The decrease in operations of K Reactor in 1988 has resulted in drying of the corridor and delta. This has led to the decline of nonpersistent vegetation and the increase of persistent vegetation. Cattails, willow, and bottomland hardwoods, in particular, have grown to dominate the corridor and most of the delta.

  4. Improvement of Ethanol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by High-Efficient Disruption of the ADH2 Gene Using a Novel Recombinant TALEN Vector.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Liu, Taomei; Tan, Guohui; Li, Haohua; Huang, Zilei

    2016-01-01

    Bioethanol is becoming increasingly important in energy supply and economic development. However, the low yield of bioethanol and the insufficiency of high-efficient genetic manipulation approaches limit its application. In this study, a novel transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) vector containing the left and right arms of TALEN was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain As2.4 to sequence the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH2 and the hygromycin-resistant gene hyg. Western blot analysis using anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody proved the successful expression of TALE proteins in As2.4 strains. qPCR and sequencing demonstrated the accurate knockout of the 17 bp target gene with 80% efficiency. The TALEN vector and ADH2 PCR product were electroporated into ΔADH2 to complement the ADH2 gene (ADH2 (+) As2.4). LC-MS and GC were employed to detect ethanol yields in the native As2.4, ΔADH2 As2.4, and ADH2 (+) As2.4 strains. Results showed that ethanol production was improved by 52.4 ± 5.3% through the disruption of ADH2 in As2.4. The bioethanol yield of ADH2 (+) As2.4 was nearly the same as that of native As2.4. This study is the first to report on the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae by employing Fast TALEN technology to improve bioethanol yield. This work provides a novel approach for the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae with high efficiency and specificity, thereby promoting the improvement of bioethanol production in S. cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. PMID:27462304

  5. Improvement of Ethanol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by High-Efficient Disruption of the ADH2 Gene Using a Novel Recombinant TALEN Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Liu, Taomei; Tan, Guohui; Li, Haohua; Huang, Zilei

    2016-01-01

    Bioethanol is becoming increasingly important in energy supply and economic development. However, the low yield of bioethanol and the insufficiency of high-efficient genetic manipulation approaches limit its application. In this study, a novel transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) vector containing the left and right arms of TALEN was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain As2.4 to sequence the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH2 and the hygromycin-resistant gene hyg. Western blot analysis using anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody proved the successful expression of TALE proteins in As2.4 strains. qPCR and sequencing demonstrated the accurate knockout of the 17 bp target gene with 80% efficiency. The TALEN vector and ADH2 PCR product were electroporated into ΔADH2 to complement the ADH2 gene (ADH2+ As2.4). LC–MS and GC were employed to detect ethanol yields in the native As2.4, ΔADH2 As2.4, and ADH2+ As2.4 strains. Results showed that ethanol production was improved by 52.4 ± 5.3% through the disruption of ADH2 in As2.4. The bioethanol yield of ADH2+ As2.4 was nearly the same as that of native As2.4. This study is the first to report on the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae by employing Fast TALEN technology to improve bioethanol yield. This work provides a novel approach for the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae with high efficiency and specificity, thereby promoting the improvement of bioethanol production in S. cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. PMID:27462304

  6. Calcilytic Ameliorates Abnormalities of Mutant Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Knock-In Mice Mimicking Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia (ADH).

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingzi; Endo, Itsuro; Ohnishi, Yukiyo; Kondo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Abe, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Seiji; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Activating mutations of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH). ADH patients develop hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypercalciuria, similar to the clinical features of hypoparathyroidism. The current treatment of ADH is similar to the other forms of hypoparathyroidism, using active vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone (PTH). However, these treatments aggravate hypercalciuria and renal calcification. Thus, new therapeutic strategies for ADH are needed. Calcilytics are allosteric antagonists of CaSR, and may be effective for the treatment of ADH caused by activating mutations of CaSR. In order to examine the effect of calcilytic JTT-305/MK-5442 on CaSR harboring activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains in vitro, we first transfected a mutated CaSR gene into HEK cells. JTT-305/MK-5442 suppressed the hypersensitivity to extracellular Ca(2+) of HEK cells transfected with the CaSR gene with activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains. We then selected two activating mutations locating in the extracellular (C129S) and transmembrane (A843E) domains, and generated two strains of CaSR knock-in mice to build an ADH mouse model. Both mutant mice mimicked almost all the clinical features of human ADH. JTT-305/MK-5442 treatment in vivo increased urinary cAMP excretion, improved serum and urinary calcium and phosphate levels by stimulating endogenous PTH secretion, and prevented renal calcification. In contrast, PTH(1-34) treatment normalized serum calcium and phosphate but could not reduce hypercalciuria or renal calcification. CaSR knock-in mice exhibited low bone turnover due to the deficiency of PTH, and JTT-305/MK-5442 as well as PTH(1-34) increased bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) in these mice. These results demonstrate that calcilytics can reverse almost all the phenotypes of ADH including hypercalciuria and renal calcification, and suggest that calcilytics can become a

  7. What's My Substrate? Computational Function Assignment of Candida parapsilosis ADH5 by Genome Database Search, Virtual Screening, and QM/MM Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dhoke, Gaurao V; Ensari, Yunus; Davari, Mehdi D; Ruff, Anna Joëlle; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Bocola, Marco

    2016-07-25

    Zinc-dependent medium chain reductase from Candida parapsilosis can be used in the reduction of carbonyl compounds to pharmacologically important chiral secondary alcohols. To date, the nomenclature of cpADH5 is differing (CPCR2/RCR/SADH) in the literature, and its natural substrate is not known. In this study, we utilized a substrate docking based virtual screening method combined with KEGG, MetaCyc pathway, and Candida genome databases search for the discovery of natural substrates of cpADH5. The virtual screening of 7834 carbonyl compounds from the ZINC database provided 94 aldehydes or methyl/ethyl ketones as putative carbonyl substrates. Out of which, 52 carbonyl substrates of cpADH5 with catalytically active docking pose were identified by employing mechanism based substrate docking protocol. Comparison of the virtual screening results with KEGG, MetaCyc database search, and Candida genome pathway analysis suggest that cpADH5 might be involved in the Ehrlich pathway (reduction of fusel aldehydes in leucine, isoleucine, and valine degradation). Our QM/MM calculations and experimental activity measurements affirmed that butyraldehyde substrates are the potential natural substrates of cpADH5, suggesting a carbonyl reductase role for this enzyme in butyraldehyde reduction in aliphatic amino acid degradation pathways. Phylogenetic tree analysis of known ADHs from Candida albicans shows that cpADH5 is close to caADH5. We therefore propose, according to the experimental substrate identification and sequence similarity, the common name butyraldehyde dehydrogenase cpADH5 for Candida parapsilosis CPCR2/RCR/SADH. PMID:27387009

  8. 13. I95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. I-95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. Providence, Providence County, RI. sec. 4116, mp 185.15. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  9. California HSR corridor evaluation and environmental constraints analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.; Field, K.D.; Leavitt, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    California is studying the feasibility of a statewide, high-speed rail (HSR) transportation system as a link between major cities in the northern and southern portions of the state. This system will complement the state`s existing transportation system and serve as an alternative to air and auto travel. In this paper, the writers provide a condensed description of the findings and conclusions drawn from the 1996 California High Speed Rail Corridor Evaluation and Environmental Constraints Analysis, which they prepared for California`s Intercity High Speed Rail Commission to document and analyze the potential statewide HSR corridors.

  10. Low-quality habitat corridors as movement conduits for two butterfly species.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Nick, M.; Tewksbury, Joshua, J.

    2005-01-01

    Haddad, Nick, M, and Joshua J. Tewksbury. Low-quality habitat corridors as movement conduits for two butterfly species. Ecol. Apps. 15(1):250-257. Abstract. Corridors are a primary conservation tool to increase connectivity, promote individual movement, and increase gene flow among populations in fragmented landscapes. The establishment of effective conservation corridors will depend on constructing or pre-serving connecting habitat that attracts dispersing individuals. Yet, it remains unclear whether corridors must necessarily be composed of high-quality habitat to be effective and promote dispersal and gene flow. We address this issue with two mobile, open-habitat butterfly species, Junonia coenia HuÈbner and Euptoieta claudia Cramer. Using experimental landscapes created explicitly to examine the effects of corridors on dispersal rates, we show that open-habitat corridors can serve as dispersal conduits even when corridors do not support resident butterfly populations. Both butterfly species were rare near forest edges and equally rare in narrow corridors, yet both species dispersed more often between patches connected by these corridors than between isolated patches. At least for species that can traverse corridors within a generation, corridor habitat may be lower in quality than larger patches and still increase dispersal and gene flow. For these species, abundance surveys may not accurately represent the conservation value of corridors.

  11. 75 FR 64741 - Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Office of the Secretary Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting... the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission will be held on... Heritage Corridor Commission, One Depot Square, Woonsocket, RI 02895, Tel.: (401) 762-0250....

  12. 75 FR 48359 - Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Office of the Secretary Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting... the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission will be held on... Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission, One Depot Square, Woonsocket, RI 02895, Tel.: (401)...

  13. 45 CFR 153.510 - Risk corridors establishment and payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Risk corridors establishment and payment... RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards Related to the Risk Corridors Program §...

  14. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  15. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Flight Rules Area within the following flight-free zones: (a) Desert View Flight-free Zone. That airspace... west between the Desert View and Bright Angel Flight-free Zones, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor... zone and the Desert View Flight-free Zone, is designated the “Zuni Point Corridor.” The corridor to...

  16. 1. Operating Floor Front (east) Corridor, view to the north. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Operating Floor Front (east) Corridor, view to the north. The wall of turbine Unit 1 is visible in left foreground of photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  17. 34. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 27, "CLEAN ROOM" ENTRANCE CORRIDOR LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 27, "CLEAN ROOM" ENTRANCE CORRIDOR LOOKING SOUTH. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  18. Interior view, ground floor passage crossing the main corridor at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, ground floor passage crossing the main corridor at its center, looking east through the doorway linking the two perpendicular axes. The door at the end of the passage opens onto a passage running under the entrance portico bearing ground floor exterior doors at each end. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. 1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING SOUTHWEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; BUILDING 92 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING SOUTHWEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; BUILDING 92 IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE AT UPPER RIGHT; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) AT LOWER LEFT - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. 76 FR 72029 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... existing FHWA notice and request for application, originally published on October 21, 2011, at 76 FR 65561... INFORMATION: On October 21, 2011, at 76 FR 65561, the FHWA issued a notice requesting applications from... Federal Highway Administration Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program AGENCY:...

  1. 43 CFR 2802.11 - How does BLM designate corridors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) RIGHTS-OF-WAY UNDER THE FEDERAL LAND POLICY MANAGEMENT ACT Lands Available for FLPMA Grants § 2802.11 How does BLM designate corridors? (a..., concerns, and needs. The process results in a resource management plan or plan amendment, which...

  2. SMART GROWTH: INFILL DEVELOPMENT ALONG A MULTILANE TRANSIT CORRIDOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infill development along transit corridors is a key element of smart growth, and revitalization of older, low and moderate income neighborhoods and their business districts is an important smart growth strategy. In many such neighborhoods and business districts, the principal ...

  3. 2. INTERIOR VIEW OF MAIN CORRIDOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; DOORS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR VIEW OF MAIN CORRIDOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; DOORS TO HALLWAY LEADING TO HYDROTHERAPY ROOM, ELECTRIC LIGHT CABINETS AND DRESSING ROOM ON LEFT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1054, South side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  4. 15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  5. 29. Basement under central corridor. Shaft on right actuates cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Basement under central corridor. Shaft on right actuates cross over valve. Shaft at left operates main flood valve to admit water into the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  6. 30. Valves under central corridor of filtration bed building. Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Valves under central corridor of filtration bed building. Main flood valves is at left and crossover valve is a right. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  7. 9. View northwest of east entry to central corridor between ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View northwest of east entry to central corridor between the filtration beds. Note square chimney at right center of photograph which is a part of the Armory Street Pumping Station. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. 33. Miter gears located on ceiling of central corridor of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Miter gears located on ceiling of central corridor of filtration building. Gears allow valve wheels above to be offset from location of gate valve on pipes below. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  9. 16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  10. View looking north along the main corridor on the third ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking north along the main corridor on the third floor of the south wing. This view, before the damaged roof was removed, captures the manner in which the continuous roof monitor provided natural illumination and ventilation for the third-floor. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 5, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 5, showing inner set of doors on vault - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north, showing tops ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north, showing tops of individual vaults and vent housings - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 8. INTERIOR, EMERGENCY ROOM, NORTHEAST OF MAIN CORRIDOR INTERSECTION (NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR, EMERGENCY ROOM, NORTHEAST OF MAIN CORRIDOR INTERSECTION (NEAR WESTERN, MAIN ENTRY), FROM ENTRY IN NORTHWESTERN CORNER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Administration Building-Dental Annex-Dispensary, Between E & F Streets, East of Third Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  14. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…

  15. 78 FR 7477 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Research program (Title V, Subtitle C of SAFETEA-LU), eligible activities include research, operational testing, evaluation, technology transfer, and limited pre-deployment... operation and management of transportation facilities and services in the corridor. 4. Membership of...

  16. 16. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor, interior view showing highcapacity venting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor, interior view showing high-capacity venting system and black-out shades on south wall VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  17. 51. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, DETAIL OF HANDPAINTED LIGHTING FIXTURE (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. 47. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAIN CORRIDOR, ROOM 1023, INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP, NORTH WALL, BUFFALO HUNT MURAL (LEFT) AND BREAKING CAMP AT WARTIME MURAL (RIGHT) (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 16. DETAIL OF AUTOMATIC DOORS OPENING INTO REFIGERATED CORRIDOR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF AUTOMATIC DOORS OPENING INTO REFIGERATED CORRIDOR IN BUILDING 148; CATTLE CARCASSES PASSED THROUGH TALL DOOR ON RIGHT; SHEEP AND VEAL PASSED THROUGH LOWER DOOR ON LEFT - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. Interior view, secondstory passage extending westward from main corridor to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, second-story passage extending westward from main corridor to rooms on the north side of the rotunda in the rotunda extension. The roof and third-floor in this area is completely missing. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. 31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR AT MEZZANINE AND LOWER LEVELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106352. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Interior view of the northwest end corridor, showing doors and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the northwest end corridor, showing doors and barred openings to former fan and engine rooms (now garage) and entry to northwest gun chamber (labeled "Gun Turret No. One") - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Battery Adair, Princeton Place, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 77 FR 73734 - Northeast Corridor Safety Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...FRA announces the third meeting of the NECSC, a Federal Advisory Committee mandated by Section 212 of the Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIIA). The Committee is made up of stakeholders operating on the Northeast Corridor (NEC), and the purpose of the Committee is to provide annual recommendations to the Secretary of Transportation. The NECSC meeting topics will......

  4. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CORRIDOR DOOR TO THE SOUTH ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CORRIDOR DOOR TO THE SOUTH ROOM SHOWING THE STRAP HINGES AND LATCHES. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. INTERIOR VIEW OF NARROW CORRIDOR. NOTE THE ENTRY STAIRWAY (STAIRS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF NARROW CORRIDOR. NOTE THE ENTRY STAIRWAY (STAIRS COVERED WITH EARTH) LEADING UP TO GROUND LEVEL ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Interior view, east to west corridor from the Fourteenth Street ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, east to west corridor from the Fourteenth Street lobby to the Fifteenth Street side of the building (168' in length) - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Interior view, secondfloor corridor looking east. Note the door to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, second-floor corridor looking east. Note the door to Egyptian Hall in the center distance and the door to Gothic Hall on the eastern entresol (third floor) at the top of the stairs - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. This image, looking south, shows a typical corridor in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    This image, looking south, shows a typical corridor in the laboratory area of the building, where numerous pipes were required to carry the various utilities needed for procedure and safety equipment - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Electronics Laboratory Building (E Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  9. 37. PLAN OF ACCESS CORRIDOR PIPING INCLUDES WASTE HOLD TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PLAN OF ACCESS CORRIDOR PIPING INCLUDES WASTE HOLD TANK CELL, OFFGAS CELL, ADSORBER CELL, AND OFFGAS FILTER CELL. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106453. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-P-58. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. 38. SECTIONS OF ACCESS CORRIDOR, INCLUDES SECTION SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. SECTIONS OF ACCESS CORRIDOR, INCLUDES SECTION SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF NAVY GUN BARRELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106454. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-59. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION OF THE SAN PEDRO RIPARIAN CORRIDOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a vegetation classification of the San Pedro riparian corridor. The classification was accomplished using a combination of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) imagery from JPL, and high resolution color infrared photography (CIR)from USDA ARS Weslaco Tx, supported by...

  12. River Corridor Closure at DOE's Hanford Site - 12503

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan; Franco, Joe

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's River Corridor will cover work that has already been completed plus the work remaining to be done. This includes the buildings, waste sites, and groundwater plumes in the 300 Area; large-scale burial ground remediation in the 600 Area; plutonium production reactor dismantling and 'cocooning' along the river; preservation of the world's first full-scale plutonium production reactor; removal of more than 14 million tons of contaminated soil and debris along the Columbia River shoreline and throughout the River Corridor; and the excavation of buried waste sites in the river shore area. It also includes operating an EPA-permitted low-level waste disposal facility in the central portion of the site. At the completions of cleanup in 2015, Hanford's River Corridor will be the largest closure project ever completed by the Department of Energy. Cleanup of the River Corridor has been one of Hanford's top priorities since the early 1990's. This urgency has been due to the proximity of hundreds of waste sites to the Columbia River. In addition, removal of the sludge from K West Basin, near the river, remains a high priority. This 220-square-mile area of the Hanford Site sits on the edge of the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River. The River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site includes the 100 and 300 Areas along the south shore of the Columbia River. The 100 Areas contain nine retired plutonium production reactors. These areas are also the location of numerous support facilities and solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. The 300 Area, located just north of the city of Richland, contains fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear research and development facilities, and their associated solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. In order to ensure that cleanup actions address all threats to human health and the environment, the River Corridor includes the

  13. Evaluating Rifean Corridor Closure using Detrital Zircon Sediment Provenance of the Taza-Guercif Basin, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. R.; Barbeau, D. L.; Emran, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the late Miocene, the connection between the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean was tectonically severed leading to severe evaporative draw down of Mediterranean sea level such that the entire basin was desiccated or near desiccated in an event from ~5.96-5.33 Ma known as the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). The MSC sequestered 6% of global ocean salinity into evaporite deposits, created a deep, dry and hot basin that altered global atmospheric circulation, opened passageways for mammal migration between Europe, Africa and Arabia and ended in the largest flood observed in the geologic record. The combined effects of the Messinian Salinity Crisis make it the most important oceanic event in the last 20 million years, yet despite the dramatic ramifications of the MSC, the exact nature of its cause has remained both elusive and controversial. By examining the sedimentary provenance of Rifean Corridor, this research evaluates the progression of corridor closure and the tectonic context of the initiation of the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The difficulty in evaluating the progression of closure is due to the tectonic complexity of the Africa-Eurasia convergent plate boundary in north-central Morocco. The shortening associated with the tectonic convergence is accommodated by two genetically and tectonically distinct orogenic systems, the Rif and Atlas mountain belts, which lie in juxtaposition to the slab-rollback dominated Alboran Sea. The basins of the Rifean corridor lie between these two orogens and as such shortening and uplift associated with either or both ranges could be the cause of the corridor closure. Several hypotheses have been posited for the tectonic controls on basin emergence including slab-rollback related delamination on the Alboran margin, domal uplift of the Middle Atlas as well as a more traditional propagation of the Rifean orogenic wedge. This research provides the first quantitative provenance data for the Taza-Guercif basin in the form of LA

  14. Stereoselective hydroxylation by CYP2C19 and oxidation by ADH4 in the in vitro metabolism of tivantinib.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, Yumi; Nakai, Daisuke; Urasaki, Yoko; Takakusa, Hideo; Ohsuki, Satoru; Iwano, Yuji; Yasukochi, Takanori; Takayama, Tomoko; Bazyo, Shohei; Oza, Chikahiro; Kurihara, Atsushi; Savage, Ronald E; Izumi, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    1. In prior studies, it has been shown that tivantinib is extensively metabolized in humans to many oxidative metabolites and glucuronides. In order to identify the responsible enzymes, we investigated the in vitro metabolism of tivantinib and its four major circulating metabolites. 2. The primary isoforms involved in the elimination of tivantinib were CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. CYP2C19 showed catalytic activity for the formation of M5 (hydroxylated metabolite), but not for M4 (a stereoisomer of M5), whereas CYP3A4/5 catalyzed the formation of both metabolites. For the elimination of M4, M5 and M8 (keto-metabolite), CYP3A4/5 was the major cytochrome P450 isoform and UGT1A9 was mainly involved in the glucuronidation of M4 and M5. 3. ADH4 was identified as one of the major alcohol dehydrogenase isoforms contributing to the formation of M6 (sequential keto-metabolite of M4 and M5) and M8. The substrate preference of ADH for M4, and not M5, was observed in the formation of M6. 4. In conclusion, CYP2C19, CYP3A4/5, UGT1A9 and ADH4 were the primary drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the in vitro metabolism of tivantinib and its metabolites. The stereoselective hydroxylation by CYP2C19 and substrate stereoselectivity of ADH4-catalyzed oxidation in the in vitro metabolism of tivantinib was discovered. PMID:26899628

  15. Alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene polymorphism and alcoholic liver cirrhosis risk: a meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Deng, Tao; Luo, He-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The association between alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene polymorphism and alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) has been analyzed in several studies, but results have been conflicting. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations between the ADH1C polymorphism and risk of ALC. Relevant studies were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang databases up to January 10, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association using the fixed or random effect model. A total of 16 case-control studies, including 1375 cases and 1802 controls, were included. Overall, no significant association between the ADH1C polymorphism and ALC risk was found (dominant model: OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.62-1.23; recessive model: OR=1.30, 95% CI: 0.84-1.99; *1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.63-1.21; *2/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.71-1.70). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we observed a significant association in Asian descent (*1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.07-2.49), while a decreased risk was found among Caucasians (dominant model: OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66-0.99; *1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.61-0.95). This meta-analysis demonstrated that the ADH1C polymorphism might increase the risk of ALC in Asians, while it may be a protective factor for ALC among Caucasians. PMID:26379912

  16. Lessons from the Corridors of College Success Initiative: An Introduction. Corridors of College Success Series. CCRC Research Brief. Number 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Lundy-Wagner, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    "Collective impact" is a new place-based model of educational and social intervention that aims to shift responsibility for improvement in outcomes from individual organizations to entire systems that affect the lives of people in a particular location. CCRC's "Corridors of College Success Series" provides insights into…

  17. Adh enhances Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity by binding to OR5M11 and activating p38 which induces apoptosis of PAMs and IL-8 release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Zhang, Jing; Bao, Chuntong; Zhang, Hu; Che, Yanyi; Sun, Changjiang; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Richard, Paul Langford; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin (TAA) family play a crucial role in the adhesion of Gram-negative pathogens to host cells, but the immunopathogenesis of TAAs remains unknown. Our previous studies demonstrated that Adh from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is required for full bacterial pathogenicity. Alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against respiratory infections. This study compared the interactions between porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae (5b WT) or an Adh-deletion strain (5b ΔAdh) via gene microarray, immunoprecipitation and other technologies. We found that Adh was shown to interact with the PAMs membrane protein OR5M11, an olfactory receptor, resulting in the high-level secretion of IL-8 by activation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Subsequently, PAMs apoptosis via the activation of the Fax and Bax signaling pathways was observed, followed by activation of caspases 8, 9, and 3. The immunological pathogenic roles of Adh were also confirmed in both murine and piglets infectious models in vivo. These results identify a novel immunological strategy for TAAs to boost the pathogenicity of A. pleuropneumoniae. Together, these datas reveal the high versatility of the Adh protein as a virulence factor and provide novel insight into the immunological pathogenic role of TAAs. PMID:27046446

  18. Ore controls at the Mahd adh Dhahab gold mine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, Ronald G.

    1978-01-01

    Mahd adh Dhahab is the largest of numerous ancient gold mines scattered through the Precambrian shield of Saudi Arabia and the only one with recent production. Free gold and silver, tellurides, pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite are in and associated with quartz veins and quartz veinlet stockworks. Country rocks consist of a sequence of pyroclastic and transported pyroclastic rocks of the Halaban Group that are locally highly silicified and potassium-feldspathized. Two known ore zones occur in a north-trending zone of quartz veins and breccias, faults, alteration, and metallization approximately 400 m wide and 1,000 m long. The ancient and recent workings are located in the northern part of this zone, and a significant new discovery, the southern mineralized zone, is in the southern part. A potential resource of 1.1 million tons of 27 g/t Au and 73 g/t Ag ore is contained in the southern mineralized zone. Geologic setting of ore bodies is similar in both zones. Significant mineralization occurs only within altered and fractured agglomerate directly beneath a cap of fine-grained tuff and sedimentary rock where the layered rocks are cut by metalliferous quartz veins. Ore was localized by four interacting controls; depth, an impervious cap, metalliferous quartz veins and a receptive host rock.

  19. Aquatic Community Colonization Within Riparian Headwater Corridors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Headwater streams are the smallest streams in a watershed. Their small size and high frequency of occurrence make them susceptible to anthropogenic habitat alterations. Many headwater streams in the Midwestern US have been channelized to drain agricultural fields. Aquatic macroinvertebrate communiti...

  20. Air transportation in the California Corridor of 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, M.; Mahaffy, K.; Yanagi, G.; Lechmanski, L.; Riddle, T.; Howard, K.; Chan, C.; Gorman, M.; Bauer, B.

    1989-01-01

    The topic of the 1988-1989 NASA/USRA Advanced Design Project at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, was the development of an air transportation system to meet the needs of the California Corridor for the year 2010. As aircraft design is taught by two instructors having different philosophies about the teaching process, the two classes took different approaches to address the problem. The first part of this summary (California Air Transit System) represents the work done by the students of Professor A. E. Andreoli, who followed a systems approach, emphasizing the determination of the proper mission. The second part of the summary (Four Aircraft to Service the California Corridor) contains the four aircraft designed by Dr. D. R. Sandlin's class based on specifications determined from work done in previous years.

  1. HSGT corridor planning: Land-use and other considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimpel, W.; Harrison, J.

    1997-05-01

    This paper explores land-use and other considerations in planning for high-speed ground transportation (HSGT) systems in the United States. Beyond the critical issue of project financing, upon which all HSGT projects proposed to date in the US have floundered, effective corridor planning (including route alignment and station siting decisions) will be key to the successful implementation of future HSGT project proposals in this country. The corridor planning process must consider many variable factors in deciding issues such as station locations, track/guideway routing and construction type, and overall route alignments. Additionally, there are many institutional factors, including community and environmental considerations as well as political and economic issues, which influence route selection and station location decisions. The general planning framework used throughout the US (shaped, in large part, by federal regulations) is discussed, and comparisons are made with high-speed rail development in other countries, particularly the larger transportation policy issues that have enabled HSGT development elsewhere.

  2. Oceanic Situational Awareness over the North Atlantic Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfield, Israel

    2005-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans impose a limitation on traffic capacity for a given corridor, given the projected traffic growth over the oceanic domain. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. This study uses Federal Aviation Administration data from a single day for the North Atlantic Corridor to analyze traffic loading to be used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from the aircraft to the satellites.

