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Sample records for adiabatic bond charge

  1. Generalization of Weber's adiabatic bond charge model to amorphous group IV semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winer, K.; Wooten, F.

    1984-11-01

    The generalization of Weber's adiabatic bond charge model to amorphous group IV semiconductors is described. Methods of relaxing the coordinates to their equilibrium configuration and of calculating the dynamical matrix for the phonon spectra are given. Particular emphasis is given to the optimization of the Coulomb subroutines required in this model. Estimates of computation time are included for the calculation of equilibrium configuration on a Cray computer.

  2. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-01-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  3. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  4. Canonical-ensemble state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) strategy for problems with more diabatic than adiabatic states: Charge-bond resonance in monomethine cyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews basic results from a theory of the a priori classical probabilities (weights) in state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) models. It addresses how the classical probabilities limit the invariance of the self-consistency condition to transformations of the complete active space configuration interaction (CAS-CI) problem. Such transformations are of interest for choosing representations of the SA-CASSCF solution that are diabatic with respect to some interaction. I achieve the known result that a SA-CASSCF can be self-consistently transformed only within degenerate subspaces of the CAS-CI ensemble density matrix. For uniformly distributed ("microcanonical") SA-CASSCF ensembles, self-consistency is invariant to any unitary CAS-CI transformation that acts locally on the ensemble support. Most SA-CASSCF applications in current literature are microcanonical. A problem with microcanonical SA-CASSCF models for problems with "more diabatic than adiabatic" states is described. The problem is that not all diabatic energies and couplings are self-consistently resolvable. A canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF strategy is proposed to solve the problem. For canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibrated ensemble is a Boltzmann density matrix parametrized by its own CAS-CI Hamiltonian and a Lagrange multiplier acting as an inverse "temperature," unrelated to the physical temperature. Like the convergence criterion for microcanonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibration condition for canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF is invariant to transformations that act locally on the ensemble CAS-CI density matrix. The advantage of a canonical-ensemble description is that more adiabatic states can be included in the support of the ensemble without running into convergence problems. The constraint on the dimensionality of the problem is relieved by the introduction of an energy constraint. The method is illustrated with a complete active space valence-bond

  5. Canonical-ensemble state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) strategy for problems with more diabatic than adiabatic states: charge-bond resonance in monomethine cyanines.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Seth

    2015-01-28

    This paper reviews basic results from a theory of the a priori classical probabilities (weights) in state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) models. It addresses how the classical probabilities limit the invariance of the self-consistency condition to transformations of the complete active space configuration interaction (CAS-CI) problem. Such transformations are of interest for choosing representations of the SA-CASSCF solution that are diabatic with respect to some interaction. I achieve the known result that a SA-CASSCF can be self-consistently transformed only within degenerate subspaces of the CAS-CI ensemble density matrix. For uniformly distributed ("microcanonical") SA-CASSCF ensembles, self-consistency is invariant to any unitary CAS-CI transformation that acts locally on the ensemble support. Most SA-CASSCF applications in current literature are microcanonical. A problem with microcanonical SA-CASSCF models for problems with "more diabatic than adiabatic" states is described. The problem is that not all diabatic energies and couplings are self-consistently resolvable. A canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF strategy is proposed to solve the problem. For canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibrated ensemble is a Boltzmann density matrix parametrized by its own CAS-CI Hamiltonian and a Lagrange multiplier acting as an inverse "temperature," unrelated to the physical temperature. Like the convergence criterion for microcanonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibration condition for canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF is invariant to transformations that act locally on the ensemble CAS-CI density matrix. The advantage of a canonical-ensemble description is that more adiabatic states can be included in the support of the ensemble without running into convergence problems. The constraint on the dimensionality of the problem is relieved by the introduction of an energy constraint. The method is illustrated with a complete active space valence-bond

  6. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  7. Canonical-ensemble state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) strategy for problems with more diabatic than adiabatic states: Charge-bond resonance in monomethine cyanines

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Seth

    2015-01-28

    valence-bond (CASVB) analysis of the charge/bond resonance electronic structure of a monomethine cyanine: Michler’s hydrol blue. The diabatic CASVB representation is shown to vary weakly for “temperatures” corresponding to visible photon energies. Canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF enables the resolution of energies and couplings for all covalent and ionic CASVB structures contributing to the SA-CASSCF ensemble. The CASVB solution describes resonance of charge- and bond-localized electronic structures interacting via bridge resonance superexchange. The resonance couplings can be separated into channels associated with either covalent charge delocalization or chemical bonding interactions, with the latter significantly stronger than the former.

  8. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, B. D.; Thijssen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  9. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Napitu, B D; Thijssen, J M

    2015-07-15

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  10. Bonding charge density from atomic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, William Yi; Chen, Long-Qing; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-05-15

    Charge transfer among individual atoms is the key concept in modern electronic theory of chemical bonding. In this work, we present a first-principles approach to calculating the charge transfer. Based on the effects of perturbations of an individual atom or a group of atoms on the electron charge density, we determine unambiguously the amount of electron charge associated with a particular atom or a group of atoms. We computed the topological electron loss versus gain using ethylene, graphene, MgO, and SrTiO3 as examples. Our results verify the nature of chemical bonds in these materials at the atomic level.

  11. Protonated alcohols are examples of complete charge-shift bonds.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter; Petit, Alban; Ho, Junming; Mitoraj, Mariusz Pawel; Coote, Michelle L; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Braïda, Benoît; Ess, Daniel H

    2014-11-07

    Accurate gas-phase and solution-phase valence bond calculations reveal that protonation of the hydroxyl group of aliphatic alcohols transforms the C-O bond from a principally covalent bond to a complete charge-shift bond with principally "no-bond" character. All bonding in this charge-shift bond is due to resonance between covalent and ionic structures, which is a different bonding mechanism from that of traditional covalent bonds. Until now, charge-shift bonds have been previously identified in inorganic compounds or in exotic organic compounds. This work showcases that charge-shift bonds can occur in common organic species.

  12. Charge-Assisted Hydrogen-Bonded Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Michael D.

    The importance of hydrogen bonds is widely recognized because of their role in defining the structure and properties of many compounds, including water, proteins, DNA, and polymers. Hydrogen bonding also has emerged as a critical tool in solid-state chemistry, in which the versatility of organic synthesis has been combined with the structure-directing properties of hydrogen-bond donor-acceptor pairs to steer molecular assembly into networks that reflect the symmetries of their molecular constituents. Although these efforts have been largely empirical, the dominance of hydrogen bonding among the multitude of intermolecular forces often leads to predictable control of crystal structure. Although charge-assisted hydrogen bonds (donors and acceptors with ionic character that reinforce the electrostatic character of the hydrogen bond) have been recognized for decades, their use in network design, particularly for “crystal engineering,” has grown substantially in the past decade. The evidence suggests that charge-assisted hydrogen bonds introduce extraordinary robustness to molecular networks that reflects a combination of strong intermolecular forces and structural compliance, thus facilitating design of organic solid-state materials.

  13. Quantum control of electronic fluxes during adiabatic attosecond charge migration in degenerate superposition states of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongming; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    We design four linearly x- and y-polarized as well as circularly right (+) and left (-) polarized, resonant π / 2 -laser pulses that prepare the model benzene molecule in four different degenerate superposition states. These consist of equal (0.5) populations of the electronic ground state S0 (1A1g) plus one of four degenerate excited states, all of them accessible by dipole-allowed transitions. Specifically, for the molecule aligned in the xy-plane, these excited states include different complex-valued linear combinations of the 1E1u,x and 1E1u,y degenerate states. As a consequence, the laser pulses induce four different types of periodic adiabatic attosecond (as) charge migrations (AACM) in benzene, all with the same period, 504 as, but with four different types of angular fluxes. One of the characteristic differences of these fluxes are the two angles for zero fluxes, which appear as the instantaneous angular positions of the "source" and "sink" of two equivalent, or nearly equivalent branches of the fluxes which flow in pincer-type patterns from one molecular site (the "source") to the opposite one (the "sink"). These angles of zero fluxes are either fixed at the positions of two opposite carbon nuclei in the yz-symmetry plane, or at the centers of two opposite carbon-carbon bonds in the xz-symmetry plane, or the angles of zero fluxes rotate in angular forward (+) or backward (-) directions, respectively. As a resume, our quantum model simulations demonstrate quantum control of the electronic fluxes during AACM in degenerate superposition states, in the attosecond time domain, with the laser polarization as the key knob for control.

  14. Characteristics of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma with effect of adiabatic and nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denra, Raicharan; Paul, Samit; Sarkar, Susmita

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, characteristics of small amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave have been investigated in a unmagnetized, collisionless, Lorentzian dusty plasma where electrons and ions are inertialess and modeled by generalized Lorentzian Kappa distribution. Dust grains are inertial and equilibrium dust charge is negative. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuation of charges on dust grains have been taken under consideration. For adiabatic dust charge variation reductive perturbation analysis gives rise to a KdV equation that governs the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves having soliton solutions. For nonadiabatic dust charge variation nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic wave obeys KdV-Burger equation and gives rise to dust acoustic shock waves. Numerical estimation for adiabatic grain charge variation shows the existence of rarefied soliton whose amplitude and width varies with grain charges. Amplitude and width of the soliton have been plotted for different electron Kappa indices keeping ion velocity distribution Maxwellian. For non adiabatic dust charge variation, ratio of the coefficients of Burger term and dispersion term have been plotted against charge fluctuation for different kappa indices. All these results approach to the results of Maxwellian plasma if both electron and ion kappa tends to infinity.

  15. Vibrational coherences in charge-transfer dyes: a non-adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Sissa, Cristina; Delchiaro, Francesca; Di Maiolo, Francesco; Terenziani, Francesca; Painelli, Anna

    2014-10-28

    Essential-state models efficiently describe linear and nonlinear spectral properties of different families of charge-transfer chromophores. Here, the essential-state machinery is applied to the calculation of the early-stage dynamics after ultrafast (coherent) excitation of polar and quadrupolar chromophores. The fully non-adiabatic treatment of coupled electronic and vibrational motion allows for a reliable description of the dynamics of these intriguing systems. In particular, the proposed approach is reliable even when the adiabatic and harmonic approximations do not apply, such as for quadrupolar dyes that show a multistable, broken-symmetry excited state. Our approach quite naturally leads to a clear picture for a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in these systems. The recovery of symmetry due to dynamical effects is however disrupted in polar solvents where a static symmetry lowering is observed. More generally, thermal disorder in polar solvents is responsible for dephasing phenomena, damping the coherent oscillations with particularly important effects in the case of polar dyes.

  16. Vibrational coherences in charge-transfer dyes: A non-adiabatic picture

    SciTech Connect

    Sissa, Cristina; Delchiaro, Francesca; Di Maiolo, Francesco

    2014-10-28

    Essential-state models efficiently describe linear and nonlinear spectral properties of different families of charge-transfer chromophores. Here, the essential-state machinery is applied to the calculation of the early-stage dynamics after ultrafast (coherent) excitation of polar and quadrupolar chromophores. The fully non-adiabatic treatment of coupled electronic and vibrational motion allows for a reliable description of the dynamics of these intriguing systems. In particular, the proposed approach is reliable even when the adiabatic and harmonic approximations do not apply, such as for quadrupolar dyes that show a multistable, broken-symmetry excited state. Our approach quite naturally leads to a clear picture for a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in these systems. The recovery of symmetry due to dynamical effects is however disrupted in polar solvents where a static symmetry lowering is observed. More generally, thermal disorder in polar solvents is responsible for dephasing phenomena, damping the coherent oscillations with particularly important effects in the case of polar dyes.

  17. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  18. The exact forces on classical nuclei in non-adiabatic charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Min, Seung Kyu; Gross, E. K. U.; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2015-02-28

    The decomposition of electronic and nuclear motion presented in Abedi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 123002 (2010)] yields a time-dependent potential that drives the nuclear motion and fully accounts for the coupling to the electronic subsystem. Here, we show that propagation of an ensemble of independent classical nuclear trajectories on this exact potential yields dynamics that are essentially indistinguishable from the exact quantum dynamics for a model non-adiabatic charge transfer problem. We point out the importance of step and bump features in the exact potential that are critical in obtaining the correct splitting of the quasiclassical nuclear wave packet in space after it passes through an avoided crossing between two Born-Oppenheimer surfaces and analyze their structure. Finally, an analysis of the exact potentials in the context of trajectory surface hopping is presented, including preliminary investigations of velocity-adjustment and the force-induced decoherence effect.

  19. The effect of adiabatic focusing upon charged particle propagation in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Charged particles propagating along the diverging lines of force of a spatially inhomogeneous guiding field were considered as they are scattered by random fields. Their longitudinal transport is described in terms of the eigenfunctions of a Sturm-Liouville operator incorporating the effect of adiabatic focussing along with that of scattering. The relaxation times and characteristic velocities are graphed and tabulated. The particle density is evaluated as a function of space and time for two different regimes. In the first regime (relatively weak focussing), a diffusive mode of propagation is dominant but coherent modes are also dominant. In the second regime (strong focussing), diffusion does not occur and the propagation is purely coherent. This supercoherent mode corresponds exactly to the so-called scatter-free propagation of kilovolt solar flare electrons. On a larger scale, focussed transport provides an interpretation of many observed characteristics of extragalactic radio sources.

  20. Characterization of intramolecular hydrogen bonds by atomic charges and charge fluxes.

    PubMed

    Baranović, Goran; Biliškov, Nikola; Vojta, Danijela

    2012-08-16

    The electronic charge redistribution and the infrared intensities of the two types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H···O and O-H···π, of o-hydroxy- and o-ethynylphenol, respectively, together with a set of related intermolecular hydrogen bond complexes are described in terms of atomic charges and charge fluxes derived from atomic polar tensors calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The polarizable continuum model shows that both the atomic charges and charge fluxes are strongly dependent on solvent. It is shown that their values for the OH bond in an intramolecular hydrogen bond are not much different from those for the "free" OH bond, but the changes are toward the values found for an intermolecular hydrogen bond. The intermolecular hydrogen bond is characterized not only by the decreased atomic charge but also by the enlarged charge flux term of the same sign producing thus an enormous increase in IR intensity. The overall behavior of the charges and fluxes of the hydrogen atom in OH and ≡CH bonds agree well with the observed spectroscopic characteristics of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The main reason for the differences between the two types of the hydrogen bond lies in the molecular structure because favorable linear proton donor-acceptor arrangement is not possible to achieve within a small molecule. The calculated intensities (in vacuo and in polarizable continuum) are only in qualitative agreement with the measured data.

  1. Modern ab initio valence bond theory calculations reveal charge shift bonding in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Patil, Amol Baliram; Bhanage, Bhalchandra Mahadeo

    2016-06-21

    The nature of bonding interactions between the cation and the anion of an ionic liquid is at the heart of understanding ionic liquid properties. A particularly interesting case is a special class of ionic liquids known as protic ionic liquids. The extent of proton transfer in protic ionic liquids has been observed to vary according to the interacting species. Back proton transfer renders protic ionic liquids volatile and to be considered as inferior ionic liquids. We try to address this issue by employing modern ab initio valence bond theory calculations. The results indicate that the bonding in the cation and the anion of a prototypical ionic liquid, ethylammonium nitrate, is fundamentally different. It is neither characteristic of covalent/polar covalent bonding nor ionic bonding but rather charge shift bonding as a resonance hybrid of two competing ionic molecular electronic structure configurations. An investigation of other analogous protic ionic liquids reveals that this charge shift bonding seems to be a typical characteristic of protic ionic liquids while the ionic solid analogue compound ammonium nitrate has less charge shift bonding character as compared to protic ionic liquids. Further the extent of charge shift bonding character has been found to be congruent with the trends in many physicochemical properties such as melting point, conductivity, viscosity, and ionicity of the studied ionic liquids indicating that percentage charge shift character may serve as a key descriptor for large scale computational screening of ionic liquids with desired properties.

  2. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  3. Non-adiabatic quantized charge pumping with tunable-barrier quantum dots: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Bernd; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2015-10-01

    Precise manipulation of individual charge carriers in nanoelectronic circuits underpins practical applications of their most basic quantum property—the universality and invariance of the elementary charge. A charge pump generates a net current from periodic external modulation of parameters controlling a nanostructure connected to source and drain leads; in the regime of quantized pumping the current varies in steps of {{q}\\text{e}} f as function of control parameters, where {{q}\\text{e}} is the electron charge and f is the frequency of modulation. In recent years, robust and accurate quantized charge pumps have been developed based on semiconductor quantum dots with tunable tunnel barriers. These devices allow modulation of charge exchange rates between the dot and the leads over many orders of magnitude and enable trapping of a precise number of electrons far away from equilibrium with the leads. The corresponding non-adiabatic pumping protocols focus on understanding of separate parts of the pumping cycle associated with charge loading, capture and release. In this report we review realizations, models and metrology applications of quantized charge pumps based on tunable-barrier quantum dots.

  4. Evaluating Electronic Couplings for Excited State Charge Transfer Based on Maximum Occupation Method ΔSCF Quasi-Adiabatic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzi; Zhang, Yong; Bao, Peng; Yi, Yuanping

    2017-02-14

    Electronic couplings of charge-transfer states with the ground state and localized excited states at the donor/acceptor interface are crucial parameters for controlling the dynamics of exciton dissociation and charge recombination processes in organic solar cells. Here we propose a quasi-adiabatic state approach to evaluate electronic couplings through combining maximum occupation method (mom)-ΔSCF and state diabatization schemes. Compared with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using global hybrid functional, mom-ΔSCF is superior to estimate the excitation energies of charge-transfer states; moreover it can also provide good excited electronic state for property calculation. Our approach is hence reliable to evaluate electronic couplings for excited state electron transfer processes, which is demonstrated by calculations on a typical organic photovoltaic system, oligothiophene/perylenediimide complex.

  5. Evidence for Quasi-adiabatic Motion of Charged Particles in Strong Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malova, H. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Grigorenko, E. E.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Delcourt, D.; Sharma, A. S.; Khabarova, O. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate quasi-adiabatic dynamics of charged particles in strong current sheets (SCSs) in the solar wind, including the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), both theoretically and observationally. A self-consistent hybrid model of an SCS is developed in which ion dynamics is described at the quasi-adiabatic approximation, while the electrons are assumed to be magnetized, and their motion is described in the guiding center approximation. The model shows that the SCS profile is determined by the relative contribution of two currents: (i) the current supported by demagnetized protons that move along open quasi-adiabatic orbits, and (ii) the electron drift current. The simplest modeled SCS is found to be a multi-layered structure that consists of a thin current sheet embedded into a much thicker analog of a plasma sheet. This result is in good agreement with observations of SCSs at ∼1 au. The analysis of fine structure of different SCSs, including the HCS, shows that an SCS represents a narrow current layer (with a thickness of ∼104 km) embedded into a wider region of about 105 km, independently of the SCS origin. Therefore, multi-scale structuring is very likely an intrinsic feature of SCSs in the solar wind.

  6. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara

    2013-08-21

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X–H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the –XH⋯Y– fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  7. Emergent Electromagnetic Induction and Adiabatic Charge Pumping in Noncentrosymmetric Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Hayata, Tomoya; Ueda, Masahito; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    The photovoltaic effect due to the adiabatic quantum phase in noncentrosymmetric Weyl semimetals is studied. We particularly focus on the case in which an external ac electric field is applied. By considering a generalized Weyl Hamiltonian with nonlinear terms, we show that the photocurrent is induced by circularly, rather than linearly, polarized light. This photovoltaic current can be understood as an emergent electromagnetic induction in momentum space; the Weyl node is a magnetic monopole in momentum space, the circular motion of which induces the electric field. This result is distinct from conventional photovoltaic effects, and the estimated photocurrent is ˜10-1- 101 nA , which can be detected experimentally.

  8. Nature of hydrogen bonding in charged hydrogen-bonded complexes and imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-12-15

    The nature of hydrogen bonding was compared in neutral complexes and negatively charged complexes consisting of either the HF molecule or the halide anion (fluoride and chloride) and the C-H bond in the methane molecule with a varying degree of fluorination (such as CH(4), CH(2)F(2), and CHF(3)). Both linear (C(3v) symmetry) and nonlinear (C(2v) symmetry) hydrogen-bonded complexes were studied. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory was used to decompose interaction energies into fundamental components such as Coulomb, repulsion, induction and dispersion to analyze the interplay among these forces in stabilizing hydrogen bonding. In the linear charged complexes, both Coulomb attraction and induction significantly contributed to the stabilization of hydrogen bonding. In the nonlinear charged complexes, mainly Coulomb attraction contributed to the HB complex stabilization, with the inductive forces playing a less important role. Contrary to the neutral complexes, dispersion forces played only a marginal role in the charged complexes. Interplay between the fundamental forces was also investigated in the ion pairs of the imidazolium-based ionic liquid, [C(2)mim]Cl, that were categorized as either (1) typical ion-ion interaction, with the anion interacting from above or below the imidazolium plane; or (2) hydrogen-bonding interaction, with the anion interacting with the C2-H bond of the imidazolium cation. Both types of interactions were found to induce similar charge transfers, and the analysis of the energetic components revealed only a slight difference in the ion pairs studied: (1) both interactions were electrostatically driven, between 86% and 88% of the overall attractive energy, with the electrostatic component being slightly lower in the hydrogen-bonded ion pairs by ~8 kJ mol(-1); and (2) dispersion forces were found to be stronger in the typical ion-ion interactions by ~15 kJ mol(-1) and could be possible only due to the fact that the anion was able to move

  9. Non-adiabatic processes in the charge transfer reaction of O{sub 2} molecules with potassium surfaces without dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2014-08-21

    Thin potassium films grown on Si(001) substrates are used to measure internal chemicurrents and the external emission of exoelectrons simultaneously during adsorption of molecular oxygen on K surfaces at 120 K. The experiments clarify the dynamics of electronic excitations at a simple metal with a narrow valence band. X-ray photoemission reveals that for exposures below 5 L almost exclusively peroxide K{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed, i.e., no dissociation of the molecule occurs during interaction. Still a significant chemicurrent and a delayed exoelectron emission are detected due to a rapid injection of unoccupied molecular levels below the Fermi level. Since the valence band width of potassium is approximately equal to the potassium work function (2.4 eV) the underlying mechanism of exoemission is an Auger relaxation whereas chemicurrents are detected after resonant charge transfer from the metal valence band into the injected level. The change of the chemicurrent and exoemission efficiencies with oxygen coverage can be deduced from the kinetics of the reaction and the recorded internal and external emission currents traces. It is shown that the non-adiabaticity of the reaction increases with coverage due to a reduction of the electronic density of states at the surface while the work function does not vary significantly. Therefore, the peroxide formation is one of the first reaction systems which exhibits varying non-adiabaticity and efficiencies during the reaction. Non-adiabatic calculations based on model Hamiltonians and density functional theory support the picture of chemicurrent generation and explain the rapid injection of hot hole states by an intramolecular motion, i.e., the expansion of the oxygen molecule on the timescale of a quarter of a vibrational period.

  10. Emergent Electromagnetic Induction and Adiabatic Charge Pumping in Noncentrosymmetric Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Hayata, Tomoya; Ueda, Masahito; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-11-18

    The photovoltaic effect due to the adiabatic quantum phase in noncentrosymmetric Weyl semimetals is studied. We particularly focus on the case in which an external ac electric field is applied. By considering a generalized Weyl Hamiltonian with nonlinear terms, we show that the photocurrent is induced by circularly, rather than linearly, polarized light. This photovoltaic current can be understood as an emergent electromagnetic induction in momentum space; the Weyl node is a magnetic monopole in momentum space, the circular motion of which induces the electric field. This result is distinct from conventional photovoltaic effects, and the estimated photocurrent is ∼10^{-1}-10^{1}  nA, which can be detected experimentally.

  11. Effects of Adiabatic Focusing on the Diffusion of Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Gang

    2016-03-01

    An approximate analytic description of a diffusion coefficient, including the effect of adiabatic focusing, has been developed. This description is formulated with the aid of stochastic differential equations and the steady perturbation solution of the Fokker-Plank transport equation. The analytical formula is based on three important assumptions. First, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is set to be separable from the spatial coordinate and the pitch-angle cosine. Second, the spatial dependence of the ratio between the mean-free path and focusing length is assumed to be weak. Third, the pitch-angle distribution relaxes quickly to a steady state. The new analytic formula could be applied to calculate the spatial diffusion coefficient in the interplanetary and interstellar space.

  12. EFFECT OF ADIABATIC FOCUSING ON THE DIFFUSION OF ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Gang E-mail: gqin@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2016-03-20

    An approximate analytic description of a diffusion coefficient, including the effect of adiabatic focusing, has been developed. This description is formulated with the aid of stochastic differential equations and the steady perturbation solution of the Fokker–Plank transport equation. The analytical formula is based on three important assumptions. First, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is set to be separable from the spatial coordinate and the pitch-angle cosine. Second, the spatial dependence of the ratio between the mean-free path and focusing length is assumed to be weak. Third, the pitch-angle distribution relaxes quickly to a steady state. The new analytic formula could be applied to calculate the spatial diffusion coefficient in the interplanetary and interstellar space.

  13. Vibrational quenching of excitonic splittings in H-bonded molecular dimers: adiabatic description and effective mode approximation.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Sabine; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel; Köppel, Horst

    2012-11-14

    The quenching of the excitonic splitting in hydrogen-bonded molecular dimers has been explained recently in terms of exciton coupling theory, involving Förster's degenerate perturbation theoretical approach [P. Ottiger, S. Leutwyler, and H. Köppel, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 174308 (2012)]. Here we provide an alternative explanation based on the properties of the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. In the proper limit, the lower of these surfaces exhibits a double-minimum shape, with an asymmetric distortion that destroys the geometric equivalence of the excitonically coupled monomers. An effective mode is introduced that exactly reproduces the energy gain and amount of distortion that occurs in a multi-dimensional normal coordinate space. This allows to describe the quenched exciton splitting as the energy difference of the two (S(1) and S(2)) vibronic band origins in a one-dimensional (rather than multi-dimensional) vibronic calculation. The agreement with the earlier result (based on Förster theory) is excellent for all five relevant cases studied. A simple rationale for the quenched exciton splitting as nonadiabatic tunneling splitting on the lower double-minimum potential energy surface is given.

  14. Halogen bonding: a study based on the electronic charge density.

    PubMed

    Amezaga, Nancy J Martinez; Pamies, Silvana C; Peruchena, Nélida M; Sosa, Gladis L

    2010-01-14

    Density functional theory (DFT) and atoms in molecules theory (AIM) were used to study the characteristic of the noncovalent interactions in complexes formed between Lewis bases (NH(3), H(2)O, and H(2)S) and Lewis acids (ClF, BrF, IF, BrCl, ICl, and IBr). In order to compare halogen and hydrogen bonds interactions, this study included hydrogen complexes formed by some Lewis bases and HF, HCl, and HBr Lewis acids. Ab initio, wave functions were generated at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level with optimized structures at the same level. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of halogen interactions in Lewis complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: (a) why can electronegative atoms such as halogens act as bridges between two other electronegative atoms? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? Considering this, we had performed a profound study of halogen complexes in the framework of the AIM theory. A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. We had also explored the concentration and depletion of the charge density, displayed by the Laplacian topology, in the interaction zone and in the X-Y halogen donor bond. From the atomic properties, it was generally observed that the two halogen atoms gain electron population in response to its own intrinsic nature. Because of this fact, both atoms are energetically stabilized.

  15. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  16. Effect of charge density of bonding agent containing a new quaternary ammonium methacrylate on antibacterial and bonding properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D.; Chen, Jihua; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Quaternary amine charge density is important because when the negatively-charged bacteria contact the positive quaternary amine charge, the electric balance is disturbed and the bacterium could be disrupted. There has been no report on the effects of charge density on the antibacterial efficacy of dental bonding agents. The objective of this study was to synthesize a new quaternary ammonium methacrylate, and investigate the effects of charge density of bonding agent on bacteria early-attachment, biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) and dentin bond strength. Methods Dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) with an alkyl chain length of 16 was synthesized and mixed into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive and primer (SBMP) at mass fractions of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10%. A microtensile dentin bond test was performed. The density of quaternary ammonium groups was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) early-attachment was examined at 4 hours, and biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Results All groups had similar microtensile bonding strengths (mean ± sd; n = 40) of about 60 MPa (p > 0.1). Quaternary amine charge density of bonding agents monotonically increased with increasing DMAHDM mass fraction. Bacteria early-attachment coverage greatly decreased with increasing DMAHDM content in the resin. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by almost 5 log, compared to SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent was inversely proportional to bacteria early-attachment coverage and biofilm CFU. Significance Increasing the quaternary amine charge density of dentin bonding agent resin was shown to greatly reduce S. mutans attachment and decrease biofilm CFU by four orders of magnitude, without compromising the dentin bond strength. The new DMAHDM is promising for use in bonding agents and other antibacterial restorative materials to inhibit caries. PMID:24534376

  17. Adiabatic description of capture into resonance and surfatron acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Vainchtein, D. L.

    2010-12-15

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the surfatron acceleration of nonrelativistic charged particles by electromagnetic waves. The acceleration is caused by capture of particles into resonance with one of the waves. We investigate capture for systems with one or two waves and provide conditions under which the obtained results can be applied to systems with more than two waves. In the case of a single wave, the once captured particles never leave the resonance and their velocity grows linearly with time. However, if there are two waves in the system, the upper bound of the energy gain may exist and we find the analytical value of that bound. We discuss several generalizations including the relativistic limit, different wave amplitudes, and a wide range of the waves' wavenumbers. The obtained results are used for qualitative description of some phenomena observed in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  18. Structures, energies and bonding in neutral and charged Li microclusters.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Diana; Kirk, Steven Robert; Jenkins, Samantha; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2012-09-01

    Structural and chemical properties of charged and neutral Lithium microclusters are investigated for [Formula: see text]. A total of 18 quantum conformational spaces are randomly walked to produce candidate structures for local minima. Very rich potential energy surfaces are produced, with the largest structural complexity predicted for anionic clusters. Analysis of the electron charge distributions using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) predicts major stabilizing roles of Non-nuclear attractors (NNAs) via NNA···Li interactions with virtually no direct Li···Li interactions, except in the least stable configurations. A transition in behavior for clusters containing more than seven nuclei is observed by using the recently introduced quantum topology to determine in a quantum mechanically consistent fashion the number of spatial dimensions each cluster has. We experiment with a novel scheme for extracting persistent structural motifs with increase in cluster size. The new structural motifs correlate well with the energetic stability, particularly in highlighting the least stable structures. Quantifying the degree of covalent character in Lithium bonding independently agrees with the observation in the transition in cluster behavior for lithium clusters containing more than seven nuclei. Good correlation with available experimental data is obtained for all properties reported in this work.

  19. Adiabatic calorimetry test of the reaction kinetics and self-heating model for 18650 Li-ion cells in various states of charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chun; Wang, Yih-Wen; Shu, Chi-Min

    2016-06-01

    Use of adiabatic calorimetry to characterise thermal runaway of Li-ion cells is a crucial technique in battery safety testing. Various states of charge (SoC) of Li-ion cells were investigated to ascertain their thermal runaway features using a Vent Sizing Package 2 (VSP2) adiabatic calorimeter. To evaluate the thermal runaway characteristics, the temperature-pressure-time trajectories of commercial cylindrical cells were tested, and it was found that cells at a SoC of greater than 50% were subject to thermal explosion at elevated temperatures. Calorimetry data from various 18650 Li-ion cells with different SoC were used to calculate the thermal explosion energies and chemical kinetics; furthermore, a novel self-heating model based on a pseudo-zero-order reaction that follows the Arrhenius equation was found to be applicable for studying the exothermic reaction of a charged cell.

  20. Bond patterns and charge-order amplitude in quarter-filled charge-transfer solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, R. T.; Ward, A. B.; Gomes, N.; Mazumdar, S.

    2017-03-01

    Most quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) quarter-filled organic charge-transfer solids (CTS) with insulating ground states have two thermodynamic transitions: a high-temperature metal-insulator transition followed by a low-temperature magnetic transition. This sequence of transitions can be understood within the 1D Peierls-extended Hubbard (PEH) model. However, in some quasi-1D CTS both transitions occur simultaneously in a direct metal to spin-gapped insulator transition. In this second class of materials the organic stack bond distortion pattern does not follow the pattern of a second dimerization of a dimer lattice. These materials also display charge ordering of a large amplitude below the transition. Using quantum Monte Carlo methods we show that the same PEH model can be used to understand both classes of materials, however, within different parameter regions. We discuss the relevance of our work to experiments on several quarter-filled conductors, focusing in particular on the materials (EDO-TTF)2X and (DMEDO-TTF)2X .

  1. Influence of charge and coordination number on bond dissociation energies, distances, and vibrational frequencies for the phosphorus-phosphorus bond.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Saurabh S; Whalen, J Marc; Burford, Neil

    2014-09-03

    We report a comprehensive and systematic experimental and computational assessment of the P-P bond in prototypical molecules that represent a rare series of known compounds. The data presented complement the existing solid-state structural data and previous computational studies to provide a thorough thermodynamic and electronic understanding of the P-P bond. Comparison of homolytic and heterolytic bond dissociation for tricoordinate-tricoordinate, tricoordinate-tetracoordinate, and tetracoordinate-tetracoordinate P-P bonds in frameworks 1-6 provides fundamental insights into covalent bonding. For all types of P-P bond discussed, homolytic dissociation is favored over heterolytic dissociation, although the distinction is small for 2(1+) and 6(1+). The presence of a single cationic charge in a molecule substantially strengthens the P-P bond (relative to analogous neutral frameworks) such that it is comparable with the C-C bond in alkanes. Nevertheless, P-P distances are remarkably independent of molecular charge or coordination number, and trends in values of d(PC) and νsymm(PC) imply that a molecular cationic charge is distributed over the alkyl substituents. In the gas phase, the diphosphonium dication 3(2+) has similar energy to two [PMe3](+) radical cations, so that it is the lattice enthalpy of 3[OTf]2 in the solid-state that enables isolation, highlighting that values from gas-phase calculations are poor guides for synthetic planning for ionic compounds. There are no relationships or correlations between bond lengths, strengths, and vibrational frequencies.

  2. Cation-cation clusters in ionic liquids: Cooperative hydrogen bonding overcomes like-charge repulsion.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Anne; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-12-02

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions is reported for the ionic liquid, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. New infrared bands in the OH frequency range appear at low temperatures indicating the formation of H-bonded cation-cation clusters similar to those known for water and alcohols. Supported by DFT calculations, these vibrational bands can be assigned to attractive interaction between the hydroxyl groups of the cations. The repulsive Coulomb interaction is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between ions of like charge. The transition energy from purely cation-anion interacting configurations to those including cation-cation H-bonds is determined to be 3-4 kJmol(-1). The experimental findings and DFT calculations strongly support the concept of anti-electrostatic hydrogen bonds (AEHBs) as recently suggested by Weinhold and Klein. The like-charge configurations are kinetically stabilized with decreasing temperatures.

  3. Water hydrogen bond structure near highly charged interfaces is not like ice.

    PubMed

    Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2010-05-26

    Imaginary chi(2) spectra of HOD at air/charged surfactant/aqueous interfaces highly resemble the IR spectrum of the bulk liquid HOD, showing no indication of the "ice-like" structure. Clearly, the hydrogen bond structures at highly charged interfaces are not like ice but very similar to the structure in the bulk.

  4. Minimal transition state charge stabilization of the oxyanion during peptide bond formation by the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Nicolas; Hiller, David A; Strobel, Scott A

    2011-12-06

    Peptide bond formation during ribosomal protein synthesis involves an aminolysis reaction between the aminoacyl α-amino group and the carbonyl ester of the growing peptide via a transition state with a developing negative charge, the oxyanion. Structural and molecular dynamic studies have suggested that the ribosome may stabilize the oxyanion in the transition state of peptide bond formation via a highly ordered water molecule. To biochemically investigate this mechanistic hypothesis, we estimated the energetic contribution to catalytic charge stabilization of the oxyanion using a series of transition state mimics that contain different charge distributions and hydrogen bond potential on the functional group mimicking the oxyanion. Inhibitors containing an oxyanion mimic that carried a neutral charge and a mimic that preserved the negative charge but could not form hydrogen bonds had less than a 3-fold effect on inhibitor binding affinity. These observations argue that the ribosome provides minimal transition state charge stabilization to the oxyanion during peptide bond formation via the water molecule. This is in contrast to the substantial level of oxyanion stabilization provided by serine proteases. This suggests that the oxyanion may be neutralized via a proton shuttle, resulting in an uncharged transition state.

  5. Charge-Shift Bonding Emerges as a Distinct Electron-Pair Bonding Family from Both Valence Bond and Molecular Orbital Theories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiyu; Danovich, David; Wu, Wei; Braïda, Benoît; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2014-06-10

    The charge-shift bonding (CSB) concept was originally discovered through valence bond (VB) calculations. Later, CSB was found to have signatures in atoms-in-molecules and electron-localization-function and in experimental electron density measurements. However, the CSB concept has never been derived from a molecular orbital (MO)-based theory. We now provide a proof of principle that an MO-based approach enables one to derive the CSB family alongside the distinctly different classical family of covalent bonds. In this bridging energy decomposition analysis, the covalent-ionic resonance energy, RECS, of a bond is extracted by cloning an MO-based purely covalent reference state, which is a constrained two-configuration wave function. The energy gap between this reference state and the variational TCSCF ground state yields numerical values for RECS, which correlate with the values obtained at the VBSCF level. This simple MO-based method, which only takes care of static electron correlation, is already sufficient for distinguishing the classical covalent or polar-covalent bonds from charge-shift bonds. The equivalence of the VB and MO-based methods is further demonstrated when both methods are augmented by dynamic correlation. Thus, it is shown from both MO and VB perspectives that the bonding in the CSB family does not arise from electron correlation. Considering that the existence of the CSB family is associated also with quite a few experimental observations that we already reviewed ( Shaik , S. , Danovich , D. , Wu , W. , and Hiberty , P. C. Nat. Chem. , 2009 , 1 , 443 - 449 ), the new bonding concept has passed by now two stringent tests. This derivation, on the one hand, supports the new concept and on the other, it creates bridges between the two main theories of electronic structure.

  6. Intermolecular dynamical charge fluctuations in water: a signature of the H-bond network.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manu; Resta, Raffaele; Car, Roberto

    2005-10-28

    We report a simulation of deuterated water using a Car-Parrinello approach based on maximally localized Wannier functions. This provides local information on the dynamics of the hydrogen-bond network and on the origin of the low-frequency infrared activity. The oscillator strength of the translational modes, peaked around approximately 200 cm-1, is anisotropic and originates from intermolecular--not intramolecular--charge fluctuations. These fluctuations are a signature of a tetrahedral hydrogen-bonding environment.

  7. Constructing diabatic states from adiabatic states: Extending generalized Mulliken-Hush to multiple charge centers with Boys localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Yeganeh, Sina; Cave, Robert J.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2008-12-01

    This article shows that, although Boys localization is usually applied to single-electron orbitals, the Boys method itself can be applied to many electron molecular states. For the two-state charge-transfer problem, we show analytically that Boys localization yields the same charge-localized diabatic states as those found by generalized Mulliken-Hush theory. We suggest that for future work in electron transfer, where systems have more than two charge centers, one may benefit by using a variant of Boys localization to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces and extract electronic coupling matrix elements. We discuss two chemical examples of Boys localization and propose a generalization of the Boys algorithm for creating diabatic states with localized spin density that should be useful for Dexter triplet-triplet energy transfer.

  8. Constructing diabatic states from adiabatic states: extending generalized Mulliken-Hush to multiple charge centers with boys localization.

    PubMed

    Subotnik, Joseph E; Yeganeh, Sina; Cave, Robert J; Ratner, Mark A

    2008-12-28

    This article shows that, although Boys localization is usually applied to single-electron orbitals, the Boys method itself can be applied to many electron molecular states. For the two-state charge-transfer problem, we show analytically that Boys localization yields the same charge-localized diabatic states as those found by generalized Mulliken-Hush theory. We suggest that for future work in electron transfer, where systems have more than two charge centers, one may benefit by using a variant of Boys localization to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces and extract electronic coupling matrix elements. We discuss two chemical examples of Boys localization and propose a generalization of the Boys algorithm for creating diabatic states with localized spin density that should be useful for Dexter triplet-triplet energy transfer.

  9. Description of molecular dynamics in intense laser fields by the time-dependent adiabatic state approach: application to simultaneous two-bond dissociation of CO2 and its control.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukio; Kono, Hirohiko; Koseki, Shiro; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2003-07-02

    We theoretically investigated the dynamics of structural deformations of CO(2) and its cations in near-infrared intense laser fields (approximately 10(15) W cm(-2)) by using the time-dependent adiabatic state approach. To obtain "field-following" adiabatic potentials for nuclear dynamics, the electronic Hamiltonian including the interaction with the instantaneous laser electric field is diagonalized by the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field molecular orbital method. In the CO(2) and CO(2+) stages, ionization occurs before the field intensity becomes high enough to deform the molecule. In the CO(2)(2+) stage, simultaneous symmetric two-bond stretching occurs as well as one-bond stretching. Two-bond stretching is induced by an intense field in the lowest time-dependent adiabatic state |1> of CO(2)(2+), and this two-bond stretching is followed by the occurrence of a large-amplitude bending motion mainly in the second-lowest adiabatic state |2> nonadiabatically created at large internuclear distances by the field from |1>. It is concluded that the experimentally observed stretched and bent structure of CO(2)(3+) just before Coulomb explosions originates from the structural deformation of CO(2)(2+). We also show in this report that the concept of "optical-cycle-averaged potential" is useful for designing schemes to control molecular (reaction) dynamics, such as dissociation dynamics of CO(2), in intense fields. The present approach is simple but has wide applicability for analysis and prediction of electronic and nuclear dynamics of polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields.

  10. Energy decomposition analysis in an adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-02-22

    Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of electronic structure calculations has facilitated quantitative understanding of diverse intermolecular interactions. Nevertheless, such analyses are usually performed at a single geometry and thus decompose a "single-point" interaction energy. As a result, the influence of the physically meaningful EDA components on the molecular structure and other properties are not directly obtained. To address this gap, the absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO)-EDA is reformulated in an adiabatic picture, where the frozen, polarization, and charge transfer energy contributions are defined as energy differences between the stationary points on different potential energy surfaces (PESs), which are accessed by geometry optimizations at the frozen, polarized and fully relaxed levels of density functional theory (DFT). Other molecular properties such as vibrational frequencies can thus be obtained at the stationary points on each PES. We apply the adiabatic ALMO-EDA to different configurations of the water dimer, the water-Cl(-) and water-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes, metallocenes (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)), and the ammonia-borane complex. This method appears to be very useful for unraveling how physical effects such as polarization and charge transfer modulate changes in molecular properties induced by intermolecular interactions. As an example of the insight obtained, we find that a linear hydrogen bond geometry for the water dimer is preferred even without the presence of polarization and charge transfer, while the red shift in the OH stretch frequency is primarily a charge transfer effect; by contrast, a near-linear geometry for the water-chloride hydrogen bond is achieved only when charge transfer is allowed.

  11. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  12. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Periyasamy, Ganga

    2015-06-28

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}, and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH{sub 3} (referred as ACl:NH{sub 3} complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH{sub 3}-end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D{sub 0} cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H{sub 2}NCl:NH{sub 3}, F{sub 3}CCl:NH{sub 3}, and HOOCCl:NH{sub 3}, exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH{sub 3} and HOCl:NH{sub 3} complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D{sub 0} cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration.

  13. Note: Charge transfer in a hydrated peptide group is determined mainly by its intrinsic hydrogen-bond energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkin, Noemi G.; Krimm, Samuel

    2014-01-28

    Charge transfer in a hydrogen-bonded N-methylacetamide(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} system is obtained from ωB97X-D/6-31++G** and CHelpG atomic charge calculations of individual peptide-water interactions as well as that of the entire complex. In the latter, the electron transfer to water is 0.19 e, influenced primarily by the hydrogen bonds to the C=O group. The values of such charge transfer are paralleled by the corresponding intrinsic hydrogen-bond energies. These results support the desirability of incorporating charge transfer in molecular mechanics energy functions.

  14. The multi-configurational adiabatic electron transfer theory and its invariance under transformations of charge density basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Chudinov, G. E.; Newton, M. D.

    1994-02-01

    The continuum multi-configurational dynamical theory of electron transfer (ET) reactions in a chemical solute immersed in a polar solvent is developed. The solute wave function is represented as a CI expansion. The corresponding decomposition of the solute charge density generates a set of dynamical variables, the discrete medium coordinates. A new expression for the free energy surface in terms of these coordinates is derived. The stochastic equations of motion derived earlier are shown to be invariant under unitary transformations of orbitals used to build the CI expansion provided the latter is complete over the corresponding orbital subspace, and also under general linear transformations of the bases employed in expanding the charge density. The interrelation between the present general treatment and the reduced theory applied previously in terms of the two-level ET model is investigated. Finally, the explicit expression for the screening potential of medium electrons is derived in the electronic Born-Oppenheimer approximation (fast (slow) electronic timescale for solvent (solute)). The theory leads to a self-consistent scheme for practical calculations of rate constants for ET reactions involving complex solutes. Illustrative test calculations for two-level ET systems are presented, and the importance of proper boundary conditions for realistic molecular cavities is demonstrated.

  15. Photoinduced charge transfer involving a MoMo quadruply bonded complex to a perylene diimide.

    PubMed

    Alberding, Brian G; Brown-Xu, Samantha E; Chisholm, Malcolm H; Epstein, Arthur J; Gustafson, Terry L; Lewis, Sharlene A; Min, Yong

    2013-04-21

    Evidence, based on femtosecond transient absorption and time resolved infrared spectroscopy, is presented for photoinduced charge transfer from the Mo2δ orbital of the quadruply bonded molecule trans-Mo2(T(i)PB)2(BTh)2, where T(i)PB = 2,4,6-triisopropyl benzoate and BTh = 2,2'-bithienylcarboxylate, to di-n-octyl perylene diimide and di-n-hexylheptyl perylene diimide in thin films and solutions of the mixtures. The films show a long-lived charge separated state while slow back electron transfer, τBET ~ 500 ps, occurs in solution.

  16. Bond disproportionation and dynamical charge fluctuations in the perovskite rare-earth nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. J.; Haverkort, M. W.; Sawatzky, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present a theory describing the local electronic properties of the perovskite rare-earth nickelates—materials which have negative charge transfer energies, strong O 2 p - Ni 3 d covalence, and breathing-mode lattice distortions at the origin of highly studied metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic ordering transitions. Utilizing a full-orbital, full-correlation double-cluster approach, we find strong charge fluctuations, in agreement with a bond disproportionation interpretation. The double-cluster formulation permits the inclusion of necessary orbital degeneracies and Coulomb interactions to calculate resonant x-ray spectral responses, with which we find excellent agreement with well-established experimental results. This previously absent, crucial link between theory and experiment provides validation of the recently proposed bond disproportionation theory, and provides an analysis methodology for spectroscopic studies of engineered phases of nickelates and other high-valence transition-metal compounds.

  17. Atomic dipole polarization in charge-transfer complexes with halogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Bartashevich, E V; Tsirelson, V G

    2013-02-21

    The polarization effects associated with halogen bonding for the series of charge-transfer complexes D(m)···X-Y, where donor molecules D(m) = NH(3), H(2)O, H(2)S, C(2)H(4), CO and X-Y = Cl(2), ClF, Br(2), BrCl, ICl, I(2), are characterized in terms of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules using the B3LYP/6-311** Kohn-Sham wave functions. We study the electrostatic potential features of separate donor and acceptor molecules, the change in atomic charges as well as the atomic electric dipole moments and their components, and the intra-atomic electron density dipole polarization and the bonding dipole moments resulting from the electron density redistribution between the molecules in the charge-transfer complexes. The equation linking the most negative electrostatic potential values in the donor molecules and the most positive values in dihalogen molecules with the stretching force constants was found using two-factor regression. It is demonstrated that the dipole polarization of the acceptor atom mirrors the strength of halogen bonding in complexes in a series of different donors and acceptors. An exponential relationship between the magnitude of the total atomic electric dipole moment of the acceptor atom and the intermolecular stretching force constant is established for weakly bounded complexes.

  18. On the physical origin of the cation-anion intermediate bond in ionic liquids Part I. Placing a (weak) hydrogen bond between two charges.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sebastian B C; Roatsch, Martin; Schöppke, Matthias; Kirchner, Barbara

    2010-07-21

    The intermediate bond forces in ionic liquids are investigated from static quantum chemical calculations at various methods and two basis sets. The experimentally observed red-shift of the donor-proton bond stretching frequency due to a bond elongation is confirmed by all methods. Comparing Hartree-Fock to second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the Hartree-Fock method gives in many cases an erroneous description of the geometries. Furthermore, the Hartree-Fock interaction energies can deviate up to 60 kJ mol(-1) from Møller-Plesset perturbation theory indicating the importance of dispersion interaction. While the usual trends of decreasing stability or interaction energies with increasing ion sizes are found, the geometries involving hydrogen atoms do not change this order of total interaction energies. Therefore, the hydrogen bond is not the most important interaction for ion pairs with regard to the total interaction energy. On the other hand, the different established analysis methods give rise to hydrogen bonding in several ion pairs. Charge analysis reveals the hydrogen-bonding character of the ion pair and shows, depending on the type of ions combined and further on the type of conformers considered, that a hydrogen bond can be present. The possibility of hydrogen bonding is also shown by an analysis of the frontier orbitals. Calculating potential energy surfaces and observing from this the change in the donor proton bond indicates that regular hydrogen bonds are possible in ion pairs of ionic liquids. Thereby, the maximum of bond elongation exceeds the one of a usual hydrogen bond by far. The more salt-like hydrogen-bonded ion pair [NH(4)][BF(4)] exhibits a steeper maximum than the more ionic liquid like ion pair [EtNH(3)][BF(4)]. The fact that imidazolium-based ionic liquids as [Emim][Cl] can display two faces, hydrogen bonding and purely ionic bonding, points to a disturbing rather than stabilizing role of hydrogen bonding on the interaction of

  19. Spectroscopic Evidence for Clusters of Like-Charged Ions in Ionic Liquids Stabilized by Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Anne; Stange, Peter; Fumino, Koichi; Weinhold, Frank; Ludwig, Ralf

    2016-02-16

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for hydrogen-bonded clusters of like-charged ions is reported for ionic liquids. The measured infrared O-H vibrational bands of the hydroxyethyl groups in the cations can be assigned to the dispersion-corrected DFT calculated frequencies of linear and cyclic clusters. Compensating the like-charge Coulomb repulsion, these cationic clusters can range up to cyclic tetramers resembling molecular clusters of water and alcohols. These ionic clusters are mainly present at low temperature and show strong cooperative effects in hydrogen bonding. DFT-D3 calculations of the pure multiply charged clusters suggest that the attractive hydrogen bonds can compete with repulsive Coulomb forces.

  20. An excursion from normal to inverted C-C bonds shows a clear demarcation between covalent and charge-shift C-C bonds.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Sason; Chen, Zhenhua; Wu, Wei; Stanger, Amnon; Danovich, David; Hiberty, Philippe C

    2009-10-19

    What is the nature of the C-C bond? Valence bond and electron density computations of 16 C-C bonds show two families of bonds that flesh out as a phase diagram. One family, involving ethane, cyclopropane and so forth, is typified by covalent C-C bonding wherein covalent spin-pairing accounts for most of the bond energy. The second family includes the inverted bridgehead bonds of small propellanes, where the bond is neither covalent nor ionic, but owes its existence to the resonance stabilization between the respective structures; hence a charge-shift (CS) bond. The dual family also emerges from calculated and experimental electron density properties. Covalent C-C bonds are characterized by negative Laplacians of the density, whereas CS-bonds display small or positive Laplacians. The positive Laplacian defines a region suffering from neighbouring repulsive interactions, which is precisely the case in the inverted bonding region. Such regions are rich in kinetic energy, and indeed the energy-density analysis reveals that CS-bonds are richer in kinetic energy than the covalent C-C bonds. The large covalent-ionic resonance energy is precisely the mechanism that lowers the kinetic energy in the bonding region and restores equilibrium bonding. Thus, different degrees of repulsive strain create two bonding families of the same chemical bond made from a single atomic constituent. It is further shown that the idea of repulsive strain is portable and can predict the properties of propellanes of various sizes and different wing substituents. Experimentally (M. Messerschmidt, S. Scheins, L. Bruberth, M. Patzel, G. Szeimies, C. Paulman, P. Luger, Angew. Chem. 2005, 117, 3993-3997; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2005, 44, 3925-3928), the C-C bond families are beautifully represented in [1.1.1]propellane, where the inverted C-C is a CS-bond, while the wings are made from covalent C-C bonds. What other manifestations can we expect from CS-bonds? Answers from experiment have the potential

  1. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics: a computational study of structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph J; Tillman, Brendon G; Cronin, William Andrew

    2006-09-28

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to characterize prototypical fluoroalkenes (fluoroethylene and 2-fluoro-2-butene) with respect to key properties of peptides (amides) including structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding. The results are compared to those obtained for model peptides (formamide, N-methylacetamide). Calculations have been carried out at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with the 6-311++G(2d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets. The results suggest that the fluoroalkene is similar in steric requirements to a peptide bond but that there is less charge separation. Calculations of the hydration free energies with the PCM bulk continuum solvent model indicate that the fluoroalkene has much smaller hydration free energies than an amide but that the difference in solvation free energy for cis and trans isomers is comparable. In studies of complexes with water molecules, the fluoroalkene is found to engage in interactions that are analogous to backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions that govern many properties of natural peptides and proteins but with smaller interaction energies. In addition, key structural differences are noted when the fluoroalkene is playing the role of hydrogen-bond acceptor which may have implications in binding, aggregation, and conformational preferences in fluoroalkene peptidomimetics. The issue of cooperativity in hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes with multiple waters has also been investigated. The fluoroalkene is found to exhibit cooperative effects that mirror those of the peptide but are smaller in magnitude. Thus, pairwise addivitity of interactions appears to more adequately describe the fluoroalkenes than the peptides they are intended to mimic.

  2. Charge distribution and chemical bonding in B-O complexes in Cz-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuliang; Caliste, Damien; Pochet, Pascal

    2013-10-01

    Density functional calculations based on wavelet basis set are performed to investigate charge distribution and chemical bonding in possible BiOi (interstitial boron and interstitial oxygen), BsO2i (substitutional boron and interstitial oxygen dimer), and BiO2i (interstitial boron and interstitial oxygen dimer) complexes in Cz-Si solar cells. It is confirmed that the BsO2ist complex composed by Bs and staggered oxygen dimer (O2ist) at second nearest site to boron has the lowest formation energy, resulting in better agreement with experiment. This is resulted by Coulomb attraction between Si-Oi and Si-Bs and consequently a decreased Coulomb repulsion between Bs-Oi in BsO2ist complex. A more physical description of the localized nature on bonding has been analyzed by maximally localized Wannier functions. It is found through the predicted Wannier centers that a doubly negative charge state of interstitial oxygen exists, which is consistent with our Bader charge analysis.

  3. Topological analysis of aromatic halogen/hydrogen bonds by electron charge density and electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; de las Vallejos, Margarita M; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the intermolecular distribution of the electronic charge density in the aromatic hydrogen/halogen bonds is studied within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) analysis. The study is carried out in nine complexes formed between benzene and simple lineal molecules, where hydrogen, fluorine and chlorine atoms act as bridge atoms. All the results are obtained at MP2 level theory using cc-pVTZ basis set. Attention is focused on topological features observed at the intermolecular region such as bond, ring and cage critical points of the electron density, as well as the bond path, the gradient of the density maps, molecular graphs and interatomic surfaces. The strength of the interaction increases in the following order: F[Symbol: see text]pi < Cl[Symbol: see text]pi < H[Symbol: see text]pi. Our results show that the fluorine atom has the capability to interact with the pi-cloud to form an aromatic halogen bond, as long as the donor group is highly electron withdrawing. The Laplacian topology allows us to state that the halogen atoms can act as nucleophiles as well as electrophiles, showing clearly their dual character.

  4. Hydrogen Bonding and Binding of Polybasic Residues with Negatively Charged Mixed Lipid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, C.; Feraudo, J.; Travesset, A.

    2008-01-23

    Phosphoinositides, phosphorylated products of phosphatidylinositol, are a family of phospholipids present in tiny amounts (1% or less) in the cytosolic surface of cell membranes, yet they play an astonishingly rich regulatory role, particularly in signaling processes. In this letter, we use molecular dynamics simulations on a model system of mixed lipid monolayers to investigate the interaction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), the most common of the phosphoinositides, with a polybasic peptide consisting of 13 lysines. Our results show that the polybasic peptide sequesters three PIP{sub 2} molecules, forming a complex stabilized by the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds between PIP{sub 2} and the Lys residues. We also show that the polybasic peptide does not sequester other charged phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine because of the inability to form long-lived stable hydrogen bonds.

  5. Electrostatic and Charge-Induced Methane Activation by a Concerted Double C-H Bond Insertion.

    PubMed

    Geng, Caiyun; Li, Jilai; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2017-02-01

    A mechanistically unique, simultaneous activation of two C-H bonds of methane has been identified during the course of its reaction with the cationic copper carbide, [Cu-C](+). Detailed high-level quantum chemical calculations support the experimental findings obtained in the highly diluted gas phase using FT-ICR mass spectrometry. The behavior of [Cu-C](+)/CH4 contrasts that of [Au-C](+)/CH4, for which a stepwise bond-activation scenario prevails. An explanation for the distinct mechanistic differences of the two coinage metal complexes is given. It is demonstrated that the coupling of [Cu-C](+) with methane to form ethylene and Cu(+) is modeled very well by the reaction of a carbon atom with methane mediated by an oriented external electric field of a positive point charge.

  6. Structure and Bonding in Nickel-Thiolate-Iodine Charge-Transfer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Norman; Steinfeld, Gunther; Lozan, Vasile; Naumov, Sergej; Flyunt, Roman; Abel, Bernd; Kersting, Berthold

    2017-02-16

    The dinuclear nickel complexes [Ni2 L(μ-O2 CR)](ClO4 ) [R=Me (4), R=OMe (6)], where L(2-) is a 24-membered macrocyclic N6 S2 ligand, react readily with excess I2 in MeCN solution at 4 °C to form stable mono-(I2 ) and bis-(I2 ) charge-transfer (CT) adducts of the type [Ni2 L(μ-O2 CR)(I2 )n ](+) (n=1 or 2) containing linear RS-I-I linkages. Three new CT compounds, namely, [Ni2 L(OAc)(I2 )](I2 )(I3 ) (5), [Ni2 L(O2 COMe)(I2 )](I5 )⋅MeCN (7⋅MeCN), and [Ni2 L(O2 COMe)(I2 )2 ](I5 )⋅MeCN (8⋅MeCN) as well as the triiodide salt [Ni2 L(OAc)](I3 ) (9) were synthesized and fully characterized. A common feature of the CT adducts is a polyiodide matrix, which surrounds the individual complex molecules, stabilized by secondary I⋅⋅⋅I interactions with the CT linkages. The scatter in both the RS-I (2.6 to 3.0 Å) and the I-I bond lengths (2.7 to 3.0 Å) is indicative of both a variable strength of the RS(-) →I2 bond and a varying degree of charge transfer. An analysis of the structural parameters was undertaken accompanied by DFT calculations to quantify the donating ability of the bridging thiolate functions and to shed more light on the bonding in this rare sort of charge-transfer complexes. The stability of the CT complexes and the results of preliminary transport measurements are also reported.

  7. Short hydrogen bonds in a new salt of pyromellitic acid: An experimental charge density investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Leonardo H. R.; Rodrigues, Bernardo L.; Idemori, Ynara M.; Fernandes, Nelson G.

    2012-04-01

    An analysis of intra- and intermolecular short hydrogen bonds in a new salt of nicotinic acid (3-pyridinecarboxylic acid), Nic, and pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid), H4Pm, with formula (HNic)2(H2Pm), 1, has been carried out by single-crystal X-ray diffraction method at 120 K. The experimental charge density has been performed using multipolar functions and analyzed by Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, which gave evidence for the partly covalent character of those interactions.

  8. Thermodynamic properties and thermal correlation lengths of a Hubbard model with bond-charge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Andreas; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2003-12-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of a one-dimensional Hubbard model with bond-charge interaction X using the transfer-matrix renormalization-group method. Numerical results for various quantities such as spin and charge susceptibilities, particle densities, specific heat, and thermal correlation lengths are presented and discussed. We compare our data also to results for the exactly solvable case X/t=1 as well as to bosonization results for weak coupling X/t≪1, which shows excellent agreement. We confirm the existence of a Tomonaga-Luttinger and a Luther-Emery liquid phase, in agreement with previous studies at zero temperature. Thermal singlet-pair-correlation lengths are shown to dominate density and spin correlations for finite temperatures in certain parameter regimes.

  9. Competition between covalent bonding and charge transfer at complex-oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salafranca, Juan; Rincón, Julián; Tornos, Javier; León, Carlos; Santamaria, Jacobo; Dagotto, Elbio; Pennycook, Stephen J; Varela, Maria

    2014-05-16

    Here we study the electronic properties of cuprate-manganite interfaces. By means of atomic resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy, we produce a subnanometer scale map of the transition metal oxidation state profile across the interface between the high Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ and the colossal magnetoresistance compound (La,Ca)MnO3. A net transfer of electrons from manganite to cuprate with a peculiar nonmonotonic charge profile is observed. Model calculations rationalize the profile in terms of the competition between standard charge transfer tendencies (due to band mismatch), strong chemical bonding effects across the interface, and Cu substitution into the Mn lattice, with different characteristic length scales.

  10. Charge-assisted bond N(+)H mediates the gelation of amorphous lurasidone hydrochloride during dissolution.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuai; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xiaojie; Ma, Di; Liang, Shujun; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jianjun; Wei, Yuanfeng

    2017-02-25

    Lurasidone hydrochloride (LH), the hydrochloride form of lurasidone with a charge-assisted bond N(+)H, is an atypical antipsychotropic agent for the treatment of schizophrenia. As a BCS class II drug, LH has a low oral bioavailability mainly due to its poor water solubility and low dissolution. In order to improve its solubility, amorphization of LH was performed and characterized. Unexpectedly, the dissolution rate of amorphous LH was much lower than that of crystalline LH. In addition, the amorphous LH powders quickly aggregated when contacting the dissolution media (water, 37°C), and formed a sticky gel adhering on the paddle. The follow-up polarized light microscope, XRPD, DSC, and FTIR analysis found that amorphous LH transformed to crystalline LH during dissolution. On the other hand, no such gelation phenomenon of amorphous lurasidone was observed under the same dissolution condition. However, the gel would reform when dropping concentrated hydrochloric acid slowly into the bottom of the medium during the dissolution of amorphous lurasidone, and XRPD/DSC/FTIR results indicated that the regenerated gel was consisted of crystalline LH, suggesting that the charge-assisted bond N(+)H in the structure of LH mediated the gel formation of amorphous LH during its dissolution process.

  11. Selective stabilization of the chorismate mutase transition state by a positively charged hydrogen bond donor.

    PubMed

    Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald

    2003-03-19

    Citrulline was incorporated via chemical semisynthesis at position 90 in the active site of the AroH chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis. The wild-type arginine at this position makes hydrogen-bonding interactions with the ether oxygen of chorismate. Replacement of the positively charged guanidinium group with the isosteric but neutral urea has a dramatic effect on the ability of the enzyme to convert chorismate into prephenate. The Arg90Cit variant exhibits a >104-fold decrease in the catalytic rate constant kcat with a 2.7-fold increase in the Michaelis constant Km. In contrast, its affinity for a conformationally constrained inhibitor molecule that effectively mimics the geometry but not the dissociative character of the transition state is only reduced by a factor of approximately 6. These results show that an active site merely complementary to the reactive conformation of chorismate is insufficient for catalysis of the mutase reaction. Instead, electrostatic stabilization of the polarized transition state by provision of a cationic hydrogen bond donor proximal to the oxygen in the breaking C-O bond is essential for high catalytic efficiency.

  12. Competition between covalent bonding and charge transfer tendencies at complex-oxides interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafranca, J.; Tornos, J.; García-Barriocanal, J.; León, C.; Santamaria, J.; Rincón, J.; Álvarez, G.; Pennycook, S. J.; Dagotto, E.; Varela, M.

    2013-03-01

    Interfaces alter the subtle balance among different degrees of freedom responsible for exotic phenomena in complex oxides, such as cuprate-manganite interfaces. We study these interfaces by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and theoretical calculations. Microscopy and EEL spectroscopy indicate that the interfaces are sharp, and the chemical profile is symmetric with two equivalent interfaces. Spectroscopy also allows us to establish an oxidation state profile with sub-nanometer resolution. We find an anomalous charge redistribution: a non-monotonic behavior of the occupancy of d orbitals in the manganite layers as a function of distance to the interface. Relying on model calculations, we establish that this profile is a result of the competition between standard charge transfer tendencies involving materials with different chemical potentials and strong bonding effects across the interface. The competition can be tuned by different factors (temperature, doping, magnetic fields...). As examples, we report different charge distributions as a function of doping of the manganite layers. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ORNL:U.S. DOE-BES, Material Sciences and Engineering Division & ORNL's ShaRE. UCM:Juan de la Cierva, Ramon y Cajal, & ERC Starting Investigator Award programs.

  13. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) II: assignment of bonded parameters and partial atomic charges.

    PubMed

    Vanommeslaeghe, K; Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, A D

    2012-12-21

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug candidates interacting with biological systems. In these simulations, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters, and partial atomic charges is required. In the present article, algorithms for the assignment of parameters and charges for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) are presented. These algorithms rely on the existing parameters and charges that were determined as part of the parametrization of the force field. Bonded parameters are assigned based on the similarity between the atom types that define said parameters, while charges are determined using an extended bond-charge increment scheme. Charge increments were optimized to reproduce the charges on model compounds that were part of the parametrization of the force field. A "penalty score" is returned for every bonded parameter and charge, allowing the user to quickly and conveniently assess the quality of the force field representation of different parts of the compound of interest. Case studies are presented to clarify the functioning of the algorithms and the significance of their output data.

  14. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) II: Assignment of bonded parameters and partial atomic charges

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug candidates interacting with biological systems. In these simulations, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters and partial atomic charges is required. In the present article, algorithms for the assignment of parameters and charges for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) are presented. These algorithms rely on the existing parameters and charges that were determined as part of the parametrization of the force field. Bonded parameters are assigned based on the similarity between the atom types that define said parameters, while charges are determined using an extended bond-charge increment scheme. Charge increments were optimized to reproduce the charges on model compounds that were part of the parametrization of the force field. A “penalty score” is returned for every bonded parameter and charge, allowing the user to quickly and conveniently assess the quality of the force field representation of different parts of the compound of interest. Case studies are presented to clarify the functioning of the algorithms and the significance of their output data. PMID:23145473

  15. Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Schmidt, Jacob C.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model compounds (i.e. deprotonated polyhydroxy alcohols) were measured by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally determined vertical and adiabatic electron detachment energies for (HOCH2CH2)2CHO (2a), (HOCH2CH2) 3CO (3a) and (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)3CO (4a) reveal that hydrogen-bonded networks can provide enormous stabilizations, and that a single charge center not only can be stabilized by up to 3 hydrogen bonds but it can increase the interaction energy between non-charged OH groups by 5.8 kcal mol1 or more per hydrogen bond. This can lead to pKa values that are very different than in water, and provide some of the impetus for catalytic processes.

  16. Bonding and charge transfer in nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes: insights from NEXAFS spectra.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, C D; Copping, Roy; Wang, Shuao; Janousch, Markus; Teat, Simon J; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Shuh, David K; Prendergast, David

    2014-11-03

    We investigate the electronic structure of three newly synthesized nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes [(UO2)(H2bbp)Cl2], [(UO)2(Hbbp)(Py)Cl], and [(UO2)(bbp)(Py)2] using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments and simulations. The complexes studied feature derivatives of the tunable tridentate N-donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (bbp) and exhibit discrete chemical differences in uranyl coordination. The sensitivity of the N K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum to local bonding and charge transfer is exploited to systematically investigate the evolution of structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes. A thorough interpretation of the measured experimental spectra is achieved via ab initio NEXAFS simulations based on the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach and enables the assignment of spectral features to electronic transitions on specific absorbing sites. We find that ligand-uranyl bonding leads to a signature blue shift in the N K-edge absorption onset, resulting from charge displacement toward the uranyl, while changes in the equatorial coordination shell of the uranyl lead to more subtle modulations in the spectral features. Theoretical simulations show that the flexible local chemistry at the nonbinding imidazole-N sites of the bbp ligand is also reflected in the NEXAFS spectra and highlights potential synthesis strategies to improve selectivity. In particular, we find that interactions of the bbp ligand with solvent molecules can lead to changes in ligand-uranyl binding geometry while also modulating the K-edge absorption. Our results suggest that NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with first-principles interpretation can offer insights into the coordination chemistry of analogous functionalized conjugated ligands.

  17. Contribution of π-bonds to effective charges, cohesive energy, and force constants of graphene-like compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    For 14 two-dimensional hexagonal compounds IV-IV and III-V, analytical expressions have been obtained using the Harrison bond-orbital method for the contribution from the π-interaction to the polarity of interatomic bonds, the effective atomic and transverse dynamical charges and their dependences on the deformation, as well as to the binding energy, the cohesive energy, and the central and non-central force constants.

  18. Solvent based hydrogen bonding: impact on poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanoscale morphology and charge transport characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mincheol; Choi, Dalsu; Fu, Boyi; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2013-06-25

    We demonstrate that supramolecular assembly and subsequent enhancement of charge transport characteristics of conjugated polymers can be facilitated simply by adding small amounts of a more volatile poor solvent, which can hydrogen bond with the majority solvent. Addition of up to 2 vol % acetone to a precursor solution of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in chloroform leads to approximately a 4-fold increase in P3HT field-effect mobility. The improvement is associated with hydrogen bonding interactions between acetone and chloroform which decrease the evaporation rate of the mixed solvent. P3HT is less soluble in the binary solvent than in the more readily vaporized chloroform component, and this characteristic enables the supramolecular assembly of P3HT chains at the nanoscale. Two-dimensional molecular ordering of the polymer film was controlled by varying the quantity of poor solvent added to the precursor solution, and the correlation between field-effect mobility and molecular ordering was investigated. Hansen solubility parameters were used to systematically understand how the solvent mixture enhances the alignment and assembly of polymer chains and influences subsequent thin film properties. The value of the relative energy difference (RED) of the solvent with respect to P3HT increased from less than 1 to more than 1 during film formation, which indicates that the solvent characteristics are initially those of a good solvent but transform into those of a poor dissolution medium. A mechanistic illustration of the molecular ordering process during film formation is postulated.

  19. Introducing constricted variational density functional theory in its relaxed self-consistent formulation (RSCF-CV-DFT) as an alternative to adiabatic time dependent density functional theory for studies of charge transfer transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Seth, Mike; Ziegler, Tom

    2014-05-14

    We have applied the relaxed and self-consistent extension of constricted variational density functional theory (RSCF-CV-DFT) for the calculation of the lowest charge transfer transitions in the molecular complex X-TCNE between X = benzene and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene. Use was made of functionals with a fixed fraction (α) of Hartree-Fock exchange ranging from α = 0 to α = 0.5 as well as functionals with a long range correction (LC) that introduces Hartree-Fock exchange for longer inter-electronic distances. A detailed comparison and analysis is given for each functional between the performance of RSCF-CV-DFT and adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is shown that in this particular case, all functionals afford the same reasonable agreement with experiment for RSCF-CV-DFT whereas only the LC-functionals afford a fair agreement with experiment using TDDFT. We have in addition calculated the CT transition energy for X-TCNE with X = toluene, o-xylene, and naphthalene employing the same functionals as for X = benzene. It is shown that the calculated charge transfer excitation energies are in as good agreement with experiment as those obtained from highly optimized LC-functionals using adiabatic TDDFT. We finally discuss the relation between the optimization of length separation parameters and orbital relaxation in the RSCF-CV-DFT scheme.

  20. Charge-density analysis using multipolar atom and spherical charge models: 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione, a compound displaying a resonance-assisted hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Ayoub; Kubicki, Maciej; Wright, Jonathan; Borowiak, Teresa; Dutkiewicz, Grzegorz; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The experimental charge-density distribution in 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione in the crystal state was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collection at 0.33 Å resolution. The molecule in the crystal is in the enol form. The experimental electron density was refined using the Hansen-Coppens multipolar model and an alternative modeling, based on spherical atoms and additional charges on the covalent bonds and electron lone-pair sites. The crystallographic refinements, charge-density distributions, molecular electrostatic potentials, dipole moments and intermolecular interaction energies obtained from the different charge-density models were compared. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical charge densities using theoretical structure factors obtained from periodic quantum calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. A strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bond connects molecules along the [001] direction. The deformation density maps show the resonance within the O=C-C=C-OH fragment and merged lone pair lobes on the hydroxyl O atom. This resonance is further confirmed by the analysis of charges and topology of the electron density.

  1. The role of charge transfer in the hydrogen bond cooperative effect of cis-N-methylformamide oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongwei; Qu, Wenwen; Chen, Guangju; Liu, Ruozhuang

    2005-07-21

    Two accumulating molecular systems have been designed to investigate the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding in theory. The first system included a series of linear oligomers of cis-N-methylformamide (c-NMF) molecules. Substantial cooperative effect has been confirmed in the electronic structures and energies of the hydrogen bonds in them as shown by the results obtained using the B3LYP method at the level of cc-pVTZ basis sets. Such a cooperative effect gradually increases with the growth of the c-NMF oligomer. The second system included a series of modified c-NMF trimers whose central c-NMF molecules contained insertion fragments of varying structural and electrical compositions. On the basis of an examination of the structures and charge populations of the c-NMF oligomers in these two systems, a mechanism of the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding in these systems based on charge flow in the c-NMF molecules is proposed. The results from the second system of c-NMF trimers were particularly instrumental in formulating this mechanism, because the charge flows between the C=O and N-H groups in the modified c-NMF molecule of these trimers were dampened by the various molecular insertions. A clear correlation between the degree of charge flow dampening from each inserted fragment and the magnitude of the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding was observed. On the basis of an analysis of the electronic structural characteristics of the molecular fragments, we conclude that the charge flow between the hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups in the c-NMF molecule is the most important factor inducing the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding.

  2. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  3. Molecular tectonics: design of 2-D networks by simultaneous use of charge-assisted hydrogen and coordination bonds.

    PubMed

    Carpanese, Cristina; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Henry, Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2009-11-28

    Using a combination of charge-assisted H- and coordination-bonds, a tetra component system composed of a dicationic and a dianionic organic tecton, Ag(+) cation and XF(6)(-) (X= P, As, Sb) anion behaves as planned and leads to the formation of 2-D isostructural networks for which the energetic contributions of the two recognition events dominate the construction process.

  4. Influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding on the geometry, atomic charges, and spectral modes of acetanilide: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binoy, J.; Prathima, N. B.; Murali Krishna, C.; Santhosh, C.; Hubert Joe, I.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    Acetanilide, a compound of pharmaceutical importance possessing pain-relieving properties due to its blocking the pulse dissipating along the nerve fiber, is subjected to vibrational spectral investigation using NIR FT Raman, FT-IR, and SERS. The geometry, Mulliken charges, and vibrational spectrum of acetanilide have been computed using the Hartree-Fock theory and density functional theory employing the 6-31G (d) basis set. To investigate the influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding, the geometry, charge distribution, and vibrational spectrum of the acetanilide dimer have been computed at the HF/6-31G (d) level. The computed geometries reveal that the acetanilide molecule is planar, while twisting of the secondary amide group with respect to the phenyl ring is found upon hydrogen bonding. The trans isomerism and “amido” form of the secondary amide, hyperconjugation of the C=O group with the adjacent C-C bond, and donor-acceptor interaction have been investigated using computed geometry. The carbonyl stretching band position is found to be influenced by the tendency of the phenyl ring to withdraw nitrogen lone pair, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, conjugation, and hyperconjugation. A decrease in the NH and C=O bond orders and increase in the C-N bond orders due to donor-acceptor interaction can be observed in the vibrational spectra. The SERS spectral analysis reveals that the flat orientation of the molecule on the adsorption plane is preferred.

  5. Chemical bonding in excited states: Energy transfer and charge redistribution from a real space perspective.

    PubMed

    Jara-Cortés, Jesús; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2017-05-15

    This work provides a novel interpretation of elementary processes of photophysical relevance from the standpoint of the electron density using simple model reactions. These include excited states of H2 taken as a prototype for a covalent bond, excimer formation of He2 to analyze non-covalent interactions, charge transfer by an avoided crossing of electronic states in LiF and conical interesections involved in the intramolecular scrambling in C2 H4 . The changes of the atomic and interaction energy components along the potential energy profiles are described by the interacting quantum atoms approach and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Additionally, the topological analysis of one- and two-electron density functions is used to explore basic reaction mechanisms involving excited and degenerate states in connection with the virial theorem. This real space approach allows to describe these processes in a unified way, showing its versatility and utility in the study of chemical systems in excited states. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hydrogen bonded arrays: the power of multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Alireza; Schmidt, Jacob; Wang, Xue-Bin; Kass, Steven R

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model compounds (i.e., deprotonated polyhydroxy alcohols) were measured by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally determined vertical and adiabatic electron detachment energies for (HOCH(2)CH(2))(2)CHO(-)(2a), (HOCH(2)CH(2))(3)CO(-) (3a), and (HOCH(2)CH(2)CH(OH)CH(2))(3)CO(-) (4a)reveal that hydrogen-bonded networks can provide enormous stabilizations and that a single charge center not only can be stabilized by up to three hydrogen bonds but also can increase the interaction energy between noncharged OH groups by 5.8 kcal mol(-1) or more per hydrogen bond. This can lead to pK(a) values that are very different from those in water and can provide some of the impetus for catalytic processes.