  3. Oil pipeline corridor through an intact forest alters ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in southeastern Ohio.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Bareena; Horn, David J; Purrington, Foster F; Gandhi, Kamal J K

    2008-06-01

    Litter-dwelling ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages were monitored 1 yr after the construction of a corridor for installation of an oil pipeline along a xeric ridge-top forest in southeastern Ohio. After the creation of the corridor, three distinct habitats were evident in these sites: open corridor, ecotone areas around the corridor, and undisturbed forest interior. Carabidae were collected using directional pitfall traps that were placed parallel and perpendicular to the corridor in each of the three habitats. Results indicate that more carabids were present in the ecotone than in the other two habitats. Carabid diversity as estimated by rarefaction was highest in the corridor followed by ecotone and forest interior. Generalist and forest specialists such as Synuchus impunctatus (Say), Carabus goryi Dejean, and Pterostichus trinarius (Casey) were present in greater numbers in the forest interior and ecotone assemblages. In contrast, open-habitat specialists such as Harpalus pensylvanicus (DeGeer) and Selenophorus opalinus (LeConte) were present in greater numbers in the corridor assemblages. Carabid assemblages of the corridor were distinct from those of the ecotone and forest interior, whereas the latter two habitats had very similar assemblages. The successional pathway of the corridor carabid assemblage will therefore be likely different from that of the forest interior and ecotone. Overall, results indicate that construction of the oil pipeline corridor had significant short-term effects on the carabid numbers, diversity, and species composition because of ensuing habitat changes and fragmentation of the forest. PMID:18559178

  4. 2. Operating Floor Rear (west) Corridor, view to the south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Operating Floor Rear (west) Corridor, view to the south. Note the cooling and service water take-off pipes for Unit 4 visible in left foreground of photograph. The deck plating that covers the oil pipes is also visible in the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  5. Moving beyond science to protect a mammalian migration corridor.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    As the discipline of conservation biology evolves and practitioners grow increasingly concerned about how to put results into achievable conservation, it is still unclear the extent to which science drives conservation outcomes, especially across rural landscapes. We addressed this issue by examining the role of science in the protection of a biological corridor. Our focus is on a North American endemic mammal reliant on long distance migration as an adaptive strategy, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The role of science in realizing policy change, while critical as a first step, was surprisingly small relative to the role of other human dimensions. In a case study, we strategically addressed a variety of conservation needs beyond science, first by building a partnership between government and private interests and then by enhancing interest in migratory phenomena across a landscape with divergent political ideologies and economic bases. By developing awareness and even people's pride in the concept of corridor conservation, we achieved local, state, and federal acceptance for protection of a 70 km long, 2 km wide pathway for the longest terrestrial migrant in the contiguous United States. Key steps included conducting and publishing research that defined the migration corridor; fostering a variety of media coverage at local, regional, and national levels; conducting public outreach through stakeholder workshops, meetings, and presentations; and meeting with and gaining the support of elected officials. All these contributed to the eventual policy change that created the first federally protected migration corridor in the United States, which in turn stimulated additional conservation actions. On the basis of our experience, we believe conservation scientists can and should step beyond traditional research roles to assist with on-the-ground conservation by engaging in aspects of conservation that involve local

  6. Bow-corridor local integrated resource plan: Draft plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This plan presents the Government of Alberta's resource management policy for public lands and resources within the Bow Corridor. Resource potentials and opportunities for development are identified to assist in the economic progress of the province. The plan includes identification of its purpose and scope and the context in which it is presented; and resource management objectives and guidelines for ecological and aesthetic resources, fisheries, forests, historical resources, minerals, range land, settlement, tourism/recreation, water and watersheds and wildlife.

  7. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  8. 2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

    2011-11-14

    This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  9. 2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

    2010-09-30

    This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  10. Corridor guided transport system utilizing permanent magnet levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, J.J.; Poland, A.P.; Lombardi, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    The invention relates to a corridor guided transport system including a guided goods conveyance container utilizing permanent magnet levitation. The transport system of the invention eliminates the need for the wheel and track arrangement presently required by known and utilized conventional train systems and also required by some conventional magnetic levitation transport systems and, as a result, is safer to operate and maintain than either of these known transportation systems.

  11. 2. Pipe Floor Front Corridor, view to the northwest, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Pipe Floor Front Corridor, view to the northwest, with Unit 4 turbine pit visible in right foreground of photograph. One of the governor compressors, originally used as an air blast circuit breaker compressor, is visible in the left foreground with one of the station sump and unwatering pump clusters located just beyond the compressor. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  12. Design Analysis of Corridors-in-the-Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min

    2008-01-01

    Corridors-in-the-sky or tubes is one of new concepts in dynamic airspace configuration. It accommodates high density traffic, which has similar trajectories. Less air traffic controllers workload is expected than classic airspaces, thus, corridors-in-the-sky may increase national airspace capacity and reduce flight delays. To design corridors-in-the-sky, besides identifying their locations, their utilization, altitudes, and impacts on remaining system need to be analyzed. This paper chooses one tube candidate and presents analyses of spatial and temporal utilization of the tube, the impact on the remaining traffic, and the potential benefit caused by off-loading the traffic from underlying sectors. Fundamental issues regarding to the benefits have been also clarified. Methods developed to assist the analysis are described. Analysis results suggest dynamic tubes in terms of varied utilizations during different time periods. And it is found that combined lane options would be a good choice to lower the impact on non-tube users. Finally, it shows significant reduction of peak aircraft count in underlying sectors with only one tube enabled.

  13. A bee in the corridor: centering and wall-following

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serres, Julien R.; Masson, Guillaume P.; Ruffier, Franck; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    In an attempt to better understand the mechanism underlying lateral collision avoidance in flying insects, we trained honeybees ( Apis mellifera) to fly through a large (95-cm wide) flight tunnel. We found that, depending on the entrance and feeder positions, honeybees would either center along the corridor midline or fly along one wall. Bees kept following one wall even when a major (150-cm long) part of the opposite wall was removed. These findings cannot be accounted for by the “optic flow balance” hypothesis that has been put forward to explain the typical bees’ “centering response” observed in narrower corridors. Both centering and wall-following behaviors are well accounted for, however, by a control scheme called the lateral optic flow regulator, i.e., a feedback system that strives to maintain the unilateral optic flow constant. The power of this control scheme is that it would allow the bee to guide itself visually in a corridor without having to measure its speed or distance from the walls.

  14. Biogeochemical sampling in the Mahd Adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebens, Richard J.; Shacklette, Hansford T.; Worl, Ronald G.

    1983-01-01

    A biogeochemical reconnaissance of the Mahd adh Dhahab district, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, confirms the ability of deep-rooted Acacia trees to reflect bedrock concentrations of some trace elements. The analytical values for lead, zinc, selenium, and cadmium in ash of tree branches are significantly higher in samples from areas of known mineralization (13 sites) than in samples from areas of no known mineralization (12 sites). Geometric mean concentrations of these elements in the two areas (mineralized; nonmineralized), quoted as parts per million in ash, are lead (122; 28), zinc (713; 443), selenium (1.2; 0.6), and cadmium (1.4; 0.5). The range of molybdenum values in ash from the two areas is similar, but a cluster of four sites in an area classified as nonmineralized corresponds to an area where the U.S. Geological Survey reported anomalous molybdenum values in rock in 1965. Results for other elements were either equivocal (mercury, tellurium, silver) or showed no correspondence to the two areas. Mean values for barium, manganese, potassium, and sodium are significantly higher in areas of no known mineralization, but we conclude that this reflects a difference in country rock major-element chemistry rather than the effect of ore-forming processes. The pattern of trace-metal values in Acacia ash is present whether the sampled tree grows on bedrock, on talus, or on residual or modern alluvium. This fact suggests that the trace-element chemistry of the trees reflects bedrock geochemistry and implies that Acacia biogeochemistry could be applied as a prospecting tool in areas where bedrock is not well exposed.

  15. Nurses’ perceptions of medication adherence in schizophrenia: results of the ADHES cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Robin; Alptekin, Koksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M.; Naber, Dieter; Olivares, José Manuel; Papageorgiou, Georgios; Roca, Miguel; Thomas, Pierre; Hargarter, Ludger; Schreiner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment is a widespread problem within schizophrenia therapy with serious consequences including increased risks of relapse and rehospitalization. Mounting evidence supports the key roles that nurses play in monitoring patient progress and facilitating long-term treatment adherence. The Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) nurses’ survey was designed to assess the opinions of nurses on the causes and management of partial/nonadherence to antipsychotic medication. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 4120 nurses from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Interpretation of results was based on a descriptive comparison of responses. Results: Nurses perceived 54% of patients seen in the preceding month to be partially/nonadherent to treatment. Most nurses (90%) reported some level of experience with administration of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics, with 24% of nurses administering >10 injections per month. The majority (85%) of nurses surveyed believed that improving adherence would improve patient outcomes. Nearly half (49%) reported that most of their patients depend on a family member or other nonprofessional carer to remind them to take their medication as prescribed. A similar proportion of nurses (43%) reported that most of their patients relied on a professional to remind them to take medication. Most nurses (92%) felt that ensuring continuous medication with LAI antipsychotics would yield long-term benefits for patients, but their opinion was that over a third of patients were unaware of LAI antipsychotic treatments. In a series of forced options, the strategy used most often by respondents (89%) to promote medication adherence was to build trusting relationships with patients while listening to and interpreting their needs and concerns. Respondents also rated this as the most effective strategy that they used (48%). Conclusion: Nurses are highly aware of adherence

  16. Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, James A.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hlava, Kevin J.; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B.; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2014-02-24

    This report, Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). The intent of WECC’s work was to identify planning-level energy corridors that the Department of Energy (DOE) and its affiliates could study in greater detail. Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the WECC Proposed Energy Corridors in five topic areas for use in reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. In compliance with Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Secretaries of Energy, Agriculture, and the Interior (Secretaries) published a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in 2008 to address the proposed designation of energy transport corridors on federal lands in the 11 western states. Subsequently, Records of Decision designating the corridors were issued in 2009 by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The 2012 settlement of a lawsuit, brought by The Wilderness Society and others against the United States, which identified environmental concerns for many of the corridors requires, among other things, periodic reviews of the corridors to assess the need for revisions, deletions, or additions. A 2013 Presidential Memorandum requires the Secretaries to undertake a continuing effort to identify and designate energy corridors. The WECC Proposed Energy Corridors and their analyses in this report provide key information for reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. Load centers and generation hubs identified in the WECC analysis, particularly as they reflect renewable energy development, would be useful in reviewing and potentially updating the designated Section 368 corridor network. Argonne used Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to

  17. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species.

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, Karen, E.; Barrett, Gary, W.

    2002-04-30

    Mabry, K.E., and G.W. Barrett. 2002. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species. Landscape Ecol. 17:629-636. Corridors are predicted to benefit populations in patchy habitats by promoting movement, which should increase population densities, gene flow, and recolonization of extinct patch populations. However, few investigators have considered use of the total landscape, particularly the possibility of interpatch movement through matrix habitat, by small mammals. This study compares home range sizes of 3 species of small mammals, the cotton mouse, old field mouse and cotton rat between patches with and without corridors. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant influence on average home range size. Habitat specialization and sex influenced the probability of an individual moving between 2 patches without corridors. The results of this study suggest that small mammals may be more capable of interpatch movement without corridors than is frequently assumed.

  18. Identification of functional corridors with movement characteristics of brown bears on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, T.A.; Farley, S.; Goldstein, M.I.; Servheen, C.

    2007-01-01

    We identified primary habitat and functional corridors across a landscape using Global Positioning System (GPS) collar locations of brown bears (Ursus arctos). After deriving density, speed, and angular deviation of movement, we classified landscape function for a group of animals with a cluster analysis. We described areas with high amounts of sinuous movement as primary habitat patches and areas with high amounts of very directional, fast movement as highly functional bear corridors. The time between bear locations and scale of analysis influenced the number and size of corridors identified. Bear locations should be collected at intervals ???6 h to correctly identify travel corridors. Our corridor identification technique will help managers move beyond the theoretical discussion of corridors and linkage zones to active management of landscape features that will preserve connectivity. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  19. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species.

    SciTech Connect

    Resasco, Julian; et al,

    2014-04-01

    Abstract. Landscape corridors are commonly used to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, but concerns persist that they may facilitate the spread of invasive species. In a replicated landscape experiment of open habitat, we measured effects of corridors on the invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, and native ants. Fire ants have two social forms: polygyne, which tend to disperse poorly but establish at high densities, and monogyne, which disperse widely but establish at lower densities. In landscapes dominated by polygyne fire ants, fire ant abundance was higher and native ant diversity was lower in habitat patches connected by corridors than in unconnected patches. Conversely, in landscapes dominated by monogyne fire ants, connectivity had no influence on fire ant abundance and native ant diversity. Polygyne fire ants dominated recently created landscapes, suggesting that these corridor effects may be transient. Our results suggest that corridors can facilitate invasion and they highlight the importance of considering species’ traits when assessing corridor utility.

  20. Molecular analysis of UAS(E), a cis element containing stress response elements responsible for ethanol induction of the KlADH4 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, C; Santori, F; Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    2000-01-01

    KlADH4 is a gene of Kluyveromyces lactis encoding a mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activity, which is specifically induced by ethanol and insensitive to glucose repression. In this work, we report the molecular analysis of UAS(E), an element of the KlADH4 promoter which is essential for the induction of KlADH4 in the presence of ethanol. UAS(E) contains five stress response elements (STREs), which have been found in many genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in the response of cells to conditions of stress. Whereas KlADH4 is not responsive to stress conditions, the STREs present in UAS(E) seem to play a key role in the induction of the gene by ethanol, a situation that has not been observed in the related yeast S. cerevisiae. Gel retardation experiments showed that STREs in the KlADH4 promoter can bind factor(s) under non-inducing conditions. Moreover, we observed that the RAP1 binding site present in UAS(E) binds KlRap1p. PMID:10724480

  1. The Arizona Sun Corridor: Quantifying climatic implications of megapolitan development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.; Moustaoui, M.; Mahalov, A.

    2010-12-01

    The local and regional-scale hydro-climatic impacts of land use and land cover change (LULCC) that result from urbanization require attention in light of future urban growth projections and related concerns for environmental sustainability. This is an especially serious issue over the southwestern U.S. where mounting pressure on the area’s natural desert environment and increasingly limited resources (e.g. water) exists, and is likely to worsen, due to unrelenting sprawl and associated urbanization. While previous modeling results have shown the degree to which the built environment has contributed to the region’s warming summertime climate, we use projections of future landscape change over the rapidly urbanizing Arizona Sun Corridor - an anticipated stretch of urban expanse that includes current metro Phoenix and Tucson - as surface boundary conditions to conduct high-resolution (order of 1-km) numerical simulations, over the seasonal timescale, to quantify the climatic effect of this relentlessly growing and increasingly vulnerable region. We use the latest version of the WRF modeling system to take advantage of several new capabilities, including a newly implemented nesting method used to refine the vertical mesh, and a comprehensive multi-story urban canopy scheme. We quantify the impact of projected (circa 2050) Sun Corridor megapolitan area on further development of the urban heat island (UHI), assess changes in the surface energy budget, with important implications for the near surface temperature and stability, and discuss modeled impacts on regional rainfall. Lastly, simulated effects are compared with projected warming due to increasing greenhouse gases (the GCMs from which these results are obtained currently do not take into account effects of urbanizing regions) and quantify the degree to which LULCC over the Arizona Sun Corridor will exacerbate regional anthropogenic climate change. A number of potential mitigation strategies are discussed

  2. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR318C (ADH6) gene product as a broad specificity NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase: relevance in aldehyde reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Larroy, Carol; Fernández, M Rosario; González, Eva; Parés, Xavier; Biosca, Josep A

    2002-01-01

    YMR318C represents an open reading frame from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with unknown function. It possesses a conserved sequence motif, the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) signature, specific to the medium-chain zinc-containing ADHs. In the present study, the YMR318C gene product has been purified to homogeneity from overexpressing yeast cells, and found to be a homodimeric ADH, composed of 40 kDa subunits and with a pI of 5.0-5.4. The enzyme was strictly specific for NADPH and was active with a wide variety of substrates, including aliphatic (linear and branched-chain) and aromatic primary alcohols and aldehydes. Aldehydes were processed with a 50-fold higher catalytic efficiency than that for the corresponding alcohols. The highest k(cat)/K(m) values were found with pentanal>veratraldehyde > hexanal > 3-methylbutanal >cinnamaldehyde. Taking into consideration the substrate specificity and sequence characteristics of the YMR318C gene product, we have proposed this gene to be called ADH6. The disruption of ADH6 was not lethal for the yeast under laboratory conditions. Although S. cerevisiae is considered a non lignin-degrading organism, the catalytic activity of ADHVI can direct veratraldehyde and anisaldehyde, arising from the oxidation of lignocellulose by fungal lignin peroxidases, to the lignin biodegradation pathway. ADHVI is the only S. cerevisiae enzyme able to significantly reduce veratraldehyde in vivo, and its overexpression allowed yeast to grow under toxic concentrations of this aldehyde. The enzyme may also be involved in the synthesis of fusel alcohols. To our knowledge this is the first NADPH-dependent medium-chain ADH to be characterized in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11742541

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) polymorphisms exacerbate bladder cancer risk associated with alcohol drinking: gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hidemi; Soga, Norihito; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Tanaka, Hideo; Yokomizo, Akira; Hayashi, Norio; Eto, Masatoshi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-06-01

    Although a range of chemical exposures (cigarette smoking and occupational exposure) are recognized risk factors for the development of bladder cancer (BCa), many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that alcohol drinking is not associated with BCa risk. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2; rs671, Glu504Lys) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B; rs1229984, His47Arg) polymorphisms impact the accumulation of acetaldehyde, resulting in an increased risk of various cancers. To date, however, no studies evaluating the association between BCa risk and alcohol drinking have considered these polymorphisms. Here, we conducted a matched case-control study to investigate whether ALDH2 and ADH1B polymorphisms influence BCa risk associated with alcohol drinking. Cases were 74 BCa patients and controls were 740 first-visit outpatients without cancer at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005. Odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and gene-environment interaction were assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. Results showed that ALDH2 Glu/Lys was associated with a significantly increased risk of BCa compared with Glu/Glu (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.14-3.62, P = 0.017). In contrast, ALDH2 Glu/Lys showed no increase in risk among the stratum of never drinkers compared with Glu/Glu, indicating a gene-environment interaction. ADH1B His/Arg had an OR of 1.98 (1.20-3.24, P = 0.007) compared with His/His. ADH1B Arg+ showed a similar OR and 95% CI. Individuals with ALDH2 Glu/Lys and ADH1B Arg+ had the highest risk of BCa compared with ALDH2 Glu/Glu and ADH1B His/His [OR 4.00 (1.81-8.87), P = 0.001]. PMID:26992901

  4. Enhanced Oceanic Situational Awareness for the North Atlantic Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfield, Israel

    2004-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans, impose a limitation of traffic capacity for a given corridor. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. Traffic loading from a specific day are used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from aircraft to the satellites.

  5. 1. Pipe Floor Rear Corridor, view to the southeast. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Pipe Floor Rear Corridor, view to the southeast. The wall of Unit 2 turbine pit is visible in the right foreground. The pipe and valve cluster in the right foreground is part of the blow down valve for Unit 2. This valve allows the water in the draft chest to be lowered (i.e., 'blown down') so that the unit can be motored (i.e., run like an electric motor rather than an electric power generator). - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  6. Traction studies of northeast corridor rail passenger service: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macie, T. W.; Stallkamp, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The enabling legislation of 1976 for improvement of service in the Northeast corridor (NEC) requires a schedule of 2 h 40 min between Washington and New York City by 1981 and 3 h 40 min between NYC and Boston, when the electrification is completed. Various options of the NEC operation that may satisfy the legislation were investigated, particularly in terms of travel time and energy consumption. NEC operations were compared with overseas systems and practices. The emerging new technology of AC traction was also evaluated.

  7. Effects of weighting schemes on the identification of wildlife corridors generated with least-cost methods.

    PubMed

    Parks, Sean A; McKelvey, Kevin S; Schwartz, Michael K

    2013-02-01

    The importance of movement corridors for maintaining connectivity within metapopulations of wild animals is a cornerstone of conservation. One common approach for determining corridor locations is least-cost corridor (LCC) modeling, which uses algorithms within a geographic information system to search for routes with the lowest cumulative resistance between target locations on a landscape. However, the presentation of multiple LCCs that connect multiple locations generally assumes all corridors contribute equally to connectivity, regardless of the likelihood that animals will use them. Thus, LCCs may overemphasize seldom-used longer routes and underemphasize more frequently used shorter routes. We hypothesize that, depending on conservation objectives and available biological information, weighting individual corridors on the basis of species-specific movement, dispersal, or gene flow data may better identify effective corridors. We tested whether locations of key connectivity areas, defined as the highest 75th and 90th percentile cumulative weighted value of approximately 155,000 corridors, shift under different weighting scenarios. In addition, we quantified the amount and location of private land that intersect key connectivity areas under each weighting scheme. Some areas that appeared well connected when analyzed with unweighted corridors exhibited much less connectivity compared with weighting schemes that discount corridors with large effective distances. Furthermore, the amount and location of key connectivity areas that intersected private land varied among weighting schemes. We believe biological assumptions and conservation objectives should be explicitly incorporated to weight corridors when assessing landscape connectivity. These results are highly relevant to conservation planning because on the basis of recent interest by government agencies and nongovernmental organizations in maintaining and enhancing wildlife corridors, connectivity will likely

  8. DNA-histone interactions are sufficient to position a single nucleosome juxtaposing Drosophila Adh adult enhancer and distal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J R; Benyajati, C

    1993-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster is transcribed from two tandem promoters in distinct developmental and tissue-specific patterns. Both promoters are regulated by separate upstream enhancer regions. In its wild-type context the adult enhancer specifically stimulates only the distal promoter, approximately 400 bp downstream, and not the proximal promoter, which is approximately 700 bp further downstream. Genomic footprinting and micrococcal nuclease analyses have revealed a specifically positioned nucleosome between the distal promoter and adult enhancer. In vitro reconstitution of this nucleosome demonstrated that DNA-core histone interactions alone are sufficient to position the nucleosome. Based on this observation and sequence periodicities in the underlying DNA, the mechanism of positioning appears to involve specific DNA structural features (ie flexibility or curvature). We have observed this nucleosome positioned early during development, before tissue differentiation, and before non-histone protein-DNA interactions are established at the distal promoter or adult enhancer. This nucleosome positioning element in the Adh regulatory region could be involved in establishing a specific tertiary nucleoprotein structure that facilitates specific cis-element accessibility and/or distal promoter-adult enhancer interactions. Images PMID:8451195

  9. Expression in fibroblasts and in live animals of Entamoeba histolytica polypeptides EhCP112 and EhADH112.

    PubMed

    Madriz, Xochil; Martínez, Máximo B; Rodríguez, Mario A; Sierra, Gustavo; Martínez-López, Carolina; Riverón, Ana M; Flores, Leopoldo; Orozco, Esther

    2004-05-01

    EhCPADH is an immunogenic, heterodimeric protein that is formed by EhCP112 (cysteine protease) and EhADH112 (adhesin), polypeptides involved in Entamoeba histolytica's cytopathic effect, target-cell adherence and phagocytosis. The EhCPADH complex is located in the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic vacuoles. Here, the independent expression of EhCP112 and EhADH112 in fibroblasts and hamsters was analysed. Also investigated was the immunological response in animals independently inoculated with plasmid pcDNA-Ehcp112, which carries the complete cysteine protease-encoding gene, or with plasmid pcDNA-Ehadh112, which carries the C terminus of the adhesin-encoding gene, or with a mixture of both. Both proteins were expressed in the plasma membranes of the transfected fibroblasts. EhCP112 was toxic for the mammalian cells. Proteins were also independently expressed in hamsters after inoculation with the plasmids. Their expression was indirectly evaluated by the presence of antibodies in the inoculated animals. Remarkably, co-immunization of the animals with the two DNA plasmids resulted in an earlier and higher anti-E. histolytica IgG induction than immunization with separate plasmids. In contrast, the cellular immune response was not noticeably improved by the plasmid mixture. Interestingly, protection against liver abscesses was detected only in animals that received the plasmid mixture and no protection was observed in hamsters independently inoculated with plasmid pcDNA-Ehcp112 or pcDNA-Ehadh112. PMID:15133088

  10. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baptiste Dafflon

    2015-04-07

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013).Processing flowchart for each corridor:Ground control points (GCP, 20.3 cm square white targets, every 20 m) surveyed with RTK GPS. Acquisition of RGB pictures using a Kite-based platform. Structure from Motion based reconstruction using hundreds of pictures and GCP coordinates. Export of DEM and RGB mosaic in geotiff format (NAD 83, 2012 geoid, UTM zone 4 north) with pixel resolution of about 2 cm, and x,y,z accuracy in centimeter range (less than 10 cm). High-accuracy and high-resolution inside GCPs zone for L2 corridor (500x20m), AB corridor (500x40) DEM will be updated once all GCPs will be measured. Only zones between GCPs are accurate although all the mosaic is provided.

  11. 75 FR 17756 - Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission will be held on... on May 20, 2010 at 9 a.m. at Atria Draper Place located at 25 Hopedale Street, Hopedale, MA for the..., Executive Director, John H. Chafee, Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission, One...

  12. 77 FR 28421 - Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Central Corridor Light Rail Transit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Light Rail Transit Project, Minneapolis and Saint Paul, MN AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... prepare a Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) for the Central Corridor Light Rail... miles long and consists of 23 Central Corridor Light Rail Transit (LRT) stations. The SDEIS...

  13. 45 CFR 153.510 - Risk corridors establishment and payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... methodology. 153.510 Section 153.510 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards Related to the Risk Corridors Program §...

  14. 45 CFR 153.510 - Risk corridors establishment and payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... methodology. 153.510 Section 153.510 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS STANDARDS RELATED TO REINSURANCE, RISK CORRIDORS, AND RISK ADJUSTMENT UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Health Insurance Issuer Standards Related to the Risk Corridors Program §...

  15. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although corridors have become commonplace in conservation to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, concerns persist that they may facilitate spread of invasive species. In a large-scale experiment, we measured effects of corridors on invasive fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, and on comm...

  16. MTR WING, TRA604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. WEST CORRIDOR. CAMERA FACES NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. WEST CORRIDOR. CAMERA FACES NORTH. HVAC AREA IS AT RIGHT OF CORRIDOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-13-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Urban Corridor Consortium Task Force on Part-Time and Commuter Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. Urban Corridor Consortium.

    Ways that urban corridor campuses might respond to the increasing enrollment of part-time and commuter students were reviewed by the University of Wisconsin Urban Corridor Consortium Task Force on Part-Time and Commuter Students. Members of the consortia are the following University of Wisconsin campuses: Green Bay, Milwaukee, Oshkosh, Parkside,…

  18. Modeling Fluvial Response to In-stream Woody Vegetation: Implications for Stream Corridor Restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    River restoration and bank stabilization programs often use vegetation for improving stream corridor habitat, aesthetic, and function. Yet no study has examined the use of managed vegetation plantings to transform a straight, degraded stream corridor into a more functional, aesthetically-pleasing m...

  19. 75 FR 2885 - Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Office of the Secretary Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission: Notice of Meeting... the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor Commission will be held on...: Jan H. Reitsma, Executive Director, John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage...

  20. 14 CFR 93.305 - Flight-free zones and flight corridors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight-free zones and flight corridors. 93... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.305 Flight-free zones and flight corridors. Except in...

  1. 76 FR 60587 - Environmental Impact Statement; North Corridor Transit Project, Seattle (WA) Metropolitan Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... County. ] Alternatives Analysis and Results The North Corridor Transit Project Alternatives Analysis (AA... for transit projects seeking New Starts funding (Title 49 United States Code 5309.) The AA report also... Supplemental EIS on the Regional Transit Long-Range Plan (June 2005). The North Corridor AA considered...

  2. 77 FR 17219 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... and the RFC, where relevant. On July 15, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 41950-41956... Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment; Final Rule #0;#0...; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment AGENCY: Department of Health and...