  7. Synergizing Noncovalent Bonding Interactions in the Self-Assembly of Organic Charge-Transfer Ferroelectrics and Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dennis

    Contemporary supramolecular chemistry---chemistry beyond the molecule---seeks to leverage noncovalent bonding interactions to generate emergent properties and complexity. These aims extend beyond the solution phase and into the solid state, where crystalline organic materials have attracted much attention for their ability to imitate the physical properties of inorganic crystals. This Thesis outlines my efforts to understand the properties of the solid-state materials that are self-assembled with noncovalent bonding motifs which I have helped to realize. In the first five Chapters, I chronicle the development of the lock-arm supramolecular ordering (LASO) paradigm, which is a general molecular design strategy for amplifying the crystallization of charge transfer complexes that revolves around the synergistic action of hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions. In an effort to expand upon the LASO paradigm, I identify a two-point halogen-bonding motif which appears to operate orthogonally from the hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions. Since some of these single crystalline materials are ferroelectric at room temperature, I discuss the implications of these experimental observations and reconcile them with the centrosymmetric space groups assigned after X-ray crystallographic refinements. I conclude in the final two Chapters by recording my endeavors to control the assembly of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with noncovalent bonding interactions between [2]catenane-bearing struts. First of all, I describe the formation of syndiotactic pi-stacked 2D MOF layers before highlighting a two-component MOF that assembles with a magic number ratio of components that is independent of the molar proportions present in the crystallization medium.

  8. Scaling relations and the role of bond-charge to the electron transmission through two coupled Aharonov-Bohm rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. H.; Tran, L.; Cain, C. A.

    2012-05-01

    Electron transport and the exact scaling relations for two irreducibly coupled Aharonov-Bohm (AB) rings with two external terminals attached are investigated. In coupled AB rings, a center common path exists where the phase of the electron wave function can be modulated by two applied fluxes simultaneously. The two coupled rings can be considered as two coupled atoms where Fermi level crossings exist not only between bonding states but also between bonding and anti-bonding states when the applied flux is varied in one of the two cases studied. We show that when the smallest atomic-sized coupled rings are scaled up any odd number of times, an identical electron transmission is preserved. When two terminals are attached to isolated coupled AB rings, there is a further redistribution of bond-charge stored within the center common path. The shift of the electron charge distribution to favor one end of the common path is accompanied by the redistribution of the two partial waves that traverse through the two arms from the input to the output terminal. The flux can control which arm the electron traverses through more favorably, and hence, the center path behaves like a flux-controlled charge reservoir for the electron transport. The unbalanced charge in the entire structure creates a space-charge effect much like a p-n junction. The paradox of the delocalization of the electron wave when two AB rings are coupled and the subsequent localization effect of the electron transport in a quantum network are described.

  9. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  10. Intermolecular charge flux as the origin of infrared intensity enhancement upon halogen-bond formation of the peptide group.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hajime

    2010-07-21

    The changes in the vibrational properties of the peptide group upon formation of O...X and N...X halogen bonds are studied theoretically. Calculations are carried out for complexes of N-methylacetamide (NMA), a well known model molecule of the peptide group, with halogen-containing molecules. For comparison, calculations are also carried out for some NMA-water hydrogen-bonding complexes. It is shown that the infrared (IR) intensity of the amide I mode of the peptide group is enhanced significantly (up to about 520 km mol(-1) or 2.6 times) upon C=O...X halogen-bond formation, in spite of rather modest magnitudes of the intermolecular electric field and of the changes in the C=O bond length and in the amide I vibrational frequency as compared with the cases of the C=O...H(D) hydrogen bonding. From the analysis of the changes in the dipole derivative and in the electronic structure, it is shown that this IR intensity enhancement arises from the intermolecular charge flux. For the N...X halogen bonding complexes, some characteristic changes in the vibrational properties are seen, among which the IR intensity enhancement of the ND out-of-plane wagging mode is most notable. The reason why such large IR intensity enhancements are seen for these particular vibrational modes is examined.

  11. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  12. Charge transfer on the metallic atom-pair bond, and the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, T; Seshubai, V

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued in our recent papers that the heat of formation of intermetallic compounds is mostly concentrated in the nearest neighbor unlike atom-pair bonds, and that the positive term in Miedema's equation is associated with charge transfer on the bond to maintain electroneutrality. In this paper, taking examples of some well populated crystal-structure types such as MgCu(2), AsNa(3), AuCu(3), MoSi(2) and SiCr(3) types, the effect of such charge transfer on the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds is examined. It is shown that the correlation between the observed size changes of atoms on alloying and their electronegativity differences is supportive of the idea of charge transfer between atoms. It is argued that the electronegativity and valence differences need to be of the required magnitude and direction to alter, through charge transfer, the elemental radius ratios R(A)/R(B) to the internal radius ratios r(A)/r(B) allowed by the structure types. Since the size change of atoms on alloying is highly correlated to how different R(A)/R(B) is from the ideal radius ratio for a structure type, the lattice parameters of intermetallic compounds can be predicted with excellent accuracy knowing R(A)/R(B). A practical application of the approach developed in our recent papers to superalloy design is presented.

  13. Orbital interactions and charge redistribution in weak hydrogen bonds: The Watson-Crick AT mimic adenine-2,4-difluorotoluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2003-08-01

    The discovery by Kool and co-workers that 2,4-difluorotoluene (F) mimics thymine (T) in DNA replication has led to a controversy about the question if this mimic has the capability of forming hydrogen bonds with adenine (A). In the present study, we address not only the question about the strengths of the hydrogen bonds in AF as compared to those in AT but we focus in particular on the nature of these interactions. Thus, we have analyzed AF and AT at the BP86/TZ2P level of density functional theory (DFT). In line with previous experience, this approach is shown to achieve close agreement with the available data from ab initio computations and experiment: the complexation energy of AF (-3.2 kcal/mol) is confirmed to be much weaker indeed than that of AT (-13.0 kcal/mol). Interestingly, the weak hydrogen bonds in AF still possess a significant orbital interaction component that resembles the situation for the more strongly bound AT, as follows from (1) an analysis of the orbital electronic structure of AF and AT, (2) a quantitative decomposition of the A-F and A-T bond energies, as well as (3) a quantitative decomposition of the charge redistribution associated with the A-F and A-T interactions based on the Voronoi deformation density (VDD) method. The VDD method has been further developed such that the charge redistribution ΔQ per atom can be decomposed into a component associated with the Pauli repulsive orbital interactions and a component associated with the bonding orbital interactions: ΔQ=ΔQPauli+ΔQoi. Implications of our findings for the mechanism of DNA replication are discussed.

  14. Adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on electro-acoustic solitary waves in an adiabatic dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    A dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged cold dust, adiabatic hot ions, and inertia-less adiabatic hot electrons has been considered. The adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on the basic properties of electro-acoustic solitary waves associated with different types of electro-acoustic (viz. ion-acoustic (IA), dust ion-acoustic (DIA), and dust acoustic (DA)) waves are thoroughly investigated by the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic properties of the IA, DIA, and DA waves are significantly modified by the adiabatic effects of ions and inertia-less electrons. The implications of our results in space and laboratory dusty plasmas are briefly discussed.

  15. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  16. Deactivation of 6-Aminocoumarin Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State through Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Krystkowiak, Ewa; Dobek, Krzysztof; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of the spectral (absorption and emission) and photophysical study of 6-aminocoumarin (6AC) in various aprotic hydrogen-bond forming solvents. It was established that solvent polarity as well as hydrogen-bonding ability influence solute properties. The hydrogen-bonding interactions between S1-electronic excited solute and solvent molecules were found to facilitate the nonradiative deactivation processes. The energy-gap dependence on radiationless deactivation in aprotic solvents was found to be similar to that in protic solvents. PMID:25244014

  17. High charge mobility in two-dimensional percolative networks of PbSe quantum dots connected by atomic bonds

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Wiel H.; Schins, Juleon M.; Aerts, Michiel; Kulkarni, Aditya; Capiod, Pierre; Berthe, Maxime; Grandidier, Bruno; Delerue, Christophe; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; van Overbeek, Carlo; Peters, Joep L.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Siebbeles, Laurens D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional networks of quantum dots connected by atomic bonds have an electronic structure that is distinct from that of arrays of quantum dots coupled by ligand molecules. We prepared atomically coherent two-dimensional percolative networks of PbSe quantum dots connected via atomic bonds. Here, we show that photoexcitation leads to generation of free charges that eventually decay via trapping. The charge mobility probed with an AC electric field increases with frequency from 150±15 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 0.2 terahertz to 260±15 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 0.6 terahertz. Gated four-probe measurements yield a DC electron mobility of 13±2 cm2 V−1 s−1. The terahertz mobilities are much higher than for arrays of quantum dots coupled via surface ligands and are similar to the highest DC mobilities reported for PbSe nanowires. The terahertz mobility increases only slightly with temperature in the range of 15–290 K. The extent of straight segments in the two-dimensional percolative networks limits the mobility, rather than charge scattering by phonons. PMID:26400049

  18. NMR Spectroscopic Characterization of Charge Assisted Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Brønsted Acid Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in Brønsted acid catalysis. However, the hydrogen bond properties responsible for the activation of the substrate are still under debate. Here, we report an in depth study of the properties and geometries of the hydrogen bonds in (R)-TRIP imine complexes (TRIP: 3,3′-Bis(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)-1,1′-binaphthyl-2,2′-diylhydrogen phosphate). From NMR spectroscopic investigations 1H and 15N chemical shifts, a Steiner–Limbach correlation, a deuterium isotope effect as well as quantitative values of 1JNH,2hJPH and 3hJPN were used to determine atomic distances (rOH, rNH, rNO) and geometry information. Calculations at SCS-MP2/CBS//TPSS-D3/def2-SVP-level of theory provided potential surfaces, atomic distances and angles. In addition, scalar coupling constants were computed at TPSS-D3/IGLO-III. The combined experimental and theoretical data reveal mainly ion pair complexes providing strong hydrogen bonds with an asymmetric single well potential. The geometries of the hydrogen bonds are not affected by varying the steric or electronic properties of the aromatic imines. Hence, the strong hydrogen bond reduces the degree of freedom of the substrate and acts as a structural anchor in the (R)-TRIP imine complex. PMID:27936674

  19. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  20. Surface Functionalization of Metal Nanoparticles by Conjugated Metal-Ligand Interfacial Bonds: Impacts on Intraparticle Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Limei; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-03

    Noble metal nanoparticles represent a unique class of functional nanomaterials with physical and chemical properties that deviate markedly from those of their atomic and bulk forms. In order to stabilize the nanoparticles and further manipulate the materials properties, surface functionalization with organic molecules has been utilized as a powerful tool. Among those, mercapto derivatives have been used extensively as the ligands of choice for nanoparticle surface functionalization by taking advantage of the strong affinity of thiol moieties to transition metal surfaces forming (polar) metal-thiolate linkages. Yet, the nanoparticle material properties are generally discussed within the context of the two structural components, the metal cores and the organic capping layers, whereas the impacts of the metal-sulfur interfacial bonds are largely ignored because of the lack of interesting chemistry. In recent years, it has been found that metal nanoparticles may also be functionalized by stable metal-carbon (or even -nitrogen) covalent bonds. Because of the formation of dπ-pπ interactions between the transition-metal nanoparticles and terminal carbon moieties, the interfacial resistance at the metal-ligand interface is markedly reduced, leading to the emergence of unprecedented optical and electronic properties. In this Account, we summarize recent progress in the studies of metal nanoparticles functionalized by conjugated metal-ligand interfacial bonds that include metal-carbene (M═C) and metal-acetylide (M-C≡)/metal-vinylidene (M═C═C) bonds. Such interfacial bonds are readily formed by ligand self-assembly onto nanoparticle metal cores. The resulting nanoparticles exhibit apparent intraparticle charge delocalization between the particle-bound functional moieties, leading to the emergence of optical and electronic properties that are analogous to those of their dimeric counterparts, as manifested in spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements. This is

  1. Charge-assisted triel bonding interactions in solid state chemistry: A combined computational and crystallographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauzá, Antonio; García-Llinás, Xavier; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    A combined energetic and geometric study of a series of triel bond complexes involving haloborane salts has been carried out at the M06-2X/def2-QZVPD level of theory. We have used 1-(dihaloboranyl)pyridin-1-ium compounds Py+BX2 (X = Cl, Br and I) as triel bond donors and Cl-, Br-, HCO2-, BF4- and ClO4- as electron donor moieties. In addition we have used Bader's theory of 'atoms in molecules' to further characterize the noncovalent interactions described herein. Finally, several examples were retrieved from the CSD (Cambridge Structural Database) in order to provide experimental support to the results presented in this work.

  2. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. This approach consists of two quantum phases, with some amount of classical preprocessing to set up the quantum problems. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. All quantum processing is strictly limited to two-qubit interactions so as to ensure physical feasibility. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation, with a specific example of the learning phase applied to a problem of interest in flight control systems. Beyond this example, the algorithm can be used to attack a broad class of anomaly detection problems.

  3. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules. PMID:27577323

  4. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules.

  5. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  6. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  7. Transient luminescence induced by electrical refilling of charge carrier traps of dislocation network at hydrophilically bonded Si wafers interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, Anton; Vyvenko, Oleg

    2014-02-21

    Dislocation network (DN) at hydrophilically bonded Si wafers interface is placed in space charge region (SCR) of a Schottky diode at a depth of about 150 nm from Schottky electrode for simultaneous investigation of its electrical and luminescent properties. Our recently proposed pulsed traps refilling enhanced luminescence (Pulsed-TREL) technique based on the effect of transient luminescence induced by refilling of charge carrier traps with electrical pulses is further developed and used as a tool to establish DN energy levels responsible for D1 band of dislocation-related luminescence in Si (DRL). In present work we do theoretical analysis and simulation of traps refilling kinetics dependence on refilling pulse magnitude (Vp) in two levels model: shallow and deep. The influence of initial charge state of deep level on shallow level occupation-Vp dependence is discussed. Characteristic features predicted by simulations are used for Pulsed-TREL experimental results interpretation. We conclude that only shallow (∼0.1 eV from conduction and valence band) energetic levels in the band gap participate in D1 DRL.

  8. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  9. S···O chalcogen bonding in sulfa drugs: insights from multipole charge density and X-ray wavefunction of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sajesh P; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Guru Row, T N

    2015-10-14

    Experimental charge density analysis combined with the quantum crystallographic technique of X-ray wavefunction refinement (XWR) provides quantitative insights into the intra- and intermolecular interactions formed by acetazolamide, a diuretic drug. Firstly, the analysis of charge density topology at the intermolecular level shows the presence of exceptionally strong interaction motifs such as a DDAA-AADD (D-donor, A-acceptor) type quadruple hydrogen bond motif and a sulfonamide dimer synthon. The nature and strength of intra-molecular S···O chalcogen bonding have been characterized using descriptors from the multipole model (MM) and XWR. Although pure geometrical criteria suggest the possibility of two intra-molecular S···O chalcogen bonded ring motifs, only one of them satisfies the "orbital geometry" so as to exhibit an interaction in terms of an electron density bond path and a bond critical point. The presence of 'σ-holes' on the sulfur atom leading to the S···O chalcogen bond has been visualized on the electrostatic potential surface and Laplacian isosurfaces close to the 'reactive surface'. The electron localizability indicator (ELI) and Roby bond orders derived from the 'experimental wave function' provide insights into the nature of S···O chalcogen bonding.

  10. Bond Dissociation Energies of the Tungsten Fluorides and Their Singly-Charged Ions: A Density Functional Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The dissociation of WF6 and the related singly-charged cations and anions into the lower fluorides and fluorine atoms has been investigated theoretically using density functional theory (B3LYP) and relativistic effective core potentials, with estimates of spin-orbit effects included using a simple model. The inclusion of spin-orbit is essential for a correct description of the thermochemistry. The total atomization energy of the neutral and anionic WF6 is reproduced to within 25 kcal/mol, but comparison of individual bond dissociation energies with available experimental data shows discrepancies of up to 10 kcal/mol. The results are nevertheless useful to help resolve discrepancies in experimental data and provide estimates of missing data.

  11. Molecular tectonics: control of reversible water release in porous charge-assisted H-bonded networks.

    PubMed

    Dechambenoit, Pierre; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2008-12-17

    The combinations of bisamidium dicationic tectons 1-2H+ and 2-2H+ bearing two OH groups as additional H-bond donor/acceptor sites with [M(CN)6](3-)2 (M = Fe, Co, Cr) anions lead to the formation of robust porous crystals (decomposition temperature in the range of 240-300 degrees C) offering channels occupied by water molecules. The release and uptake of solvent molecules takes place through a reversible single crystal-to-single crystal transformation. Importantly, the temperature of dehydration can be increased by ca 40 degrees C through the decoration of the channels by introduction of OH groups on the backbone of the organic tecton.

  12. Adsorption of charged and neutral polymer chains on silica surfaces: The role of electrostatics, volume exclusion, and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruijt, Evan; Biesheuvel, P. M.; de Vos, Wiebe M.

    2015-01-01

    We develop an off-lattice (continuum) model to describe the adsorption of neutral polymer chains and polyelectrolytes to surfaces. Our continuum description allows taking excluded volume interactions between polymer chains and ions directly into account. To implement those interactions, we use a modified hard-sphere equation of state, adapted for mixtures of connected beads. Our model is applicable to neutral, charged, and ionizable surfaces and polymer chains alike and accounts for polarizability effects of the adsorbed layer and chemical interactions between polymer chains and the surface. We compare our model predictions to data of a classical system for polymer adsorption: neutral poly(N -vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) on silica surfaces. The model shows that PVP adsorption on silica is driven by surface hydrogen bonding with an effective maximum binding energy of about 1.3 kBT per PVP segment at low p H . As the p H increases, the Si-OH groups become increasingly dissociated, leading to a lower capacity for H bonding and simultaneous counterion accumulation and volume exclusion close to the surface. Together these effects result in a characteristic adsorption isotherm, with the adsorbed amount dropping sharply at a critical p H . Using this model for adsorption data on silica surfaces cleaned by either a piranha solution or an O2 plasma, we find that the former have a significantly higher density of silanol groups.

  13. Chemical bonding and charge redistribution - Valence band and core level correlations for the Ni/Si, Pd/Si, and Pt/Si systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Madhukar, A.

    1982-01-01

    Via a systematic study of the correlation between the core and valence level X-ray photoemission spectra, the nature of the chemical bonding and charge redistribution for bulk transition metal silicides has been examined. Particular emphasis is placed on Pt2Si and PtSi. It is observed that the strength of the metal (d)-silicon (p) interaction increases in the order Ni2Si, Pd2Si, Pt2Si. It is also observed that both the metal and silicon core lines shift to higher binding energy as the silicides are formed. The notion of charge redistribution for metallic bonds is invoked to explain these data.

  14. Interactions between free radicals and a graphene fragment: physical versus chemical bonding, charge transfer, and deformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengting T; Chen, Lei; Tian, Chuanjin J; Meng, Yan; Wang, Zhigang G; Zhang, Ruiqin Q; Jin, Mingxing X; Zhang, Ping; Ding, Dajun J

    2011-11-30

    The adsorption of six free radicals (FRs) respectively on a graphene fragment was studied using a density functional tight-binding method with the inclusion of an empirical dispersion term in total energy. The results indicate that the different interaction paths between the FRs and the graphene lead to different forms of physical (PA) or chemical adsorptions (CA). The CA appears only in the condition where some of the nonhydrogen atoms are closer to the graphene, with the deformation occurring in the latter. The charge transfer increases with the increase in adsorption energy in every FR-graphene system. Although the deformation in the graphene is negligible in all PA cases, the FR is closer to the graphene and the graphene deformation is clearer in all CA cases, with all atomic displacements being larger than 0.1 Å. Our findings are useful not only for FR scavenging but also for studying the interaction between general molecules and material surfaces.

  15. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  16. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  17. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E.; Terrabuio, Luiz A.; Haiduke, Roberto L. A.

    2014-02-28

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching of the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions alone

  18. Proteins in vacuo: A molecular dynamics study of the unfolding behavior of highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme subjected to a temperature pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, C. T.; Velázquez, I.; Bittner, M.; Tapia, O.

    1999-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to interpret a variety of experimental data on highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme in vacuo. The simulation approach involved submitting a model of the protein [Reimann, Velázquez, and Tapia, J. Phys. Chem. B 102, 9344 (1998)] in a given charge state to a 3-ns-long heat pulse (usually at 500 K) followed by cooling or relaxation for 1 ns back to room temperature (293 K). This treatment yielded a charge threshold around Q0=8+ for obtaining significant unfolding, as indicated by an enhancement in collision cross section and conformer length. The collision cross sections and lengths theoretically obtained, along with the threshold charge state for initiating unfolding, were compatible with experimental results on lysozyme in vacuo. The unfolded, highly elongated conformations obtained for Q>=9+ displayed a significant level of non-native β-sheet content which appeared to be additionally stabilized by charge self-solvation.

  19. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  20. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  1. Magnetic susceptibility of alkali-tetracyanoquinodimethane salts and extended Hubbard models with bond order and charge density wave phases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Topham, Benjamin J; Yu, RuiHui; Ha, Quoc Binh Dang; Soos, Zoltán G

    2011-06-21

    The molar spin susceptibilities χ(T) of Na-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), K-TCNQ, and Rb-TCNQ(II) are fit quantitatively to 450 K in terms of half-filled bands of three one-dimensional Hubbard models with extended interactions using exact results for finite systems. All three models have bond order wave (BOW) and charge density wave (CDW) phases with boundary V = V(c)(U) for nearest-neighbor interaction V and on-site repulsion U. At high T, all three salts have regular stacks of TCNQ(-) anion radicals. The χ(T) fits place Na and K in the CDW phase and Rb(II) in the BOW phase with V ≈ V(c). The Na and K salts have dimerized stacks at T < T(d) while Rb(II) has regular stacks at 100 K. The χ(T) analysis extends to dimerized stacks and to dimerization fluctuations in Rb(II). The three models yield consistent values of U, V, and transfer integrals t for closely related TCNQ(-) stacks. Model parameters based on χ(T) are smaller than those from optical data that in turn are considerably reduced by electronic polarization from quantum chemical calculation of U, V, and t of adjacent TCNQ(-) ions. The χ(T) analysis shows that fully relaxed states have reduced model parameters compared to optical or vibration spectra of dimerized or regular TCNQ(-) stacks.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation and computational analysis of charge transfer hydrogen bonded reaction between 3-aminoquinoline with chloranilic acid in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M.; Alenezi, Maha S.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.

    2015-10-01

    Charge transfer hydrogen bonded reaction between the electron donor (proton acceptor) 3-aminoquinoline with the electron acceptor (proton donor) chloranilic acid (H2CA) has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work included the application of UV-vis spectroscopy to identify the charge transfer band of the formed complex, its molecular composition as well as estimating its formation constants in different solvent included acetonitrile (AN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and chloroform (CHL). It has been recorded the presence of new absorption bands in the range 500-550 nm attributing to the formed complex. The molecular composition of the HBCT complex was found to be 1:1 (donor:acceptor) in all studied solvents based on continuous variation and photometric titration methods. In addition, the calculated formation constants from Benesi-Hildebrand equation recorded high values, especially in chloroform referring to the formation of stable HBCT complex. Infrared spectroscopy has been applied for the solid complex where formation of charge and proton transfer was proven in it. Moreover, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies were used to characterize the formed complex where charge and proton transfers were reconfirmed. Computational analysis included the use of GAMESS computations as a package of ChemBio3D Ultr12 program were applied for energy minimization and estimation of the stabilization energy for the produced complex. Also, geometrical parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) of the formed HBCT complex were computed and analyzed. Furthermore, Mullikan atomic charges, molecular potential energy surface, HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals as well as assignment of the electronic spectra of the formed complex were presented. A full agreement between experimental and computational analysis has been found especially in the existence of the charge and proton transfers and the assignment of HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals in the formed complex as

  3. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  4. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential

  5. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartocci, Alessio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl4 and CF4. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl4 and Ng-CF4 and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF4, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl4, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the

  6. Adiabatic Betatron deceleration of ionospheric charged particles: a new explanation for (i) the rapid outflow of ionospheric O ions, and for (ii) the increase of plasma mass density observed in magnetospheric flux tubes during main phases of geomagnetic s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph; Pierrard, Viviane; Darrouzet, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Using European arrays of magnetometers and the cross-phase analysis to determine magnetic field line resonance frequencies, it has been found by Kale et al. (2009) that the plasma mass density within plasmaspheric flux tubes increased rapidly after the SSC of the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms. These observations tend to confirm other independent experimental results, suggesting that heavy ion up-flow from the ionosphere is responsible for the observed plasma density increases during main phases of geomagnetic storms. The aim of our contribution is to point out that, during main phases, reversible Betatron effect induced by the increase of the southward Dst-magnetic field component (|Δ Bz|), diminishes slightly the perpendicular kinetic energy (W?) of charged particles spiraling along field lines. Furthermore, due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant (μ = Wm/ Bm) the mirror points of all ionospheric ions and electrons are lifted up to higher altitudes i.e. where the mirror point magnetic field (Bm) is slightly smaller. Note that the change of the mirror point altitude is given by: Δ hm = -1/3 (RE + hm) Δ Bm / Bm. It is independent of the ion species and it does not depend of their kinetic energy. The change of kinetic energy is determined by: Δ Wm = Wm Δ Bm / Bm. Both of these equations have been verified numerically by Lemaire et al. (2005; doi: 10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00099-1) using trajectory calculations in a simple time-dependant B-field model: i.e. the Earth's magnetic dipole, plus an increasing southward B-field component: i.e. the Dst magnetic field whose intensity becomes more and more negative during the main phase of magnetic storms. They showed that a variation of Bz (or Dst) by more than - 50 nT significantly increases the mirror point altitudes by more than 100 km which is about equal to scale height of the plasma density in the topside ionosphere where particles are almost collisionless (see Fig. 2 in Lemaire et al., 2005

  7. Rational Design of Charge-Transfer Interactions in Halogen-Bonded Co-crystals toward Versatile Solid-State Optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weigang; Zheng, Renhui; Zhen, Yonggang; Yu, Zhenyi; Dong, Huanli; Fu, Hongbing; Shi, Qiang; Hu, Wenping

    2015-09-02

    Charge-transfer (CT) interactions between donor (D) and acceptor (A) groups, as well as CT exciton dynamics, play important roles in optoelectronic devices, such as organic solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting sources, which are not yet well understood. In this contribution, the self-assembly behavior, molecular stacking structure, CT interactions, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and corresponding physicochemical properties of two similar halogen-bonded co-crystals are comprehensively investigated and compared, to construct an "assembly-structure-CT-property" relationship. Bpe-IFB wire-like crystals (where Bpe = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene and IFB = 1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene), packed in a segregated stacking form with CT ground and excited states, are measured to be quasi-one-dimensional (1D) semiconductors and show strong violet-blue photoluminescence (PL) from the lowest CT1 excitons (ΦPL = 26.1%), which can be confined and propagate oppositely along the 1D axial direction. In comparison, Bpe-F4DIB block-like crystals (F4DIB = 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene), packed in a mixed stacking form without CT interactions, are determined to be insulators and exhibit unique white light emission and two-dimensional optical waveguide property. Surprisingly, it seems that the intrinsic spectroscopic states of Bpe and F4DIB do not change after co-crystallization, which is also confirmed by theoretical calculations, thus offering a new design principle for white light emitting materials. More importantly, we show that the CT interactions in co-crystals are related to their molecular packing and can be triggered or suppressed by crystal engineering, which eventually leads to distinct optoelectronic properties. These results help us to rationally control the CT interactions in organic D-A systems by tuning the molecular stacking, toward the development of a fantastic "optoelectronic world".

  8. The polar 2e/12c bond in phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl hetero-dimers: Stronger stacking interaction and fascinating interlayer charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of chemists have focused on the two-electron/multicenter bond (2e/mc) that was first introduced to interpret the bonding mechanism of radical dimers. Herein, we report the polar two-electron/twelve center (2e/12c) bonding character in a series of phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl radical hetero-dimers. Interestingly, the bonding energy of weaker polar hetero-dimer (P-TAP) is dominated by the overlap of the two different singly occupied molecular orbital of radicals, while that of stronger polar hetero-dimer (P-HAP) is dominated by the electrostatic attraction. Results show that the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers plays a prominent role in the essential attribution of the polar 2e/12c bond. Correspondingly, a stronger stacking interaction in the hetero-dimer could be effectively achieved by increasing the difference of nitrogen atoms number between the monomers. It is worthy of note that an interesting interlayer charge transfer character is induced in the polar hetero-dimers, which is dependent on the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers. It is our expectation that the new knowledge about the bonding nature of radical hetero-dimers might provide important information for designing radical based functional materials with various applications.

  9. Effect of Charge State on Polymeric Bonding Geometry: The Ground State of Na{sub 2}RbC{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Bendele, G.M.; Stephens, P.W.; Stephens, P.W.; Prassides, K.; Vavekis, K.; Kordatos, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have predicted all fullerene polymers to have interfullerene connections via [2+2] cycloaddition. We find that the ground state of Na{sub 2}RbC{sub 60} is a one-dimensional polymer of fullerene molecules connected by {ital single} carbon-carbon bonds. We discuss and exclude possible steric and kinetic reasons for this discrepancy. Our results imply that it is the charge state of the fullerene molecule that drives the bonding mechanism, causing (C{sup 1{minus}}{sub 60}){sub n} and neutral (C{sub 60}){sub n} to favor cycloaddition and (C{sup 3{minus}}{sub 60}){sub n} to favor single carbon-carbon bonds. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Charge redistribution and a shortening of the Fe--As bond at the quantum critical point of SmO1-xFxFeAs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Dong, Peng; Xu, Wei; Liu, Shengli; Chu, Wangsheng; Chen, Xianhui; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-07-01

    Many researchers have pointed out that there is a quantum critical point (QCP) in the F-doped SmOFeAs system. In this paper, the electronic structure and local structure of the superconductive FeAs layer in SmO(1-x)FxFeAs as a function of the F-doping concentration have been investigated using Fe and As K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Experiments performed on the X-ray absorption near-edge structure showed that in the vicinity of the QCP the intensity of the pre-edge feature at the Fe-edge decreases continuously, while there is a striking rise of the shoulder-peak at the As edge, suggesting the occurrence of charge redistribution near the QCP. Further analysis on the As K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure demonstrated that the charge redistribution originates mostly from a shortening of the Fe-As bond at the QCP. An evident relationship between the mysterious QCP and the fundamental Fe-As bond was established, providing new insights on the interplay between QCP, charge dynamics and the local structural Fe-As bond in Fe-based superconductors.

  11. Fingerprints of Through-Bond and Through-Space Exciton and Charge π-Electron Delocalization in Linearly Extended [2.2]Paracyclophanes.

    PubMed

    Zafra, José L; Molina Ontoria, Agustín; Mayorga Burrezo, Paula; Peña-Alvarez, Miriam; Samoc, Marek; Szeremeta, Janusz; Ramírez, Francisco J; Lovander, Matthew D; Droske, Christopher J; Pappenfus, Ted M; Echegoyen, Luis; López Navarrete, Juan T; Martín, Nazario; Casado, Juan

    2017-03-01

    New stilbenoid and thiophenic compounds terminally functionalized with donor-donor, acceptor-acceptor, or donor-acceptor moieties and possessing a central [2.2]paracyclophane unit have been prepared, and their properties interpreted in terms of through-bond and through space π-electron delocalization (i.e., π-conjugations). Based on photophysical data, their excited-state properties have been described with a focus on the participation of the central [2.2]paracyclophane in competition with through-bond conjugation in the side arms. To this end, two-photon and one-photon absorption and emission spectroscopy, as a function of temperature, solvent polarity, and pressure in the solid state have been recorded. Furthermore, charge delocalization through the [2.2]paracyclophane in the neutral state and in the oxidized species (radical cations, dications and radical trications) has been investigated, allowing the elucidation of the vibrational Raman fingerprint of through-space charge delocalization. Thus, a complementary approach to both "intermolecular" excitation and charge delocalizations in [2.2]paracyclophane molecules is shown which can serve as models of charge and exciton migration in organic semiconductors.

  12. Charge transfer and polarization for chloride ions bound in ClC transport proteins: natural bond orbital and energy decomposition analyses.

    PubMed

    Church, Jonathan; Pezeshki, Soroosh; Davis, Christal; Lin, Hai

    2013-12-19

    ClC transport proteins show a distinct "broken-helix" architecture, in which certain α-helices are oriented with their N-terminal ends pointed toward the binding sites where the chloride ions are held extensively by the backbone amide nitrogen atoms from the helices. To understand the effectiveness of such binding structures, we carried out natural bond orbital analysis and energy decomposition analysis employing truncated active-site model systems for the bound chloride ions along the translocation pore of the EcClC proteins. Our results indicated that the chloride ions are stabilized in such a binding environment by electrostatic, polarization, and charge-transfer interactions with the backbone and a few side chains. Up to ~25% of the formal charges of the chloride ions were found smeared out to the surroundings primarily via charge transfer from the chloride's lone pair n(Cl) orbitals to the protein's antibonding σ*(N-H) or σ*(O-H) orbitals; those σ* orbitals are localized at the polar N-H and O-H bonds in the chloride's first solvation shells formed by the backbone amide groups and the side chains of residues Ser107, Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. Polarizations by the chloride ions were dominated by the redistribution of charge densities among the π orbitals and lone pair orbitals of the protein atoms, in particular the atoms of the backbone peptide links and of the side chains of Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. The substantial amounts of electron density involved in charge transfer and in polarization were consistent with the large energetic contributions by the two processes revealed by the energy decomposition analysis. The significant polarization and charge-transfer effects may have impacts on the mechanisms and dynamics of the chloride transport by the ClC proteins.

  13. Arbitrary amplitude electro-acoustic solitary waves in an adiabatic dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    The properties of different types of electro-acoustic (namely ion-acoustic (IA), dust ion-acoustic (DIA), and dust-acoustic (DA)) solitary waves (SWs) in an adiabatic dusty plasma (containing negatively charged cold dust, adiabatic hot ions and inertia-less adiabatic hot electrons) are investigated by the pseudo-potential approach. The combined effects of the adiabatic electrons and ions, and negatively charged dust on the basic properties (critical Mach number, amplitude and width) of the arbitrary amplitude electro-acoustic SWs are systematically and explicitly examined. It is found that the combined effects of the adiabatic electrons and ions, and negatively charged dust significantly modify the basic properties (critical Mach number, amplitude and width) of the SWs. It is also found that due to the effect of the adiabaticity of electrons, the negative DIA SWs (which are found to exist in a dusty plasma containing isothermal electrons, cold ions and negatively charged static dust) disappear, i.e. due to the effect of adiabatic electrons, one cannot have negative DIA SWs for any possible set of dusty plasma parameters.

  14. A new analysis of charge transfer and polarization for ligand-metal bonding - Model studies of Al4CO and Al4NH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagus, P. S.; Hermann, K.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the bonding of CO and NH3 ligands to Al is analyzed, and the intra-unit charge polarization and inter-unit donation for the interaction of ligands with metals are studied. The consequences of metal-to-ligand and ligand-to-metal charge transfer are separately considered by performing a constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) with the electrons of the metal member of the complex in the field of frozen ligand. The electrons of the metal atoms are then frozen in the relaxed distribution given by the CSOV SCF wave function and the ligand electrons are allowed to relax. Quantitative measures of the importance of inter-unit charge transfers and intra-unit polarization are obtained using results of SCF studies of Al4CO and Al4NH3 clusters chosen to simulate the adsorption of the ligands at an on-top side of the Al(111) surface. The electrostatic attraction of the effective dipole moments of the metal and ligand units makes an important contribution to the bond.

  15. Hydrogen bonding and induced dipole moments in water: predictions from the Gaussian charge polarizable model and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Peter J; Cummings, Peter T

    2006-10-14

    We compare a new classical water model, which features Gaussian charges and polarizability (GCPM) with ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations. We compare the total dipole moment, the total dipole moment distribution, and degree of hydrogen bonding at ambient to supercritical conditions. We also compared the total dipole moment calculated from both the electron density (partitioning the electron density among molecules based on a zero electron flux condition), and from the center of localized Wannier function centers (WFCs). Compared to CPMD, we found that GCPM overpredicts the dipole moment derived by partitioning the electron density and underpredicts that obtained from the WFCs, but exhibits similar trends and distribution of values. We also found that GCPM predicted similar degrees of hydrogen bonding compared to CPMD and has a similar structure.

  16. Collision-induced dissociation of fatty acid [M - 2H + Na]- ions: charge-directed fragmentation and assignment of double bond position.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Altvater, Jens; Gallagher, Thomas J; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2014-11-01

    The collision-induced dissociation (CID) of cationic fatty acid-metal ion complexes has been extensively studied and, in general, provides rich structural information. In particular, charge-remote fragmentation processes are commonly observed allowing the assignment of double bond position. In a previous manuscript, we presented two methods to doubly deprotonate polyunsaturated fatty acids to form anionic fatty acid-sodium ion complexes, referred to as [M - 2H + Na] (-) ions. In the current manuscript, the CID behavior of these [M - 2H + Na] (-) ions is investigated for the first time. Significantly, we also present a deuterium-labeling experiment, which excludes the possibility that deprotonation occurs predominately at the α-carbon in the formation of fatty acid [M - H + NaF](-) ions. This supports our original proposal where deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic positions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. CID spectra of polyunsaturated fatty acid [M - 2H + Na](-) ions display abundant product ions arising from acyl chain cleavages. Through the examination of fatty acid isomers, it is demonstrated that double bond position may be unequivocally determined for methylene-interrupted polyunsaturated fatty acids with three or more carbon-carbon double bonds. In addition, CID of [M - 2H + Na](-) ions was applied to 18:3 isomers of Nannochloropsis oculata and three isomers were tentatively identified: ∆(9,12,15)18:3, ∆(6,9,12)18:3, and ∆(5,8,11)18:3. We propose that structurally-informative product ions are formed via charge-driven fragmentation processes at the site of the resonance-stabilized carbanion as opposed to charge-remote fragmentation processes, which could be inferred if deprotonation occurred predominately at the α-carbon.

  17. Effect of solvent hydrogen bonding on the photophysical properties of intramolecular charge transfer probe trans-ethyl p-(dimethylamino) cinamate and its derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, T. Sanjoy; Moyon, N. S.; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2009-08-01

    Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) behavior of trans-ethyl p-(dimethylamino) cinamate (EDAC) and 4-(dimethylamino) cinnamic acid (DMACA) were studied by steady state absorption and emission, picosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments in various pure and mixed solvent systems. The large fluorescence spectral shift in more polar solvents indicates an efficient charge transfer from the donor site to the acceptor moiety in the excited state compared to the ground state. The energy for 0,0 transition ( ν0,0) for EDAC shows very good linear correlation with static solvent dielectric property; however, fluorescence emission maximum, stokes shift and fluorescence quantum yield show significant deviation from linearity in polar protic solvents, indicating a large contribution of solvent hydrogen bonding on the excited state relaxation mechanism. A quantitative estimation of contribution from different solvatochromic parameters was made using linear free energy relationship based on Kamlet-Taft equation.

  18. Molecular structure, natural bond analysis, vibrational and electronic spectra, surface enhanced Raman scattering and Mulliken atomic charges of the normal modes of [Mn(DDTC)2] complex.