  3. Corridors of barchan dunes: Stability and size selection.

    PubMed

    Hersen, P; Andersen, K H; Elbelrhiti, H; Andreotti, B; Claudin, P; Douady, S

    2004-01-01

    Barchans are crescentic dunes propagating on a solid ground. They form dune fields in the shape of elongated corridors in which the size and spacing between dunes are rather well selected. We show that even very realistic models for solitary dunes do not reproduce these corridors. Instead, two instabilities take place. First, barchans receive a sand flux at their back proportional to their width while the sand escapes only from their horns. Large dunes proportionally capture more sand than they lose, while the situation is reversed for small ones: therefore, solitary dunes cannot remain in a steady state. Second, the propagation speed of dunes decreases with the size of the dune: this leads, through the collision process, to a coarsening of barchan fields. We show that these phenomena are not specific to the model, but result from general and robust mechanisms. The length scales needed for these instabilities to develop are derived and discussed. They turn out to be much smaller than the dune field length. As a conclusion, there should exist further, yet unknown, mechanisms regulating and selecting the size of dunes. PMID:14995611

  4. Abort-once-around entry dispersion corridor analysis. [for space shuttle reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    Abort-Once-Around (AOA) entry dispersion corridors were determined for Shuttle Mission 3A. These corridors are presented as plots of entry interface flight path angle versus range to target. The methods used to determine the corridors are discussed. Major dispersion sources are discussed and results presented. While specific trajectory inputs and constraints are subject to change, the dispersion corridors show the trends under consideration. The corridors presented show the delta V advantage of the two-burn over the one-burn AOA. The atmospheric dispersion study illustrates the need to target for the seasonal atmosphere. The 40 deg/30 deg angle of attack (alpha) (TPS design) profile did not provide adequate crossrange capability with worst case aerodynamic dispersions. This problem was alleviated with the change to a 38 deg/28 deg alpha profile. The backface temperatures calculated were generally higher than the present limits.

  5. Bison phylogeography constrains dispersal and viability of the Ice Free Corridor in western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Duane; Ives, John W.; Zazula, Grant D.; Letts, Brandon; Andrews, Thomas D.; Driver, Jonathan C.; Hall, Elizabeth; Hare, P. Gregory; Jass, Christopher N.; MacKay, Glen; Southon, John R.; Stiller, Mathias; Woywitka, Robin; Suchard, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ice Free Corridor has been invoked as a route for Pleistocene human and animal dispersals between eastern Beringia and more southerly areas of North America. Despite the significance of the corridor, there are limited data for when and how this corridor was used. Hypothetical uses of the corridor include: the first expansion of humans from Beringia into the Americas, northward postglacial expansions of fluted point technologies into Beringia, and continued use of the corridor as a contact route between the north and south. Here, we use radiocarbon dates and ancient mitochondrial DNA from late Pleistocene bison fossils to determine the chronology for when the corridor was open and viable for biotic dispersals. The corridor was closed after ∼23,000 until 13,400 calendar years ago (cal y BP), after which we find the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bison used this route to disperse from the south, and by 13,000 y from the north. Our chronology supports a habitable and traversable corridor by at least 13,000 cal y BP, just before the first appearance of Clovis technology in interior North America, and indicates that the corridor would not have been available for significantly earlier southward human dispersal. Following the opening of the corridor, multiple dispersals of human groups between Beringia and interior North America may have continued throughout the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene. Our results highlight the utility of phylogeographic analyses to test hypotheses about paleoecological history and the viability of dispersal routes over time. PMID:27274051

  6. Bison phylogeography constrains dispersal and viability of the Ice Free Corridor in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Heintzman, Peter D; Froese, Duane; Ives, John W; Soares, André E R; Zazula, Grant D; Letts, Brandon; Andrews, Thomas D; Driver, Jonathan C; Hall, Elizabeth; Hare, P Gregory; Jass, Christopher N; MacKay, Glen; Southon, John R; Stiller, Mathias; Woywitka, Robin; Suchard, Marc A; Shapiro, Beth

    2016-07-19

    The Ice Free Corridor has been invoked as a route for Pleistocene human and animal dispersals between eastern Beringia and more southerly areas of North America. Despite the significance of the corridor, there are limited data for when and how this corridor was used. Hypothetical uses of the corridor include: the first expansion of humans from Beringia into the Americas, northward postglacial expansions of fluted point technologies into Beringia, and continued use of the corridor as a contact route between the north and south. Here, we use radiocarbon dates and ancient mitochondrial DNA from late Pleistocene bison fossils to determine the chronology for when the corridor was open and viable for biotic dispersals. The corridor was closed after ∼23,000 until 13,400 calendar years ago (cal y BP), after which we find the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bison used this route to disperse from the south, and by 13,000 y from the north. Our chronology supports a habitable and traversable corridor by at least 13,000 cal y BP, just before the first appearance of Clovis technology in interior North America, and indicates that the corridor would not have been available for significantly earlier southward human dispersal. Following the opening of the corridor, multiple dispersals of human groups between Beringia and interior North America may have continued throughout the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene. Our results highlight the utility of phylogeographic analyses to test hypotheses about paleoecological history and the viability of dispersal routes over time. PMID:27274051

  7. 78 FR 43226 - Going-to-the-Sun Road Corridor Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, Glacier National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... National Park Service Going-to-the-Sun Road Corridor Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement... Environmental Impact Statement for the Going-to-the-Sun Road Corridor Management Plan for Glacier National Park...-to-the Sun Road (GTSR) corridor. DATES: The National Park Service will accept comments from...

  8. Preliminary mineralogic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope study of the Mahd adh Dhahab gold mine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert O.; Hall, W.E.; Cunningham, C.G.; Czamanske, G.K.; Afifi, A.M.; Stacey, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Mahd adh Dhahab mine, located about 280 km northeast of Jiddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, has yielded more than 2 million ounces of gold from periodic production during the past 3,000 years. A new orebody on the southern side of the ancient workings, known as the South orebody, is being developed by Gold Fields-Mahd adh Dhahab Limited. A suite of samples was collected from the newly exposed orebody for preliminary mineralogic, stable isotope, fluid inclusion, and geochemical studies. The Mahd adh Dhahab deposit is in the carapace of a Proterozoic epizonal rhyolite stock that domed pyroclastic and metasedimentary rocks of the Proterozoic Halaban group. Ore of gold, silver, copper, zinc, tellurium, and lead is associated with north-trending, steeply dipping quartz veins in a zone 1,000 m long and 400 m wide. The veins include an assemblage of quartz-chlorite-pyrite-hematite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-precious metals, which is similar to the mineral assemblage at the epithermal deposit at Creede, Colorado. The primary ore contains abundant chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrite in addition to a complex precious metal assemblage. Gold and silver occur principally as minute grains of telluride minerals disseminated in quartz-chlorite-hematite and as inclusions in chalcopyrite and sphalerite. Telluride minerals include petzite, hessite, and sylvanite. Free gold is present but not abundant. All of the vein-quartz samples contained abundant, minute inclusions of both low-density, vapor-rich fluids and liquid-rich fluids. Primary fluid inclusions yielded homogenization temperatures of from 110? to 238? C. Preliminary light-stable isotope studies of the sulfide minerals and quartz showed that all of the d34S values are between 1.2 and 6.3 per mil, which is a typical range for hydrothermal sulfide minerals that derive their sulfur from an igneous source. The data-suggest that the sulfide sulfur isotope geochemistry was controlled by exchange with la large sulfur isotope

  9. Subjective Response to Alcohol and ADH Polymorphisms in a Select Sample of Young Adult Male East Indians and Africans in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Montane Jaime, Lazara Karelia; Shafe, Samuel; Liang, Tiebing; Wills, Derek N; Berg, Greta I; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Level of response to alcohol has been associated with risk of alcohol dependence in a number of ethnic groups. In the present study, subjective and objective responses to alcohol were evaluated in Indo-Trinidadians (Indo-T) and Afro-Trinidadians (Afro-T). Associations of alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphisms with response to alcohol, using the Subjective High Assessment Scale (SHAS), and breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC) were tested. Method: Regular male drinkers without alcohol dependence (n = 112) ages 18–25 years participated in alcohol challenge sessions consisting of placebo and two doses of alcohol (target BrAC: 0 g/dl for placebo, .04 g/dl low dose, and .08 g/dl high dose) and genotyped for variants in ADH1B*3 and ADH1C*2. Results: Indo-T had significantly higher BrAC, pulse rates, and cortisol levels when compared with Afro-T but did not have significantly higher SHAS values. Higher responses on the SHAS items muddle/confused and nauseated were significantly associated with the presence of at least one ADH1B*3 allele following the high dose of alcohol in Afro-T. Indo-T with at least one ADH1C*2 allele displayed significantly different Drug × Time interactions for the SHAS item effects of alcohol at the low dose and for the SHAS items clumsy, muddle/confused, effects of alcohol, floating, drunk, and total at the high dose from Indo-T with two ADH1C*1 alleles. Conclusions: This is the first study that has investigated individual sensitivity to alcohol in a Caribbean population and in people of East Indian descent. Indo-T with at least one ADH1C*2 allele may be at higher risk for heavy drinking by feeling less of the effects of alcohol, including nausea. In Afro-T, having at least one ADH1B*3 allele appears to exert a protective effect by enhancing the unpleasant effects of alcohol, such as nausea and confusion. PMID:25208201

  10. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  11. The Joint Effects of ADH1B Variants and Childhood Adversity on Alcohol-Related Phenotypes in African-American and European-American Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Carolyn E.; Wang, Zuoheng; Xu, Ke; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background The ADH1B gene has consistently been implicated in problem drinking, but rarely incorporated into gene by environment investigations of alcohol phenotypes. This study examined the joint effects of variation in ADH1B and childhood adversity – a well-documented risk factor for alcohol problems and moderator of genetic liability to psychiatric outcomes – on maximum drinks consumed in a 24-hour period (maxdrinks) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms. Methods Data were drawn from 2,617 African-American (AA) and 1,436 European-American (EA) participants (42% female) in a multisite genetic study of substance dependence. We tested the most significant ADH1B SNPs for alcohol dependence from a genomewide association study with this sample, ADH1B-rs1229984 (Arg48His) and ADH1B-rs2066702 (Arg370Cys), in EA and AA subsamples, respectively. Results Ordinal regression analyses conducted separately by sex and population revealed significant main effects for childhood adversity both for alcohol phenotypes in AA women and men and for maxdrinks in EA women. A significant rs1229984 by childhood adversity interaction was observed for AUD symptoms in EA men. Unexposed His-allele carriers reported a mean of 3.6 AUD criteria, but adversity-exposed His-allele carriers endorsed approximately the same number (6.3) as those without the protective allele (6.3 and 7.0 for adversity-exposed and adversity-unexposed groups, respectively). Conclusions Results suggest that under conditions of childhood adversity, the His allele does not exert its protective effects in EA men (OR=0.57, CI:0.32–1.01; p=0.056). Findings highlight the robust risk effect conferred by childhood adversity and the importance of considering population and sex in genetically informative investigations of its association with alcohol outcomes. PMID:25410943

  12. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Genus Fragaria (Strawberry) Using Intron-Containing Sequence from the ADH-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    DiMeglio, Laura M.; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae. PMID:25078607

  13. Air transportation systems for the California corridor of 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    In 1986 NASA and USRA identified Cal Poly as one of seven 'Centers of Aircraft Design Education', and accepted a proposal from Cal Poly to conduct a three-year study of the potential for Lighter-Than-Air (LTA), Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL), and Short Take-Off and landing (STOL) aircraft concepts for air transportation within the California corridor. The project emphasizes configurations that are both innovative and unconventional in design for use in the 2010 time period. The topic of LTA/VTOL/STOL aircraft was selected because it is consistent with the mission of the NASA Ames Research Center and is a broad topic that succeeding classes at Cal Poly can continue to iterate and refine to produce meaningful results for NASA. Along with studying the technical issues normally involved in any aircraft design problem, the topics of safety, noise, public acceptance, and economic viability in commercial operations are also addressed.

  14. The California corridor transportation system: A design summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A design group was assembled to find and research criteria relevent to the design of a California Corridor Transportation System. The efforts of this group included defining the problem, conducting a market analysis, formulation of a demand model, identification and evaluation of design drivers, and the systematic development of a solution. The problems of the current system were analyzed and used to determine design drivers, which were divided into the broad categories of cost, convenience, feasibility, environment, safety, and social impact. The relative importance of individual problems was addressed, resulting in a hierarchy of design drivers. Where possible, methods of evaluating the relative merit of proposed systems with respect to each driver were developed. Short takeoff vertical landing aircraft concepts are also discussed for supersonic fighters.

  15. Strategy for the Identification of an INL Comprehensive Utility Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    This report documents the strategy developed to identify a comprehensive utility corridor (CUC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The strategy established the process for which the Campus Development Office will evaluate land management issues. It is a process that uses geographical information system geospatial technology to layer critical INL mission information in a way that thorough evaluations can be conducted and strategies developed. The objective of the CUC Project was to develop a process that could be implemented to identify potential utility corridor options for consideration. The process had to take into account all the missions occurring on the INL and other land-related issues. The process for developing a CUC strategy consists of the following four basic elements using geographical information system capabilities: 1. Development of an INL base layer map; this base layer map geospatially references all stationary geographical features on INL and sitewide information. 2. Development of current and future mission land-use need maps; this involved working with each directorate to identify current mission land use needs and future land use needs that project 30 years into the future. 3. Development of restricted and potential constraint maps; this included geospatially mapping areas such as wells, contaminated areas, firing ranges, cultural areas, ecological areas, hunting areas, easement, and grazing areas. 4. Development of state highway and power line rights of way map; this included geospatially mapping rights-of-way along existing state highways and power lines running through the INL that support INL operations. It was determined after completing and evaluating the geospatial information that the area with the least impact to INL missions was around the perimeter of the INL Site. Option 1, in this document, identifies this perimeter; however, it does not mean the entire perimeter is viable. Many places along the perimeter corridor cannot

  16. 7. View (looking west) of the second floor corridor in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View (looking west) of the second floor corridor in the south segment of building. The second floor was designed for residential rental rooms. The guardrail, balusters, newel posts, and handrail, as well as the two upper-level door openings with transoms, are original features. The doors, proper, are nonoriginal and probably were installed when the second floor was converted to office use. The pair of doors (one leaf is open and one is closed) is located at the intermediate stair landing. The original exterior doorway (without a door) is located at the bottom of the stair. The upper-level door without a transom is nonoriginal, as are the floor tile and wall paneling. At the time of documentation a suspended ceiling and duct were removed to ... - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. Carbon stock corridors to mitigate climate change and promote biodiversity in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantz, Patrick; Goetz, Scott; Laporte, Nadine

    2014-02-01

    A key issue in global conservation is how biodiversity co-benefits can be incorporated into land use and climate change mitigation activities, particularly those being negotiated under the United Nations to reduce emissions from tropical deforestation and forest degradation. Protected areas have been the dominant strategy for tropical forest conservation and they have increased substantially in recent decades. Avoiding deforestation by preserving carbon stored in vegetation between protected areas provides an opportunity to mitigate the effects of land use and climate change on biodiversity by maintaining habitat connectivity across landscapes. Here we use a high-resolution data set of vegetation carbon stock to map corridors traversing areas of highest biomass between protected areas in the tropics. The derived corridors contain 15% of the total unprotected aboveground carbon in the tropical region. A large number of corridors have carbon densities that approach or exceed those of the protected areas they connect, suggesting these are suitable areas for achieving both habitat connectivity and climate change mitigation benefits. To further illustrate how economic and biological information can be used for corridor prioritization on a regional scale, we conducted a multicriteria analysis of corridors in the Legal Amazon, identifying corridors with high carbon, high species richness and endemism, and low economic opportunity costs. We also assessed the vulnerability of corridors to future deforestation threat.

  18. Identifying transit corridors for elephant using a long time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittiglio, Claudia; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van Gils, Hein A. M. J.; Prins, Herbert H. T.

    2012-02-01

    The role of corridors in mitigating the effects of landscape fragmentation on biodiversity is controversial. Recent studies have highlighted the need for new approaches in corridor design using long-term datasets. We present a method to identify transit corridors for elephant at a population scale over a large area and an extended period of time using long-term aerial surveys. We investigated environmental and anthropogenic factors directly and indirectly related to the wet versus dry season distribution of elephant and its transit corridors. Four environmental variables predicted the presence of elephant at the landscape scale in both seasons: distance from permanent water, protected areas and settlements and vegetation structure. Path analysis revealed that altitude and monthly average NDVI, and distance from temporary water had a significant indirect effect on elephant distribution at local scale in dry and wet seasons respectively. Five transit corridors connecting Tarangire National Park and the northern as well as south-eastern wet season dispersal areas were identified and matched the wildlife migration routes described in the 1960s. The corridors are stable over the decades, providing landscape connectivity for elephant. Our approach yielded insights how advanced spatial analysis can be integrated with biological data available from long-term datasets to identify actual transit corridors and predictors of species distribution.

  19. Effectiveness of a regional corridor in connecting two Florida black bear populations.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jeremy D; Oli, Madan K; Wooten, Michael C; Eason, Thomas H; McCown, J Walter; Paetkau, David

    2006-02-01

    Corridors may mitigate the adverse effects of habitat fragmentation by restoring or maintaining connectivity between disjunct populations. The efficacy of corridors for large carnivores, however has rarely been evaluated objectively. We used noninvasive sampling, microsatellite analysis, and population assignment tests to evaluate the effectiveness of a regional corridor in connecting two Florida black bear (Ursus americanus floridanus) populations (Osceola and Ocala). Bear movement was predominantly unidirectional, with a limited mixing of individuals from the two populations in one area of the corridor We also documented bears in Osceola that were genetically assigned to Ocala and bears in Osceola that may be offspring from an Osceola-Ocala mating. Our results indicate that the Osceola-Ocala corridor is functional and provides a conduit for gene flow between these populations. Human development, however may hinder the use of the Osceola-Ocala corridor by bears. The noninvasive sampling and genetic methods we used provide a means of evaluating corridor effectiveness that can help identify linkages necessary for maintaining metapopulation structure and population viability. PMID:16909668

  20. Discrete element method for emergency flow of pedestrian in S-type corridor.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyeongwon; Park, Junyoung

    2014-10-01

    Pedestrian flow in curved corridor should be modeled before design because this type of corridor can be most dangerous part during emergency evacuation. In this study, this flow is analyzed by Discrete Element Method with psychological effects. As the turning slope of corridor increases, the evacuation time is linearly increases. However, in the view of crashed death accident, the case with 90 degree turning slope can be dangerous because there are 3 dangerous points. To solve this matter, the pedestrian gathering together in curved part should be dispersed. PMID:25942811

  1. View of corridor running north/south on the second floor showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of corridor running north/south on the second floor showing door openings to residential rooms, window opening to lightwell, and secondary stair to third floor - Hotel Adams, 391 Leavenworth Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 76 FR 29290 - Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel Corridor, Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Interstate 64 Hampton Roads Bridge... Transportation for potential transportation improvements along the Interstate 64 Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel... Bridge Tunnel (HRBT) corridor in Virginia. The approximate limits of the study are from the...

  3. 11. Interior view of main corridor looking into open secretarial/reception ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view of main corridor looking into open secretarial/reception space; showing closed doorway to office; center of west wing, view to southwest. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Administration Office, 2704 George Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  4. Interior, south wing, corridor, looking west U.S. Veterans Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, south wing, corridor, looking west - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. DC66843 VIEW OF THE INDEPENDENCE AVENUE CORRIDOR SPANNED BY THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-43 VIEW OF THE INDEPENDENCE AVENUE CORRIDOR SPANNED BY THE •DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BRIDGES, LOOKING WEST FROM TWELFTH STREET, SW - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. 77 FR 58439 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Northeast Corridor Between Washington, DC, New York, NY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the Northeast Corridor Between Washington, DC, New York, NY and Boston, MA AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

  7. Riparian corridors enhance movement of a forest specialist bird in fragmented tropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Cameron S.; St. Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2008-01-01

    Riparian corridors and fencerows are hypothesized to increase the persistence of forest animals in fragmented landscapes by facilitating movement among suitable habitat patches. This function may be critically important for forest birds, which have declined dramatically in fragmented habitats. Unfortunately, direct evidence of corridor use has been difficult to collect at landscape scales and this limits support for corridors in conservation planning. Using telemetry and handheld GPS units, we examined the movement of forest birds by translocating territorial individuals of barred antshrikes (Thamnophilus doliatus; a forest specialist) and rufous-naped wrens (Campylorhynchus rufinucha; a forest generalist) 0.7–1.9 km from their territories in the highly fragmented tropical dry forest of Costa Rica. In each translocation, the directly intervening habitat comprised 1 of 3 treatments: forested riparian corridor, linear living fencerow, or open pasture. Antshrikes returned faster and with greater success in riparian corridors relative to pasture treatments. This species also traveled more directly in riparian corridor treatments, detoured to use forested routes in the other 2 treatments, and did not use fencerows even when they led directly to their home territories. By contrast, wrens were more likely to use fencerows when returning, and return time and success were equivalent among the 3 treatments. Both species crossed fewer gaps in tree cover during riparian corridor treatments than in fencerow or pasture treatments. We conclude that antshrikes, which may be representative of other forest specialists, use forested corridors for movement in this landscape and that fencerows are avoided as movement conduits. PMID:19017794

  8. Evolution of the landscape along the Clear Creek Corridor, Colorado; urbanization, aggregate mining and reclamation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arbogast, Belinda; Knepper, Daniel H.; Melick, Roger A.; Hickman, John

    2002-01-01

    Prime agricultural land along the Clear Creek floodplain, Colorado, attracted settlement in the 1850's but the demand for sand and gravel for 1900's construction initiated a sequence of events that exceeded previous interests and created the modified landscape and urban ecosystem that exists today. The Clear Creek valley corridor offers a landscape filled with a persistent visible and hidden reminder of it's past use. The map sheets illustrate the Clear Creek landscape as a series of compositions, both at the macro view (in the spatial context of urban structure and highways from aerial photographs) and micro view (from the civic scale where landscape features like trees, buildings, and sidewalks are included). The large-scale topographic features, such as mountains and terraces, appear 'changeless' (they do change over geologic time), while Clear Creek has changed from a wide braided stream to a narrow confined stream. Transportation networks (streets and highways) and spiraling population growth in adjacent cities (from approximately 38,000 people in 1880 to over a million in 1999) form two dominant landscape patterns. Mining and wetland/riparian occupy the smallest amount of land use acres compared to urban, transportation, or water reservoir activities in the Clear Creek aggregate reserve study area. Four types of reclaimed pits along Clear Creek were determined: water storage facilities, wildlife/greenbelt space, multiple-purpose reservoirs, and 'hidden scenery.' The latter involves infilling gravel pits (with earth backfill, concrete rubble, or sanitary landfill) and covering the site with light industry or residential housing making the landform hard to detect as a past mine site. Easier to recognize are the strong-edged, rectilinear water reservoirs, reclaimed from off-channel sand and gravel pits that reflect the land survey grid and property boundaries. The general public may not realize softly contoured linear wildlife corridors connecting urban

  9. Extension of an iterative closest point algorithm for simultaneous localization and mapping in corridor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Haosong; Chen, Weihai; Wu, Xingming; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is a crucial technique for intelligent robots to navigate autonomously and execute complex tasks. It can also be applied to shape measurement, reverse engineering, and many other scientific or engineering fields. A widespread SLAM algorithm, named KinectFusion, performs well in environments with complex shapes. However, it cannot handle translation uncertainties well in highly structured scenes. This paper improves the KinectFusion algorithm and makes it competent in both structured and unstructured environments. 3-D line features are first extracted according to both color and depth data captured by Kinect sensor. Then the lines in the current data frame are matched with the lines extracted from the entire constructed world model. Finally, we fuse the distance errors of these line-pairs into the standard KinectFusion framework and estimate sensor poses using an iterative closest point-based algorithm. Comparative experiments with the KinectFusion algorithm and one state-of-the-art method in a corridor scene have been done. The experimental results demonstrate that after our improvement, the KinectFusion algorithm can also be applied to structured environments and has higher accuracy. Experiments on two open access datasets further validated our improvements.

  10. Mapping threats to power line corridors for Connecticut rights-of-way management.

    PubMed

    Poulos, H M; Camp, A E

    2011-02-01

    Trees are a major threat to power line security across forested regions of the world. We developed a decision support system for identifying locations in Connecticut, USA where trees have grown tall enough to make contact with transmission lines during storms. We used the Random Forest algorithm, danger tree presence/absence data, and 25 raster environmental datasets to develop (1) an understanding of the abiotic environmental settings that host danger trees and (2) a spatially explicit map of danger tree distributions across Connecticut power line corridors. Danger trees were prevalent in locations (1) with an infrequent history of storms; (2) forested and residential land uses; and (3) low to middle elevations. Products from this research can be transferred to adaptive right-of-way management because they present managers with key information on where danger trees are likely to occur, and the methods presented herein have great potential for future application to other regions managers seek to identify high priority areas for danger tree removal. PMID:21153640

  11. Major migration corridors of mesoscale ocean eddies in the South China Sea from 1992 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yunyan; Wu, Di; Liang, Fuyuan; Yi, Jiawei; Mo, Yang; He, Zhigang; Pei, Tao

    2016-06-01

    It has become a routine to automatically identify mesoscale ocean eddies in the world's oceans and reconstruct their trajectories from remote sensing data. However, the major migration pathways along which eddies mainly propagate are not clear, particularly in the South China Sea (SCS). This study utilized a trajectory partition-and-group method to quantitatively measure and group trajectories of eddies in the SCS from 1992 to 2012 to extract their major migration corridors. The trajectories were first simplified into segments using the minimum description length (MDL) principle, their origin and destination (OD) points, and their trajectory partitions (TP) between two consecutive tracking times, respectively. The MDL-, OD-, and TP-based segments were then respectively grouped into clusters using the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN) algorithm. Representative trajectories, i.e., the major migration corridors, were then extracted from different clusters. Results show that the MDL-based corridors are the most tenable in revealing the migration corridors of eddies in the SCS. The major MDL-based migration corridors of both anticyclonic and cyclonic eddy in the SCS mainly extend westward and show a meridional propagation toward the equator. The different major migration corridors in the northern, central, and southern SCS could be attributed to the various influences of seabed topography and/or background currents in these regions.

  12. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose....

  13. TA-59 North Parking Lot and Pajarito Road Corridor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide traffic engineering services for the TA-59 North Parking Lot/Pajarito Road corridor Analysis at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The following tasks were accomplished to assess the development of the north parking lot and Pajarito Road in the vicinity of TA-59: conducted turning-movement counts from 7 AM to 9 AM and from 4 PM to 6 PM at the Pajarito Road/TA-59 intersection; conducted a parking supply and demand survey for all the parking lots within TA-59 on half-hour intervals between 0600--1800 (6 AM to 6 PM); conducted mid-day directional speed study along Pajarito Road, just east or south of the TA-59/Pajarito Road intersection; conducted peak hour gap study on Pajarito Road in the vicinity of TA-59; reviewed the TA-59 Parking Lot North of Pajarito Road, FY-94 Weapons GPP Short List Candidate {number_sign}9 report and other documents pertaining to past transportation studies; reassigned current turning-movement volumes with a 100 space parking lot being built on the north side of Pajarito Road; prepared traffic projections for the Pajarito Road/TA-59 intersection according to the proposed development on the north side of Pajarito Road that would employee 246 people; and assigned pedestrian crossing volumes between the northern lot/future development site and areas south of Pajarito Road.

  14. Small mammal populations in a restored stream corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-03-13

    An opportunity to study the response of a small mammal community to restoration of a riparian wetland was provided by the Pen Branch project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Live trapping of small mammals was conducted on six transects at Pen Branch in 1996 and 1998 and at three transects at Meyer's Branch, an unimpacted stream at SRS, in 1997 and 1998. Distributions of rates of capture of the four most common species were both spatially and temporally uneven. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance found no significant differences in the relationship of capture rates between species and between treatment and both the within-stream control and Meyers Branch. Habitat use and movement within stream corridors appears to be dependent primarily on species, with age and sex perhaps contributing to preference and distance moved. The lack of differences in capture rates related to transect or treatment may be due to the close proximity of sample transects relative to the movement potential of the species sampled.

  15. How to comprehensively evaluate river corridor conditions? A comparison of different biotic and morphological indices in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfieri, Bruno; Surian, Nicola; Hardersen, Sönke; Maiolini, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of river conditions is crucial for planning appropriate management actions. The European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (WFD) requires the assessment of biological, physical-chemical and hydromorphological elements to define the ecological status of rivers. The WFD suggests the use of different bioindicators (i.e. benthic macroinvertebrates, diatoms, aquatic macrophytes and fish), the so called "biological quality elements" (BQEs). However, recent studies showed that BQEs-based indices have two main limitations: (i) their standard application is limited to flowing channels and (ii) they are not sensitive to hydromorphological alteration. Hydromorphological conditions are usually evaluated applying methods for physical habitat assessment (i.e. the River Habitat Survey or derived methods) that consist in site-scale inventories of river forms and anthropic structures. The lack of consideration of wider spatial (i.e. reach or catchment scale) and temporal scales (e.g. channel evolution over the last 50-100 years) make such methods inadequate for a sound diagnosis of morphological alterations. The Morphological Quality Index (MQI) and the dragonfly-based Odonate River Index (ORI) were developed in the recent years to overcome the above-mentioned limitations and to assess the condition of the whole river corridor (i.e. the channel and its adjacent floodplain) at reach scale. In this study we correlated the assessments of MQI, ORI and two BQEs-based biotic indices (i.e. STAR_ICMi for benthic macroinvertebrates and ICMi for diatoms) in 15 lowland river reaches in northern Italy. The selected reaches are characterized by a wide range of morphological degradation. MQI and ORI were highly correlated, probably because both methods work at reach scale and consider the integrity of the whole river corridor, either in terms of morphology or considering ecological aspects. In contrast, no significant relationships were found between MQI and ORI and the BQEs

  16. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  17. Cloning and Overexpression of the als, pflA, and adhB Genes in Streptococcus thermophilus and Their Effects on Metabolite Formation.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Ismail; Ozcelik, Fatma Gul; Karakas-Sen, Asuman; Ozkose, Emin; Gezginc, Yekta; Ekinci, M Sait

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a lactic acid bacterium and used as starter culture in the dairy industry, mainly in the manufacture of yoghurt, with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. It produces lactic acid as a major fermentation end product and some carbonyl compounds through sugar metabolism. The level of metabolites could be improved using molecular biotechnology. The genes of als, encoding α-acetolactate synthase (Als), the pflA, encoding pyruvate-formate lyase activating enzyme (PflA), and the adhB which encodes alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) of S. thermophilus NCFB2393 strain were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and separately cloned into the overexpression vector pNZ276 under the control of the lacA promoter. The strains were transformed individually with the constructed plasmids. Their abilities to generate important metabolites such as pyruvate, lactate, formate, acetaldehyde, acetoin, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol in LM17 medium were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. High level of 2,3-butanediol was obtained by overexpressing the als gene. The level of formate increased slightly by overexpressing the pflA gene. The overexpression of the adhB gene, on the other hand, resulted in a significant increase in the ethanol level. PMID:26280324

  18. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH III) presequences that affect both in vitro mitochondrial import and in vitro processing by the matrix protease.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, D T; Pilgrim, D B; Young, E T

    1990-01-01

    Point mutations in the presequence of the mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogerase isoenzyme (ADH III) have been shown to affect either the import of the precursor protein into yeast mitochondria in vivo or its processing within the organelle. In the present work, the behavior of these mutants during in vitro import into isolated mitochondria was investigated. All point mutants tested were imported with a slower initial rate than that of the wild-type precursor. This defect was corrected when the precursors were treated with urea prior to import. Once imported, the extent of processing to the mature form of mutant precursors varied greatly and correlated well with the defects observed in vivo. This result was not affected by prior urea treatment. When matrix extracts enriched for the processing protease were used, this defect was shown to be due to failure of the protease to efficiently recognize or cleave the presequence, rather than to a lack of access to the precursor. The rate of import of two ADH III precursors bearing internal deletions in the leader sequence was similar to those of the point mutants, whereas a deletion leading to the removal of the 15 amino-terminal amino acids was poorly imported. The mature amino terminus of wild-type ADH III was determined to be Gln-25. Mutant m01 (Ser-26 to Phe), which reduced the efficiency of cleavage in vitro by 80%, was cleaved at the correct site. Images PMID:2188098

  19. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-03-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984(∗)T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  20. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Kevin J.; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J.; Price, Alkes L.

    2016-01-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984∗T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  1. A flash from the past: a case on long term follow-up of a "corridor" operation.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Danilo; Sarkozy, Andrea; Wauters, Kristel; Brugada, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    An electrophysiological study in a patient with a previous corridor operation was performed because of syncope. The atrial electrograms showed the persistence of the sinus rhythm in the right atrial corridor despite an organized atrial fibrillation in the left atrium. The first case described of a long term follow-up in a corridor operation, one of the first described surgical approach for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, that gave the beginning to the non-pharmacological approach of this arrhythmia. PMID:23174503

  2. Geology of the Mahd Adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Major-element data show that the Mahd Group was produced from separate basaltic and dacitic-rhyolitic magmas that overlapped without mixing. The alkalis and alkaline-earth elements were particularly mobile during metamorphism (which caused widespread albitization of feldspars) and also during hydrothermal alteration (which added secondary microcline). This mobility adversely affected rubidium-strontium whole-rock systematics, which makes whole-rock isochron dates obtained from these rocks questionable. The new geological data presented here are combined with the geochronologic data of Calvez and Kemp (1982) to re-interpret the geologic history of this area.

  3. Integrating occupancy modeling and interview data for corridor identification: A case study for jaguars in Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, K.A.; Nijhawan, S.; Salom-Perez, R.; Potosme, S.H.; Hines, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Corridors are critical elements in the long-term conservation of wide-ranging species like the jaguar (Panthera onca). Jaguar corridors across the range of the species were initially identified using a GIS-based least-cost corridor model. However, due to inherent errors in remotely sensed data and model uncertainties, these corridors warrant field verification before conservation efforts can begin. We developed a novel corridor assessment protocol based on interview data and site occupancy modeling. We divided our pilot study area, in southeastern Nicaragua, into 71, 6. ??. 6 km sampling units and conducted 160 structured interviews with local residents. Interviews were designed to collect data on jaguar and seven prey species so that detection/non-detection matrices could be constructed for each sampling unit. Jaguars were reportedly detected in 57% of the sampling units and had a detection probability of 28%. With the exception of white-lipped peccary, prey species were reportedly detected in 82-100% of the sampling units. Though the use of interview data may violate some assumptions of the occupancy modeling approach for determining 'proportion of area occupied', we countered these shortcomings through study design and interpreting the occupancy parameter, psi, as 'probability of habitat used'. Probability of habitat use was modeled for each target species using single state or multistate models. A combination of the estimated probabilities of habitat use for jaguar and prey was selected to identify the final jaguar corridor. This protocol provides an efficient field methodology for identifying corridors for easily-identifiable species, across large study areas comprised of unprotected, private lands. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Predicting Rockfall Occurrence Remotely in an Operational Rail Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, Ryan; Hutchinson, Jean; Lato, Matt; Gauthier, Dave; Edwards, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Rockfalls are a type of landslide that are problematic in operation transportation corridors in mountainous environments and adjacent to steep slopes. These frequent and fast acting events often occur suddenly and their occurrence progresses both in space and time. Recent advances in remote sensing approaches, such as terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and ground based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (Gb InSAR) applications have allowed for the observation of slope behavior at small enough spatial and temporal scales that the prediction of rockfall is now possible. In this study, sequential TLS scanning is used to predict the occurrence of rockfalls in an operational rail corridor in Western Canada where the railway traverses many geomorphologically and geologically complex hazard slopes. Several case studies were analyzed where the focus was on the prediction of rockfall location, size and failure time. In one case, early warning rockfall occurrence was given to the railway prior to rock block release. In the previous three years, a series of TLS data were collected at several high priority hazard sites traversed by railway infrastructure at intervals ranging from bimonthly to a daily basis. Source zone locations were identified on the basis of small pre-failure deformation. A novel 3-dimensional (3D) model difference filtering approach was used to better detect small pre-failure deformation in complex 3D environments allowing for the identification of source zones from rockfalls as small as 1 m3. A 3D analysis of block rotation and translation was also conducted to better understand failure kinematics and mechanisms. Potential rockfall volumes were projected on the basis of the extent of pre-failure deformation and on the assuming bounding joint structures. In a case of a 2600 m3 rockfall, where daily TLS data were collected prior to failure, two failure time forecasting models were evaluated: Voight's model and the inverse velocity model. Pre

  5. Particulate Matter Concentrations in East Oakland's High Street Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, P.; Jackson, J.; Lewis, R.; Marigny, A.; Mitchell, J. D.; Nguyen, R.; Philips, B.; Randle, D.; Romero, D.; Spears, D.; Telles, C.; Weissman, D.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of small solid pieces and/or liquid droplets in the air. High concentrations of PM can pose a serious health hazard because inhalation can result in breathing problems and/or aggravate asthma. Long term exposure can increase the likelihood of respiratory problems like asthma and emphysema as well as cancer. The smaller the particles, the deeper they can get into the respiratory system. For this reason, the smallest particles, those smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5), are the most dangerous. PM2.5 is largely emitted from motor vehicles burning fuels that don't break down fully. Our research team investigated the levels of PM2.5 as well as particles smaller than 10 micrometers (PM10) and total suspended particulate (TSP) along the northeast-southwest trending High Street Corridor, near Fremont High School in East Oakland, California. Using the Aerocet 531 mass particle counter, team members walked through neighborhoods and along major roads within a 1 mile radius of Fremont High School. The Aerocet 531 recorded two minute average measurements of all the relevant PM sizes, which are reported in mg/m3. Measurements were consistently taken in the morning, between 8:30 and 11:30 am. Preliminary results indicate maximum readings of all PM sizes at sites that are in close proximity to a major freeway (Interstate-880). These results support our initial hypothesis that proximity to major roads and freeways, especially those with high diesel-fuel burning truck traffic, would be the primary factor affecting PM concentration levels. Preliminary median and maximum readings all suggest particulate matter levels below what the EPA would consider unhealthy or risky.

  6. Remote sensing methods for power line corridor surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, Leena; Lehtomäki, Matti; Ahokas, Eero; Hyyppä, Juha; Karjalainen, Mika; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Kukko, Antero; Heinonen, Tero

    2016-09-01

    To secure uninterrupted distribution of electricity, effective monitoring and maintenance of power lines are needed. This literature review article aims to give a wide overview of the possibilities provided by modern remote sensing sensors in power line corridor surveys and to discuss the potential and limitations of different approaches. Monitoring of both power line components and vegetation around them is included. Remotely sensed data sources discussed in the review include synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, optical satellite and aerial images, thermal images, airborne laser scanner (ALS) data, land-based mobile mapping data, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) data. The review shows that most previous studies have concentrated on the mapping and analysis of network components. In particular, automated extraction of power line conductors has achieved much attention, and promising results have been reported. For example, accuracy levels above 90% have been presented for the extraction of conductors from ALS data or aerial images. However, in many studies datasets have been small and numerical quality analyses have been omitted. Mapping of vegetation near power lines has been a less common research topic than mapping of the components, but several studies have also been carried out in this field, especially using optical aerial and satellite images. Based on the review we conclude that in future research more attention should be given to an integrated use of various data sources to benefit from the various techniques in an optimal way. Knowledge in related fields, such as vegetation monitoring from ALS, SAR and optical image data should be better exploited to develop useful monitoring approaches. Special attention should be given to rapidly developing remote sensing techniques such as UAVs and laser scanning from airborne and land-based platforms. To demonstrate and verify the capabilities of automated monitoring approaches, large tests in various environments

  7. Assessment of Critical Events Corridors through Multivariate Cascading Outages Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Kumbale, Murali; Chen, Yousu; Singh, Ruchi; Green, Irina; Morgan, Mark P.

    2011-10-17

    Massive blackouts of electrical power systems in North America over the past decade has focused increasing attention upon ways to identify and simulate network events that may potentially lead to widespread network collapse. This paper summarizes a method to simulate power-system vulnerability to cascading failures to a supplied set of initiating events synonymously termed as Extreme Events. The implemented simulation method is currently confined to simulating steady state power-system response to a set of extreme events. The outlined method of simulation is meant to augment and provide a new insight into bulk power transmission network planning that at present remains mainly confined to maintaining power system security for single and double component outages under a number of projected future network operating conditions. Although one of the aims of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of simulating network vulnerability to cascading outages, a more important goal has been to determine vulnerable parts of the network that may potentially be strengthened in practice so as to mitigate system susceptibility to cascading failures. This paper proposes to demonstrate a systematic approach to analyze extreme events and identify vulnerable system elements that may be contributing to cascading outages. The hypothesis of critical events corridors is proposed to represent repeating sequential outages that can occur in the system for multiple initiating events. The new concept helps to identify system reinforcements that planners could engineer in order to 'break' the critical events sequences and therefore lessen the likelihood of cascading outages. This hypothesis has been successfully validated with a California power system model.

  8. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    J. L . Orrock; B. J. Danielson; M. J. Burns; D. J. Levey

    2003-02-03

    J.L. Orrock, B.J. Danielson, M.J. Burns, and D.J. Levey. 2003. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation. Ecology, 84(10):2589-2599. Abstract: Corridors that connect patches of disjunct habitat may be promising tools for mediating the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation, but little is known about how corridors affect ecological interactions. In eight 12-ha experimental landscapes, we examined how corridors affect the impact of invertebrate, rodent, and avian seed predators on pokeweed, Phytolacca americana. Over 13 months in 2000 and 2001, we quantified the effects of patch shape, connectivity, and predator type on the number of seeds germinating in the field (germinants), seed removal, and the viability of remaining seeds. Corridors did not affect the number of P. americana germinants in experimental exclosures or the viability of seeds remaining in exclosures. However, corridors affected the removal of seeds in a predator-specific manner: invertebrates removed more seeds in unconnected patches, whereas rodents removed more seeds in connected patches. Seed removal by birds was similar in connected and unconnected patches. Total seed removal by all seed predators was not affected by corridors, because invertebrates removed more seeds where rodents removed fewer seeds, and vice versa. Overall, seed predation signi®cantly reduced the number and viability of remaining seeds, and reduced the number of germinants in 2000 but not in 2001. The abundance of naturally occurring P. americana plants in our experimental patches in 2000 decreased with increasing seed removal from exclosures but was not related to viability or germinants in 2000, suggesting that seed removal may shape the distribution and abundance of this species. Complementary patterns of seed removal by rodents and invertebrates suggest that corridors alter the effects of these predator taxa by changing the relative amounts of edge and core

  9. Methodology for Collision Risk Assessment of an Airspace Flow Corridor Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yimin

    This dissertation presents a methodology to estimate the collision risk associated with a future air-transportation concept called the flow corridor. The flow corridor is a Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept to reduce congestion and increase throughput in en-route airspace. The flow corridor has the potential to increase throughput by reducing the controller workload required to manage aircraft outside the corridor and by reducing separation of aircraft within corridor. The analysis in this dissertation is a starting point for the safety analysis required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to eventually approve and implement the corridor concept. This dissertation develops a hybrid risk analysis methodology that combines Monte Carlo simulation with dynamic event tree analysis. The analysis captures the unique characteristics of the flow corridor concept, including self-separation within the corridor, lane change maneuvers, speed adjustments, and the automated separation assurance system. Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the movement of aircraft in the flow corridor and to identify precursor events that might lead to a collision. Since these precursor events are not rare, standard Monte Carlo simulation can be used to estimate these occurrence rates. Dynamic event trees are then used to model the subsequent series of events that may lead to collision. When two aircraft are on course for a near-mid-air collision (NMAC), the on-board automated separation assurance system provides a series of safety layers to prevent the impending NNAC or collision. Dynamic event trees are used to evaluate the potential failures of these layers in order to estimate the rare-event collision probabilities. The results show that the throughput can be increased by reducing separation to 2 nautical miles while maintaining the current level of safety. A sensitivity analysis shows that the most critical parameters in the model related to the overall

  10. Corridors restore animal-mediated pollination in fragmented tropical forest landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kormann, Urs; Scherber, Christoph; Tscharntke, Teja; Klein, Nadja; Larbig, Manuel; Valente, Jonathon J; Hadley, Adam S; Betts, Matthew G

    2016-01-27

    Tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions have become heavily eroded through habitat loss. Animal-mediated pollination is required in more than 94% of higher tropical plant species and 75% of the world's leading food crops, but it remains unclear if corridors avert deforestation-driven pollination breakdown in fragmented tropical landscapes. Here, we used manipulative resource experiments and field observations to show that corridors functionally connect neotropical forest fragments for forest-associated hummingbirds and increase pollen transfer. Further, corridors boosted forest-associated pollinator availability in fragments by 14.3 times compared with unconnected equivalents, increasing overall pollination success. Plants in patches without corridors showed pollination rates equal to bagged control flowers, indicating pollination failure in isolated fragments. This indicates, for the first time, that corridors benefit tropical forest ecosystems beyond boosting local species richness, by functionally connecting mutualistic network partners. We conclude that small-scale adjustments to landscape configuration safeguard native pollinators and associated pollination services in tropical forest landscapes. PMID:26817765

  11. Climate change and plant dispersal along corridors in fragmented landscapes of Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Imbach, Pablo A; Locatelli, Bruno; Molina, Luis G; Ciais, Philippe; Leadley, Paul W

    2013-09-01

    Climate change is a threat to biodiversity, and adaptation measures should be considered in biodiversity conservation planning. Protected areas (PA) are expected to be impacted by climate change and improving their connectivity with biological corridors (BC) has been proposed as a potential adaptation measure, although assessing its effectiveness remains a challenge. In Mesoamerica, efforts to preserve the biodiversity have led to the creation of a regional network of PA and, more recently, BC. This study evaluates the role of BC for facilitating plant dispersal between PA under climate change in Mesoamerica. A spatially explicit dynamic model (cellular automaton) was developed to simulate species dispersal under different climate and conservation policy scenarios. Plant functional types (PFT) were defined based on a range of dispersal rates and vegetation types to represent the diversity of species in the region. The impacts of climate change on PA and the role of BC for dispersal were assessed spatially. Results show that most impacted PA are those with low altitudinal range in hot, dry, or high latitude areas. PA with low altitudinal range in high cool areas benefit the most from corridors. The most important corridors cover larger areas and have high altitude gradients. Only the fastest PFT can keep up with the expected change in climate and benefit from corridors for dispersal. We conclude that the spatial assessment of the vulnerability of PA and the role of corridors in facilitating dispersal can help conservation planning under a changing climate. PMID:24101983

  12. Engineering monitoring of rockfall hazards along transportation corridors: using mobile terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lato, M.; Hutchinson, J.; Diederichs, M.; Ball, D.; Harrap, R.

    2009-06-01

    Geotechnical hazards along linear transportation corridors are challenging to identify and often require constant monitoring. Inspecting corridors using traditional, manual methods requires the engineer to be unnecessarily exposed to the hazard. It also requires closure of the corridor to ensure safety of the worker from passing vehicles. This paper identifies the use of mobile terrestrial LiDAR data as a compliment to traditional field methods. Mobile terrestrial LiDAR is an emerging remote data collection technique capable of generating accurate fully three-dimensional virtual models while driving at speeds up to 100 km/h. Data is collected from a truck that causes no delays to active traffic nor does it impede corridor use. These resultant georeferenced data can be used for geomechanical structural feature identification and kinematic analysis, rockfall path identification and differential monitoring of rock movement or failure over time. Comparisons between mobile terrestrial and static LiDAR data collection and analysis are presented. As well, detailed discussions on workflow procedures for possible implementation are discussed. Future use of mobile terrestrial LiDAR data for corridor analysis will focus on repeated surveys and developing dynamic four-dimensional models, higher resolution data collection. As well, computationally advanced, spatially accurate, geomechanically controlled three-dimensional rockfall simulations should be investigated.

  13. Molecular corridors and parameterizations of volatility in the evolution of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pöschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2015-10-01

    The formation and aging of organic aerosols (OA) proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of OA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. Based on data from over 30 000 compounds, we show that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. We developed parameterizations to predict the volatility of organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur from the elemental composition that can be measured by soft-ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Field measurement data from new particle formation events, biomass burning, cloud/fog processing, and indoor environments were mapped into molecular corridors to characterize the chemical nature of the observed OA components. We found that less oxidized indoor OA are constrained to a corridor of low molar mass and high volatility, whereas highly oxygenated compounds in atmospheric water extend to high molar mass and low volatility. Among the nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds identified in atmospheric aerosols, amines tend to exhibit low molar mass and high volatility, whereas organonitrates and organosulfates follow high O : C corridors extending to high molar mass and low volatility. We suggest that the consideration of molar mass and molecular corridors can help to constrain volatility and particle phase state in the modeling of OA particularly for nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  14. Geochemical variations in aeolian mineral particles from the Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Castillo, Sonia; Alastuey, Andrés; Cuevas, Emilio; Herrmann, Ludger; Mounkaila, Mohammed; Elvira, Josep; Gibbons, Wes

    2006-10-01

    The Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor runs from Chad to Mauritania and expels huge amounts of mineral aerosols into the Atlantic Ocean. Data on samples collected from Algeria, Chad, Niger, and Western Sahara illustrate how corridor dust mineralogy and chemistry relate to geological source and weathering/transport history. Dusts sourced directly from igneous and metamorphic massifs are geochemically immature, retaining soluble cations (e.g., K, Na, Rb, Sr) and accessory minerals containing HFSE (e.g., Zr, Hf, U, Th) and REE. In contrast, silicate dust chemistry in desert basins (e.g., Bodélé Depression) is influenced by a longer history of transport, physical winnowing (e.g., loss of Zr, Hf, Th), chemical leaching (e.g., loss of Na, K, Rb), and mixing with intrabasinal materials such as diatoms and evaporitic salts. Mineral aerosols blown along the corridor by the winter Harmattan winds mix these basinal and basement materials. Dusts blown into the corridor from sub-Saharan Africa during the summer monsoon source from deeply chemically weathered terrains and are therefore likely to be more kaolinitic and stripped of mobile elements (e.g., Na, K, Mg, Ca, LILE), but retain immobile and resistant elements (e.g., Zr, Hf, REE). Finally, dusts blown southwestwards into the corridor from along the Atlantic Coastal Basin will be enriched in carbonate from Mesozoic-Cenozoic marine limestones, depleted in Th, Nb, and Ta, and locally contaminated by uranium-bearing phosphate deposits. PMID:16600327

  15. An experimental test of matrix permeability and corridor use by an endemic understory bird.

    PubMed

    Castellón, Traci D; Sieving, Kathryn E

    2006-02-01

    Because of widespread habitat fragmentation, maintenance of landscape connectivity has become a major focus of conservation planning, but empirical tests of animal movement in fragmented landscapes remain scarce. We conducted a translocation experiment to test the relative permeability of three landscape elements (open habitat, shrubby secondary vegetation, and wooded corridors) to movement by the Chucao Tapaculo (Scelorchilus rubecula), a forest understory bird endemic to South American temperate rainforest. Forty-one radio-tagged subjects were translocated (individually) to three landscape treatments consisting of small release patches that were either entirely surrounded by open habitat (pasture), entirely surrounded by dense shrubs, or linked to other patches by wooded corridors that were otherwise surrounded by open matrix. The number of days subjects remained in release patches before dispersal (a measure of habitat resistance) was significantly longer for patches surrounded by open habitat than for patches adjoining corridors or surrounded by dense shrubs. These results indicate that open habitat significantly constrains Chucao dispersal, in accord with expectation, but dispersal occurs equally well through wooded corridors and shrub-dominated matrix. Thus, corridor protection or restoration and management of vegetation in the matrix (to encourage animal movement) may be equally feasible alternatives for maintaining connectivity. PMID:16909666

  16. Stream Corridor Lowering for Servicing: Considerations and Approaches to Natural Channel Design in Southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, P. V.

    2009-05-01

    Although there are numerous approaches to natural channel design, all approaches generally advocate application of geomorphic principles to develop stable watercourses with improved habitat function. In southern Ontario, natural channel design approaches are increasingly utilized in stream corridor management. In numerous greenfield developments within southern Ontario, creek corridors are lowered and relocated to address potential hazards and facilitate development. These projects usually utilize natural channel design approaches. Although lowering for servicing can be a controversial technique, this approach has resulted in the maintenance of channels that may have previously been enclosed and lost. In the southern Ontario context mimicking natural corridor form and function is complicated by a surficial geology dominated by glacial sediments. Approaches to natural channel design have evolved over time to address this encumbrance. This presentation examines the geomorphology of streams and stream corridors within southern Ontario. Case studies from southern Ontario are provided to illustrate many of the impediments to, and innovations in, natural channel design. This lays the foundation for illustrating how these design approaches address potential hazards, provide for stream form and function, and mimic much of the physical and biological interactions found within natural stream corridors.

  17. California air transportation study: A transportation system for the California Corridor of the year 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    To define and solve the problems of transportation in the California Corrider in the year 2010, the 1989 California Polytechnic State University Aeronautical Engineering Senior Design class determined future corridor transportation needs and developed a system to meet the requirements. A market study, which included interpreting travel demand and gauging the future of regional and national air travel in and out of the corridor, allowed the goals of the project to be accurately refined. Comprehensive trade-off studies of several proposed transporation systems were conducted to determine which components would form the final proposed system. Preliminary design and further analysis were performed for each resulting component. The proposed system consists of three vehicles and a special hub or mode mixer, the Corridor Access Port (CAP). The vehicles are: (1) an electric powered aircraft to serve secondary airports and the CAP; (2) a high speed magnetic levitation train running through the CAP and the high population density areas of the corridor; and (3) a vertical takeoff and landing tilt rotor aircraft to serve both intercity and intrametropolitan travelers from the CAP and city vertiports. The CAP is a combination and an extension of the hub, mode mixer, and Wayport concepts. The CAP is an integrated part of the system which meets the travel demands in the corridor, and interfaces with interstate and international travel.

  18. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kim, Soo Rin; Subramaniam, Vijay; Steffen, David; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-10-01

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite that cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose. Microbial strains capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose into lactic acid are needed for sustainable and economic lactic acid production. In this study, we introduced a lactic acid-producing pathway into an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose. Specifically, ldhA from the fungi Rhizopus oryzae was overexpressed under the control of the PGK1 promoter through integration of the expression cassette in the chromosome. The resulting strain exhibited a high lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced lactic acid from glucose or xylose. Interestingly, we observed that the engineered strain exhibited substrate-dependent product formation. When the engineered yeast was cultured on glucose, the major fermentation product was ethanol while lactic acid was a minor product. In contrast, the engineered yeast produced lactic acid almost exclusively when cultured on xylose under oxygen-limited conditions. The yields of ethanol and lactic acid from glucose were 0.31 g ethanol/g glucose and 0.22 g lactic acid/g glucose, respectively. On xylose, the yields of ethanol and lactic acid were <0.01 g ethanol/g xylose and 0.69 g lactic acid/g xylose, respectively. These results demonstrate that lactic acid can be produced from xylose with a high yield by S. cerevisiae without deleting pyruvate decarboxylase, and the formation patterns of fermentations can be altered by substrates. PMID:26043971

  19. Earthquake Hazards and Lifelines in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor - Cottage Grove to Woodburn, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, Y.; Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway (I-5) corridor, which stretches from Mexico to Canada, is both the main economic artery of the Pacific Northwest and home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems have major components located within the I-5 corridor. For the purposes of this map, we refer to these essential systems as lifeline systems. The Pacific Northwest section of I-5, the I-5 urban corridor, extends from Eugene, Oregon, to the border of Canada. The population of this region is rapidly increasing with the bulk of growth and economic development centered in the cities of Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Oregon, and Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, Washington.

  20. Earthquake Hazards and Lifelines in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor - Woodburn, Oregon, to Centralia, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, Y.; Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway (I-5) corridor, which stretches from Mexico to Canada, is both the main economic artery of the Pacific Northwest and home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems have major components located within the I-5 corridor. For the purposes of this map, we refer to these essential systems as lifeline systems. The Pacific Northwest section of I-5, the I-5 urban corridor, extends from Eugene, Oregon, to the border of Canada. The population of this region is rapidly increasing with the bulk of growth and economic development centered in the cities of Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Oregon, and Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, Washington.