    PubMed

    Téllez S, Claudio A; Costa, Anilton C; Mondragón, M A; Ferreira, Glaucio B; Versiane, O; Rangel, J L; Lima, G Müller; Martin, A A

    2016-12-05

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned for the Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Mn(II) complex, [Mn(DDTC)2]. The calculations have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, second derivative spectra and band deconvolution analysis. The UV-vis experimental spectra were measured in acetonitrile solution, and the calculated electronic spectrum was obtained using the TD/B3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set for all atoms. Charge transfer bands and those d-d spin forbidden were assigned in the UV-vis spectrum. The natural bond orbital analysis was carried out using the DFT/B3LYP method and the Mn(II) hybridization leading to the planar geometry of the framework was discussed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was also performed. Mulliken charges of the normal modes were obtained and related to the SERS enhanced bands.

  19. Molecular structure, natural bond analysis, vibrational and electronic spectra, surface enhanced Raman scattering and Mulliken atomic charges of the normal modes of [Mn(DDTC)2] complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez S., Claudio A.; Costa, Anilton C.; Mondragón, M. A.; Ferreira, Glaucio B.; Versiane, O.; Rangel, J. L.; Lima, G. Müller; Martin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned for the Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Mn(II) complex, [Mn(DDTC)2]. The calculations have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, second derivative spectra and band deconvolution analysis. The UV-vis experimental spectra were measured in acetonitrile solution, and the calculated electronic spectrum was obtained using the TD/B3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set for all atoms. Charge transfer bands and those d-d spin forbidden were assigned in the UV-vis spectrum. The natural bond orbital analysis was carried out using the DFT/B3LYP method and the Mn(II) hybridization leading to the planar geometry of the framework was discussed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was also performed. Mulliken charges of the normal modes were obtained and related to the SERS enhanced bands.

  20. The Floquet Adiabatic Theorem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Davidson, Shainen; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2015-03-01

    The existance of the adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems has been the subject of an active debate with different articles reaching opposite conclusions over the years. In this talk we clarify the situation by deriving a systematic expansion in the time-derivatives of a slow parameter for the occupation probabilities of the Floque states. Our analysis shows that the in a certain limit the transition between Floquet eigenstates are suppressed and it is possible to define an adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems. Crucially we observe however that the conditions for adiabaticity in ordinary and Floquet systems are different and that this difference can become important when the amplitude of the periodic driving is large. We illustrate our results with specific examples of a periodically driven harmonic oscillator and cold atoms in optical lattices which are relevant in current experiments.

  1. Adiabatic losses in Stirling refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauwens, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Stirling cycle has been used very effectively in cryocoolers; but efficiencies relative to the Carnot limit are typically observed to peak for absolute temperature ratios of about two, which makes it less suitable for low-life refrigeration. The adiabatic loss appears to be responsible for poor performance at small temperature differences. In this paper, adiabatic losses are evaluated, for a temperature ratio of 2/3, taking into account the effect of phase angle between pistons, of volume ratio, of the distribution of the dead volume necessary to reduce the volume ratio, and of the distribution of displacement between expansion and compression spaces. The study is carried out numerically, using an adiabatic Stirling engine model in which cylinder flow is assumed to be stratified. Results show that the best location for the cylinder dead volume is on the compression side. Otherwise, all strategies used to trade off refrigeration for coefficient of performance are found to be roughly equivalent.

  2. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  3. Hydrogen-Bond Networks: Strengths of Different Types of Hydrogen Bonds and An Alternative to the Low Barrier Hydrogen-Bond Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Yanping; O'Doherty, George A.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2013-11-27

    We report quantifying the strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen bond networks (HBNs) via measurement of the adiabatic electron detachment energy of the conjugate base of a small covalent polyol model compound (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) in the gas phase and the pKa of the corresponding acid in DMSO. The latter result reveals that the hydrogen bonds to the charged center and those that are one solvation shell further away (i.e., primary and secondary) provide 5.3 and 2.5 pKa units of stabilization per hydrogen bond in DMSO. Computations indicate that these energies increase to 8.4 and 3.9 pKa units in benzene and that the total stabilizations are 16 (DMSO) and 25 (benzene) pKa units. Calculations on a larger linear heptaol (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) reveal that the terminal hydroxyl groups each contribute 0.6 pKa units of stabilization in DMSO and 1.1 pKa units in benzene. All of these results taken together indicate that the presence of a charged center can provide a powerful energetic driving force for enzyme catalysis and conformational changes such as in protein folding due to multiple hydrogen bonds in a HBN.

  4. Hydrogen-bond networks: strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds and an alternative to the low barrier hydrogen-bond proposal.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Yanping; O'Doherty, George A; Wang, Xue-Bin; Kass, Steven R

    2013-11-27

    We report quantifying the strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen-bond networks (HBNs) via measurement of the adiabatic electron detachment energy of the conjugate base of a small covalent polyol model compound (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) in the gas phase and the pKa of the corresponding acid in DMSO. The latter result reveals that the hydrogen bonds to the charged center and those that are one solvation shell further away (i.e., primary and secondary) provide 5.3 and 2.5 pKa units of stabilization per hydrogen bond in DMSO. Computations indicate that these energies increase to 8.4 and 3.9 pKa units in benzene and that the total stabilizations are 16 (DMSO) and 25 (benzene) pKa units. Calculations on a larger linear heptaol (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) reveal that the terminal hydroxyl groups each contribute 0.6 pKa units of stabilization in DMSO and 1.1 pKa units in benzene. All of these results taken together indicate that the presence of a charged center can provide a powerful energetic driving force for enzyme catalysis and conformational changes such as in protein folding due to multiple hydrogen bonds in a HBN.

  5. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  6. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  7. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  8. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  9. Effects of genetic replacements of charged and H-bonding residues in the retinal pocket on Ca2+ binding to deionized bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y N; el-Sayed, M A; Bonet, M L; Lanyi, J K; Chang, M; Ni, B; Needleman, R

    1993-01-01

    Metal cations are known to be required for proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin (bR). Previous studies found that bR has two high-affinity and four to six low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites. In our efforts to find the location of these Ca2+ sites, the effects of replacing charged (Asp-85, Asp-212, and Arg-82) and H-bonding (Tyr-185) residues in the retinal pocket on the color control and binding affinity of Ca2+ ions in Ca(2+)-regenerated bR were examined. The important results are as follows: (i) The removal of Ca2+ from recombinant bR in which charged residues were replaced by neutral ones shifted the retinal absorption to the blue, opposite to that observed in wild-type bR or in recombinant bR in which the H-bonding residue, Tyr-185, was replaced by a non-H-bonding amino acid (Phe). (ii) Similar to the observation in wild-type bR, the binding of Ca2+ to the second site gave the observed color change in the recombinant bR samples in which charged residues were replaced by neutral ones. (iii) The residue replacements had no effect on the affinity constants of the four to six weakly bound Ca2+. (iv) The two high-affinity sites exhibited reduced affinity with substitutions; while the extent of the reduction depended on the specific substitution, each site was reduced by the same factor for each of the charged residue substitutions but by different factors for the mutant where Tyr-185 was replaced with Phe(Y185F). The above results suggest that the two Ca2+ ions in the two high-affinity sites are within interaction distance with one another and with the charged residues in the retinal pocket. The results further suggest that, while the interaction between Tyr-185 and the high-affinity Ca2+ ions is relatively short range and specific (with more coupling to the Ca2+ ion in the second affinity site), between the charged residues and Ca2+ ions it seems to be of the electrostatic (e.g., ion-ion) long range, nonspecific type. Although neither Asp-85, Asp-212, nor Arg-82 is

  10. Electronic structure, bonding, charge distribution, and x-ray absorption spectra of the (001) surfaces of fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulis, Paul; Yao, Hongzhi; Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.

    2007-12-01

    Fluorapatite (FAP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) are two very important bioceramic crystals. The (001) surfaces of FAP and HAP crystals are studied by ab initio density functional calculations using a supercell slab geometry. It is shown that in both crystals, the O-terminated (001) surface is more stable with calculated surface energies of 0.865 and 0.871J/m2 for FAP and HAP, respectively. In FAP, the two surfaces are symmetric. In HAP, the orientation of the OH group along the c axis reduces the symmetry such that the top and bottom surfaces are no longer symmetric. It is revealed that the atoms near the surface and subsurface are significantly relaxed especially in the case of HAP. The largest relaxations occurred via the lateral movements of the O ions at the subsurface level. The electronic structures of the surface models in the form of layer-by-layer resolved partial density of states for all the atoms show systematic variation from the surface region toward the bulk region. The calculated Mulliken effective charge on each type of atom and the bond order values between cations (Ca, P) and anions (O, F) show different charge transfers and bond strength variations from the bulk crystal values. Electron charge density calculations show that the surfaces of both FAP and HAP crystals are mostly positively charged due to the presence of Ca ions at the surface. The positively charged surfaces have implications for the absorption on apatite surfaces of water and other organic molecules in an aqueous environment which are an important part of its bioactivity. The x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra ( Ca-K , O-K , F-K , P-K , and P-L3 edges) of both the surface models and the bulk crystals are calculated and compared. The calculations use a supercell approach which takes into account the electron-core-hole interaction. It is shown that the site-specific XANES spectra show significant differences between atoms near the surface and in the bulk and are very

  11. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  12. A study of vibrational spectra and investigations of charge transfer and chemical bonding features of 2-chloro benzimidazole based on DFT computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthunatesan, S.; Ragavendran, V.

    2015-01-01

    Benzimidazoles are bicyclic heteroatomic molecules. Polycyclic heteroatomic molecules have extensive coupling of different modes leading to strong coupling of force constants associated with the various chemical bonds of the molecules. To carry out a detailed vibrational spectroscopic analysis of such a bicyclic heteroatomic molecule, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-chloro benzimidazole (CBZ) have been recorded in the condensed phase. Density Functional Theory calculations in the B3LYP/6-31G* level have been carried out to determine the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies. In order to obtain a close agreement between theoretical and observed frequencies and hence to perform a reliable assignment, the theoretical DFT force field was transformed from Cartesian to local symmetry co-ordinates and then scaled empirically using SQM methodology. The SQM treatment resulted in a RMS deviation of 9.4 cm-1. For visual comparison, the observed and calculated spectra are presented on a common wavenumber scale. From the NBO analysis, the electron density (ED) charge transfers in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies E(2) confirms the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The calculated Homo and Lumo energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The results obtained from the vibrational, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analyses have been properly tabulated.

  13. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, natural bond orbitals and Mulliken atomic charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex, [Cd(DDTC)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez Soto, C. A.; Costa, A. C.; Versiane, O.; Lemma, T.; Machado, N. C. F.; Mondragón, M. A.; Martin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned to the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Cd(II) complex, abbreviated as ([Cd(DDTC)2]). The calculations and spectral interpretation have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, infrared and Raman second derivative spectra, and band deconvolution analysis to assist in the assignment of observed fundamentals. This study validated the unusual pseudo tetrahedral molecular structure formed around the Cd(II) cation. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to determine the interactions of the normal-modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex on nano-structured silver surfaces. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to study the Cd(II) hybridization causing the pseudo tetrahedral geometry of the framework of the [Cd(DDTC)2] complex, and to confirm the charge transfer mechanisms through second order perturbation theory analysis of the Fox Matrix. In order to find out the electronic dispersion of the Mulliken atomic charges (MAC) in the normal modes, we calculated the MAC for each normal mode and correlated these values with the SERS effect. Experimental UV-Vis spectra were obtained and charge transfer bands were assigned. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values for the vibrational and UV-Vis spectra was obtained.

  14. Quantum chemical study on influence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the geometry, the atomic charges and the vibrational dynamics of 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parag; Bee, Saba; Gupta, Archana; Tandon, Poonam; Rastogi, V K; Mishra, Soni; Rawat, Poonam

    2014-01-01

    FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (4000-200 cm(-1)) spectral measurements on solid 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (2,6-DCBN) have been done. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features in the ground state have been calculated by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) level. A comparison between the calculated and the experimental results covering the molecular structure has been made. The assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes have been done on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED). To investigate the influence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the geometry, the charge distribution and the vibrational spectrum of 2,6-DCBN; calculations have been done for the monomer as well as the tetramer. The intermolecular interaction energies corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) have been calculated using counterpoise method. Based on these results, the correlations between the vibrational modes and the structure of the tetramer have been discussed. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) contour map has been plotted in order to predict how different geometries could interact. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis has been done for the chemical interpretation of hyperconjugative interactions and electron density transfer between occupied (bonding or lone pair) orbitals to unoccupied (antibonding or Rydberg) orbitals. UV spectrum was measured in methanol solution. The energies and oscillator strengths were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) and matched to the experimental findings. TD-DFT method has also been used for theoretically studying the hydrogen bonding dynamics by monitoring the spectral shifts of some characteristic vibrational modes involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds in the ground and the first excited state. The (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge independent atomic orbital

  15. Temperature-Driven and Electrochemical-Potential-Driven Adiabatic Pumping via a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masahiro; Kato, Takeo

    2017-02-01

    We investigate adiabatic pumping via a single level quantum dot induced by periodic modulation of thermodynamic variables of reservoirs, i.e., temperatures and electrochemical potentials. We consider the impurity Anderson model and derive analytical formulas for coherent adiabatic charge pumping applicable to the strong dot-reservoir coupling within the first-order perturbation with respect to Coulomb interaction. We show that charge pumping is induced by rectification effect due to delayed response of the quantum dot to time-dependent reservoir parameters. The presence of interaction is necessary because this delayed response rectifies charge current via Coulomb interaction. For temperature-driven charge pumping, one-way pumping is realized regardless of reservoir temperatures when an energy level of the quantum dot locates near the Fermi level. We clarify that this new feature of adiabatic pumping is caused by level broadening effect of the quantum dot due to strong dot-reservoir coupling.

  16. Stochasticity, superadiabaticity, and the theory of adiabatic invariants and guiding center motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    The theory of adiabatic invariants is discussed within the modern framework of symplectic Hamiltonian dynamics. The distinctions between exact, adiabatic, and superadiabatic invariants are clarified. The intimate connection between adiabatic (as opposed to exact) invariance and resonant interactions between motions on disparate time scales is elucidated. For the important case of charged particle motion in a strong magnetic field, resonances between gyration, bounce motion, and an external sinusoidal perturbation are described explicitly by introducing a time-dependent symplectic formulation of the guiding center motion. Destruction of invariance is discussed for quite general situations of physical interest, including the case of a trapped particle in a tokamak.

  17. Nature of halogen bonding. A study based on the topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron charge density and an energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; Sosa, Gladis L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2013-05-01

    In this work we investigate the nature of the Cl···N interactions in complexes formed between substituted ammonium [NHn(X3-n) (with n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and X = -CH3, -F] as Lewis bases and F-Cl molecule as Lewis acid. They have been chosen as a study case due to the wide range of variation of their binding energies, BEs. Møller-Plesset [MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p)] calculations show that the BEs for this set of complexes lie in the range from 1.27 kcal/mol (in F-Cl···NF3) to 27.62 kcal/mol [in F-Cl···N(CH3)3]. The intermolecular distribution of the electronic charge density and their L(r) = -¼∇(2)ρ(r) function have been investigated within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. The intermolecular interaction energy decomposition has also been analyzed using the reduced variational space (RVS) method. The topological analysis of the L(r) function reveals that the local topological properties measured at the (3,+1) critical point [in L(r) topology] are good descriptors of the strength of the halogen bonding interactions. The results obtained from energy decomposition analysis indicate that electrostatic interactions play a key role in these halogen bonding interactions. These results allow us to establish that, when the halogen atom is bonded to a group with high electron-withdrawing capacity, the electrostatic interaction between the electron cloud of the Lewis base and the halogen atom unprotected nucleus of the Lewis acid produces the formation and determines the geometry of the halogen bonded complexes. In addition, a good linear relationship has been established between: the natural logarithm of the BEs and the electrostatic interaction energy between electron charge distribution of N atom and nucleus of Cl atom, denoted as V e-n(N,Cl) within the AIM theory.

  18. Solvent dependence on bond length alternation and charge distribution in phenol blue: a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Murugan, N Arul; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Agren, Hans

    2009-04-30

    Car-Parrinello mixed quantum mechanics/classical mechanics (CP-QM/MM) calculations are performed for phenol blue (PB) in chloroform and water solvents along with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) calculations on PB in the gas phase. The solvent effect on molecular geometry, particularly of bond length alternation (BLA), has been studied. As reported for similar donor-acceptor polyenic systems, a remarkable solvent effect is seen on the BLA. The calculated BLA parameter suggests that PB is in the neutral form in the gas phase and in chloroform solvent, while in water, it is cyanine-like, which is a mixture of neutral and zwitterionic resonant forms, something that clarifies the controversial reports on the structure of PB in chloroform. We have also verified that the structures obtained from CPMD and CP-QM/MM calculations are correct by calculating absorption spectra for PB in the gas phase and in chloroform solvent and compared with experimental results. To understand the structure for PB in the gas phase and in water solvent, we have carried out Mayer bond order analysis, supporting that the structure of PB in water is cyanine-like. Moreover, PB in water is found to be much more polarized than that in chloroform solvent. Overall, the present work demonstrates that CP-QM/MM calculations can be used to understand the solvent effects on polyenic and merocyanine-like systems, which are usually difficult to model.

  19. A theoretical study of charge-transport parameters for a hydrogen-bonded organic semiconductor: the indigo and s-indaceno [1,2-b:5,6-b‧] dithiophene-4,9-dione derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui-Ling; Shi, Ya-Rui; Liu, Yu-Fang

    2016-06-01

    The properties of synthesized ambipolar organic semiconductor (OSC) materials, containing hydrogen bonding, i.e. the 6,6‧-dibromoindigo and the three s-indaceno [1, 2-b:5, 6-b‧] dithiophene-4,9-dione derivatives, have been systematically studied using a density functional theory. The hydrogen bonding formed between the interlayer molecules, though it does not affect the charge mobility in the same layer, influences the interorbital overlapping of HOMO and LUMO states between the layers, and influences the charge mobility directly. In addition, the hydrogen bonding between the layers may reinforce the π-π stacking and make the center-to-center distance closer, which indirectly enhances charge mobility, and can turn a monopole OSC into an ambipolar one.

  20. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M.

    2016-03-01

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm-1 oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  1. Adiabatic Spin Pumping with Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciolo, Eduardo R.

    Electronic transport in mesoscopic systems has been intensively studied for more the last three decades. While there is a substantial understanding of the stationary regime, much less is know about phase-coherent nonequilibrium transport when pulses or ac perturbations are used to drive electrons at low temperatures and at small length scales. However, about 20 years ago Thouless proposed to drive nondissipative currents in quantum systems by applying simultaneously two phase-locked external perturbations. The so-called adiabatic pumping mechanism has been revived in the last few years, both theoretically and experimentally, in part because of the development of lateral semiconductor quantum dots. Here we will explain how open dots can be used to create spin-polarized currents with little or no net charge transfer. The pure spin pump we propose is the analog of a charge battery in conventional electronics and may provide a needed circuit element for spin-based electronics. We will also discuss other relevant issues such as rectification and decoherence and point out possible extensions of the mechanism to closed dots.

  2. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  3. Sequential bond energies and barrier heights for the water loss and charge separation dissociation pathways of Cd2+(H2O)n, n = 3-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Theresa E.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2011-03-01

    The bond dissociation energies for losing one water from Cd2+(H2O)n complexes, n = 3-11, are measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer coupled with a thermal electrospray ionization source. Kinetic energy dependent cross sections are obtained for n = 4-11 complexes and analyzed to yield 0 K threshold measurements for loss of one, two, and three water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. The threshold measurements are converted from 0 to 298 K values to give the hydration enthalpies and free energies for sequentially losing one water from each complex. Theoretical geometry optimizations and single point energy calculations are performed on reactant and product complexes using several levels of theory and basis sets to obtain thermochemistry for comparison to experiment. The charge separation process, Cd2+(H2O)n → CdOH+(H2O)m + H+(H2O)n-m-1, is also observed for n = 4 and 5 and the competition between this process and water loss is analyzed. Rate-limiting transition states for the charge separation process at n = 3-6 are calculated and compared to experimental threshold measurements resulting in the conclusion that the critical size for this dissociation pathway of hydrated cadmium is ncrit = 4.

  4. Fluorescent charge-assisted halogen-bonding macrocyclic halo-imidazolium receptors for anion recognition and sensing in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Fabiola; Caballero, Antonio; White, Nicholas G; Claridge, Tim D W; Costa, Paulo J; Félix, Vítor; Beer, Paul D

    2012-07-18

    The synthesis and anion binding properties of a new family of fluorescent halogen bonding (XB) macrocyclic halo-imidazolium receptors are described. The receptors contain chloro-, bromo-, and iodo-imidazolium motifs incorporated into a cyclic structure using naphthalene spacer groups. The large size of the iodine atom substituents resulted in the isolation of anti and syn conformers of the iodo-imidazoliophane, whereas the chloro- and bromo-imidazoliophane analogues exhibit solution dynamic conformational behavior. The syn iodo-imidazoliophane isomer forms novel dimeric isostructural XB complexes of 2:2 stoichiometry with bromide and iodide anions in the solid state. Solution phase DOSY NMR experiments indicate iodide recognition takes place via cooperative convergent XB-iodide 1:1 stoichiometric binding in aqueous solvent mixtures. (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic titration experiments with a variety of anions in the competitive CD(3)OD/D(2)O (9:1) aqueous solvent mixture demonstrated the bromo- and syn iodo-imidazoliophane XB receptors to bind selectively iodide and bromide respectively, and sense these halide anions exclusively via a fluorescence response. The protic-, chloro-, and anti iodo-imidazoliophane receptors proved to be ineffectual anion complexants in this aqueous methanolic solvent mixture. Computational DFT and molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the experimental observations that bromo- and syn iodo-imidazoliophane XB receptors form stable cooperative convergent XB associations with bromide and iodide.

  5. Which Method of Assigning Bond Orders in Lewis Structures Best Reflects Experimental Data? An Analysis of the Octet Rule and Formal Charge Systems for Period 2 and 3 Nonmetallic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, Ronald F.

    2009-01-01

    Two systems were evaluated for drawing Lewis structures of period 2 and 3 non-metallic compounds: the octet rule and minimization of formal charge. The test set of molecules consisted of the oxides, halides, oxohalides, oxoanions, and oxoacids of B, N, O, F, Al, P, S, and Cl. Bond orders were quantified using experimental data, including bond…

  6. Shortcuts to adiabaticity: suppression of pair production in driven Dirac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Achieving effectively adiabatic dynamics in finite time is a ubiquitous goal in virtually all areas of modern physics. So-called shortcuts to adiabaticity refer to a set of methods and techniques that allow us to produce in a short time the same final state that would result from an adiabatic, infinitely slow process. In this paper we generalize one of these methods—the fast-forward technique—to driven Dirac dynamics. As our main result we find that shortcuts to adiabaticity for the (1+1)-dimensional Dirac equation are facilitated by a combination of both scalar and pseudoscalar potentials. Our findings are illustrated for two analytically solvable examples, namely charged particles driven in spatially homogeneous and linear vector fields.

  7. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  8. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  9. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  10. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  11. Charge-transfer solids using nucleobases: supramolecular architectures composed of cytosine and [Ni(dmit)2] assembled by multiple hydrogen bonds and heteroatomic contacts.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukihiro; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Ishikawa, Manabu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Hiramatsu, Takaaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi

    2013-09-09

    Protonated species of the nucleobase cytosine (C), namely the monoprotonated CH(+) and the hemiprotonated CHC(+), were used to obtain four charge-transfer complexes of [Ni(dmit)2] (dmit: 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate). Diffusion methods afforded two semiconducting [Ni(dmit)2](-) salts; (CH)[Ni(dmit)2](CH3CN) (1) and (CHC)[Ni(dmit)2] (2). In salt 1, the [Ni(dmit)2](-) ions with a S = 1/2 spin construct a uniform one-dimensional array along the molecular long axis, and the significant intermolecular interaction along the face-to-face direction results in a spin-singlet ground state. In contrast, salt 2 exhibits the Mott insulating behavior associated with uniform 1D arrays of [Ni(dmit)2](-), which assemble a two-dimensional layer that is sandwiched between the layers of hydrogen-bonded CHC(+) ribbons. Multiple hydrogen bonds between CHC(+) and [Ni(dmit)2](-) seem to result in the absence of structural phase transition down to 0.5 K. Electrooxidation of [Ni(dmit)2](-) afforded the polymorphs of the [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) salts, (CHC(+))[{Ni(dmit)2}(0.5-)]2 (3 and 4), which are the first mixed-valence salts of nucleobase cations with metal complex anions. Similar to 2, salt 3 contains CHC(+) ribbons that are sandwiched between the 2D [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) layers. In the layer, the [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) ions form dimers with a S = 1/2 spin and the narrow electronic bandwidth causes a semiconducting behavior. In salt 4, the CHC(+) units form an unprecedented corrugated 2D sheet, which is sandwiched between the 2D [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) layers that involve ring-over-atom and spanning overlaps. In contrast to 3, salt 4 exhibits metallic behavior down to 1.8 K, associated with a wide bandwidth and a 2D Fermi surface. The ability of hydrogen-bonded CHC(+) sheets as a template for the anion radical arrangements is demonstrated.

  12. Electron delocalization in the S1 and T1 metal-to-ligand charge transfer states of trans-substituted metal quadruply bonded complexes

    PubMed Central

    Alberding, Brian G.; Chisholm, Malcolm H.; Gallucci, Judith C.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Gustafson, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    The singlet S1 and triplet T1 photoexcited states of the compounds containing MM quadruple bonds trans-M2(TiPB)2(O2CC6H4-4-CN)2, where TiPB = 2,4,6-triisopropylbenzoate and M = Mo (I) or M = W (I′), and trans-M2(O2CMe)2((N[i Pr ])2CC ≡ CC6H5)2, where M = Mo (II) and M = W (II′), have been investigated by a variety of spectroscopic techniques including femtosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. The singlet states are shown to be delocalized metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states for I and I′ but localized for II and II′ involving the cyanobenzoate or amidinate ligands, respectively. The triplet states are MoMoδδ* for both I and II but delocalized 3MLCT for I′ and localized 3MLCT for II′. These differences arise from consideration of the relative orbital energies of the M2δ or M2δ* and the ligand π∗ as well as the magnitudes of orbital overlap. PMID:21525414

  13. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  14. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  15. Study on structures and properties of ammonia clusters (NH3)n (n=1-5) and liquid ammonia in terms of ab initio method and atom-bond electronegativity equalization method ammonia-8P fluctuating charge potential model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2010-05-07

    Structures, binding energies, and vibrational frequencies of (NH(3))(n) (n=2-5) isomers and dynamical properties of liquid ammonia have been explored using a transferable intermolecular potential eight point model including fluctuating charges and flexible body based on a combination of the atom-bond electronegativity equalization and molecular (ABEEM) mechanics (ABEEM ammonia-8P) in this paper. The important feature of this model is to divide the charge sites of one ammonia molecule into eight points region containing four atoms, three sigma bonds, and a lone pair, and allows the charges in system to fluctuate responding to the ambient environment. Due to the explicit descriptions of charges and special treatment of hydrogen bonds, the results of equilibrium geometries, dipole moments, cluster interaction energies, vibrational frequencies for the gas phase of small ammonia clusters, and radial distribution function for liquid ammonia calculated with the ABEEM ammonia-8P potential model are in good agreement with those measured by available experiments and those obtained from high level ab initio calculations. The properties of ammonia dimer are studied in detail involving the structure and one-dimensional, two-dimensional potential energy surface. As for interaction energies, the root mean square deviation is 0.27 kcal/mol, and the linear correlation coefficient reaches 0.994.

  16. Adiabatic compressibility of an immiscible molten NaCl-AgI salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. P.; Tkachev, N. K.; Kulik, N. P.; Peshkina, K. G.

    2016-08-01

    Adiabatic compressibility β of an immiscible 0.5NaCl + 0.5AgI liquid mixture in the immiscibility range is studied experimentally and theoretically using the model of charged hard spheres. The compressibility is calculated by the relationship β = 1/ u 2ρ studied using sound velocity u measured by a pulse method and density ρ determined by hydrostatic weighing. It is shown that the compressibility of the upper phase decreases and that of the lower phase increases when the temperature increases because of the superposition of the effects of the thermal motion of ions and the phase compositions. The temperature dependence of the difference between the compressibilities of the equilibrium phases is described using the empirical equation Δβ = ( T c- T)0.442, which is close to the mean-field theory description. The results of the model calculations adequately reproduce the experimentally observed temperature dependence of the compressibility of the coexisting phases. However, the theoretically predicted critical exponent (1/2) differs from the experimentally determined exponent by 13%. These results are discussed in terms of the nature of chemical bond in silver iodide.

  17. Competing adiabatic Thouless pumps in enlarged parameter spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Ryu, Shinsei; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-12-01

    The transfer of conserved charges through insulating matter via smooth deformations of the Hamiltonian is known as quantum adiabatic, or Thouless, pumping. Central to this phenomenon are Hamiltonians whose insulating gap is controlled by a multidimensional (usually two-dimensional) parameter space in which paths can be defined for adiabatic changes in the Hamiltonian, i.e., without closing the gap. Here, we extend the concept of Thouless pumps of band insulators by considering a larger, three-dimensional parameter space. We show that the connectivity of this parameter space is crucial for defining quantum pumps, demonstrating that, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional case, pumped quantities depend not only on the initial and final points of Hamiltonian evolution but also on the class of the chosen path and preserved symmetries. As such, we distinguish the scenarios of closed/open paths of Hamiltonian evolution, finding that different closed cycles can lead to the pumping of different quantum numbers, and that different open paths may point to distinct scenarios for surface physics. As explicit examples, we consider models similar to simple models used to describe topological insulators, but with doubled degrees of freedom compared to a minimal topological insulator model. The extra fermionic flavors from doubling allow for extra gapping terms/adiabatic parameters—besides the usual topological mass which preserves the topology-protecting discrete symmetries—generating an enlarged adiabatic parameter space. We consider cases in one and three spatial dimensions, and our results in three dimensions may be realized in the context of crystalline topological insulators, as we briefly discuss.

  18. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  19. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  20. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  1. Study of the slope of the linear relationship between retention and mobile phase composition (Snyder-Soczewiñski model) in normal phase liquid chromatography with bonded and charge-transfer phases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-12-02

    The Snyder model and the Soczewiñski model are compared on classic NPLC bonded phases using literature data, and on the charge transfer 2, 4-dinitroanilinopropyl (DNAP) column using experimentally collected data. Overall, the Snyder model slightly better predicts the n-slope than the Soczewiñski model. However, both models give comparable uncertainty in predicting n-slope for a given compound. The number of aromatic double bonds was the most suitable descriptor for estimating the relative n-slope of PAHs, as it correlated with behavior better than the number of aromatic rings and is simpler to calculate than the solute adsorption area. On the DNAP phase, a modified Soczewiñski model is suggested to allow for the significant contribution of the aromatic rings to the n-slope. For classic NPLC bonded phases and DNAP columns, the contribution of polar group to the n-slope parallels the adsorption energy of each polar group.

  2. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  3. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  4. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  5. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  6. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  7. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  8. Adiabatic response and quantum thermoelectrics for ac-driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Battista, Francesca; von Oppen, Felix; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-02-01

    We generalize the theory of thermoelectrics to include coherent electron systems under adiabatic ac driving, accounting for quantum pumping of charge and heat, as well as for the work exchanged between the electron system and driving potentials. We derive the relevant response coefficients in the adiabatic regime and show that they obey generalized Onsager reciprocity relations. We analyze the consequences of our generalized thermoelectric framework for quantum motors, generators, heat engines, and heat pumps, characterizing them in terms of efficiencies and figures of merit. We illustrate these concepts in a model for a quantum pump.

  9. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  10. On the stability of obliquely propagating dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in hot adiabatic magnetized dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, M.; EL-Labany, S. K.; EL-Shamy, E. F.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Khaled, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Obliquely propagating dust ion acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) are investigated in hot adiabatic magnetized dusty plasmas consisting of hot adiabatic inertial ions, hot adiabatic inertialess electrons, and negatively/positively charged static dust grains. Using a reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived. The effects of the concentration of negatively/positively charged dust particles and ion-neutral collision on the basic characteristics of DIASWs are studied. The three-dimensional stability of these waves is examined by the use of small-k (long wavelength plane wave) perturbation expansion technique. It is shown that the instability criterion and their growth rate depend on external magnetic field, obliqueness, the concentration of charged dust grains, ion-neutral, and ion-dust collisions.

  11. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a four-component adiabatic magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, T. Mannan, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    Theoretical investigation has been made on obliquely propagating dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves (SWs) in a magnetized dusty plasma which consists of non-inertial adiabatic electron and ion fluids, and inertial negatively as well as positively charged adiabatic dust fluids. The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equation which admits a solitary wave solution for small but finite amplitude limit. It has been shown that the basic features (speed, height, thickness, etc.) of such DA solitary structures are significantly modified by adiabaticity of plasma fluids, opposite polarity dust components, and the obliqueness of external magnetic field. The SWs have been changed from compressive to rarefactive depending on the value of {mu} (a parameter determining the number of positive dust present in this plasma model). The present investigation can be of relevance to the electrostatic solitary structures observed in various dusty plasma environments (viz. cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, etc.)

  12. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  13. Diabatic Versus Adiabatic Calculation of Torsion-Vibration Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2013-06-01

    The introductory part of this talk will deal briefly with two historical topics: (i) use of the words adiabatic, nonadiabatic, and diabatic in thermodynamics and quantum mechanics, and (ii) application of diabatic and adiabatic ideas to vibrational energy level calculations for a pair of diatomic-molecule potential energy curves exhibiting an avoided crossing. The main part of the talk will be devoted to recent work with Li-Hong Xu and Ron Lees on how ab initio projected frequency calculations for small-amplitude vibrations along the large-amplitude internal rotation path in methanol can best be used to help guide experimental assignments and fits in the IR vibrational spectrum. The three CH stretching vibrations for CH_{3}OH can conveniently be represented as coefficients multiplying three different types of basis vibrations, i.e., as coefficients of: (i) the local mode C-H_i bond displacements δr_{i} for hydrogens H_{1}, H_{2} and H_{3} of the methyl top, (ii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species A_{1} oplus E in the permutation-inversion group G_{6} = C_{3v} appropriate for methanol, or (iii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species 2A_{1} oplus A_{2} in the permutation-inversion group G_{6}. In this talk, we will focus on diabatic and adiabatic computations for the A_{1} oplus E basis vibrations of case (ii) above. We will briefly explain how Jahn-Teller-like and Renner-Teller-like torsion-vibration interaction terms occurring in the potential energy expression in the diabatic calculation become torsion-vibration Coriolis interaction terms occurring in the kinetic energy expression of the adiabatic calculations, and also show how, for algebraically solvable parameter choices, the same energy levels are obtained from either calculation. A final conclusion as to which approach is computationally superior for the numerical data given in a quantum chemistry output file has not yet been arrived at.

  14. Valence-bond non-equilibrium solvation model for a twisting monomethine cyanine.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sean; McKenzie, Ross H; Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-28

    We propose and analyze a two-state valence-bond model of non-equilibrium solvation effects on the excited-state twisting reaction of monomethine cyanines. Suppression of this reaction is thought responsible for environment-dependent fluorescence yield enhancement in these dyes. Fluorescence is quenched because twisting is accompanied via the formation of dark twisted intramolecular charge-transfer (TICT) states. For monomethine cyanines, where the ground state is a superposition of structures with different bond and charge localizations, there are two possible twisting pathways with different charge localizations in the excited state. For parameters corresponding to symmetric monomethines, the model predicts two low-energy twisting channels on the excited-state surface, which leads to a manifold of TICT states. For typical monomethines, twisting on the excited state surface will occur with a small barrier or no barrier. Changes in the solvation configuration can differentially stabilize TICT states in channels corresponding to different bonds, and that the position of a conical intersection between adiabatic states moves in response to solvation to stabilize either one channel or the other. There is a conical intersection seam that grows along the bottom of the excited-state potential with increasing solvent polarity. For monomethine cyanines with modest-sized terminal groups in moderately polar solution, the bottom of the excited-state potential surface is completely spanned by a conical intersection seam.

  15. Valence-bond non-equilibrium solvation model for a twisting monomethine cyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Sean; McKenzie, Ross H.; Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-01

    We propose and analyze a two-state valence-bond model of non-equilibrium solvation effects on the excited-state twisting reaction of monomethine cyanines. Suppression of this reaction is thought responsible for environment-dependent fluorescence yield enhancement in these dyes. Fluorescence is quenched because twisting is accompanied via the formation of dark twisted intramolecular charge-transfer (TICT) states. For monomethine cyanines, where the ground state is a superposition of structures with different bond and charge localizations, there are two possible twisting pathways with different charge localizations in the excited state. For parameters corresponding to symmetric monomethines, the model predicts two low-energy twisting channels on the excited-state surface, which leads to a manifold of TICT states. For typical monomethines, twisting on the excited state surface will occur with a small barrier or no barrier. Changes in the solvation configuration can differentially stabilize TICT states in channels corresponding to different bonds, and that the position of a conical intersection between adiabatic states moves in response to solvation to stabilize either one channel or the other. There is a conical intersection seam that grows along the bottom of the excited-state potential with increasing solvent polarity. For monomethine cyanines with modest-sized terminal groups in moderately polar solution, the bottom of the excited-state potential surface is completely spanned by a conical intersection seam.

  16. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  17. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Metal-organic charge transfer can produce biradical states and is mediated by conical intersections

    PubMed Central

    Tishchenko, Oksana; Li, Ruifang; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper illustrates key features of charge transfer between calcium atoms and prototype conjugated hydrocarbons (ethylene, benzene, and coronene) as elucidated by electronic structure calculations. One- and two-electron charge transfer is controlled by two sequential conical intersections. The two lowest electronic states that undergo a conical intersection have closed-shell and open-shell dominant configurations correlating with the 4s2 and 4s13d1 states of Ca, respectively. Unlike the neutral-ionic state crossing in, for example, hydrogen halides or alkali halides, the path from separated reactants to the conical intersection region is uphill and the charge-transferred state is a biradical. The lowest-energy adiabatic singlet state shows at least two minima along a single approach path of Ca to the π system: (i) a van der Waals complex with a doubly occupied highest molecular orbital, denoted , and a small negative charge on Ca and (ii) an open-shell singlet (biradical) at intermediate approach (Ca⋯C distance ≈2.5–2.7 Å) with molecular orbital structure ϕ1ϕ2, where ϕ2 is an orbital showing significant charge transfer form Ca to the π-system, leading to a one-electron multicentered bond. A third minimum (iii) at shorter distances along the same path corresponding to a closed-shell state with molecular orbital structure has also been found; however, it does not necessarily represent the ground state at a given Ca⋯C distance in all three systems. The topography of the lowest adiabatic singlet potential energy surface is due to the one- and two-electron bonding patterns in Ca-π complexes. PMID:21037111

  19. Effect of geometric deformation of tetrahedral bonding on the vibrational properties of Group-IV semiconductors: Si in the BC-8 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, A.; El-Batanouny, M.; Wooten, F.

    1982-12-01

    The phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states for silicon in the BC-8 structure have been calculated with the use of Weber's adiabatic-bond-charge model. All parameters were scaled in an unambiguous physical manner from Weber's values for silicon in the diamond structure. The frequency values at Γ agree to within 10% of those values available from Raman spectroscopy. The Γ-1 mode is compatible with a transformation from the BC-8 structure to the wurtzite structure, a transformation that takes place upon heating the BC-8 polymorph.

  20. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  1. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan

    2012-12-01

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form Iadia = ∮pi dqi. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by ΔA = 8 π lp2 in the Schwarzschild and Painlevé coordinates.

  2. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  3. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  4. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  5. Adiabatic cluster-state quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.

    2010-09-15

    Models of quantum computation (QC) are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal QC. For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled ''cluster'' state, followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum-circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. Our results could help increase the feasibility of adiabatic schemes by using tools from one-way QC.

  6. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  7. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  8. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  9. A Model for the Chemical Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    Bond stereochemistry in polyatomic hydrides is explained in terms of the principle of bond energies maximization, which yields X-H straight bonds and suggests the formation of appropriate sp hybrids on the central atom. An introduction to the electron charge distribution in molecules is given, and atomic, overlap, gross and formal charges are…

  10. Inter-layer charge disproportionation in the dual-layer organic metal (tTTF-I)2ClO4 with unsymmetrical I···O halogen bond interactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyoung-Soon; Jeannin, Olivier; Brezgunova, Mariya; Dahaoui, Slimane; Aubert, Emmanuel; Espinosa, Enrique; Auban-Senzier, Pascale; Świetlik, Roman; Frąckowiak, Arkadiusz; Fourmigué, Marc

    2014-04-14

    A mixed-valence salt of tTTF-I with ClO4(-), formulated as (tTTF-I)2ClO4, is characterized by the presence of two crystallographically independent donor molecules, segregated in different layers and linked together through I···O interactions with the ClO4(-) anion disordered at room temperature. The tTTF-I donor molecule was prepared by metallation of tTTF (trimethylene tetrathiafulvalene) followed by reaction with iodine to afford the mono and diiodo derivatives tTTF-I and tTTFI2, respectively. The crystal structure of the latter neutral tTTFI2 shows the occurrence of strong type II, II halogen bond interactions. Band structure calculations of the dual-layer structure of the 2 : 1 salt (tTTF-I)2ClO4 show co-existence of both 1D open and 2D closed Fermi surfaces. The salt undergoes a metal-insulator phase transition at T(MI) = 90 K, associated with an electronic dimensionality decrease, since already at 100 K, the 2D part of the Fermi surface transforms into 1D corrugated planes. High resolution X-ray investigations performed at 100 K, combined with multipolar refinements, indicate an approximately equivalent +0.5e charge in both donor molecules, as also deduced from the intramolecular bond distances. On the other hand, Raman spectroscopic investigations show that at ambient temperature the charge is actually distributed non-uniformly in conducting layers of tTTF-I molecules, with the identification of molecules with charges +1, +0.5, 0e, while at low temperature the charge distribution becomes essentially uniform (+0.5e), as confirmed from the X-ray high resolution data. These apparently contradictory behaviors are actually a consequence of a partial electron transfer between the two independent slabs to reach a common Fermi level in the metallic phase.

  11. The concept of bond order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Robert J.; Richards, W. Graham

    A method for obtaining precise charge densities in defined regions of space from ab initio molecular wavefunctions is employed to place the concept of bond order on a firm theoretical footing. The bond orders obtained for carbon—carbon bonds in a range of organic compounds are assessed: those for buta-1,3-diene confirm that it consists of essentially localised double and single bonds.

  12. Adiabatic effects on nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical investigation has been performed on a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing strongly correlated negatively charged dust grains and weakly correlated adiabatic electrons and ions. The adiabatic effects on the dust-acoustic (DA) solitary and shock waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma are taken into account. The DA solitary and shock waves are found to exist with negative potential only. It has been shown that the strong correlation among the charged dust grains is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the DA shock waves. It has also been found that the effects of adiabaticity significantly modify the basic features (e.g., amplitude, width, speed, etc.) of the DA solitary and shock waves. It has been suggested that a laboratory experiment be performed to test the theory presented in this work.

  13. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  14. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  15. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  16. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  17. Diabatic-At-Construction Method for Diabatic and Adiabatic Ground and Excited States Based on Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Grofe, Adam; Qu, Zexing; Truhlar, Donald G; Li, Hui; Gao, Jiali

    2017-03-14

    We describe a diabatic-at-construction (DAC) strategy for defining diabatic states to determine the adiabatic ground and excited electronic states and their potential energy surfaces using the multistate density functional theory (MSDFT). The DAC approach differs in two fundamental ways from the adiabatic-to-diabatic (ATD) procedures that transform a set of preselected adiabatic electronic states to a new representation. (1) The DAC states are defined in the first computation step to form an active space, whose configuration interaction produces the adiabatic ground and excited states in the second step of MSDFT. Thus, they do not result from a similarity transformation of the adiabatic states as in the ATD procedure; they are the basis for producing the adiabatic states. The appropriateness and completeness of the DAC active space can be validated by comparison with experimental observables of the ground and excited states. (2) The DAC diabatic states are defined using the valence bond characters of the asymptotic dissociation limits of the adiabatic states of interest, and they are strictly maintained at all molecular geometries. Consequently, DAC diabatic states have specific and well-defined physical and chemical meanings that can be used for understanding the nature of the adiabatic states and their energetic components. Here we present results for the four lowest singlet states of LiH and compare them to a well-tested ATD diabatization method, namely the 3-fold way; the comparison reveals both similarities and differences between the ATD diabatic states and the orthogonalized DAC diabatic states. Furthermore, MSDFT can provide a quantitative description of the ground and excited states for LiH with multiple strongly and weakly avoided curve crossings spanning over 10 Å of interatomic separation.

  18. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  19. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Xue, Longjian

    2015-05-28

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol-gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 10(7) μm(3) are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media.

  20. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  1. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  2. Nickel-hydrogen battery state of charge during low rate trickle charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, C.; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, J.; Jackson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA AXAF-I program requires high battery state of charge at launch. Traditional approaches to providing high state of charge, during prelaunch operations, require significant battery cooling. The use of active cooling, in the AXAF-I prelaunch environment, was considered and proved to be difficult to implement and very expensive. Accordingly alternate approaches were considered. An approach utilizing adiabatic charging and low rate trickle charge, was investigated and proved successful.

  3. Chemical bond properties and charge transfer bands of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) in Eu(3+)-doped garnet hosts Ln3M5O12 and ABO4 molybdate and tungstate phosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Ling; Noh, Hyeon Mi; Moon, Byung Kee; Choi, Byung Chun; Jeong, Jung Hyun

    2014-06-21

    Charge transfer (CT) energy from the ligand to the central ions is an important factor in luminescence properties for rare earth doped inorganic phosphors. The dielectric theory of complex crystals was used to calculate chemical bond properties. Combining the photoluminescence and the dielectric theory of complex crystals, the CT bands of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) for Eu(3+)-doped inorganic phosphors have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Taking Eu(3+)-doped Ln3M5O12 (Ln = Y, Lu and M = Al, Ga), Gd3Ga5O12, MMoO4 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) and MWO4 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) as typical phosphors, we investigated the effects of the cation size on the CT bands and chemical bond properties including the bond length (d), the covalency (fc), the bond polarizability (αb) and the environmental factor (he) of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+), respectively. For systematic isostructural Ln3M5O12 (Ln = Y, Lu and M = Al, Ga) phosphors, with the increasing M ion radius, the bond length of Ln-O decreases, but fc and αb increase, which is the main reason that the environmental factor increased. For the isostructural MMoO4:Eu, with the increasing M ion radius, the Mo-O bond length increases, but fc and αb decrease, and thus he decreases. However, in the compound system MWO4:Eu (M = Ca, Ba) with the increasing M ion radius, the O-W bond length increases, but fc and αb increase, and thus he increases and the O-W CT energy decreases. Their O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) CT bands as well as their full width at half maximum (FWHM) were directly influenced by he. And with the increasing he, CT bands of O-Eu or O-Mo or O-W decrease and their FWHM increases. These results indicate a promising approach for changing the material properties, searching for new Eu(3+) doped molybdate, tungstate or other oxide phosphors and analyzing the experimental result.

  4. Molecular tectonics: design and generation of charge-assisted, H-bonded, hybrid molecular networks based on amidinium cations and thio- or isothio-cyanatometallates.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Gabriela; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2008-02-07

    Upon combining the bis-amidinium dication 1-2H(+) with thiocyanatometallate M(SCN)(4)(2-) (M = Pd, Hg) or isothiocyanatometallate Cu(NCS)(4)(2-) anions (behaving as H-bond donor and acceptors, respectively) three new hybrid molecular networks have been obtained in the crystalline phase and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction on single crystals. Whereas for the combination of tecton 1-2H(+) and both Pd(SCN)(4)(2-) and Hg(SCN)(4)(2-) anions analogous 1-D H-bonded networks were observed, for the Cu(NCS)(4)(2-) anion a 2-D network was obtained. Based on structural features of both components, the formation of the two types of networks is discussed.

  5. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  6. Dissociation energies and charge distribution of the Co-NO bond for nitrosyl-alpha,beta,gamma,delta-tetraphenylporphinatocobalt(II) and nitrosyl-alpha,beta,gamma,delta-tetraphenylporphinatocobalt(III) in benzonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Li, Qian; Hao, Wei-Fang; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2002-08-21

    The first two series of Co-NO bond dissociation enthalpies in benzonitrile solution were determined for 12 cobalt(II) nitrosyl porphyrins and for 12 cobalt(III) nitrosyl porphyrins by titration calorimetry with suitable thermodynamic cycles. The results display that the energy scales of the heterolytic Co(III)-NO bond dissociation, the homolytic Co(III)-NO bond dissociation, and the homolytic Co(II)-NO bond dissociation are 14.7-23.2, 15.1-17.5, and 20.8-24.6 kcal/mol in benzonitrile solution, respectively, which not only indicates that the thermodynamic stability of cobalt(II) nitrosyl porphyrins is larger than that of the corresponding cobalt(III) nitrosyl porphyrins for homolysis in benzonitrile solution but also suggests that both cobalt(III) nitrosyl porphyrins and cobalt(II) nitrosyl porphyrins are excellent NO donors, and in addition, cobalt(III) nitrosyl porphyrins are also excellent NO(+) contributors. Hammett-type linear free energy analyses suggest that the nitrosyl group carries negative charges of 0.49 +/- 0.06 and 0.27 +/- 0.04 in T(G)PPCo(II)NO and in T(G)PPCo(III)NO, respectively, which indicates that nitric oxide is an electron-withdrawing group both in T(G)PPCo(II)NO and in T(G)PPCo(III)NO, behaving in a manner similar to Lewis acids rather than to Lewis bases. The energetic and structural information disclosed in the present work is believed to furnish hints to the understanding of cobalt nitrosyl porphyrins' biological functions in vivo.

  7. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  8. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  9. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  10. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  11. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  12. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  13. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Deffner, Sebastian; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiǧit

    2017-03-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under nonadiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian H =p2/2 m +U (q ,t ) in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action I0, we construct a so-called fast-forward potential energy function VFF(q ,t ) that, when added to H , guides all trajectories with initial action I0 to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant J (q ,p ,t ) whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  14. Adiabatic invariance with first integrals of motion.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2002-10-01

    The construction of a microthermodynamic formalism for isolated systems based on the concept of adiabatic invariance is an old but seldom appreciated effort in the literature, dating back at least to P. Hertz [Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 33, 225 (1910)]. An apparently independent extension of such formalism for systems bearing additional first integrals of motion was recently proposed by Hans H. Rugh [Phys. Rev. E 64, 055101 (2001)], establishing the concept of adiabatic invariance even in such singular cases. After some remarks in connection with the formalism pioneered by Hertz, it will be suggested that such an extension can incidentally explain the success of a dynamical method for computing the entropy of classical interacting fluids, at least in some potential applications where the presence of additional first integrals cannot be ignored.

  15. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  16. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  17. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  18. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  19. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  1. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  2. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  3. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

  4. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  5. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; ...

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidationmore » state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.« less

  6. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.

  7. Charge disproportionation in tetragonal La2MoO5, a small band gap semiconductor influenced by direct Mo-Mo bonding.

    PubMed

    Colabello, Diane M; Camino, Fernando E; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G

    2015-01-28

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10 dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo(5+) (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo(3+) (d(3)), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo(4+), a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. It is shown that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.

  8. Donor-Acceptor Interaction Determines the Mechanism of Photoinduced Electron Injection from Graphene Quantum Dots into TiO2: π-Stacking Supersedes Covalent Bonding.

    PubMed

    Long, Run; Casanova, David; Fang, Wei-Hai; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2017-02-22

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) constitutes the key step in conversion of solar energy into electricity and fuels. Required for fast and efficient charge separation, strong donor-acceptor interaction is typically achieved through covalent chemical bonding and leads to fast, adiabatic ET. Focusing on interfaces of pyrene, coronene, and a graphene quantum dot (GQD) with TiO2, we demonstrate the opposite situation: covalent bonding leads to weak coupling and nonadiabatic (NA) ET, while through-space π-electron interaction produces adiabatic ET. Using real-time time-dependent density functional theory combined with NA molecular dynamics, we simulate photoinduced ET into TiO2 from flat and vertically placed molecules and GQD containing commonly used carboxylic acid linkers. Both arrangements can be achieved experimentally with GQDs and other two-dimensional materials, such as MoS2. The weak through-bond donor-acceptor coupling is attributed to the π-electron withdrawing properties of the carboxylic acid group. The calculated ET time scales are in excellent agreement with pump-probe optical experiments. The simulations show that the ET proceeds faster than energy relaxation. The electron couples to a broad spectrum of vibrational modes, ranging from 100 cm(-1) large-scale motions to 1600 cm(-1) C-C stretches. Compared to graphene/TiO2 heterojunctions, the molecule/TiO2 and GQD/TiO2 systems exhibit energy gaps, allowing for longer-lived excited states and hot electron injection, facilitating charge separation and higher voltage. The reported state-of-the-art simulations generate a detailed time-domain, atomistic description of the interfacial charge and energy transfer and relaxation processes, and demonstrate that the fundamental principles leading to efficient charge separation in nanoscale materials depend strongly and often unexpectedly on the type of donor-acceptor interaction. Understanding these principles is critical to the development of highly efficient

  9. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  10. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  11. Reorientational dynamics of charged and neutral solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazoilum bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquids: Realization of ionic component of hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-05-01

    Role of electrostatic interaction on rotational relaxation dynamics of two charged solutes, sodium 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS), 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (1-PSA) and neutral perylene has been studied in two structurally similar but chemically distinguishable imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs). Analysis of the results reveals that rotational relaxation of MPTS is significantly hindered even in the IL where acidic C2-H of the imidazolium moiety is replaced by the methyl group. Moreover, rotational relaxation of neutral perylene is found to be faster than mononegative 1-PSA which is again observed to be faster than that of tri-negative MPTS in the same ILs.

  12. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Kamarudin, H.; Alahmed, Z. A.; Auluck, S.; Chyský, Jan

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C15H12N4O2S2) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K2 for the local density approximation (Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C-H…O, C-H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C-H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C-H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π-π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å).

  13. Quantized adiabatic transport in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek Y H; Gong, Jiangbin

    2012-07-06

    Though topological aspects of energy bands are known to play a key role in quantum transport in solid-state systems, the implications of Floquet band topology for transport in momentum space (i.e., acceleration) have not been explored so far. Using a ratchet accelerator model inspired by existing cold-atom experiments, here we characterize a class of extended Floquet bands of one-dimensional driven quantum systems by Chern numbers, reveal topological phase transitions therein, and theoretically predict the quantization of adiabatic transport in momentum space. Numerical results confirm our theory and indicate the feasibility of experimental studies.

  14. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Warner, B. A.; Castles, S.; Breon, S. R.; San Sebastian, M.; Hait, T.

    1990-01-01

    An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) for space use is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The breadboard ADR operated at 100 mK for 400 minutes. Some significant changes to that ADR, designed to eliminate shortcomings revealed during tests, are reported. To increase thermal contact, the ferric ammonium sulfate crystals were grown directly on gold-plated copper wires which serve as the thermal bus. The thermal link to the X-ray sensors was also markedly improved. To speed up the testing required to determine the best design parameters for the gas gap heat switch, the new heat switch has a modular design and is easy to disassemble.

  15. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    We study the Ising Hamiltonian with a transverse field term to simulate the quantum annealing. Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design the time dependence of the Hamiltonian. The dynamical invariant is obtained by the mean-field ansatz, and the Hamiltonian is designed by the inverse engineering. We show that the time dependence of physical quantities such as the magnetization is independent of the speed of the Hamiltonian variation in the infinite-range model. We also show that rotating transverse magnetic fields are useful to achieve the ideal time evolution.

  16. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  17. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  18. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  19. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  20. Thermal explosion hazards on 18650 lithium ion batteries with a VSP2 adiabatic calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Jhu, Can-Yong; Wang, Yih-Wen; Shu, Chi-Min; Chang, Jian-Chuang; Wu, Hung-Chun

    2011-08-15

    Thermal abuse behaviors relating to adiabatic runaway reactions in commercial 18650 lithium ion batteries (LiCoO(2)) are being studied in an adiabatic calorimeter, vent sizing package 2 (VSP2). We select four worldwide battery producers, Sony, Sanyo, Samsung and LG, and tested their Li-ion batteries, which have LiCoO(2) cathodes, to determine their thermal instabilities and adiabatic runaway features. The charged (4.2V) and uncharged (3.7 V) 18650 Li-ion batteries are tested using a VSP2 with a customized stainless steel test can to evaluate their thermal hazard characteristics, such as the initial exothermic temperature (T(0)), the self-heating rate (dT/dt), the pressure rise rate (dP/dt), the pressure-temperature profiles and the maximum temperature (T(max)) and pressure (P(max)). The T(max) and P(max) of the charged Li-ion battery during the runaway reaction reach 903.0°C and 1565.9 psig (pound-force per square inch gauge), respectively. This result leads to a thermal explosion, and the heat of reaction is 26.2 kJ. The thermokinetic parameters of the reaction of LiCoO(2) batteries are also determined using the Arrhenius model. The thermal reaction mechanism of the Li-ion battery (pack) proved to be an important safety concern for energy storage. Additionally, use of the VSP2 to classify the self-reactive ratings of the various Li-ion batteries demonstrates a new application of the adiabatic calorimetric methodology.

  1. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counterdiabatic Hamiltonian to stifle nonadiabatic transitions. Here this shortcut to adiabaticity is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport. This yields a classical analog of transitionless driving, and provides a strategy for constructing quantal counterdiabatic Hamiltonians. As an application of this framework, exact classical and quantal counterdiabatic terms are obtained for a particle in a box and for even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

  2. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration.

    PubMed

    Shustov, P I; Artemyev, A V; Yushkov, E V

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  3. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, P. I. Yushkov, E. V.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  4. Numerical simulations of solar spicules: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźma, B.; Murawski, K.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Konkol, P.; Mignone, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the formation and evolution of solar spicules using numerical simulations of a vertical velocity pulse that is launched from the upper chromosphere. Methods: With the use of the PLUTO code, we numerically solved adiabatic and non-adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D cylindrical geometry. We followed the evolution of spicules triggered by pulses that are launched in a vertical velocity component from the upper chromosphere. Then we compared the results obtained with and without non-adiabatic terms in the MHD equations. Results: Our numerical results reveal that the velocity pulse is steepened into a shock that propagates upward into the corona. The chromospheric cold and dense plasma follows the shock and rises into the corona with the mean speed of 20-25 km s-1. The nonlinear wake behind the pulse in the stratified atmosphere leads to quasi-periodic rebound shocks, which lead to quasi-periodic rising of chromospheric plasma into the corona with a period close to the acoustic cut-off period of the chromosphere. We found that the effect of non-adiabatic terms on spicule evolution is minor; the general properties of spicules such as their heights and rising-time remain slightly affected by these terms. Conclusions: In the framework of the axisymmetric model we devised, we show that the solar spicules can be triggered by the vertical velocity pulses, and thermal conduction and radiative cooling terms do not exert any significant influence on the dynamics of these spicules.

  5. Through-space and through-bond mixed charge transfer mechanisms on the hydrazine oxidation by cobalt(II) phthalocyanine in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Paredes-García, V; Cardenas-Jirón, G I; Venegas-Yazigi, D; Zagal, J H; Paez, M; Costamagna, J

    2005-02-17

    Two quantum chemistry theoretical models in the gas phase at the density functional theory B3LYP/LACVP(d) level of calculation are proposed to rationalize the hydrazine oxidation by cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (Co(II)Pc). This oxidation reaction involves the net transfer of four electrons. These theoretical models that are described in terms of energy profiles include a through-space mechanism for the transfer of the first electron of the hydrazine and a through-bond mechanism proposed for the transfer of the three electrons remaining. The main difference between both models arises from a one-electron and one-proton alternate transfer for model 1 and a two-electron and two-proton alternate transfer for model 2. The main problem for experimental studies is to determine if the first transfer corresponds to an electron or a chemical transfer. Under this point of view, we proposed two models which deal with this problem. We conclude that model 1 is more reasonable than model 2 because the whole oxidation process is always exergonic.

  6. Thermodynamic and spectral properties of adiabatic Peierls chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We present exact numerical results for the effects of thermal fluctuations on the experimentally relevant thermodynamic and spectral properties of Peierls chains. To this end, a combination of classical Monte Carlo sampling and exact diagonalization is used to study adiabatic half-filled Holstein and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models. The classical nature of the lattice displacements in combination with parallel tempering permit simulations on large system sizes and a direct calculation of spectral functions in the frequency domain. Most notably, the long-range order and the associated Peierls gap give rise to a distinct low-temperature peak in the specific heat. The closing of the gap and suppression of order by thermal fluctuations involves in-gap excitations in the form of soliton-antisoliton pairs and is also reflected in the dynamic density and bond structure factors as well as in the optical conductivity. We compare our data to the widely used mean-field approximation and highlight relations to symmetry-protected topological phases and disorder problems.

  7. On the Role of Prior Probability in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Yang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the role of prior probability on the efficiency of quantum local adiabatic search algorithm. The following aspects for prior probability are found here: firstly, only the probabilities of marked states affect the running time of the adiabatic evolution; secondly, the prior probability can be used for improving the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm; thirdly, like the usual quantum adiabatic evolution, the running time for the case of multiple solution states where the number of marked elements are smaller enough than the size of the set assigned that contains them can be significantly bigger than that of the case where the assigned set only contains all the marked states.

  8. Adiabatic following for a three-state quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Shore, Bruce W.; Rangelov, Andon; Kyoseva, Elica

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic time-evolution - found in various forms of adiabatic following and adiabatic passage - is often advantageous for controlled manipulation of quantum systems due to its insensitivity to deviations in the pulse shapes and timings. In this paper we discuss controlled adiabatic evolution of a three-state quantum system, a natural advance to the widespread use of two-state systems in numerous contemporary applications. We discuss, and illustrate, not only possibilities for population transfer but also for creating, with prescribed relative phase, 50:50 superpositions of two Zeeman sublevels in a letter-vee coupling linkage.

  9. Adiabatic approximation via hodograph translation and zero-curvature equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasev, M. V.

    2014-04-01

    For quantum as well classical slow-fast systems, we develop a general method which allows one to compute the adiabatic invariant (approximate integral of motion), its symmetries, the adiabatic guiding center coordinates and the effective scalar Hamiltonian in all orders of a small parameter. The scheme does not exploit eigenvectors or diagonalization, but is based on the ideas of isospectral deformation and zero-curvature equations, where the role of "time" is played by the adiabatic (quantization) parameter. The algorithm includes the construction of the zero-curvature adiabatic connection and its splitting generated by averaging up to an arbitrary order in the small parameter.

  10. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  11. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    PubMed Central

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them. PMID:27849023

  12. Accurate Variational Description of Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    Adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) is a quantum computing protocol where a system is driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The initial Hamiltonian has an easily prepared ground-state and the final Hamiltonian encodes some desired optimization problem. An adiabatic time evolution then yields a solution to the optimization problem. Several challenges emerge in the theoretical description of this protocol: on one hand, the exact simulation of quantum dynamics is exponentially complex in the size of the optimization problem. On the other hand, approximate approaches such as tensor network states (TNS) are limited to small instances by the amount of entanglement that can be encoded. I will present here an extension of the time-dependent Variational Monte Carlo approach to problems in AQO. This approach is based on a general class of (Jastrow-Feenberg) entangled states, whose parameters are evolved in time according to a stochastic variational principle. We demonstrate this approach for optimization problems of the Ising spin-glass type. A very good accuracy is achieved when compared to exact time-dependent TNS on small instances. We then apply this approach to larger problems, and discuss the efficiency of the quantum annealing scheme in comparison with its classical counterpart.

  13. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  14. The formation of multiple adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Wright, T. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-07-01

    In a previous paper, Zhou et al. [2006. A numerical methodology for investigating adiabatic shear band formation. J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54, 904-926] developed a numerical method for analyzing one-dimensional deformation of thermoviscoplastic materials. The method uses a second order algorithm for integration along characteristic lines, and computes the plastic flow after complete localization with high resolution and efficiency. We apply this numerical scheme to analyze localization in a thermoviscoplastic material where multiple shear bands are allowed to form at random locations in a large specimen. As a shear band develops, it unloads neighboring regions and interacts with other bands. Beginning with a random distribution of imperfections, which might be imagined as arising qualitatively from the microstructure, we obtain the average spacing of shear bands through calculations and compare our results with previously existing theoretical estimates. It is found that the spacing between nucleating shear bands follows the perturbation theory due to Wright and Ockendon [1996. A scaling law for the effect of inertia on the formation of adiabatic shear bands. Int. J. Plasticity 12, 927-934], whereas the spacing between mature shear bands is closer to that predicted by the momentum diffusion theory of Grady and Kipp [1987. The growth of unstable thermoplastic shear with application to steady-wave shock compression in solids. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 35, 95-119]. Scaling laws for the dependence of band spacing on material parameters differ in many respects from either theory.

  15. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  16. Non-adiabatic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jesse; Denissen, Nicholas; Reisner, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a non-adiabatic environment is investigated with the multi-physics numerical model, FLAG. This work was inspired by laboratory experiments of non-adiabatic RTI, where a glass vessel with a layer of tetrahyrdofuran (THF) below a layer of toluene was placed inside a microwave. THF, a polar solvent, readily absorbs electromagnetic energy from microwaves. Toluene, a non-polar solvent, is nearly transparent to microwave heating. The presence of a heat source in the THF layer produced convection and a time-dependent Atwood number (At). The system, initially in stable hydrostatic equilibrium At < 0 , was set into motion by microwave induced, volumetric heating of the THF. The point when At > 0 , indicates that the system is RTI unstable. The observed dominant mode at the onset of RTI was the horizontal length scale of the vessel. This scale is contrary to classical RTI, where the modes start small and increases in scale with time. It is shown that the dominant RTI mode observed in the experiments was determined by the THF length scale prior to RTI. The dominant length scale transitions from the THF to the toluene via the updrafts and downdrafts in the convective cells. This happens when At passes from negative to positive. This work was funded by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program.

  17. Decoherence in current induced forces: Application to adiabatic quantum motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Alcázar, Lucas J.; Bustos-Marún, Raúl A.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2015-08-01

    Current induced forces are not only related with the discrete nature of electrons but also with its quantum character. It is natural then to wonder about the effect of decoherence. Here, we develop the theory of current induced forces including dephasing processes and we apply it to study adiabatic quantum motors (AQMs). The theory is based on Büttiker's fictitious probe model, which here is reformulated for this particular case. We prove that it accomplishes the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also show that, in spite of decoherence, the total work performed by the current induced forces remains equal to the pumped charge per cycle times the voltage. We find that decoherence affects not only the current induced forces of the system but also its intrinsic friction and noise, modifying in a nontrivial way the efficiency of AQMs. We apply the theory to study an AQM inspired by a classical peristaltic pump where we surprisingly find that decoherence can play a crucial role by triggering its operation. Our results can help to understand how environmentally induced dephasing affects the quantum behavior of nanomechanical devices.

  18. 27 CFR 19.516 - Bond account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... maximum penal sum, he shall maintain an account of his bond and he shall charge the bond with the amount... return. Where a bond in less than the maximum penal sum has been allocated among two or more plants, as... the penal sum allocated to that plant. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72 Stat. 1356, as amended (26...

  19. A Modified Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Evaluation of Boolean Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a modified construction of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for Boolean functions studied by M. Andrecut et al. [13, 14]. Our algorithm has the time complexity O(1) for the evaluation of Boolean functions, without additional computational cost of implementing the driving Hamiltonian, which is required by the adiabatic evolution described in [13, 14].

  20. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  1. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  2. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  3. Semiclassical Monte Carlo: a first principles approach to non-adiabatic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander J; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N; Wang, Ruixi; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2014-11-14

    Modeling the dynamics of photophysical and (photo)chemical reactions in extended molecular systems is a new frontier for quantum chemistry. Many dynamical phenomena, such as intersystem crossing, non-radiative relaxation, and charge and energy transfer, require a non-adiabatic description which incorporate transitions between electronic states. Additionally, these dynamics are often highly sensitive to quantum coherences and interference effects. Several methods exist to simulate non-adiabatic dynamics; however, they are typically either too expensive to be applied to large molecular systems (10's-100's of atoms), or they are based on ad hoc schemes which may include severe approximations due to inconsistencies in classical and quantum mechanics. We present, in detail, an algorithm based on Monte Carlo sampling of the semiclassical time-dependent wavefunction that involves running simple surface hopping dynamics, followed by a post-processing step which adds little cost. The method requires only a few quantities from quantum chemistry calculations, can systematically be improved, and provides excellent agreement with exact quantum mechanical results. Here we show excellent agreement with exact solutions for scattering results of standard test problems. Additionally, we find that convergence of the wavefunction is controlled by complex valued phase factors, the size of the non-adiabatic coupling region, and the choice of sampling function. These results help in determining the range of applicability of the method, and provide a starting point for further improvement.

  4. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  5. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  6. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  7. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  8. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  9. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  10. On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. W.; Walter, J. W.

    T HE DYNAMICS of adiabatic shear band formation is considered making use of a simplified thermo/visco/plastic flow law. A new numerical solution is used to follow the growth of a perturbation from initiation, through early growth and severe localization, to a slowly varying terminal configuration. Asymptotic analyses predict the early and late stage patterns, but the timing and structure of the abrupt transition to severe localization can only be studied numerically, to date. A characteristic feature of the process is that temperature and plastic strain rate begin to localize immediately, but only slowly, whereas the stress first evolves almost as if there were no perturbation, but then collapses rapidly when severe localization occurs.

  11. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2013-08-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: (1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, (2) Wightman formulation and (3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between (1) and (3) and utilize the known relationships between (1) and (2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit ( confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of Dütsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index—an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  12. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  13. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    1992-01-01

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  14. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  15. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  16. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  17. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  18. Adiabatic theory, Liapunov exponents, and rotation number for quadratic Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, François; Foulon, Patrick

    1987-11-01

    We consider the adiabatic problem for general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians and develop a method quite different from WKB. In particular, we apply our results to the Schrödinger equation in a strip. We show that there exists a first regular step (avoiding resonance problems) providing one adiabatic invariant, bounds on the Liapunov exponents, and estimates on the rotation number at any order of the perturbation theory. The further step is shown to be equivalent to a quantum adiabatic problem, which, by the usual adiabatic techniques, provides the other possible adiabatic invariants. In the special case of the Schrödinger equation our method is simpler and more powerful than the WKB techniques.

  19. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, Eva; Castro, Miguel; Mediano, Arturo

    2009-05-01

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/ m MNP) C(Δ T/Δ t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR≈ Cβ/ m MNP, where β is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  20. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  1. Pure spin current induced by adiabatic quantum pumping in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Souma, Satofumi Ogawa, Matsuto

    2014-05-05

    We show theoretically that pure spin current can be generated in zigzag edged graphene nanoribbons through the adiabatic pumping by edge selective pumping potentials. The origin of such pure spin current is the spin splitting of the edge localized states, which are oppositely spin polarized at opposite edges. In the proposed device, each edge of the ribbon is covered by two independent time-periodic local gate potentials with a definite phase difference, inducing the edge spin polarized current. When the pumping phase difference is opposite in sign between two edges, the total charge currents is zero and the pure edge spin current is generated.

  2. Quantitative investigation of bonding characteristics in ternary Zintl anions: charge and energy analysis of [Sn2E(15)(2)(ZnPh)](-) (E(15) = Sb, Bi) and [Sn2Sb5(ZnPh)2](3-).

    PubMed

    Raupach, Marc; Dehnen, Stefanie; Tonner, Ralf

    2014-05-30

    The analysis of chemical bonding in Zintl anions and complexes thereof is mostly based on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis. While this approach delivers remarkable insights, it falls short of providing quantitative measures for chemical bonding in these compounds. Here, we investigate the organozinc-ligated Zintl anions [Sn2E(15)2(ZnPh)](-) (E(15) = Sb, Bi) and [Sn2Sb5(ZnPh)2](3-) with charge and energy analysis methods. Partial charge analysis confirms that natural population analysis is more reliable than the Hirshfeld method for the diffuse charge density of the Zintl anions. In a subsequent step, the combined method energy decomposition analysis with natural orbitals for chemical valence is used to deliver quantitative results for the chemical bond between the organozinc fragment and the Zintl anionic cage. From this analysis, we conclude that the shared-electron description represents the chemical bonding in these compounds more appropriate. The bonding is characterized by a σ-type bond polarized toward the ZnPh fragment and a strong π-donation (15-20% of orbital interaction) into the p-orbitals at zinc. Electrostatic contributions, which are not considered in FMO analyses, make up around two-thirds of the attractive metal-ligand interaction and should not be neglected in the discussion of chemical bonding in these compounds. Usage of ligands with better σ- or π-accepting ability might thus serve to further stabilize the interesting class of compounds with multinary Zintl anions in the future.

  3. Relating normal vibrational modes to local vibrational modes with the help of an adiabatic connection scheme.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2012-08-28

    Information on the electronic structure of a molecule and its chemical bonds is encoded in the molecular normal vibrational modes. However, normal vibrational modes result from a coupling of local vibrational modes, which means that only the latter can provide detailed insight into bonding and other structural features. In this work, it is proven that the adiabatic internal coordinate vibrational modes of Konkoli and Cremer [Int. J. Quantum Chem. 67, 29 (1998)] represent a unique set of local modes that is directly related to the normal vibrational modes. The missing link between these two sets of modes are the compliance constants of Decius, which turn out to be the reciprocals of the local mode force constants of Konkoli and Cremer. Using the compliance constants matrix, the local mode frequencies of any molecule can be converted into its normal mode frequencies with the help of an adiabatic connection scheme that defines the coupling of the local modes in terms of coupling frequencies and reveals how avoided crossings between the local modes lead to changes in the character of the normal modes.

  4. The novel arsenate Na4Co(7-x)Al(2/3x)(AsO4)6 (x = 1.37): crystal structure, charge-distribution and bond-valence-sum investigations.

    PubMed

    Marzouki, Riadh; Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Driss, Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    The title compound, tetrasodium cobalt aluminium hexaarsenate, Na(4)Co(7-x)Al(2/3x)(AsO(4))(6) (x = 1.37), is isostructural with K(4)Ni(7)(AsO(4))(6); however, in its crystal structure, some of the Co(2+) ions are substituted by Al(3+) in a fully occupied octahedral site (site symmetry 2/m) and a partially occupied tetrahedral site (site symmetry 2). A third octahedral site is fully occupied by Co(2+) ions only. One of the two independent tetrahedral As atoms and two of its attached O atoms reside on a mirror plane, as do two of the three independent Na(+) cations, all of which are present at half-occupancy. The proposed structural model based on a careful investigation of the crystal data is supported by charge-distribution (CHARDI) analysis and bond-valence-sum (BVS) calculations. The correlation between the X-ray refinement and the validation results is discussed.

  5. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  6. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  7. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  8. A DIRECT METHOD TO DETERMINE THE PARALLEL MEAN FREE PATH OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES WITH ADIABATIC FOCUSING

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.-Q.; Wan, W. E-mail: wanw@mail.iggcas.ac.cn

    2012-03-01

    The parallel mean free path of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which is determined by physical properties of SEPs as well as those of solar wind, is a very important parameter in space physics to study the transport of charged energetic particles in the heliosphere, especially for space weather forecasting. In space weather practice, it is necessary to find a quick approach to obtain the parallel mean free path of SEPs for a solar event. In addition, the adiabatic focusing effect caused by a spatially varying mean magnetic field in the solar system is important to the transport processes of SEPs. Recently, Shalchi presented an analytical description of the parallel diffusion coefficient with adiabatic focusing. Based on Shalchi's results, in this paper we provide a direct analytical formula as a function of parameters concerning the physical properties of SEPs and solar wind to directly and quickly determine the parallel mean free path of SEPs with adiabatic focusing. Since all of the quantities in the analytical formula can be directly observed by spacecraft, this direct method would be a very useful tool in space weather research. As applications of the direct method, we investigate the inherent relations between the parallel mean free path and various parameters concerning physical properties of SEPs and solar wind. Comparisons of parallel mean free paths with and without adiabatic focusing are also presented.

  9. Quantum adiabatic optimization and combinatorial landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution algorithm on a variant of the satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, γ=M/N . We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (instead of only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold γ=γd starting with some value of K —the number of variables in each clause. Beyond the dynamic threshold, the algorithm should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz. We have been able to map the ensemble of random graphs onto another ensemble with fluctuations significantly reduced. This enabled us to obtain tight upper bounds on the satisfiability transition and to recompute the dynamical transition using the extended set of landscapes.

  10. Design of the PIXIE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a telescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: (1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and (2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 mW, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 mW. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 μW. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  11. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    PubMed

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  12. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  13. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakye-Yiadom, S.; Bassim, M. N.; Al-Ameeri, S.

    2012-08-01

    It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment) or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the "scars" due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  14. Nonlinear heavy-ion-acoustic waves in an adiabatic collisionless bi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. A.; Rahman, M. M.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The basic properties of heavy-ion-acoustic (HIA) waves have been investigated in a collisionless plasma system which is supposed to be composed of nonthermal electrons, Boltzmann distributed light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. The Kortewg-de Vries and Burgers equations are derived in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry by employing the standard reductive perturbation method for studying the basic features (viz. amplitude, phase speed, etc.) of HIA solitary and shock waves, which are associated with either positive or negative potential. It is found that the effects of nonplanar geometry, adiabaticity of positively charged inertial heavy ions, the presence of nonthermal (Cairns distributed) electrons, and number densities of the plasma components significantly modify the basic features of nonplanar HIA waves. It has been observed that the properties of solitary and shock waves associated with HIA waves in a nonplanar geometry differ from those in a planar geometry. The implications of our results may be helpful in understanding the electrostatic perturbations in various laboratory and astrophysical plasma environments.

  15. Adiabatic shear bands localization in materials undergoing deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.; Muratov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic shear banding phenomenon in composite materials undergoing the high speed shear deformations. The mathematical model of adiabatic shear banding in thermo-visco-plastic material is given. New two step numerical algorithm which is based on the Courant-Isaacson-Rees scheme that allows one to simulate fully localized plastic flow from initial stage of localization is proposed. To test this numerical algorithm we use three benchmark problems. The testing results show the accuracy and efficiency of proposed algorithm. The features of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites are studied. The existence of characteristic depth of localization in composites is shown. Influence of initial temperature distribution on the processes of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites is considered.