  1. Lifelines and Earthquake Hazards in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor: Cottage Grove to Woodburn, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, M.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wells, R.E.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.; Southern Willamette Valley Working Group

    2004-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway corridor, stretching from Mexico to Canada, is not only the economic artery of the Pacific Northwest, but is also home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems, such as railroads and electrical transmission lines, have major components in the I-5 corridor. The section of I-5 from Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Blaine, Washington, is rapidly urbanizing, with population growth and economic development centered around the cities of Eugene, Salem, Portland, Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham. For the purposes of this map, we refer to this area as the I-5 Urban Corridor. This publicaton consists of two large sheets: A map and a text-and-figures poster.

  2. An Optimal Deployment of Wireless Charging Lane for Electric Vehicles on Highway Corridors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongxi

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrated modeling framework to optimally locate wireless charging facilities along a highway corridor to provide sufficient in-motion charging. The integrated model consists of a master, Infrastructure Planning Model that determines best locations with integrated two sub-models that explicitly capture energy consumption and charging and the interactions between electric vehicle and wireless charging technologies, geometrics of highway corridors, speed, and auxiliary system. The model is implemented in an illustrative case study of a highway corridor of Interstate 5 in Oregon. We found that the cost of establishing the charging lane is sensitive and increases with the speed to achieve. Through sensitivity analyses, we gain better understanding on the extent of impacts of geometric characteristics of highways and battery capacity on the charging lane design.

  3. Integrated modelling for Sustainability Appraisal of urban river corridors: going beyond compartmentalised thinking.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Rouquette, J R; Lerner, David N

    2013-12-15

    Sustainability Appraisal (SA) is a complex task that involves integration of social, environmental and economic considerations and often requires trade-offs between multiple stakeholders that may not easily be brought to consensus. Classical SA, often compartmentalised in the rigid boundary of disciplines, can facilitate discussion, but can only partially inform decision makers as many important aspects of sustainability remain abstract and not interlinked. A fully integrated model can overcome compartmentality in the assessment process and provides opportunity for a better integrative exploratory planning process. The objective of this paper is to explore the benefit of an integrated modelling approach to SA and how a structured integrated model can be used to provide a coherent, consistent and deliberative platform to assess policy or planning proposals. The paper discusses a participative and integrative modelling approach to urban river corridor development, incorporating the principal of sustainability. The paper uses a case study site in Sheffield, UK, with three alternative development scenarios, incorporating a number of possible riverside design features. An integrated SA model is used to develop better design by optimising different design elements and delivering a more sustainable (re)-development plan. We conclude that participatory integrated modelling has strong potential for supporting the SA processes. A high degree of integration provides the opportunity for more inclusive and informed decision-making regarding issues of urban development. It also provides the opportunity to reflect on their long-term dynamics, and to gain insights on the interrelationships underlying persistent sustainability problems. Thus the ability to address economic, social and environmental interdependencies within policies, plans, and legislations is enhanced. PMID:24200012

  4. From mountains to the ocean: quantifying connectivity along the river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rivers are the landscape's arteries; they convey water, solutes, energy, and living organisms from the hillslopes, floodplains, aquifers, and atmosphere to the oceans. As water moves along this complex circulatory system, it is continuously exchanged with the surrounding alluvial aquifer, termed hyporheic exchange, which strongly conditions and constrains the biogeochemical evolution of water at the local scale with basin-scale consequences. Over the last two decades, considerable efforts have focused on the use of detailed mathematical models to explore the hydrodynamics and biogeochemical effect of hyporheic exchange at the scale of individual channel morphologies. While these efforts are essential to gain mechanistic understanding, their computational demand makes them impractical for basin applications. In this talk, a parsimonious but physically based model of hyporheic flow for application in large river basins is presented: Networks with EXchange and Subsurface Storage (NEXSS). At the core of NEXSS are the up-scaling of detailed mathematical models and a characterization of the channel geometry, geomorphic features, and related hydraulic drivers based on scaling equations from the literature and readily accessible information such as river discharge, width, grain size, sinuosity, channel slope, and regional groundwater gradients. As a proof-of-concept, we use NEXSS to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of hyporheic exchange and denitrification potential along the Mississippi River basin. This modeling approach allows us to map the location of critical hot spots for biogeochemical transformation, their geomorphic drivers, and cumulative effect. Finally, we discuss new avenues to incorporate exchange with floodplains and ponded waters, which also play a key role in water quality along the river corridor. This new modeling approach is critical to transition from purely empirical continental models of water quality to hybrid approaches that

  5. Hydroclimatological Processes in the Central American Dry Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, H. G.; Duran-Quesada, A. M.; Amador, J. A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Mora, G.

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the hydroclimatological variability and the climatic precursors of drought in the Central American Dry Corridor (CADC), a subregion located in the Pacific coast of Southern Mexico and Central America. Droughts are frequent in the CADC, which is featured by a higher climatological aridity compared to the highlands and Caribbean coast of Central America. The CADC region presents large social vulnerability to hydroclimatological impacts originated from dry conditions, as there is a large part of population that depends on subsistance agriculture. The influence of large-scale climatic precursors such as ENSO, the Caribbean Low-Level Jet (CLLJ), low frequency signals from the Pacific and Caribbean and some intra-seasonal signals such as the MJO are evaluated. Previous work by the authors identified a connection between the CLLJ and CADC precipitation. This connection is more complex than a simple rain-shadow effect, and instead it was suggested that convection at the exit of the jet in the Costa-Rica and Nicaragua Caribbean coasts and consequent subsidence in the Pacific could be playing a role in this connection. During summer, when the CLLJ is stronger than normal, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (located mainly in the Pacific) displaces to a more southern position, and vice-versa, suggesting a connection between these two processes that has not been fully explained yet. The role of the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool also needs more research. All this is important, as it suggest a working hypothesis that during summer, the effect of the Caribbean wind strength may be responsible for the dry climate of the CADC. Another previous analysis by the authors was based on downscaled precipitation and temperature from GCMs and the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. The data was later used in a hydrological model. Results showed a negative trend in reanalysis' runoff for 1980-2012 in San José (Costa Rica) and Tegucigalpa (Honduras). This highly significant drying trend

  6. Reducing The Risk Of Abrupt Climate Change: Emission Corridors Preserving The Thermohaline Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickfeld, K.

    Paleo-reconstructions have shown that large and abrupt climate changes have occurred throughout the last ice-age cycles. This evidence, supplemented by insights into the complex and nonlinear nature of the climate system, gives raise to the concern that anthropogenic forcing may trigger such events in the future. A prominent example for such a potential climatic shift is the collapse of the North Atlantic thermohaline circu- lation (THC), which would cause a major cooling of the northern North Atlantic and north-western Europe and considerable regional sea level rise, with possibly severe consequences on, e.g., fisheries, agriculture and ecosystems. In this paper we present emission corridors for the 21st century preserving the THC. Emission corridors embrace the range of future emissions beyond which either the THC collapses or the mitigation burden becomes intolerable. They are calculated along the conceptual and methodological lines of the tolerable windows approach. We investigate the sensitivity of the emission corridors to the main uncertain parame- ters (climate and North Atlantic hydrological sensitivities as well as emissions of non CO_2 greenhouse gases). Results show a high dependence of the size of the emis- sion corridors on hydrological and climate sensitivities. For the best-guess values of both parameters we find that the emission corridors are wider than the range spanned by the SRES emissions scenarios. Thus, no immediate mitigation seems necessary in order to preserve the THC. For high but still realistic values of the sensitivities, however, even the low SRES emissions scenarios transgress the corridor boundaries. These findings imply that under 'business as usual' a non-negligible risk of either a THC collapse or an intolerable mitigation burden exists.

  7. 77 FR 74729 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent and Draft Environmental Impact Statement: I-10 Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... Statement: I-10 Corridor Improvement Study; Maricopa County, AZ AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA... prepare an EIS for the I-10 Corridor Improvement Study was published in the Federal Register on February 4... 2002, the FWHA issued a revised NOI to correct the project limits. The study area limits for the...

  8. 78 FR 52602 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent and Draft Environmental Impact Statement: I-17 Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Statement: I-17 Corridor Improvement Study; Maricopa County, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration... Maricopa County, Arizona. A NOI to prepare an EIS for the I-17 Corridor Improvement Study was published in... Phoenix, and the study area limits for the EIS consisted of approximately 21 miles of I-17. A...

  9. Urban Power Line Corridors as Novel Habitats for Grassland and Alien Plant Species in South-Western Finland.

    PubMed

    Lampinen, Jussi; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Huhta, Ari-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Regularly managed electric power line corridors may provide habitats for both early-successional grassland plant species and disturbance-dependent alien plant species. These habitats are especially important in urban areas, where they can help conserve native grassland species and communities in urban greenspace. However, they can also provide further footholds for potentially invasive alien species that already characterize urban areas. In order to implement power line corridors into urban conservation, it is important to understand which environmental conditions in the corridors favor grassland species and which alien species. Likewise it is important to know whether similar environmental factors in the corridors control the species composition of the two groups. We conducted a vegetation study in a 43 kilometer long urban power line corridor network in south-western Finland, and used generalized linear models and distance-based redundancy analysis to determine which environmental factors best predict the occurrence and composition of grassland and alien plant species in the corridors. The results imply that old corridors on dry soils and steep slopes characterized by a history as open areas and pastures are especially suitable for grassland species. Corridors suitable for alien species, in turn, are characterized by productive soils and abundant light and are surrounded by a dense urban fabric. Factors controlling species composition in the two groups are somewhat correlated, with the most important factors including light abundance, soil moisture, soil calcium concentration and soil productivity. The results have implications for grassland conservation and invasive alien species control in urban areas. PMID:26565700

  10. 75 FR 52969 - Rim of the Valley Corridor Special Resource Study, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, CA; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Special Resource Study, the NPS will evaluate the national significance of the area's natural and cultural... National Park Service Rim of the Valley Corridor Special Resource Study, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties... protection and other considerations within the Rim of the Valley Corridor Special Resource Study area in...

  11. 76 FR 8397 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Chicago, IL to St. Louis, MO High Speed Rail Program Corridor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ..., MO High Speed Rail Program Corridor AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), U.S. Department of... High Speed Rail Corridor Program in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA... passenger trains. The EIS will consider increasing the number of frequencies of high-speed passenger...

  12. Composition and abundance of small mammal communities in forest fragments and vegetation corridors in Southern Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Andréa O; Passamani, Marcelo

    2012-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation leads to isolation and reduce habitat areas, in addition to a series of negative effects on natural populations, affecting richness, abundance and distribution of animal species. In such a context, habitat corridors serve as an alternative for connectivity in fragmented landscapes, minimizing the effects of structural isolation of different habitat areas. This study evaluated the richness, composition and abundance of small mammal communities in forest fragments and in the relevant vegetation corridors that connect these fragments, located in Southern Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. Ten sites were sampled (five forest fragments and five vegetation corridors) using the capture-mark-recapture method, from April 2007-March 2008. A total sampling effort of 6 300 trapnights resulted in 656 captures of 249 individuals. Across the 10 sites sampled, 11 small mammal species were recorded. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordinations and ANOSIM based on the composition of small mammal communities within the corridor and fragment revealed a qualitative difference between the two environments. Regarding abundance, there was no significant difference between corridors and fragments. In comparing mean values of abundance per species in each environment, only Cerradomys subflavus showed a significant difference, being more abundant in the corridor environment. Results suggest that the presence of several small mammal species in the corridor environment, in relatively high abundances, could indicate corridors use as habitat, though they might also facilitate and/or allow the movement of individuals using different habitat patches (fragments). PMID:23025102

  13. Urban Power Line Corridors as Novel Habitats for Grassland and Alien Plant Species in South-Western Finland

    PubMed Central

    Lampinen, Jussi; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Huhta, Ari-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Regularly managed electric power line corridors may provide habitats for both early-successional grassland plant species and disturbance-dependent alien plant species. These habitats are especially important in urban areas, where they can help conserve native grassland species and communities in urban greenspace. However, they can also provide further footholds for potentially invasive alien species that already characterize urban areas. In order to implement power line corridors into urban conservation, it is important to understand which environmental conditions in the corridors favor grassland species and which alien species. Likewise it is important to know whether similar environmental factors in the corridors control the species composition of the two groups. We conducted a vegetation study in a 43 kilometer long urban power line corridor network in south-western Finland, and used generalized linear models and distance-based redundancy analysis to determine which environmental factors best predict the occurrence and composition of grassland and alien plant species in the corridors. The results imply that old corridors on dry soils and steep slopes characterized by a history as open areas and pastures are especially suitable for grassland species. Corridors suitable for alien species, in turn, are characterized by productive soils and abundant light and are surrounded by a dense urban fabric. Factors controlling species composition in the two groups are somewhat correlated, with the most important factors including light abundance, soil moisture, soil calcium concentration and soil productivity. The results have implications for grassland conservation and invasive alien species control in urban areas. PMID:26565700

  14. The Effect of Lift on Entry Corridor Depth and Guidance Requirements for the Return Lunar Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Thomas J.; Slye, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    Corridors for manned vehicles are defined consistent with requirements for avoiding radiation exposure and for limiting values of peak deceleration. Use of lift increases the depth of the entry corridor. Mid-course guidance requirements appear to be critical only for the flight-path angle. Increasing the energy of the transport orbit increases the required guidance accuracy for the flight-path angle. Corrective thrust applied essentially parallel to the local horizontal produces the maximum change in perigee altitude for a given increment of velocity. Energy required to effect a given change in perigee altitude varies inversely with range measured from the center of the earth.

  15. Distance effects of NO{sub x} emissions on ozone in the Northeast Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, K.; Kumar, N.; Russell, T.

    1995-08-01

    The issues that impact the distance effects of NO{sub x} emissions on ozone in the Northeast Corridor are outlined. The following subjects are discussed: issues and approach; reduced model; formulation and results; photochemical modeling; and urban-to-regional multiscale (URM) results. It was found that NO{sub x} control is critical to lowering peak ozone and spatial ozone exposure; that very high levels of NO{sub x} control are required to reach attainment; VOC control can help in urban areas; for upwind sources are not as important to reducing peak in corridor; and controls must be targeted.

  16. Identification of a G‐Protein Subunit‐α11 Gain‐of‐Function Mutation, Val340Met, in a Family With Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia Type 2 (ADH2)

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Sian E; Gorvin, Caroline M; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howles, Sarah A; Cranston, Treena; Rust, Nigel; Nesbit, M Andrew; Glaser, Ben; Taylor, Jenny C; Buchs, Andreas E; Hannan, Fadil M

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is characterized by hypocalcemia, inappropriately low serum parathyroid hormone concentrations and hypercalciuria. ADH is genetically heterogeneous with ADH type 1 (ADH1), the predominant form, being caused by germline gain‐of‐function mutations of the G‐protein coupled calcium‐sensing receptor (CaSR), and ADH2 caused by germline gain‐of‐function mutations of G‐protein subunit α‐11 (Gα11). To date Gα11 mutations causing ADH2 have been reported in only five probands. We investigated a multigenerational nonconsanguineous family, from Iran, with ADH and keratoconus which are not known to be associated, for causative mutations by whole‐exome sequencing in two individuals with hypoparathyroidism, of whom one also had keratoconus, followed by cosegregation analysis of variants. This identified a novel heterozygous germline Val340Met Gα11 mutation in both individuals, and this was also present in the other two relatives with hypocalcemia that were tested. Three‐dimensional modeling revealed the Val340Met mutation to likely alter the conformation of the C‐terminal α5 helix, which may affect G‐protein coupled receptor binding and G‐protein activation. In vitro functional expression of wild‐type (Val340) and mutant (Met340) Gα11 proteins in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaSR, demonstrated that the intracellular calcium responses following stimulation with extracellular calcium, of the mutant Met340 Gα11 led to a leftward shift of the concentration‐response curve with a significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced mean half‐maximal concentration (EC50) value of 2.44 mM (95% CI, 2.31 to 2.77 mM) when compared to the wild‐type EC50 of 3.14 mM (95% CI, 3.03 to 3.26 mM), consistent with a gain‐of‐function mutation. A novel His403Gln variant in transforming growth factor, beta‐induced (TGFBI), that may be causing keratoconus was also identified, indicating likely digenic

  17. Identification of a G-Protein Subunit-α11 Gain-of-Function Mutation, Val340Met, in a Family With Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia Type 2 (ADH2).

    PubMed

    Piret, Sian E; Gorvin, Caroline M; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howles, Sarah A; Cranston, Treena; Rust, Nigel; Nesbit, M Andrew; Glaser, Ben; Taylor, Jenny C; Buchs, Andreas E; Hannan, Fadil M; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2016-06-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is characterized by hypocalcemia, inappropriately low serum parathyroid hormone concentrations and hypercalciuria. ADH is genetically heterogeneous with ADH type 1 (ADH1), the predominant form, being caused by germline gain-of-function mutations of the G-protein coupled calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), and ADH2 caused by germline gain-of-function mutations of G-protein subunit α-11 (Gα11 ). To date Gα11 mutations causing ADH2 have been reported in only five probands. We investigated a multigenerational nonconsanguineous family, from Iran, with ADH and keratoconus which are not known to be associated, for causative mutations by whole-exome sequencing in two individuals with hypoparathyroidism, of whom one also had keratoconus, followed by cosegregation analysis of variants. This identified a novel heterozygous germline Val340Met Gα11 mutation in both individuals, and this was also present in the other two relatives with hypocalcemia that were tested. Three-dimensional modeling revealed the Val340Met mutation to likely alter the conformation of the C-terminal α5 helix, which may affect G-protein coupled receptor binding and G-protein activation. In vitro functional expression of wild-type (Val340) and mutant (Met340) Gα11 proteins in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaSR, demonstrated that the intracellular calcium responses following stimulation with extracellular calcium, of the mutant Met340 Gα11 led to a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve with a significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced mean half-maximal concentration (EC50 ) value of 2.44 mM (95% CI, 2.31 to 2.77 mM) when compared to the wild-type EC50 of 3.14 mM (95% CI, 3.03 to 3.26 mM), consistent with a gain-of-function mutation. A novel His403Gln variant in transforming growth factor, beta-induced (TGFBI), that may be causing keratoconus was also identified, indicating likely digenic inheritance of keratoconus and ADH2 in this family. In

  18. Metabolic process engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum Δack-adhE2 for enhanced n-butanol production from glucose: effects of methyl viologen on NADH availability, flux distribution, and fermentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Yu, Mingrui; Tang, I-Ching; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-04-01

    Butanol biosynthesis through aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2) is usually limited by NADH availability, resulting in low butanol titer, yield, and productivity. To alleviate this limitation and improve n-butanol production by Clostridium tyrobutyricum Δack-adhE2 overexpressing adhE2, the NADH availability was increased by using methyl viologen (MV) as an artificial electron carrier to divert electrons from ferredoxin normally used for H2 production. In the batch fermentation with the addition of 500 μM MV, H2 , acetate, and butyrate production was reduced by more than 80-90%, while butanol production increased more than 40% to 14.5 g/L. Metabolic flux analysis revealed that butanol production increased in the fermentation with MV because of increased NADH availability as a result of reduced H2 production. Furthermore, continuous butanol production of ∼55 g/L with a high yield of ∼0.33 g/g glucose and extremely low ethanol, acetate, and butyrate production was obtained in fed-batch fermentation with gas stripping for in situ butanol recovery. This study demonstrated a stable and reliable process for high-yield and high-titer n-butanol production by metabolically engineered C. tyrobutyricum by applying MV as an electron carrier to increase butanol biosynthesis. PMID:25363722

  19. Helminth Community Dynamics in Populations of Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Using Two Distinct Migratory Corridors.

    PubMed

    Garvon, Jason M; Fedynich, Alan M; Peterson, Markus J; Pence, Danny B

    2011-01-01

    The influence of spatially distinct host subpopulations on helminth community structure and pattern was examined in a migratory avian host species. Forty helminth species represented by 24,082 individuals were collected from 184 blue-winged teal (Anas discors; BWT) from 2 primary migratory corridors in Florida (eastern migratory corridor; EMC) and Louisiana and Texas (western migratory corridor; WMC). Mean species richness was greater in BWT from the WMC (x̅±SE = 10.2 ± 0.3 species) than the EMC (8.6 ± 0.2). The helminth community from the WMC had higher abundances of 6 common/intermediate species. Corridor helminth communities were similar in species composition but less similar when incorporating abundances of those species. Overlapping distributions of phylogenetically related host species that share generalist helminth species across ecologically similar habitats seem to mitigate the isolating mechanisms that are necessary for the distinct coevolutionary pathways to develop between adjacent corridors. PMID:21584230

  20. A highly efficient ADH-coupled NADH-recycling system for the asymmetric bioreduction of carbon-carbon double bonds using enoate reductases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Katharina; Hall, Melanie; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Fabian, Walter M F; Faber, Kurt; Glueck, Silvia M

    2011-06-01

    The asymmetric bioreduction of activated alkenes catalyzed by flavin-dependent enoate reductases from the OYE-family represents a powerful method for the production of optically active compounds. For its preparative-scale application, efficient and economic NADH-recycling is crucial. A novel enzyme-coupled NADH-recycling system is proposed based on the concurrent oxidation of a sacrificial sec-alcohol catalyzed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A). Due to the highly favorable position of the equilibrium of ene-reduction versus alcohol-oxidation, the cosubstrate is only required in slight excess. PMID:21328323

  1. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  2. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  3. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  4. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  5. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  6. Migration and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) along highway corridors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    The east-west density gradient and the pattern and mode of migration of the wetland exotic, purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.), were assessed in a survey of populations along the New York State Thruway from Albany to Buffalo to determine if the highway corridor contributed to the spread of this species. During the peak flowering season of late July to early August, individual colonies of purple loosestrife were identified and categorized into three size classes in parallel belt transects consisting of the median strip and highway rights-of-way on the north and south sides of the road. Data were also collected on the presence of colonies adjacent to the corridor and on highway drainage patterns. Although a distinct east-west density gradient existed in the corridor, it corresponded to the gradient on adjacent lands and was greatly influenced by a major infestation at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. The disturbed highway corridor served as a migration route for purple loosestrife, but topographic features dictated that this migration was a short-distance rather than long-distance process. Ditch and culvert drainage patterns increased the ability of purple loosestrife to migrate to new wetland sites. Management strategies proposed to reduce the spread of this wetland threat include minimizing disturbance, pulling by hand, spraying with glyphosate, disking, and mowing.

  7. ETR BUILDING, TRA642, INTERIOR. FIRST FLOOR. INSIDE UTILITY CORRIDOR ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BUILDING, TRA-642, INTERIOR. FIRST FLOOR. INSIDE UTILITY CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH PERIMETER WALL (COMMON TO ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA-648). CAMERA FACES WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-16-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  9. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  10. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  11. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  12. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  13. Corridor One: An Integrated Distance Visualization Environment for SSI and ASCI Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Finkelstein, A.; Funkhouser, T.

    1999-07-15

    The Corridor One project is a three-year integrated research project that combines the forces of six leading-edge laboratory and university groups working in the area of visualization, distributed computing and high-performance networking to develop and to deploy the most advanced, integrated distance visualization environment.

  14. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED BY EAST WALL ON LEFT AND APPARATUS ON RIGHT. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-1-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IN WEST CORRIDOR FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IN WEST CORRIDOR FACING SOUTH. FREIGHT ELEVATOR IS AT RIGHT OF VIEW. AT CENTER VIEW IS MTR VAULT NO. 1, USED TO STORE SPECIAL OR FISSIONABLE MATERIALS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-6-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. 78 FR 73559 - Moose-Wilson Corridor Comprehensive Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, Grand Teton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...; (2) distinguish the corridor's fundamental and other important resources and values; (3) clearly... address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying information--may be made publicly available at any...

  17. The Corridor Principle and the Near Failure Syndrome: Two Generic Concepts with Practical Value for Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronstadt, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author defines the Corridor Principle, which explains how entrepreneurs are able to use knowledge and insight from earlier ventures to see new venture opportunities that they could not have seen and/or pursued had they not started an earlier venture. He discusses its importance to practitioners in allowing them to anticipate…

  18. MTR WING A, TRA604, INTERIOR. MAIN FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604, INTERIOR. MAIN FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR 2 (BETWEEN ROOMS ON WEST WALL AND IN CENTER OF FLOOR). CAMERA FACING SOUTH. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-12-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. 78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Transportation (TxDOT) to study potential new and/or improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along... of Study is to evaluate alternatives to provide higher speed passenger rail service to meet future... Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma City AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration...

  20. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  1. 75 FR 10332 - In the Matter of: Corridor Communications Corp., International Cosmetics Marketing Co., PNV, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of: Corridor Communications Corp., International Cosmetics Marketing Co., PNV, Inc... International Cosmetics Marketing Co. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended...

  2. The influence of corridors on the movement behavior of individual Peromyscus polionotus in experimental landscapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, Brent J.; Hubbard, Michael W.

    1999-05-01

    To assess corridor effects on movement in Peromyscus polionotus (old-field mice), we used a set of three experimental landscapes that contained multiple patches (1.64 ha) of usable, open habitat embedded in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forest matrix. Some patches were connected by corridors and others were isolated (unconnected). We introduced mice to nest boxes in experimental patches and followed them through the landscapes via trapping. We found weak evidence that the presence of corridors decreased the probability that P. polionotus (particularly females) would disperse or disappear from a patch. In the process of live trapping the patches, we also encountered ‘feral’ P. polionotus, Sigmodon hispidus (cotton rats), and Peromyscus gossypinus (cotton mice). The average number of feral animals did not differ between isolated and connected patches. This suggests that corridors do not act as drift fences that ‘sieve’ individuals out of the matrix and into the patches. However, more male than female P. polionotus and S. hispidus were trapped in isolated patches. This intersexual difference did not exist in connected patches.

  3. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Launch site location review-flight corridor. 420.23 Section 420.23 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License...

  4. 76 FR 63346 - Environmental Impact Statement, Tappan Zee Bridge/I-287 Corridor Project (Rockland and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... corridor. A Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an Alternatives Analysis (AA) and EIS was published in the... Transportation Authority (MTA/MNR) issued an Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an Alternatives Analysis (AA) and... AA explored a number of options to rehabilitate or replace the Tappan Zee Bridge over the...

  5. Migration and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) along highway corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1989-05-01

    The east-west density gradient and the pattern and mode of migration of the wetland exotic, purple loosestrife ( Lythrum salicaria L.), were assessed in a survey of populations along the New York State Thruway from Albany to Buffalo to determine if the highway corridor contributed to the spread of this species. During the peak flowering season of late July to early August, individual colonies of purple loosestrife were identified and categorized into three size classes in parallel belt transects consisting of the median strip and highway rights-of-way on the north and south sides of the road. Data were also collected on the presence of colonies adjacent to the corridor and on highway drainage patterns. Although a distinct east-west density gradient existed in the corridor, it corresponded to the gradient on adjacent lands and was greatly influenced by a major infestation at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. The disturbed highway corridor served as a migration route for purple loosestrife, but topographic features dictated that this migration was a short-distance rather than long-distance process. Ditch and culvert drainage patterns increased the ability of purple loosestrife to migrate to new wetland sites. Management strategies proposed to reduce the spread of this wetland threat include minimizing disturbance, pulling by hand, spraying with glyphosate, disking, and mowing.

  6. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 420 - Method for Defining a Flight Corridor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method for Defining a Flight Corridor B Appendix B to Part 420 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Pt. 420, App. B Appendix B to Part 420—Method for Defining a...

  7. Lessons Learned during Creation of the I-65 Biofuels Corridor (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    A team of Clean Cities coalitions and state agencies worked together to create a biofuels corridor along I-65 between Indiana and Alabama. The team built relationships with stakeholders and learned the value of strong partnerships, good communication, marketing, and preparation.

  8. Corrigendum: Sailing From the Seas of Chaos Into the Corridor of Stability.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Lakens, D., & Evers, E. R. K. (2014). Sailing from the seas of chaos into the corridor of stability: Practical recommendations to increase the informational value of studies. Perspectives in Psychological Science, 9, 278-292. doi:10.1177/1745691614528520. PMID:26993282

  9. 78 FR 13748 - Environmental Impact Statement for the East San Fernando Valley Transit Corridor Project, Los...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ...The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) are issuing this Notice of Intent (NOI) to advise other agencies and the public that they will jointly prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for proposed transit improvements in the East San Fernando Valley Transit Project Corridor in Los Angeles County, California. The......