  16. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  17. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M. E-mail: Paul.Saffin@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  18. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  19. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; Beccara, Silvio a; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; and others

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  20. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; a Beccara, Silvio; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; Alfè, Dario

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C(60) collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C(60) impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  1. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  2. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  3. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H.

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  4. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  5. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  6. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachimowicz, P.; Kowal, M.; Skalski, J.

    2017-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy, we calculated static fission barriers Bf for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei 98 ≤Z ≤126 , including even-even, odd-even, even-odd and odd-odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential-energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10th below to the 10th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "imaginary water flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole nonaxiality. The ground states (g.s.) were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations. We find that the nonaxiality significantly changes first and second fission saddle in many nuclei. The effect of the mass asymmetry, known to lower the second, very deformed saddles in actinides, in the heaviest nuclei appears at the less deformed saddles in more than 100 nuclei. It happens for those saddles in which the triaxiality does not play any role, which suggests a decoupling between effects of the mass asymmetry and triaxiality. We studied also the influence of the pairing interaction strength on the staggering of Bf for odd- and even-particle numbers. Finally, we provide a comparison of our results with other theoretical fission barrier evaluations and with available experimental estimates.

  7. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  8. Probing the electronic structures and properties of neutral and charged arsenic sulfides [Asn S₂ (⁻¹,⁰,⁺¹), n = 1-6] with Gaussian-3 theory.

    PubMed

    Hou, Liyuan; Yang, Jucai; Ning, Hongmei

    2014-10-01

    The structures and energies of neutral and charged arsenic sulfides As n S2 ((-1,0,+1)) (n = 1-6) were investigated systematically by means of the Gaussian-3 (G3) scheme. The ground-state structures of these species are presented. The ground-state structures of As n S2 can be viewed as the lowest-energy structure of neutral As n+1S by replacing an As atom with a S atom. To be more precise, the ground-state structures of As n S2 can be viewed as the lowest-energy structure of neutral As n+2 by replacing two As atoms with two S atoms, in which the feature of sulfur bonding is edge-bridging. No rule could be found for the ground state structure of As n S2 (-) and As n S2 (+). In As n S2 (-), the feature of sulfur bonding is either edge-bridging or a terminal atom, and in AsnS2 (+) the feature of sulfur bonding is edge-bridging analogous to As n S2. The potential energy surfaces of As4S2 and its charged species are very flat. So co-existence for many isomers of As4S2 and its charged species are possible. The reliable adiabatic electron affinities (AEAs) and adiabatic ionization potentials (AIPs) of As n S2 were estimated. There are odd-even alternations in both AEAs and AIPs as a function of size of As n S2. The dissociation energies (DEs) of S [and/or its ion S((-/+))] from As n S2 clusters and their ions were calculated and used to reveal relative stability.

  9. The method of Gaussian weighted trajectories. III. An adiabaticity correction proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, L.

    2008-01-28

    The addition of an adiabaticity correction (AC) to the Gaussian weighted trajectory (GWT) method and its normalized version (GWT-N) is suggested. This correction simply consists in omitting vibrationally adiabatic nonreactive trajectories in the calculations of final attributes. For triatomic exchange reactions, these trajectories satisfy the criterion {omega} not much larger than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), where {omega} is a vibrational action defined by {omega}={integral}{sup []}-[]dt(pr-p{sub 0}r{sub 0}), r being the reagent diatom bond length, p its conjugate momentum, and r{sub 0} and p{sub 0} the corresponding variables for the unperturbed diatom ({omega}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) bears some analogy with the semiclassical elastic scattering phase shift). The resulting GWT-AC and GWT-ACN methods are applied to the recently studied H{sup +}+H{sub 2} and H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reactions and the agreement between their predictions and those of exact quantum scattering calculations is found to be much better than for the initial GWT and GWT-N methods. The GWT-AC method, however, appears to be the most accurate one for the processes considered, in particular, the H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reaction.

  10. Reduction of thioredoxin significantly decreases its partial specific volume and adiabatic compressibility.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminsky, S. M.; Richards, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    The partial specific volume and adiabatic compressibility were determined at several temperatures for oxidized and reduced Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Oxidized thioredoxin had a partial specific volume of 0.785-0.809 mL/g at the observed upper limit for all proteins whereas the partial specific volume of reduced thioredoxin was 0.745-0.755 mL/g, a value in the range found for a majority of proteins. The adiabatic compressibility of oxidized thioredoxin was also much larger (9.8-18 x 10(-12) cm2 dyne-1) than that of the reduced protein (3.8-7.3 x 10(-12)). Apart from the region immediately around the small disulfide loop, the structures of the oxidized (X-ray, crystal) and reduced protein (nuclear magnetic resonance, solution) are reported to be very similar. It would appear that alterations in the solvent layer in contact with the protein surface must play a major role in producing these large changes in the apparent specific volumes and compressibilities in this system. Some activities of thioredoxin require the reduced structure but are not electron transfer reactions. The large changes in physical parameters reported here suggest the possibility of a reversible metabolic control function for the SS bond. PMID:1304879

  11. The method of Gaussian weighted trajectories. III. An adiabaticity correction proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, L.

    2008-01-01

    The addition of an adiabaticity correction (AC) to the Gaussian weighted trajectory (GWT) method and its normalized version (GWT-N) is suggested. This correction simply consists in omitting vibrationally adiabatic nonreactive trajectories in the calculations of final attributes. For triatomic exchange reactions, these trajectories satisfy the criterion Ω not much larger than ℏ, where Ω is a vibrational action defined by Ω =∫-∞∞dt(pṙ0), r being the reagent diatom bond length, p its conjugate momentum, and r0 and p0 the corresponding variables for the unperturbed diatom (Ω /ℏ bears some analogy with the semiclassical elastic scattering phase shift). The resulting GWT-AC and GWT-ACN methods are applied to the recently studied H++H2 and H++D2 reactions and the agreement between their predictions and those of exact quantum scattering calculations is found to be much better than for the initial GWT and GWT-N methods. The GWT-AC method, however, appears to be the most accurate one for the processes considered, in particular, the H++D2 reaction.

  12. Influence of substituent effects on the formation of P···Cl pnicogen bonds or halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2014-03-27

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out in search of equilibrium structures with P···Cl pnicogen bonds or halogen bonds on the potential energy surfaces H2FP:ClY for Y = F, NC, Cl, CN, CCH, CH3, and H. Three different types of halogen-bonded complexes with traditional, chlorine-shared, and ion-pair bonds have been identified. Two different pnicogen-bonded complexes have also been found on these surfaces. The most electronegative substituents F and NC form only halogen-bonded complexes, while the most electropositive substituents CH3 and H form only pnicogen-bonded complexes. The halogen-bonded complexes involving the less electronegative groups Cl and CN are more stable than the corresponding pnicogen-bonded complexes, while the pnicogen-bonded complexes with CCH are more stable than the corresponding halogen-bonded complex. Traditional halogen-bonded complexes are stabilized by charge transfer from the P lone pair to the Cl-A σ* orbital, where A is the atom of Y directly bonded to Cl. Charge transfer from the Cl lone pair to the P-F σ* orbital stabilizes pnicogen-bonded complexes. As a result, the H2FP unit becomes positively charged in halogen-bonded complexes and negatively charged in pnicogen-bonded complexes. Spin-spin coupling constants (1X)J(P-Cl) for complexes with traditional halogen bonds increase with decreasing P-Cl distance, reach a maximum value for complexes with chlorine-shared halogen bonds, and then decrease and change sign when the bond is an ion-pair bond. (1p)J(P-Cl) coupling constants across pnicogen bonds tend to increase with decreasing P-Cl distance.

  13. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.

    2009-05-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r \\ge 1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values.

  14. Theory and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Aluminum Coordination Complexes – Al K-Edge Studies of Charge and Bonding in (BDI)Al, (BDI)AlR2, and (BDI)AlX2 Complexes.

    PubMed

    Altman, Alison B; Pemmaraju, C D; Camp, Clément; Arnold, John; Minasian, Stefan G; Prendergast, David; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek

    2015-08-19

    Polarized aluminum K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and first-principles calculations were used to probe electronic structure in a series of (BDI)Al, (BDI)AlX2, and (BDI)AlR2 coordination compounds (X = F, Cl, I; R = H, Me; BDI = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-β-diketiminate). Spectral interpretations were guided by examination of the calculated transition energies and polarization-dependent oscillator strengths, which agreed well with the XANES spectroscopy measurements. Pre-edge features were assigned to transitions associated with the Al 3p orbitals involved in metal-ligand bonding. Qualitative trends in Al 1s core energy and valence orbital occupation were established through a systematic comparison of excited states derived from Al 3p orbitals with similar symmetries in a molecular orbital framework. These trends suggested that the higher transition energies observed for (BDI)AlX2 systems with more electronegative X(1-) ligands could be ascribed to a decrease in electron density around the aluminum atom, which causes an increase in the attractive potential of the Al nucleus and concomitant increase in the binding energy of the Al 1s core orbitals. For (BDI)Al and (BDI)AlH2 the experimental Al K-edge XANES spectra and spectra calculated using the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach had nearly identical energies for transitions to final state orbitals of similar composition and symmetry. These results implied that the charge distributions about the aluminum atoms in (BDI)Al and (BDI)AlH2 are similar relative to the (BDI)AlX2 and (BDI)AlMe2 compounds, despite having different formal oxidation states of +1 and +3, respectively. However, (BDI)Al was unique in that it exhibited a low-energy feature that was attributed to transitions into a low-lying p-orbital of b1 symmetry that is localized on Al and orthogonal to the (BDI)Al plane. The presence of this low-energy unoccupied molecular orbital on electron-rich (BDI)Al distinguishes

  15. Proton transfer in nanoconfined polar solvents. II. Adiabatic proton transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ward H

    2005-09-29

    The reaction dynamics for a model phenol-amine proton transfer system in a confined methyl chloride solvent have been simulated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. In this approach, the proton vibration is treated quantum mechanically (and adiabatically), while the rest of the system is described classically. Nonequilibrium trajectories are used to determine the proton transfer reaction rate constant. The reaction complex and methyl chloride solvent are confined in a smooth, hydrophobic spherical cavity, and radii of 10, 12, and 15 A have been considered. The effects of the cavity radius and the heavy atom (hydrogen bond) distance on the reaction dynamics are considered, and the mechanism of the proton transfer is examined in detail by analysis of the trajectories.

  16. Efficient and direct generation of multidimensional free energy surfaces via adiabatic dynamics without coordinate transformations.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jerry B; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2008-12-11

    Adiabatic free energy dynamics (AFED) was introduced by Rosso et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 116, 4389] for computing free energy profiles quickly and accurately using a dynamical adiabatic separation between a set of collective variables or reaction coordinates and the remaining degrees of freedom of a system. This approach has been shown to lead to a significant gain in efficiency versus traditional methods such as umbrella sampling, thermodynamic integration, and free energy perturbation for generating one-dimensional free energy profiles. More importantly, AFED is able to generate multidimensional free energy surfaces efficiently via full sweeps of the surface that rapidly map out the locations of the free energy minima. The most significant drawback to the AFED approach is the need to transform the coordinates into a generalized coordinate system that explicitly contains the collective variables of interest. Recently, Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden built upon the AFED approach by introducing a set of extended phase-space variables, to which the adiabatic decoupling and high temperature are applied [Chem. Phys. Lett. 2006, 426, 168]. In this scheme, which the authors termed "temperature accelerated molecular dynamics" or TAMD, the need for explicit coordinate transformations is circumvented. The ability of AFED and TAMD to generate free energy surfaces efficiently depends on the thermostatting mechanism employed, since both approaches are inherently nonequilibrium due to the adiabatic decoupling. Indeed, Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden did not report any direct generation of free energy surfaces within the overdamped Langevin dynamics employed by these authors. Here, we show that by formulating TAMD in a manner that is closer to the original AFED approach, including the generalized Gaussian moment thermostat (GGMT) and multiple time-scale integration, multidimensional free energy surfaces for complex systems can be generated directly from the probability

  17. Charge dynamic characteristics in corona-charged polytetrafluoroethylene film electrets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Jin; Xiao, Hui-Ming; Zhu, Chun-Feng

    2004-08-01

    In this work, the charge dynamics characteristics of injection, transport and decay in porous and non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film electrets were investigated by means of corona charging, isothermal and thermal stimulating surface-potential decay measurements. The results showed that the initial surface potential, whether positively or negatively charging, is much higher in non-porous PTFE than in porous PTFE. For porous film the value of initial surface potentials increases with increase of film thickness. Higher charging temperature can remarkably improve charge stability. The charge dynamics are correlated to materials microstructure according to their scanning electron micrographs. For non-porous PTFE films, polarizability change of C-F bonds is the main origin of electret charges; but for porous PTFE film a large number of bulk and interface type traps are expected because of the greater area of interface and higher crystallinity.

  18. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  19. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  20. Adiabatic circular polarizer based on chiral fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Xue, Lin-Lin; Li, Cheng; Su, Jue; Qian, Jing-Ren

    2011-01-31

    Based on the adiabatic coupling principle, a new scheme of a broadband circular polarizer formed by twisting a high-birefringence (Hi-Bi) fiber with a slowly varying twist rate is proposed. The conditions of adiabatic coupling for the adiabatic polarizer are first identified through analytical derivations. These conditions are easily realized by choosing a reasonable variation of the twist rate. Moreover, the bandwidth of the polarizer is able to be directly determined by the twist rates at the two ends. Finally, the broadband characteristics of the polarizer are demonstrated by simulations. It is also shown that the performance of the polarizer can be remarkably improved by accomplishing a multi-mode phase-matching along the grating or by using of the couplings of the core mode to lossy modes.

  1. Effect of dephasing on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Vitanov, N.V.; Bergmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    This work explores the effect of phase relaxation on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The study is based on the Liouville equation, which is solved analytically in the adiabatic limit. The transfer efficiency of STIRAP is found to decrease exponentially with the dephasing rate; this effect is stronger for shorter pulse delays and weaker for larger delays, since the transition time is found to be inversely proportional to the pulse delay. Moreover, it is found that the transfer efficiency of STIRAP in the presence of dephasing does not depend on the peak Rabi frequencies at all, as long as they are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution; hence increasing the field intensity cannot reduce the dephasing losses. It is shown also that for any dephasing rate, the final populations of the initial state and the intermediate state are equal. For strong dephasing all three populations tend to (1/3)

  2. Applications of chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage to atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Johnson, David M. S.; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Timmons, Brian P.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    We present robust atom optics, based on chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP), in the context of atom interferometry. Such ARP light pulses drive coherent population transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two fixed-intensity optical fields with large single photon detunings. Since adiabatic transfer is less sensitive to atom temperature and non-uniform Raman beam intensity than standard Raman pulses, this approach should improve the stability of atom interferometers operating in dynamic environments. In such applications, chirped Raman ARP may also provide advantages over the previously demonstrated stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, which requires precise modulation of beam intensity and zeroing of the single photon detuning. We demonstrate a clock interferometer with chirped Raman ARP pulses, and compare its stability to that of a conventional Raman pulse interferometer. We also discuss potential improvements to inertially sensitive atom interferometers. Copyright 2011 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental aspects of the adiabatic approach in estimating the effect of electron screening on alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-12-15

    Special features of the effect of the electron shell on alpha decay that have important experimental implications are studied within the adiabatic approach. The magnitude of the effect is about several tenths of a percent or smaller, depending on the transition energy and on the atomic number. A dominant role of inner shells is shown: more than 80% of the effect is saturated by 1s electrons. This circumstance plays a crucial role for experiments, making it possible to measure this small effect by a difference method in the same storage rings via a comparison of, for example, decay probabilities in bare nuclei and heliumlike ions. The reasons behind the relative success and the applicability limits of the frozen-shell model, which has been used to calculate the effect in question for more than half a century, are analyzed. An interesting experiment aimed at studying charged alpha-particle states is proposed. This experiment will furnish unique information for testing our ideas of the interplay of nonadiabatic and adiabatic processes.

  4. Magnetic translation and Berry's phase factor through adiabatically rotating a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen

    This dissertation covers two results obtained by the author on the Berry phase. Chapter one is the introduction. In chapter two, a special method is introduced to study the infinitely degenerate system of a charged particle moving in an adiabatically rotating magnetic field. It leads to the factorisation of the quantum evolution operator into three factors: a rotation, a path-dependent magnetic translation and a dynamical factor. While the rotation operator is well known from Berry's original work, this dissertation finds the new role played by the magnetic translation operator in the quantum adiabatic evolution. Chapter three introduces a nontrivial example where the concept of the Berry phase can be used even if the Hamiltonian is a time-dependent sum of a discrete spectrum part and a continuous spectrum part. The maximum amount of information concerning the evolution operator is also obtained in this case. These two results attest to the naturalness and effectiveness of the concept of the Berry phase, and are convincing evidence that more discoveries are waiting to be made in the future.

  5. Adiabatic Pseudospectral Technique: Applications to Four Atom Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antikainen, Jyrki Tapio

    1995-01-01

    After the introduction, in chapter 2 we review some of the well established techniques used to solve the Schrodinger equation. The following methods are discussed: the Finite Basis Representation, the Discrete Variable Representation, the Basic Light basis set truncation, and the Lanczos tridiagonalization. After reviewing the previous techniques we present the main features of our Adiabatic Pseudospectral (APS) technique. The Adiabatic Pseudospectral technique is a synthesis of several powerful computational methods such as the sequential adiabatic basis set reduction, the iterative Lanczos diagonalization, the collocation techniques, and a careful implementation of the matrix -vector product for the Hamiltonian in the reduced adiabatic representation. In chapter 3 we use our adiabatic pseudospectral method (APS) to calculate energy levels of the H _2O_2 molecule up to 5000 cm ^{-1}. Reasonably high accuracy (a few wavenumbers) is achieved for a fully six dimensional calculation in a few hours of CPU time on an IBM 580 workstation. These results are a great improvement over previous calculations on the same system which required 50-100 times more computational effort for a similar level of accuracy. The method presented here is both general and robust. It will allow for routine studies of six dimensional potential surfaces and the associated spectroscopy, while making calculations on still larger systems feasible. In chapter 4 the adiabatic pseudospectral method is used to study the high energy vibrational levels of the H_2C_2 molecule. We calculate stimulated emission pumping spectra initialized by the excited electronic state vibrational trans-bent state ~ A_sp{u}{1 }3_{nu}_3 . The calculations show that with the APS-method we can easily investigate energy regions in the excess of 15,000 cm^{-1}; these high energy regions have been previously unattainable by computational techniques.

  6. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon-Enrich, R.; Benseny, A.; Ahufinger, V.; Greentree, A. D.; Busch, Th; Mompart, J.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound.

  7. Quantum dynamics by the constrained adiabatic trajectory method

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, A.; Jolicard, G.; Guerin, S.; Killingbeck, J. P.

    2011-03-15

    We develop the constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM), which allows one to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation constraining the dynamics to a single Floquet eigenstate, as if it were adiabatic. This constrained Floquet state (CFS) is determined from the Hamiltonian modified by an artificial time-dependent absorbing potential whose forms are derived according to the initial conditions. The main advantage of this technique for practical implementation is that the CFS is easy to determine even for large systems since its corresponding eigenvalue is well isolated from the others through its imaginary part. The properties and limitations of the CATM are explored through simple examples.

  8. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in k-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alinea, Allan L.; Kubota, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Yukari; Naylor, Wade E-mail: kubota@celas.osaka-u.ac.jp E-mail: naylor@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    We look at the question posed by Parker et al. about the effect of UV regularisation on the power spectrum for inflation. Focusing on the slow-roll k-inflation, we show that up to second order in the Hubble and sound flow parameters, the adiabatic regularisation of such model leads to no difference in the power spectrum apart from certain cases that violate near scale-invariant power spectra. Furthermore, extending to non-minimal k-inflation, we establish the equivalence of the subtraction terms in the adiabatic regularisation of the power spectrum in Jordan and Einstein frames.

  9. Dynamics with the effective adiabatic theory: The Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Benny; Chandler, David

    1988-07-01

    This paper extends our earlier work on the effective adiabatic theory [J. Chem. Phys. 82, 3400 (1985)] to study relaxation of a two-level system coupled to a Gaussian dissipative bath—the spin-boson problem. Bloch equations are derived which, under the limited circumstances described herein, treat the role of bath fluctuations omitted in the equilibrium effective adiabatic reference system. Applications to the Lorentzian dissipative bath show that the theory agrees closely with numerical simulation results. Application to an Ohmic bath shows that the theory is in agreement with currently accepted results concerned with the problem of macroscopic quantum coherence.

  10. Adiabatic State Conversion and Pulse Transmission in Optomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin

    2012-04-01

    Optomechanical systems with strong coupling can be a powerful medium for quantum state engineering of the cavity modes. Here, we show that quantum state conversion between cavity modes of distinctively different wavelengths can be realized with high fidelity by adiabatically varying the effective optomechanical couplings. The conversion fidelity for Gaussian states is derived by solving the Langevin equation in the adiabatic limit. Meanwhile, we also show that traveling photon pulses can be transmitted between different input and output channels with high fidelity and the output pulse can be engineered via the optomechanical couplings.

  11. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  12. Quantum charge pumping through fractional fermions in charge density modulated quantum wires and Rashba nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Arijit; Rainis, Diego; Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Loss, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We study the phenomenon of adiabatic quantum charge pumping in systems supporting fractionally charged fermionic bound states in two different setups. The first quantum pump setup consists of a charge density modulated quantum wire, and the second one is based on a semiconducting nanowire with Rashba spin-orbit interaction, in the presence of a spatially oscillating magnetic field. In both these quantum pumps transport is investigated in an N-X-N geometry, with the system of interest (X) connected to two normal-metal leads (N), and the two pumping parameters are the strengths of the effective wire-lead barriers. Pumped charge is calculated within the scattering matrix formalism. We show that quantum pumping in both setups provides a unique signature of the presence of the fractional-fermion bound states, in terms of the asymptotically quantized pumped charge. Furthermore, we investigate shot noise arising due to quantum pumping, verifying that the quantized pumped charge corresponds to minimal shot noise.

  13. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  14. Dust-acoustic Korteweg-de Vries solitons in an adiabatic hot dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2007-01-15

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made of dust-acoustic (DA) Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) solitons by the reductive perturbation method. An unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged adiabatic hot dust fluid and of Boltzmann distributed electrons and ions has been considered. It has been found that the DA K-dV solitons associated with only negative potential can exist in such a dusty plasma. It has been also found that the effects of dust fluid temperature have significantly modified the basic properties (amplitude and width) of the solitary potential structures in such a dusty plasma. The implications of these results to some space and astrophysical plasma situations are briefly discussed.

  15. Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-11-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  16. Reprint of : Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  17. Ultrafast Response of the Hubbard Model: Non-adiabatic TDDFT + DMFT versus Non-equilibrium DMFT Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shree Ram; Turkowski, Volodymyr; Rahman, Talat S.

    We study the ultrafast response of electrons in the one-band Hubbard model to an external laser-pulse perturbation by using the Non-adiabatic Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory + Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (TDDFT +DMFT) approach. The corresponding exchange-correlation kernel (XC) is obtained from the DMFT charge susceptibility by using the Quantum Monte Carlo solver for the impurity problem. Detailed analysis of the time-dependent excited charge density, the Fermi distribution function, and the spatially nonhomogeneous response (metallic domain growth), is performed for different values for the carrier density and local Coulomb repulsion. We compare the results with the corresponding non-equilibrium DMFT solutions, and demonstrate that non-adiabaticity (frequency-dependence) of the XC kernel is important in order to reproduce the non-equilibrium DMFT solution. Also, from the numerical results for the charge susceptibility, we obtain an approximate analytical expression for the XC kernel. Using this kernel, we reveal possible types of ''elementary'' excitations and the dynamics of metallic domain growth in the case of the one-band Hubbard model. Possible generalization of the approach to the multi-orbital case is discussed. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354.

  18. The gravito-electrodynamics of charged dust in planetary ring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Hill, J. R.; Northrop, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of micron and submicron sized dust grains moving under the combined influence of planetary gravitation and the electromagnetic forces within the corotating regions of planetary magnetospheres are discussed. Magnetogravitational capture of charged grains in planetary rings is outlined. The adiabatic motion of charged dust is reviewed.

  19. Adiabatic frequency conversion with a sign flip in the coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. S.; Rangelov, A. A.; Montemezzani, G.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Adiabatic frequency conversion is a method recently developed in nonlinear optics [H. Suchowski, D. Oron, A. Arie, and Y. Silberberg, Phys. Rev. A 78, 063821 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.063821], using ideas from the technique of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) via a level crossing in quantum physics. In this method, the coupling coefficients are constant and the phase mismatch is chirped adiabatically. In this work, we propose another method for adiabatic frequency conversion, in which the phase mismatch is constant and the coupling is a pulse-shaped function with a sign flip (i.e., a phase step of π ) at its maximum. Compared to the RAP method, our technique has comparable efficiency but it is simpler to implement for it only needs two bulk crystals with opposite χ(2 ) nonlinearity. Moreover, because our technique requires constant nonzero frequency mismatch and has zero conversion efficiency on exact frequency matching, it can be used as a frequency filter.

  20. Failure of geometric electromagnetism in the adiabatic vector Kepler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, J.R.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic moment of a particle orbiting a straight current-carrying wire may precess rapidly enough in the wire's magnetic field to justify an adiabatic approximation, eliminating the rapid time dependence of the magnetic moment and leaving only the particle position as a slow degree of freedom. To zeroth order in the adiabatic expansion, the orbits of the particle in the plane perpendicular to the wire are Keplerian ellipses. Higher-order postadiabatic corrections make the orbits precess, but recent analysis of this 'vector Kepler problem' has shown that the effective Hamiltonian incorporating a postadiabatic scalar potential ('geometric electromagnetism') fails to predict the precession correctly, while a heuristic alternative succeeds. In this paper we resolve the apparent failure of the postadiabatic approximation, by pointing out that the correct second-order analysis produces a third Hamiltonian, in which geometric electromagnetism is supplemented by a tensor potential. The heuristic Hamiltonian of Schmiedmayer and Scrinzi is then shown to be a canonical transformation of the correct adiabatic Hamiltonian, to second order. The transformation has the important advantage of removing a 1/r{sup 3} singularity which is an artifact of the adiabatic approximation.

  1. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  2. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-02-12

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape.

  3. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  4. Cosmological solutions in spatially curved universes with adiabatic particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aresté Saló, Llibert; de Haro, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    We perform a qualitative and thermodynamic study of two models when one takes into account adiabatic particle production. In the first one, there is a constant particle production rate, which leads to solutions depicting the current cosmic acceleration but without inflation. The other one has solutions that unify the early and late time acceleration. These solutions converge asymptotically to the thermal equilibrium.

  5. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  6. Reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-12-01

    Reversible computing is considered to be a key technology to achieve an extremely high energy efficiency in future computers. In this study, we investigated the relationship between reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic. We analyzed the evolution of phase differences of Josephson junctions in the reversible quantum-flux-parametron (RQFP) gate and confirmed that the phase differences can change time reversibly, which indicates that the RQFP gate is physically, as well as logically, reversible. We calculated energy dissipation required for the RQFP gate to perform a logic operation and numerically demonstrated that the energy dissipation can fall below the thermal limit, or the Landauer bound, by lowering operation frequencies. We also investigated the 1-bit-erasure gate as a logically irreversible gate and the quasi-RQFP gate as a physically irreversible gate. We calculated the energy dissipation of these irreversible gates and showed that the energy dissipation of these gate is dominated by non-adiabatic state changes, which are induced by unwanted interactions between gates due to logical or physical irreversibility. Our results show that, in reversible computing using adiabatic superconductor logic, logical and physical reversibility are required to achieve energy dissipation smaller than the Landauer bound without non-adiabatic processes caused by gate interactions.

  7. Adiabatic State Conversion and Photon Transmission in Optomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin

    2012-02-01

    Light-matter interaction in optomechanical systems in the strong coupling regime can be explored as a tool to transfer cavity states and to transmit photon pulses. Here, we show that quantum state conversion between cavity modes with different wavelengths can be realized with high fidelity by adiabatically varying the effective optomechanical couplings. During this adiabatic process, the quantum state is preserved in the dark mode of the cavities, similar to the adiabatic transfer schemes in EIT systems. The fidelity for gaussian states is derived by solving the Langevin equation in the adiabatic limit and shows negligible dependence on the mechanical noise. We also show that an input pulse can be transmitted to an output channel with a different wavelength via the effective optomechanical couplings. The condition for optimal transmission is derived in the frequency domain. Input pulses with a narrow spectral width can be transmitted with high fidelity. For input pulses with a large spectral width, the shape of the output pulses can be manipulated by applying time-dependent effective couplings. (1) L. Tian, arXiv:1111.2119. (2) L. Tian and H. L. Wang, Phys. Rev. A 82, 053806 (2010).

  8. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  9. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  10. Non-adiabatic transition probability dependence on conical intersection topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhado, João Pedro; Hynes, James T.

    2016-11-01

    We derive a closed form analytical expression for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a distribution of trajectories passing through a generic conical intersection (CI), based on the Landau-Zener equation for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a single straight-line trajectory in the CI's vicinity. We investigate the non-adiabatic transition probability's variation with topographical features and find, for the same crossing velocity, no intrinsic difference in efficiency at promoting non-adiabatic decay between peaked and sloped CIs, a result in contrast to the commonly held view. Any increased efficiency of peaked over sloped CIs is thus due to dynamical effects rather than to any increased transition probability of topographical origin. It is also shown that the transition probability depends in general on the direction of approach to the CI, and that the coordinates' reduced mass can affect the transition probability via its influence on the CI topography in mass-scaled coordinates. The resulting predictions compare well with surface hopping simulation results.

  11. Non-adiabatic transition probability dependence on conical intersection topography.

    PubMed

    Malhado, João Pedro; Hynes, James T

    2016-11-21

    We derive a closed form analytical expression for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a distribution of trajectories passing through a generic conical intersection (CI), based on the Landau-Zener equation for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a single straight-line trajectory in the CI's vicinity. We investigate the non-adiabatic transition probability's variation with topographical features and find, for the same crossing velocity, no intrinsic difference in efficiency at promoting non-adiabatic decay between peaked and sloped CIs, a result in contrast to the commonly held view. Any increased efficiency of peaked over sloped CIs is thus due to dynamical effects rather than to any increased transition probability of topographical origin. It is also shown that the transition probability depends in general on the direction of approach to the CI, and that the coordinates' reduced mass can affect the transition probability via its influence on the CI topography in mass-scaled coordinates. The resulting predictions compare well with surface hopping simulation results.

  12. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  13. Synergistic and diminutive effects between halogen bond and lithium bond in complexes involving aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Cai, Mengyang; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo

    2015-10-01

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to study the interplay between halogen bond and lithium bond in the ternary systems FX-C6H5CN-LiF, FLi-C6H5CN-XF, and FLi-C6H5X-NH3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) involving aromatic compounds. This effect was studied in terms of interaction energy, electron density, charge transfer, and orbital interaction. The results showed that both FX-C6H5CN-LiF and FLi-C6H5CN-XF exhibit diminutive effects with the weakening of halogen bond and lithium bond, while FLi-C6H5X-NH3 displays synergistic effects with the strengthening of halogen bond and lithium bond. The nature of halogen bond and lithium bond in the corresponding binary complexes has been unveiled by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules methodology and energy decomposition analysis.

  14. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  15. Sub-adiabatic perpendicular electron heating across high-Mach number collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundkvist, D. J.; Mozer, F.

    2012-12-01

    Spacecraft observations of a high Mach number quasi-perpendicular bow shock with high plasma beta have revealed electrons that were sub-adiabatic through the shock ramp because they were less heated than expected from conservation of the first adiabatic invariant. This stands out in contrast to existing theories of electron heating at collisionless shocks in which the electrons are adiabatically heated through compression or more-than-adiabatically heated due to additional effects such as anomalous resistivity induced by microinstabilites.

  16. A valence bond study of three-center four-electron pi bonding: electronegativity vs electroneutrality.

    PubMed

    DeBlase, Andrew; Licata, Megan; Galbraith, John Morrison

    2008-12-18

    Three-center four-electron (3c4e) pi bonding systems analogous to that of the ozone molecule have been studied using modern valence bond theory. Molecules studied herein consist of combinations of first row atoms C, N, and O with the addition of H atoms where appropriate in order to preserve the 3c4e pi system. Breathing orbital valence bond (BOVB) calculations were preformed at the B3LYP/6-31G**-optimized geometries in order to determine structural weights, pi charge distributions, resonance energies, and pi bond energies. It is found that the most weighted VB structure depends on atomic electronegativity and charge distribution, with electronegativity as the dominant factor. By nature, these systems are delocalized, and therefore, resonance energy is the main contributor to pi bond energies. Molecules with a single dominant VB structure have low resonance energies and therefore low pi bond energies.

  17. Photoinduced Charge Transfer from Titania to Surface Doping Site

    PubMed Central

    Inerbaev, Talgat; Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Kilin, Dmitri S.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate a theoretical model in which Ru is substituting for Ti at the (100) surface of anatase TiO2. Charge transfer from the photo-excited TiO2 substrate to the catalytic site triggers the photo-catalytic event (such as water oxidation or reduction half-reaction). We perform ab-initio computational modeling of the charge transfer dynamics on the interface of TiO2 nanorod and catalytic site. A slab of TiO2 represents a fragment of TiO2 nanorod in the anatase phase. Titanium to ruthenium replacement is performed in a way to match the symmetry of TiO2 substrate. One molecular layer of adsorbed water is taken into consideration to mimic the experimental conditions. It is found that these adsorbed water molecules saturate dangling surface bonds and drastically affect the electronic properties of systems investigated. The modeling is performed by reduced density matrix method in the basis of Kohn-Sham orbitals. A nano-catalyst modeled through replacement defect contributes energy levels near the bottom of the conduction band of TiO2 nano-structure. An exciton in the nano-rod is dissipating due to interaction with lattice vibrations, treated through non-adiabatic coupling. The electron relaxes to conduction band edge and then to the Ru cite with faster rate than hole relaxes to the Ru cite. These results are of the importance for an optimal design of nano-materials for photo-catalytic water splitting and solar energy harvesting. PMID:23795229

  18. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  19. Ultra-Flexible Thermal Bus for Use in the Astro-H Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) developed for the Astro-H Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a multi-stage solid-state cooler. It is capable of holding the SXS detector array at 0.050 K for greater than 24 hours with a recycle time of less than one hour. This quick recycle time relies upon high-conductivity thermal straps to couple the individual stages to a pair of heat switches without imposing a lateral load on the paramagnetic salt pills. To accomplish this we construct thermal straps using a technique of diffusion bonding together the ends of high-purity copper straps leaving the length between as individual foils. A thermal bus created this way has a thermal conductivity comparable to a solid strap of the equivalent thickness but with much-increased flexibility. The technique for selecting the base material, machining, cleaning, forming into final shape, and finally bonding together individual foils will be discussed along with examples of complete straps in various geometries.

  20. Ab Initio Simulation of Charge Transfer at the Semiconductor Quantum Dot/TiO 2 Interface in Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xin, Xukai; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; ...

    2014-07-24

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have emerged as a promising solar architecture for next-generation solar cells. The QDSSCs exhibit a remarkably fast electron transfer from the quantum dot (QD) donor to the TiO2 acceptor with size quantization properties of QDs that allows for the modulation of band energies to control photoresponse and photoconversion efficiency of solar cells. In order to understand the mechanisms that underpin this rapid charge transfer, the electronic properties of CdSe and PbSe QDs with different sizes on the TiO2 substrate are simulated using a rigorous ab initio density functional method. Our method capitalizes on localized orbitalmore » basis set, which is computationally less intensive. Quite intriguingly, a remarkable set of electron bridging states between QDs and TiO2 occurring via the strong bonding between the conduction bands of QDs and TiO2 is revealed. Such bridging states account for the fast adiabatic charge transfer from the QD donor to the TiO2 acceptor, and may be a general feature for strongly coupled donor/acceptor systems. All the QDs/TiO2 systems exhibit type II band alignments, with conduction band offsets that increase with the decrease in QD size. This facilitates the charge transfer from QDs donors to TiO2 acceptors and explains the dependence of the increased charge transfer rate with the decreased QD size.« less

  1. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  2. A Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Network and Its Effect on Anion Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, Masoud; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2014-08-07

    Rigid tricyclic locked in all axial 1,3,5-cyclohexanetriol derivatives with 0–3 trifluoromethyl groups were synthesized and photoelectron spectra of their conjugate bases and chloride anion clusters are reported along with density functional computations. The resulting vertical and adiabatic detachment energies provide measures of the anion stabilization due to the hydrogen bond network and inductive effects. The latter mechanism is found to be transmitted through space via hydrogen bonds

  3. Sideband excitation of trapped ions by rapid adiabatic passage for manipulation of motional states

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Nomura, S.; Toyoda, K.; Urabe, S.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an analysis and experimental results of the manipulation of motional states of a single trapped {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion based on sideband excitation by rapid adiabatic passage. When the sideband transition is excited by rapid adiabatic passage, adiabaticity may be affected by ac Stark shifts. We investigate the influence of ac Stark shifts and compensate for these shifts with an additional laser field. This makes the population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage more robust with respect to experimental parameters. Finally, we manipulate the motional states and generate motional Fock states of a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion by rapid adiabatic passage with ac Stark compensation.

  4. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series.

  5. Charge distribution and transport properties in reduced ceria phases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoko, E.; Smith, M. F.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2011-12-01

    The question of the charge distribution in reduced ceria phases (CeO2-x) is important for understanding the microscopic physics of oxygen storage capacity, and the electronic and ionic conductivities in these materials. All these are key properties in the application of these materials in catalysis and electrochemical devices. Several approaches have been applied to study this problem, including ab initio methods. Recently [1], we applied the bond valence model (BVM) to discuss the charge distribution in several different crystallographic phases of reduced ceria. Here, we compare the BVM results to those from atomistic simulations to determine if there is consistency in the predictions of the two approaches. Our analysis shows that the two methods give a consistent picture of the charge distribution around oxygen vacancies in bulk reduced ceria phases. We then review the transport theory applicable to reduced ceria phases, providing useful relationships which enable comparison of experimental results obtained by different techniques. In particular, we compare transport parameters obtained from the observed optical absorption spectrum, α(ω), dc electrical conductivity with those predicted by small polaron theory and the Harrison method. The small polaron energy is comparable to that estimated from α(ω). However, we found a discrepancy between the value of the electron hopping matrix element, t, estimated from the Marcus-Hush formula and that obtained by the Harrison method. Part of this discrepancy could be attributed to the system lying in the crossover region between adiabatic and nonadiabatic whereas our calculations assumed the system to be nonadiabatic. Finally, by considering the relationship between the charge distribution and electronic conductivity, we suggest the possibility of low temperature metallic conductivity for intermediate phases, i.e., x˜0.3. This has not yet been experimentally observed.

  6. Numerical Investigation of the effect of adiabatic section location on thermal performance of a heat pipe network with the application in thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    Latent heat thermal energy storage systems benefits from high energy density and isothermal storing process. However, the low thermal conductivity of the phase change material leads to prolong the melting or solidification time. Using a passive device such as heat pipes is required to enhance the heat transfer and to improve the efficiency of the system. In the present work, the performance of a heat pipe network specifically designed for a thermal energy storage system is studied numerically. The network includes a primary heat pipe, which transfers heat received from solar receiver to the heat engine. The excess heat is simultaneously delivered to charge the phase change material via secondary heat pipes. The primary heat pipe composed of a disk shape evaporator, an adiabatic section and a disk shape condenser. The adiabatic section can be either located at the center or positioned outward to the surrounding of the container. Here, the effect of adiabatic section position on thermal performance of the system is investigated. It was concluded that displacing the adiabatic section outwards dramatically increases the average temperatures of the condensers and reduces the thermal resistance of heat pipes.

  7. Non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-01

    Strong coupling of molecules to the vacuum field of micro cavities can modify the potential energy surfaces thereby opening new photophysical and photochemical reaction pathways. While the influence of laser fields is usually described in terms of classical field, coupling to the vacuum state of a cavity has to be described in terms of dressed photon-matter states (polaritons) which require quantized fields. We present a derivation of the non-adiabatic couplings for single molecules in the strong coupling regime suitable for the calculation of the dressed state dynamics. The formalism allows to use quantities readily accessible from quantum chemistry codes like the adiabatic potential energy surfaces and dipole moments to carry out wave packet simulations in the dressed basis. The implications for photochemistry are demonstrated for a set of model systems representing typical situations found in molecules.

  8. Non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, Markus Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-07

    Strong coupling of molecules to the vacuum field of micro cavities can modify the potential energy surfaces thereby opening new photophysical and photochemical reaction pathways. While the influence of laser fields is usually described in terms of classical field, coupling to the vacuum state of a cavity has to be described in terms of dressed photon-matter states (polaritons) which require quantized fields. We present a derivation of the non-adiabatic couplings for single molecules in the strong coupling regime suitable for the calculation of the dressed state dynamics. The formalism allows to use quantities readily accessible from quantum chemistry codes like the adiabatic potential energy surfaces and dipole moments to carry out wave packet simulations in the dressed basis. The implications for photochemistry are demonstrated for a set of model systems representing typical situations found in molecules.

  9. Adiabatic theory of solitons fed by dispersive waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickartz, Sabrina; Bandelow, Uwe; Amiranashvili, Shalva

    2016-09-01

    We consider scattering of low-amplitude dispersive waves at an intense optical soliton which constitutes a nonlinear perturbation of the refractive index. Specifically, we consider a single-mode optical fiber and a group velocity matched pair: an optical soliton and a nearly perfectly reflected dispersive wave, a fiber-optical analog of the event horizon. By combining (i) an adiabatic approach that is used in soliton perturbation theory and (ii) scattering theory from quantum mechanics, we give a quantitative account of the evolution of all soliton parameters. In particular, we quantify the increase in the soliton peak power that may result in the spontaneous appearance of an extremely large, so-called champion soliton. The presented adiabatic theory agrees well with the numerical solutions of the pulse propagation equation. Moreover, we predict the full frequency band of the scattered dispersive waves and explain an emerging caustic structure in the space-time domain.

  10. Adiabatic far-field sub-diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Cang, Hu; Salandrino, Alessandro; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-08-10

    The limited resolution of a conventional optical imaging system stems from the fact that the fine feature information of an object is carried by evanescent waves, which exponentially decays in space and thus cannot reach the imaging plane. We introduce here an adiabatic lens, which utilizes a geometrically conformal surface to mediate the interference of slowly decompressed electromagnetic waves at far field to form images. The decompression is satisfying an adiabatic condition, and by bridging the gap between far field and near field, it allows far-field optical systems to project an image of the near-field features directly. Using these designs, we demonstrated the magnification can be up to 20 times and it is possible to achieve sub-50 nm imaging resolution in visible. Our approach provides a means to extend the domain of geometrical optics to a deep sub-wavelength scale.

  11. Engineering adiabaticity at an avoided crossing with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasseur, T.; Theis, L. S.; Sanders, Y. R.; Egger, D. J.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate ways to optimize adiabaticity and diabaticity in the Landau-Zener model with nonuniform sweeps. We show how diabaticity can be engineered with a pulse consisting of a linear sweep augmented by an oscillating term. We show that the oscillation leads to jumps in populations whose value can be accurately modeled using a model of multiple, photon-assisted Landau-Zener transitions, which generalizes work by Wubs et al. [New J. Phys. 7, 218 (2005)], 10.1088/1367-2630/7/1/218. We extend the study on diabaticity using methods derived from optimal control. We also show how to preserve adiabaticity with optimal pulses at limited time, finding a nonuniform quantum speed limit.

  12. Adiabatic molecular-dynamics-simulation-method studies of kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    An adiabatic molecular-dynamics method is developed and used to study the Muser-Robbins model for dry friction (i.e., nonzero kinetic friction in the slow sliding speed limit). In this model, dry friction between two crystalline surfaces rotated with respect to each other is due to mobile molecules (i.e., dirt particles) adsorbed at the interface. Our adiabatic method allows us to quickly locate interface potential-well minima, which become unstable during sliding of the surfaces. Since dissipation due to friction in the slow sliding speed limit results from mobile molecules dropping out of such unstable wells, our method provides a way to calculate dry friction, which agrees extremely well with results found by conventional molecular dynamics for the same system, but our method is more than a factor of 10 faster.

  13. Steam bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulin, E.; Demier, R.; Krepchin, I.; Walker, D.

    1984-01-01

    Steam bottoming cycles using adiabatic diesel engine exhaust heat which projected substantial performance and economic benefits for long haul trucks were studied. Steam cycle and system component variables, system cost, size and performance were analyzed. An 811 K/6.90 MPa state of the art reciprocating expander steam system with a monotube boiler and radiator core condenser was selected for preliminary design. The costs of the diesel with bottoming system (TC/B) and a NASA specified turbocompound adiabatic diesel with aftercooling with the same total output were compared, the annual fuel savings less the added maintenance cost was determined to cover the increase initial cost of the TC/B system in a payback period of 2.3 years. Steam bottoming system freeze protection strategies were developed, technological advances required for improved system reliability are considered and the cost and performance of advanced systes are evaluated.

  14. Adiabatic approximation and fluctuations in exciton-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2015-07-01

    We study the relation between the models commonly used to describe the dynamics of nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensates, namely the ones described by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and by the open-dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation including a separate equation for the reservoir density. In particular, we focus on the validity of the adiabatic approximation and small density fluctuations approximation that allow one to reduce the coupled condensate-reservoir dynamics to a single partial differential equation. We find that the adiabatic approximation consists of three independent analytical conditions that have to be fulfilled simultaneously. By investigating stochastic versions of the two corresponding models, we verify that the breakdown of these approximations can lead to discrepancies in correlation lengths and distributions of fluctuations. Additionally, we consider the phase diffusion and number fluctuations of a condensate in a box, and show that self-consistent description requires treatment beyond the typical Bogoliubov approximation.

  15. Confinement loss in adiabatic photonic crystal fiber tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmey, Boris T.; Nguyen, Hong C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2006-09-01

    We numerically study confinement loss in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) tapers and compare our results with previously published experimental data. Agreement between theory and experiment requires taking into account hole shrinkage during the tapering process, which we measure by using a noninvasive technique. We show that losses are fully explained within the adiabatic approximation and that they are closely linked to the existence of a fundamental core-mode cutoff. This cutoff is equivalent to the core-mode cutoff in depressed-cladding fibers, so that losses in PCF tapers can be obtained semiquantitatively from an equivalent depressed-cladding fiber model. Finally, we discuss the definition of adiabaticity in this open boundary problem.

  16. Adiabatic far-field sub-diffraction imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cang, Hu; Salandrino, Alessandro; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The limited resolution of a conventional optical imaging system stems from the fact that the fine feature information of an object is carried by evanescent waves, which exponentially decays in space and thus cannot reach the imaging plane. We introduce here an adiabatic lens, which utilizes a geometrically conformal surface to mediate the interference of slowly decompressed electromagnetic waves at far field to form images. The decompression is satisfying an adiabatic condition, and by bridging the gap between far field and near field, it allows far-field optical systems to project an image of the near-field features directly. Using these designs, we demonstrated the magnification can be up to 20 times and it is possible to achieve sub-50 nm imaging resolution in visible. Our approach provides a means to extend the domain of geometrical optics to a deep sub-wavelength scale. PMID:26258769

  17. Multidimensional Study of High-Adiabat OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Christopherson, A. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Mora, A.; Radha, P. B.; Shang, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Woo, K. M.; Varchas, G.

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent advances in modeling laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, there remains a predictability gap. This is particularly shown by the shortfall in hot-spot pressures inferred from OMEGA cryogenic implosions. To address this, a series of high-adiabat, cryogenic implosions were performed on OMEGA. These shots were performed with and without single-beam smoothing by spectral dispersion, at low and high drive intensities. These shots represent a regime where good agreement with simulation is expected because of the high adiabat. Multidimensional simulations of these shots will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with experimental indicators of departure from spherical symmetry (``1-D-ness''). The roles of short- and long-wavelength perturbations are considered. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Breaking of dynamical adiabaticity in direct laser acceleration of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Arefiev, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of an electron oscillating in an ion channel and irradiated by a plane electromagnetic wave is considered. It is shown that the interaction qualitatively changes with the increase of electron energy, as the oscillations across the channel become relativistic. The "square-wave-like" profile of the transverse velocity in the relativistic case enables breaking of the adiabaticity that precludes electron energy retention in the non-relativistic case. For an electron with a relativistic factor γ0, the adiabaticity breaks if ωL/ωp0≪√{γ0 } . Under these conditions, the kinetic energy acquired by the electron is retained once the interaction with the laser field ceases. This mechanism notably enables electron heating in regimes that do not require a resonant interaction between the initially oscillating electron and the laser electric field.

  19. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Salmilehto, J; Savenko, I G; Ala-Nissila, T; Möttönen, M

    2015-02-01

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving, such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions.

  20. Reverse engineering of a nonlossy adiabatic Hamiltonian for non-Hermitian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi-Cheng; Chen, Ye-Hong; Huang, Bi-Hua; Xia, Yan; Song, Jie

    2016-11-01

    We generalize the quantum adiabatic theorem to the non-Hermitian system and build a strict adiabaticity condition to make the adiabatic evolution nonlossy when taking into account the effect of the adiabatic phase. According to the strict adiabaticity condition, the nonadiabatic couplings and the effect of the imaginary part of adiabatic phase should be eliminated as much as possible. Also, the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian reverse-engineering method is proposed for adiabatically driving an artificial quantum state. A concrete two-level system is adopted to show the usefulness of the reverse-engineering method. We obtain the desired target state by adjusting extra rotating magnetic fields at a predefined time. Furthermore, the numerical simulation shows that certain noise and dissipation in the systems are no longer undesirable but play a positive role in the scheme. Therefore, the scheme is quite useful for quantum information processing in some dissipative systems.

  1. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  2. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  3. Geometric Phase for Adiabatic Evolutions of General Quantum States

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Biao; Liu, Jie; Niu, Qian; Singh, David J

    2005-01-01

    The concept of a geometric phase (Berry's phase) is generalized to the case of noneigenstates, which is applicable to both linear and nonlinear quantum systems. This is particularly important to nonlinear quantum systems, where, due to the lack of the superposition principle, the adiabatic evolution of a general state cannot be described in terms of eigenstates. For linear quantum systems, our new geometric phase reduces to a statistical average of Berry's phases. Our results are demonstrated with a nonlinear two-level model.

  4. Stellar oscillations - II - The non-adiabatic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Sonoi, T.

    2015-02-01

    A leap forward has been performed due to the space-borne missions, MOST, CoRoT and Kepler. They provided a wealth of observational data, and more precisely oscillation spectra, which have been (and are still) exploited to infer the internal structure of stars. While an adiabatic approach is often sufficient to get information on the stellar equilibrium structures it is not sufficient to get a full understanding of the physics of the oscillation. Indeed, it does not permit one to answer some fundamental questions about the oscillations, such as: What are the physical mechanisms responsible for the pulsations inside stars? What determines the amplitudes? To what extent the adiabatic approximation is valid? All these questions can only be addressed by considering the energy exchanges between the oscillations and the surrounding medium. This lecture therefore aims at considering the energetical aspects of stellar pulsations with particular emphasis on the driving and damping mechanisms. To this end, the full non-adiabatic equations are introduced and thoroughly discussed. Two types of pulsation are distinguished, namely the self-excited oscillations that result from an instability and the solar-like oscillations that result from a balance between driving and damping by turbulent convection. For each type, the main physical principles are presented and illustrated using recent observations obtained with the ultra-high precision photometry space-borne missions (MOST, CoRoT and Kepler). Finally, we consider in detail the physics of scaling relations, which relates the seismic global indices with the global stellar parameters and gave birth to the development of statistical (or ensemble) asteroseismology. Indeed, several of these relations rely on the same cause: the physics of non-adiabatic oscillations.

  5. Adiabatic modulation of cnoidal wave by Kuznetsov - Ma soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. A.; Petnikova, V. M.; Shuvalov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of nonlinear interaction of a cnoidal wave (a “fast” component of vector light field) with localized in time and periodic in space control signal in the form of Kuznetsov-Ma soliton (a "slow" component of the same field) is analytically solved in the adiabatic approximation. The conditions which must be fulfilled for stable propagation of the obtained solution with amplitude and frequency modulation are determined.

  6. Adiabatic pipelining: a key to ternary computing with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Pečar, P; Ramšak, A; Zimic, N; Mraz, M; Lebar Bajec, I

    2008-12-10

    The quantum-dot cellular automaton (QCA), a processing platform based on interacting quantum dots, was introduced by Lent in the mid-1990s. What followed was an exhilarating period with the development of the line, the functionally complete set of logic functions, as well as more complex processing structures, however all in the realm of binary logic. Regardless of these achievements, it has to be acknowledged that the use of binary logic is in computing systems mainly the end result of the technological limitations, which the designers had to cope with in the early days of their design. The first advancement of QCAs to multi-valued (ternary) processing was performed by Lebar Bajec et al, with the argument that processing platforms of the future should not disregard the clear advantages of multi-valued logic. Some of the elementary ternary QCAs, necessary for the construction of more complex processing entities, however, lead to a remarkable increase in size when compared to their binary counterparts. This somewhat negates the advantages gained by entering the ternary computing domain. As it turned out, even the binary QCA had its initial hiccups, which have been solved by the introduction of adiabatic switching and the application of adiabatic pipeline approaches. We present here a study that introduces adiabatic switching into the ternary QCA and employs the adiabatic pipeline approach to successfully solve the issues of elementary ternary QCAs. What is more, the ternary QCAs presented here are sizewise comparable to binary QCAs. This in our view might serve towards their faster adoption.

  7. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of Liquid Fuels and Monopropellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Sensitivity of Liquid Fuels and Monopropellants " 46’b Internat’I Instrumentation Syrup (Bellevue, WA, 30 Apr- 04 May 00) (Statement A) (Deadline: 30 Dec...99) Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of Liquid Fuels and Monopropellants Ismail M. K. Ismail Tom W. Hawkins Senior Engineer/Scientist Group Leader...hazard sensitivity, propellants, fuels, oxidizers ABSTRACT Liquid rocket fuels and monopropellants can be sensitive to rapid compression. Such liquids

  8. On optimal methods for adiabatic quantum state transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando

    2013-03-01

    Many problems in science could be solved by preparing the low-energy quantum state (or any eigenstate) of a Hamiltonian. A common example is the Boolean satisfiability problem, where each clause can be mapped to the energy of an interacting many-body system, and the problem reduces to minimizing the energy. In quantum computing, adiabatic quantum state transformations (ASTs) provide a tool for preparing the quantum state. ASTs are conventionally implemented via slow or adiabatic perturbations to the Hamiltonian, relying on the quantum adiabatic theorem. Nevertheless, more efficient implementations of ASTs exist. In this talk I will review recently developed methods for ASTs that are more efficient and require less assumptions on the Hamiltonians than the conventional implementation. Such methods involve measurements of the states along the evolution path and have a best-case implementation cost of L/G, where L is the length of the (evolved) state path and G is a lower bound to the spectral gap of the Hamiltonians. I will show that this cost is optimal and comment on results of the gap amplification problem, where the goal is to reduce the cost by increasing G. We acknowledge support from NSF through the CCF program and the LDRD programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.

  10. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  11. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Toussaint, U. V.; Timucin, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum excitation gap. g min, = O(n 2(exp -n/2), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to 'the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  12. The performance of the quantum adiabatic algorithm on spike Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghang; Crosson, Elizabeth

    Spike Hamiltonians arise from optimization instances for which the adiabatic algorithm provably out performs classical simulated annealing. In this work, we study the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm for solving the “the Hamming weight with a spike” problem by analyzing the scaling of the spectral gap at the critical point for various sizes of the barrier. Our main result is a rigorous lower bound on the minimum spectral gap for the adiabatic evolution when the bit-symmetric cost function has a thin but polynomially high barrier, which is based on a comparison argument and an improved variational ansatz for the ground state. We also adapt the discrete WKB method for the case of abruptly changing potentials and compare it with the predictions of the spin coherent instanton method which was previously used by Farhi, Goldstone and Gutmann. Finally, our improved ansatz for the ground state leads to a method for predicting the location of avoided crossings in the excited energy states of the thin spike Hamiltonian, and we use a recursion relation to understand the ordering of some of these avoided crossings as a step towards analyzing the previously observed diabatic cascade phenomenon.

  13. Adiabatic shear mechanisms for the hard cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Caixu; Wang, Bo; Liu, Xianli; Feng, Huize; Cai, Chunbin

    2015-05-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remains some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high strain domain caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  14. Irreconcilable difference between quantum walks and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Meyer, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Continuous-time quantum walks and adiabatic quantum evolution are two general techniques for quantum computing, both of which are described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolutions by Schrödinger's equation. In the former, the Hamiltonian is fixed, while in the latter, the Hamiltonian varies with time. As a result, their formulations of Grover's algorithm evolve differently through Hilbert space. We show that this difference is fundamental; they cannot be made to evolve along each other's path without introducing structure more powerful than the standard oracle for unstructured search. For an adiabatic quantum evolution to evolve like the quantum walk search algorithm, it must interpolate between three fixed Hamiltonians, one of which is complex and introduces structure that is stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Conversely, for a quantum walk to evolve along the path of the adiabatic search algorithm, it must be a chiral quantum walk on a weighted, directed star graph with structure that is also stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Thus, the two techniques, although similar in being described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolution, compute by fundamentally irreconcilable means.

  15. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGES

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; ...

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficientmore » as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.« less

  16. Adiabatic dynamics with classical noise in optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guanglei; Daley, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The technique of adiabatic state preparation is an interesting potential tool for the realisation of sensitive many-body states with ultra-cold atoms at low temperatures. However, questions remain regarding the influence of classical noise in these adiabatic dynamics. We investigate such dynamics in a situation where a level dressing scheme can make amplitude noise in an optical lattice proportional to the Hamiltonian, leading to a quantum Zeno effect for non-adiabatic transitions. We compute the dynamics using stochastic many-body Schrödinger equation and master equation approaches. Taking the examples of 1D Bose-Hubbard model from Mott insulator phase to superfluid phase and comparing with analytical calculations for a two-level system, we demonstrate that when the total time for the process is limited, properly transformed noise can lead to an increased final fidelity in the state preparation. We consider the dynamics also in the presence of imperfections, studying the resulting heating and dephasing for the many-body states, and identifying optimal regimes for future experiments.

  17. Adiabatic invariants for the regular region of the Dicke model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastarrachea-Magnani, M. A.; Relaño, A.; Lerma-Hernández, S.; López-del-Carpio, B.; Chávez-Carlos, J.; Hirsch, J. G.

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic invariants for the non-integrable Dicke model are introduced. They are shown to provide approximate second integrals of motion in the energy region where the system exhibits a regular dynamics. This low-energy region, present for any set of values of the Hamiltonian parameters is described both with a semiclassical and a full quantum analysis in a broad region of the parameter space. Peres lattices in this region exhibit that many observables vary smoothly with energy, along distinct lines which beg for a formal description. It is demonstrated how the adiabatic invariants provide a rationale to their presence in many cases. They are built employing the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, valid when a fast system is coupled to a much slower one. As the Dicke model has one bosonic and one fermionic degree of freedom, two versions of the approximation are used, depending on which one is the faster. In both cases a noticeably accord with exact numerical results is obtained. The employment of the adiabatic invariants provides a simple and clear theoretical framework to study the physical phenomenology associated to these regimes, far beyond the energies where a quadratic approximation around the minimal energy configuration can be used.

  18. Experimental implementation of an adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Matthias; van Dam, Wim; Hogg, Tad; Breyta, Greg; Chuang, Isaac

    2003-03-01

    A novel quantum algorithm using adiabatic evolution was recently presented by Ed Farhi [1] and Tad Hogg [2]. This algorithm represents a remarkable discovery because it offers new insights into the usefulness of quantum resources. An experimental demonstration of an adiabatic algorithm has remained beyond reach because it requires an experimentally accessible Hamiltonian which encodes the problem and which must also be smoothly varied over time. We present tools to overcome these difficulties by discretizing the algorithm and extending average Hamiltonian techniques [3]. We used these techniques in the first experimental demonstration of an adiabatic optimization algorithm: solving an instance of the MAXCUT problem using three qubits and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. We show that there exists an optimal run-time of the algorithm which can be predicted using a previously developed decoherence model. [1] E. Farhi et al., quant-ph/0001106 (2000) [2] T. Hogg, PRA, 61, 052311 (2000) [3] W. Rhim, A. Pines, J. Waugh, PRL, 24,218 (1970)

  19. Analysis of a High-Adiabat Cryogenic Implosion on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, A. R.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Forrest, C. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Delettrez, J. A.; Radha, P. B.; Howard, J.

    2014-10-01

    The performance of high-adiabat implosions >~ 10 is marginally affected by nonuniformities because of the strong ablative stabilization. To test the validity of the one-dimensional (1-D) physics included in existing hydrocodes, a study of high-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions is carried out by comparing the results of 1-D simulations with several measured quantities. It is found that after including nonlocal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and hot electrons, 1-D simulations reproduce most of the observables with reasonable accuracy. Since the analysis is applied to the only high-adiabat DT implosion fielded on OMEGA, these results do not fully validate the 1-D physics of current hydrocodes. However, this work shows the framework for establishing a validation capability of the 1-D physics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  20. Adiabatic Computation of Internal Blast from Aluminum-Cased Charges in Air.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    relation K = K (V/RT) An (6)p n where Aln is the change in number of moles of gas for the synthesis reaction . Then for any species the mole number is...point, to an increasing extent, A12 0 3 () is being converted to A12 0(g) by the endothermic (energy-absorbing) reaction AI2.0 3 (l) + 4 Al - 3 AI20(g...effect. 1. Simple production of aluminum nitride: AI(l) + 1/2N,(g) -AIN(s) The reaction is strongly exothermic (though less so than the production of

  1. Non-adiabatic effects in thermochemistry, spectroscopy and kinetics: the general importance of all three Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    Using a simple model Hamiltonian, the three correction terms for Born-Oppenheimer (BO) breakdown, the adiabatic diagonal correction (DC), the first-derivative momentum non-adiabatic correction (FD), and the second-derivative kinetic-energy non-adiabatic correction (SD), are shown to all contribute to thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties as well as to thermal non-diabatic chemical reaction rates. While DC often accounts for >80% of thermodynamic and spectroscopic property changes, the commonly used practice of including only the FD correction in kinetics calculations is rarely found to be adequate. For electron-transfer reactions not in the inverted region, the common physical picture that diabatic processes occur because of surface hopping at the transition state is proven inadequate as the DC acts first to block access, increasing the transition state energy by (ℏω)(2)λ/16J(2) (where λ is the reorganization energy, J the electronic coupling and ω the vibration frequency). However, the rate constant in the weakly-coupled Golden-Rule limit is identified as being only inversely proportional to this change rather than exponentially damped, owing to the effects of tunneling and surface hopping. Such weakly-coupled long-range electron-transfer processes should therefore not be described as "non-adiabatic" processes as they are easily described by Born-Huang ground-state adiabatic surfaces made by adding the DC to the BO surfaces; instead, they should be called just "non-Born-Oppenheimer" processes. The model system studied consists of two diabatic harmonic potential-energy surfaces coupled linearly through a single vibration, the "two-site Holstein model". Analytical expressions are derived for the BO breakdown terms, and the model is solved over a large parameter space focusing on both the lowest-energy spectroscopic transitions and the quantum dynamics of coherent-state wavepackets. BO breakdown is investigated pertinent to: ammonia inversion, aromaticity

  2. H-bonding in protein hydration revisited

    PubMed Central

    Petukhov, Michael; Rychkov, Georgy; Firsov, Leonid; Serrano, Luis

    2004-01-01

    H-bonding between protein surface polar/charged groups and water is one of the key factors of protein hydration. Here, we introduce an Accessible Surface Area (ASA) model for computationally efficient estimation of a free energy of water–protein H-bonding at any given protein conformation. The free energy of water–protein H-bonds is estimated using empirical formulas describing probabilities of hydrogen bond formation that were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of water molecules at the surface of a small protein, Crambin, from the Abyssinian cabbage (Crambe abyssinica) seed. The results suggest that atomic solvation parameters (ASP) widely used in continuum hydration models might be dependent on ASA for polar/charged atoms under consideration. The predictions of the model are found to be in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data on model compounds. This model combines the computational speed of ASA potential, with the high resolution of more sophisticated solvation methods. PMID:15238635

  3. H-bonding in protein hydration revisited.

    PubMed

    Petukhov, Michael; Rychkov, Georgy; Firsov, Leonid; Serrano, Luis

    2004-08-01

    H-bonding between protein surface polar/charged groups and water is one of the key factors of protein hydration. Here, we introduce an Accessible Surface Area (ASA) model for computationally efficient estimation of a free energy of water-protein H-bonding at any given protein conformation. The free energy of water-protein H-bonds is estimated using empirical formulas describing probabilities of hydrogen bond formation that were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of water molecules at the surface of a small protein, Crambin, from the Abyssinian cabbage (Crambe abyssinica) seed. The results suggest that atomic solvation parameters (ASP) widely used in continuum hydration models might be dependent on ASA for polar/charged atoms under consideration. The predictions of the model are found to be in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data on model compounds. This model combines the computational speed of ASA potential, with the high resolution of more sophisticated solvation methods.

  4. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  5. Interplay between halogen bond and lithium bond in MCN-LiCN-XCCH (M = H, Li, and Na; X = Cl, Br, and I) complex: the enhancement of halogen bond by a lithium bond.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingzhong; Li, Ran; Liu, Zhenbo; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo

    2011-11-30

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to study the complex of MCN-LiCN-XCCH (M = H, Li, and Na; X = Cl, Br, and I). The aim is to study the cooperative effect between halogen bond and lithium bond. The alkali metal has an enhancing effect on the lithium bond, making it increased by 77 and 94% for the Li and Na, respectively. There is the cooperativity between the lithium bond and halogen bond. The former has a larger enhancing effect on the latter, being in a range of 11.7-29.4%. The effect of cooperativity on the halogen bond is dependent on the type of metal and halogen atoms. The enhancing mechanism has been analyzed in views with the orbital interaction, charge transfer, dipole moment, polarizability, atom charges, and electrostatic potentials. The results show that the electrostatic interaction plays an important role in the enhancement of halogen bond.

  6. 19 CFR 113.54 - Cancellation of erroneous charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the claim for liquidated damages did not in fact occur. (b) Carnets. Section 114.34 of this chapter... OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Assessment of Damages and Cancellation of Bond § 113.54 Cancellation of erroneous charges. (a) Bonds. Section 172.11(b) of this chapter sets forth provisions relating to...

  7. Does fluorine participate in halogen bonding?

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Kiamars; Lesani, Mina

    2015-03-16

    When R is sufficiently electron withdrawing, the fluorine in the R-F molecules could interact with electron donors (e.g., ammonia) and form a noncovalent bond (F⋅⋅⋅N). Although these interactions are usually categorized as halogen bonding, our studies show that there are fundamental differences between these interactions and halogen bonds. Although the anisotropic distribution of electronic charge around a halogen is responsible for halogen bond formations, the electronic charge around the fluorine in these molecules is spherical. According to source function analysis, F is the sink of electron density at the F⋅⋅⋅N BCP, whereas other halogens are the source. In contrast to halogen bonds, the F⋅⋅⋅N interactions cannot be regarded as lump-hole interactions; there is no hole in the valence shell charge concentration (VSCC) of fluorine. Although the quadruple moment of Cl and Br is mainly responsible for the existence of σ-holes, it is negligibly small in the fluorine. Here, the atomic dipole moment of F plays a stabilizing role in the formation of F⋅⋅⋅N bonds. Interacting quantum atoms (IQA) analysis indicates that the interaction between halogen and nitrogen in the halogen bonds is attractive, whereas it is repulsive in the F⋅⋅⋅N interactions. Virial-based atomic energies show that the fluorine, in contrast to Cl and Br, stabilize upon complex formation. According to these differences, it seems that the F⋅⋅⋅N interactions should be referred to as "fluorine bond" instead of halogen bond.

  8. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  9. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  10. Influence of adduct stereochemistry and hydrogen-bonding solvents on photoinduced charge transfer in a covalent benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-nucleoside adduct on picosecond time scales

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, D. ); Shafirovich, V.Y.; Geacintov, N.E. )

    1994-09-29

    Photoinduced electron transfer occurs with different rate constants upon picosecond laser pulse excitation of the stereoisomeric (+)-trans- and (-)-cis-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-N[sup 2]-deoxyguanosine covalently linked adducts (BPDE-N[sup 2]-dG, bond with 10S absolute configuration) in polar solvents (N,N[prime]-dimethylformamide (DMF), and the hydrogen-bonding liquids H[sub 2]O, D[sub 2]O, formamide (FA), and N-methylformamide (NMF)). In the case of (+)-trans-BPDE-dG in DMF, photoinduced electron transfer occurs in the normal Marcus region, from dG to the pyrenyl residue singlet with a rate constant k[sub s] = (9.1 [+-] 0.9) x 10[sup 9] s[sup [minus]1], which is followed by a slower recombination (k[sub r] = (1.8 + 0.5) x 10[sup 9] s[sup [minus]1]) in the inverted Marcus region. In the cis-stereoisomeric adduct, both rate constants are enhanced by a factor of approximately 5. The presence of the hydrogen-bonding network in NMF and FA exerts opposite effects on these rate constants, decreasing k[sub s] and increasing k[sub r] by factors of 2-5. In aqueous solutions these effects are even more pronounced, and radical ions are not observed since k[sub r] [much gt] k[sub s]. A kinetic isotope effect on the delay of the pyrenyl singlets in H[sub 2]O and D[sub 2]O (k[sub s](H[sub 2]O)/k[sub s](D[sub 2]O) = 1.3-1.5) suggests that a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism may be operative in aqueous solutions. 51 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Chemical bonding in electron-deficient boron oxide clusters: core boronyl groups, dual 3c-4e hypervalent bonds, and rhombic 4c-4e bonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lu, Haigang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2014-04-28

    We explore the structural and bonding properties of the electron-deficient boron oxide clusters, using a series of B3On(-/0/+) (n = 2-4) clusters as examples. Global-minimum structures of these boron oxide clusters are identified via unbiased Coalescence Kick and Basin Hopping searches, which show a remarkable size and charge-state dependence. An array of new bonding elements are revealed: core boronyl groups, dual 3c-4e hypervalent bonds (ω-bonds), and rhombic 4c-4e bonds (o-bonds). In favorable cases, oxygen can exhaust all its 2s/2p electrons to facilitate the formation of B-O bonds. The current findings should help understand the bonding nature of low-dimensional boron oxide nanomaterials and bulk boron oxides.

  12. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  13. Halogen bonding origin properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobza, Pavel

    2015-12-01

    σ-hole bonding represents an unusual and novel type of noncovalent interactions in which atom with σ- hole interacts with Lewis base such as an electronegative atom (oxygen, nitrogen, …) or aromatic systems. This bonding is of electrostatic nature since the σ-hole bears a positive charge. Dispersion energy forms equally important energy term what is due to the fact that two heavy atoms (e.g. halogen and oxygen) having high polarizability lie close together (the respective distance is typically shorter than the sum of van der Waals radii). Among different types of σ-hole bondings the halogen bonding is by far the most known but chalcogen and pnictogen bondings are important as well.

  14. Halogen bonding origin properties and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hobza, Pavel

    2015-12-31

    σ-hole bonding represents an unusual and novel type of noncovalent interactions in which atom with σ- hole interacts with Lewis base such as an electronegative atom (oxygen, nitrogen, …) or aromatic systems. This bonding is of electrostatic nature since the σ-hole bears a positive charge. Dispersion energy forms equally important energy term what is due to the fact that two heavy atoms (e.g. halogen and oxygen) having high polarizability lie close together (the respective distance is typically shorter than the sum of van der Waals radii). Among different types of σ-hole bondings the halogen bonding is by far the most known but chalcogen and pnictogen bondings are important as well.

  15. Bond Energies in Models of the Schrock Metathesis Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliu, Monica; Li, Shenggang; Arduengo, Anthony J.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-06-23

    Heats of formation, adiabatic and diabatic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of the model Schrock-type metal complexes M(NH)(CRR)(OH)₂ (M = Cr, Mo, W; CRR = CH₂, CHF, CF₂) and MO₂(OH)₂ compounds, and Brønsted acidities and fluoride affinities for the M(NH)(CH₂)(OH) ₂ transition metal complexes are predicted using high level CCSD(T) calculations. The metallacycle intermediates formed by reaction of C₂H4 with M(NH)-(CH₂)(OH)2 and MO₂(OH)₂ are investigated at the same level of theory. Additional corrections were added to the complete basis set limit to obtain near chemical accuracy ((1 kcal/mol). A comparison between adiabatic and diabatic BDEs is made and provides an explanation of trends in the BDEs. Electronegative groups bonded on the carbenic carbon lead to less stable Schrock-type complexes as the adiabatic BDEs ofMdCF₂ andMdCHF bonds are much lower than theMdCH₂ bonds. The Cr compounds have smaller BDEs than theWorMo complexes and should be less stable. Different M(NH)(OH)₂(C₃H₆) and MO(OH)₂(OC₂H4) metallacycle intermediates are investigated, and the lowest-energy metallacycles have a square pyramidal geometry. The results show that consideration of the singlet_triplet splitting in the carbene in the initial catalyst as well as in the metal product formed by the retro [2+2] cycloaddition is a critical component in the design of an effective olefin metathesis catalyst in terms of the parent catalyst and the groups being transferred.

  16. Beyond structure: ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of non-adiabatic wavepacket dynamics.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-12-16

    The excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of polyatomic molecules, leading to the coupling of structural and electronic dynamics, is a fundamentally important yet challenging problem for both experiment and theory. Ongoing developments in ultrafast extreme vacuum ultraviolet (XUV) and soft X-ray sources present new probes of coupled electronic-structural dynamics because of their novel and desirable characteristics. As one example, inner-shell spectroscopy offers localized, atom-specific probes of evolving electronic structure and bonding (via chemical shifts). In this work, we present the first on-the-fly ultrafast X-ray time-resolved absorption spectrum simulations of excited state wavepacket dynamics: photo-excited ethylene. This was achieved by coupling the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) method, employing on-the-fly dynamics simulations, with high-level algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) X-ray absorption cross-section calculations. Using the excited state dynamics of ethylene as a test case, we assessed the ability of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to project out the electronic character of complex wavepacket dynamics, and evaluated the sensitivity of the calculated spectra to large amplitude nuclear motion. In particular, we demonstrate the pronounced sensitivity of the pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum to the electronic and structural evolution of the excited-state wavepacket. We conclude that ultrafast time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy may become a powerful tool in the interrogation of excited state non-adiabatic molecular dynamics.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving for trapped-ion displacement in phase space

    PubMed Central

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; del Campo, Adolfo; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    The application of adiabatic protocols in quantum technologies is severely limited by environmental sources of noise and decoherence. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving constitute a powerful alternative that speed up time-evolution while mimicking adiabatic dynamics. Here we report the experimental implementation of counterdiabatic driving in a continuous variable system, a shortcut to the adiabatic transport of a trapped ion in phase space. The resulting dynamics is equivalent to a ‘fast-motion video' of the adiabatic trajectory. The robustness of this protocol is shown to surpass that of competing schemes based on classical local controls and Fourier optimization methods. Our results demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity provide a robust speedup of quantum protocols of wide applicability in quantum technologies. PMID:27669897

  18. Shear Faulting and Adiabatic Heating: Experimental Results from Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, N.; Schulson, E. M.; Renshaw, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Ice exhibits two distinct modes of shear faulting (Golding et al. Acta Materialia, 2010;58:5043), namely frictional or Coulombic (C) faulting under moderate levels of confinement and non-frictional or plastic (P) faulting under high levels of confinement. The mechanisms governing C-faulting have previously been discussed in connection with the comb-crack model (Renshaw & Schulson Nature, 2001;412:897). Here we examine the physical process[es] that trigger P-faulting. Systematic experiments on laboratory grown granular and columnar polycrystalline ice loaded triaxially under a high degree of confinement at -10 oC to -40 oC at applied strain rates 10-5 s-1 to 10-1 s-1 trace the micro-mechanical evolution of P-faulting. Terminal failure is characterized by a sudden brittle-like loss in load bearing capacity, the development of a narrow shear band, comprised of recrystallized grains and oriented on a plane of maximum shear, and localized heating. Possible mechanisms considered to account for the localization include: 1) adiabatic heating, 2) localized material softening through a reduction in dislocation density caused by dynamic recrystallization and 3) a transition from power-law creep to grain-size-dependent diffusional creep as a result of grain refinement caused by dynamic recrystallization. Our results indicate that, although recrystallization develops dynamically during loading, microstructural development does not significantly affect shear localization in ice. Nor does it affect the character of the fault. The minimum levels of deformation required to generate faulting are found to be consistent with those predicted for adiabatic shear instability. The present observations suggest that under specific conditions adiabatic heating, rather than dynamic recrystallization, may lead to material instability and shear faulting.

  19. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  20. Optical force on atoms with periodic adiabatic rapid passage sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiyue

    Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) is a long-existing method to invert the population of a two-level nuclear spin system. Its extension to the optical domain necessitates a frequency chirped light pulse to interact with a two-level atom through dipole interaction. In this dissertation ARP processes for various pulse schemes and pulse parameters have been studied theoretically and experimentally. The non-adiabatic transition probability of ARP was quantified to characterize the efficiency of ARP for population transfer. Unanticipated regularities were found in the pulse parameter space. ARP sequences in periodic phase coherent counter-propagating light pulses can be used to produce large optical forces on atoms. The magnitude of the force is proportional to the pulse repetition rate. So the force can be much larger than the usual radiative force if the pulse repetition rate is much higher than the spontaneous emission rate. The behavior of the atoms in such periodic ARP fields without spontaneous emission is well described by a periodic Hamiltonian. By investigating the evolution of the Bloch vector on the Bloch sphere, we related the average optical force on atoms to the non-adiabatic transition probability of a single pulse. Syncopation time has to be introduced in the pulsing scheme to produce a directional force in the presence of spontaneous emission. Experimentally, we observed the force on He* atoms by the deflection of the atomic beam with periodic chirped pulses from counter-propagating pulse trains. The chirped pulse train was realized by synchronized phase and amplitude modulation of the light from a cw diode laser. The Fourier spectrum of the modulated light was monitored to guarantee the quality of the chirped pulses. The measured ARP forces are about half of the theoretical predictions. Not only have we shown that such forces are huge and robust, but we have also been able to map the forces in the two dimensional pulse parameter space. The force

  1. Major Steps in the Discovery of Adiabatic Shear Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Bradley; Walley, Stephen M.; Yang, Rong; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2015-10-01

    The standard story of the discovery of adiabatic shear bands is that it began with the American researchers Zener and Hollomon's famous 1944 paper where the phenomenon was first reported and named. However, a recent discovery by one of us (SMW) in the Cambridge University Library has shown that the phenomenon was discovered and described by a Russian researcher, V.P. Kravz-Tarnavskii, in 1928. A follow-up paper was published by two of his colleagues in 1935. Translations of the 1928 and 1935 papers may be found at http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.1353.