  10. Genetic Association and Gene-Gene Interaction Reveal Genetic Variations in ADH1B, GSTM1 and MnSOD Independently Confer Risk to Alcoholic Liver Diseases in India

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Chatterjee, Ankita; Das, Kausik; Bhowmik, Pradip; Das, Soumyajit; Basu, Priyadarshi; Santra, Amal K.; Datta, Simanti; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Banerjee, Soma

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is an important modifier of clinical outcome and natural history of progression in Alcoholic liver disease (ALD). While the significance of ethnicity in this evolution is very clear, subtle inter-individual genetic variant(s) might be important and thus we investigated those in an Indian population. Fourteen markers were genotyped within two alcohol metabolism genes [Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene clusters (ADH1B and ADH1C) and Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2)], one microsomal ethanol oxidizing enzyme cytochrome p450 (CYP2E1) and three oxidative stress response (OSR) genes (MnSOD, GSTT1 and GSTM1) among 490 Bengali individuals (322 ALD and 168 control) from Eastern and North-Eastern India and validation was performed in a new cohort of 150 Bengali patients including 100 ALD and 50 advanced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Out of 14 genetic variants, carriage of 5 genotypes (rs2066701CC in ADH1B, rs1693425TT in ADH1C, rs4880TT in MnSOD and GSTT1/GSTM1 null, p-value <0.05) were noted significantly higher among ALD patients while inter or intra group gene-gene interaction analysis revealed that addition of risk genotype of any OSR gene enhanced the possibility of ALD synergistically. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed independent association of rs2066701CC, rs4880TT and GSTM1 null genotype with ALD while lower frequencies of those genotypes in advanced NASH patients further confirmed their causal relation to ALD. Thus these findings suggest that the three variants of ADH1C, MnSOD and GSTM1 can be used to identify individuals who are at high risk to develop ALD and may be helpful in proper management of Indian alcoholics. PMID:26937962

  11. Identification of Priority Conservation Areas and Potential Corridors for Jaguars in the Caatinga Biome, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; Ferraz, Katia Maria Paschoaletto Micchi de Barros; de Paula, Rogério Cunha; de Campos, Cláudia Bueno

    2014-01-01

    The jaguar, Panthera onca, is a top predator with the extant population found within the Brazilian Caatinga biome now known to be on the brink of extinction. Designing new conservation units and potential corridors are therefore crucial for the long-term survival of the species within the Caatinga biome. Thus, our aims were: 1) to recognize suitable areas for jaguar occurrence, 2) to delineate areas for jaguar conservation (PJCUs), 3) to design corridors among priority areas, and 4) to prioritize PJCUs. A total of 62 points records of jaguar occurrence and 10 potential predictors were analyzed in a GIS environment. A predictive distributional map was obtained using Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) as performed by the Maximum Entropy (Maxent) algorithm. Areas equal to or higher than the median suitability value of 0.595 were selected as of high suitability for jaguar occurrence and named as Priority Jaguar Conservation Units (PJCU). Ten PJCUs with sizes varying from 23.6 km2 to 4,311.0 km2 were identified. Afterwards, we combined the response curve, as generated by SDM, and expert opinions to create a permeability matrix and to identify least cost corridors and buffer zones between each PJCU pair. Connectivity corridors and buffer zone for jaguar movement included an area of 8.884,26 km2 and the total corridor length is about 160.94 km. Prioritizing criteria indicated the PJCU representing c.a. 68.61% of the total PJCU area (PJCU # 1) as of high priority for conservation and connectivity with others PJCUs (PJCUs # 4, 5 and 7) desirable for the long term survival of the species. In conclusion, by using the jaguar as a focal species and combining SDM and expert opinion we were able to create a valid framework for practical conservation actions at the Caatinga biome. The same approach could be used for the conservation of other carnivores. PMID:24709817

  12. Molecular corridors and parameterizations of volatility in the chemical evolution of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    The formation and aging of organic aerosols (OA) proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of OA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. Based on data from over 30 000 compounds, we show that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. We developed parameterizations to predict the saturation mass concentration of organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur from the elemental composition that can be measured by soft-ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Field measurement data from new particle formation events, biomass burning, cloud/fog processing, and indoor environments were mapped into molecular corridors to characterize the chemical nature of the observed OA components. We found that less-oxidized indoor OA are constrained to a corridor of low molar mass and high volatility, whereas highly oxygenated compounds in atmospheric water extend to high molar mass and low volatility. Among the nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds identified in atmospheric aerosols, amines tend to exhibit low molar mass and high volatility, whereas organonitrates and organosulfates follow high O : C corridors extending to high molar mass and low volatility. We suggest that the consideration of molar mass and molecular corridors can help to constrain volatility and particle-phase state in the modeling of OA particularly for nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  13. Mapping High Biomass Corridors for Climate and Biodiversity Co-Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantz, P.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.

    2013-12-01

    A key issue in global conservation is how climate mitigation activities can secure biodiversity co-benefits. Tropical deforestation releases significant amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere and results in widespread biodiversity loss. The dominant strategy for forest conservation has been protected area designation. However, maintaining biodiversity in protected areas requires ecological exchange with ecosystems in which they are embedded. At current funding levels, existing conservation strategies are unlikely to prevent further loss of connectivity between protected areas and surrounding landscapes. The emergence of REDD+, a mechanism for funding carbon emissions reductions from deforestation in developing countries, suggests an alignment of goals and financial resources for protecting forest carbon, maintaining biodiversity in protected areas, and minimizing loss of forest ecosystem services. Identifying, protecting and sustainably managing vegetation carbon stocks between protected areas can provide both climate mitigation benefits through avoided CO2 emissions from deforestation and biodiversity benefits through the targeted protection of forests that maintain connectivity between protected areas and surrounding ecosystems. We used a high resolution, pan-tropical map of vegetation carbon stocks derived from MODIS, GLAS lidar and field measurements to map corridors that traverse areas of highest aboveground biomass between protected areas. We mapped over 13,000 corridors containing 49 GtC, accounting for 14% of unprotected vegetation carbon stock in the tropics. In the majority of cases, carbon density in corridors was commensurate with that of the protected areas they connect, suggesting significant opportunities for achieving climate mitigation and biodiversity co-benefits. To further illustrate the utility of this approach, we conducted a multi-criteria analysis of corridors in the Brazilian Amazon, identifying high biodiversity, high vegetation carbon stock

  14. Use of empirically derived source-destination models to map regional conservation corridors.

    PubMed

    Cushman, Samuel A; McKelvey, Kevin S; Schwartz, Michael K

    2009-04-01

    The ability of populations to be connected across large landscapes via dispersal is critical to long-term viability for many species. One means to mitigate population isolation is the protection of movement corridors among habitat patches. Nevertheless, the utility of small, narrow, linear features as habitat corridors has been hotly debated. Here, we argue that analysis of movement across continuously resistant landscapes allows a shift to a broader consideration of how landscape patterns influence connectivity at scales relevant to conservation. We further argue that this change in scale and definition of the connectivity problem improves one's ability to find solutions and may help resolve long-standing disputes regarding scale and definition of movement corridors and their importance to population connectivity. We used a new method that combines empirically derived landscape-resistance maps and least-cost path analysis between multiple source and destination locations to assess habitat isolation and identify corridors and barriers to organism movement. Specifically, we used a genetically based landscape resistance model for American black bears (Ursus americanus) to identify major movement corridors and barriers to population connectivity between Yellowstone National Park and the Canadian border. Even though western Montana and northern Idaho contain abundant public lands and the largest wilderness areas in the contiguous United States, moving from the Canadian border to Yellowstone Park along those paths indicated by modeled gene flow required bears to cross at least 6 potential barriers. Our methods are generic and can be applied to virtually any species for which reliable maps of landscape resistance can be developed. PMID:19016821

  15. Characterization and purification of Adh distal promoter factor 2, Adf-2, a cell-specific and promoter-specific repressor in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Benyajati, C; Ewel, A; McKeon, J; Chovav, M; Juan, E

    1992-01-01

    Chromatin footprinting in Drosophila tissue culture cells has detected the binding of a non-histone protein at +8 of the distal Adh RNA start site, on a 10-bp direct repeat motif abutting a nucleosome positioned over the inactive Adh distal promoter. Alternatively the active promoter is bound by a transcription initiation complex. We have characterized and purified a protein Adf-2 that binds specifically to this direct repeat motif 5'TCTCAGTGCA3', present at +8 and -202 of the distal RNA start site. DNase I footprinting, methylation interference, and UV-crosslinking analyses showed that both direct repeats interact in vitro with a nuclear protein of approximately 120 kilodaltons (kDa). We purified Adf-2 through multiple rounds of sequence-specific DNA affinity chromatography. Southwestern analysis showed that the purified 120 KDa polypeptide binds the Adf-2 motif efficiently as a monomer or homomultimer. In vivo titrations of Adf-2 activity with the Adf-2 motif by transient co-transfection competitions in different Drosophila cell lines suggested that Adf-2 is a cell-specific repressor. Adf-2 has been detected ubiquitously in vitro, but is functional in vivo as a sequence-specific DNA binding protein and repressor only in the cells that have the inactive distal promoter. We discuss the possibility that an activation process is required for Adf-2 protein to bind DNA and function in vivo. Images PMID:1408750

  16. Efficient production of lycopene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of synthetic crt genes from a plasmid harboring the ADH2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Bahieldin, Ahmed; Gadalla, Nour O; Al-Garni, Saleh M; Almehdar, Hussein; Noor, Samah; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Sabir, Jamal S M; Murata, Norio

    2014-03-01

    Lycopene is an effective antioxidant proposed as a possible treatment for some cancers and other degenerative human conditions. This study aims at generation of a yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) of efficient productivity of lycopene by overexpressing synthetic genes derived from crtE, crtB and crtI genes of Erwinia uredovora. These synthetic genes were constructed in accordance with the preferred codon usage in S. cerevisiae but with no changes in amino acid sequences of the gene products. S. cerevisiae cells were transformed with these synthetic crt genes, whose expression was regulated by the ADH2 promoter, which is de-repressed upon glucose depletion. The RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses indicated that the synthetic crt genes were efficiently transcribed and translated in crt-transformed S. cerevisiae cells. The highest level of lycopene in one of the transformed lines was 3.3mglycopene/g dry cell weight, which is higher than the previously reported levels of lycopene in other microorganisms transformed with the three genes. These results suggest the excellence of using the synthetic crt genes and the ADH2 promoter in generation of recombinant S. cerevisiae that produces a high level of lycopene. The level of ergosterol was reversely correlated to that of lycopene in crt-transformed S. cerevisiae cells, suggesting that two pathways for lycopene and ergosterol syntheses compete for the use of farnesyl diphosphate. PMID:24680933

  17. One-step fabrication of integrated disposable biosensor based on ADH/NAD+/meldola's blue/graphitized mesoporous carbons/chitosan nanobiocomposite for ethanol detection.

    PubMed

    Hua, Erhui; Wang, Li; Jing, Xiaoying; Chen, Changtao; Xie, Guoming

    2013-07-15

    A novel strategy to simplify the dehydrogenase-based electrochemical biosensor fabrication through one-step drop-coating nanobiocomposite on a screen printed electrode (SPE) was developed. The nanobiocomposite was prepared by successively adding graphitized mesoporous carbons (GMCs), meldola's blue (MDB), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) in chitosan (CS) solution. MDB/GMCs/CS film was prepared. Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrated that MDB was strongly adsorbed on GMCs. After optimizing the concentration of MDB and the working potential, the MDB/GMCs/CS film presented a fast amperometric response (5s), excellent sensitivity (10.36 nA μM(-1)), wide linear range (10-410 μM) toward NADH and without any other interference signals (such as AA, UA, DA, H2O2 and metal ions). Furthermore, concentrations of ADH and NAD(+) in nanobiocomposite and the detection conditions (temperature and pH) were also optimized. The constructed disposable ethanol biosensor showed an excellent linear response ranged from 0.5 to 15 mM with high sensitivity (67.28 nA mM(-1)) and a low limit of detection (80 μM) and a remarkable long-term stability (40 days). The intra-batch and inter-batch variation coefficients were both less than 5% (n=5). The ethanol recovery test demonstrated that the proposed biosensor offered a remarkable and accurate method for ethanol detection in the real blood samples. PMID:23622540

  18. An introduction to issues of habitat fragmentation relative to transportation corridors with special reference to high-speed rail (HSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Robert S.; Smith, Dwight G.

    1993-01-01

    Potential environmental impacts on wildlife result from siting and construction (short-term impacts) and habitat removal and fragmentation (long-term impacts) as a consequence of transportation corridor construction. Especially in rural districts, wildlife migration corridors and dispersal orientation are altered or destroyed and wildlife populations and their gene pools are isolated. This significantly weakens the wildlife community. Prudent selection of construction corridors reduces fragmentation impacts by maximizing preserved fragment sizes, and by running parallel to, not through, natural areas. Corridor width determines the degree to which wildlife movement is restricted except that culverts, underpasses, overpasses, and one-way gates, can aid wildlife in cross movements. Minimum underpass dimensions for large wildlife should be no smaller than 14 ft×14 ft and should include natural substratum inverts. Rail corridors have four characteristics that minimize adverse environmental impacts. The railbed is dry, ballast fillters runoff, there is little runoff beyond the toe of slope, and drainage ditches serve to control sheet flow and erosion, sediment movement, and uncontrolled channel flow. Rail corridors usually occupy smaller land areas because they are narrower and are more feasible to elevate so as to allow free movement of wildlife across the corridor.

  19. First Nd isotope record of Mediterranean-Atlantic water exchange through the Moroccan Rifian Corridor during the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Flecker, Rachel; Gutjahr, Marcus; Valdes, Paul J.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first neodymium isotope reconstruction of Mediterranean-Atlantic water exchange through the Moroccan ('Rifian') Corridor 8-5 Ma. This covers the late Miocene Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC); a period when progressive tectonic restriction of the Mediterranean-Atlantic seaways resulted in extreme, basin-wide Mediterranean salinity fluctuations. The Rifian Corridor was one of these seaways and until now, relatively poor age constraints existed for the timing of Corridor closure, due to the impact of uplift and erosion on the sedimentary record. The bottom water Nd isotope record from the continuous Bou Regreg Valley succession in northwest Morocco allows us to explore corridor connectivity with the Atlantic. Data from the interior and Mediterranean edge of the Rifian Corridor (respectively, the Taza-Guercif and Melilla basins, northern Morocco) provide new information on corridor shallowing and the provenance of water flowing through the seaway. As a result, we can constrain the age of Rifian Corridor closure to 6.64-6.44 Ma. We also find no evidence of the siphoning of Atlantic waters through the seaway (7.20-6.58 Ma). Our results cannot exclude the possibility that at times during the Messinian Salinity Crisis, Mediterranean Outflow Water reached the Atlantic.

  20. The Vapor Plume at Material Disposal Are C in Relation to Pajarito Corridor Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, William B.

    2012-04-02

    A vapor plume made up of volatile organic compounds is present beneath Material Disposal Area C (MDA C) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The location and concentrations within the vapor plume are discussed in relation to existing and planned facilities and construction activities along Pajarito Road (the 'Pajarito Corridor') and in terms of worker health and safety. This document provides information that indicates that the vapor plume does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of proposed facilities along Pajarito Road. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) monitors emissions, effluents, and environmental media to meet environmental compliance requirements, determine actions to protect the environment, and monitor the long-term health of the local environment. LANL also studies and characterizes 'legacy' waste from past Laboratory operations to make informed decisions regarding eventual corrective actions and the disposition of that waste. Starting in 1969, these activities have been annually reported in the LANL Environmental Report (formerly Environmental Surveillance Report), and are detailed in publicly accessible technical reports meeting environmental compliance requirements. Included among the legacy sites being investigated are several formerly used material disposal areas (MDAs) set aside by the Laboratory for the general on-site disposal of waste from mission-related activities. One such area is MDA C located in Technical Area 50 (TA-50), which was used for waste disposal between 1948 and 1974. The location of TA-50 is depicted in Figure 1. The present paper uses a series of maps and cross sections to address the public concerns raised about the vapor plume at MDA C. As illustrated here, extensive sampling and data interpretation indicate that the vapor plume at MDA C does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers

  1. Predicting the continuum between corridors and barriers to animal movements using Step Selection Functions and Randomized Shortest Paths.

    PubMed

    Panzacchi, Manuela; Van Moorter, Bram; Strand, Olav; Saerens, Marco; Kivimäki, Ilkka; St Clair, Colleen C; Herfindal, Ivar; Boitani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The loss, fragmentation and degradation of habitat everywhere on Earth prompts increasing attention to identifying landscape features that support animal movement (corridors) or impedes it (barriers). Most algorithms used to predict corridors assume that animals move through preferred habitat either optimally (e.g. least cost path) or as random walkers (e.g. current models), but neither extreme is realistic. We propose that corridors and barriers are two sides of the same coin and that animals experience landscapes as spatiotemporally dynamic corridor-barrier continua connecting (separating) functional areas where individuals fulfil specific ecological processes. Based on this conceptual framework, we propose a novel methodological approach that uses high-resolution individual-based movement data to predict corridor-barrier continua with increased realism. Our approach consists of two innovations. First, we use step selection functions (SSF) to predict friction maps quantifying corridor-barrier continua for tactical steps between consecutive locations. Secondly, we introduce to movement ecology the randomized shortest path algorithm (RSP) which operates on friction maps to predict the corridor-barrier continuum for strategic movements between functional areas. By modulating the parameter Ѳ, which controls the trade-off between exploration and optimal exploitation of the environment, RSP bridges the gap between algorithms assuming optimal movements (when Ѳ approaches infinity, RSP is equivalent to LCP) or random walk (when Ѳ → 0, RSP → current models). Using this approach, we identify migration corridors for GPS-monitored wild reindeer (Rangifer t. tarandus) in Norway. We demonstrate that reindeer movement is best predicted by an intermediate value of Ѳ, indicative of a movement trade-off between optimization and exploration. Model calibration allows identification of a corridor-barrier continuum that closely fits empirical data and demonstrates that RSP

  2. Water exchange through the Betic and Rifian corridors prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vara, Alba; Topper, Robin P. M.; Meijer, Paul Th.; Kouwenhoven, Tanja J.

    2015-05-01

    Although the present-day Mediterranean-Atlantic water exchange has been extensively studied, little is known about the dynamics of the Betic and Rifian corridors that existed before the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Due to the difficulties in studying the paleogeographic evolution of these corridors, physics-based knowledge of their behavior is essential to interpret observational evidence and to relate flow structures to gateway geometries. Here we present the first systematic model study of the water exchange through these gateways. We use the parallel version of the Princeton Ocean Model (sbPOM) and a set of idealized bathymetries based on a late Tortonian paleogeography. This analysis represents a major step forward in the understanding of the behavior of the double-gateway system constituted by the Late Miocene Betic and Rifian corridors. We demonstrate that the "siphon" scenario, involving inflow of cold upwelled Atlantic water through the Rifian corridor and outflow of Mediterranean water only via the Betic corridor, is unlikely from a physics perspective. It is shown that two exchange patterns are possible depending solely on the relative depth of the corridors. The implication of this is that geological evidence for the behavior of one corridor provides information about the dimensions of the other. We show that disappearance of outflow in one corridor does not necessarily imply its closure and we establish a guideline to determine how geological evidence can be interpreted as indicating one- or two-layer flow. Based on the model results, we propose new physics-based scenarios for the time interval defined for the siphon.

  3. Vegetation and substrate on aeolian landscapes in the Colorado River corridor, Cataract Canyon, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Gillette, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation and substrate data presented in this report characterize ground cover on aeolian landscapes of the Colorado River corridor through Cataract Canyon, Utah, in Canyonlands National Park. The 27-km-long Cataract Canyon reach has undergone less anthropogenic alteration than other reaches of the mainstem Colorado River. Characterizing ecosystem parameters there provides a basis against which to evaluate future changes, such as those that could result from the further spread of nonnative plant species or increased visitor use. Upstream dams have less effect on the hydrology and sediment supply in Cataract Canyon compared with downstream reaches in Grand Canyon National Park. For this reason, comparison of these vegetation and substrate measurements with similar data from aeolian landscapes of Grand Canyon will help to resolve the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on the Colorado River corridor ecosystem.

  4. Vegetation and substrate properties of aeolian dune fields in the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes vegetation and substrate properties of aeolian landscapes in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Arizona, in Grand Canyon National Park. Characterizing these parameters provides a basis from which to assess future changes in this ecosystem, including the spread of nonnative plant species. Differences are apparent between aeolian dune fields that are downwind of where modern controlled flooding deposits new sandbars (modern-fluvial-sourced dune fields) and those that have received little or no new windblown sand since river regulation began in the 1960s (relict-fluvial-sourced dune fields). The most substantial difference between modern- and relict-fluvial-sourced aeolian dune fields is the greater abundance of biologic soil crust in relict dune fields. These findings can be used with similar investigations in other geomorphic settings in Grand Canyon and elsewhere in the Colorado River corridor to evaluate the health of the Colorado River ecosystem over time.

  5. Monitoring the vernal advancement and retrogradation (green wave effect) of natural vegetation. [Great Plains Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Haas, R. H.; Deering, D. W.; Schell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Great Plains Corridor rangeland project utilizes natural vegetation systems as phenological indicators of seasonal development and climatic effects upon regional growth conditions. A method has been developed for quantitative measurement of vegetation conditions over broad regions using ERTS-1 MSS data. Radiance values recorded in ERTS-1 spectral bands 5 and 7, corrected for sun angle, are used to compute a band ratio parameter which is shown to be correlated with green biomass and vegetation moisture content. This report details the progress being made toward determining factors associated with the transformed vegetation index (TVI) and limitations on the method. During the first year of ERTS-1 operation (cycles 1-20), an average of 50% usable ERTS-1 data was obtained for the ten Great Plains Corridor test sites.

  6. Gravel resources, urbanization, and future land use, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, James M.; Fitch, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    An assessment of gravel needs in Front Range Urban Corridor markets to 2000 A.D., based on forecast population increases and urbanization, indicates that adequate resources to meet anticipated needs are potentially available, if future land use does not preclude their extraction. Because of urban encroachment onto gravel-bearing lands, this basic construction material is in short supply nationally and in the Front Range Urban Corridor. Longer hauls, increased prices, and use of alternatives, especially crushed rock aggregate, have resulted. An analysis of possible sequential land uses following gravel mining indicates that a desirable use is for 'real estate' ponds and small lakes. A method for computing gravel reserves, based on planimeter measurement of area of resource-bearing lands and statistical analysis of reliability of thickness and size distribution data, was developed to compute reserves in individual markets. A discussion of the qualitative 'usability' of these reserves is then made for the individual markets.

  7. Competing frameworks in planning for the aged in the growth corridors of Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, Elizabeth; Biggs, Simon; Kurowski, William

    2014-01-01

    The Ageing in the Growth Corridors Project was initiated as a partnership between the University of Melbourne and the Department of Health in the Northwest Metropolitan Region of Melbourne, Australia. It involved a research team working with six project officers appointed to stimulate development in relation to an aging population in the sprawling outer metropolitan growth corridors. This article identifies the key lessons learned in terms of project implementation relating to attitudinal and structural barriers to the development of an age-friendly environment in areas of rapid urban growth. The findings illustrate some of the dilemmas raised by competing program conceptions, a dynamic and changing federal/state policy context, and local resource and strategic management constraints. The partnership with the university, nevertheless, provided a point of stability and continuity for the project officers in implementing their mandate. PMID:24224881

  8. Tectonics of the Western Betics: the role of E-W strike slip fault corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, Gianluca; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Célérier, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    The tectonic origin of the arcuate Betic-Rif orogenic belt that surrounds the Alboran Sea at the western tip of the Mediterranean Sea remains debated. Here, we investigate the tectonic units cropping out in the Western Betics (Malaga region, Southern Spain) with the main goal of reconstructing the Oligo-Miocene evolution of the area. New structural data and geological mapping together with available data allow us to identify the main structural features of the area. Deformation is found to be extremely diffused but two E-W elongated tectonic blocks with different lithological composition are outlined by marked E-W dextral strike-slip corridors ending up in horse-tail splays. These E-W strike slip corridors are responsible for late Miocence tectonics of both the internal and external zones of the Betic Cordillera.

  9. Sailing From the Seas of Chaos Into the Corridor of Stability: Practical Recommendations to Increase the Informational Value of Studies.

    PubMed

    Lakens, Daniël; Evers, Ellen R K

    2014-05-01

    Recent events have led psychologists to acknowledge that the inherent uncertainty encapsulated in an inductive science is amplified by problematic research practices. In this article, we provide a practical introduction to recently developed statistical tools that can be used to deal with these uncertainties when performing and evaluating research. In Part 1, we discuss the importance of accurate and stable effect size estimates as well as how to design studies to reach a corridor of stability around effect size estimates. In Part 2, we explain how, given uncertain effect size estimates, well-powered studies can be designed with sequential analyses. In Part 3, we (a) explain what p values convey about the likelihood that an effect is true, (b) illustrate how the v statistic can be used to evaluate the accuracy of individual studies, and (c) show how the evidential value of multiple studies can be examined with a p-curve analysis. We end by discussing the consequences of incorporating our recommendations in terms of a reduced quantity, but increased quality, of the research output. We hope that the practical recommendations discussed in this article will provide researchers with the tools to make important steps toward a psychological science that allows researchers to differentiate among all possible truths on the basis of their likelihood. PMID:26173264

  10. Effets du Parecoxib dans la Prévention des Adhérences abdominales postopératoires: étude expérimentale randomisée chez les rats

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Tshilombo, François; Odimba, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bien d’études ont été menées sur les adhérences intrapéritonéales, mais aucune unanimité n'est encore acquise sur leur prévention. Le but de notre étude a été d’évaluer le potentiel effet d'un antiinflammatoire, parecoxib dans la prévention des adhérences ainsi que sur la cicatrisation chez des rats. Méthodes Dans un modèle expérimental d'adhérences postopératoires secondaires à des lésions péritonéales par brûlure, 30 rats furent randomisés en trois groupes suivant le mode d'administration de parecoxib (groupe contrôle; intrapéritonéal; intramusculaire. Résultats Le parecoxib a significativement diminué la quantité (p < .05) et la sévérité (p < .01) des adhérences postopératoires dans les deux modèles expérimentaux. Au total, 21 rats ont développé des adhérences, respectivement 9 (100%) dans le groupe A, 5 (50%) dans le groupe B et 7 (70%) dans le groupe C (p = 0.05). Du point de vue de la formation des adhérences au site du traumatisme, dix-neuf rats en ont développé: 9 (100%) dans le groupe A et 5 (50%) pour chacun de deux autres groupes B et C. Une différence significative a été constatée en comparant ces groupes deux à deux: A vs B (p < 0.05); A vs C (p < 0,05). Parecoxib n'a pas compromis la cicatrisation intestinale, ni cutanée. Conclusion Cette étude a montré que le parecoxib pouvait réduire la formation des adhérences postopératoires. La confirmation de la sécurité du parecoxib sur les anastomoses intestinales doit être investiguée au cours d'autres expérimentations. PMID:26966478

  11. Palaeohydrological corridors for hominin dispersals in the Middle East ∼250-70,000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeze, Paul S.; Groucutt, Huw S.; Drake, Nick A.; White, Tom S.; Jennings, Richard P.; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    The timing and extent of palaeoenvironmental connections between northeast Africa, the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula during the Middle and Late Pleistocene are critical to debates surrounding dispersals of hominins, including movements of Homo sapiens out of Africa. Although there is evidence that synchronous episodes of climatic amelioration during the late Middle and Late Pleistocene may have allowed connections to form between northern Africa and western Asia, a number of palaeoclimate models indicate the continued existence of an arid barrier between northern Arabia and the Levant. Here we evaluate the palaeoenvironmental setting for hominin dispersals between, and within, northeast Africa and southwest Asia during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 7-5 using reconstructions of surface freshwater availability as an environmental proxy. We use remotely sensed data to map palaeohydrological features (lakes, wetlands and rivers) across the presently hyper-arid areas of northern Arabia and surrounding regions, integrating these results with palaeoclimate models, palaeoenvironmental proxy data and absolute dating to determine when these features were active. Our analyses suggest limited potential for dispersals during MIS 7 and 6, but indicate the formation of a palaeohydrological corridor (the 'Tabuk Corridor') between the Levant and the Arabian interior during the MIS 6-5e glacial-interglacial transition and during MIS 5e. A recurrence of this corridor, following a slightly different route, also occurred during MIS 5a. These palaeohydrological and terrestrial data can be used to establish when proposed routes for hominin dispersals became viable. Furthermore, the distribution of Arabian archaeological sites with affinities to Levantine assemblages, some of which are associated with Homo sapiens fossils, and the relative density of Middle Palaeolithic assemblages within the Tabuk Corridor, are consistent with it being utilised for dispersals at various times.