  2. Adiabatic transport of qubits around a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, David; Moro, Olivia

    2017-03-01

    We consider localized qubits evolving around a black hole following a quantum adiabatic dynamics. We develop a geometric structure (based on fibre bundles) permitting to describe the quantum states of a qubit and the spacetime geometry in a single framework. The quantum decoherence induced by the black hole on the qubit is analysed in this framework (the role of the dynamical and geometric phases in this decoherence is treated), especially for the quantum teleportation protocol when one qubit falls to the event horizon. A simple formula to compute the fidelity of the teleportation is derived. The case of a Schwarzschild black hole is analysed.

  3. From Classical Nonlinear Integrable Systems to Quantum Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2016-08-01

    Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that is reduced to a classical nonlinear integrable equation. For a given time-dependent Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is introduced to prevent nonadiabatic transitions. Using the fact that the equation for the dynamical invariant is equivalent to the Lax equation in nonlinear integrable systems, we obtain the counterdiabatic term exactly. The counterdiabatic term is available when the corresponding Lax pair exists and the solvable systems are classified in a unified and systematic way. Multisoliton potentials obtained from the Korteweg-de Vries equation and isotropic X Y spin chains from the Toda equations are studied in detail.

  4. Relativistic blast waves in two dimensions. I - The adiabatic case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate solutions are presented for the dynamical evolution of strong adiabatic relativistic blast waves which result from a point explosion in an ambient gas in which the density varies both with distance from the explosion center and with polar angle in axisymmetry. Solutions are analytical or quasi-analytical for the extreme relativistic case and numerical for the arbitrarily relativistic case. Some general properties of nonplanar relativistic shocks are also discussed, including the incoherence of spherical ultrarelativistic blast-wave fronts on angular scales greater than the reciprocal of the shock Lorentz factor, as well as the conditions for producing blast-wave acceleration.

  5. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  6. More bang for your buck: Super-adiabatic quantum engines

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Goold, J.; Paternostro, M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical untenability of the quasi-static assumption makes any realistic engine intrinsically irreversible and its operating time finite, thus implying friction effects at short cycle times. An important technological goal is thus the design of maximally efficient engines working at the maximum possible power. We show that, by utilising shortcuts to adiabaticity in a quantum engine cycle, one can engineer a thermodynamic cycle working at finite power and zero friction. Our findings are illustrated using a harmonic oscillator undergoing a quantum Otto cycle. PMID:25163421

  7. Non-Adiabatic Holonomic Quantum Gates in an atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.; Sjoqvist, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computation is essentially the implementation of a universal set of quantum gate operations on a set of qubits, which is reliable in the presence of noise. We propose a scheme to perform robust gates in an atomic four-level system using the idea of non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation proposed in [1]. The gates are realized by applying sequences of short laser pulses that drive transitions between the four energy levels in such a way that the dynamical phases vanish. [4pt] [1] E. Sjoqvist, D.M. Tong, B. Hessmo, M. Johansson, K. Singh, arXiv:1107.5127v2 [quant-ph

  8. Metallization of nanofilms in strong adiabatic electric fields.

    PubMed

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Kling, Matthias F; Stockman, Mark I

    2010-08-20

    We introduce an effect of metallization of dielectric nanofilms by strong, adiabatically varying electric fields. The metallization causes optical properties of a dielectric film to become similar to those of a plasmonic metal (strong absorption and negative permittivity at low optical frequencies). This is a quantum effect, which is exponentially size-dependent, occurring at fields on the order of 0.1 V/Å and pulse durations ranging from ∼1 fs to ∼10 ns for a film thickness of 3-10 nm.

  9. Metallization of Nanofilms in Strong Adiabatic Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Kling, Matthias F.; Stockman, Mark I.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce an effect of metallization of dielectric nanofilms by strong, adiabatically varying electric fields. The metallization causes optical properties of a dielectric film to become similar to those of a plasmonic metal (strong absorption and negative permittivity at low optical frequencies). This is a quantum effect, which is exponentially size-dependent, occurring at fields on the order of 0.1V/Å and pulse durations ranging from ˜1fs to ˜10ns for a film thickness of 3-10 nm.

  10. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  11. Non-adiabatic pumping in an oscillating-piston model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuchem, Maya; Dittrich, Thomas; Cohen, Doron

    2012-05-01

    We consider the prototypical "piston pump" operating on a ring, where a circulating current is induced by means of an AC driving. This can be regarded as a generalized Fermi-Ulam model, incorporating a finite-height moving wall (piston) and non-trivial topology (ring). The amount of particles transported per cycle is determined by a layered structure of phase space. Each layer is characterized by a different drift velocity. We discuss the differences compared with the adiabatic and Boltzmann pictures, and highlight the significance of the "diabatic" contribution that might lead to a counter-stirring effect.

  12. Optimized sympathetic cooling of atomic mixtures via fast adiabatic strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Stephen; Sundaram, Bala; Onofrio, Roberto

    2011-11-15

    We discuss fast frictionless cooling techniques in the framework of sympathetic cooling of cold atomic mixtures. It is argued that optimal cooling of an atomic species--in which the deepest quantum degeneracy regime is achieved--may be obtained by means of sympathetic cooling with another species whose trapping frequency is dynamically changed to maintain constancy of the Lewis-Riesenfeld adiabatic invariant. Advantages and limitations of this cooling strategy are discussed, with particular regard to the possibility of cooling Fermi gases to a deeper degenerate regime.

  13. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  14. Propagation of laser pulses under conditions of adiabatic population transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipkin, V G; Manushkin, D V; Timofeev, V P

    1998-12-31

    A medium of three-level absorbing atoms is considered under conditions of adiabatic population transfer. A study is made of the characteristics of spatial propagation of two delayed (relative to one another) Gaussian pulses. It is shown that selective excitation of a two-photon resonant state with a near-unity probability is conserved over the length of a medium, which is considerably greater than the absorption length of a weak probe pulse in the absence of the second field. (physical basis of quantum electronics)

  15. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in Tm{sup 3+}:YAG

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A. L.; Lauro, R.; Louchet, A.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAG crystal. Tm{sup 3+}:YAG is a promising material for use in quantum information processing applications, but as yet there are few experimental investigations of coherent Raman processes in this material. We investigate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening and Rabi frequency on the transfer efficiency and the width of the two-photon spectrum. Simulations of the complete Tm{sup 3+}:YAG system are presented along with the corresponding experimental results.

  16. Adiabatic invariants in stellar dynamics. 2: Gravitational shocking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    A new theory of gravitational shocking based on time-dependent perturbation theory shows that the changes in energy and angular momentum due to a slowly varying disturbance are not exponentially small for stellar dynamical systems in general. It predicts significant shock heating by slowly varying perturbations previously thought to be negligible according to the adiabatic criterion. The theory extends the scenarios traditionally computed only with the impulse approximation and is applicable to a wide class of disturbances. The approach is applied specifically to the problem of disk shocking of star clusters.

  17. Modeling of the Adiabatic and Isothermal Methanation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubova, Jekaterina; Bazbauers, Gatis; Markova, Darja

    2011-01-01

    Increased use of biomass offers one of the ways to reduce anthropogenic impact on the environment. Using various biomass conversion processes, it is possible to obtain different types of fuels: • solid, e.g. bio-carbon; • liquid, e.g. biodiesel and ethanol; • gaseous, e.g. biomethane. Biomethane can be used in the transport and energy sector, and the total methane production efficiency can reach 65%. By modeling adiabatic and isothermal methanation processes, the most effective one from the methane production point of view is defined. Influence of the process parameters on the overall efficiency of the methane production is determined.

  18. Control of adiabatic light transfer in coupled waveguides with longitudinally varying detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oukraou, Hassan; Vittadello, Laura; Coda, Virginie; Ciret, Charles; Alonzo, Massimo; Rangelov, Andon A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Montemezzani, Germano

    2017-02-01

    We study adiabatic light transfer in systems of two coupled waveguides with spatially varying detuning of the propagation constants, providing an analogy to the quantum phenomena of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) and two-state stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (two-state STIRAP). Experimental demonstration using a photoinduction technique confirms the robust and broadband character of the structures that act as broadband directional couplers and broadband beam splitters, respectively.

  19. Shortcut to Adiabatic Passage in Two- and Three-Level Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2010-09-17

    We propose a method to speed up adiabatic passage techniques in two-level and three-level atoms extending to the short-time domain their robustness with respect to parameter variations. It supplements or substitutes the standard laser beam setups with auxiliary pulses that steer the system along the adiabatic path. Compared to other strategies, such as composite pulses or the original adiabatic techniques, it provides a fast and robust approach to population control.

  20. Determining the Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm using Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-18

    efficiently a quantum computer could solve optimization problems using the quantum adiabatic algorithm (QAA). Comparisons were made with a classical...Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm , Optimization, Monte Carlo, quantum computer, satisfiability problems, spin glass... quantum adiabatic algorithm (QAA). Comparisons were made with a classical heuristic algorithm , WalkSAT. A preliminary study was also made to see if the

  1. Shortcut to adiabatic control of soliton matter waves by tunable interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Sun, Kun; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for shortcut to adiabatic control of soliton matter waves in harmonic traps. The tunable interaction controlled by Feshbach resonance is inversely designed to achieve fast and high-fidelity compression of soliton matter waves as compared to the conventional adiabatic compression. These results pave the way to control the nonlinear dynamics for matter waves and optical solitons by using shortcuts to adiabaticity. PMID:28009007

  2. Experimental studies of adiabatic flow boiling in fractal-like branching microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Brian J.; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.

    2011-01-15

    Experimental results of adiabatic boiling of water flowing through a fractal-like branching microchannel network are presented and compared to numerical model simulations. The goal is to assess the ability of current pressure loss models applied to a bifurcating flow geometry. The fractal-like branching channel network is based on channel length and width ratios between adjacent branching levels of 2{sup -1/2}. There are four branching sections for a total flow length of 18 mm, a channel height of 150 {mu}m and a terminal channel width of 100 {mu}m. The channels were Deep Reactive Ion Etched (DRIE) into a silicon disk. A Pyrex disk was anodically bonded to the silicon to form the channel top to allow visualization of the flow within the channels. The flow rates ranged from 100 to 225 g/min and the inlet subcooling levels varied from 0.5 to 6 C. Pressure drop along the flow network and time averaged void fraction in each branching level were measured for each of the test conditions. The measured pressure drop ranged from 20 to 90 kPa, and the measured void fraction ranged from 0.3 to 0.9. The measured pressure drop results agree well with separated flow model predictions accounting for the varying flow geometry. The measured void fraction results followed the same trends as the model; however, the scatter in the experimental results is rather large. (author)

  3. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-02-26

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs.

  4. Fast adiabatic quantum state transfer and entanglement generation between two atoms via dressed states

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2017-01-01

    We propose a dressed-state scheme to achieve shortcuts to adiabaticity in atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics for speeding up adiabatic two-atom quantum state transfer and maximum entanglement generation. Compared with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the dressed-state scheme greatly shortens the operation time in a non-adiabatic way. By means of some numerical simulations, we determine the parameters which can guarantee the feasibility and efficiency both in theory and experiment. Besides, numerical simulations also show the scheme is robust against the variations in the parameters, atomic spontaneous emissions and the photon leakages from the cavity.

  5. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov- Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs. PMID:26916031

  6. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  7. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; Jau, Yuan -Yu; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2015-01-28

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (CZ) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly-excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. As a result, for reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a CZ gate in < 10 μs with error probability on the order of 10-3.

  8. Sliding Seal Materials for Adiabatic Engines, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.; Wei, W.

    1986-01-01

    An essential task in the development of the heavy-duty adiabatic diesel engine is identification and improvements of reliable, low-friction piston seal materials. In the present study, the sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, and loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In addition, silicon nitride and partially stabilized zirconia disks were ion implanted with TiNi, Ni, Co, and Cr, and subsequently run against carbide pins, with the objective of producing reduced friction via solid lubrication at elevated temperature. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Electron microscopy was used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing, and Auger electron spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Unmodified ceramic sliding couples were characterized at all temperatures by friction coefficients of 0.24 and above. The coefficient at 800 C in an oxidizing environment was reduced to below 0.1, for certain material combinations, by the ion implanation of TiNi or Co. This beneficial effect was found to derive from lubricious Ti, Ni, and Co oxides.

  9. Breakdown of adiabatic electron behavior in expanding magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichko, Emily; Egedal, Jan; Daughton, William

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection the incoming magnetic flux tubes expand in the inflow region. If this expansion is sufficiently slow the results are well described by a previously developed adiabatic model. Using kinetic simulations in a simple geometry and applying rapid magnetic perturbations, this study investigates the point at which the adiabatic assumption fails. To this end a 2D VPIC simulation was constructed, where the magnetic field in a uniform plasma is perturbed by externally driven currents. By varying the onset speed of the magnetic perturbation and the electron thermal speed, we found a sharp threshold at which this model breaks down. We believe that this point is determined by the time of the magnetic pumping compared to the electron transit time through the region, i.e. ω ~ Ḃ / B ~vthe / L . This threshold was also characterized by the launching of Whistler waves and with time domain structures, such as electron holes and double layers, which agree with those seen during magnetic reconnection and may relate to similar structures in the Van Allen Belts. NSF GEM award 1405166 and NASA grant NNX14AC68G.

  10. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    DOE PAGES

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; ...

    2015-01-28

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (CZ) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+/σ- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces actingmore » on doubly-excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. As a result, for reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a CZ gate in < 10 μs with error probability on the order of 10-3.« less

  11. Schedule path optimization for adiabatic quantum computing and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lishan; Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2016-04-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing and optimization have garnered much attention recently as possible models for achieving a quantum advantage over classical approaches to optimization and other special purpose computations. Both techniques are probabilistic in nature and the minimum gap between the ground state and first excited state of the system during evolution is a major factor in determining the success probability. In this work we investigate a strategy for increasing the minimum gap and success probability by introducing intermediate Hamiltonians that modify the evolution path between initial and final Hamiltonians. We focus on an optimization problem relevant to recent hardware implementations and present numerical evidence for the existence of a purely local intermediate Hamiltonian that achieve the optimum performance in terms of pushing the minimum gap to one of the end points of the evolution. As a part of this study we develop a convex optimization formulation of the search for optimal adiabatic schedules that makes this computation more tractable, and which may be of independent interest. We further study the effectiveness of random intermediate Hamiltonians on the minimum gap and success probability, and empirically find that random Hamiltonians have a significant probability of increasing the success probability, but only by a modest amount.

  12. The effect of adiabaticity on strongly quenched Bose Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Kain, Ben

    2015-05-01

    We study the properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate following a deep quench to a large scattering length during which the condensate fraction nc changes with time. We construct a closed set of equations that highlight the role of the adiabaticity or equivalently, dnc/dt, the rate change of nc, which is to induce an (imaginary) effective interaction between quasiparticles. We show analytically that such a system supports a steady state characterized by a constant condensate density and a steady but periodically changing momentum distribution, whose time average is described exactly by the generalized Gibbs ensemble. We discuss how the nc -induced effective interaction, which cannot be ignored on the grounds of the adiabatic approximation for modes near the gapless Goldstone mode, can significantly affect condensate populations and Tan's contact for a Bose gas that has undergone a deep quench. In particular, we find that even when the Bose gas is quenched to unitarity, nc(t) does not completely deplete, approaching, instead, to a steady state with a finite condensate fraction. ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; KITP, University of Santa Barbara.

  13. Highly parallel implementation of non-adiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yosuke; Schleife, Andre; Draeger, Erik; Anisimov, Victor; Correa, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    While the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation tremendously lowers computational effort, many questions in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science require an explicit description of coupled non-adiabatic electron-ion dynamics. Electronic stopping, i.e. the energy transfer of a fast projectile atom to the electronic system of the target material, is a notorious example. We recently implemented real-time time-dependent density functional theory based on the plane-wave pseudopotential formalism in the Qbox/qb@ll codes. We demonstrate that explicit integration using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is very suitable for modern highly parallelized supercomputers. Applying the new implementation to systems with hundreds of atoms and thousands of electrons, we achieved excellent performance and scalability on a large number of nodes both on the BlueGene based ``Sequoia'' system at LLNL as well as the Cray architecture of ``Blue Waters'' at NCSA. As an example, we discuss our work on computing the electronic stopping power of aluminum and gold for hydrogen projectiles, showing an excellent agreement with experiment. These first-principles calculations allow us to gain important insight into the the fundamental physics of electronic stopping.

  14. Enhanced Diffusion Weighting Generated by Selective Adiabatic Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ziqi; Bartha, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical description and experimental validation of the enhanced diffusion weighting generated by selective adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulse trains is provided. Six phantoms (Ph-1 to Ph-6) were studied on a 4T Varian/Siemens whole body MRI system. Phantoms consisted of 2.8 cm diameter plastic tubes containing a mixture of 10 μm ORGASOL polymer beads and 2 mM Gd-DTPA dissolved in 5% agar (Ph-1) or nickel(II) ammonium sulphate hexahydrate doped (56.3 mM – 0.8 mM) water solutions (Ph-2 to Ph-6). A customized localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) sequence containing slice selective AFP pulse trains and pulsed diffusion gradients applied in the phase encoding direction was used to measure 1H2O diffusion. The b-value associated with the LASER sequence was derived using the Bloch-Torrey equation. The apparent diffusion coefficients measured by LASER were comparable to those measured by a conventional pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) sequence for all phantoms. Image signal intensity increased in Ph-1 and decreased in Ph-2 – Ph-6 as AFP pulse train length increased while maintaining a constant echo-time. These experimental results suggest that such AFP pulse trains can enhance contrast between regions containing microscopic magnetic susceptibility variations and homogeneous regions in which dynamic dephasing relaxation mechanisms are dominant. PMID:17600741

  15. The 0.1K bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T.; Lesyna, L.; Kittel, P.; Werner, M.

    1983-01-01

    The most straightforward way of reducing the noise equivalent power of bolometers is to lower their operating temperature. We have been exploring the possibility of using conventionally constructed bolometers at ultra-low temperatures to achieve NEP's suitable to the background environment of cooled space telescopes. We have chosen the technique of adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt as a gravity independent, compact, and low power way to achieve temperatures below pumped He-3 (0.3 K). The demagnetization cryostat we used was capable of reaching temperatures below 0.08 K using Chromium Potassium Alum as a salt from a starting temperature of 1.5 K and a starting magnetic field of 30,000 gauss. Computer control of the magnetic field decay allowed a temperature of 0.2 K to be maintained to within 0.5 mK over a time period exceeding 14 hours. The refrigerator duty cycle was over 90 percent at this temperature. The success of these tests has motivated us to construct a more compact portable adiabatic demagnetization cryostat capable of bolometer optical tests and use at the 5m Hale telescope at 1mm wavelengths.

  16. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Fan; Shaw, Raymond; Xue, Huiwen

    2016-07-29

    Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixedmore » parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the “super-adiabatic” growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision–coalescence in warm clouds.« less

  17. Adiabatic cooling of the artificial Porcupine plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruizhin, Iu. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Moskalenko, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma density obtained during the interaction of the artificial plasma jet, fired into the ionosphere with the body of the Porcupine main payload, have been analyzed for times when there was a well-developed wake effect. Using wake theory, the maximum temperature of the quasi-neutral xenon ion beam has been determined for an intermediate distance from the ion beam source when the beam has left the diamagnetic region but is still much denser than the ionospheric background plasma. The beam temperature is found to be about 4 times less than the temperature at injection. This observation is very well explained by adiabatic cooling of the beam during its initial diamagnetic and current-buildup phases at distances r smaller than 10 m. Outside this region, the beam conserves the temperature achieved. The observation proves that the artificial plasma jet passes through an initial gas-like diamagnetic phase restricted to the vicinity of the beam source, where it expands adiabatically. Partial cooling also takes place outside the diamagnetic region where the beam current still builds up. The observations also support a recently developed current-closure model of the quasi-neutral ion beam.

  18. AB INITIO SIMULATIONS FOR MATERIAL PROPERTIES ALONG THE JUPITER ADIABAT

    SciTech Connect

    French, Martin; Becker, Andreas; Lorenzen, Winfried; Nettelmann, Nadine; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Redmer, Ronald; Wicht, Johannes

    2012-09-15

    We determine basic thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen-helium-water mixtures for the extreme conditions along Jupiter's adiabat via ab initio simulations, which are compiled in an accurate and consistent data set. In particular, we calculate the electrical and thermal conductivity, the shear and longitudinal viscosity, and diffusion coefficients of the nuclei. We present results for associated quantities like the magnetic and thermal diffusivity and the kinematic shear viscosity along an adiabat that is taken from a state-of-the-art interior structure model. Furthermore, the heat capacities, the thermal expansion coefficient, the isothermal compressibility, the Grueneisen parameter, and the speed of sound are calculated. We find that the onset of dissociation and ionization of hydrogen at about 0.9 Jupiter radii marks a region where the material properties change drastically. In the deep interior, where the electrons are degenerate, many of the material properties remain relatively constant. Our ab initio data will serve as a robust foundation for applications that require accurate knowledge of the material properties in Jupiter's interior, e.g., models for the dynamo generation.

  19. Adiabatic-nuclei calculations of positron scattering from molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor; Chiari, Luca; Zecca, Antonio; Brunger, Michael J.

    2017-02-01

    The single-center adiabatic-nuclei convergent close-coupling method is used to investigate positron collisions with molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ground and first vibrationally excited states. Cross sections are presented over the energy range from 1 to 1000 eV for elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, total ionization, and the grand total cross section. The present adiabatic-nuclei positron-H2 scattering length is calculated as A =-2.70 a0 for the ground state and A =-3.16 a0 for the first vibrationally excited state. The present elastic differential cross sections are also used to "correct" the low-energy grand total cross-section measurements of the Trento group [A. Zecca et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 032702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.032702] for the forward-angle-scattering effect. In general, the comparison with experiment is good. By performing convergence studies, we estimate that our Rm=1.448 a0 fixed-nuclei results are converged to within ±5 % for the major scattering integrated cross sections.

  20. Breakdown of the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Simone; Lazzeri, Michele; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Geim, A. K.; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Mauri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    The adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation (ABO) has been the standard ansatz to describe the interaction between electrons and nuclei since the early days of quantum mechanics. ABO assumes that the lighter electrons adjust adiabatically to the motion of the heavier nuclei, remaining at any time in their instantaneous ground state. ABO is well justified when the energy gap between ground and excited electronic states is larger than the energy scale of the nuclear motion. In metals, the gap is zero and phenomena beyond ABO (such as phonon-mediated superconductivity or phonon-induced renormalization of the electronic properties) occur. The use of ABO to describe lattice motion in metals is, therefore, questionable. In spite of this, ABO has proved effective for the accurate determination of chemical reactions, molecular dynamics and phonon frequencies in a wide range of metallic systems. Here, we show that ABO fails in graphene. Graphene, recently discovered in the free state, is a zero-bandgap semiconductor that becomes a metal if the Fermi energy is tuned applying a gate voltage, Vg. This induces a stiffening of the Raman G peak that cannot be described within ABO.

  1. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  2. Characteristics of beryllium bonds; a QTAIM study.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, K

    2012-08-01

    The nature of beryllium bonds formed between BeX2 (X is H, F and Cl) and some Lewis bases have been investigated. The distribution of the Laplacian of electron density shows that there is a region of charge depletion around the Be atom, which, according to Laplacian complementary principal, can interact with a region of charge concentration of an atom in the base and form a beryllium bond. The molecular graphs of the investigated complexes indicate that beryllium in BeH2 and BeF2 can form “beryllium bonds” with O, N and P atoms but not with halogens. In addition, eight criteria based on QTAIM properties, including the values of electron density and its Laplacian at the BCP, penetration of beryllium and acceptor atom, charge, energy, volume and first atomic moment of beryllium atom, have been considered and compared with the corresponding ones in conventional hydrogen bonds. These bonds share many common features with very strong hydrogen bonds, however,some differences have also been observed.

  3. Motion of charged particles in planetary magnetospheres with nonelectromagnetic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Hill, T. W.; Wolf, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Expressions are derived for the mirror point, the bounce period, the second adiabatic invariant, and the bounce-averaged azimuthal drift velocity as functions of equatorial pitch angle for a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field in the presence of centrifugal, gravitational, and Coriolis forces. These expressions are evaluated numerically, and the results are displayed graphically. The average azimuthal drift speed for a flux tube containing a thermal equilibrium plasma distribution is also evaluated.

  4. How are hydrogen bonds modified by metal binding?

    PubMed

    Husberg, Charlotte; Ryde, Ulf

    2013-06-01

    We have used density functional theory calculations to investigate how the hydrogen-bond strength is modified when a ligand is bound to a metal using over 60 model systems involving six metals and eight ligands frequently encountered in metalloproteins. We study how the hydrogen-bond geometry and energy vary with the nature of metal, the oxidation state, the coordination number, the ligand involved in the hydrogen bond, other first-sphere ligands, and different hydrogen-bond probe molecules. The results show that, in general, the hydrogen-bond strength is increased for neutral ligands and decreased for negatively charged ligands. The size of the effect is mainly determined by the net charge of the metal complex, and all effects are typically decreased when the model is solvated. In water solution, the hydrogen-bond strength can increase by up to 37 kJ/mol for neutral ligands, and that of negatively charged ligands can increase (for complexes with a negative net charge) or decrease (for positively charged complexes). If the net charge of the complex does not change, there is normally little difference between different metals or different types of complexes. The only exception is observed for sulphur-containing ligands (Met and Cys) and if the ligand is redox-active (e.g. high-valence Fe-O complexes).

  5. Bifunctional hydrogen bonds in monohydrated cycloether complexes.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Margarita M; Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-03-04

    In this work, the cooperative effects implicated in bifunctional hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) were studied (in monohydrated six-membered cycloether) within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and of the natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. The study was carried out in complexes formed by six-membered cycloether compounds (tetrahydropyrane, 1,4-dioxane, and 1,3-dioxane) and a water molecule. These compounds were used as model systems instead of more complicated molecules of biological importance. All the results were obtained at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) level theory using a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Attention was focused on the indicators of the cooperative effects that arise when a water molecule interacts simultaneously with a polar and a nonpolar portion of a six-membered cycloether (via bifunctional hydrogen bonds) and compared with conventional H-bonds where the water molecule only interacts with the polar portion of the cycloether. Different indicators of H-bonds strength, such as structural and spectroscopic data, electron charge density, population analysis, hyperconjugation energy and charge transference, consistently showed significant cooperative effects in bifunctional H-bonds. From the AIM, as well as from the NBO analysis, the obtained results allowed us to state that in the monohydrated six-membered cycloether, where the water molecule plays a dual role, as proton acceptor and proton donor, a mutual reinforcement of the two interactions occurs. Because of this feature, the complexes engaged by bifunctional hydrogen bonds are more stabilized than the complexes linked by conventional hydrogen bonds.

  6. The Bondons: The Quantum Particles of the Chemical Bond

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2010-01-01

    By employing the combined Bohmian quantum formalism with the U(1) and SU(2) gauge transformations of the non-relativistic wave-function and the relativistic spinor, within the Schrödinger and Dirac quantum pictures of electron motions, the existence of the chemical field is revealed along the associate bondon particle B̶ characterized by its mass (mB̶), velocity (vB̶), charge (eB̶), and life-time (tB̶). This is quantized either in ground or excited states of the chemical bond in terms of reduced Planck constant ħ, the bond energy Ebond and length Xbond, respectively. The mass-velocity-charge-time quaternion properties of bondons’ particles were used in discussing various paradigmatic types of chemical bond towards assessing their covalent, multiple bonding, metallic and ionic features. The bondonic picture was completed by discussing the relativistic charge and life-time (the actual zitterbewegung) problem, i.e., showing that the bondon equals the benchmark electronic charge through moving with almost light velocity. It carries negligible, although non-zero, mass in special bonding conditions and towards observable femtosecond life-time as the bonding length increases in the nanosystems and bonding energy decreases according with the bonding length-energy relationship Ebond[kcal/mol]×Xbond[A0]=182019, providing this way the predictive framework in which the B̶ particle may be observed. Finally, its role in establishing the virtual states in Raman scattering was also established. PMID:21151435

  7. 27 CFR 26.68a - Bond account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subpart shall keep an account of the charges against and credits to the bond if the penal sum of his bond is less than the maximum prescribed in §§ 26.66(a), 26.67, or § 26.68, or if the penal sum...

  8. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |; Galili, T.; Levanon, H.

    1998-07-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  9. Bond lengths of diatomic molecules periodically driven by light: the p-LAMB scheme.

    PubMed

    Sola, Ignacio R; Shin, Seokmin; Chang, Bo Y

    2011-03-14

    A laser scheme using a periodically changing frequency is used to induce oscillations of the internuclear motion, which are quantum analogs of classical vibrations in diatomic molecules. This is what we call the periodic laser adiabatic manipulation of the bond, or p-LAMB scheme. In p-LAMB, the carrier frequency of the laser must vary periodically from the blue to the red of a photodissociation band and backwards, following for instance a cosine-dependent frequency of period τ(c). In the adiabatic regime the dynamics is fully time-reversible. The amplitude of the internuclear oscillation is controlled by the pulse frequency ω(t), while τ(c) determines the duration (or period) of the bond oscillation. In the presence of efficient dipole coupling, the bandwidth of the pulse is the main constraint to the maximum bond stretch that can be obtained. Before the onset of the adiabatic regime the dynamics are more complex, showing dispersion of the vibrational wave packet and anharmonic deformation of the bond. However, the nonadiabatic effects are mostly canceled and full revivals are observed at certain multiples of τ(c).

  10. Vibrational spectra (experimental and theoretical), molecular structure, natural bond orbital, HOMO-LUMO energy, Mulliken charge and thermodynamic analysis of N'-hydroxy-pyrimidine-2-carboximidamide by DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Jasmine, N Jeeva; Muthiah, P Thomas; Arunagiri, C; Subashini, A

    2015-06-05

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H, (13)C NMR and UV-Visible spectral measurements of N'-hydroxy-pyrimidine-2-carboximidamide (HPCI) and complete analysis of the observed spectra have been proposed. DFT calculation has been performed and the structural parameters of the compound was determined from the optimized geometry with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and giving energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies and force constants. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental. The geometric parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts were compared with the experimental data of the molecule. The title compound, C5H6N4O, is approximately planar, with an angle of 11.04 (15)°. The crystal structure is also stabilized by intermolecular N-H⋯O, N-H⋯N, O-H⋯N, C-H⋯O hydrogen bond and offset π-π stacking interactions. The influences of hydroxy and carboximidamide groups on the skeletal modes and proton chemical shifts have been investigated. Moreover, we have not only simulated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) but also determined the transition state and band gap. The kinetic, thermodynamic stability and chemical hardness of the molecule have been determined. Complete NBO analysis was also carried out to find out the intermolecular electronic interactions and their stabilization energy. The thermodynamic properties like entropies and their correlations with temperatures were also obtained from the harmonic frequencies of the optimized structure.

  11. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  12. Simple proof of equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and the circuit model.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari; Lidar, Daniel A; Mitchell, Morgan

    2007-08-17

    We prove the equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and quantum computation in the circuit model. An explicit adiabatic computation procedure is given that generates a ground state from which the answer can be extracted. The amount of time needed is evaluated by computing the gap. We show that the procedure is computationally efficient.

  13. Vibrationally enhanced charge transfer and mode/bond-specific H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer in the reaction of HOD{sup +} with N{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, David M.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-09-21

    The reaction of HOD{sup +} with N{sub 2}O was studied over the collision energy (E{sub col}) range from 0.20 eV to 2.88 eV, for HOD{sup +} in its ground state and in each of its fundamental vibrational states: bend (010), OD stretch (100), and OH stretch (001). The dominant reaction at low E{sub col} is H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer, but charge transfer becomes dominant for E{sub col} > 0.5 eV. Increasing E{sub col} enhances charge transfer only in the threshold region (E{sub col} < 1 eV), but all modes of HOD{sup +} vibrational excitation enhance this channel over the entire energy range, by up to a factor of three. For reaction of ground state HOD{sup +}, the H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer channels have similar cross sections, enhanced by increasing collision energy for E{sub col} < 0.3 eV, but suppressed by E{sub col} at higher energies. OD stretch excitation enhances D{sup +} transfer by over a factor of 2, but has little effect on H{sup +} transfer, except at low E{sub col} where a modest enhancement is observed. Excitation of the OH stretch enhances H{sup +} transfer by up to a factor of 2.5, but actually suppresses D{sup +} transfer over most of the E{sub col} range. Excitation of the bend mode results in ∼60% enhancement of both H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer at low E{sub col} but has little effect at higher energies. Recoil velocity distributions at high E{sub col} are strongly backscattered in the center-of-mass frame, indicating direct reaction dominated by large impact parameter collisions. At low E{sub col} the distributions are compatible with mediation by a short-lived collision complex. Ab initio calculations find several complexes that may be important in this context, and RRKM calculations predict lifetimes and decay branching that is consistent with observations. The recoil velocity distributions show that HOD{sup +} vibrational excitation enhances reactivity in all collisions at low E{sub col}, while for high E{sub col} with enhancement comes

  14. Controlled Rapid Adiabatic Passage in a V-Type System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-Gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-01

    In chirped rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), chirp sign determines the final state to which the complete population transfer (CPT) occurs in a three-level V-type system. In this study, we show that laser intensity can be alternatively used as a control means in RAP, when the laser pulse is chirped and of a spectral hole resonant to one of the excited states. We verified such excitation selectivity in the experiment performed as-shaped femtosecond laser pulses interacting with the lowest three levels (5S, 5 P1/2, and 5 P3/2) of atomic rubidium. The successful demonstration implies that this intensity-dependent RAP in conjunction with laser beam profile programming may allow excitation selectivity for atoms or ions arranged in space.

  15. Multiphoton Raman Atom Optics with Frequency-Swept Adiabatic Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David; Kinast, Joseph; Stoner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometry is a promising candidate for future inertial navigators, gravitational wave detectors, and measurements of fundamental physical constants. The sensitivity of this technique, however, is often limited by the small momentum separations created between interfering atom wave packets (typically ~ 2 ℏk) . We address this issue using light-pulse atom optics derived from stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). In experiments, these Raman ARP atom optics have generated up to 30 ℏk photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive atom interferometer, thereby enhancing the phase shift per unit acceleration by a factor of 15. Since this approach forgoes evaporative cooling and velocity selection, it could enable large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates, while also lowering the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty.

  16. Adiabatic photo-steering theory in topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Feasible external control of material properties is a crucial issue in condensed matter physics. A new approach to achieving this aim, named adiabatic photo-steering, is reviewed. The core principle of this scheme is that several material constants are effectively turned into externally tunable variables by irradiation of monochromatic laser light. Two-dimensional topological insulators are selected as the optimal systems that exhibit a prominent change in their properties following the application of this method. Two specific examples of photo-steered quantum phenomena, which reflect topological aspects of the electronic systems at hand, are presented. One is the integer quantum Hall effect described by the Haldane model, and the other is the quantum spin Hall effect described by the Kane–Mele model. The topological quantities associated with these phenomena are the conventional Chern number and spin Chern number, respectively. A recent interesting idea, time-reversal symmetry breaking via a temporary periodic external stimulation, is also discussed. PMID:27877726

  17. Investigating the adiabatic beam grouping at the NICA accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, O. I.; Butenko, A. V.; Grebentsov, A. Yu.; Eliseev, A. V.; Meshkov, I. N.; Svetov, A. L.; Sidorin, A. O.; Slepnev, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The NICA complex comprises the Booster and Nuclotron synchrotrons for accelerating particle beams to the required energy and the Collider machine, in which particle collisions are investigated. The experimental heavy-ion program deals with ions up to Au+79. The light-ion program deals with polarized deuterons and protons. Grouping of a beam coasting in an ion chamber is required in many parts of the complex. Beam grouping may effectively increase the longitudinal emittance and particle losses. To avoid these negative effects, various regimes of adiabatic grouping have been simulated and dedicated experiments with a deuteron beam have been conducted at the Nuclotron machine. As a result, we are able to construct and optimize the beam-grouping equipment, which provides a capture efficiency near 100% either retaining or varying the harmonic multiplicity of the HF system.

  18. Adiabatic approximation for the Rabi model with broken inversion symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li-Tuo; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Wu, Huai-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    We study the properties and behavior of the Rabi model with broken inversion symmetry. Using an adiabatic approximation approach, we explore the high-frequency qubit and oscillator regimes, and obtain analytical solutions for the qubit-oscillator system. We demonstrate that, due to broken inversion symmetry, the positions of two potentials and zero-point energies in the oscillators become asymmetric and have a quadratic dependence on the mean dipole moments within the high-frequency oscillator regime. Furthermore, we find that there is a critical point above which the qubit-oscillator system becomes unstable, and the position of this critical point has a quadratic dependence on the mean dipole moments within the high-frequency qubit regime. Finally, we verify this critical point based on the method of semiclassical approximation.

  19. Shortcut to Adiabaticity for an Anisotropic Gas Containing Quantum Defects.

    PubMed

    Papoular, D J; Stringari, S

    2015-07-10

    We present a shortcut to adiabaticity (STA) protocol applicable to 3D unitary Fermi gases and 2D weakly interacting Bose gases containing defects such as vortices or solitons. Our protocol relies on a new class of exact scaling solutions in the presence of anisotropic time-dependent harmonic traps. It connects stationary states in initial and final traps having the same frequency ratios. The resulting scaling laws exhibit a universal form and also apply to the classical Boltzmann gas. The duration of the STA can be made very short so as to realize a quantum quench from one stationary state to another. When applied to an anisotropically trapped superfluid gas, the STA conserves the shape of the quantum defects hosted by the cloud, thereby acting like a perfect microscope, which sharply contrasts with their strong distortion occurring during the free expansion of the cloud.

  20. Novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron logic

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2014-03-14

    We herein propose the quantum-flux-latch (QFL) as a novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic. A QFL is very compact and compatible with AQFP logic gates and can be read out in one clock cycle. Simulation results revealed that the QFL operates at 5 GHz with wide parameter margins of more than ±22%. The calculated energy dissipation was only ∼0.1 aJ/bit, which yields a small energy delay product of 20 aJ·ps. We also designed shift registers using QFLs to demonstrate more complex circuits with QFLs. Finally, we experimentally demonstrated correct operations of the QFL and a 1-bit shift register (a D flip-flop)