  12. Migratory corridors of adult female Kemp’s ridley turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaver, Donna J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Rubio, Cynthia; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.; Pena, Jaime; Gamez, Daniel Gomez; Gonzales Diaz Miron, Raul de Jesus; Burchfield, Patrick M.; Martinez, Hector J.; Ortiz, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    For many marine species, locations of migratory pathways are not well defined. We used satellite telemetry and switching state-space modeling (SSM) to define the migratory corridor used by Kemp's ridley turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) in the Gulf of Mexico. The turtles were tagged after nesting at Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA from 1997 to 2014 (PAIS; n = 80); Rancho Nuevo, Tamaulipas, Mexico from 2010 to 2011 (RN; n = 14); Tecolutla, Veracruz, Mexico from 2012 to 2013 (VC; n = 13); and Gulf Shores, Alabama, USA during 2012 (GS; n = 1). The migratory corridor lies in nearshore Gulf of Mexico waters in the USA and Mexico with mean water depth of 26 m and a mean distance of 20 km from the nearest mainland coast. Migration from the nesting beach is a short phenomenon that occurs from late-May through August, with a peak in June. There was spatial similarity of post-nesting migratory pathways for different turtles over a 16 year period. Thus, our results indicate that these nearshore Gulf waters represent a critical migratory habitat for this species. However, there is a gap in our understanding of the migratory pathways used by this and other species to return from foraging grounds to nesting beaches. Therefore, our results highlight the need for tracking reproductive individuals from foraging grounds to nesting beaches. Continued tracking of adult females from PAIS, RN, and VC nesting beaches will allow further study of environmental and bathymetric components of migratory habitat and threats occurring within our defined corridor. Furthermore, the existence of this migratory corridor in nearshore waters of both the USA and Mexico demonstrates that international cooperation is necessary to protect essential migratory habitat for this imperiled species.

  13. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603, REACTOR FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR CREATED BY REACTOR (LEFT OF VIEW) AND WEST WALL ON RIGHT. BRIDGE OVERHEAD PROVIDED ACCESS TO TOP OF REACTOR FROM BALCONY. NOTE WIDTH OF BRIDGE. CAMERA FACING SOUTH TOWARDS OPEN DOOR OF REACTOR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-1-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Comanagement of wildlife corridors: the case for citizen participation in the Algonquin to Adirondack proposal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca; Harris, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    The debate between top-down and bottom-up planning has recently re-emerged in environmental management. Many commentators agree on the merits of comanagement, in which affected citizens and professional managers share responsibility for planning. Nevertheless, the manifold advantages of comanagement have not always been fully appreciated in environmental planning. For example, a group representing NGOs and academic institutions recently proposed an ecological corridor linking Algonquin Provincial Park in southern Ontario to the Adirondack Park in northern New York. This corridor, known as A2A, was designed to encourage the migration of wolves and other wildlife between the parks. Much of the land in A2A is private property. A survey of households, randomly scattered throughout the United States portion of the corridor, revealed that affected landowners had little knowledge of the proposal and no contact with its advocates. Many respondents were farmers who utilized land for livelihood. Other landowners enjoyed property for a variety of recreational purposes. Regardless of use, survey participants placed high value on the importance of conserving biological diversity. They also expressed great distrust toward restrictions that might be placed on their activities. In general, respondents felt very unsure about A2A, and they were uncertain about personal involvement in the planning process. Certain landowners indicated a willingness to have their land be included in an ecological corridor, despite not knowing about it before the survey was administered. These results suggest that A2A proponents have little to lose and much to gain by disseminating information locally and by embracing comanagement for further formulation of this plan. PMID:15627463

  15. Geometric Context and Orientation Map Combination for Indoor Corridor Modeling Using a Single Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baligh Jahromi, Ali; Sohn, Gunho

    2016-06-01

    Since people spend most of their time indoors, their indoor activities and related issues in health, security and energy consumption have to be understood. Hence, gathering and representing spatial information of indoor spaces in form of 3D models become very important. Considering the available data gathering techniques with respect to the sensors cost and data processing time, single images proved to be one of the reliable sources. Many of the current single image based indoor space modeling methods are defining the scene as a single box primitive. This domain-specific knowledge is usually not applicable in various cases where multiple corridors are joined at one scene. Here, we addressed this issue by hypothesizing-verifying multiple box primitives which represents the indoor corridor layout. Middle-level perceptual organization is the foundation of the proposed method, which relies on finding corridor layout boundaries using both detected line segments and virtual rays created by orthogonal vanishing points. Due to the presence of objects, shadows and occlusions, a comprehensive interpretation of the edge relations is often concealed. This necessitates the utilization of virtual rays to create a physically valid layout hypothesis. Many of the former methods used Orientation Map or Geometric Context to evaluate their proposed layout hypotheses. Orientation map is a map that reveals the local belief of region orientations computed from line segments, and in a segmented image geometric context uses color, texture, edge, and vanishing point cues to estimate the likelihood of each possible label for all super-pixels. Here, the created layout hypotheses are evaluated by an objective function which considers the fusion of orientation map and geometric context with respect to the horizontal viewing angle at each image pixel. Finally, the best indoor corridor layout hypothesis which gets the highest score from the scoring function will be selected and converted to a 3D

  16. A cell-based study on pedestrian acceleration and overtaking in a transfer station corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Xuemei; Ran, Bin

    2013-04-01

    Pedestrian speed in a transfer station corridor is faster than usual and sometimes running can be found among some of them. In this paper, pedestrians are divided into two categories. The first one is aggressive, and the other is conservative. Aggressive pedestrians weaving their way through crowd in the corridor are the study object of this paper. During recent decades, much attention has been paid to the pedestrians' behavior, such as overtaking (also deceleration) and collision avoidance, and that continues in this paper. After sufficiently analyzing the characteristics of pedestrian flow in transfer station corridor, a cell-based model is presented in this paper, including the acceleration (also deceleration) and overtaking analysis. Acceleration (also deceleration) in a corridor is fixed according to Newton's Law and then speed calculated with a kinematic formula is discretized into cells based on the fuzzy logic. After the speed is updated, overtaking is analyzed based on updated speed and force explicitly, compared to rule-based models, which herein we call implicit ones. During the analysis of overtaking, a threshold value to determine the overtaking direction is introduced. Actually, model in this paper is a two-step one. The first step is to update speed, which is the cells the pedestrian can move in one time interval and the other is to analyze the overtaking. Finally, a comparison between the rule-based cellular automata, the model in this paper and data in HCM 2000 is made to demonstrate our model can be used to achieve reasonable simulation of acceleration (also deceleration) and overtaking among pedestrians.

  17. Blood Parasites of Blue-winged Teal ( Anas discors ) from Two Migratory Corridors, in the Southern USA.

    PubMed

    Garvon, Jason M; Mott, Joanna B; Jacobs, Sandy Serio; Fedynich, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    We collected 180 Blue-winged Teal ( Anas discors ) in September and October 2002 from Florida, US (n=100, representing the eastern migratory corridor) and the Louisiana-Texas, US, border (n=80, representing the western migratory corridor) and examined for blood parasites using thin heart-blood smears. Leucocytozoon simondi, Haemoproteus nettionis, and microfilariae were found in 16, 23, and 27 birds, respectively. Prevalence of L. simondi and H. nettionis did not vary by migratory corridor, but the prevalence of microfilariae was higher in the western corridor (23%) than the eastern corridor (9%). No differences in prevalence of L. simondi, H. nettionis, and microfilariae were observed by host age or sex. The mean density of L. simondi and H. nettionis averaged 1.5±0.3 and 2.3±0.4 (±SE per 3,000 erythrocytes), respectively. Ranked abundance models for main and interactive effects of corridor, age, and sex were not statistically significant for L. simondi or H. nettionis. Low prevalence and abundance of hematozoa in early autumn migrants reflects the likelihood of low exposure probabilities of Blue-winged Teal on the breeding grounds, compared to their congeners. PMID:27285417

  18. Connecting the dots: an invariant migration corridor links the Holocene to the present

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L; Berger, Kim Murray

    2006-01-01

    Numerous species undergo impressive movements, but due to massive changes in land use, long distance migration in terrestrial vertebrates has become a highly fragile ecological phenomenon. Uncertainty about the locations of past migrations and the importance of current corridors hampers conservation planning. Using archeological data from historic kill sites and modern methods to track migration, we document an invariant, 150 km (one-way) migration corridor used for at least 6000 years by North America's sole extant endemic ungulate. Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) from the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, like other long distant migrants including Serengeti wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and Arctic caribou (Rangifer tarandus), move nearly 50 km d−1, but in contrast to these other species, rely on an invariant corridor averaging only 2 km wide. Because an entire population accesses a national park (Grand Teton) by passage through bottlenecks as narrow as 121 m, any blockage to movement will result in extirpation. Based on animation of real data coupled with the loss of six historic routes, alternative pathways throughout the 60 000 km2 Yellowstone ecosystem are no longer available. Our findings have implications for developing strategies to protect long distance land migrations in Africa, Asia and North America and to prevent the disappearance of ecological phenomena that have operated for millennia. PMID:17148280

  19. Identifying ecological corridors for Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) and Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis).

    PubMed

    Miquelle, Dale G; Rozhnov, Vyachaslav V; Ermoshin, Victor; Murzin, Andre A; Nikolaev, Igor G; Hernandez-Blanco, Jose A; Naidenko, Sergie V

    2015-07-01

    The rapid explosion of human populations and the associated development of human-dominated landscapes have drastically reduced and fragmented habitat for tigers (Panthera tigris) and leopards (Panthera pardus) across Asia, resulting in multiple small populations. However, Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) habitat in Russia has remained largely interconnected, except for a break between tigers in southwest Primorye and the southern Sikhote-Alin Mountains. This habitat patch in southwest Primorye also retains the last population of Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis). Genetic differentiation of tigers in southwest Primorye and the Sikhote-Alin Mountains along with survey data suggest that habitat fragmentation is limiting movement of tigers and leopards across the Razdolnaya River basin. We looked at historical and recent survey data on tigers and leopards and mapped existing cover types to examine land-use patterns of both large felids and humans in the development strip along the Razdolnaya River. We then used least-cost distance analyses to identify the most effective potential corridor to retain connectivity for large felids between Land of the Leopard National Park and Ussuriskii Zapovednik (Reserve). We identified a single potential corridor that still exists with a total distance of 62.5 km from Land of the Leopard National Park to Ussuriskii Zapovednik, mostly (93%) through forested habitat. We recommend formal recognition of a Razdolnaya ecological corridor and provide specific recommendations for each of 3 proposed management sections. PMID:26096589

  20. Usage of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Along the Corridors between the EV Project Major Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Mindy Kirkpatrick

    2012-05-01

    The report explains how the EVSE are being used along the corridors between the EV Project cities. The EV Project consists of a nationwide collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), ECOtality North America, Nissan, General Motors, and more than 40 other city, regional and state governments, and electric utilities. The purpose of the EV Project is to demonstrate the deployment and use of approximately 14,000 Level II (208-240V) electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and 300 fast chargers in 16 major cities. This research investigates the usage of all currently installed EV Project commercial EVSE along major interstate corridors. ESRI ArcMap software products are utilized to create geographic EVSE data layers for analysis and visualization of commercial EVSE usage. This research locates the crucial interstate corridors lacking sufficient commercial EVSE and targets locations for future commercial EVSE placement. The results and methods introduced in this research will be used by INL for the duration of the EV Project.

  1. Movements and corridors of African elephants in relation to protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, I.; Krink, T.; Vollrath, F.

    2005-04-01

    Understanding how mammals satisfy their need for space in fragmenting ecosystems is crucial for ecosystem conservation. Using state-of-the-art global positioning system (GPS) technology we tracked 11 focal African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in Kenya at 3-hourly fix intervals and collected between 34 and 406 days per individual. Our recordings gave a high spatio-temporal resolution compared to previous studies and allowed novel insights into range use. The actual ranges of the tracked elephants are smaller than usually represented. Moreover, the ranges in our sample were complex and not confined to officially designated protected areas, except where fenced. All the unfenced elephants in our sample had distinct `home sectors' linked by `travel' corridors. Within each home sector the elephants concentrated in favourite `core zones'. Such core zones tended to lie in protected areas whereas corridors typically crossed unprotected range. Elephants moved significantly faster along corridors than elsewhere in their range, which suggests awareness of danger outside the protected area. We conclude that understanding the complex use of an animal's range is crucial for conservation planning aiming to balance animal interests with those of human beings that co-habit in their range.

  2. 2007 Weather and Aeolian Sand-Transport Data from the Colorado River Corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Andrews, Timothy; Fairley, Helen C.; Brown, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    Weather data constitute an integral part of ecosystem monitoring in the Colorado River corridor and are particularly valuable for understanding processes of landscape change that contribute to the stability of archeological sites. Data collected in 2007 are reported from nine weather stations in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Ariz. The stations were deployed in February and March 2007 to measure wind speed and direction, rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, and barometric pressure. Sand traps near each weather station collect windblown sand, from which daily aeolian sand-transport rates are calculated. The data reported here were collected as part of an ongoing study to test and evaluate methods for quantifying processes that affect the physical integrity of archeological sites along the river corridor; as such, these data can be used to identify rainfall events capable of causing gully incision and to predict likely transport pathways for aeolian sand, two landscape processes integral to the preservation of archeological sites. Weather data also have widespread applications to other studies of physical, cultural, and biological resources in Grand Canyon. Aeolian sand-transport data reported here, collected in the year before the March 2008 High-Flow Experiment (HFE) at Glen Canyon Dam, represent baseline data against which the effects of the 2008 HFE on windblown sand will be compared in future reports.

  3. Skip entry guidance using numerical predictor-corrector and patched corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zong-Fu; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Tang, Guo-Jian

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a skip entry guidance algorithm that uses a numerical predictor-corrector and a patched corridor for low-lifting capsules returning from the Moon. The longitudinal and lateral channels are assumed to be decoupled. The bank angle magnitude profile is parameterized using piecewise linear segments with respect to a normalized energy. The shape of the bank-vs-energy profile is determined using a single piecewise-defined variable. The predicted longitudinal bias is nullified using a false position method. The adverse effects of aerodynamic and atmospheric uncertainties are mitigated using an on-board estimating strategy during the trajectory prediction. A patched corridor is devised to manage the lateral state based on analytical derivations and reasonable approximations. The sign of the bank angle is reversed when the boundary of the patched corridor is violated. Dispersed simulations are implemented in a three-degree-of-freedom dynamical context, and the results demonstrate the high performance of the proposed guidance algorithm under stressful testing conditions.

  4. Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: Ecological corridor rather than barrier?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, R.E., Jr.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Douglas, D.C.; Handel, C.M.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Gottschalck, J.C.; Warnock, N.; McCaffery, B.J.; Battley, Phil F.; Piersma, Theunis

    2009-01-01

    Mountain ranges, deserts, ice fields and oceans generally act as barriers to the movement of land-dependent animals, often profoundly shaping migration routes. We used satellite telemetry to track the southward flights of bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri), shorebirds whose breeding and non-breeding areas are separated by the vast central Pacific Ocean. Seven females with surgically implanted transmitters flew non-stop 8117-11680km (10153??1043 s.d.) directly across the Pacific Ocean; two males with external transmitters flew non-stop along the same corridor for 7008-7390km. Flight duration ranged from 6.0 to 9.4 days (7.8??1.3 s.d.) for birds with implants and 5.0 to 6.6 days for birds with externally attached transmitters. These extraordinary non-stop flights establish new extremes for avian flight performance, have profound implications for understanding the physiological capabilities of vertebrates and how birds navigate, and challenge current physiological paradigms on topics such as sleep, dehydration and phenotypic flexibility. Predicted changes in climatic systems may affect survival rates if weather conditions at their departure hub or along the migration corridor should change. We propose that this transoceanic route may function as an ecological corridor rather than a barrier, providing a wind-assisted passage relatively free of pathogens and predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  5. Corridors maintain species richness in the fragmented landscapes of a microecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, F.; Gonzalez, A.; Evans-Freke, I.

    1998-01-01

    Theory predicts that species richness or single-species populations can be maintained, or at least extinctions minimized, by boosting rates of immigration. One possible way of achieving this is by establishing corridors of suitable habitat between reserves. Using moss patches as model microecosystems, we provide here probably the first field experimental test of the idea that corridors can reduce the rate of loss of species, and therefore help to maintain species richness. Connecting patches of habitat with corridors did indeed slow the rate of extinction of species, preserving species richness for longer periods of time than in disconnected habitat patches. The pattern of γ-diversity, the cumulative species richness of entire connected systems, is similarly higher than that of fragmented systems, despite the homogenizing effects of movement. Predators are predicted to be more susceptible to fragmentation because of their greater mobility and smaller population sizes. Our data are consistent with this prediction: the proportion of predator species declined significantly in disconnected as compared with connected treatments.

  6. Connecting the dots: an invariant migration corridor links the Holocene to the present.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L; Berger, Kim Murray

    2006-12-22

    Numerous species undergo impressive movements, but due to massive changes in land use, long distance migration in terrestrial vertebrates has become a highly fragile ecological phenomenon. Uncertainty about the locations of past migrations and the importance of current corridors hampers conservation planning. Using archeological data from historic kill sites and modern methods to track migration, we document an invariant, 150 km (one-way) migration corridor used for at least 6000 years by North America's sole extant endemic ungulate. Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) from the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, like other long distant migrants including Serengeti wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and Arctic caribou (Rangifer tarandus), move nearly 50 km d-1, but in contrast to these other species, rely on an invariant corridor averaging only 2 km wide. Because an entire population accesses a national park (Grand Teton) by passage through bottlenecks as narrow as 121 m, any blockage to movement will result in extirpation. Based on animation of real data coupled with the loss of six historic routes, alternative pathways throughout the 60,000 km2 Yellowstone ecosystem are no longer available. Our findings have implications for developing strategies to protect long distance land migrations in Africa, Asia and North America and to prevent the disappearance of ecological phenomena that have operated for millennia. PMID:17148280

  7. Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: ecological corridor rather than barrier?

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Robert E.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Douglas, David C.; Handel, Colleen M.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Gottschalck, Jon C.; Warnock, Nils; McCaffery, Brian J.; Battley, Philip F.; Piersma, Theunis

    2008-01-01

    Mountain ranges, deserts, ice fields and oceans generally act as barriers to the movement of land-dependent animals, often profoundly shaping migration routes. We used satellite telemetry to track the southward flights of bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri), shorebirds whose breeding and non-breeding areas are separated by the vast central Pacific Ocean. Seven females with surgically implanted transmitters flew non-stop 8117–11 680 km (10 153±1043 s.d.) directly across the Pacific Ocean; two males with external transmitters flew non-stop along the same corridor for 7008–7390 km. Flight duration ranged from 6.0 to 9.4 days (7.8±1.3 s.d.) for birds with implants and 5.0 to 6.6 days for birds with externally attached transmitters. These extraordinary non-stop flights establish new extremes for avian flight performance, have profound implications for understanding the physiological capabilities of vertebrates and how birds navigate, and challenge current physiological paradigms on topics such as sleep, dehydration and phenotypic flexibility. Predicted changes in climatic systems may affect survival rates if weather conditions at their departure hub or along the migration corridor should change. We propose that this transoceanic route may function as an ecological corridor rather than a barrier, providing a wind-assisted passage relatively free of pathogens and predators. PMID:18974033

  8. Road network in an agrarian landscape: Potential habitat, corridor or barrier for small mammals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon (de), Louis; Le Viol, Isabelle; Jiguet, Frédéric; Machon, Nathalie; Scher, Olivier; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2015-01-01

    If the negative effects of road networks on biodiversity are now recognized, their role as barriers, habitats or corridors remain to be clarified in human altered landscapes in which road verges often constitute the few semi-natural habitats where a part of biodiversity important for ecosystem functioning may maintain. In human-dominated landscape, their roles are crucial to precise in comparison to other habitats for small mammal species considered as major natural actors (pests (voles) or biological control agents (shrew)). We studied these roles through the comparison of small mammal abundance captured (418 individuals belonging to 8 species) using non-attractive pitfall traps (n = 813) in 176 sampled sites distributed in marginal zones of road and crop, in natural areas and in fields. We examined the effect of roadside width and isolation of sites. We found the higher small mammal abundances in roadside verges and an effect of width margins for shrews. The significant effect of the distance to the next adjacent natural habitat at the same side of the road on the relative abundance of Sorex coronatus, and the absence of a significant effect of distance to the next natural habitat at the opposite side of road, suggest that highway and road verges could be used as corridor for their dispersal, but have also a barrier effect for shrews. Our results show that in intensive agricultural landscapes roadside and highway verges may often serve as refuge, habitat and corridor for small mammals depending on species and margin characteristics.

  9. Forest corridors maintain historical gene flow in a tiger metapopulation in the highlands of central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep; Dutta, Trishna; Maldonado, Jesús E.; Wood, Thomas C.; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Seidensticker, John

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of gene flow of an endangered species metapopulation occupying a fragmented habitat is crucial for landscape-level conservation planning and devising effective conservation strategies. Tigers (Panthera tigris) are globally endangered and their populations are highly fragmented and exist in a few isolated metapopulations across their range. We used multi-locus genotypic data from 273 individual tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) from four tiger populations of the Satpura–Maikal landscape of central India to determine whether the corridors in this landscape are functional. This 45 000 km2 landscape contains 17% of India's tiger population and 12% of its tiger habitat. We applied Bayesian and coalescent-based analyses to estimate contemporary and historical gene flow among these populations and to infer their evolutionary history. We found that the tiger metapopulation in central India has high rates of historical and contemporary gene flow. The tests for population history reveal that tigers populated central India about 10 000 years ago. Their population subdivision began about 1000 years ago and accelerated about 200 years ago owing to habitat fragmentation, leading to four spatially separated populations. These four populations have been in migration–drift equilibrium maintained by high gene flow. We found the highest rates of contemporary gene flow in populations that are connected by forest corridors. This information is highly relevant to conservation practitioners and policy makers, because deforestation, road widening and mining are imminent threats to these corridors. PMID:23902910

  10. U-Pb zircon geochronology and Nd-Hf-O isotopic systematics of the Neoproterozoic Hadb adh Dayheen ring complex, Central Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Kamal A.; Jeon, Heejin; Andresen, Arild; Li, Shuang-Qing; Harbi, Hesham M.; Hegner, Ernst

    2014-10-01

    A combined study of single zircon U-Pb dating, Hf-O zircon isotopic analyses and whole-rock Nd isotopic compositions was carried out to infer the magma sources of Neoproterozoic post-collisional A-type granitoids in Saudi Arabia. U-Pb zircon dating of magmatic zircons of two samples from the Hadb adh Dayheen ring complex yielded ages of 625 ± 11 Ma for a hornblende-biotite granite sample, and 613 ± 4 Ma for a monzogranite sample. The granitic rocks show initial εNd values of + 4.1 to + 5.3 and εHf of + 4.5 to + 8.4 that are lower than those of a model depleted mantle (εHf ~+ 14 and εNd ~+ 6.5) and consistent with melting of subduction-related crustal protoliths that were formed during the Neoproterozoic assembly of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Crustal-model ages (Hf-tNC) of 0.81 to 1.1 Ga are inconsistent with depleted-mantle Nd model ages of 0.71 to 0.81 Ga and indicate that the post-collisional Hadb adh Dayheen granites were derived mostly from juvenile crust formed in Neoproterozoic time. Single zircons data show a wide range in δ18O values from + 3.2‰ to + 6.4‰, possibly indicating crystallization of zircon from magma derived from magmatic rocks altered by meteoric water in a magma chamber-caldera system.

  11. Precision Analysis of Point-And Photogrammetric Measurements for Corridor Mapping: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P.; Blázquez, M.; Sastre, J.; Colomina, I.

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the key aspects of the sensor orientation and calibration approach within the mapKITE concept for corridor mapping, focusing on the contribution analysis of point-and-scale measurements of kinematic ground control points. MapKITE is a new mobile, simultaneous terrestrial and aerial, geodata acquisition and post-processing method. On one hand, the acquisition system is a tandem composed of a terrestrial mobile mapping system and an unmanned aerial system, the latter equipped with a remote sensing payload, and linked through a 'virtual tether', that is, a real-time waypoint supply from the terrestrial vehicle to the unmanned aircraft. On the other hand, mapKITE entails a method for geodata post-processing (specifically, sensor orientation and calibration) based on the described acquisition paradigm, focusing on few key aspects: the particular geometric relationship of a mapKITE network - the aerial vehicle always observes the terrestrial one as they both move -, precise air and ground trajectory determination - the terrestrial vehicle is regarded as a kinematic ground control point - and new photogrammetric measurements - pointing on and measuring the scale of an optical target on the roof of the terrestrial vehicle - are exploited. In this paper, we analyze the performance of aerial image orientation and calibration in mapKITE for corridor mapping, which is the natural application niche of mapKITE, based on the principles and procedures of integrated sensor orientation with the addition of point-and-scale photogrammetric measurements of the kinematic ground control points. To do so, traditional (static ground control points, photogrammetric tie points, aerial control) and new (pointing-and-scaling of kinematic ground control points) measurements have been simulated for mapKITE corridor mapping missions, consisting on takeoff and calibration pattern, single-pass corridor operation potentially performing calibration patterns, and landing and

  12. Streamlining Transportation Corridor Planning Processess: Freight and Traffic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar

    2010-08-01

    The traffic investigation is one of the most important parts of an Environmental Impact Statement of projects involving the construction of new roadway facilities and/or the improvement of existing ones. The focus of the traffic analysis is on the determination of anticipated traffic flow characteristics of the proposed project, by the application of analytical methods that can be grouped under the umbrella of capacity analysis methodologies. In general, the main traffic parameter used in EISs to describe the quality of traffic flow is the Level of Service (LOS). The current state of the practice in terms of the traffic investigations for EISs has two main shortcomings. The first one is related to the information that is necessary to conduct the traffic analysis, and specifically to the lack of integration among the different transportation models and the sources of information that, in general, reside in GIS databases. A discussion of the benefits of integrating CRS&SI technologies and the transportation models used in the EIS traffic investigation is included. The second shortcoming is in the presentation of the results, both in terms of the appearance and formatting, as well as content. The presentation of traffic results (current and proposed) is discussed. This chapter also addresses the need of additional data, in terms of content and coverage. Regarding the former, other traffic parameters (e.g., delays) that are more meaningful to non-transportation experts than LOS, as well as additional information (e.g., freight flows) that can impact traffic conditions and safety are discussed. Spatial information technologies can decrease the negative effects of, and even eliminate, these shortcomings by making the relevant information that is input to the models more complete and readily available, and by providing the means to communicate the results in a more clear and efficient manner. The benefits that the application and use of CRS&SI technologies can provide to

  13. Making Pickles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Sarah

    1977-01-01

    Making pickles developed from a laboratory lesson during a unit on solutions, suspensions, acids, and bases. The pickle lab has been used as a summation and application of these topics. Directions for setting up the lab experience and actually making the pickles are included. (MA)

  14. Bidirectional recovery patterns of Mojave Desert vegetation in an aqueduct pipeline corridor after 36 years: I. Perennial shrubs and grasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Kristin H.; Weigand, James F.; Gowan, Timothy A.; Mack, Jeremy S.

    2015-01-01

    We studied recovery of 21 perennial plant species along a severely disturbed aqueduct corridor in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa plant alliance in the Mojave Desert 36 years after construction. The 97-m wide corridor contained a central dirt road and buried aqueduct pipeline. We established transects at 0 m (road verge), 20 m and 40 m into the disturbance corridor, and at 100 m in undisturbed habitat (the control). Although total numbers of shrubs per transect did not vary significantly with distance from the verge, canopy cover of shrubs, species richness, and species diversity were higher in the control than at the verge and other distances. Canopy cover of common shrubs (Ericameria nauseosa, Ambrosia salsola, A. dumosa, L. tridentata, Grayia spinosa) and perennial grasses (Elymus elymoides, Poa secunda) also varied significantly by location. Discriminant analysis clearly separated the four distances based on plant composition. Patterns of recovery were bidirectional: secondary succession from the control into the disturbance corridor and inhibition from the verge in the direction of the control. Time estimated for species composition to resemble the control is dependent on location within the disturbance corridor and could be centuries at the road verge. Our findings have applications to other deserts.

  15. Non-Operational Property Evaluation for the Hanford Site River Corridor - 12409

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, John; Aly, Alaa

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Site River Corridor consists of the former reactor areas of the 100 Areas and the former industrial (fuel processing) area in the 300 Area. Most of the waste sites are located close to the decommissioned reactors or former industrial facilities along the Columbia River. Most of the surface area of the River Corridor consists of land with little or no subsurface infrastructure or indication of past or present releases of hazardous constituents, and is referred to as non-operational property or non-operational area. Multiple lines of evidence have been developed to assess identified fate and transport mechanisms and to evaluate the potential magnitude and significance of waste site-related contaminants in the non-operational area. Predictive modeling was used for determining the likelihood of locating waste sites and evaluating the distribution of radionuclides in soil based on available soil concentration data and aerial radiological surveys. The results of this evaluation indicated: 1) With the exception of stack emissions, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas, 2) Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides, and (3) the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations or other waste sites in non-operational area soils is very small. The overall conclusions from the NPE evaluation of the River Corridor are: - With the exception of stack emissions to the air, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas. While pathways such as windblown dust, overland transport and biointrusion have the potential for dispersing waste site contaminants, the resulting transport is unlikely to result in substantial contamination in non-operational areas. - Stack

  16. The Effect of the Hayward Corridor Improvement Project on Carbon Monoxide Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlfelder, M.; Martinez, E.; Maestas, A.; Peek, A.

    2013-12-01

    In August of 2010, construction began on a stretch of road in Downtown Hayward to address a problem with traffic flow. Known as the Hayward Corridor, the project reshaped the flow of traffic, replacing the two way streets of Foothill, Mission, and A Street with a loop between them. This project began with the initiative of reducing congestion in this area and improving access to businesses for pedestrians. The project was expected to have little environmental impact in most common assessments of degree of effect, including particulate matter, ozone and carbon monoxide levels. This report will discuss the effect of the Hayward Corridor Improvement Project on carbon monoxide emission. Data available to the public in the project's Environmental Impact Report shows that carbon monoxide levels before construction began were at an acceptable level according to federal and state standards. Projections for future concentrations both with and without the project show a decrease in carbon monoxide levels due to technological improvements and the gradual replacement of older, less efficient vehicles. The Environmental Impact Report projected that there would be little difference in carbon monoxide levels whether the project took place or not, at an average of 1.67x102 fewer parts per million per 1 hour period of measurement emitted in the case of the project not taking place. While it is not possible to draw a conclusion on what the current carbon monoxide levels would be if the project had not taken place due to the changes in traffic flow and other surrounding roads as a result of the project, the data gathered in June of 2013 suggested that carbon monoxide levels are higher than the values projected in 2007. This report summarizes both the accuracy of these carbon monoxide level projections and the effect of construction on carbon monoxide levels in the Hayward Corridor and the surrounding area.

  17. Recreational trails as corridors for alien plants in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Floye H.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Alien plant species often use areas of heavy human activity for habitat and dispersal. Roads and utility corridors have been shown to harbor more alien species than the surrounding vegetation and are therefore believed to contribute to alien plant persistence and spread. Recreational trails represent another corridor that could harbor alien species and aid their spread. Effective management of invasive species requires understanding how alien plants are distributed at trailheads and trails and how their dispersal may be influenced by native vegetation. Our overall goal was to investigate the distribution of alien plants at trailheads and trails in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. At trailheads, we found that although the number of alien species was less than the number of native species, alien plant cover ( x̄=50%) did not differ from native plant cover, and we observed a large number of alien seedlings in the soil seed bank, suggesting that alien plants are a large component of trailhead communities and will continue to be so in the future. Along trails, we found higher alien species richness and cover on trail (as opposed to 4 m from the trail) in 3 out of 4 vegetation types, and we observed higher alien richness and cover in meadows than in other vegetation types. Plant communities at both trailheads and trails, as well as seed banks at trailheads, contain substantial diversity and abundance of alien plants. These results suggest that recreational trails in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado may function as corridors that facilitate the spread of alien species into wildlands. Our results suggest that control of alien plants should begin at trailheads where there are large numbers of aliens and that control efforts on trails should be prioritized by vegetation type.

  18. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed. PMID:24726322

  19. Identification of Effects of Regulatory Actions on Air Quality in Goods Movement Corridors in California.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa; Seto, Edmund; Ritz, Beate; Jerrett, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Few studies have assessed the impact of regulatory actions on air quality improvement through a comprehensive monitoring effort. In this study, we designed saturation sampling of nitrogen oxides (NOX) for the counties of Los Angeles and Alameda (San Francisco Bay) before (2003-2007) and after (2008-2013) implementation of goods movement actions in California. We further separated the research regions into three location categories, including goods movement corridors (GMCs), nongoods movement corridors (NGMCs), and control areas (CTRLs). Linear mixed models were developed to identify whether reductions in NOX were greater in GMCs than in other areas, after controlling for potential confounding, including weather conditions (e.g., wind speed and temperature) and season of sampling. We also considered factors that might confound the relationship, including traffic and cargo volumes that may have changed due to economic downturn impacts. Compared to the pre-policy period, we found reductions of average pollutant concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NOX in GMCs of 6.4 and 21.7 ppb. The reductions were smaller in NGMCs (5.9 and 16.3 ppb, respectively) and in CTRLs (4.6 and 12.1 ppb, respectively). After controlling for potential confounding from weather conditions, season of sampling, and the economic downturn in 2008, the linear mixed models demonstrated that reductions in NO2 and NOX were significantly greater in GMCs compared to reductions observed in CTRLs; there were no statistically significant differences between NGMCs and CTRLs. These results indicate that policies regulating goods movement are achieving the desired outcome of improving air quality for the state, particularly in goods movement corridors where most disadvantaged communities live. PMID:27380254

  20. Explosive and Effusive Silicic Magmatism in the Macolod Corridor, Luzon Islands, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmot, M. S.; Flood, T. P.; Patino, L. C.; Vogel, T. A.; Arpa, C. B.; Arcilla, C.; Maximo, R. P.

    2003-12-01

    Silicic magmatism occurs in the Macolod Corridor, Luzon Island, Philippines. Luzon Island is an oceanic arc related to the subduction of the South China Sea plate eastward under the Philippine. Several silicic domes and voluminous pyroclastic deposits occur in the Macolod Corridor, which is a pull-apart rift zone that cuts across Central Luzon. The Laguna de Bay caldera occurs on the northern margin of the Corridor and has been the source of several pyroclastic flows that contain abundant silicic pumice fragments. Dating the different types of volcanic deposits reveals similar ages for the domes and some of the ash-flows sheets. Ar/Ar dates of three of the domes, Trapiche, Mt. Bulalo and Mt. Bijang has yielded ages of 43+/-17 ka, 15+/-7 ka, and 66+/-14 ka, respectively. 14C dates of the pyroclastic samples from Laguna de Bay area used in this study are 42-47 ka (unpublished PHIVOLCS report, 1999). The silica concentrations for the high-silica portion for the domes and ignimbrites are also similar, averaging 66 wt.% SiO2 (normalized anhydrous) for Laguna de Bay, and 68 wt.% for the domes. The chemical compositions of both the domes and Laguna de Bay samples put them outside the field of adakites. Thus, it is unlikely that the silicic magmas represent subducting slab melts. Despite the similar ages, SiO2 concentrations, and proximity of the domes and caldera, they are chemically distinct with respect to both major and trace element concentrations. The Laguna de Bay samples have higher REE, Th concentrations and lower CaO and Na2O concentrations than the dome samples. Negative Eu anomalies are present in the Laguna de Bay samples and not in the dome samples. These data are consistent with plagioclase fractionating from the dome magmas producing the Laguna de Bay magmas.

  1. Out of Africa: the importance of rivers as human migration corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J. A.; Coulthard, T. J.; Rogerson, M.; Barton, N.; Bruecher, T.

    2013-12-01

    The route and timing of Homo sapiens exiting Africa remains uncertain. Corridors leading out of Africa through the Sahara, the Nile Valley, and the Red Sea coast have been proposed as migration routes for anatomically modern humans 80,000-130,000 years ago. During this time climate conditions in the Sahara were wetter than present day, and monsoon rainfall fed rivers that flowed across the desert landscape. The location and timing of these rivers may have supported human migration northward from central Africa to the Mediterranean coast, and onwards to Europe or Asia. Here, we use palaeoclimate rainfall and a hydrological model to spatially simulate and quantitatively test the existence of three major rivers crossing the Sahara from south to north during the time of human migration. We provide evidence that, given realistic underlying climatology, the well-known Sahabi and Kufrah rivers very likely flowed across modern day Libya and reached the coast. More unexpectedly an additional river crossed the core of the Sahara through Algeria (Irharhar river) and flowed into the Chotts basin. The Irharhar river is unique, because it links locations in central Africa experiencing monsoon climates with temperate coastal Mediterranean environments where food and resources were likely abundant. From an ecological perspective, this little-known corridor may prove to be the most parsimonious migration route. Support for the Irharar as a viable migration corridor is provided by its geographic proximity to middle Stone Age archaeological artefacts found in North Africa. Our new, highly novel approach provides the first quantitative analysis of the likelihood that rivers occurred during the critical period of human migration out of Africa. Simulated probability of surface water in North Africa during the last interglacial and the location of tools and ornaments from the Middle Stone Age.

  2. The Levant versus the Horn of Africa: Evidence for Bidirectional Corridors of Human Migrations

    PubMed Central

    Luis, J. R.; Rowold, D. J.; Regueiro, M.; Caeiro, B.; Cinnioğlu, C.; Roseman, C.; Underhill, P. A.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.; Herrera, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Paleoanthropological evidence indicates that both the Levantine corridor and the Horn of Africa served, repeatedly, as migratory corridors between Africa and Eurasia. We have begun investigating the roles of these passageways in bidirectional migrations of anatomically modern humans, by analyzing 45 informative biallelic markers as well as 10 microsatellite loci on the nonrecombining region of the Y chromosome (NRY) in 121 and 147 extant males from Oman and northern Egypt, respectively. The present study uncovers three important points concerning these demic movements: (1) The E3b1-M78 and E3b3-M123 lineages, as well as the R1*-M173 lineages, mark gene flow between Egypt and the Levant during the Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic. (2) In contrast, the Horn of Africa appears to be of minor importance in the human migratory movements between Africa and Eurasia represented by these chromosomes, an observation based on the frequency distributions of E3b*-M35 (no known downstream mutations) and M173. (3) The areal diffusion patterns of G-M201, J-12f2, the derivative M173 haplogroups, and M2 suggest more recent genetic associations between the Middle East and Africa, involving the Levantine corridor and/or Arab slave routes. Affinities to African groups were also evaluated by determining the NRY haplogroup composition in 434 samples from seven sub-Saharan African populations. Oman and Egypt’s NRY frequency distributions appear to be much more similar to those of the Middle East than to any sub-Saharan African population, suggesting a much larger Eurasian genetic component. Finally, the overall phylogeographic profile reveals several clinal patterns and genetic partitions that may indicate source, direction, and relative timing of different waves of dispersals and expansions involving these nine populations. PMID:14973781

  3. Development and Implementation of the Waste Management Information System to Support Hanford's River Corridor Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, L. M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a Waste Information Management System (WMIS) to support the waste designation, transportation, and disposal processes used by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC to support cleanup of the Columbia River Corridor. This waste, primarily consisting of remediated burial sites and building demolition debris, is disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), which is located in the center of the Hanford Site (an approximately 1460 square kilometers site). WMIS uses a combination of bar-code scanning, hand-held computers, and strategic employment of a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag system to track each waste shipment from waste generation to disposal. (authors)

  4. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  5. Comparative use of riparian corridors and oases by migrating birds in southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, S.K.; Melcher, C.P.; Howe, W.H.; Knopf, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of cottonwood-willow riparian corridors and isolated oases to land birds migrating across southeastern Arizona was evaluated during four spring migrations, 1989 to 1994, based on patterns of species richness, relative abundance, density, and body condition of birds. We surveyed birds in 13 study sites ranging in size and connectivity from small isolated patches to extensive riparian forest, sampled vegetation and insects, and captured birds in mistnets. The continuous band of riparian vegetation along the San Pedro River does not appear to be functioning as a corridor for many migrating species, although it may for a few, namely Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens), Summer Tanagers (Piranga rubra), and Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Steldigopteryx serripennis), which account for fewer than 10% of the individuals migrating through the area. Small, isolated oases hosted more avian species than the corridor sites, and the relative abundances of most migrating birds did not differ between sites relative to size-connectivity. There were few differences in between-year variability in the relative abundances of migrating birds between corridor and oasis sites. Between-year variability decreased with overall abundance of species and was greater for species with breeding ranges that centered north of 50??N latitude. Body condition of birds did not differ relative to the size-connectivity of the capture site, but individuals of species with more northerly breeding ranges had more body fat than species that breed nearby. Peak migration densities of several bird species far exceeded breeding densities reported for the San Pedro River, suggesting that large components of these species were en route migrants. Peak densities of Yellow Warblers (Dendroica petechia) reached 48.0 birds/ha, of Wilson's Warblers (Wilsonia pusilla) 33.7 birds/ha, and of Yellow-rumped Warblers (D. coronata) 30.1 birds/ha. Riparian vegetation is limited in extent in the

  6. Monitoring the Vernal Advancement and Retrogradation (Green Wave Effect) of Natural Vegetation. [Great Plains Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Haas, R. H.; Deering, D. W.; Schell, J. A.; Harlan, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Great Plains Corridor rangeland project successfully utilized natural vegetation systems as phenological indicators of seasonal development and climatic effects upon regional growth conditions. An effective method was developed for quantitative measurement of vegetation conditions, including green biomass estimates, recorded in bands 5 and 6, corrected for sun angle, were used to compute a ratio parameter (TV16) which is shown to be highly correlated with green biomass and vegatation moisture content. Analyses results of ERTS-1 digital data and correlated ground data are summarized. Attention was given to analyzing weather influences and test site variables on vegetation condition measurements with ERTS-1 data.

  7. Comparison of serial and parallel simulations of a corridor fire using FDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valasek, L.

    2015-09-01

    Current fire simulators allow to model the course of fire in large areas and its impact on structure and equipment. This paper deals with a comparison of serial and parallel calculations of simulation of a corridor fire by the FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator) system. In parallel case, the whole computational domain is divided into several computational meshes, the computation on each mesh is considered as a single MPI (Message Passing Interface) process realised on one computational core and communication between MPI processes is provided by MPI. The aim of this paper is to determine the size of error caused by parallelization of computation, which occurs at touches of computational meshes.

  8. The origin of the silicic domes in the Macolod Corridor, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.; Patino, L. C.; Vogel, T. A.; Arcilla, C.; Stimac, J. A.; Maximo, R. R.; Arpa, M. B.

    2002-12-01

    The petrogenesis of silicic magmas in areas that do not contain continental crust is often unclear. This study examines the composition of domes associated with Mount Makiling stratovolcano, Philippines, to understand the generation of silicic magmas, in an island arc setting. Makiling volcano and associated domes are located in the Macolod Corridor. The corridor is a tectonic depression between the West Luzon Arc (produced by east dipping South China Sea plate) and the East Luzon Arc (produced by the west dipping Philippine Sea plate) with numerous volcanic features. The volcanism in this part of the Macolod Corridor has occurred sporadically over at least the past million years. Sampling of Makiling volcano indicates a continuous range in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite. The range in composition in the domes is wider, from basalt to rhyolite. The chemical variation in samples from individual domes is small, and may be an indication of monogenetic nature of the magmatic activity. Howerver, most of the domes have similar compositions, with SiO2 modes of 70% and with little variation of other chemical parameters that may indicate derivation from a larger silicic magma system. At least one dome has bimodal composition, one set of samples ranges in composition form basalts-basaltic andesite and the other set of samples consists of dacites. There is a dubious association among the magmas from the Macolod corridor with subduction zone magmatism, the rocks from Makiling volcano and most of those sampled from the domes are calc-alkaline with large Nb and Ti depletion on spider diagrams. Conversely, one dome has tholeiitic characteristics with higher FeO/MgO ratios for a given SiO2 content. The major and minor elements data in the samples from Makiling volcano plot on trends that show little scatter. All the samples follow on a single trend for Mg, Fe, and Ca. Though, for other elements (Ti, Al, Sr, Na, K, Rb, and Zr) the samples from the northeastern part of

  9. Teton Wilderness, Teton Corridor, and Du Noir addition to Washakie Wilderness, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Antweiler, J.C.; Williams, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted during the summers of 1972, 1973, and 1974 by the USGS and the USBM to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Teton Wilderness, the Teton Corridor, and the Du Noir Addition to the Washakie Wilderness. As a result of this study it was determined that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources, but there is probable potential for oil and gas resources in two anticlines in the western part of the Teton Wilderness and in the postulated Younts Basin in the eastern part of the wilderness and the eastern part of the Du Noir Addition. The Whetstone anticline is the largest.

  10. Making Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, James

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides simple instructions for making an animation using "PowerPoint". He describes the process by walking readers through it for a sample image. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  11. Making Movies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Zoe; Davies, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Children enjoy making movies but can it help them to understand science? In this article, the authors discuss how creating stop-frame animations of salt dissolving can deepen children's understanding of this process. (Contains 1 figure.)

  12. A Chronic Disease Prevention and Management Corridor© to Supporting System-Level Transformations for Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sampalli, Tara; Christian, Erin; Edwards, Lynn; Ryer, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Improving care for chronic conditions requires system-level transformations to ensure multiple levels of adoption and sustainability of the implemented improvements. These comprehensive solutions require transformations and supports at various levels, leadership and process changes at service/program level. Recognizing the importance of an organization-wide strategy to mitigate the growing issue of chronic disease prevention and management, a novel system-level approach has been developed in a district health authority in Nova Scotia, Canada. In this paper, the contextual factors and efforts that led to the conceptual framework of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Management (CDPM) "Corridor©" to management of chronic conditions are discussed. The CDPM Corridor© essentially constitutes a system-level redesign process; common elements, tools and resources; and a hub of supports for chronic disease prevention and management. The CDPM Corridor PMID:26718253

  13. Structure and diversity of phyllostomid bat assemblages on riparian corridors in a human-dominated tropical landscape

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña-Cuéllar, Erika; Benítez-Malvido, Julieta; Avila-Cabadilla, Luis Daniel; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Estrada, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests around the world have been lost, mainly because of agricultural activities. Linear elements like riparian vegetation in fragmented tropical landscapes help maintain the native flora and fauna. Information about the role of riparian corridors as a reservoir of bat species, however, is scanty. We assessed the value of riparian corridors on the conservation of phyllostomid bat assemblage in an agricultural landscape of southern Mexico. For 2 years (2011–2013), mist-netting at ground level was carried out twice during the dry season (December to May) and twice during the wet season (June to November) in different habitats: (1) riparian corridors in mature forest, (2) riparian corridors in pasture, (3) continuous forest away from riparian vegetation, and (4) open pastures. Each habitat was replicated three times. To determine the influence of vegetation structure on bat assemblages, all trees (≥10 cm dbh) were sampled in all habitats. Overall, 1752 individuals belonging to 28 species of Phyllostomidae were captured with Sternodermatinae being the most rich and abundant subfamily. Riparian corridors in mature forest and pastures had the greatest species richness and shared 65% of all species. Open pastures had the lowest richness and abundance of bats with no Phyllostominae species recorded. Six of the 18 species recorded could be considered as habitat indicators. There was a positive relationship between bat species composition and tree basal area. Our findings suggest that contrary to our expectations, bats with generalist habits and naturally abundant could be useful detector taxa of habitat modification, rather than bats strongly associated with undisturbed forest. Also in human-dominated landscapes, the maintenance of habitat elements such as large trees in riparian corridors can serve as reservoirs for bat species, especially for those that are strongly associated with undisturbed forest. PMID:25750716

  14. Structure and diversity of phyllostomid bat assemblages on riparian corridors in a human-dominated tropical landscape.

    PubMed

    de la Peña-Cuéllar, Erika; Benítez-Malvido, Julieta; Avila-Cabadilla, Luis Daniel; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Estrada, Alejandro

    2015-02-01

    Tropical forests around the world have been lost, mainly because of agricultural activities. Linear elements like riparian vegetation in fragmented tropical landscapes help maintain the native flora and fauna. Information about the role of riparian corridors as a reservoir of bat species, however, is scanty. We assessed the value of riparian corridors on the conservation of phyllostomid bat assemblage in an agricultural landscape of southern Mexico. For 2 years (2011-2013), mist-netting at ground level was carried out twice during the dry season (December to May) and twice during the wet season (June to November) in different habitats: (1) riparian corridors in mature forest, (2) riparian corridors in pasture, (3) continuous forest away from riparian vegetation, and (4) open pastures. Each habitat was replicated three times. To determine the influence of vegetation structure on bat assemblages, all trees (≥10 cm dbh) were sampled in all habitats. Overall, 1752 individuals belonging to 28 species of Phyllostomidae were captured with Sternodermatinae being the most rich and abundant subfamily. Riparian corridors in mature forest and pastures had the greatest species richness and shared 65% of all species. Open pastures had the lowest richness and abundance of bats with no Phyllostominae species recorded. Six of the 18 species recorded could be considered as habitat indicators. There was a positive relationship between bat species composition and tree basal area. Our findings suggest that contrary to our expectations, bats with generalist habits and naturally abundant could be useful detector taxa of habitat modification, rather than bats strongly associated with undisturbed forest. Also in human-dominated landscapes, the maintenance of habitat elements such as large trees in riparian corridors can serve as reservoirs for bat species, especially for those that are strongly associated with undisturbed forest. PMID:25750716

  15. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart A of... - Policy for the Signing and Numbering of Future Interstate Corridors Designated by Section 332 of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adjacent State. 5. Signing and other identification of a future Interstate route segment must not indicate... interchanges. 2. An Interstate shield may be located on a green informational sign of a few words. For example: Future Interstate Corridor or Future I-00 Corridor. 3. The Interstate shield may not include the...

  16. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart A of... - Policy for the Signing and Numbering of Future Interstate Corridors Designated by Section 332 of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adjacent State. 5. Signing and other identification of a future Interstate route segment must not indicate... interchanges. 2. An Interstate shield may be located on a green informational sign of a few words. For example: Future Interstate Corridor or Future I-00 Corridor. 3. The Interstate shield may not include the...

  17. Typology of building shading elements on Jalan Sudirman corridor in Pekanbaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, G.; Aldy, P.

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, temperature in Pekanbaru was between 22.60°C and 34.6°C with humidity 79.14 percent. This condition has increase the concern of energy utilization to building comfort. Buildings have the biggest energy consuming due to the use of air conditioner in Pekanbaru. One effort to reduced energy is shading devices application. Application of air conditioner need huge energy, replaced natural circulation with architecture elements to reduced building thermal. This research study about system and building shading devices types that influence building thermal in Pekanbaru so that knowing characteristics and elements form. This study aims to determine and identify of systems and building elements types in Pekanbaru, which the element forms to conquer in climate condition. Qualitative method with rationalistic-paradigm has used to identify typology of building shading devices on Jalan Sudirman corridor. The research orientation on typology theory, thermal theory, and building shading device to identification of building shading device types on Jalan Sudirman corridor. Based on the survey result, there are 2 type of building shading devices on Jalan Sudirman Pekanbaru which is based on forms and quantity of shading. The types are building shading devices based on shading quantity and building shading devices based on shading forms.

  18. Sources and potential health risk of gas phase PAHs in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Zhousuo; Ding, Zhongyuan; Huang, Tao; Ma, Jianmin; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Gao, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Gas phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China were determined during heating and non-heating seasons, respectively, using passive air samplers. Polyurethane foam (PUF) disks were chosen as the sampling medium. Fifteen PAHs out of the 16 PAHs classified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were detected in this field sampling investigation. The atmospheric levels of sampled PAHs were higher at urban sites than that at rural sites among 14 sampling sites and increased during heating season. The highest concentration (11.34 ng m(-3)) was observed in Lanzhou during the heating season, the capital and largest industrial city of Gansu Province. PAH contamination in air was dominated by three aromatic ring congeners. Possible sources of PAHs were apportioned using PAH species ratios and the principle component analysis (PCA) combined with a multiple linear regression (MLR) method. Fossil fuel consumption was identified to be the predominant source of PAHs over Hexi Corridor, accounting for 43 % of the concentration of total (15) PAHs. Backward and forward trajectory and cluster analysis were also carried out to identify potential origins of PAHs monitored at several urban and rural sites. Lung cancer risk of local residents to gas phase PAHs via inhalation exposure throughout the province was found to be around a critical value of the lung cancer risk level at 10(-6) recommended by the U.S. EPA risk assessment guideline. PMID:26432264

  19. Corridor- and stopover-use of the Hawaiian goose (Branta sandvicensis), an intratropical altitudinal migrant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Christina R.; Hess, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    We outfitted six male Hawaiian geese, or nene (Branta sandvicensis), with 45-g solar-powered satellite transmitters and collected four location coordinates d−1 from 2010 to 2012. We used 6193 coordinates to characterize migration corridors, habitat preferences and temporal patterns of displacement for 16 migration events with Brownian bridge utilization distributions (BBUD). We used 1552 coordinates to characterize stopovers from 37 shorter-distance movement events with 25% BBUDs. Two subpopulations used a well-defined common migration corridor spanning a broad gradient of elevation. Use of native-dominated subalpine shrubland was 2.81 times more likely than the availability of this land-cover type. The nene differed from other tropical and temperate-zone migrant birds in that: (1) migration distance and the number of stopovers were unrelated (Mann–Whitney test W = 241, P < 0.006), and; (2) individual movements were not unidirectional suggesting that social interactions may be more important than refuelling en route; but like other species, nene made more direct migrations with fewer stopovers in return to breeding areas (0.58 ± 0.50) than in migration away from breeding areas (1.64 ± 0.48). Our findings, combined with the direction and timing of migration, which is opposite that of most other intratropical migrants, suggest fundamentally different drivers of altitudinal migration.

  20. Large-scale hydrothermal fluid discharges in the Norris-Mammoth corridor, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Sorey, M.L.; Thordsen, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Norris–Mammoth corridor is a complex subsidence structure that extends ∼40 km northward from the 0.6 Ma Yellowstone caldera, and contains many hydrothermal features with high fluid discharges totaling ∼1000 l/s. About 150–250 l/s of hydrothermal water, which attains boiling temperature at surface and 360°C at depth, discharge from the Norris Geyser Basin, adjacent to the caldera. The highest thermal water and gas discharges in the corridor are from Mammoth Hot Springs, where 500–600 l/s thermal water with surface temperatures of up to 73°C and calculated subsurface temperatures of ∼100°C issue from ∼100 hot springs scattered over a score of step-like travertine terraces that range in age from ∼0.4 Ma to recent. All the thermal water is meteoric, likely recharged in the Gallatin Range at 2.5–3.0 km elevations. The isotopic and chemical compositions of thermal waters and solutes can be interpreted to indicate a common magmatic source for heat and volatile solutes located near Norris. However, the chemical and isotopic compositions of gases, especially the 3He/4He ratios, provide strong evidence for a separate magmatic source for the Mammoth system.